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Sample records for electrode optoelectronic tweezers

  1. Optoelectronic tweezers for medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Clemens; Neale, Steven; Menachery, Anoop; Barrett, Mike; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) allows the spatial patterning of electric fields through selected illumination of a photoconductive surface. This enables the manipulation of micro particles and cells by creating non-uniform electrical fields that then produce dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The DEP responses of cells differ and can produce negative or positive (repelled or attracted to areas of high electric field) forces. Therefore OET can be used to manipulate individual cells and separate different cell types from each other. Thus OET has many applications for medical diagnostics, demonstrated here with work towards diagnosing Human African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness.

  2. Single-sided lateral-field and phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohta, Aaron (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Hsu, Hsan-Yin (Inventor); Jamshidi, Arash (Inventor); Wu, Ming-Chiang (Inventor); Neale, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Described herein are single-sided lateral-field optoelectronic tweezers (LOET) devices which use photosensitive electrode arrays to create optically-induced dielectrophoretic forces in an electric field that is parallel to the plane of the device. In addition, phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers (PhOET) devices are described that allow for optoelectronic tweezers (OET) operation in high-conductivity physiological buffer and cell culture media.

  3. Assembling silver nanowires using optoelectronic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuailong; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Neale, Steve L.

    2016-03-01

    Light patterned dielectrophoresis or optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has been proved to be an effective micromanipulation technology for cell separation, cell sorting and control of cell interactions. Apart from being useful for cell biology experiments, the capability of moving small objects accurately also makes OET an attractive technology for other micromanipulation applications. In particular, OET has the potential to be used for efficiently and accurately assembling small optoelectronic/electronic components into circuits. This approach could produce a step change in the size of the smallest components that are routinely assembled; down from the current smallest standard component size of 400×200 μm (0402 metric) to components a few microns across and even nanostructured components. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of OET to manipulate conductive silver nanowires into different patterns. The silver nanowires (typical diameter: 60 nm; typical length: 10 μm) were suspended in a 15 mS/m solution of KCL in water and manipulated by positive dielectrophoresis force generated by OET. A proof-of-concept demonstration was also made to prove the feasibility of using OET to manipulate silver nanowires to form a 150-μm-long conductive path between two isolated electrodes. It can be seen that the resistance between two electrodes was effectively brought down to around 700 Ω after the silver nanowires were assembled and the solution evaporated. Future work in this area will focus on increasing the conductivity of these tracks, encapsulating the assembled silver nanowires to prevent silver oxidation and provide mechanical protection, which can be achieved via 3D printing and inkjet printing technology.

  4. Optoelectronic tweezers for microparticle and cell manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 .mu.m or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or groups of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  5. Optoelectronic Tweezers for Microparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 micromillimeters or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or group of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  6. Optoelectronic Tweezers as a Tool for Parallel Single-Cell Manipulation and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Justin K.; Ohta, Aaron T.; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Neale, Steven L.; Jamshidi, Arash; Wu, Ming C.

    2010-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) is a promising approach for the parallel manipulation of single cells for a variety of biological applications. By combining the manipulation capabilities of OET with other relevant biological techniques (such as cell lysis and electroporation), one can realize a true parallel, single-cell diagnostic and stimulation tool. Here, we demonstrate the utility of the OET device by integrating it onto single-chip systems capable of performing in-situ, electrode-based electroporation/lysis, individual cell, light-induced lysis, and light-induced electroporation. PMID:20543904

  7. Manipulating and assembling metallic beads with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuailong; Juvert, Joan; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Neale, Steven L.

    2016-09-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) or light-patterned dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been developed as a micromanipulation technology for controlling micro- and nano-particles with applications such as cell sorting and studying cell communications. Additionally, the capability of moving small objects accurately and assembling them into arbitrary 2D patterns also makes OET an attractive technology for microfabrication applications. In this work, we demonstrated the use of OET to manipulate conductive silver-coated Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microspheres (50 μm diameter) into tailored patterns. It was found that the microspheres could be moved at a max velocity of 3200 μm/s, corresponding to 4.2 nano-newton (10‑9 N) DEP force, and also could be positioned with high accuracy via this DEP force. The underlying mechanism for this strong DEP force is shown by our simulations to be caused by a significant increase of the electric field close to the particles, due to the interaction between the field and the silver shells coating the microspheres. The associated increase in electrical gradient causes DEP forces that are much stronger than any previously reported for an OET device, which facilitates manipulation of the metallic microspheres efficiently without compromise in positioning accuracy and is important for applications on electronic component assembling and circuit construction.

  8. Manipulating and assembling metallic beads with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuailong; Juvert, Joan; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Neale, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) or light-patterned dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been developed as a micromanipulation technology for controlling micro- and nano-particles with applications such as cell sorting and studying cell communications. Additionally, the capability of moving small objects accurately and assembling them into arbitrary 2D patterns also makes OET an attractive technology for microfabrication applications. In this work, we demonstrated the use of OET to manipulate conductive silver-coated Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microspheres (50 μm diameter) into tailored patterns. It was found that the microspheres could be moved at a max velocity of 3200 μm/s, corresponding to 4.2 nano-newton (10−9 N) DEP force, and also could be positioned with high accuracy via this DEP force. The underlying mechanism for this strong DEP force is shown by our simulations to be caused by a significant increase of the electric field close to the particles, due to the interaction between the field and the silver shells coating the microspheres. The associated increase in electrical gradient causes DEP forces that are much stronger than any previously reported for an OET device, which facilitates manipulation of the metallic microspheres efficiently without compromise in positioning accuracy and is important for applications on electronic component assembling and circuit construction. PMID:27599445

  9. Trap profiles of projector based optoelectronic tweezers (OET) with HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Steven L.; Ohta, Aaron T.; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Valley, Justin K.; Jamshidi, Arash; Wu, Ming C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present trap profile measurements for HeLa cells in Optoelectronic Tweezers (OET) based on a data projector. The data projector is used as a light source to illuminate amorphous Si creating virtual electrodes which are used to trap particles through dielectrophoresis. We show that although the trap stiffness is typically greater at the edges of the optical spot it is possible to create a trap with constant trap stiffness by reducing the trap’s size until it is similar to the object being trapped. We have successfully created a trap for HeLa cells with a constant trap stiffness of 3×10−6 Nm−1 (capable of moving the cell up to 50 μms−1) with a 12 μm diameter trap. We also calculate the depth of the potential well that the cell will experience due to the trap and find that it to be 1.6×10−16J (4×104 kBT). PMID:19333286

  10. Lipid Bilayer-Integrated Optoelectronic Tweezers for Nanoparticle Manipulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si) layer deposited on top of 100 nm of an indium tin oxide (ITO) layer, and the other side is only the 100 nm of ITO layer...aqueous solution was sandwiched between a transparent ITO electrode and a photoconductive ( hydrogenated amorphous silicon) electrode. By simultaneously...in the following experiments consisted of 96 mol % of DOPC and 4 mol % of thiol-ended lipids, PTE-SH (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- hos - phothioethanol

  11. Programmable manipulation of motile cells in optoelectronic tweezers using a grayscale image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonjae; Nam, Seong-Won; Hwang, Hyundoo; Park, Sungsu; Park, Je-Kyun

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a grayscale optoelectronic tweezers (OET) which allows adjustment of the electric field strength at each position of OET. A grayscale light image was used to pattern vertical electric field strength on an OET. As an electric field depends on the brightness at each point, the brighter light patterns generate the stronger electric field in the OET. Its feasibility for application to cell manipulation was demonstrated by aligning highly motile protozoan cells in vertical direction. Depending on the brightness of each pixel, the behaviors of aligned cells varied due to the different electric field strength to each cell.

  12. Use of optoelectronic tweezers in manufacturing—accurate solder bead positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuailong; Liu, Yongpeng; Juvert, Joan; Tian, Pengfei; Navarro, Jean-Claude; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Neale, Steven L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we analyze the use of optoelectronic tweezers (OETs) to manipulate 45 μm diameter Sn62Pb36Ag2 solder beads with light-induced dielectrophoresis force and we demonstrate high positioning accuracy. It was found that the positional deviation of the solder beads increases with the increase of the trap size. To clarify the underlying mechanism, simulations based on the integration of the Maxwell stress tensor were used to study the force profiles of OET traps with different sizes. It was found that the solder beads felt a 0.1 nN static friction or stiction force due to electrical forces pulling them towards the surface and that this force is not dependent on the size of the trap. The stiction limits the positioning accuracy; however, we show that by choosing a trap that is just larger than the solder bead sub-micron positional accuracy can be achieved.

  13. Optoelectronic tweezers for the measurement of the relative stiffness of erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Steven L.; Mody, Nimesh; Selman, Colin; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we describe the first use of Optoelectronic Tweezers (OET), an optically controlled micromanipulation method, to measure the relative stiffness of erythrocytes in mice. Cell stiffness is an important measure of cell health and in the case of erythrocytes, the most elastic cells in the body, an increase in cell stiffness can indicate pathologies such as type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension (high blood pressure). OET uses a photoconductive device to convert an optical pattern into and electrical pattern. The electrical fields will create a dipole within any polarisable particles in the device, such as cells, and non-uniformities of the field can be used to place unequal forces onto each side of the dipole thus moving the particle. In areas of the device where there are no field gradients, areas of constant illumination, the force on each side of the dipole will be equal, keeping the cell stationary, but as there are opposing forces on each side of the cell it will be stretched. The force each cell will experience will differ slightly so the stretching will depend on the cells polarisability as well as its stiffness. Because of this a relative stiffness rather than absolute stiffness is measured. We show that with standard conditions (20Vpp, 1.5MHz, 10mSm-1 medium conductivity) the cell's diameter changes by around 10% for healthy mouse erythrocytes and we show that due to the low light intensities required for OET, relative to conventional optical tweezers, multiple cells can be measured simultaneously.

  14. Phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers for dynamic cell manipulation in cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsan-yin; Ohta, Aaron T; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Jamshidi, Arash; Neale, Steven L; Wu, Ming C

    2010-01-21

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET), based on light-induced dielectrophoresis, has been shown as a versatile tool for parallel manipulation of micro-particles and cells (P. Y. Chiou, A. T. Ohta and M. C. Wu, Nature, 2005, 436, 370-372). However, the conventional OET device cannot operate in cell culture media or other high-conductivity physiological buffers due to the limited photoconductivity of amorphous silicon. In this paper, we report a new phototransistor-based OET (Ph-OET). Consisting of single-crystalline bipolar junction transistors, the Ph-OET has more than 500x higher photoconductivity than amorphous silicon. Efficient cell trapping of live HeLa and Jurkat cells in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) has been demonstrated using a digital light projector, with a cell transport speed of 33 microm/sec, indicating a force of 14.5 pN. Optical concentration of cells and real-time control of individually addressable cell arrays have also been realized. Precise control of separation between two cells has also been demonstrated. We envision a new platform for single cell studies using Ph-OET.

  15. Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers for Single-Cell and Microparticle Manipulation across a Large Area in High Conductivity Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yajia; Mao, Yufei; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Chui, Chi On; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has advanced within the past decade to become a promising tool for cell and microparticle manipulation. Its incompatibility with high conductivity media and limited throughput remain two major technical challenges. Here a novel manipulation concept and corresponding platform called Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers (SLOT) are proposed and demonstrated to tackle these challenges concurrently. The SLOT platform comprises a periodic array of optically tunable phototransistor traps above which randomly dispersed single cells and microparticles are self-aligned to and retained without light illumination. Light beam illumination on a phototransistor turns off the trap and releases the trapped cell, which is then transported downstream via a background flow. The cell trapping and releasing functions in SLOT are decoupled, which is a unique feature that enables SLOT’s stepper-mode function to overcome the small field-of-view issue that all prior OET technologies encountered in manipulation with single-cell resolution across a large area. Massively parallel trapping of more than 100,000 microparticles has been demonstrated in high conductivity media. Even larger scale trapping and manipulation can be achieved by linearly scaling up the number of phototransistors and device area. Cells after manipulation on the SLOT platform maintain high cell viability and normal multi-day divisibility.

  16. Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers for Single-Cell and Microparticle Manipulation across a Large Area in High Conductivity Media

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yajia; Mao, Yufei; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Chui, Chi On; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has advanced within the past decade to become a promising tool for cell and microparticle manipulation. Its incompatibility with high conductivity media and limited throughput remain two major technical challenges. Here a novel manipulation concept and corresponding platform called Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers (SLOT) are proposed and demonstrated to tackle these challenges concurrently. The SLOT platform comprises a periodic array of optically tunable phototransistor traps above which randomly dispersed single cells and microparticles are self-aligned to and retained without light illumination. Light beam illumination on a phototransistor turns off the trap and releases the trapped cell, which is then transported downstream via a background flow. The cell trapping and releasing functions in SLOT are decoupled, which is a unique feature that enables SLOT’s stepper-mode function to overcome the small field-of-view issue that all prior OET technologies encountered in manipulation with single-cell resolution across a large area. Massively parallel trapping of more than 100,000 microparticles has been demonstrated in high conductivity media. Even larger scale trapping and manipulation can be achieved by linearly scaling up the number of phototransistors and device area. Cells after manipulation on the SLOT platform maintain high cell viability and normal multi-day divisibility. PMID:26940301

  17. Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers for Single-Cell and Microparticle Manipulation across a Large Area in High Conductivity Media.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yajia; Mao, Yufei; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Chui, Chi On; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2016-03-04

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has advanced within the past decade to become a promising tool for cell and microparticle manipulation. Its incompatibility with high conductivity media and limited throughput remain two major technical challenges. Here a novel manipulation concept and corresponding platform called Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers (SLOT) are proposed and demonstrated to tackle these challenges concurrently. The SLOT platform comprises a periodic array of optically tunable phototransistor traps above which randomly dispersed single cells and microparticles are self-aligned to and retained without light illumination. Light beam illumination on a phototransistor turns off the trap and releases the trapped cell, which is then transported downstream via a background flow. The cell trapping and releasing functions in SLOT are decoupled, which is a unique feature that enables SLOT's stepper-mode function to overcome the small field-of-view issue that all prior OET technologies encountered in manipulation with single-cell resolution across a large area. Massively parallel trapping of more than 100,000 microparticles has been demonstrated in high conductivity media. Even larger scale trapping and manipulation can be achieved by linearly scaling up the number of phototransistors and device area. Cells after manipulation on the SLOT platform maintain high cell viability and normal multi-day divisibility.

  18. Transparent electrodes for organic optoelectronic devices: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Weiran; Li, Jian; Chen, Hongzheng; Xue, Jiangeng

    2014-01-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes are one of the essential components for organic optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaic cells and light-emitting diodes. Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is the most common transparent electrode in these devices due to its excellent optical and electrical properties. However, the manufacturing of ITO film requires precious raw materials and expensive processes, which limits their compatibility with mass production of large-area, low-cost devices. The optical/electrical properties of ITO are strongly dependent on the deposition processes and treatment conditions, whereas its brittleness and the potential damage to underlying films during deposition also present challenges for its use in flexible devices. Recently, several other transparent conductive materials, which have various degrees of success relative to commercial applications have been developed to address these issues. Starting from the basic properties of ITO and the effect of various ITO surface modification methods, here we review four different groups of materials, doped metal oxides, thin metals, conducting polymers, and nanomaterials (including carbon nanotubes, graphene, and metal nanowires), that have been reported as transparent electrodes in organic optoelectronic materials. Particular emphasis is given to their optical/electrical and other material properties, deposition techniques, and applications in organic optoelectronic devices.

  19. Optoelectronic tweezers integrated with lensfree holographic microscopy for wide-field interactive cell and particle manipulation on a chip.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Wei; Su, Ting-Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2013-06-21

    We demonstrate an optoelectronic tweezer (OET) coupled to a lensfree holographic microscope for real-time interactive manipulation of cells and micro-particles over a large field-of-view (FOV). This integrated platform can record the holographic images of cells and particles over the entire active area of a CCD sensor array, perform digital image reconstruction to identify target cells, dynamically track the positions of cells and particles, and project light beams to trigger light-induced dielectrophoretic forces to pattern and sort cells on a chip. OET technology has been previously shown to be capable of performing parallel single cell manipulation over a large area. However, its throughput has been bottlenecked by the number of cells that can be imaged within the limited FOV of a conventional microscope objective lens. Integrating lensfree holographic imaging with OET solves this fundamental FOV barrier, while also creating a compact on-chip cell/particle manipulation platform. Using this unique platform, we have successfully demonstrated real-time interactive manipulation of thousands of single cells and micro-particles over an ultra-large area of e.g., 240 mm(2) (i.e. 17.96 mm × 13.52 mm).

  20. Highly conductive transparent organic electrodes with multilayer structures for rigid and flexible optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyang; Liu, Xingyuan; Lin, Fengyuan; Li, Hailing; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Nan

    2015-05-27

    Transparent electrodes are essential components for optoelectronic devices, such as touch panels, organic light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. Indium tin oxide (ITO) is widely used as transparent electrode in optoelectronic devices. ITO has high transparency and low resistance but contains expensive rare elements, and ITO-based devices have poor mechanical flexibility. Therefore, alternative transparent electrodes with excellent opto-electrical performance and mechanical flexibility will be greatly demanded. Here, organics are introduced into dielectric-metal-dielectric structures to construct the transparent electrodes on rigid and flexible substrates. We show that organic-metal-organic (OMO) electrodes have excellent opto-electrical properties (sheet resistance of below 10 Ω sq(-1) at 85% transmission), mechanical flexibility, thermal and environmental stabilities. The OMO-based polymer photovoltaic cells show performance comparable to that of devices based on ITO electrodes. This OMO multilayer structure can therefore be used to produce transparent electrodes suitable for use in a wide range of optoelectronic devices.

  1. Effect of annealing over optoelectronic properties of graphene based transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Shriniwas; Kaur, Inderpreet

    2016-04-01

    Graphene, an atom-thick two dimensional graphitic material have led various fundamental breakthroughs in the field of science and technology. Due to their exceptional optical, physical and electrical properties, graphene based transparent electrodes have shown several applications in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells and thin film transistors. Here, we are presenting effect of annealing over optoelectronic properties of graphene based transparent electrodes. Graphene based transparent electrodes have been prepared by wet chemical approach over glass substrates. After fabrication, these electrodes tested for optical transmittance in visible region. Sheet resistance was measured using four probe method. Effect of thermal annealing at 200 °C was studied over optical and electrical performance of these electrodes. Optoelectronic performance was judged from ratio of direct current conductivity to optical conductivity (σdc/σopt) as a figure of merit for transparent conductors. The fabricated electrodes display good optical and electrical properties. Such electrodes can be alternatives for doped metal oxide based transparent electrodes.

  2. Highly Conductive Transparent Organic Electrodes with Multilayer Structures for Rigid and Flexible Optoelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoyang; Liu, Xingyuan; Lin, Fengyuan; Li, Hailing; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Transparent electrodes are essential components for optoelectronic devices, such as touch panels, organic light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. Indium tin oxide (ITO) is widely used as transparent electrode in optoelectronic devices. ITO has high transparency and low resistance but contains expensive rare elements, and ITO-based devices have poor mechanical flexibility. Therefore, alternative transparent electrodes with excellent opto-electrical performance and mechanical flexibility will be greatly demanded. Here, organics are introduced into dielectric–metal–dielectric structures to construct the transparent electrodes on rigid and flexible substrates. We show that organic-metal-organic (OMO) electrodes have excellent opto-electrical properties (sheet resistance of below 10 Ω sq−1 at 85% transmission), mechanical flexibility, thermal and environmental stabilities. The OMO-based polymer photovoltaic cells show performance comparable to that of devices based on ITO electrodes. This OMO multilayer structure can therefore be used to produce transparent electrodes suitable for use in a wide range of optoelectronic devices. PMID:26014889

  3. A Flexible and Thin Graphene/Silver Nanowires/Polymer Hybrid Transparent Electrode for Optoelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hua; Wu, Zhaoxin; Jiang, Yaqiu; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xin; Jiao, Bo; Abbas, Waseem; Hou, Xun

    2016-11-16

    A typical thin and fully flexible hybrid electrode was developed by integrating the encapsulation of silver nanowires (AgNWs) network between a monolayer graphene and polymer film as a sandwich structure. Compared with the reported flexible electrodes based on PET or PEN substrate, this unique electrode exhibits the superior optoelectronic characteristics (sheet resistance of 8.06 Ω/□ at 88.3% light transmittance). Meanwhile, the specific up-to-bottom fabrication process could achieve the superflat surface (RMS = 2.58 nm), superthin thickness (∼8 μm thickness), high mechanical robustness, and lightweight. In addition, the strong corrosion resistance and stability for the hybrid electrode were proved. With these advantages, we employ this electrode to fabricate the simple flexible organic light-emitting device (OLED) and perovskite solar cell device (PSC), which exhibit the considerable performance (best PCE of OLED = 2.11 cd/A(2); best PCE of PSC = 10.419%). All the characteristics of the unique hybrid electrode demonstrate its potential as a high-performance transparent electrode candidate for flexible optoelectronics.

  4. Aligned silver nanowire-based transparent electrodes for engineering polarisation-selective optoelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoungchoo; Bae, In-Gon; Huh, Yoon Ho

    2016-01-01

    We herein report on a remarkably simple, fast, and economic way of fabricating homogeneous and well oriented silver nanowires (AgNWs) that exhibit strong in-plane electrical and optical anisotropies. Using a small quantity of AgNW suspension, the horizontal-dip (H-dip) coating method was applied, in which highly oriented AgNWs were deposited unidirectionally along the direction of coating over centimetre-scale lengths very rapidly. In applying the H-dip-coating method, we adjusted the shear strain rate of the capillary flow in the Landau-Levich meniscus of the AgNW suspension, which induced a high degree of uniaxial orientational ordering (0.37–0.43) of the AgNWs, comparable with the ordering seen in archetypal nematic liquid crystal (LC) materials. These AgNWs could be used to fabricate not only transparent electrodes, but also LC-alignment electrodes for LC devices and/or polarising electrodes for organic photovoltaic devices, having the potential to revolutionise the architectures of a number of polarisation-selective opto-electronic devices for use in printed/organic electronics. PMID:26778621

  5. Highly stable and flexible silver nanowire-graphene hybrid transparent conducting electrodes for emerging optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghwa; Lee, Hyungjin; Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Youngu

    2013-09-07

    A new AgNW-graphene hybrid transparent conducting electrode (TCE) was prepared by dry-transferring a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown monolayer graphene onto a pristine AgNW TCE. The AgNW-graphene hybrid TCE exhibited excellent optical and electrical properties as well as mechanical flexibility. The AgNW-graphene hybrid TCE showed highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities because of the superior gas-barrier property of the graphene protection layer. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with the AgNW-graphene hybrid TCE showed excellent photovoltaic performance as well as superior long-term stability under ambient conditions.

  6. Dynamic manipulation and patterning of microparticles and cells by using TiOPc-based optoelectronic dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Mo; Yu, Tung-Ming; Huang, Hang-Ping; Ku, Meng-Yen; Hsu, Long; Liu, Cheng-Hsien

    2010-06-15

    We develop light-driven optoelectronic tweezers based on the organic photoconductive material titanium oxide phthalocyanine. These tweezers function based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP). The dynamic manipulation of a single microparticle and cell patterning are demonstrated by using this light-driven optoelectronic DEP chip. The adaptive light patterns that drive the optoelectronic DEP onchip are designed by using Flash software to approach appropriate dynamic manipulation. This is also the first reported demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, for successfully patterning such delicate cells from human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line HepG2 by using any optoelectronic tweezers.

  7. Femtosecond Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jiahui; Wang, Lei; Sokolov, Alexei

    2004-10-01

    Optical tweezers has drawn much attention of people since recent years, which shows great advantages on biological applications due to quite straightforward ideas and simple configurations. Optical tweezers rely upon the extremely high gradient in the electric field produced near the beam waist of a tightly focused laser beam, which creates a force sufficient to trap micron-sized dielectric particles in three dimensions.(J.E. Molloy and M.J. Padgett, Light, Action: Optical Tweezers, Contemporary P)hysics, 43 241 (2002). We applied a femtosecond laser on optical tweezers as light source and got successfully ``optical trapping'' and ``optical tweezers.'' Further, due to the characters of short pulse width and extremely high intensity of laser, femtosecond optical tweezers may direct us to new optics field. Under such strong intensity many non-linear optical phenomena could be observable, such like optical Kerr effect, stimulated Raman effect and so on. Our work will shows that it may be applied into the recently proposed FAST CAR (Femtosecond Adaptive Spectroscopic Techniques for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy) by M. Scully et. al.(M. O. Scully, G. W. Kattawar, R. P. Lucht, T. Opatrny, H. Pilloff, A. Rebane, A. V. Sokolov, and M. S. Zubairy, ``FAST CARS: Engineering a Laser Spectroscopic Technique for Rapid Identification of Bacterial Spores,'' Proceedings of NASE (2002).)

  8. Automation of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tseng-Ming; Chang, Bo-Jui; Hsu, Long

    2000-07-01

    Optical tweezers is a newly developed instrument, which makes possible the manipulation of micro-optical particles under a microscope. In this paper, we present the automation of an optical tweezers which consists of a modified optical tweezers, equipped with two motorized actuators to deflect a 1 W argon laser beam, and a computer control system including a joystick. The trapping of a single bead and a group of lactoacidofilus was shown, separately. With the aid of the joystick and two auxiliary cursers superimposed on the real-time image of a trapped bead, we demonstrated the simple and convenient operation of the automated optical tweezers. By steering the joystick and then pressing a button on it, we assign a new location for the trapped bead to move to. The increment of the motion 0.04 (mu) m for a 20X objective, is negligible. With a fast computer for image processing, the manipulation of the trapped bead is smooth and accurate. The automation of the optical tweezers is also programmable. This technique may be applied to accelerate the DNA hybridization in a gene chip. The combination of the modified optical tweezers with the computer control system provides a tool for precise manipulation of micro particles in many scientific fields.

  9. Transparent indium tin oxide electrodes on muscovite mica for high-temperature processed flexible opto-electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shanming; Chen, Chang; Fu, Nian-Qing; Zhou, Hua; Ye, Mao; Lin, Peng; Yuan, Wen-Xiang; Zeng, Xierong; Chen, Lang; Huang, Haitao

    2016-10-11

    Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) electrodes were deposited on transparent and flexible muscovite mica. The use of mica substrate makes a high-temperature annealing process (up to 500 °C) possible. ITO/mica retains its low electric resistivity even after continuous bending of 1000 times on account of the unique layered structure of mica. When used as a transparent flexible heater, ITO/mica shows an extremely fast ramping (< 15 s) up to a high temperature of over 438 °C. When used as a transparent electrode, ITO/mica permits a high temperature annealing (450 °C) approach to fabricate flexible perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with high efficiency.

  10. Interferometer Control of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses progress in using spatial light modulators and interferometry to control the beam profile of an optical tweezers. The approach being developed is to use a spatial light modulator (SLM) to control the phase profile of the tweezers beam and to use a combination of the SLM and interferometry to control the intensity profile. The objective is to perform fine and calculable control of the moments and forces on a tip or tool to be used to manipulate and interrogate nanostructures. The performance of the SLM in generating multiple and independently controllable tweezers beams is also reported. Concurrent supporting research projects are mentioned and include tweezers beam scattering and neural-net processing of the interference patterns for control of the tweezers beams.

  11. Are electron tweezers possible?

    PubMed

    Oleshko, Vladimir P; Howe, James M

    2011-11-01

    Positively answering the question in the title, we demonstrate in this work single electron beam trapping and steering of 20-300nm solid Al nanoparticles generated inside opaque submicron-sized molten Al-Si eutectic alloy spheres. Imaging of solid nanoparticles and liquid alloy in real time was performed using energy filtering in an analytical transmission electron microscope (TEM). Energy-filtering TEM combined with valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy enabled us to investigate in situ nanoscale transformations of the internal structure, temperature dependence of plasmon losses, and local electronic and optical properties under melting and crystallization of individual binary alloy particles. For particles below 20nm in size, enhanced vibrations of the dynamic solid-liquid interface due to instabilities near the critical threshold were observed just before melting. The obtained results indicate that focused electron beams can act as a tool for manipulation of metal nanoparticles by transferring linear and angular mechanical momenta. Such thermally assisted electron tweezers can be utilized for touchless manipulation and processing of individual nano-objects and potentially for fabrication of assembled nanodevices with atomic level sensitivity and lateral resolution provided by modern electron optical systems. This is by three orders of magnitude better than for light microscopy utilized in conventional optical tweezers. New research directions and potential applications of trapping and tracking of nano-objects by focused electron beams are outlined.

  12. Optical tweezers on biaxial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we propose optical tweezers based on a biaxial crystal. To control the movement of opaque particles, we use the shift polarization interferometer. The results of experimental study of laser tweezers are shown. We demonstrates movement of a microparticle of toner using singular-optical trap, rotate a particle due to orbital momentum, conversion of two traps when changing the plane of polarizer transmission and converging of two traps.

  13. Round-tip dielectrophoresis-based tweezers for single micro-object manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Taiga; Osaki, Toshihisa; Kawano, Ryuji; Kamiya, Koki; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we present an efficient methodology to manipulate a single micro-object using round-tip positive dielectrophoresis-based tweezers. The tweezers consist of a glass needle with a round-tip and a pair of thin gold-film electrodes. The round-tip, which has a radius of 3µm, is formed by melting a finely pulled glass needle and concentrates the electric field at the tip of the tweezers, which allows the individual manipulation of single micro-objects. The tweezers successfully captured, conveyed, and positioned single cell-sized liposomes with diameters of 5-23µm, which are difficult to manipulate with conventional manipulation methodologies, such as optical tweezers or glass micropipettes, due to the similarities between their optical properties and those of the media, as well as the ease with which they are deformed or broken. We used Stokes' drag theory to experimentally evaluate the positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) force generated by the tweezers as a function of the liposome size, the content of the surrounding media, and the applied AC voltage and frequency. The results agreed with the theoretically deduced pDEP force. Finally, we demonstrated the separation of labeled single cells from non-labeled cells with the tweezers. This device can be used as an efficient tool for precisely and individually manipulating biological micro-objects that are typically transparent and flexible.

  14. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihuan; Nabet, Bahram

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in "volumetric modes,"which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry-Perot (FP), and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD) simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width), tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal), core-shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs) form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption) and downward transitions (emission) of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this "rate management" scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs) that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  15. Optical Tweezer Assembly and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    An Optical Tweezer, as the name implies, is a useful tool for precision manipulation of micro and nano scale objects. Using the principle of electromagnetic radiation pressure, an optical tweezer employs a tightly focused laser beam to trap and position objects of various shapes and sizes. These devices can trap micrometer and nanometer sized objects. An exciting possibility for optical tweezers is its future potential to manipulate and assemble micro and nano sized sensors. A typical optical tweezer makes use of the following components: laser, mirrors, lenses, a high quality microscope, stage, Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, TV monitor and Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs). The laser wavelength employed is typically in the visible or infrared spectrum. The laser beam is directed via mirrors and lenses into the microscope. It is then tightly focused by a high magnification, high numerical aperture microscope objective into the sample slide, which is mounted on a translating stage. The sample slide contains a sealed, small volume of fluid that the objects are suspended in. The most common objects trapped by optical tweezers are dielectric spheres. When trapped, a sphere will literally snap into and center itself in the laser beam. The PSD s are mounted in such a way to receive the backscatter after the beam has passed through the trap. PSD s used with the Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) technique provide highly precise data. Most optical tweezers employ lasers with power levels ranging from 10 to 100 miliwatts. Typical forces exerted on trapped objects are in the pico-newton range. When PSDs are employed, object movement can be resolved on a nanometer scale in a time range of milliseconds. Such accuracy, however, can only by utilized by calibrating the optical tweezer. Fortunately, an optical tweezer can be modeled accurately as a simple spring. This allows Hook s Law to be used. My goal this summer at NASA Glenn Research Center is the assembly and

  16. Undergraduate Construction of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbell, Lawrence

    2012-10-01

    I will present a poster on the construction of optical tweezers. This will demonstrate the full process one must go through when working on a research project. First I sifted through the internet for papers and information pertaining to the tweezers. Afterwards I discussed the budget with the lab manager. Next I made purchases, however some items, such as the sample mount, needed to be custom made. These I built in the machine shop. Once the tweezers were operational I spent some time ensuring that the mirrors and lenses were adjusted just right, so that the trap performed at full strength. Finally, I used video data of the Brownian motion of trapped silica microspheres to get a reasonable estimate of the trapping stiffness with such particles. As a general note, all of this was done with the intent of leaving the tweezers for future use by other undergraduates. Because of this extra effort was taken to ensure the tweezers were as safe to use as possible. For this reason a visible LASER was chosen over an infrared LASER, in addition, the LASER was oriented parallel to the surface of the table in order to avoid stray upwards beams.

  17. Plasmon nano-optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Mathieu L.; Righini, Maurizio; Quidant, Romain

    2011-06-01

    Conventional optical tweezers, formed at the diffraction-limited focus of a laser beam, have become a powerful and flexible tool for manipulating micrometre-sized objects. Extending optical trapping down to the nanometre scale would open unprecedented opportunities in many fields of science, where such nano-optical tweezers would allow the ultra-accurate positioning of single nano-objects. Among the possible strategies, the ability of metallic nanostructures to control light at the subwavelength scale can be exploited to engineer such nano-optical traps. This Review summarizes the recent advances in the emerging field of plasmon-based optical trapping and discusses the details of plasmon tweezers along with their potential applications to bioscience and quantum optics.

  18. Optoelectronic device

    DOEpatents

    Bonekamp, Jeffrey E.; Boven, Michelle L.; Gaston, Ryan S.

    2014-09-09

    The invention is an optoelectronic device comprising an active portion which converts light to electricity or converts electricity to light, the active portion having a front side for the transmittal of the light and a back side opposite from the front side, at least two electrical leads to the active portion to convey electricity to or from the active portion, an enclosure surrounding the active portion and through which the at least two electrical leads pass wherein the hermetically sealed enclosure comprises at the front side of the active portion a barrier material which allows for transmittal of light, one or more getter materials disposed so as to not impede the transmission of light to or from the active portion, and a contiguous gap pathway to the getter material which pathway is disposed between the active portion and the barrier material.

  19. Optical tweezers: 20 years on.

    PubMed

    McGloin, David

    2006-12-15

    In 1986, Arthur Ashkin and colleagues published a seminal paper in Optics Letters, 'Observation of a single-beam gradient force optical trap for dielectric particles' which outlined a technique for trapping micrometre-sized dielectric particles using a focused laser beam, a technology which is now termed optical tweezers. This paper will provide a background in optical manipulation technologies and an overview of the applications of optical tweezers. It contains some recent work on the optical manipulation of aerosols and concludes with a critical discussion of where the future might lead this maturing technology.

  20. Optical tweezers for confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, A.; Meyer zu Hörste, G.; Pilarczyk, G.; Monajembashi, S.; Uhl, V.; Greulich, K. O.

    2000-11-01

    In confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSMs), lasers can be used for image formation as well as tools for the manipulation of microscopic objects. In the latter case, in addition to the imaging lasers, the light of an extra laser has to be focused into the object plane of the CLSM, for example as optical tweezers. Imaging as well as trapping by optical tweezers can be done using the same objective lens. In this case, z-sectioning for 3D imaging shifts the optical tweezers with the focal plane of the objective along the optical axis, so that a trapped object remains positioned in the focal plane. Consequently, 3D imaging of trapped objects is impossible without further measures. We present an experimental set-up keeping the axial trapping position of the optical tweezers at its intended position whilst the focal plane can be axially shifted over a distance of about 15 μm. It is based on fast-moving correctional optics synchronized with the objective movement. First examples of application are the 3D imaging of chloroplasts of Elodea densa (Canadian waterweed) in a vigorous cytoplasmic streaming and the displacement of zymogen granules in pancreatic cancer cells (AR42 J).

  1. Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Clere, T.M.

    1983-08-30

    A 3-dimensional electrode is disclosed having substantially coplanar and substantially flat portions and ribbon-like curved portions, said curved portions being symmetrical and alternating in rows above and below said substantially coplanar, substantially flat portions, respectively, and a geometric configuration presenting in one sectional aspect the appearance of a series of ribbon-like oblate spheroids interrupted by said flat portions and in another sectional aspect, 90/sup 0/ from said one aspect, the appearance of a square wave pattern.

  2. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  3. Microcrystal manipulation with laser tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Armin Duman, Ramona; Stevens, Bob; Ward, Andy

    2013-07-01

    Optical trapping has successfully been applied to select and mount microcrystals for subsequent X-ray diffraction experiments. X-ray crystallography is the method of choice to deduce atomic resolution structural information from macromolecules. In recent years, significant investments in structural genomics initiatives have been undertaken to automate all steps in X-ray crystallography from protein expression to structure solution. Robotic systems are widely used to prepare crystallization screens and change samples on synchrotron beamlines for macromolecular crystallography. The only remaining manual handling step is the transfer of the crystal from the mother liquor onto the crystal holder. Manual mounting is relatively straightforward for crystals with dimensions of >25 µm; however, this step is nontrivial for smaller crystals. The mounting of microcrystals is becoming increasingly important as advances in microfocus synchrotron beamlines now allow data collection from crystals with dimensions of only a few micrometres. To make optimal usage of these beamlines, new approaches have to be taken to facilitate and automate this last manual handling step. Optical tweezers, which are routinely used for the manipulation of micrometre-sized objects, have successfully been applied to sort and mount macromolecular crystals on newly designed crystal holders. Diffraction data from CPV type 1 polyhedrin microcrystals mounted with laser tweezers are presented.

  4. Molecular clips and tweezers hosting neutral guests.

    PubMed

    Hardouin-Lerouge, Marie; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Sallé, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Intense current interest in supramolecular chemistry is devoted to the construction of molecular assemblies displaying controlled molecular motion associated to recognition. On this ground, molecular clips and tweezers have focused an increasing attention. This tutorial review points out the recent advances in the construction of always more sophisticated molecular clips and tweezers, illustrating their remarkably broad structural variety and focusing on their binding ability towards neutral guests. A particular attention is brought to recent findings in dynamic molecular tweezers whose recognition ability can be regulated by external stimuli. Porphyrin-based systems will not be covered here as this very active field has been recently reviewed.

  5. Quantum limited particle sensing in optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.W.; Hsu, Magnus T. L.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2009-12-15

    Particle sensing in optical tweezers systems provides information on the position, velocity, and force of the specimen particles. The conventional quadrant detection scheme is applied ubiquitously in optical tweezers experiments to quantify these parameters. In this paper, we show that quadrant detection is nonoptimal for particle sensing in optical tweezers and propose an alternative optimal particle sensing scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. A formalism for particle sensing in terms of transverse spatial modes is developed and numerical simulations of the efficacies of both quadrant and spatial homodyne detection are shown. We demonstrate that 1 order of magnitude improvement in particle sensing sensitivity can be achieved using spatial homodyne over quadrant detection.

  6. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K O; McKellar, T; Fekete, J; Rakonjac, A; Deb, A B; Kjærgaard, N

    2014-04-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optic deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along it, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addressing individual sites in the channel. The deflectors are controlled using a multichannel direct digital synthesizer, which receives instructions on a submicrosecond time scale from a field-programmable gate array. Using the tweezer system, we demonstrate sequential binary splitting of an ultracold 87Rb cloud into 2(5) clouds.

  7. Optical tweezers based on polarization interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.; Dominikov, Mykola M.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose optical tweezers based on a biaxial crystal. To control the movement of opaque particles, we use the shift polarization interferometer. The results of experimental study of laser tweezers are shown. We demonstrates movement of a microparticle of toner using singular-optical trap, rotate a particle due to orbital momentum, conversion of two traps when changing the plane of polarizer transmission and converging of two traps.

  8. Experimental Optoelectronic Associative Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1992-01-01

    Optoelectronic associative memory responds to input image by displaying one of M remembered images. Which image to display determined by optoelectronic analog computation of resemblance between input image and each remembered image. Does not rely on precomputation and storage of outer-product synapse matrix. Size of memory needed to store and process images reduced.

  9. Method of fabricating an optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction

    DOEpatents

    Shtein, Max; Yang, Fan; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-10-14

    A method of fabricating an optoelectronic device comprises: depositing a first layer having protrusions over a first electrode, in which the first layer comprises a first organic small molecule material; depositing a second layer on the first layer such that the second layer is in physical contact with the first layer; in which the smallest lateral dimension of the protrusions are between 1 to 5 times the exciton diffusion length of the first organic small molecule material; and depositing a second electrode over the second layer to form the optoelectronic device. A method of fabricating an organic optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction is also provided and comprises: depositing a first layer with protrusions over an electrode by organic vapor phase deposition; depositing a second layer on the first layer where the interface of the first and second layers forms a bulk heterojunction; and depositing another electrode over the second layer.

  10. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  11. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Keir C; Nagy, Attila

    2008-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. Here we describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  12. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  13. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  14. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  15. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  16. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The energy provided at the tip of the tweezer used to remove hair may be radio frequency, galvanic...

  17. "Red Tweezers": Fast, customisable hologram generation for optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Richard W.; Gibson, Graham M.; Linnenberger, Anna; Phillips, David B.; Grieve, James A.; Carberry, David M.; Serati, Steven; Miles, Mervyn J.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2014-01-01

    Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT) are a versatile way of manipulating microscopic particles in 3D. However, their ease of use has been hampered by the computational load of calculating the holograms, resulting in an unresponsive system. We present a program for generating these holograms on a consumer Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), coupled to an easy-to-use interface in LabVIEW (National Instruments). This enables a HOT system to be set up without writing any additional code, as well as providing a platform enabling the fast generation of other holograms. The GPU engine calculates holograms over 300 times faster than the same algorithm running on a quad core CPU. The hologram algorithm can be altered on-the-fly without recompiling the program, allowing it to be used to control Spatial Light Modulators in any situation where the hologram can be calculated in a single pass. The interface has also been rewritten to take advantage of new features in LabVIEW 2010. It is designed to be easily modified and extended to integrate with hardware other than our own.

  18. Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. In this talk, I will review our research activities on electrically driven light emission, photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors. In particular, WSe2 monolayer p-n junctions formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, type-II heterojunctions based on MoS2/WSe2 and MoS2/phosphorene van der Waals stacks, 2D multi-junction solar cells, and 3D/2D semiconductor interfaces will be presented. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in these devices. If an electrical current is driven, efficient electroluminescence is obtained. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the optical properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the device response. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors. We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion and light emission, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

  19. Magnetic tweezers for the measurement of twist and torque.

    PubMed

    Lipfert, Jan; Lee, Mina; Ordu, Orkide; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Dekker, Nynke H

    2014-05-19

    Single-molecule techniques make it possible to investigate the behavior of individual biological molecules in solution in real time. These techniques include so-called force spectroscopy approaches such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers, flow stretching, and magnetic tweezers. Amongst these approaches, magnetic tweezers have distinguished themselves by their ability to apply torque while maintaining a constant stretching force. Here, it is illustrated how such a "conventional" magnetic tweezers experimental configuration can, through a straightforward modification of its field configuration to minimize the magnitude of the transverse field, be adapted to measure the degree of twist in a biological molecule. The resulting configuration is termed the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers. Additionally, it is shown how further modification of the field configuration can yield a transverse field with a magnitude intermediate between that of the "conventional" magnetic tweezers and the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers, which makes it possible to directly measure the torque stored in a biological molecule. This configuration is termed the magnetic torque tweezers. The accompanying video explains in detail how the conversion of conventional magnetic tweezers into freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers can be accomplished, and demonstrates the use of these techniques. These adaptations maintain all the strengths of conventional magnetic tweezers while greatly expanding the versatility of this powerful instrument.

  20. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Moelmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2011-09-15

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits require the transport of atoms to neighboring sites. We numerically optimize the nonadiabatic transport of the atoms through the lattice and the intensity ramps of the optical tweezer in order to maximize the gate fidelities. We find overall gate times of a few 100 {mu}s, while keeping the error probability due to vibrational excitations and spontaneous scattering below 10{sup -3}. The requirements on the positioning error and intensity noise of the optical tweezer and the magnetic field stability are analyzed and we show that atoms in optical lattices could meet the requirements for fault-tolerant scalable quantum computing.

  1. Micro-objective manipulated with optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, M.; Kurosawa, T.; Hane, K.

    1997-02-01

    A microscope is described that uses a {mu}m-sized ball lens, which is here termed micro-objective, manipulated with optical tweezers to image the side view of the arbitrary region of a sample. Since this micro-objective is small in size, it can go into a concave region to produce a local image of the inside which the conventional microscope cannot observe. Preliminary results show good lens performance from the micro-objective when combined with optical tweezers. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Origin and Future of Plasmonic Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jer-Shing; Yang, Ya-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers can overcome the diffraction limits of conventional optical tweezers and enable the trapping of nanoscale objects. Extension of the trapping and manipulation of nanoscale objects with nanometer position precision opens up unprecedented opportunities for applications in the fields of biology, chemistry and statistical and atomic physics. Potential applications include direct molecular manipulation, lab-on-a-chip applications for viruses and vesicles and the study of nanoscale transport. This paper reviews the recent research progress and development bottlenecks and provides an overview of possible future directions in this field. PMID:28347051

  3. Molecular tweezers targeting transthyretin amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Nelson; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Attar, Aida; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Gales, Luís; Saraiva, Maria João; Almeida, Maria Rosário

    2014-04-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses comprise a wide spectrum of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by extracellular deposition of toxic TTR aggregates in various organs. Despite recent advances regarding the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying TTR misfolding and pathogenic self-assembly, there is still no effective therapy for treatment of these fatal disorders. Recently, the "molecular tweezers", CLR01, has been reported to inhibit self-assembly and toxicity of different amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, including TTR, by interfering with hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions known to play an important role in the aggregation process. In addition, CLR01 showed therapeutic effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, we assessed the ability of CLR01 to modulate TTR misfolding and aggregation in cell culture and in an animal model. In cell culture assays we found that CLR01 inhibited TTR oligomerization in the conditioned medium and alleviated TTR-induced neurotoxicity by redirecting TTR aggregation into the formation of innocuous assemblies. To determine whether CLR01 was effective in vivo, we tested the compound in mice expressing TTR V30M, a model of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, which recapitulates the main pathological features of the human disease. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses showed a significant decrease in TTR burden in the gastrointestinal tract and the peripheral nervous system in mice treated with CLR01, with a concomitant reduction in aggregate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress response, protein oxidation, and apoptosis. Taken together, our preclinical data suggest that CLR01 is a promising lead compound for development of innovative, disease-modifying therapy for TTR amyloidosis.

  4. Optoelectronic Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R. F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Peterson, Gary D.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2004-10-05

    An optoelectronic mounting structure is provided that may be used in conjunction with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. The mounting structure may be a flexible printed circuit board. Thermal vias or heat pipes in the head region may transmit heat from the mounting structure to the heat spreader. The heat spreader may provide mechanical rigidity or stiffness to the heat region. In another embodiment, an electrical contact and ground plane may pass along a surface of the head region so as to provide an electrical contact path to the optoelectronic devices and limit electromagnetic interference. In yet another embodiment, a window may be formed in the head region of the mounting structure so as to provide access to the heat spreader. Optoelectronic devices may be adapted to the heat spreader in such a manner that the devices are accessible through the window in the mounting structure.

  5. A force calibration standard for magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Dulin, David; Cnossen, Jelmer; Köber, Mariana; van Oene, Maarten M.; Ordu, Orkide; Berghuis, Bojk A.; Hensgens, Toivo; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-12-01

    To study the behavior of biological macromolecules and enzymatic reactions under force, advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have proven instrumental. Magnetic tweezers form one of the most powerful of these techniques, due to their overall simplicity, non-invasive character, potential for high throughput measurements, and large force range. Drawbacks of magnetic tweezers, however, are that accurate determination of the applied forces can be challenging for short biomolecules at high forces and very time-consuming for long tethers at low forces below ˜1 piconewton. Here, we address these drawbacks by presenting a calibration standard for magnetic tweezers consisting of measured forces for four magnet configurations. Each such configuration is calibrated for two commonly employed commercially available magnetic microspheres. We calculate forces in both time and spectral domains by analyzing bead fluctuations. The resulting calibration curves, validated through the use of different algorithms that yield close agreement in their determination of the applied forces, span a range from 100 piconewtons down to tens of femtonewtons. These generalized force calibrations will serve as a convenient resource for magnetic tweezers users and diminish variations between different experimental configurations or laboratories.

  6. Discussion of optoelectronic HMDASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Xu; Yang, Yi; Sun, Longhe; Liu, Hua

    2000-10-01

    The use of opto-electronic Helmet Mounted Display And Sight System (HMDASS) will decrease responding time for fighter in near distance tussle. See-through type Helmet Mounted Display (HMD), instead of the simple graduation board display, will provide more information and so much as integrate the FLTR image. We research some questions of TFTLCD device in optic- electric HMDASS application, such as luminance, information content & format etc. This paper discuss the luminance question in perspective type LCD-HMD and put forward a display method to increase the reaction velocity for a pilot using opto-electronic Helmet Mounted Sight (HMS).

  7. Optoelectronic techniques for broadband switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, S. F.; Jou, L.; Lenart, J.

    1988-01-01

    Optoelectronic switching employs a hybrid optical/electronic principle to perform the switching function and is applicable for either analog broadband or high-bit rate digital switching. The major advantages of optoelectronic switching include high isolation, low crosstalk, small physical size, light weight, and low power consumption. These advantages make optoelectronic switching an excellent candidate for on-board satellite switching. This paper describes a number of optoelectronic switching architectures. System components required for implementing these switching architectures are discussed. Performance of these architectures are evaluated by calculating their crosstalk, isolation, insertion loss, matrix size, drive power, throughput, and switching speed. Technologies needed for monolithic optoelectronic switching are also identified.

  8. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  9. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Cochran, Sandy; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-04-01

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  10. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-04-14

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  11. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  12. The Smallest Tweezers in the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewalle, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A pair of fine tweezers and a steady hand may well be enough to pick up a grain of sand, but what would you use to hold something hundreds of times smaller still, the size of only one micron? The answer is to use a device that is not mechanical in nature but that relies instead on the tiny forces that light exerts on small particles: "optical…

  13. Tweezers for Chimeras in Small Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelchenko, Iryna; Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Zakharova, Anna; Wolfrum, Matthias; Schöll, Eckehard

    2016-03-01

    We propose a control scheme which can stabilize and fix the position of chimera states in small networks. Chimeras consist of coexisting domains of spatially coherent and incoherent dynamics in systems of nonlocally coupled identical oscillators. Chimera states are generally difficult to observe in small networks due to their short lifetime and erratic drifting of the spatial position of the incoherent domain. The control scheme, like a tweezer, might be useful in experiments, where usually only small networks can be realized.

  14. Fractal zone plate beam based optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shubo; Zhang, Xinyu; Ma, Wenzhuo; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation with an optical beam generated by a fractral zone plate (FZP). The experimental results show that the FZP beam can simultaneously trap multiple particles positioned in different focal planes of the FZP beam, owing to the multiple foci and self-reconstruction property of the FZP beam. The FZP beam can also be used to construct three-dimensional optical tweezers for potential applications. PMID:27678305

  15. Picosecond optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since the invention of picosecond lasers, scientists and electronic engineers have been dreaming of inventing electronic devices that can record in real time the physical and electronic events that take place on picosecond time scales. With the exception of the expensive streak camera, this dream has been largely unfullfilled. Today, a real-time oscilloscope with picosecond time resolution is still not available. To fill the need for even better time resolution, researchers have turned to optical pulses and thus a hybrid technology has emerged-picosecond optoelectronics. This technology, based on bulk photoconductors, has had a slow start. However, because of the simplicity, scaleability, and jitterfree nature of the devices, the technology has recently experienced a rapid growth. This volume reviews the major developments in the field of picosecond optoelectronics over the past decade.

  16. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers-current magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessalova, Valentina; Perov, Nikolai; Rodionova, Valeria

    2016-10-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers-Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10-11 A m2 at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates.

  17. Complexation of Optoelectronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Il‧in, M. Yu.; Konyaev, M. A.; Mikhailenko, A. S.; Morozov, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    Problems of increasing the efficiency and the functionality of complex optoelectronic systems for monitoring real atmospheric conditions and of their use are discussed. It is shown by the example of a meteorological complex comprising an infrared wind-sensing lidar and an X-range Doppler radar that the complexation of probing systems working in different electromagnetic-radiation ranges opens up new opportunities for determining the meteorological parameters of a turbulent atmosphere and investigating the interaction of radiation with it.

  18. Monolithic Optoelectronic Integrated Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Walters, Wayne; Gustafsen, Jerry; Bendett, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Monolithic optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEIC) receives single digitally modulated input light signal via optical fiber and converts it into 16-channel electrical output signal. Potentially useful in any system in which digital data must be transmitted serially at high rates, then decoded into and used in parallel format at destination. Applications include transmission and decoding of control signals to phase shifters in phased-array antennas and also communication of data between computers and peripheral equipment in local-area networks.

  19. The Smallest Tweezers in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewalle, Alexandre

    2008-11-01

    A pair of fine tweezers and a steady hand may well be enough to pick up a grain of sand, but what would you use to hold something hundreds of times smaller still, the size of only one micron? The answer is to use a device that is not mechanical in nature but that relies instead on the tiny forces that light exerts on small particles: "optical tweezers." In recent years, this technique has become central to nanotechnology for the manipulation of small particles, even individual molecules. It is also an ideal illustration of how classroom physics is applied to cutting-edge research, combining concepts such as the vector nature of momentum and force, Newton's laws, optics, the wave-particle duality of light, and thermodynamics. The physics behind optical tweezers has many layers of complexity, but it can be reduced to a basic principle: the conservation of momentum. This paper guides the reader through a much simplified demonstration of this "tweezing effect" using a question-answer approach, leaving the reader with the choice to treat each step as a problem exercise.

  20. Quantitative characterization for dielectrophoretic behavior of biological cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In Soo; Hee Park, Se; Woo Lee, Sang; Sung Yoon, Dae; Kim, Beop-Min

    2014-02-01

    We report a method to precisely quantify dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces and cutoff frequencies (fc) of viable and nonviable yeast cells. The method consists of a two-step process in which generated DEP forces act upon a cell through a micro-electrode device, followed by direct measurement of DEP forces using optical tweezers. DEP behaviors of viable and nonviable yeast cells are monitored as a function of AC frequency. We believe that the proposed method can be used as a powerful platform for cell-based assays to characterize the DEP behavior of various cell types including cancer and normal cells.

  1. Broadband light based optoelectric tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Avanish; Clayton, Katherine; Wereley, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Trapping, sorting and transport of particles are fundamental operations in microfluidic platforms. However, very few methods exist that can dynamically trap and manipulate particles with high spatial resolution and accuracy. Recently, a new set of methods have emerged that can trap and sort particles by optically controlling electrokinetic effects. Rapid Electrokinetic Patterning (REP) is such an emerging optoelectric technique. It utilizes a laser activated electrothermal (ET) vortex and particle-electrode interactions for trapping particles. Trapped particles can be translated by optically steering the laser or by moving the trapping chamber. Previously demonstrated applications of REP have utilized a 1064 nm infrared laser, integrated in an inverted microscope, to create the necessary temperature rise for producing the ET flow. Use of an external laser for REP trapping is expensive and time intensive to integrate, making it difficult to design a portable REP system. Using experiments and simulations, we show that a non-coherent incandescent broadband light source can be used for REP trapping and manipulation. This allows for a microscope with a broadband lamp to be used for REP trapping without integrating an external laser.

  2. Method of fabricating an optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction

    DOEpatents

    Shtein, Max; Yang, Fan; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-09-02

    A method of fabricating an organic optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction comprises the steps of: depositing a first layer over a first electrode by organic vapor phase deposition, wherein the first layer comprises a first organic small molecule material; depositing a second layer on the first layer such that the second layer is in physical contact with the first layer, wherein the interface of the second layer on the first layer forms a bulk heterojunction; and depositing a second electrode over the second layer to form the optoelectronic device. In another embodiment, a first layer having protrusions is deposited over the first electrode, wherein the first layer comprises a first organic small molecule material. For example, when the first layer is an electron donor layer, the first electrode is an anode, the second layer is an electron acceptor layer, and the second electrode is a cathode. As a further example, when the first layer is an electron acceptor layer, the first electrode is a cathode, the second layer is an electron donor layer, and the second electrode is an anode.

  3. Optical Tweezers Array and Nimble Tweezers Probe Generated by Spatial- Light Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Seibel, Robin E.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical tweezers is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center as a visiblelight interface between ubiquitous laser technologies and the interrogation, visualization, manufacture, control, and energization of nanostructures such as silicon carbide (SiC) nanotubes. The tweezers uses one or more focused laser beams to hold micrometer-sized particles called tools (sometimes called tips in atomic-force-microscope terminology). A strongly focused laser beam has an associated light-pressure gradient that is strong enough to pull small particles to the focus, in spite of the oppositely directed scattering force; "optical tweezers" is the common term for this effect. The objective is to use the tools to create carefully shaped secondary traps to hold and assemble nanostructures that may contain from tens to hundreds of atoms. The interaction between a tool and the nanostructures is to be monitored optically as is done with scanning probe microscopes. One of the initial efforts has been to create, shape, and control multiple tweezers beams. To this end, a programmable spatial-light modulator (SLM) has been used to modify the phase of a laser beam at up to 480 by 480 points. One program creates multiple, independently controllable tweezer beams whose shapes can be tailored by making the SLM an adaptive mirror in an interferometer (ref. 1). The beams leave the SLM at different angles, and an optical Fourier transform maps these beams to different positions in the focal plane of a microscope objective. The following figure shows two arrays of multiple beams created in this manner. The patterns displayed above the beam array control the intensity-to-phase transformation required in programming the SLM. Three of the seven beams displayed can be used as independently controllable beams.

  4. Optoelectronic technology consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs-Brenner, Mary

    1992-12-01

    The Optoelectronics Technology Consortium has been established to position U.S. industry as the world leader in optical interconnect technology by developing, fabricating, intergrating and demonstrating the producibility of optoelectronic components for high-density/high-data-rate processors and accelerating the insertion of this technology into military and commercial applications. This objective will be accomplished by a program focused in three areas. (1) Demonstrated performance: OETC will demonstrate an aggregate data transfer rate of 16 Gbit/s between single transmitter and receiver packages, as well as the expandability of this technology by combing four links in parallel to achieve a 64 Gbit/s link. (2) Accelerated development: By collaborating during precompetitive technology development stage, OTEC will advance the development of optical components and produce links for a multiboard processor testbed demonstration; and (3) Producibility: OETC's technology will achieve this performance by using components that are affordable, and reliable, with a line BER less than 10(exp -15) and MTTF greater than 10(exp 6) hours.

  5. Reusable acoustic tweezers for disposable devices

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Xie, Yuliang; Li, Sixing; Lata, James; Ren, Liqiang; Mao, Zhangming; Ren, Baiyang; Wu, Mengxi; Ozcelik, Adem

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate acoustic tweezers used for disposable devices. Rather than forming an acoustic resonance, we locally transmitted standing surface acoustic waves into a removable, independent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-glass hybridized microfluidic superstrate device for micromanipulation. By configuring and regulating the displacement nodes on a piezoelectric substrate, cells and particles were effectively patterned and transported into said superstrate, accordingly. With the label-free and contactless nature of acoustic waves, the presented technology could offer a simple, accurate, low-cost, biocompatible, and disposable method for applications in the fields of point-of-care diagnostics and fundamental biomedical studies. PMID:26507411

  6. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  7. Integrated terahertz optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guozhen; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-11-01

    Currently, terahertz (THz) optical systems are based on bulky free-space optics. This is due to the lack of a common platform onto which different THz components, e.g., source, waveguide, modulator and detector, can be monolithically integrated. With the development of THz quantum cascade laser (QCL), it has been realized that the QCL chip may be such a platform for integrated THz photonics. Here, we report our recent works where the THz QCL is integrated with passive or optoelectronic components. They are: 1) integrated graphene modulator with THz QCL achieving 100% modulation depth and fast speed; 2) phase-locked THz QCL with integrated plasmonic waveguide and subwavelength antennas realizing dynamically widely tunable polarizations.

  8. Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing

    PubMed Central

    Paquot, Y.; Duport, F.; Smerieri, A.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Haelterman, M.; Massar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations. PMID:22371825

  9. Materials for optoelectronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Shiang, Joseph John; Smigelski, Jr., Paul Michael

    2015-01-27

    Energy efficient optoelectronic devices include an electroluminescent layer containing a polymer made up of structural units of formula I and II; ##STR00001## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently C.sub.22-44 hydrocarbyl, C.sub.22-44 hydrocarbyl containing one or more S, N, O, P, or Si atoms, oxaalkylaryl, or a combination thereof; R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 are independently H, C.sub.1-44 hydrocarbyl or C.sub.1-44 hydrocarbyl containing one or more S, N, O, P, or Si atoms, or R.sup.3 and R.sup.4, taken together, form a C.sub.2-10 monocyclic or bicyclic ring containing up to three S, N, O, P, or Si heteroatoms; and X is S, Se, or a combination thereof.

  10. Investigating the potential applications of a Raman tweezer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, John Casey

    This thesis describes the construction of an Optical Tweezer apparatus to be used in conjunction with a confocal Raman spectrometer. The tweezer utilizes an infrared (e=1064 nm) laser directed into an inverted microscope with NA=1.4 oil immersion 100x objective lens that strongly focuses the laser light into a sample to function as a single-beam gradient force trap. The long term goal of this research program is to develop a single molecule Raman tweezers apparatus that allows one to control the position of a Raman nanoplasmonic amplifier. This thesis describes the construction of the Raman tweezer apparatus along with several Raman spectra obtained from optically trapped samples of polystyrene fluorescent orange, amine-modified latex beads. In addition, I explored the Raman spectra of bulk cytochrome c mixed with or injected onto Ag aggregates for SERs enhancement.

  11. Nanosized optoelectronic devices based on photoactivated proteins.

    PubMed

    Dimonte, Alice; Frache, Stefano; Erokhin, Victor; Piccinini, Gianluca; Demarchi, Danilo; Milano, Francesco; Micheli, Giovanni De; Carrara, Sandro

    2012-11-12

    Molecular nanoelectronics is attracting much attention, because of the possibility to add functionalities to silicon-based electronics by means of intrinsically nanoscale biological or organic materials. The contact point between active molecules and electrodes must present, besides nanoscale size, a very low resistance. To realize Metal-Molecule-Metal junctions it is, thus, mandatory to be able to control the formation of useful nanometric contacts. The distance between the electrodes has to be of the same size of the molecule being put in between. Nanogaps technology is a perfect fit to fulfill this requirement. In this work, nanogaps between gold electrodes have been used to develop optoelectronic devices based on photoactive proteins. Reaction Centers (RC) and Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) have been inserted in nanogaps by drop casting. Electrical characterizations of the obtained structures were performed. It has been demonstrated that these nanodevices working principle is based on charge separation and photovoltage response. The former is induced by the application of a proper voltage on the RC, while the latter comes from the activation of BR by light of appropriate wavelengths.

  12. Subpiconewton dynamic force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kruithof, M; Chien, F; de Jager, M; van Noort, J

    2008-03-15

    We introduce a simple method for dynamic force spectroscopy with magnetic tweezers. This method allows application of subpiconewton force and twist control by calibration of the applied force from the height of the magnets. Initial dynamic force spectroscopy experiments on DNA molecules revealed a large hysteresis that is caused by viscous drag on the magnetic bead and will conceal weak interactions. When smaller beads are used, this hysteresis is sufficiently reduced to reveal intramolecular interactions at subpiconewton forces. Compared with typical quasistatic force spectroscopy, a significant reduction of measurement time is achieved, allowing the real-time study of transient structures and reaction intermediates. As a proof of principle, nucleosome-nucleosome interactions on a subsaturated chromatin fiber were analyzed.

  13. Multiplexed spectroscopy with holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibula, Matthew A.; McIntyre, David H.

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a multiplexed holographic optical tweezers system with an imaging spectrometer to manipulate multiple optically trapped nanosensors and detect multiple fluorescence spectra. The system uses a spatial light modulator (SLM) to control the positions of infrared optical traps in the sample so that multiple nanosensors can be positioned into regions of interest. Spectra of multiple nanosensors are detected simultaneously with the application of an imaging spectrometer. Nanosensors are capable of detecting changes in their environment such as pH, ion concentration, temperature, and voltage by monitoring changes in the nanosensors' emitted fluorescence spectra. We use streptavidin labeled quantum dots bound to the surface of biotin labeled polystyrene microspheres to measure temperature changes by observing a corresponding shift in the wavelength of the spectral peak. The fluorescence is excited at 532 nm with a wide field source.

  14. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  15. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    purified tubes aligned in parallel. While the operating principle is somewhat different from that of single-tube diodes because of the presence of metallic tubes in the material, the film diodes nonetheless show a rectifying behavior and much greater light intensity than single-tube devices. With their superior light output and robustness, they bring us one step closer to a real-world application of carbon nanotubes optoelectronics.

  16. How safe is gamete micromanipulation by laser tweezers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.

    1998-04-01

    Laser tweezers, used as novel sterile micromanipulation tools of living cells, are employed in laser-assisted in vitro fertilization (IVF). For example, controlled spermatozoa transport with 1064 nm tweezers to human egg cells has been performed in European clinics in cases of male infertility. The interaction of approximately 100 mW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams at MW/cm2 intensity with human gametes results in low mean less than 2 K temperature increases and less than 100 pN trapping forces. Therefore, photothermal or photomechanical induced destructive effects appear unlikely. However, the high photon flux densities may induce simultaneous absorption of two NIR photons resulting in nonlinear interactions. These nonlinear interactions imply non-resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous cellular chromophores. In the case of less than 800 nm tweezers, UV- like damage effects may occur. The destructive effect is amplified when multimode cw lasers are used as tweezer sources due to longitudinal mode-beating effects and partial mode- locking. Spermatozoa damage within seconds using 760 nm traps due to formation of unstable ps pulses in a cw Ti:Sa ring laser is demonstrated. We recommend the use of greater than or equal to 800 nm traps for optical gamete micromanipulation. To our opinion, further basic studies on the influence of nonlinear effects of laser tweezers on human gamete are necessary.

  17. Coupled opto-electronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. Steve (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A coupled opto-electronic oscillator that directly couples a laser oscillation with an electronic oscillation to simultaneously achieve a stable RF oscillation at a high frequency and ultra-short optical pulsation by mode locking with a high repetition rate and stability. Single-mode selection can be achieved even with a very long opto-electronic loop. A multimode laser can be used to pump the electronic oscillation, resulting in a high operation efficiency. The optical and the RF oscillations are correlated to each other.

  18. Systems approach to identification of feedback enhanced optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Hullas; Aggarwal, Tanuj; Salapaka, Murti V.

    2008-08-01

    Feedback enhanced optical tweezers, based on Proportional and Integral (PI) control, are routinely used for increasing the stiffness of optical traps. Digital implementation of PI controller, using DSP or FPGA, enables easy maneuverability of feedback gains. In this paper, we report occurrence of a peak in the thermal noise power spectrum of the trapped bead as the proportional gain is cranked up, which imposes a limit on how stiff a trap can be made using position feedback. We explain the reasons for the deviant behavior in the power spectrum and present a mathematical formula to account for the anomaly, which is in very good agreement with the experimental observations. Further, we present a new method to do the closed loop system identification of feedback enhanced optical tweezers by applying a frequency chirp. The system model thus obtained greatly predicts the closed loop behavior of our feedback based optical tweezers system.

  19. A Plasma Tweezer Concept to De-spin an Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereen, Keon; Datta, Iman; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Tweezer is a new concept for controlled de-spinning and deflection of space bodies without mechanical contact. The method shoots plasma jets or beams at the target from a pair of plasma thrusters located at the end of each lever arm of a ``tweezer'' structure. The main spacecraft body is at the fulcrum point of the tweezer and the target is located between the thrusters. This arrangement cancels out the impulse of two plasma jets on the spacecraft and applies forces on opposite sides of the target. Careful timing and orientation of the jets can then provide the necessary forces to despin and redirect the target. This concept is more efficient than the Ion Beam Shepherd method [C. Bombardelli and J. Pelaez, J. Guid. Control Dyn. (2011)] because it does not require a secondary thruster to cancel momentum and can benefit from angular momentum stored in the spacecraft's initial spin stabilization.

  20. Simple Optoelectronic Feedback in Microwave Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of stabilizing microwave and millimeter-wave oscillators calls for the use of feedback in optoelectronic delay lines characterized by high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The method would extend the applicability of optoelectronic feedback beyond the previously reported class of optoelectronic oscillators that comprise two-port electronic amplifiers in closed loops with high-Q feedback circuits.

  1. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  2. Control and manipulation of cold atoms in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muldoon, Cecilia; Brandt, Lukas; Dong, Jian; Stuart, Dustin; Brainis, Edouard; Himsworth, Matthew; Kuhn, Axel

    2012-07-01

    Neutral atoms trapped by laser light are among the most promising candidates for storing and processing information in a quantum computer or simulator. The application certainly calls for a scalable and flexible scheme for addressing and manipulating the atoms. We have now made this a reality by implementing a fast and versatile method to dynamically control the position of neutral atoms trapped in optical tweezers. The tweezers result from a spatial light modulator (SLM) controlling and shaping a large number of optical dipole-force traps. Trapped atoms adapt to any change in the potential landscape, such that one can rearrange and randomly access individual sites within atom-trap arrays.

  3. Dynamic optical tweezers based assay for monitoring early drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yuquan; Min, Changjun; Zhu, Siwei; Feng, Jie; Yuan, X.-C.

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, a dynamic optical tweezers based assay is proposed and investigated for monitoring early drug resistance with Pemetrexed-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. The validity and stability of the method are verified experimentally in terms of the physical parameters of the optical tweezers system. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is more convenient and faster than traditional techniques when the capability of detecting small variations of the response of cells to a drug is maintained.

  4. Tunable optical tweezers for wavelength-dependent measurements.

    PubMed

    Hester, Brooke; Campbell, Gretchen K; López-Mariscal, Carlos; Filgueira, Carly Levin; Huschka, Ryan; Halas, Naomi J; Helmerson, Kristian

    2012-04-01

    Optical trapping forces depend on the difference between the trap wavelength and the extinction resonances of trapped particles. This leads to a wavelength-dependent trapping force, which should allow for the optimization of optical tweezers systems, simply by choosing the best trapping wavelength for a given application. Here we present an optical tweezer system with wavelength tunability, for the study of resonance effects. With this system, the optical trap stiffness is measured for single trapped particles that exhibit either single or multiple extinction resonances. We include discussions of wavelength-dependent effects, such as changes in temperature, and how to measure them.

  5. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  6. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  7. Telemedicine optoelectronic biomedical data processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosolovska, Vita V.

    2010-08-01

    The telemedicine optoelectronic biomedical data processing system is created to share medical information for the control of health rights and timely and rapid response to crisis. The system includes the main blocks: bioprocessor, analog-digital converter biomedical images, optoelectronic module for image processing, optoelectronic module for parallel recording and storage of biomedical imaging and matrix screen display of biomedical images. Rated temporal characteristics of the blocks defined by a particular triggering optoelectronic couple in analog-digital converters and time imaging for matrix screen. The element base for hardware implementation of the developed matrix screen is integrated optoelectronic couples produced by selective epitaxy.

  8. Trapping and patterning of biological objects using photovoltaic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubera, M.; Elvira, I.; García-Cabañes, A.; Bella, J. L.; Carrascosa, M.

    2016-01-01

    Photovoltaic tweezers are a recently proposed technique for manipulation and patterning of micro- and nano-objects. It is based in the dielectrophoretic forces associated to the electric fields induced by illumination of certain ferroelectrics due to the bulk photovoltaic effect. The technique has been applied to the patterning of dielectric and metal micro- and nano-particles. In this work, we report the use of photovoltaic tweezers to pattern biological objects on LiNbO3:Fe. Specifically, spores and pollen grains and their nanometric fragments have been trapped and patterned. 1D and 2D arrangements have been achieved by deposition in air or from a hexane suspension. The quality of patterns obtained with nanometric fragments is even better than previous results using photovoltaic tweezers with inorganic micro- and nano-particles. In fact, 1D patterns with a period of 2 μm, almost half of the minimum reported period achieved with photovoltaic tweezers, have been obtained with pollen fragments.

  9. Ultrahigh Frequency Lensless Ultrasonic Transducers for Acoustic Tweezers Application

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Lin, Anderson; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Eun Sok; Shung, Kirk Koping

    2014-01-01

    Similar to optical tweezers, a tightly focused ultrasound microbeam is needed to manipulate microparticles in acoustic tweezers. The development of highly sensitive ultrahigh frequency ultrasonic transducers is crucial for trapping particles or cells with a size of a few microns. As an extra lens would cause excessive attenuation at ultrahigh frequencies, two types of 200-MHz lensless transducer design were developed as an ultrasound microbeam device for acoustic tweezers application. Lithium niobate single crystal press-focused (PF) transducer and zinc oxide self-focused transducer were designed, fabricated and characterized. Tightly focused acoustic beams produced by these transducers were shown to be capable of manipulating single microspheres as small as 5 μm two-dimensionally within a range of hundreds of micrometers in distilled water. The size of the trapped microspheres is the smallest ever reported in the literature of acoustic PF devices. These results suggest that these lensless ultrahigh frequency ultrasonic transducers are capable of manipulating particles at the cellular level and that acoustic tweezers may be a useful tool to manipulate a single cell or molecule for a wide range of biomedical applications. PMID:23042219

  10. Spin dynamics and Kondo physics in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yiheng; Lester, Brian J.; Brown, Mark O.; Kaufman, Adam M.; Long, Junling; Ball, Randall J.; Isaev, Leonid; Wall, Michael L.; Rey, Ana Maria; Regal, Cindy A.

    2016-05-01

    We propose to use optical tweezers as a toolset for direct observation of the interplay between quantum statistics, kinetic energy and interactions, and thus implement minimum instances of the Kondo lattice model in systems with few bosonic rubidium atoms. By taking advantage of strong local exchange interactions, our ability to tune the spin-dependent potential shifts between the two wells and complete control over spin and motional degrees of freedom, we design an adiabatic tunneling scheme that efficiently creates a spin-singlet state in one well starting from two initially separated atoms (one atom per tweezer) in opposite spin state. For three atoms in a double-well, two localized in the lowest vibrational mode of each tweezer and one atom in an excited delocalized state, we plan to use similar techniques and observe resonant transfer of two-atom singlet-triplet states between the wells in the regime when the exchange coupling exceeds the mobile atom hopping. Moreover, we argue that such three-atom double-tweezers could potentially be used for quantum computation by encoding logical qubits in collective spin and motional degrees of freedom. Current address: Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.

  11. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  12. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    PubMed Central

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects. PMID:27195446

  13. Multipoint viscosity measurements in microfluidic channels using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Keen, Stephen; Yao, Alison; Leach, Jonathan; Di Leonardo, Roberto; Saunter, Chris; Love, Gordon; Cooper, Jonathan; Padgett, Miles

    2009-07-21

    We demonstrate the technique of multipoint viscosity measurements incorporating the accurate calibration of micron sized particles. We describe the use of a high-speed camera to measure the residual motion of particles trapped in holographic optical tweezers, enabling us to calculate the fluid viscosity at multiple points across the field-of-view of the microscope within a microfluidic system.

  14. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  15. Unraveling chromatin structure using magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, John

    2010-03-01

    The compact, yet dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in regulating gene expression. Although the static structure of chromatin fibers has been studied extensively, the controversy about the higher order folding remains. The compaction of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin has been implicated in the regulation of all DNA processes. To understand the relation between gene regulation and chromatin structure it is essential to uncover the mechanisms by which chromatin fibers fold and unfold. We used magnetic tweezers to probe the mechanical properties of individual nucleosomes and chromatin fibers consisting of a single, well-defined array of 25 nucleosomes. From these studies five major features appeared upon forced extension of chromatin fibers: the elastic stretching of chromatin's higher order structure, the breaking of internucleosomal contacts, unwrapping of the first turn of DNA, unwrapping of the second turn of DNA, and the dissociation of histone octamers. These events occur sequentially at the increasing force. Neighboring nucleosomes stabilize DNA folding into a nucleosome relative to isolated nucleosomes. When an array of nucleosomes is folded into a 30 nm fiber, representing the first level of chromatin condensation, the fiber stretched like a Hookian spring at forces up to 4 pN. Together with a nucleosome-nucleosome stacking energy of 14 kT this points to a solenoid as the underlying topology of the 30 nm fiber. Surprisingly, linker histones do not affect the length or stiffness of the fibers, but stabilize fiber folding up to forces of 7 pN. The stiffness of the folded chromatin fiber points at histone tails that mediate nucleosome stacking. Fibers with a nucleosome repeat length of 167 bp instead of 197 bp are significantly stiffer, consistent with a two-start helical arrangement. The extensive thermal breathing of the chromatin fiber that is a consequence of the observed high compliance provides a structural basis for understanding the

  16. Optoelectronic Apparatus Measures Glucose Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Rovati, Luigi L.

    2003-01-01

    An optoelectronic apparatus has been invented as a noninvasive means of measuring the concentration of glucose in the human body. The apparatus performs polarimetric and interferometric measurements of the human eye to acquire data from which the concentration of glucose in the aqueous humor can be computed. Because of the importance of the concentration of glucose in human health, there could be a large potential market for instruments based on this apparatus.

  17. Optoelectronic assistance for the disabled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Arturo; Almazan, Salvador; Suaste, Ernesto

    1994-06-01

    We show an optoelectronic implementation assistant that will be used by handicapped people. The system works with the head gesture movements of the user. These movements are vectorized with an IR spotlight that is detected by four optocoupled detectors. The information is interpreted and sent to the PC by the serial port. This implementation could be used as a powerful tool between man-machine interaction.

  18. Opto-electronic morphological processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Cheng, Li J. (Inventor); Psaltis, Demetri (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The opto-electronic morphological processor of the present invention is capable of receiving optical inputs and emitting optical outputs. The use of optics allows implementation of parallel input/output, thereby overcoming a major bottleneck in prior art image processing systems. The processor consists of three components, namely, detectors, morphological operators and modulators. The detectors and operators are fabricated on a silicon VLSI chip and implement the optical input and morphological operations. A layer of ferro-electric liquid crystals is integrated with a silicon chip to provide the optical modulation. The implementation of the image processing operators in electronics leads to a wide range of applications and the use of optical connections allows cascadability of these parallel opto-electronic image processing components and high speed operation. Such an opto-electronic morphological processor may be used as the pre-processing stage in an image recognition system. In one example disclosed herein, the optical input/optical output morphological processor of the invention is interfaced with a binary phase-only correlator to produce an image recognition system.

  19. Nanofabrication of Hybrid Optoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibos, Alan Michael

    The material requirements for optoelectronic devices can vary dramatically depending on the application. Often disparate material systems need to be combined to allow for full device functionality. At the nanometer scale, this can often be challenging because of the inherent chemical and structural incompatibilities of nanofabrication. This dissertation concerns the integration of seemingly dissimilar materials into hybrid optoelectronic devices for photovoltaic, plasmonic, and photonic applications. First, we show that combining a single strip of conjugated polymer and inorganic nanowire can yield a nanoscale solar cell, and modeling of optical absorption and exciton diffusion in this device can provide insight into the efficiency of charge separation. Second, we use an on-chip nanowire light emitting diode to pump a colloidal quantum dot coupled to a silver waveguide. The resulting device is an electro-optic single plasmon source. Finally, we transfer diamond waveguides onto near-field avalanche photodiodes fabricated from GaAs. Embedded in the diamond waveguides are nitrogen vacancy color centers, and the mapping of emission from these single-photon sources is demonstrated using our on-chip detectors, eliminating the need for external photodetectors on an optical table. These studies show the promise of hybrid optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale with applications in alternative energy, optical communication, and quantum optics.

  20. Oxide semiconductors for organic opto-electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigdel, Ajaya K.

    In this dissertation, I have introduced various concepts on the modulations of various surface, interface and bulk opto-electronic properties of ZnO based semiconductor for charge transport, charge selectivity and optimal device performance. I have categorized transparent semiconductors into two sub groups depending upon their role in a device. Electrodes, usually 200 to 500 nm thick, optimized for good transparency and transporting the charges to the external circuit. Here, the electrical conductivity in parallel direction to thin film, i.e bulk conductivity is important. And contacts, usually 5 to 50 nm thick, are optimized in case of solar cells for providing charge selectivity and asymmetry to manipulate the built in field inside the device for charge separation and collection. Whereas in Organic LEDs (OLEDs), contacts provide optimum energy level alignment at organic oxide interface for improved charge injections. For an optimal solar cell performance, transparent electrodes are designed with maximum transparency in the region of interest to maximize the light to pass through to the absorber layer for photo-generation, plus they are designed for minimum sheet resistance for efficient charge collection and transport. As such there is need for material with high conductivity and transparency. Doping ZnO with some common elements such as B, Al, Ga, In, Ge, Si, and F result in n-type doping with increase in carriers resulting in high conductivity electrode, with better or comparable opto-electronic properties compared to current industry-standard indium tin oxide (ITO). Furthermore, improvement in mobility due to improvement on crystallographic structure also provide alternative path for high conductivity ZnO TCOs. Implementing these two aspects, various studies were done on gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) transparent electrode, a very promising indium free electrode. The dynamics of the superimposed RF and DC power sputtering was utilized to improve the

  1. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  2. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  3. Functional Carbon Nanocomposite, Optoelectronic, and Catalytic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu Teng

    coatings have been demonstrated. In particular, co-deposited platinum, silicon, and carbon nanomaterial films were fashioned into electronic hydrogen gas sensors, cost efficient dye sensitized solar cell electrodes, and high capacity lithium ion battery anodes. Furthermore, concentrated graphene inks were coated to form aligned graphene-polymer nanocomposites and outstanding carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid semitransparent electrical conductors. Nanocomposite graphene-titanium dioxide catalysts produced from these cellulosic inks have low covalent defect densities and were shown to be approximately two and seven times more active than those based on reduced graphene oxide in photo-oxidation and photo-reduction reactions, respectively. Using a broad range of material characterization techniques, mechanistic insight was obtained using composite photocatalysts fabricated from well defined nanomaterials. For instance, optical spectroscopy and electronic measurements revealed a direct correlation between graphene charge transport performance and composite photochemical activity. Moreover, investigations into multidimensional composites based on 1D carbon nanotubes, 2D graphene, and 2D titanium dioxide nanosheets generated additional mechanistic insight for extending photocatalytic spectral response and increasing reaction specificity. Together, these results demonstrate the versatility of vacuum co-deposition and cellulosic nanomaterial inks for fabricating carbon nanocomposite optoelectronic and energy conversion coatings.

  4. Integrated Optoelectronics for Parallel Microbioanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirbl, Robert; Moynihan, Philip; Bearman, Gregory; Lane, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Miniature, relatively inexpensive microbioanalytical systems ("laboratory-on-achip" devices) have been proposed for the detection of hazardous microbes and toxic chemicals. Each system of this type would include optoelectronic sensors and sensor-output-processing circuitry that would simultaneously look for the optical change, fluorescence, delayed fluorescence, or phosphorescence signatures from multiple redundant sites that have interacted with the test biomolecules in order to detect which one(s) was present in a given situation. These systems could be used in a variety of settings that could include doctors offices, hospitals, hazardous-material laboratories, biological-research laboratories, military operations, and chemical-processing plants.

  5. Simultaneous calibration of optical tweezers spring constant and position detector response.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Antoine; Perronet, Karen; Dulin, David; Villing, André; Bouyer, Philippe; Visscher, Koen; Westbrook, Nathalie

    2010-12-06

    We demonstrate a fast and direct calibration method for systems using a single laser for optical tweezers and particle position detection. The method takes direct advantage of back-focal-plane interferometry measuring not an absolute but a differential position, i.e. the position of the trapped particle relative to the center of the optical tweezers. Therefore, a fast step-wise motion of the optical tweezers yields the impulse response of the trapped particle. Calibration parameters such as the detector's spatial and temporal response and the spring constant of the optical tweezers then follow readily from fitting the measured impulse response.

  6. Nanoscopy of bacterial cells immobilized by holographic optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Diekmann, Robin; Wolfson, Deanna L.; Spahn, Christoph; Heilemann, Mike; Schüttpelz, Mark; Huser, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging non-adherent cells by super-resolution far-field fluorescence microscopy is currently not possible because of their rapid movement while in suspension. Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) enable the ability to freely control the number and position of optical traps, thus facilitating the unrestricted manipulation of cells in a volume around the focal plane. Here we show that immobilizing non-adherent cells by optical tweezers is sufficient to achieve optical resolution well below the diffraction limit using localization microscopy. Individual cells can be oriented arbitrarily but preferably either horizontally or vertically relative to the microscope's image plane, enabling access to sample sections that are impossible to achieve with conventional sample preparation and immobilization. This opens up new opportunities to super-resolve the nanoscale organization of chromosomal DNA in individual bacterial cells. PMID:27958271

  7. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, L. J.; Otto, O.; Skarstam, D. R.; Jahn, S.; Chimerel, C.; Gornall, J. L.; Keyser, U. F.

    2010-11-01

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of λ-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single λ-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbazole-Linked Porphyrin Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Michelin, Clément; Bucher, Léo; Desbois, Nicolas; Gros, Claude P; Piant, Sébastien; Bolze, Frédéric; Fang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Kadish, Karl M

    2015-08-17

    Herein the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, two-photon absorption and electrochemical properties of 3,6-disubstituted carbazole tweezers is reported. A dimer resulting from a Glaser homocoupling was isolated during a Sonogashira coupling reaction between a diethynyl-carbazole spacer and a 5-bromo-triarylporphyrin and the properties of this original compound were compared with the 3,6-disubstituted carbazole bisporphyrin tweezers. The dyads reported herein present a two-photon absorption maximum at 920 nm with two-photon absorption cross-section in the 1200 GM range. Despite a strong linear absorption in the Soret region and moderate fluorescence quantum yield, they both lead to a high brightness reaching 30 000 M(-1)  cm(-1) .

  9. A guide to magnetic tweezers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Rupa; Rybenkov, Valentin

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic force spectroscopy is a rapidly developing single molecule technique that found numerous applications at the interface of physics and biology. Since the invention of the first magnetic tweezers, a number of modifications were incorporated into the approach that helped relieve the limitations of the original design and amplified its strengths. Inventive molecular biology solutions further advanced the technique by expanding its possible applications. In its present form, the method can be applied to single molecules and live cells without resorting to intense sample irradiation, can be easily multiplexed, accommodates multiple DNAs, displays impressive resolution, and allows a remarkable ease in stretching and twisting macromolecules. In this review, we describe the architecture of magnetic tweezers, key requirements to the experimental design and analysis of data, and outline several applications of the method that illustrate its versatility.

  10. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies.

  11. A microscopic steam engine implemented in an optical tweezer.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, Pedro A

    2014-12-19

    The introduction of improved steam engines at the end of the 18th century marked the start of the industrial revolution and the birth of classical thermodynamics. Currently, there is great interest in miniaturizing heat engines, but so far traditional heat engines operating with the expansion and compression of gas have not reached length scales shorter than one millimeter. Here, a micrometer-sized piston steam engine is implemented in an optical tweezer. The piston is a single colloidal microparticle that is driven by explosive vapourization of the surrounding liquid (cavitation bubbles) and by optical forces at a rate between a few tens of Hertz and one kilo-Hertz. The operation of the engine allows to exert impulsive forces with optical tweezers and induce streaming in the liquid, similar to the effect of transducers when driven at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies.

  12. Determination of motility forces on isolated chromosomes with laser tweezers.

    PubMed

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Stilgoe, Alexander B; Bui, Ann A M; Rocha, Yesenia; Cruz, Gladys M; Loke, Vince; Shi, Linda Z; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W

    2014-10-31

    Quantitative determination of the motility forces of chromosomes during cell division is fundamental to understanding a process that is universal among eukaryotic organisms. Using an optical tweezers system, isolated mammalian chromosomes were held in a 1064 nm laser trap. The minimum force required to move a single chromosome was determined to be ≈ 0.8-5 pN. The maximum transverse trapping efficiency of the isolated chromosomes was calculated as ≈ 0.01-0.02. These results confirm theoretical force calculations of ≈ 0.1-12 pN to move a chromosome on the mitotic or meiotic spindle. The verification of these results was carried out by calibration of the optical tweezers when trapping microspheres with a diameter of 4.5-15 µm in media with 1-7 cP viscosity. The results of the chromosome and microsphere trapping experiments agree with optical models developed to simulate trapping of cylindrical and spherical specimens.

  13. Mechanical force characterization in manipulating live cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Sun, Dong; Huang, Wenhao

    2011-02-24

    Laser trapping with optical tweezers is a noninvasive manipulation technique and has received increasing attentions in biological applications. Understanding forces exerted on live cells is essential to cell biomechanical characterizations. Traditional numerical or experimental force measurement assumes live cells as ideal objects, ignoring their complicated inner structures and rough membranes. In this paper, we propose a new experimental method to calibrate the trapping and drag forces acted on live cells. Binding a micro polystyrene sphere to a live cell and moving the mixture with optical tweezers, we can obtain the drag force on the cell by subtracting the drag force on the sphere from the total drag force on the mixture, under the condition of extremely low Reynolds number. The trapping force on the cell is then obtained from the drag force when the cell is in force equilibrium state. Experiments on numerous live cells demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed force calibration approach.

  14. Sensing interactions in the microworld with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacoret, Cécile; Bowman, Richard; Gibson, Graham; Sinan, Haliyo D.; Bergander, Arvid; Carberry, David; Régnier, Stéphane; Padgett, Miles

    2009-08-01

    Optical Tweezers have become a widespread tool in Cell Biology, microengineering and other fields requiring delicate micromanipulation. But for those sensitive tasks, it remains difficult to handle objects without damaging them. As the precision in position and force measurement increase, the richness of information cannot be fully exploited with simple interfaces such as a mouse or a common joystick. For this reason, we propose a haptic force-feedback optical tweezer command and a force-feedback system controlled by one hand. The system combines accurate force measurement using a fast camera and the coupling of these measured forces with a human operator. The overall transparency allows even the feeling of the Brownian motion.

  15. Active-passive calibration of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mario; Richardson, Andrew C; Reihani, S Nader S; Oddershede, Lene B; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    In order to use optical tweezers as a force measuring tool inside a viscoelastic medium such as the cytoplasm of a living cell, it is crucial to perform an exact force calibration within the complex medium. This is a nontrivial task, as many of the physical characteristics of the medium and probe, e.g., viscosity, elasticity, shape, and density, are often unknown. Here, we suggest how to calibrate single beam optical tweezers in a complex viscoelastic environment. At the same time, we determine viscoelastic characteristics such as friction retardation spectrum and elastic moduli of the medium. We apply and test a method suggested [M. Fischer and K. Berg-Sørensen, J. Opt. A, Pure Appl. Opt. 9, S239 (2007)], a method which combines passive and active measurements. The method is demonstrated in a simple viscous medium, water, and in a solution of entangled F-actin without cross-linkers.

  16. Multispectral optical tweezers for molecular diagnostics of single biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Corey; Fardad, Shima; Sincore, Alex; Vangheluwe, Marie; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Optical trapping of single biological cells has become an established technique for controlling and studying fundamental behavior of single cells with their environment without having "many-body" interference. The development of such an instrument for optical diagnostics (including Raman and fluorescence for molecular diagnostics) via laser spectroscopy with either the "trapping" beam or secondary beams is still in progress. This paper shows the development of modular multi-spectral imaging optical tweezers combining Raman and Fluorescence diagnostics of biological cells.

  17. Measurement of angular momentum flux in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Asavei, Theodor; Preece, Daryl; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2011-03-01

    It is well established that a light beam can carry angular momentum and therefore when using optical tweezers it is possible to exert torques to twist or rotate microscopic objects. Both spin and orbital angular momentum can be transferred. This transfer can be achieved using birefringent particles exposed to a Gaussian circularly polarized beam. In this case, a transfer of spin angular momentum will occur. The change in spin, and hence the torque, can be readily measured optically. On the other hand, it is much more challenging to measure orbital angular momentum and torque. Laguerre-Gauss mode decomposition, as used for orbital angular momentum encoding for quantum communication, and rotational frequency shift can be used, and are effective methods in a macro-environment. However, the situation becomes more complicated when a measurement is done on microscale, especially with highly focused laser beams. We review the methods for the measurement of the angular momentum of light in optical tweezers, and the challenges faced when measuring orbital angular momentum. We also demonstrate one possible simple method for a quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum in optical tweezers.

  18. Magnetic tweezers: micromanipulation and force measurement at the molecular level.

    PubMed Central

    Gosse, Charlie; Croquette, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Cantilevers and optical tweezers are widely used for micromanipulating cells or biomolecules for measuring their mechanical properties. However, they do not allow easy rotary motion and can sometimes damage the handled material. We present here a system of magnetic tweezers that overcomes those drawbacks while retaining most of the previous dynamometers properties. Electromagnets are coupled to a microscope-based particle tracking system through a digital feedback loop. Magnetic beads are first trapped in a potential well of stiffness approximately 10(-7) N/m. Thus, they can be manipulated in three dimensions at a speed of approximately 10 microm/s and rotated along the optical axis at a frequency of 10 Hz. In addition, our apparatus can work as a dynamometer relying on either usual calibration against the viscous drag or complete calibration using Brownian fluctuations. By stretching a DNA molecule between a magnetic particle and a glass surface, we applied and measured vertical forces ranging from 50 fN to 20 pN. Similarly, nearly horizontal forces up to 5 pN were obtained. From those experiments, we conclude that magnetic tweezers represent a low-cost and biocompatible setup that could become a suitable alternative to the other available micromanipulators. PMID:12023254

  19. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A.; Wiener, Diane M.; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level.

  20. Theory of optical-tweezers forces near a plane interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Neto, P. A. Maia; Nussenzveig, H. M.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2016-11-01

    Optical-tweezers experiments in molecular and cell biology often take place near the surface of the microscope slide that defines the bottom of the sample chamber. There, as elsewhere, force measurements require force-calibrated tweezers. In bulk, one can calculate the tweezers force from first principles, as recently demonstrated. Near the surface of the microscope slide, this absolute calibration method fails because it does not account for reverberations from the slide of the laser beam scattered by the trapped microsphere. Nor does it account for evanescent waves arising from total internal reflection of wide-angle components of the strongly focused beam. In the present work we account for both of these phenomena. We employ Weyl's angular spectrum representation of spherical waves in terms of real and complex rays and derive a fast-converging recursive series of multiple reflections that describes the reverberations, including also evanescent waves. Numerical simulations for typical setup parameters evaluate these effects on the optical force and trap stiffness, with emphasis on axial trapping. Results are in good agreement with available experimental data. Thus, absolute calibration now applies to all situations encountered in practice.

  1. Optoelectronic Particle-Fallout Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis; Mogan, Paul A.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Moerk, John S.; Haskell, William D.; Cox, Robert B.; Rose, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Portable optoelectronic system monitors fallout of small particles (dust and fibers) onto surface at given location during extended time. Data on accumulated fallout downloaded from system to computer for display and analysis. Typical display is plot of signal proportional to amount of accumulated fallout as function of time and read to determine when contamination occurs. In many cases, possible to establish correlations between accumulations of particles and activities in vicinity. Also capable of signaling alarm in event contamination by fallout exceeds specified level. System made very inexpensively and used to monitor accumulation of dust and fibers associated with motion of air in variety of environments. Phenomena monitored indirectly by use of system might include circulation of air in buildings, and human and animal activity. Also serves as auxiliary intrusion monitor (though probably not real-time alarm) in sealed room because motion of intruder inevitably stirs up some dust.

  2. Construction of supramolecular hyperbranched polymers via the "tweezering directed self-assembly" strategy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu-Kui; Yang, Zhi-Shuai; Lv, Xiao-Qin; Yao, Ri-Sheng; Wang, Feng

    2014-08-28

    A bis-alkynylplatinum(II) terpyridine tweezer-alkynylgold(III) diphenylpyridine guest is shown to maintain the specific complexation in the presence of a B21C7-secondary ammonium salt recognition motif, which facilitates the formation of supramolecular hyperbranched polymers via the "tweezering directed self-assembly" strategy.

  3. Linear microrheology with optical tweezers of living cells 'is not an option'!

    PubMed

    Tassieri, Manlio

    2015-08-07

    Optical tweezers have been successfully adopted as exceptionally sensitive transducers for microrheology studies of complex fluids. Despite the general trend, in this article I explain why a similar approach should not be adopted for microrheology studies of living cells. This conclusion is acheived on the basis of statistical mechanics principles that indicate the unsuitability of optical tweezers for such purpose.

  4. Optoelectronically automated system for carbon nanotubes synthesis via arc-discharge in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Debasis; Brinley, Erik; Kuiry, Suresh C.; McCutchen, Matthew; Seal, Sudipta; Heinrich, Helge; Kabes, Bradley

    2005-03-01

    The method of arc discharge in the solution is unique and inexpensive route for synthesis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon onions, and other carbon nanostructures. Such a method can be used for in situ synthesis of CNTs decorated with nanoparticles. Herein, we report a simple and inexpensive optoelectronically automated system for arc discharge in solution synthesis of CNTs. The optoelectronic system maintains a constant gap between the two electrodes allowing a continuous synthesis of the carbon nanostructures. The system operates in a feedback loop consisting of an electrode-gap detector and an analog electronic unit, as controller. This computerized feeding system of the anode was used for in situ nanoparticles incorporated CNTs. For example, we have successfully decorated CNTs with ceria, silica, and palladium nanoparticles. Characterizations of nanostructures are performed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy.

  5. pH-stimulated concurrent mechanical activation of two DNA "tweezers". A "SET-RESET" logic gate system.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Johann; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Orbach, Ron; Willner, Itamar

    2009-12-01

    A DNA tweezer consisting of C-rich arms is kept in the "closed" form by hybridization of the arms with a nucleic acid cross-linker. At acidic pH (pH = 5.2), the arms are stabilized through the formation of the i-motif, C-quadruplex structures, releasing the cross-linking nucleic acid and transforming the tweezer to its "opened" state. At neutral pH (pH = 7.2), the C-quadruplex structures are dissociated, resulting in the capturing of the cross-linking nucleic acid and the closure of the tweezer. By the reversible treatment of the tweezer at pH = 5.2 and at pH = 7.2, the tweezer system is cycled between the open and closed states, respectively, followed by a FRET process between a fluorophore-quencher pair that labels the tweezer. Also the concurrent activation of two DNA tweezers by pH stimuli is described. The pH-induced opening of one tweezer (tweezer A) by the formation of C-quadruplex (pH = 5.2) and the release of the cross-linking nucleic acid result in the closure of a second tweezer (tweezer B) by the hybridization of the released strand with the arms of tweezer B. The dissociation of the C-quadruplex structures (pH = 7.2) results in the favored translocation of the cross-linking nucleic acid from tweezer B to A. By the cycling of the pH of the system between pH = 5.2 and pH = 7.2, the concurrent opening and closure of the two tweezers are accomplished. The two tweezers system performs a SET-RESET logic gate operation, where the pH stimuli act as inputs.

  6. Interferometer-Controlled Optical Tweezers Constructed for Nanotechnology and Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to control microparticles was developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the nanotechnology project under NASA's Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research Program. A prototype interferometer-controlled optical tweezers was constructed to manipulate scanning probe microscope (SPM) tips. A laser beam passed through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and a microscope objective then produced an optical trap from the coaxial beams. The trap levitated and generated the coarse motion of a 10-mm polystyrene sphere used to simulate a SPM tip. The interference between the beams provided fine control of the forces and moments on the sphere. The interferometer included a piezoelectric-scanned mirror to modulate the interference pattern. The 10-mm sphere was observed to oscillate about 1 mm as the mirror and fringe pattern oscillated. The prototype tweezers proved the feasibility of constructing a more sophisticated interferometer tweezers to hold and manipulate SPM tips. The SPM tips are intended to interrogate and manipulate nanostructures. A more powerful laser will be used to generate multiple traps to hold nanostructures and SPM tips. The vibrating mirror in the interferometer will be replaced with a spatial light modulator. The modulator will allow the optical phase distribution in one leg of the interferometer to be programmed independently at 640 by 480 points for detailed control of the forces and moments. The interference patterns will be monitored to measure the motion of the SPM tips. Neuralnetwork technology will provide fast analysis of the interference patterns for diagnostic purposes and for local or remote feedback control of the tips. This effort also requires theoretical and modeling support in the form of scattering calculations for twin coherent beams from nonspherical particles.

  7. A simple optical tweezers for trapping polystyrene particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiq, Minarni; Nasir, Zulfa; Yogasari, Dwiyana

    2013-09-01

    Optical tweezers is an optical trap. For decades, it has become an optical tool that can trap and manipulate any particle from the very small size like DNA to the big one like bacteria. The trapping force comes from the radiation pressure of laser light which is focused to a group of particles. Optical tweezers has been used in many research areas such as atomic physics, medical physics, biophysics, and chemistry. Here, a simple optical tweezers has been constructed using a modified Leybold laboratory optical microscope. The ocular lens of the microscope has been removed for laser light and digital camera accesses. A laser light from a Coherent diode laser with wavelength λ = 830 nm and power 50 mW is sent through an immersion oil objective lens with magnification 100 × and NA 1.25 to a cell made from microscope slides containing polystyrene particles. Polystyrene particles with size 3 μm and 10 μm are used. A CMOS Thorlabs camera type DCC1545M with USB Interface and Thorlabs camera lens 35 mm are connected to a desktop and used to monitor the trapping and measure the stiffness of the trap. The camera is accompanied by camera software which makes able for the user to capture and save images. The images are analyzed using ImageJ and Scion macro. The polystyrene particles have been trapped successfully. The stiffness of the trap depends on the size of the particles and the power of the laser. The stiffness increases linearly with power and decreases as the particle size larger.

  8. Design of a high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Palanker, Daniel; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Phil; Baccus, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that electrical stimulation of the retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), whereas at least several thousand pixels would be required for functional restoration of sight. This paper presents the design of an optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system with a stimulating pixel density of up to 2500 pix mm(-2) (corresponding geometrically to a maximum visual acuity of 20/80). Requirements on proximity of neural cells to the stimulation electrodes are described as a function of the desired resolution. Two basic geometries of sub-retinal implants providing required proximity are presented: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. To provide for natural eye scanning of the scene, rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera, the system operates similar to 'virtual reality' devices. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted collimated infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for the simultaneous use of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical delivery of visual information to the implant allows for real-time image processing adjustable to retinal architecture, as well as flexible control of image processing algorithms and stimulation parameters.

  9. Design of a high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Phil; Baccus, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that electrical stimulation of the retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), whereas at least several thousand pixels would be required for functional restoration of sight. This paper presents the design of an optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system with a stimulating pixel density of up to 2500 pix mm-2 (corresponding geometrically to a maximum visual acuity of 20/80). Requirements on proximity of neural cells to the stimulation electrodes are described as a function of the desired resolution. Two basic geometries of sub-retinal implants providing required proximity are presented: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. To provide for natural eye scanning of the scene, rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera, the system operates similar to 'virtual reality' devices. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted collimated infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for the simultaneous use of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical delivery of visual information to the implant allows for real-time image processing adjustable to retinal architecture, as well as flexible control of image processing algorithms and stimulation parameters.

  10. Assembly of Acircular SnO2 Rod Using Optical Tweezers and Laser Curing of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanhyuk Nam,; Daehie Hong,; Jaeik Chung,; Jaewon Chung,; Insung Hwang,; Jongheun Lee,; Seunghwan Ko,; Costas P. Grigoropoulos,

    2010-05-01

    Acicular tin dioxide (SnO2) rods (1-2 μm in diameter, 5-20 μm long) were assembled and fused on the patterned gold electrode by an optical tweezer. In addition, the electrical contact between the assembled SnO2 rod and the gold electrode was improved by laser curing of gold nanoparticles and the subsequent sintering in the oven. Here, the nanoparticles covered the entire area of the assembled SnO2 rod by evaporating a droplet of nanoparticle solution dripped on the assembled SnO2 rod. Subsequently, nanoparticles near the contact area between the rod and electrode were locally cured by direct heating with a focused infrared laser beam, which induced desorption of the surface monolayer. Therefore, the cured gold nanoparticles could be sintered after the non-laser irradiated nanoparticles were cleaned by the initial solvent application. Without sintering of the nanoparticles, the resistance of the assembled SnO2 rod was measured over several MΩ. After the nanoparticle sintering it could be reduced to a few hundred kΩ, which was in agreement with the resistance of the assembled SnO2 rod.

  11. Assembly of Acircular SnO2 Rod Using Optical Tweezers and Laser Curing of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Chanhyuk; Hong, Daehie; Chung, Jaeik; Chung, Jaewon; Hwang, Insung; Lee, Jongheun; Ko, Seunghwan; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2010-05-01

    Acicular tin dioxide (SnO2) rods (1-2 µm in diameter, 5-20 µm long) were assembled and fused on the patterned gold electrode by an optical tweezer. In addition, the electrical contact between the assembled SnO2 rod and the gold electrode was improved by laser curing of gold nanoparticles and the subsequent sintering in the oven. Here, the nanoparticles covered the entire area of the assembled SnO2 rod by evaporating a droplet of nanoparticle solution dripped on the assembled SnO2 rod. Subsequently, nanoparticles near the contact area between the rod and electrode were locally cured by direct heating with a focused infrared laser beam, which induced desorption of the surface monolayer. Therefore, the cured gold nanoparticles could be sintered after the non-laser irradiated nanoparticles were cleaned by the initial solvent application. Without sintering of the nanoparticles, the resistance of the assembled SnO2 rod was measured over several MΩ. After the nanoparticle sintering it could be reduced to a few hundred kΩ, which was in agreement with the resistance of the assembled SnO2 rod.

  12. Analysis of micro-fluidic tweezers in the Stokes regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Longhua; Ding, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Nanowire fluidic tweezers have been developed to capture and manipulate micro objects. The fluidic trapping force and the fluid field are important to achieve accurate control, but have not been fully understood yet. Utilizing singularity method, we construct the exact velocity field to analyze flows induced by a spheroid nanowire tumbling in the Stokes regime. To further explore the trapping, we analyze the trajectories of rigid or deformable microspheres near the tumbling nanowire using regularized Stokeslet method. The fluid structure, the trapping phenomenon and mechanism, and precise relation about trapping with the geometry will be presented. YD is sponsored by the Recruitment Program of Global Young Experts (China).

  13. Optical Tweezers for Sample Fixing in Micro-Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amenitsch, H.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Laggner, P.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.; Garbin, V.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, Ch.

    2007-01-19

    In order to manipulate, characterize and measure the micro-diffraction of individual structural elements down to single phospholipid liposomes we have been using optical tweezers (OT) combined with an imaging microscope. We were able to install the OT system at the microfocus beamline ID13 at the ESRF and trap clusters of about 50 multi-lamellar liposomes (< 10 {mu}m large cluster). Further we have performed a scanning diffraction experiment with a 1 micrometer beam to demonstrate the fixing capabilities and to confirm the size of the liposome cluster by X-ray diffraction.

  14. Advances in magnetic tweezers for single molecule and cell biophysics.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Devrim; Lee, Gil U

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MTW) enable highly accurate forces to be transduced to molecules to study mechanotransduction at the molecular or cellular level. We review recent MTW studies in single molecule and cell biophysics that demonstrate the flexibility of this technique. We also discuss technical advances in the method on several fronts, i.e., from novel approaches for the measurement of torque to multiplexed biophysical assays. Finally, we describe multi-component nanorods with enhanced optical and magnetic properties and discuss their potential as future MTW probes.

  15. Single molecule studies of helicases with magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hodeib, Samar; Raj, Saurabh; Manosas, M; Zhang, Weiting; Bagchi, Debjani; Ducos, Bertrand; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Helicases are a broad family of enzymes that perform crucial functions in DNA replication and in the maintenance of DNA and RNA integrity. A detailed mechanical study of helicases on DNA and RNA is possible using single molecule manipulation methods. Among those, magnetic tweezers (or traps) present a convenient, moderate throughput assay (tens of enzymes can be monitored simultaneously) that allow for high resolution (single base-pair) studies of these enzymes in various conditions and on various substrates (double and single stranded DNA and RNA). Here we discuss various implementation of the basic assay relevant for these studies.

  16. Optical tweezers studies of transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Lisica, Ana; Grill, Stephan W

    2017-02-21

    Transcription is the first step in the expression of genetic information and it is carried out by large macromolecular enzymes called RNA polymerases. Transcription has been studied for many years and with a myriad of experimental techniques, ranging from bulk studies to high-resolution transcript sequencing. In this review, we emphasise the advantages of using single-molecule techniques, particularly optical tweezers, to study transcription dynamics. We give an overview of the latest results in the single-molecule transcription field, focusing on transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases. Finally, we evaluate recent quantitative models that describe the biophysics of RNA polymerase translocation and backtracking dynamics.

  17. Opto-Electronic Oscillator and its Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental results of a new class of microwave oscillators called opto-electronic oscillators (OEO). We discuss techniques of achieving high stability single mode operation and demonstrate the applications of OEO in photonic communication systems.

  18. Optical tweezers: Characterization and systems approach to high bandwidth force estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Hullas

    In recent times, the hard boundaries between classical fields of sciences have almost disappeared. There is a cross-pollination of ideas between sciences, engineering and mathematics. This work investigates a modern tool of micro-manipulation of microscopic particles that is used primarily by bio-physicists and bio-chemists for single cell, single molecule studies. This tool called the Optical Tweezers can trap microscopic dielectric particles using radiation pressure of light. Optical tweezers is increasingly being used in bio-assays as it provides a means to observe bio-molecules non invasively and offers a spatial resolution in nanometers and force resolution in femto-Newtons at millisecond timescales. In this work, physics governing the operating principle behind optical tweezers is presented, followed by a step by step procedure to build an optical tweezers system having measurement and actuation capability along with a controller logic for feedback implementation. The working of optical tweezers system is presented using a spring mass damper model and the traditional methods of optical tweezers characterization are discussed. A comprehensive view of Optical tweezers is then presented from a system theoretic perspective, underlying the limitations of traditional methods of tweezers characterization that are based on the first principle. The role of feedback in Optical tweezers is presented along with the fundamental limitations that the plant model imposes on optical tweezers performance to be used as a force sensor for fast dynamics input force. The purpose of optical tweezers as a pico-newton force probe is emphasized and a classical controls based method to improve the bandwidth of force estimation using an ad-hoc approach of system inversion is presented. The efficacy of system inversion based method in improving the force probe capability of feedback enhanced optical tweezers is validated by experimental results. It is shown experimentally that the system

  19. Transparent heat-spreader for optoelectronic applications

    DOEpatents

    Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo

    2014-11-04

    An optoelectronic cooling system is equally applicable to an LED collimator or a photovoltaic solar concentrator. A transparent fluid conveys heat from the optoelectronic chip to a hollow cover over the system aperture. The cooling system can keep a solar concentrator chip at the same temperature as found for a one-sun flat-plate solar cell. Natural convection or forced circulation can operate to convey heat from the chip to the cover.

  20. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices. [Review

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given.

  1. Metal oxides for optoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinge; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Metal oxides (MOs) are the most abundant materials in the Earth's crust and are ingredients in traditional ceramics. MO semiconductors are strikingly different from conventional inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and III-V compounds with respect to materials design concepts, electronic structure, charge transport mechanisms, defect states, thin-film processing and optoelectronic properties, thereby enabling both conventional and completely new functions. Recently, remarkable advances in MO semiconductors for electronics have been achieved, including the discovery and characterization of new transparent conducting oxides, realization of p-type along with traditional n-type MO semiconductors for transistors, p-n junctions and complementary circuits, formulations for printing MO electronics and, most importantly, commercialization of amorphous oxide semiconductors for flat panel displays. This Review surveys the uniqueness and universality of MOs versus other unconventional electronic materials in terms of materials chemistry and physics, electronic characteristics, thin-film fabrication strategies and selected applications in thin-film transistors, solar cells, diodes and memories.

  2. Metamaterial mirrors in optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Esfandyarpour, Majid; Garnett, Erik C; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Michael D; Brongersma, Mark L

    2014-07-01

    The phase reversal that occurs when light is reflected from a metallic mirror produces a standing wave with reduced intensity near the reflective surface. This effect is highly undesirable in optoelectronic devices that use metal films as both electrical contacts and optical mirrors, because it dictates a minimum spacing between the metal and the underlying active semiconductor layers, therefore posing a fundamental limit to the overall thickness of the device. Here, we show that this challenge can be circumvented by using a metamaterial mirror whose reflection phase is tunable from that of a perfect electric mirror (φ = π) to that of a perfect magnetic mirror (φ = 0). This tunability in reflection phase can also be exploited to optimize the standing wave profile in planar devices to maximize light-matter interaction. Specifically, we show that light absorption and photocurrent generation in a sub-100 nm active semiconductor layer of a model solar cell can be enhanced by ∼20% over a broad spectral band.

  3. Metal oxides for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xinge; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Metal oxides (MOs) are the most abundant materials in the Earth's crust and are ingredients in traditional ceramics. MO semiconductors are strikingly different from conventional inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and III-V compounds with respect to materials design concepts, electronic structure, charge transport mechanisms, defect states, thin-film processing and optoelectronic properties, thereby enabling both conventional and completely new functions. Recently, remarkable advances in MO semiconductors for electronics have been achieved, including the discovery and characterization of new transparent conducting oxides, realization of p-type along with traditional n-type MO semiconductors for transistors, p-n junctions and complementary circuits, formulations for printing MO electronics and, most importantly, commercialization of amorphous oxide semiconductors for flat panel displays. This Review surveys the uniqueness and universality of MOs versus other unconventional electronic materials in terms of materials chemistry and physics, electronic characteristics, thin-film fabrication strategies and selected applications in thin-film transistors, solar cells, diodes and memories.

  4. Invited article: a review of haptic optical tweezers for an interactive microworld exploration.

    PubMed

    Pacoret, Cécile; Régnier, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first review of haptic optical tweezers, a new technique which associates force feedback teleoperation with optical tweezers. This technique allows users to explore the microworld by sensing and exerting picoNewton-scale forces with trapped microspheres. Haptic optical tweezers also allow improved dexterity of micromanipulation and micro-assembly. One of the challenges of this technique is to sense and magnify picoNewton-scale forces by a factor of 10(12) to enable human operators to perceive interactions that they have never experienced before, such as adhesion phenomena, extremely low inertia, and high frequency dynamics of extremely small objects. The design of optical tweezers for high quality haptic feedback is challenging, given the requirements for very high sensitivity and dynamic stability. The concept, design process, and specification of optical tweezers reviewed here are focused on those intended for haptic teleoperation. In this paper, two new specific designs as well as the current state-of-the-art are presented. Moreover, the remaining important issues are identified for further developments. The initial results obtained are promising and demonstrate that optical tweezers have a significant potential for haptic exploration of the microworld. Haptic optical tweezers will become an invaluable tool for force feedback micromanipulation of biological samples and nano- and micro-assembly parts.

  5. Developments of pulse laser assist optical tweezers (PLAT) for in vivo manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Saki; Sugiura, Tadao; Minato, Kotaro

    2011-02-01

    Optical tweezers is a technique to trap and to manipulate micron sized objects under a microscope by radiation pressure force exerted by a laser beam. Optical tweezers has been utilized for single-molecular measurements of force exerted by molecular interactions and for cell palpation. To extend applications of optical tweezers we have developed a novel optical tweezers system combined with a pulse laser. We utilize a pulsed laser (Q-switched Nd: YAG laser, wavelength of 1064 nm) to assist manipulations by conventional optical tweezers achieved by a continuous wave (CW) laser. The pulsed laser beam is introduced into the same optics for conventional optical tweezers. In principle, instantaneous radiation force is proportional to instantaneous power of laser beam. As a result, pulsed laser beam generates strong instantaneous force on an object to be manipulated. If the radiation force becomes strong enough to get over an obstacle structure and/or to be released from adhesion, the object will be free from these difficulties. We have named this technique as Pulse Laser beam Assisted optical Tweezers (PLAT). We have successfully demonstrated to manipulate objects surface on a living cell for "in vivo manipulation."

  6. Use of optical tweezers to probe epithelial mechanosensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mechanosensation mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of disease states. Specifically in renal tubules, the primary cilium and associated mechanosensitive ion channels are hypothesized to play a role in water and salt homeostasis, with relevant disease states including polycystic kidney disease and hypertension. Previous experiments investigating ciliary-mediated cellular mechanosensation have used either fluid flow chambers or micropipetting to elicit a biological response. The interpretation of these experiments in terms of the ``ciliary hypothesis'' has been difficult due the spatially distributed nature of the mechanical disturbance-several competing hypotheses regarding possible roles of primary cilium, glycocalyx, microvilli, cell junctions, and actin cytoskeleton exist. I report initial data using optical tweezers to manipulate individual primary cilia in an attempt to elicit a mechanotransduction response-specifically, the release of intracellular calcium. The advantage of using laser tweezers over previous work is that the applied disturbance is highly localized. I find that stimulation of a primary cilium elicits a response, while stimulation of the apical surface membrane does not. These results lend support to the hypothesis that the primary cilium mediates transduction of mechanical strain into a biochemical response in renal epithelia.

  7. Multiplexed single-molecule force proteolysis measurements using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Arjun S; Chai, Jack; Dunn, Alexander R

    2012-07-25

    The generation and detection of mechanical forces is a ubiquitous aspect of cell physiology, with direct relevance to cancer metastasis(1), atherogenesis(2) and wound healing(3). In each of these examples, cells both exert force on their surroundings and simultaneously enzymatically remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). The effect of forces on ECM has thus become an area of considerable interest due to its likely biological and medical importance(4-7). Single molecule techniques such as optical trapping(8), atomic force microscopy(9), and magnetic tweezers(10,11) allow researchers to probe the function of enzymes at a molecular level by exerting forces on individual proteins. Of these techniques, magnetic tweezers (MT) are notable for their low cost and high throughput. MT exert forces in the range of ~1-100 pN and can provide millisecond temporal resolution, qualities that are well matched to the study of enzyme mechanism at the single-molecule level(12). Here we report a highly parallelizable MT assay to study the effect of force on the proteolysis of single protein molecules. We present the specific example of the proteolysis of a trimeric collagen peptide by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1); however, this assay can be easily adapted to study other substrates and proteases.

  8. Multiplying optical tweezers force using a micro-lever.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Lin, Chin-Te; Liu, Yi-Jui; Hwang, Jiann-Lih; Chung, Tien-Tung; Baldeck, Patrice L

    2011-10-10

    This study presents a photo-driven micro-lever fabricated to multiply optical forces using the two-photon polymerization 3D-microfabrication technique. The micro-lever is a second class lever comprising an optical trapping sphere, a beam, and a pivot. A micro-spring is placed between the short and long arms to characterize the induced force. This design enables precise manipulation of the micro-lever by optical tweezers at the micron scale. Under optical dragging, the sphere placed on the lever beam moves, resulting in torque that induces related force on the spring. The optical force applied at the sphere is approximately 100 to 300 pN, with a laser power of 100 to 300 mW. In this study, the optical tweezers drives the micro-lever successfully. The relationship between the optical force and the spring constant can be determined by using the principle of leverage. The arm ratio design developed in this study multiplies the applied optical force by 9. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation of spring property.

  9. Precision Assembly of Complex Cellular Microenvironments using Holographic Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Glen R.; Britchford, Emily; Upton, Thomas; Ware, James; Gibson, Graham M.; Devaud, Yannick; Ehrbar, Martin; Padgett, Miles; Allen, Stephanie; Buttery, Lee D.; Shakesheff, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The accurate study of cellular microenvironments is limited by the lack of technologies that can manipulate cells in 3D at a sufficiently small length scale. The ability to build and manipulate multicellular microscopic structures will facilitate a more detailed understanding of cellular function in fields such as developmental and stem cell biology. We present a holographic optical tweezers based technology to accurately generate bespoke cellular micro-architectures. Using embryonic stem cells, 3D structures of varying geometries were created and stabilized using hydrogels and cell-cell adhesion methods. Control of chemical microenvironments was achieved by the temporal release of specific factors from polymer microparticles positioned within these constructs. Complex co-culture micro-environmental analogues were also generated to reproduce structures found within adult stem cell niches. The application of holographic optical tweezers-based micromanipulation will enable novel insights into biological microenvironments by allowing researchers to form complex architectures with sub-micron precision of cells, matrices and molecules. PMID:25716032

  10. Use of optical tweezers to probe epithelial mechanosensation.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mechanosensation mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of disease states. Specifically in renal tubules, the primary cilium and associated mechanosensitive ion channels are hypothesized to play a role in water and salt homeostasis, with relevant disease states including polycystic kidney disease and hypertension. Previous experiments investigating ciliary-mediated cellular mechanosensation have used either fluid flow chambers or micropipetting to elicit a biological response. The interpretation of these experiments in terms of the "ciliary hypothesis" has been difficult due the spatially distributed nature of the mechanical disturbance-several competing hypotheses regarding possible roles of primary cilium, glycocalyx, microvilli, cell junctions, and actin cytoskeleton exist. I report initial data using optical tweezers to manipulate individual primary cilia in an attempt to elicit a mechanotransduction response-specifically, the release of intracellular calcium. The advantage of using laser tweezers over previous work is that the applied disturbance is highly localized. I find that stimulation of a primary cilium elicits a response, while stimulation of the apical surface membrane does not. These results lend support to the hypothesis that the primary cilium mediates transduction of mechanical strain into a biochemical response in renal epithelia.

  11. Inducing trauma into neuroblastoma cells and synthetic neural networks using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Patrick William

    The laser tweezers have become a very useful tool in the fields of physics, chemistry, and biology. My intent is to use the laser tweezers to induce trauma into neuroblastoma cells, cells that resemble neural cells when treated with retinoic acid, to try to surmise what happens when neural cells and networks are disrupted or destroyed. The issues presented will deal with the obtaining, maintenance, and differentiation of the cells, as well as the inner operations of the laser tweezers themselves, and what kind of applications it has been applied to, as well as to my work in this project.

  12. Optical tweezers assisted quantitative phase imaging led to thickness mapping of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) allows dynamic mapping of optical path length of microscopic samples with high temporal and axial resolution. However, decoupling of the geometric thickness from the refractive index in phase measurements is challenging. Here, we report use of optical tweezers combined with QPM for decoupling geometric thickness from the refractive index. This is demonstrated by orienting the microscopic sample (red blood cell) by optical tweezers and imaging the phase at various orientations. Since optical tweezers can orient wide variety of micro and nanoscopic objects, this integrated method can be employed to accurately determine their physical properties.

  13. A simple method for evaluating the trapping performance of acoustic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Ho Lam, Kwok; Kirk Shung, K.

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a rapid and simple method to evaluate the trapping performance of high frequency focused ultrasonic transducers for acoustic tweezer applications. The method takes into consideration the friction between the particle to be trapped and the surface that it resides on. As a result it should be more reliable and accurate than the methods proposed previously. The trapping force produced by a 70-MHz press-focused transducer was measured to evaluate the performance of this approach. This method demonstrates its potential in optimizing the excitation conditions for acoustic tweezer applications and the design of acoustic tweezers.

  14. A simple method for evaluating the trapping performance of acoustic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Ho Lam, Kwok; Kirk Shung, K

    2013-02-25

    The purpose of this paper is to present a rapid and simple method to evaluate the trapping performance of high frequency focused ultrasonic transducers for acoustic tweezer applications. The method takes into consideration the friction between the particle to be trapped and the surface that it resides on. As a result it should be more reliable and accurate than the methods proposed previously. The trapping force produced by a 70-MHz press-focused transducer was measured to evaluate the performance of this approach. This method demonstrates its potential in optimizing the excitation conditions for acoustic tweezer applications and the design of acoustic tweezers.

  15. Polymer light harvesting composites for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sam-Shajing; Wang, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Polymer based optoelectronic composites and thin film devices exhibit great potential in space applications due to their lightweight, flexible shape, high photon absorption coefficients, and robust radiation tolerance in space environment. Polymer/dye composites appear promising for optoelectronics applications due to potential enhancements in both light harvesting and charge separation. In this study, the optoelectronic properties of a series of molecular dyes paired with a conjugated polymer Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) were investigated. Specifically, the solution PL quenching coefficients (Ksv) of dye/polymer follows a descending order from dyes of Chloro(protoporphyrinato)iron(III) (Hemin), Protoporphyrin, to meso-Tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine (TCPP). In optoelectronic devices made of the P3HT/dye/PCBM composites, the short circuit current densities Jsc as well as the overall power conversion efficiencies (PCE) also follow a descending order from Hemin, Protoporphyrin, to TCPP, despite Hemin exhibits the intermediate polymer/dye LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) offset and lowest absorption coefficient as compared to the other two dyes, i.e., the cell optoelectronic efficiency did not follow the LUMO offsets which are the key driving forces for the photo induced charge separations. This study reveals that too large LUMO offset or electron transfer driving force may result in smaller PL quenching and optoelectronic conversion efficiency, this could be another experimental evidence for the Marcus electron transfer model, particularly for the Marcus `inverted region'. It appears an optimum electron transfer driving force or strong PL quenching appears more critical than absorption coefficient for optoelectronic conversion devices.

  16. TweezPal - Optical tweezers analysis and calibration software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Natan

    2010-11-01

    Optical tweezers, a powerful tool for optical trapping, micromanipulation and force transduction, have in recent years become a standard technique commonly used in many research laboratories and university courses. Knowledge about the optical force acting on a trapped object can be gained only after a calibration procedure which has to be performed (by an expert) for each type of trapped objects. In this paper we present TweezPal, a user-friendly, standalone Windows software tool for optical tweezers analysis and calibration. Using TweezPal, the procedure can be performed in a matter of minutes even by non-expert users. The calibration is based on the Brownian motion of a particle trapped in a stationary optical trap, which is being monitored using video or photodiode detection. The particle trajectory is imported into the software which instantly calculates position histogram, trapping potential, stiffness and anisotropy. Program summaryProgram title: TweezPal Catalogue identifier: AEGR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 891 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 792 653 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Borland Delphi Computer: Any PC running Microsoft Windows Operating system: Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, Vista, 7 RAM: 12 Mbytes Classification: 3, 4.14, 18, 23 Nature of problem: Quick, robust and user-friendly calibration and analysis of optical tweezers. The optical trap is calibrated from the trajectory of a trapped particle undergoing Brownian motion in a stationary optical trap (input data) using two methods. Solution method: Elimination of the experimental drift in position data. Direct calculation of the trap stiffness from the positional

  17. Electrode compositions

    DOEpatents

    Block, J.; Fan, X.

    1998-10-27

    An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

  18. Electrode compositions

    DOEpatents

    Block, Jacob; Fan, Xiyun

    1998-01-01

    An electrode composition for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5-4.5 volts.

  19. Automated transportation of single cells using robot-tweezer manipulation system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Songyu; Sun, Dong

    2011-08-01

    Manipulation of biological cells becomes increasingly important in biomedical engineering to address challenge issues in cell-cell interaction, drug discovery, and tissue engineering. Significant demand for both accuracy and productivity in cell manipulation highlights the need for automated cell transportation with integrated robotics and micro/nano manipulation technologies. Optical tweezers, which use highly focused low-power laser beams to trap and manipulate particles at micro/nanoscale, have emerged as an essential tool for manipulating single cells. In this article, we propose to use a robot-tweezer manipulation system to solve the problem of automatic transportation of biological cells, where optical tweezers function as special robot end effectors. Dynamics equation of the cell in optical tweezers is analyzed. A closed-loop controller is designed for transporting and positioning cells. Experiments are performed on live cells to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in effective cell positioning.

  20. Cell patterning via diffraction-induced optoelectronic dielectrophoresis force on an organic photoconductive chip.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Mo; Tseng, Sheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Po; Hsu, Long; Liu, Cheng-Hsien

    2013-10-07

    A laser diffraction-induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) phenomenon for the patterning and manipulation of individual HepG2 cells and polystyrene beads via positive/negative DEP forces is reported in this paper. The optoelectronic substrate was fabricated using an organic photoconductive material, TiOPc, via a spin-coating process on an indium tin oxide glass surface. A piece of square aperture array grid grating was utilized to transform the collimating He-Ne laser beam into the multi-spot diffraction pattern which forms the virtual electrodes as the TiOPc-coating surface was illuminated by the multi-spot diffraction light pattern. HepG2 cells were trapped at the spot centers and polystyrene beads were trapped within the dim region of the illuminated image. The simulation results of light-induced electric field and a Fresnel diffraction image illustrated the distribution of trapped microparticles. The HepG2 morphology change, adhesion, and growth during a 5-day culture period demonstrated the cell viability through our manipulation. The power density inducing DEP phenomena, the characteristics of the thin TiOPc coating layer, the operating ac voltage/frequency, the sandwiched medium, the temperature rise due to the ac electric fields and the illuminating patterns are discussed in this paper. This concept of utilizing laser diffraction images to generate virtual electrodes on our TiOPc-based optoelectronic DEP chip extends the applications of optoelectronic dielectrophoretic manipulation.

  1. Perovskite Materials: Solar Cell and Optoelectronic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid organometallic trihalide perovskites are promising candidates in the applications for next-generation, high-performance, low-cost optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaics, light emitting diodes, and photodetectors. Particularly, the solar cells based on this type of materials have reached 22% lab scale power conversion efficiency in only about seven years, comparable to the other thin film photovoltaic technologies. Hybrid perovskite materials not only exhibit superior optoelectronic properties, but also show many interesting physical properties such as ion migration and defect physics, which may allow the exploration of more device functionalities. In this article, the fundamental understanding of the interrelationships between crystal structure, electronic structure, and material properties is discussed. Various chemical synthesis and processing methods for superior device performance in solar cells and optoelectronic devices are reviewed.

  2. Bio-inspired networks for optoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Huang, Yuanlin; Li, Ruopeng; Peng, Qiang; Luo, Junyi; Pei, Ke; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Gao, Jinwei

    2014-11-28

    Modern optoelectronics needs development of new materials characterized not only by high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, but also by mechanical strength, and flexibility. Recent advances employ grids of metallic micro- and nanowires, but the overall performance of the resulting material composites remains unsatisfactory. In this work, we propose a new strategy: application of natural scaffoldings perfected by evolution. In this context, we study two bio-inspired networks for two specific optoelectronic applications. The first network, intended for solar cells, light sources and similar devices, has a quasi-fractal structure and is derived directly from a chemically extracted leaf venation system. The second network is intended for touch screens and flexible displays, and is obtained by metalizing a spider's silk web. We demonstrate that each of these networks attain an exceptional optoelectonic and mechanical performance for its intended purpose, providing a promising direction in the development of more efficient optoelectronic devices.

  3. Bio-inspired networks for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bing; Huang, Yuanlin; Li, Ruopeng; Peng, Qiang; Luo, Junyi; Pei, Ke; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Gao, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Modern optoelectronics needs development of new materials characterized not only by high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, but also by mechanical strength, and flexibility. Recent advances employ grids of metallic micro- and nanowires, but the overall performance of the resulting material composites remains unsatisfactory. In this work, we propose a new strategy: application of natural scaffoldings perfected by evolution. In this context, we study two bio-inspired networks for two specific optoelectronic applications. The first network, intended for solar cells, light sources and similar devices, has a quasi-fractal structure and is derived directly from a chemically extracted leaf venation system. The second network is intended for touch screens and flexible displays, and is obtained by metalizing a spider’s silk web. We demonstrate that each of these networks attain an exceptional optoelectonic and mechanical performance for its intended purpose, providing a promising direction in the development of more efficient optoelectronic devices.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boquist, Carl W.; Marchant, David D.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic-metal composite suitable for use in a high-temperature environment consists of a refractory ceramic matrix containing 10 to 50 volume percent of a continuous high-temperature metal reinforcement. In a specific application of the composite, as an electrode in a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the one surface of the electrode which contacts the MHD fluid may have a layer of varying thickness of nonreinforced refractory ceramic for electrode temperature control. The side walls of the electrode may be coated with a refractory ceramic insulator. Also described is an electrode-insulator system for a MHD channel.

  5. Manipulation and spectroscopy of a single particle by use of white-light optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Shi, Kebin; Liu, Zhiwen

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, three-dimensional (3D) trapping and manipulation of microscopic objects by use of supercontinuum white light generated from photonic crystal fibers. Furthermore, we show that the supercontinuum white-light optical tweezers used have the unique capability to perform optical scattering spectroscopy of a single 3D trapped object over a broad wavelength range. These novel tweezers can potentially open a promising avenue toward simultaneous manipulation and characterization of microscopic objects.

  6. Chromosomal analysis and identification based on optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy: comment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Jimmy; Jørgensen, Thomas M.

    2007-05-01

    The authors of the work: ‘Chromosomal analysis and identification based on optical tweezers and raman spectroscopy’ [Opt. Express 14, 5385 (2006], claim that they have been able to identify and differentiate between three human chromosomes with an optical-tweezer Raman Spectroscopic experimental (LTRS) set-up. The results and conclusions as they are presented in the paper are questionable, however, when the spectral data and data analysis are studied in greater detail.

  7. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  8. Peculiarities of RBC aggregation studied by double trap optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Zhdanov, Alexander G.; Rykova, Sofia Yu.; Krasnova, Tatyana N.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2010-04-01

    Aggregation peculiarities of red blood cells (RBCs) in autologous plasma are studied using double trap optical tweezers technique. The positions of RBCs are controlled with submicrometer accuracy by two optical traps formed by strongly focused laser beams (λ=1064 nm). Quantitative measurements of interaction forces between RBCs in pair aggregates are performed. Depending on the RBCs aggregation force, four different end-points of disaggregation induced by optical trap movement are revealed. Analysis of experimental force dependence on the distance between two RBCs during disaggregation is in a good agreement with the model of ring-shaped interaction surfaces of RBCs in pair aggregate. Aggregation velocities measured are shown to be strongly different for healthy and pathologic (System Lupus Erythematosis - SLE) blood samples.

  9. Probing multiscale mechanics of collagen with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Lam, Norman H.; Altindal, Tuba; Wieczorek, Andrew; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-09-01

    How the molecular structure of the structural, extracellular matrix protein collagen correlates with its mechanical properties at different hierarchical structural levels is not known. We demonstrate the utility of optical tweezers to probe collagen's mechanical response throughout its assembly hierarchy, from single molecule force-extension measurements through microrheology measurements on solutions of collagen molecules, collagen fibrillar gels and gelatin. These experiments enable the determination of collagen's flexibility, mechanics, and timescales and strengths of interaction at different levels of hierarchy, information critical to developing models of how collagen's physiological function and stability are influenced by its chemical composition. By investigating how the viscoelastic properties of collagen are affected by the presence of telopeptides, protein domains that strongly influence fibril formation, we demonstrate that these play a role in conferring transient elasticity to collagen solutions.

  10. Automated analysis of single cells using Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Casabella, S; Scully, P; Goddard, N; Gardner, P

    2016-01-21

    In recent years, significant progress has been made into the label-free detection and discrimination of individual cancer cells using Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy (LTRS). However, the majority of examples reported have involved manual trapping of cells, which is time consuming and may lead to different cell lines being analysed in discrete batches. A simple, low-cost microfluidic flow chamber is introduced which allows single cells to be optically trapped and analysed in an automated fashion, greatly reducing the level of operator input required. Two implementations of the flow chamber are discussed here; a basic single-channel device in which the fluid velocity is controlled manually, and a dual-channel device which permits the automated capture and analysis of multiple cell lines with no operator input. Results are presented for the discrimination of live epithelial prostate cells and lymphocytes, together with a consideration of the consequences of traditional 'batch analysis' typically used for LTRS of live cells.

  11. Kinect the dots: 3D control of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Lucy; Preece, Daryl; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2013-07-01

    Holographically generated optical traps confine micron- and sub-micron sized particles close to the center of focused light beams. They also provide a way of trapping multiple particles and moving them in three dimensions. However, in many systems the user interface is not always advantageous or intuitive especially for collaborative work and when depth information is required. We discuss and evaluate a set of multi-beam optical tweezers that utilize off the shelf gaming technology to facilitate user interaction. We use the Microsoft Kinect sensor bar as a way of getting the user input required to generate arbitrary optical force fields and control optically trapped particles. We demonstrate that the system can also be used for dynamic light control.

  12. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-08-15

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 deg., smaller angles give a full 2{pi} phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  13. Dynamic excitations in membranes induced by optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ziv, R; Moses, E; Nelson, P

    1998-01-01

    We present the phenomenology of transformations in lipid bilayers that are excited by laser tweezers. A variety of dynamic instabilities and shape transformations are observed, including the pearling instability, expulsion of vesicles, and more exotic ones, such as the formation of passages. Our physical picture of the laser-membrane interaction is based on the generation of tension in the bilayer and loss of surface area. Although tension is the origin of the pearling instability, it does not suffice to explain expulsion of vesicles, where we observe opening of giant pores and creeping motion of bilayers. We present a quantitative theoretical framework to understand most of the observed phenomenology. The main hypothesis is that lipid is pulled into the optical trap by the familiar dielectric effect, is disrupted, and finally is repackaged into an optically unresolvable suspension of colloidal particles. This suspension, in turn, can produce osmotic pressure and depletion forces, driving the observed transformations. PMID:9649388

  14. Using Optical Tweezers to Study Cell Mechanics during Airway Reopening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Huseyin; Wang, Jing; Ghadiali, Samir; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Patients suffering from the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) must be mechanically ventilated in order to survive. However, these ventilation protocols may generate injurious hydrodynamic stresses especially during low tidal volume (VT) ventilation when the flow of micron-sized air bubbles displace the surrounding liquid. In-vitro studies in our lab revealed that microbubble flows can severally damage lung epithelial cells (EC). The degree of injury was elevated for sub-confluent monolayers in small channel heights. Under these conditions, the micromechanics of individual EC may influence the degree of cellular injury. To investigate the role of cell mechanics, we used an oscillating Optical Tweezers (OT) technique to measure the intrinsic mechanical properties of EC before and after the flow of microbubbles. Knowledge of how the EC's micromechanical properties influence cell viability may lead to the development of novel treatment therapies that enhance the EC's ability to withstand injurious hydrodynamic stresses during ventilation treatment.

  15. The effect of immersion oil in optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Ali; Reihani, S Nader S

    2011-08-01

    Optimized optical tweezers are of great importance for biological micromanipulation. In this paper, we present a detailed electromagnetic-based calculation of the spatial intensity distribution for a laser beam focused through a high numerical aperture objective when there are several discontinuities in the optical pathway of the system. For a common case of 3 interfaces we have shown that 0.01 increase in the refractive index of the immersion medium would shift the optimal trapping depth by 3-4 μm (0.2-0.6 μm) for aqueous (air) medium. For the first time, We have shown that the alteration of the refractive index of the immersion medium can be also used in aerosol trapping provided that larger increase in the refractive index is considered.

  16. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  17. Extending the Range for Force Calibration in Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J.; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  18. Extending the range for force calibration in magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates.

  19. A new optoelectronic reversible storage medium (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basov, N. G.; Plotnikov, A. F.; Popov, Iu. M.; Seleznev, V. N.

    1987-03-01

    The characteristics of reversible storage media designed for optical data recording (such as thermomagnetic media used in disk storages) are analyzed. Consideration is given to a new class of optoelectronic media based on MNOS structures. It is shown that the data recording density in these media can reach 100,000 bit/sq mm and that the energy of the light pulse which controls the recording will not exceed 10 to the -12th J. The use of these media broadens the possibilities for optical programming and redundancy. The data exchange rate in the optoelectronic memory can reach 10 to the 11th bit/s.

  20. Opto-electronic oscillators having optical resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Xiaotian Steve (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Systems and techniques of incorporating an optical resonator in an optical part of a feedback loop in opto-electronic oscillators. This optical resonator provides a sufficiently long energy storage time and hence to produce an oscillation of a narrow linewidth and low phase noise. Certain mode matching conditions are required. For example, the mode spacing of the optical resonator is equal to one mode spacing, or a multiplicity of the mode spacing, of an opto-electronic feedback loop that receives a modulated optical signal and to produce an electrical oscillating signal.

  1. Optoelectronic semiconductor device and method of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yi; Zhu, Jia; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Fan, Shanhui; Yu, Zongfu

    2014-11-25

    An optoelectronic device comprising an optically active layer that includes a plurality of domes is presented. The plurality of domes is arrayed in two dimensions having a periodicity in each dimension that is less than or comparable with the shortest wavelength in a spectral range of interest. By virtue of the plurality of domes, the optoelectronic device achieves high performance. A solar cell having high energy-conversion efficiency, improved absorption over the spectral range of interest, and an improved acceptance angle is presented as an exemplary device.

  2. Investigation of inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers for 3D manipulation and force sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxiang; Yu, Miao

    2009-08-03

    Optical tweezers provide a versatile tool in biological and physical researches. Optical tweezers based on optical fibers are more flexible and ready to be integrated when compared with those based on microscope objectives. In this paper, the three-dimensional (3D) trapping ability of an inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers is demonstrated. The trapping efficiency with respect to displacement is experimentally calibrated along two dimensions. The system is studied numerically using a modified ray-optics model. The spring constants obtained in the experiment are predicted by simulations. It is found both experimentally and numerically that there is a critical value for the fiber inclination angle to retain the 3D trapping ability. The inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers are demonstrated to be more robust to z-axis misalignment than the counter-propagating fiber optical tweezers, which is a special case of th former when the fiber inclination angle is 90 masculine. This inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers can serve as both a manipulator and a force sensor in integrated systems, such as microfluidic systems and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  3. MatLab program for precision calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2004-06-01

    Optical tweezers are used as force transducers in many types of experiments. The force they exert in a given experiment is known only after a calibration. Computer codes that calibrate optical tweezers with high precision and reliability in the ( x, y)-plane orthogonal to the laser beam axis were written in MatLab (MathWorks Inc.) and are presented here. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number of factors that affect this power spectrum. First, cross-talk between channels in 2D position measurements is tested for, and eliminated if detected. Then, the Lorentzian power spectrum that results from the Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck theory, is fitted to the low-frequency part of the experimental spectrum in order to obtain an initial guess for parameters to be fitted. Finally, a more complete theory is fitted, a theory that optionally accounts for the frequency dependence of the hydrodynamic drag force and hydrodynamic interaction with a nearby cover slip, for effects of finite sampling frequency (aliasing), for effects of anti-aliasing filters in the data acquisition electronics, and for unintended "virtual" filtering caused by the position detection system. Each of these effects can be left out or included as the user prefers, with user-defined parameters. Several tests are applied to the experimental data during calibration to ensure that the data comply with the theory used for their interpretation: Independence of x- and y-coordinates, Hooke's law, exponential distribution of power spectral values, uncorrelated Gaussian scatter of residual values. Results are given with statistical errors and covariance matrix. Program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier: ADTV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV Computer for

  4. Oxide Heteroepitaxy for Flexible Optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Bitla, Yugandhar; Chen, Ching; Lee, Hsien-Chang; Do, Thi Hien; Ma, Chun-Hao; Qui, Le Van; Huang, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wen-Wei; Chang, Li; Chiu, Po-Wen; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2016-11-30

    The emerging technological demands for flexible and transparent electronic devices have compelled researchers to look beyond the current silicon-based electronics. However, fabrication of devices on conventional flexible substrates with superior performance are constrained by the trade-off between processing temperature and device performance. Here, we propose an alternative strategy to circumvent this issue via the heteroepitaxial growth of transparent conducting oxides (TCO) on the flexible mica substrate with performance comparable to that of their rigid counterparts. With the examples of ITO and AZO as a case study, a strong emphasis is laid upon the growth of flexible yet epitaxial TCO relying muscovite's superior properties compared to those of conventional flexible substrates and its compatibility with the present fabrication methods. Besides excellent optoelectro-mechanical properties, an additional functionality of high-temperature stability, normally lacking in the current state-of-the-art transparent flexitronics, is provided by these heterostructures. These epitaxial TCO electrodes with good chemical and thermal stabilities as well as mechanical durability can significantly contribute to the field of flexible, light-weight, and portable smart electronics.

  5. High resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loudin, Jim; Dinyari, Rostam; Huie, Phil; Butterwick, Alex; Peumans, Peter; Palanker, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Electronic retinal prostheses seek to restore sight in patients with retinal degeneration by delivering pulsed electric currents to retinal neurons via an array of microelectrodes. Most implants use inductive or optical transmission of information and power to an intraocular receiver, with decoded signals subsequently distributed to retinal electrodes through an intraocular cable. Surgical complexity could be minimized by an "integrated" prosthesis, in which both power and data are delivered directly to the stimulating array without any discrete components or cables. We present here an integrated retinal prosthesis system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a video goggle projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths (~ 900 nm). Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by specially optimized series photodiode circuits. Prostheses of three different pixel densities (16 pix/mm2, 64 pix/mm2, and 256 pix/mm2) have been designed, simulated, and prototyped. Retinal tissue response to subretinal implants made of various materials has been investigated in RCS rats. The resulting prosthesis can provide sufficient charge injection for high resolution retinal stimulation without the need for implantation of any bulky discrete elements such as coils or tethers. In addition, since every pixel functions independently, pixel arrays may be placed separately in the subretinal space, providing visual stimulation to a larger field of view.

  6. A transparent electrode based on a metal nanotrough network.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Kong, Desheng; Ruan, Zhichao; Hsu, Po-Chun; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Zongfu; Carney, Thomas J; Hu, Liangbing; Fan, Shanhui; Cui, Yi

    2013-06-01

    Transparent conducting electrodes are essential components for numerous flexible optoelectronic devices, including touch screens and interactive electronics. Thin films of indium tin oxide-the prototypical transparent electrode material-demonstrate excellent electronic performances, but film brittleness, low infrared transmittance and low abundance limit suitability for certain industrial applications. Alternatives to indium tin oxide have recently been reported and include conducting polymers, carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, although flexibility is greatly improved, the optoelectronic performance of these carbon-based materials is limited by low conductivity. Other examples include metal nanowire-based electrodes, which can achieve sheet resistances of less than 10Ω □(-1) at 90% transmission because of the high conductivity of the metals. To achieve these performances, however, metal nanowires must be defect-free, have conductivities close to their values in bulk, be as long as possible to minimize the number of wire-to-wire junctions, and exhibit small junction resistance. Here, we present a facile fabrication process that allows us to satisfy all these requirements and fabricate a new kind of transparent conducting electrode that exhibits both superior optoelectronic performances (sheet resistance of ~2Ω □(-1) at 90% transmission) and remarkable mechanical flexibility under both stretching and bending stresses. The electrode is composed of a free-standing metallic nanotrough network and is produced with a process involving electrospinning and metal deposition. We demonstrate the practical suitability of our transparent conducting electrode by fabricating a flexible touch-screen device and a transparent conducting tape.

  7. Using optoelectronic sensors in the system PROTEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Piszczek, M.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of optoelectronic devices for human protection in rescue activity. The system consists of an ground robots with predicted sensor. The multisensor construction of the system ensures significant improvement of security of using on-situ like chemical or explosive sensors. The article show a various scenario of use for individual sensor in system PROTEUS.

  8. Functionalized polyfluorenes for use in optoelectronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Chichak, Kelly Scott [Clifton Park, NY; Lewis, Larry Neil [Scotia, NY; Cella, James Anthony [Clifton Park, NY; Shiang, Joseph John [Niskayuna, NY

    2011-11-01

    The present invention relates to process comprising reacting a polyfluorenes comprising at least one structural group of formula I ##STR00001## with an iridium (III) compound of formula II ##STR00002## The invention also relates to the polyfluorenes, which are products of the reaction, and the use of the polyfluorenes in optoelectronic devices.

  9. Efficient Optoelectronics Teaching in Undergraduate Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matin, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The Engineering Department's vision for undergraduate education for the next century is to develop a set of laboratory experiences that are thoughtfully sequenced and integrated to promote the full development of students in all courses. Optoelectronics is one of the most important and most demanding courses in Electrical and Computer Engineering.…

  10. Optoelectronic Shaft-Angle Encoder Tolerates Misalignments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic shaft-angle encoder measures angle of rotation of shaft with high precision while minimizing effects of eccentricity and other misalignments. Grooves on disk serve as reference marks to locate reading heads and measure increments of rotation of disk. Shaft-angle encoder, resembling optical compact-disk drive, includes two tracking heads illuminating grooves on disk and measures reflections from them.

  11. Silicon photomultiplier-based optoelectronic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yishuo, Song; Xiaoping, Du; Zhaoyang, Zeng; Shengjun, Wang

    2013-09-01

    Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based optoelectronic mixing (OEM) is studied for the first time. The validity of SiPM-based OEM is experimentally verified. Compared with the avalanche photodiodes-based OEM, the SiPM-based OEM is less noisy and easy to realize for its low voltage operation and high responsivity.

  12. Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits For Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psaltis, D.; Katz, J.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lin, S. H.; Nouhi, A.

    1990-01-01

    Many threshold devices placed on single substrate. Integrated circuits containing optoelectronic threshold elements developed for use as planar arrays of artificial neurons in research on neural-network computers. Mounted with volume holograms recorded in photorefractive crystals serving as dense arrays of variable interconnections between neurons.

  13. GaAs optoelectronic neuron arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Steven; Grot, Annette; Luo, Jiafu; Psaltis, Demetri

    1993-01-01

    A simple optoelectronic circuit integrated monolithically in GaAs to implement sigmoidal neuron responses is presented. The circuit integrates a light-emitting diode with one or two transistors and one or two photodetectors. The design considerations for building arrays with densities of up to 10,000/sq cm are discussed.

  14. Automated multi-parametric sorting of micron-sized particles via multi-trap laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaputa, Daniel S.

    The capabilities of laser tweezers have rapidly expanded since the first demonstration by Ashkin and co-workers in 1970 of the ability to trap particles using optical energy. Laser tweezers have been used to measure piconewton forces in many biological and material science application, sort bacteria, measure DNA bond strength, and even perform microsurgery. The laser tweezers system developed for this dissertation foreshadows the next generation of laser tweezer systems that provide automated particle sorted based upon multiple criteria. Many laser tweezer sorting applications today entail the operator sorting cells from a bulk sample, one by one. This dissertation demonstrates the technologies of pattern recognition and image processing that allow for an entire microscope slide to be sorted without any operator intervention. We already live in an automated world where the cars we drive are built by machines instead of humans. The technology is there, and the only factors limiting the advancements of fully automated biological instrumentation is the lack of developers with the appropriate knowledge sets. This dissertation introduces the concept of sorting particles via a multi-parametric approach where several parameters such as size, fluorescence, and Raman spectra are used as sorting criteria. Since the advent of laser tweezers, several groups have demonstrated the ability to sort cells and other particle by size, or by fluorescence, or by any other parameter, but to our knowledge there does not exist a laser tweezer sorting system that can sort particles based upon multiple parameters. Sorting via a single parameter can be a severe limitation as the method lacks the robustness and class specificity that exists when sorting based upon multiple parameters. Simply put, it makes more sense to determine the worth of a baseball card by considering it's condition as well as it's age, rather then solely upon its condition. By adding another parameter such as the name of

  15. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  16. Fiber optical tweezers for microscale and nanoscale particle manipulation and force sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    Optical tweezers have been an important tool in biology and physics for studying single molecules and colloidal systems. Most of current optical tweezers are built with microscope objectives, which are: i) expensive, ii) bulky and hard to integrate, iii) sensitive to environmental fluctuations, iv) limited in terms of working distances from the substrate, and v) rigid with the requirements on the substrate (transparent substrate made with glass and with a fixed thickness). These limitations of objective-based optical tweezers prevent them from being miniaturized. Fiber optical tweezers can provide a solution for cost reduction and miniaturization, and these optical tweezers can be potentially used in microfluidic systems. However, the existing fiber optical tweezers have the following limitations: i) low trapping efficiency due to weakly focused beams, ii) lack of the ability to control the positions of multiple particles simultaneously, and iii) limited functionalities. The overall objective of this dissertation work is to further the fundamental understanding of fiber optical tweezers through experimental study and modeling, and to develop novel fiber optical tweezers systems to enhance the capability and functionalities of fiber optical tweezers as microscale and nanoscale manipulators/sensors. The contributions of this dissertation work are summarized as follows. i) An enhanced understanding of the inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers (DFOTs) system has been achieved. Stable three dimensional (3D) optical trapping of a single micron-sized particle has been experimentally demonstrated. This is the first time that the trapping efficiency has been calibrated and the stiffness of the trap has been obtained in the experiments, which has been carried out by using two methods: the drag force method and power spectrum analysis. Such calibration enables the system to be used as a picoNewton-level force sensor in addition to a particle manipulator. The influence of

  17. Quantitative guidelines for force calibration through spectral analysis of magnetic tweezers data.

    PubMed

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H

    2010-08-09

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools that can be used to study the kinetics and mechanics of a variety of enzymes and their complexes. Force spectroscopy, for example, can be used to control the force applied to a single molecule and thereby facilitate the investigation of real-time nucleic acid-protein interactions. In magnetic tweezers, which offer straightforward control and compatibility with fluorescence measurements or parallel tracking modes, force-measurement typically relies on the analysis of positional fluctuations through video microscopy. Significant errors in force estimates, however, may arise from incorrect spectral analysis of the Brownian motion in the magnetic tweezers. Here we investigated physical and analytical optimization procedures that can be used to improve the range over which forces can be reliably measured. To systematically probe the limitations of magnetic tweezers spectral analysis, we have developed a magnetic tweezers simulator, whose outcome was validated with experimental data. Using this simulator, we evaluate methods to correctly perform force experiments and provide guidelines for correct force calibration under configurations that can be encountered in typical magnetic tweezers experiments.

  18. Bulky melamine-based Zn-porphyrin tweezer as a CD probe of molecular chirality.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Ana G; Vantomme, Ghislaine; Negrón-Abril, Yashira L; Lubian, Elisa; Saielli, Giacomo; Menegazzo, Ileana; Cordero, Roselynn; Proni, Gloria; Nakanishi, Koji; Carofiglio, Tommaso; Berova, Nina

    2011-10-01

    The transfer of chirality from a guest molecule to an achiral host is the subject of significant interest especially when, upon chiral induction, the chiroptical response of the host/guest complex can effectively report the absolute configuration (AC) of the guest. For more than a decade, dimeric metalloporphyrin hosts (tweezers) have been successfully applied as chirality probes for determination of the AC for a wide variety of chiral synthetic compounds and natural products. The objective of this study is to investigate the utility of a new class of melamine-bridged Zn-porphyrin tweezers as sensitive AC reporters. A combined approach based on an experimental CD analysis and a theoretical prediction of the prevailing interporphyrin helicity demonstrates that these tweezers display favorable properties for chiral recognition. Herein, we discuss the application of the melamine-bridged tweezer to the chiral recognition of a diverse set of chiral guests, such as 1,2-diamines, α-amino-esters and amides, secondary alcohols, and 1,2-amino-alcohols. The bulky periphery and the presence of a rigid porphyrin linkage lead, in some cases, to a more enhanced CD sensitivity than that reported earlier with other tweezers.

  19. Automatic real time evaluation of red blood cell elasticity by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Diógenes S.; Silva, Diego C. N.; Williams, Ajoke J.; Bezerra, Marcos A. C.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2015-05-01

    Optical tweezers have been used to trap, manipulate, and measure individual cell properties. In this work, we show that the association of a computer controlled optical tweezers system with image processing techniques allows rapid and reproducible evaluation of cell deformability. In particular, the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) plays a key role in the transport of oxygen through the blood microcirculation. The automatic measurement processes consisted of three steps: acquisition, segmentation of images, and measurement of the elasticity of the cells. An optical tweezers system was setup on an upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera and a motorized XYZ stage, computer controlled by a Labview platform. On the optical tweezers setup, the deformation of the captured RBC was obtained by moving the motorized stage. The automatic real-time homemade system was evaluated by measuring RBCs elasticity from normal donors and patients with sickle cell anemia. Approximately 150 erythrocytes were examined, and the elasticity values obtained by using the developed system were compared to the values measured by two experts. With the automatic system, there was a significant time reduction (60 × ) of the erythrocytes elasticity evaluation. Automated system can help to expand the applications of optical tweezers in hematology and hemotherapy.

  20. Numerical study of the properties of optical vortex array laser tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2013-11-04

    Chu et al. constructed a kind of Ince-Gaussian modes (IGM)-based vortex array laser beams consisting of p x p embedded optical vortexes from Ince-Gaussian modes, IG(e)(p,p) modes [Opt. Express 16, 19934 (2008)]. Such an IGM-based vortex array laser beams maintains its vortex array profile during both propagation and focusing, and is applicable to optical tweezers. This study uses the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to study the properties of the IGM-based vortex array laser tweezers while it traps dielectric particles. This study calculates the resultant force exerted on the spherical dielectric particles of different sizes situated at the IGM-based vortex array laser beam waist. Numerical results show that the number of trapping spots of a structure light (i.e. IGM-based vortex laser beam), is depended on the relation between the trapped particle size and the structure light beam size. While the trapped particle is small comparing to the beam size of the IGM-based vortex array laser beams, the IGM-based vortex array laser beams tweezers are suitable for multiple traps. Conversely, the tweezers is suitable for single traps. The results of this study is useful to the future development of the vortex array laser tweezers applications.

  1. Probing DNA helicase kinetics with temperature-controlled magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Gollnick, Benjamin; Carrasco, Carolina; Zuttion, Francesca; Gilhooly, Neville S; Dillingham, Mark S; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2015-03-18

    Motor protein functions like adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis or translocation along molecular substrates take place at nanometric scales and consequently depend on the amount of available thermal energy. The associated rates can hence be investigated by actively varying the temperature conditions. In this article, a thermally controlled magnetic tweezers (MT) system for single-molecule experiments at up to 40 °C is presented. Its compact thermostat module yields a precision of 0.1 °C and can in principle be tailored to any other surface-coupled microscopy technique, such as tethered particle motion (TPM), nanopore-based sensing of biomolecules, or super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument is used to examine the temperature dependence of translocation along double-stranded (ds)DNA by individual copies of the protein complex AddAB, a helicase-nuclease motor involved in dsDNA break repair. Despite moderately lower mean velocities measured at sub-saturating ATP concentrations, almost identical estimates of the enzymatic reaction barrier (around 21-24 k(B)T) are obtained by comparing results from MT and stopped-flow bulk assays. Single-molecule rates approach ensemble values at optimized chemical energy conditions near the motor, which can withstand opposing loads of up to 14 piconewtons (pN). Having proven its reliability, the temperature-controlled MT described herein will eventually represent a routinely applied method within the toolbox for nano-biotechnology.

  2. Improved antireflection coated microspheres for biological applications of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Valentina; Sonnberger, Aaron; Abdosamadi, Mohammad K.; McDonald, Craig; Schäffer, Erik; McGloin, David

    2016-09-01

    The success of optical tweezers in cellular biology1 is in part due to the wide range of forces that can be applied, from femto- to hundreds of pico-Newtons; nevertheless extending the range of applicable forces to the nanoNewton regime opens access to a new set of phenomena that currently lie beyond optical manipulation. A successful approach to overcome the conventional limits on trapping forces involves the optimization of the trapped probes. Jannasch et al.2 demonstrated that an anti-reflective shell of nanoporous titanium dioxide (aTiO2, nshell = 1.75) on a core particle made out of titanium dioxide in the anatase phase (cTiO2, ncore = 2.3) results in trappable microspheres capable to reach forces above 1 nN. Here we present how the technique can be further improved by coating the high refractive index microspheres with an additional anti-reflective shell made out of silica (SiO2). This external shell not only improves the trap stability for microspheres of different sizes, but also enables the use of functionalization techniques already established for commercial silica beads in biological experiments. We are also investigating the use of these new microspheres as probes to measure adhesion forces between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) in effector T-Cells and will present preliminary results comparing standard and high-index beads.

  3. A holographic optical tweezers module for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, J.; Serati, R.; Masterson, H.; Serati, Steve

    2016-09-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is an unparalleled laboratory for studying colloidal suspensions in microgravity. The first colloidal experiments on the ISS involved passive observation of suspended particles, and current experiments are now capable of observation under controlled environmental conditions; for example, under heating or under externally applied magnetic or electric fields. Here, we describe the design of a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) module for the ISS, with the goal of giving ISS researchers the ability to actively control 3D arrangements of particles, allowing them to initialize and perform repeatable experiments. We discuss the design's modifications to the basic HOT module hardware to allow for operation in a high-vibration, microgravity environment. We also discuss the module's planned particle tracking and routing capabilities, which will enable the module to remotely perform pre-programmed colloidal and biological experiments. The HOT module's capabilities can be expanded or upgraded through software alone, providing a unique platform for optical trapping researchers to test new tweezing beam configurations and routines in microgravity.

  4. Application of laser tweezers to passive microrheology of collagen solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Forde, Nancy R.

    2009-05-01

    Rheology is the field that can describe both viscous and elastic properties of a material in response to applied force or deformation. Passive microrheology (PMR) is a technique in which motion of a particle arising from thermal fluctuations is measured on nanometer length scales. One experimental approach to PMR uses optical tweezers, which trap and probe μm-sized particles, located within the material, at a high bandwidth. In this study, viscoelastic properties of solutions of collagen are characterized. To do this, we have probed the power spectral density of fluctuations of 1-μm-diameter microspheres optically trapped in acidic solutions of varying concentration of collagen type I (0, 0.5, and 1 mg/ml). The results show evidence that the behaviour of the solutions becomes increasingly non-Newtonian at high protein concentration. We attribute this to the presence of the viscoelastic polymer. This introduces frequency dependence to the complex modulus of the solution which is used to characterize the elasticity and viscosity of these systems.

  5. Use of shape induced birefringence for rotation in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asavei, Theodor; Nieminen, Timo A.; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2010-08-01

    Since a light beam can carry angular momentum (AM) it is possible to use optical tweezers to exert torques to twist or rotate microscopic objects. The alignment torque exerted on an elongated particle in a polarized light field represents a possible torque mechanism. In this situation, although some exchange of orbital angular momentum occurs, scattering calculations show that spin dominates, and polarization measurements allow the torque to be measured with good accuracy. This phenomenon can be explained by considering shape birefringence with an induced polarizability tensor. Another example of a shape birefringent object is a microsphere with a cylindrical cavity. Its design is based on the fact that due to its symmetry a sphere does not rotate in an optical trap, but one could break the symmetry by designing an object with a spherical outer shape with a non spherical cavity inside. The production of such a structure can be achieved using a two photon photo-polymerization technique. We show that using this technique, hollow spheres with varying sizes of the cavity can be successfully constructed. We have been able to demonstrate rotation of these spheres with cylindrical cavities when they are trapped in a laser beam carrying spin angular momentum. The torque efficiency achievable in this system can be quantified as a function of a cylinder diameter. Because they are biocompatible and easily functionalized, these structures could be very useful in work involving manipulation, control and probing of individual biological molecules and molecular motors.

  6. Bio-syncretic tweezers actuated by microorganisms: modeling and analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Xie, S X; Wang, W X; Xi, N; Wang, Y C; Liu, L Q

    2016-09-28

    Advancements in micro-/nano-technology have led to the development of micro-manipulators. However, some challenges remain; for instance, the efficiency, precision and flexibility of micro-manipulators restrain their applications. This paper proposes a bio-tweezer system to flexibly manipulate micro-objects with bio-actuation via local light-induced high-concentration microorganisms in two different manipulation modes: light-spot induced mode and geometric shape-induced mode. Depending on the shape of micro-objects, either 2-dimensional translation or 1-dimensional rotation can be achieved. Based on the Langevin equation, a mathematical model considering both hydrodynamics and mimicked Brownian motion is proposed to analyze the bio-manipulation performance of the microorganisms; the model was validated by experiments to translate micro-particles in a two-dimensional plane and to rotate a micro-gear structure around its axis. This paper will aid in the development of micro-manipulators and the quantitative understanding of micro-/nano-manipulation actuated by microorganisms.

  7. Magnetic tweezers force calibration for molecules that exhibit conformational switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, David R.; Saleh, Omar A.

    2016-09-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution magnetic tweezers experiments allow for the direct calibration of pulling forces applied to short biomolecules. In one class of experiments, a force is applied to a structured RNA or protein to induce an unfolding transition; when the force is maintained at particular values, the molecule can exhibit conformational switching between the folded and unfolded states or between intermediate states. Here, we analyze the degree to which common force calibration approaches, involving the fitting of model functions to the Allan variance or power spectral density of the bead trajectory, are biased by this conformational switching. We find significant effects in two limits: that of large molecular extension changes between the two states, in which alternative fitting functions must be used, and that of very fast switching kinetics, in which the force calibration cannot be recovered due to the slow diffusion time of the magnetic bead. We use simulations and high-resolution RNA hairpin data to show that most biophysical experiments do not occur in either of these limits.

  8. Probing DNA Helicase Kinetics with Temperature‐Controlled Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Gollnick, Benjamin; Carrasco, Carolina; Zuttion, Francesca; Gilhooly, Neville S.; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Motor protein functions like adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis or translocation along molecular substrates take place at nanometric scales and consequently depend on the amount of available thermal energy. The associated rates can hence be investigated by actively varying the temperature conditions. In this article, a thermally controlled magnetic tweezers (MT) system for single‐molecule experiments at up to 40 °C is presented. Its compact thermostat module yields a precision of 0.1 °C and can in principle be tailored to any other surface‐coupled microscopy technique, such as tethered particle motion (TPM), nanopore‐based sensing of biomolecules, or super‐resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument is used to examine the temperature dependence of translocation along double‐stranded (ds)DNA by individual copies of the protein complex AddAB, a helicase‐nuclease motor involved in dsDNA break repair. Despite moderately lower mean velocities measured at sub‐saturating ATP concentrations, almost identical estimates of the enzymatic reaction barrier (around 21–24 k B T) are obtained by comparing results from MT and stopped‐flow bulk assays. Single‐molecule rates approach ensemble values at optimized chemical energy conditions near the motor, which can withstand opposing loads of up to 14 piconewtons (pN). Having proven its reliability, the temperature‐controlled MT described herein will eventually represent a routinely applied method within the toolbox for nano‐biotechnology. PMID:25400244

  9. Particle interaction measurements using laser tweezers optical trapping.

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Timothy P.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Grillet, Anne M.; Molecke, Ryan A.

    2008-08-01

    Laser tweezers optical trapping provides a unique noninvasive capability to trap and manipulate particles in solution at the focal point of a laser beam passed through a microscope objective. Additionally, combined with image analysis, interaction forces between colloidal particles can be quantitatively measured. By looking at the displacement of particles within the laser trap due to the presence of a neighboring particle or looking at the relative diffusion of two particles held near each other by optical traps, interparticle interaction forces ranging from pico- to femto-Newtons can be measured. Understanding interaction forces is critical for predicting the behavior of particle dispersions including dispersion stability and flow rheology. Using a new analysis method proposed by Sainis, Germain, and Dufresne, we can simultaneously calculate the interparticle velocity and particle diffusivity which allows direct calculation of the interparticle potential for the particles. By applying this versatile tool, we measure difference in interactions between various phospholipid bilayers that have been coated onto silica spheres as a new type of solid supported liposome. We measure bilayer interactions of several cell membrane lipids under various environmental conditions such as pH and ionic strength and compare the results with those obtained for empty liposomes. These results provide insight into the role of bilayer fluctuations in liposome fusion, which is of fundamental interest to liposome based drug delivery schemes.

  10. Temperature control and measurement with tunable femtosecond optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2016-09-01

    We present the effects of wavelength dependent temperature rise in a femtosecond optical tweezers. Our experiments involve the femtosecond trapping laser tunable from 740-820 nm at low power 25 mW to cause heating in the trapped volume within a homogeneous solution of sub micro-molar concentration of IR dye. The 780 nm high repetition rate laser acts as a resonant excitation source which helps to create the local heating effortlessly within the trapping volume. We have used both position autocorrelation and equipartion theorem to evaluate temperature at different wavelength having different absorption coefficient. Fixing the pulse width in the temporal domain gives constant bandwidth at spatial domain, which makes our system behave as a tunable temperature rise device with high precision. This observation leads us to calculate temperature as well as viscosity within the vicinity of the trapping zone. A mutual energy transfer occurs between the trapped bead and solvents that leads to transfer the thermal energy of solvents into the kinetic energy of the trap bead and vice-versa. Thus hot solvated molecules resulting from resonant and near resonant excitation of trapping wavelength can continuously dissipate heat to the trapped bead which will be reflected on frequency spectrum of Brownian noise exhibited by the bead. Temperature rise near the trapping zone can significantly change the viscosity of the medium. We observe temperature rise profile according to its Gaussian shaped absorption spectrum with different wavelength.

  11. Membrane tether formation from outer hair cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiwei; Anvari, Bahman; Takashima, Masayoshi; Brecht, Peter; Torres, Jorge H; Brownell, William E

    2002-01-01

    Optical tweezers were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the outer hair cell (OHC) plasma membrane by pulling tethers with 4.5-microm polystyrene beads. Tether formation force and tether force were measured in static and dynamic conditions. A greater force was required for tether formations from OHC lateral wall (499 +/- 152 pN) than from OHC basal end (142 +/- 49 pN). The difference in the force required to pull tethers is consistent with an extensive cytoskeletal framework associated with the lateral wall known as the cortical lattice. The apparent plasma membrane stiffness, estimated under the static conditions by measuring tether force at different tether length, was 3.71 pN/microm for OHC lateral wall and 4.57 pN/microm for OHC basal end. The effective membrane viscosity was measured by pulling tethers at different rates while continuously recording the tether force, and estimated in the range of 2.39 to 5.25 pN x s/microm. The viscous force most likely results from the viscous interactions between plasma membrane lipids and the OHC cortical lattice and/or integral membrane proteins. The information these studies provide on the mechanical properties of the OHC lateral wall is important for understanding the mechanism of OHC electromotility. PMID:11867454

  12. Toward automated formation of microsphere arrangements using multiplexed optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekaran, Keshav; Bollavaram, Manasa; Banerjee, Ashis G.

    2016-09-01

    Optical tweezers offer certain advantages such as multiplexing using a programmable spatial light modulator, flexibility in the choice of the manipulated object and the manipulation medium, precise control, easy object release, and minimal object damage. However, automated manipulation of multiple objects in parallel, which is essential for efficient and reliable formation of micro-scale assembly structures, poses a difficult challenge. There are two primary research issues in addressing this challenge. First, the presence of stochastic Langevin force giving rise to Brownian motion requires motion control for all the manipulated objects at fast rates of several Hz. Second, the object dynamics is non-linear and even difficult to represent analytically due to the interaction of multiple optical traps that are manipulating neighboring objects. As a result, automated controllers have not been realized for tens of objects, particularly with three dimensional motions with guaranteed collision avoidances. In this paper, we model the effect of interacting optical traps on microspheres with significant Brownian motions in stationary fluid media, and develop simplified state-space representations. These representations are used to design a model predictive controller to coordinate the motions of several spheres in real time. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the utility of the controller in automatically forming desired arrangements of varying configurations starting with randomly dispersed microspheres.

  13. Optical tweezers as manufacturing and characterization tool in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Ghadiri, R.; Ksouri, S. I.; Gurevich, E. L.; Ostendorf, A.

    2014-09-01

    Pumping and mixing of small volumes of liquid samples are basic processes in microfluidic applications. Among the number of different principles for active transportation of the fluids microrotors have been investigated from the beginning. The main challenge in microrotors, however, has been the driving principle. In this work a new approach for a very simple magnetic driving principle has been realized. More precisely, we take advantage of optical grippers to fabricate various microrotors and introduce an optical force method to characterize the fluid flow generated by rotating the structures through magnetic actuation. The microrotors are built of silica and magnetic microspheres which are initially coated with Streptavidin or Biotin molecules. Holographic optical tweezers (HOT) are used to trap, to position, and to assemble the microspheres with the chemical interaction of the biomolecules leading to a stable binding. Using this technique, complex designs of microrotors can be realized. The magnetic response of the magnetic microspheres enables the rotation and control of the structures through an external magnetic field. The generated fluid flow around the microrotor is measured optically by inserting a probe particle next to the rotor. While the probe particle is trapped by optical forces the flow force leads to a displacement of the particle from the trapping position. This displacement is directly related to the flow velocity and can be measured and calibrated. Variations of the microrotor design and rotating speed lead to characteristic flow fields.

  14. Calibration of holographic optical tweezers for force measurements on biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, Astrid; Forde, Nancy

    2009-05-01

    Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) modify the phase of a laser beam to create and dynamically position multiple optical traps independently in 3D; refractive micrometer-sized particles can be held in these traps to function as probing handles. HOTs offer the flexibility needed to probe the mechanics of complex systems such as cells or protein networks. Thus far, however, HOTs have not found wide use in biophysics, in large part due to lack of evidence as to how exerted forces vary as the positions of HOT traps are changed. To perform quantitative force measurements, parameters such as trap stiffness, range of trap steering, and minimum step size are of key importance. We find for our HOT setup that stiffness does not change significantly over a range of ˜25μm. In addition, we control and detect, using high-speed (>kHz) camera imaging, trap displacements to ˜1nm. Our results suggest that after full characterization HOTs can be successfully employed in quantitative experiments on biomaterials, e.g., probing elastomeric properties of structural protein networks.

  15. Triaxial Atomic Force Microscope Contact-Free Tweezers for Nanoassembly

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Keith A; Westervelt, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    We propose a Traixial Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) Contact-free Tweezer (TACT) for the controlled assembly of nanoparticles suspended in a liquid. The TACT overcomes four major challenges faced in nanoassembly: (1) The TACT can hold and position a single nanoparticle with spatial accuracy smaller than the nanoparticle size (~ 5 nm). (2) The nanoparticle is held away from the surface of the TACT by negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) to prevent van der Waals forces from sticking it to the TACT. (3) The TACT holds nanoparticles in a trap that is size-matched to the particle and surrounded by a repulsive region so that it will only trap a single particle at a time. (4) The trap can hold a semiconductor nanoparticle in water with a trapping energy greater than thermal energy. For example, a 5 nm radius silicon nanoparticle is held with 10 kBT at room temperature. We propose methods for using the TACT as a nanoscale pick-and-place tool to assemble semiconductor quantum dots, biological molecules, semiconductor nanowires, and carbon nanotubes. PMID:19713582

  16. Calibration of femtosecond optical tweezers as a sensitive thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Dipankar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2015-08-01

    We present cumulative perturbation effects of femtosecond laser pulses on an optical tweezer. Our experiments involve a dual wavelength high repetition rate femtosecond laser, one at the non-heating wavelength of 780 nm while the other at 1560 nm to cause heating in the trapped volume under low power (100-800 μW) conditions. The 1560 nm high repetition rate laser acts as a resonant excitation source for the vibrational combination band of the hydroxyl group (OH) of water, which helps create the local heating effortlessly within the trapping volume. With such an experimental system, we are the first to observe direct effect of temperature on the corner frequency deduced from power spectrum. We can, thus, control and measure temperature precisely at the optical trap. This observation has lead us to calculate viscosity as well as temperature in the vicinity of the trapping zone. These experimental results also support the well-known fact that the nature of Brownian motion is the response of the optically trapped bead from the temperature change of surroundings. Temperature rise near the trapping zone can significantly change the viscosity of the medium. However, we notice that though the temperature and viscosity are changing as per our corner frequency calculations, the trap stiffness remains the same throughout our experiments within the temperature range of about 20 K.

  17. Optoelectronic Effect in Laser Transmitter Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, V. V.; Mien, V. D.; Eliseev, P. G.

    2001-04-01

    Optoelectronic signals in laser transmitter modules based on the voltage saturation effect of laser diode have been experimentally studied for the GaAlAs/GaAs (λ = 830 nm) and InGaAsP/InP (λ= 1310 nm) structures. The behavior of the observed optoelectronic signals has been explained as the changing of the relative position of carrier quazi-Fermi levels. The experimental method for definition of the density inversion threshold in the active region of laser diodes has been established as well as the active region internal gain has been measured. These results give the possibility of using laser transmitter modules at the same time as an amplifier and optical switch.

  18. Terahertz optoelectronics with surface plasmon polariton diode.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Raj K; Genov, Dentcho A

    2014-05-09

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics.

  19. Organic Optoelectronic Materials: Mechanisms and Applications.

    PubMed

    Ostroverkhova, Oksana

    2016-11-23

    Organic (opto)electronic materials have received considerable attention due to their applications in thin-film-transistors, light-emitting diodes, solar cells, sensors, photorefractive devices, and many others. The technological promises include low cost of these materials and the possibility of their room-temperature deposition from solution on large-area and/or flexible substrates. The article reviews the current understanding of the physical mechanisms that determine the (opto)electronic properties of high-performance organic materials. The focus of the review is on photoinduced processes and on electronic properties important for optoelectronic applications relying on charge carrier photogeneration. Additionally, it highlights the capabilities of various experimental techniques for characterization of these materials, summarizes top-of-the-line device performance, and outlines recent trends in the further development of the field. The properties of materials based both on small molecules and on conjugated polymers are considered, and their applications in organic solar cells, photodetectors, and photorefractive devices are discussed.

  20. Light Management with Nanostructures for Optoelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Leung, Siu-Fung; Zhang, Qianpeng; Xiu, Fei; Yu, Dongliang; Ho, Johnny C; Li, Dongdong; Fan, Zhiyong

    2014-04-17

    Light management is of paramount importance to improve the performance of optoelectronic devices including photodetectors, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. Extensive studies have shown that the efficiency of these optoelectronic devices largely depends on the device structural design. In the case of solar cells, three-dimensional (3-D) nanostructures can remarkably improve device energy conversion efficiency via various light-trapping mechanisms, and a number of nanostructures were fabricated and exhibited tremendous potential for highly efficient photovoltaics. Meanwhile, these optical absorption enhancement schemes can benefit photodetectors by achieving higher quantum efficiency and photon extraction efficiency. On the other hand, low extraction efficiency of a photon from the emissive layer to outside often puts a constraint on the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of LEDs. In this regard, different designs of device configuration based on nanostructured materials such as nanoparticles and nanotextures were developed to improve the out-coupling efficiency of photons in LEDs under various frameworks such as waveguides, plasmonic theory, and so forth. In this Perspective, we aim to provide a comprehensive review of the recent progress of research on various light management nanostructures and their potency to improve performance of optoelectronic devices including photodetectors, solar cells, and LEDs.

  1. Intriguing Optoelectronic Properties of Metal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Manser, Joseph S; Christians, Jeffrey A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-11-09

    A new chapter in the long and distinguished history of perovskites is being written with the breakthrough success of metal halide perovskites (MHPs) as solution-processed photovoltaic (PV) absorbers. The current surge in MHP research has largely arisen out of their rapid progress in PV devices; however, these materials are potentially suitable for a diverse array of optoelectronic applications. Like oxide perovskites, MHPs have ABX3 stoichiometry, where A and B are cations and X is a halide anion. Here, the underlying physical and photophysical properties of inorganic (A = inorganic) and hybrid organic-inorganic (A = organic) MHPs are reviewed with an eye toward their potential application in emerging optoelectronic technologies. Significant attention is given to the prototypical compound methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) due to the preponderance of experimental and theoretical studies surrounding this material. We also discuss other salient MHP systems, including 2-dimensional compounds, where relevant. More specifically, this review is a critical account of the interrelation between MHP electronic structure, absorption, emission, carrier dynamics and transport, and other relevant photophysical processes that have propelled these materials to the forefront of modern optoelectronics research.

  2. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  3. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    PubMed

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments.

  4. Molecular doping of single-walled carbon nanotube transistors: optoelectronic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiangbin; Emelianov, Aleksei V.; Bakulin, Artem A.; Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.

    2016-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are a promising material for future optoelectronic applications, including flexible electrodes and field-effect transistors. Molecular doping of carbon nanotube surface can be an effective way to control the electronic structure and charge dynamics of these material systems. Herein, two organic semiconductors with different energy level alignment in respect to SWCNT are used to dope the channel of the SWCNT-based transistor. The effects of doping on the device performance are studied with a set of optoelectronic measurements. For the studied system, we observed an opposite change in photo-resistance, depending on the type (electron donor vs electron acceptor) of the dopants. We attribute this effect to interplay between two effects: (i) the change in the carrier concentration and (ii) the formation of trapping states at the SWCNT surface. We also observed a modest 4 pA photocurrent generation in the doped systems, which indicates that the studied system could be used as a platform for multi-pulse optoelectronic experiments with photocurrent detection.

  5. Fast terahertz optoelectronic amplitude modulator based on plasmonic metamaterial antenna arrays and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessop, David S.; Sol, Christian W. O.; Xiao, Long; Kindness, Stephen J.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Lin, Hungyen; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Ren, Yuan; Kamboj, Varun S.; Hofmann, Stephan; Zeitler, J. Axel; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A.; Degl'Innocenti, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The growing interest in terahertz (THz) technologies in recent years has seen a wide range of demonstrated applications, spanning from security screening, non-destructive testing, gas sensing, to biomedical imaging and communication. Communication with THz radiation offers the advantage of much higher bandwidths than currently available, in an unallocated spectrum. For this to be realized, optoelectronic components capable of manipulating THz radiation at high speeds and high signal-to-noise ratios must be developed. In this work we demonstrate a room temperature frequency dependent optoelectronic amplitude modulator working at around 2 THz, which incorporates graphene as the tuning medium. The architecture of the modulator is an array of plasmonic dipole antennas surrounded by graphene. By electrostatically doping the graphene via a back gate electrode, the reflection characteristics of the modulator are modified. The modulator is electrically characterized to determine the graphene conductivity and optically characterization, by THz time-domain spectroscopy and a single-mode 2 THz quantum cascade laser, to determine the optical modulation depth and cut-off frequency. A maximum optical modulation depth of ~ 30% is estimated and is found to be most (least) sensitive when the electrical modulation is centered at the point of maximum (minimum) differential resistivity of the graphene. A 3 dB cut-off frequency > 5 MHz, limited only by the area of graphene on the device, is reported. The results agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, and demonstrate the first steps towards ultra-fast, graphene based THz optoelectronic devices.

  6. Two-Dimensional Materials for Halide Perovskite-Based Optoelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan; Shi, Gaoquan

    2017-03-03

    Halide perovskites have high light absorption coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths, intense photoluminescence, and slow rates of non-radiative charge recombination. Thus, they are attractive photoactive materials for developing high-performance optoelectronic devices. These devices are also cheap and easy to be fabricated. To realize the optimal performances of halide perovskite-based optoelectronic devices (HPODs), perovskite photoactive layers should work effectively with other functional materials such as electrodes, interfacial layers and encapsulating films. Conventional two-dimensional (2D) materials are promising candidates for this purpose because of their unique structures and/or interesting optoelectronic properties. Here, we comprehensively summarize the recent advancements in the applications of conventional 2D materials for halide perovskite-based photodetectors, solar cells and light-emitting diodes. The examples of these 2D materials are graphene and its derivatives, mono- and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), graphdiyne and metal nanosheets, etc. The research related to 2D nanostructured perovskites and 2D Ruddlesden-Popper perovskites as efficient and stable photoactive layers is also outlined. The syntheses, functions and working mechanisms of relevant 2D materials are introduced, and the challenges to achieving practical applications of HPODs using 2D materials are also discussed.

  7. Wafer-scale growth of large arrays of perovskite microplate crystals for functional electronics and optoelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gongming; Li, Dehui; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Li, Yongjia; Chen, Chih-Yen; Yin, Anxiang; Zhao, Zipeng; Lin, Zhaoyang; Wu, Hao; He, Qiyuan; Ding, Mengning; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted intensive interest for its diverse optoelectronic applications. However, most studies to date have been limited to bulk thin films that are difficult to implement for integrated device arrays because of their incompatibility with typical lithography processes. We report the first patterned growth of regular arrays of perovskite microplate crystals for functional electronics and optoelectronics. We show that large arrays of lead iodide microplates can be grown from an aqueous solution through a seeded growth process and can be further intercalated with methylammonium iodide to produce perovskite crystals. Structural and optical characterizations demonstrate that the resulting materials display excellent crystalline quality and optical properties. We further show that perovskite crystals can be selectively grown on prepatterned electrode arrays to create independently addressable photodetector arrays and functional field effect transistors. The ability to grow perovskite microplates and to precisely place them at specific locations offers a new material platform for the fundamental investigation of the electronic and optical properties of perovskite materials and opens a pathway for integrated electronic and optoelectronic systems. PMID:26601297

  8. New optoelectronic sensor for measuring biologically effective irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosyachenko, Leonid A.; Sklyarchuk, Valery M.

    1997-12-01

    A new optoelectronic sensor whose spectral responsivity to UV radiation is almost identical with that of the human skin or of the eyes is presented. The sensor comprises two closely-spaced UV-sensitive Au-SiC diode, one of which is fitted with a glass filter. The photodiodes are connected to electronics that amplifies, combines and subtracts electrical signals generated by radiation in the photodiodes. The responsivity of the Au-SiC diode structure with a semitransparent gold electrode covers the whole UV spectrum, with the long-wavelength end bounded by the semiconductor bandgap. The photodiode with a filter absorbing wavelengths shorter than 315-320 nm is responsive in the UV-A region, while the difference between the electrical signals generated in the filter-containing and filter-free diodes is determined by the UV-B + IV-C radiation. The measuring of biologically effective radiation over the entire UV spectral range is achieved through combining the signal generated by UV-A radiation and the previously amplified difference signal generated by UV-B + UV-C radiation. The sensor spectral responsivity thus obtained is very close to the tabular curve of the relative spectral effectiveness of UV radiation on the normal human skin or eyes.

  9. Thermal gradient induced tweezers for the manipulation of particles and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiajie; Cong, Hengji; Loo, Fong-Chuen; Kang, Zhiwen; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Haixi; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Kong, Siu-Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2016-11-01

    Optical tweezers are a well-established tool for manipulating small objects. However, their integration with microfluidic devices often requires an objective lens. More importantly, trapping of non-transparent or optically sensitive targets is particularly challenging for optical tweezers. Here, for the first time, we present a photon-free trapping technique based on electro-thermally induced forces. We demonstrate that thermal-gradient-induced thermophoresis and thermal convection can lead to trapping of polystyrene spheres and live cells. While the subject of thermophoresis, particularly in the micro- and nano-scale, still remains to be fully explored, our experimental results have provided a reasonable explanation for the trapping effect. The so-called thermal tweezers, which can be readily fabricated by femtosecond laser writing, operate with low input power density and are highly versatile in terms of device configuration, thus rendering high potential for integration with microfluidic devices as well as lab-on-a-chip systems.

  10. Thermal gradient induced tweezers for the manipulation of particles and cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiajie; Cong, Hengji; Loo, Fong-Chuen; Kang, Zhiwen; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Haixi; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Kong, Siu-Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2016-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a well-established tool for manipulating small objects. However, their integration with microfluidic devices often requires an objective lens. More importantly, trapping of non-transparent or optically sensitive targets is particularly challenging for optical tweezers. Here, for the first time, we present a photon-free trapping technique based on electro-thermally induced forces. We demonstrate that thermal-gradient-induced thermophoresis and thermal convection can lead to trapping of polystyrene spheres and live cells. While the subject of thermophoresis, particularly in the micro- and nano-scale, still remains to be fully explored, our experimental results have provided a reasonable explanation for the trapping effect. The so-called thermal tweezers, which can be readily fabricated by femtosecond laser writing, operate with low input power density and are highly versatile in terms of device configuration, thus rendering high potential for integration with microfluidic devices as well as lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:27853191

  11. Manipulation of cells with laser microbeam scissors and optical tweezers: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2017-02-01

    The use of laser microbeams and optical tweezers in a wide field of biological applications from genomic to immunology is discussed. Microperforation is used to introduce a well-defined amount of molecules into cells for genetic engineering and optical imaging. The microwelding of two cells induced by a laser microbeam combines their genetic outfit. Microdissection allows specific regions of genomes to be isolated from a whole set of chromosomes. Handling the cells with optical tweezers supports investigation on the attack of immune systems against diseased or cancerous cells. With the help of laser microbeams, heart infarction can be simulated, and optical tweezers support studies on the heartbeat. Finally, laser microbeams are used to induce DNA damage in living cells for studies on cancer and ageing.

  12. Optical disassembly of cellular clusters by tunable ‘tug-of-war’ tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Bezryadina, Anna S; Preece, Daryl C; Chen, Joseph C; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms underlie many persistent infections, posing major hurdles in antibiotic treatment. Here we design and demonstrate ‘tug-of-war’ optical tweezers that can facilitate the assessment of cell–cell adhesion—a key contributing factor to biofilm development, thanks to the combined actions of optical scattering and gradient forces. With a customized optical landscape distinct from that of conventional tweezers, not only can such ‘tug-of-war’ tweezers stably trap and stretch a rod-shaped bacterium in the observing plane, but, more importantly, they can also impose a tunable lateral force that pulls apart cellular clusters without any tethering or mechanical movement. As a proof of principle, we examined a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain that forms robust biofilms and found that the strength of intercellular adhesion depends on the growth medium. This technique may herald new photonic tools for optical manipulation and biofilm study, as well as other biological applications. PMID:27818838

  13. Thermal gradient induced tweezers for the manipulation of particles and cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajie; Cong, Hengji; Loo, Fong-Chuen; Kang, Zhiwen; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Haixi; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Kong, Siu-Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2016-11-17

    Optical tweezers are a well-established tool for manipulating small objects. However, their integration with microfluidic devices often requires an objective lens. More importantly, trapping of non-transparent or optically sensitive targets is particularly challenging for optical tweezers. Here, for the first time, we present a photon-free trapping technique based on electro-thermally induced forces. We demonstrate that thermal-gradient-induced thermophoresis and thermal convection can lead to trapping of polystyrene spheres and live cells. While the subject of thermophoresis, particularly in the micro- and nano-scale, still remains to be fully explored, our experimental results have provided a reasonable explanation for the trapping effect. The so-called thermal tweezers, which can be readily fabricated by femtosecond laser writing, operate with low input power density and are highly versatile in terms of device configuration, thus rendering high potential for integration with microfluidic devices as well as lab-on-a-chip systems.

  14. Temperature-dependent conformations of a membrane supported zinc porphyrin tweezer by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Widom, Julia R; Lee, Wonbae; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Molinski, Tadeusz F; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H

    2013-07-25

    We studied the equilibrium conformations of a zinc porphyrin tweezer composed of two carboxylphenyl-functionalized zinc tetraphenyl porphyrin subunits connected by a 1,4-butyndiol spacer, which was suspended inside the amphiphilic regions of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) liposomes. By combining phase-modulation two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) with linear absorbance and fluorimetry, we determined that the zinc porphyrin tweezer adopts a mixture of folded and extended conformations in the membrane. By fitting an exciton-coupling model to a series of data sets recorded over a range of temperatures (17-85 °C) and at different laser center wavelengths, we determined that the folded form of the tweezer is stabilized by a favorable change in the entropy of the local membrane environment. Our results provide insights toward understanding the balance of thermodynamic factors that govern molecular assembly in membranes.

  15. RBCs under optical tweezers as cellular motors and rockers: microfluidic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Samarendra; Mohanty, Khyati; Gupta, Pradeep

    2006-08-01

    Recently, we have reported self-rotation of normal red blood cells (RBC), suspended in hypertonic buffer, and trapped in unpolarized laser tweezers. Here, we report use of such an optically driven RBC-motor for microfluidic applications such as pumping/centrifugation of fluids. Since the speed of rotation of the RBC-motor was found to vary with the power of the trapping beam, the flow rate could be controlled by controlling the laser power. In polarized optical tweezers, preferential alignment of trapped RBC was observed. The aligned RBC (simulating a disk) in isotonic buffer, could be rotated in a controlled manner for use as a microfluidic valve by rotation of the plane of polarization of the trapping beam. The thickness of the discotic RBC could be changed by changing the osmolarity of the solution and thus the alignment torque on the RBC due to the polarization of the trapping beam could be varied. Further, in polarized tweezers, the RBCs in hypertonic buffer showed rocking motion while being in rotation. Here, the RBC rotated over a finite angular range, stopped for some time at a particular angle, and then started rotating till it was back to the aligned position and this cycle was found repetitive. This can be attributed to the fact that though the RBCs were found to experience an alignment torque to align with plane of polarization of the tweezers due to its form birefringence, it was smaller in magnitude as compared to the rotational torque due to its structural asymmetry in hypertonic solution. Changes in the laser power caused a transition from/to rocking to/from motor behavior of the RBC in a linearly polarized tweezers. By changing the direction of polarization caused by rotation of an external half wave plate, the stopping angle of rocking could be changed. Further, RBCs suspended in intermediate hypertonic buffer and trapped with polarized tweezers showed fluttering about the vertical plane.

  16. Pulse laser assist optical tweezers (PLAT) with long-duration pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Saki; Sugiura, Tadao; Minato, Kotaro

    2011-07-01

    Optical tweezers is a technique to trap and to manipulate micron sized objects under a microscope by radiation pressure force exerted by a laser beam. Optical tweezers has been utilized for single-molecular measurements of force exerted by molecular interactions and for cell palpation. To extend applications of optical tweezers we have developed a novel optical tweezers system combined with a pulse laser. We utilize a pulse laser (Q-switched Nd: YAG laser, wavelength of 1064 nm) to assist manipulations by conventional optical tweezers with a continuous wave (CW) laser. The pulse laser beam is introduced into the same optics for conventional optical tweezers. In principle, instantaneous radiation force is proportional to instantaneous power of laser beam. As a result, pulse laser beam generates strong instantaneous force on an object to be manipulated. If the radiation force becomes strong enough to get over an obstacle structure and/or to be released from adhesion, the object will be free from these difficulties. We investigate the effect of pulse laser assistance with changing pulse duration of the laser. We report optimum pulse duration of 100 ns to 200 ns deduced from motion analysis of a particle in a beam spot. Our goal is to realize in-vivo manipulation and operation of a cell. For this purpose we need to reduce light energy of pulse laser beam and to avoid laser induced breakdown caused by strong light field. So we have developed a pulse laser with 160-ns pulse duration and have confirmed that availability on manipulation of living cells.

  17. Two-particle quantum interference in tunnel-coupled optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A M; Lester, B J; Reynolds, C M; Wall, M L; Foss-Feig, M; Hazzard, K R A; Rey, A M; Regal, C A

    2014-07-18

    The quantum statistics of atoms is typically observed in the behavior of an ensemble via macroscopic observables. However, quantum statistics modifies the behavior of even two particles. Here, we demonstrate near-complete control over all the internal and external degrees of freedom of two laser-cooled (87)Rb atoms trapped in two optical tweezers. This controllability allows us to observe signatures of indistinguishability via two-particle interference. Our work establishes laser-cooled atoms in optical tweezers as a promising route to bottom-up engineering of scalable, low-entropy quantum systems.

  18. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kotsifaki, D. G. Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2015-11-23

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force and the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, indicative of evanescent plasmonic enhancement.

  19. Shape deformations of giant unilamellar vesicles with a laser tweezer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Poole, Cory; Bradford, Peter; English, Doug

    2004-10-01

    Vesicles are phospholipid bilayers that form a surface enclosing a volume of water or solution. They are of importance as model systems to study cells, as well as having practical applications such as containers for performing nanochemistry and facilitating drug delivery. Their properties have been studied for decades. Using a holographic laser tweezer array (LTA), which converts a single laser beam into many laser tweezer points, we stretch the vesicles in controlled ways from several points at once, measuring each force applied. Here, we present data on shape deformations of simple, spherical vesicles and on membrane fracture.

  20. Manipulating multiparticles simultaneously with tapered-tip single fiber optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Wu, Zhongfu; Liu, Zhihai; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2008-12-01

    We present a single-core tapered-tip single fiber optical tweezers, which can trap multi-particle simultaneously. In order to test and verify its new function, finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to calculate and simulate. The relationship between the trapping force and the particle-parameters, such as the size, refractive index and others of particle are studied. By experimental validation, the tapered-tip single optic fiber tweezers can trap Particle 2nd after the Particle 1st trapped firmly, but can not trap Particle 3rd, which just verifies the theoretical simulation results to be right.

  1. Characterisation of coated aerosols using optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. H.; Ward, A.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thin organic films are believed to form naturally on the surface of aerosols [1,2] and influence aerosol properties. Cloud condensation nuclei formation and chemical reactions such as aerosol oxidation are effected by the presence of thin films [3]. There is a requirement to characterise the physical properties of both the core aerosol and its organic film in order to fully understand the contribution of coated aerosols to the indirect effect. Two complementary techniques have been used to study the oxidation of thin organic films on the surface of aerosols; laser optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry. Micron sized polystyrene beads coated in oleic acid have been trapped in air using two counter propagating laser beams. Polystyrene beads are used as a proxy for solid aerosol. The trapped aerosol is illuminated with a white LED over a broadband wavelength range and the scattered light collected to produce a Mie spectrum [4]. Analysis of the Mie spectrum results in determination of the core polystyrene bead radius, the oleic acid film thickness and refractive index dispersion of the core and shell [5]. A flow of ozone gas can then be introduced into the aerosol environment to oxidise the thin film of oleic acid and the reaction followed by monitoring the changes in the Mie spectrum. The results demonstrate complete removal of the oleic acid film. We conclude that the use of a counter propagating optical trap combined with white light Mie spectroscopy can be used to study a range of organic films on different types of aerosols and their oxidation reactions. Neutron reflectometry has been used as a complementary technique to study the oxidation of monolayer films at the air-water interface in order to gain information on reaction kinetics. The oxidation of an oleic acid film at the air-water interface by the common tropospheric oxidant ozone has been studied using a Langmuir trough. Results indicate complete removal of the oleic acid film with ozone in agreement

  2. Investigating intermolecular forces associated with thrombus initiation using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Maneesh; Lopez, Jose A.; Romo, Gabriel M.; Dong, Jing-Fei; McIntire, Larry V.; Moake, Joel L.; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-05-01

    Thrombus formation occurs when a platelet membrane receptor, glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX-V complex, binds to its ligand, von Willebrand factor (vWf), in the subendothelium or plasma. To determine which GP Ib-IX-V amino acid sequences are critical for bond formation, we have used optical tweezers to measure forces involved in the binding of vWf to GP Ib-IX-V variants. Inasmuch as GP Ib(alpha) subunit is the primary component in human GP Ib-IX-V complex that binds to vWf, and that canine GP Ib(alpha) , on the other hand, does not bind to human vWf, we progressively replaced human GP Ib(alpha) amino acid sequences with canine GP Ib(alpha) sequences to determine the sequences essential for vWf/GP Ib(alpha) binding. After measuring the adhesive forces between optically trapped, vWf-coated beads and GP Ib(alpha) variants expressed on mammalian cells, we determined that leucine- rich repeat 2 of GP Ib(alpha) was necessary for vWf/GP Ib-IX- V bond formation. We also found that deletion of the N- terminal flanking sequence and leucine-rich repeat 1 reduced adhesion strength to vWf but did not abolish binding. While divalent cations are known to influence binding of vWf, addition of 1mM CaCl2 had no effect on measured vWf/GP Ib(alpha) bond strengths.

  3. Dynamic properties of bacterial pili measured by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallman, Erik G.; Andersson, Magnus J.; Schedin, Staffan S.; Jass, Jana; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2004-10-01

    The ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to cause urinary tract infections is dependent on their ability to colonize the uroepithelium. Infecting bacteria ascend the urethra to the bladder and then kidneys by attaching to the uroepithelial cells via the differential expression of adhesins. P pili are associated with pyelonephritis, the more severe infection of the kidneys. In order to find means to treat pyelonephritis, it is therefore of interest to investigate the properties P pili. The mechanical behavior of individual P pili of uropathogenic Escherichia coli has recently been investigated using optical tweezers. P pili, whose main part constitutes the PapA rod, composed of ~1000 PapA subunits in a helical arrangement, are distributed over the bacterial surface and mediate adhesion to host cells. We have earlier studied P pili regarding its stretching/elongation properties where we have found and characterized three different elongation regions, of which one constitute an unfolding of the quaternary (helical) structure of the PapA rod. It was shown that this unfolding takes place at an elongation independent force of 27 +/- 2 pN. We have also recently performed studies on its folding properties and shown that the unfolding/folding of the PapA rod is completely reversible. Here we present a study of the dynamical properties of the PapA rod. We show, among other things, that the unfolding force increases and that the folding force decreases with the speed of unfolding and folding respectively. Moreover, the PapA rod can be folded-unfolded a significant number of times without loosing its characteristics, a phenomenon that is believed to be important for the bacterium to keep close contact to the host tissue and consequently helps the bacterium to colonize the host tissue.

  4. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  5. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  6. Organic photosensitive cells grown on rough electrode with nano-scale morphology control

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Fan; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-06-07

    An optoelectronic device and a method for fabricating the optoelectronic device includes a first electrode disposed on a substrate, an exposed surface of the first electrode having a root mean square roughness of at least 30 nm and a height variation of at least 200 nm, the first electrode being transparent. A conformal layer of a first organic semiconductor material is deposited onto the first electrode by organic vapor phase deposition, the first organic semiconductor material being a small molecule material. A layer of a second organic semiconductor material is deposited over the conformal layer. At least some of the layer of the second organic semiconductor material directly contacts the conformal layer. A second electrode is deposited over the layer of the second organic semiconductor material. The first organic semiconductor material is of a donor-type or an acceptor-type relative to the second organic semiconductor material, which is of the other material type.

  7. Assembly of opto-electronic module with improved heat sink

    DOEpatents

    Chan, Benson; Fortier, Paul Francis; Freitag, Ladd William; Galli, Gary T.; Guindon, Francois; Johnson, Glen Walden; Letourneau, Martial; Sherman, John H.; Tetreault, Real

    2004-11-23

    A heat sink for a transceiver optoelectronic module including dual direct heat paths and a structure which encloses a number of chips having a central web which electrically isolates transmitter and receiver chips from each other. A retainer for an optical coupler having a port into which epoxy is poured. An overmolded base for an optoelectronic module having epoxy flow controller members built thereon. Assembly methods for an optoelectronic module including gap setting and variation of a TAB bonding process.

  8. GaAs Optoelectronic Integrated-Circuit Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Steven H.; Kim, Jae H.; Psaltis, Demetri

    1992-01-01

    Monolithic GaAs optoelectronic integrated circuits developed for use as artificial neurons. Neural-network computer contains planar arrays of optoelectronic neurons, and variable synaptic connections between neurons effected by diffraction of light from volume hologram in photorefractive material. Basic principles of neural-network computers explained more fully in "Optoelectronic Integrated Circuits For Neural Networks" (NPO-17652). In present circuits, devices replaced by metal/semiconductor field effect transistors (MESFET's), which consume less power.

  9. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VHmore » is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.« less

  10. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Halogen vacancies (VH ) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr. Both C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH , in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbB r3 (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of n s2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 , and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH , such as those with large cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH . The results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  11. Statistical conjugated polymers comprising optoelectronically distinct units.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, Jon; Sun, Jing; Gao, Dong; Karl, Dominik; Seferos, Dwight S

    2013-03-12

    Poly(3-heptylselenophene)-stat-poly(3-hexylthiophene) is synthesized and characterized in terms of its crystallinity and performance in an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. Despite the random distribution of units along the polymer main chain, the material is semi-crystalline, as demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. Thin-film absorption suggests an increased compatibility than seen with 3-hexylselenophene monomer. Optoelectronic properties are an average of the two homopolymers, and OPV performance is enhanced by a broadened absorption profile and a favorable morphology.

  12. In-situ nanochemistry for optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Won Jin

    This thesis describes recent results on simple methods to arrange nanosize objects such as semiconductor nanocrystals, noble metal nanoparticles, and upconversion nanophosphors by means of top-down processes. Specific focus is directed towards approaches to produce predefined patterns of various nanostructure materials using optical lithography for direct writing of films for optoelectronic and electronic devices. To obtain photo-patternability, the nanostructure materials [for example semiconductor nanocrystals (CdSe, CdTe, PbSe), metallic nanoparticles (Ag), upconversion nanophosphors (Er3+/Yb 3+ or Tm3+/Yb3+ co-doped NaYF4 ), and transparent conducting oxide nanoparticles (ITO, ZnO)] were functionalized by incorporation of the functional ligand t-butoxycarbonyl (t-BOC) which has an acid-labile moiety. The t-BOC group undergoes a cleavage, when subjected to UV irradiation in the presence of a photo acid generator (PAG) to releases isobutene and carbon dioxide. Depending on the need of the application, either the exposed regions (negative pattern) or the non-exposed regions (positive pattern) could be developed from the exposed films by appropriate solvent selection. The photo exposed regions of the film are rendered hydrophilic due to the degradation of the t-BOC, the un-exposed regions remain hydrophobic. This solubility change in the QDs is the basis of their patternablity. The un-exposed regions can be removed to obtain the negative pattern by washing with hydrophobic solvents, whereas the exposed regions can be selectively removed to obtain positive pattern by washing with hydrophilic solvents. This change in the surface chemistry results in the ability to photo-pattern the various nanostructure materials where desired for a number of optoelectronic device geometries. We demonstrate that the ultimate resolution (linewidth and spacing) of this technique is below submicron. Details on technological aspects concerning nanoparticle patterning as well as practical

  13. ARTICLES: Optoelectronic readout with an injection laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luc, Vu V.; Eliseev, P. G.; Man'ko, Margarita A.; Mikaelyan, T. T.; Okhotnikov, O. G.; Sokolov, S. N.

    1982-09-01

    An investigation was made of the possibility of utilizing an injection heterolaser in optical devices for data retrieval. An injection laser was used both as a source and detector of its own radiation reflected from a data carrier (optoelectronic readout). The influence of the reflected radiation was due to quasisteady modulation of the Q factor of the resonator, which was accompanied by modulation of the voltage across the laser diode. A study was made of the influence of the pump current on the useful signal and it was found that this current was related to the differential resistance of the laser diode.

  14. A Design Methodology for Optoelectronic VLSI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    soldered to a copper -clad printed circuit (PC) board, are no longer sufficient for today’s high-speed ICs. A processing chip that can compute data at a rate...design approach. A new design methodology has to be adopted to take advan- tage of the benefits that FSOI offers. Optoelectronic VLSI is the coupling of...and connections are made from chip to chip via traces of copper wire, as shown in Figure 2-2. The signal from a logic gate on one chip to a logic gate

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Killpatrick, Don H.

    1978-01-01

    An electrode capable of withstanding high temperatures and suitable for use as a current collector in the channel of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator consists of a sintered powdered metal base portion, the upper surface of the base being coated with a first layer of nickel aluminide, an intermediate layer of a mixture of nickel aluminide - refractory ceramic on the first layer and a third or outer layer of a refractory ceramic material on the intermediate layer. The sintered powdered metal base resists spalling by the ceramic coatings and permits greater electrode compliance to thermal shock. The density of the powdered metal base can be varied to allow optimization of the thermal conductivity of the electrode and prevent excess heat loss from the channel.

  16. Cermet electrode

    DOEpatents

    Maskalick, Nicholas J.

    1988-08-30

    Disclosed is a cermet electrode consisting of metal particles of nickel, cobalt, iron, or alloys or mixtures thereof immobilized by zirconia stabilized in cubic form which contains discrete deposits of about 0.1 to about 5% by weight of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof. The solid oxide electrode can be made by covering a substrate with particles of nickel, cobalt, iron, or mixtures thereof, growing a stabilized zirconia solid oxide skeleton around the particles thereby immobilizing them, contacting the skeleton with a compound of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof, and heating the skeleton to a temperature of at least 500.degree. C. The electrode can also be made by preparing a slurry of nickel, cobalt, iron, or mixture and a compound of praseodymium, dysprosium, terbium, or a mixture thereof, depositing the slurry on a substrate, heating the slurry to dryness, and growing a stabilized zirconia skeleton around the metal particles.

  17. Red blood cell micromanipulation with elliptical laser beam profile optical tweezers in different osmolarity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this work optical tweezers with elliptical beam profiles have been developed in order to examine the effect of optical force on fresh red blood cells (RBC) in isotonic, hypertonic and hypotonic buffer solutions. Considering that the optical force depends essentially on the cell surface and the cytoplasmic refractive index, it is obvious that biochemical modifications associated with different states of the cell will influence its behaviour in the optical trap. Line optical tweezers were used to manipulate simultaneously more than one red blood cell. After we have been manipulated a RBC with an elliptical laser beam profile in an isotonic or hypertonic buffer, we noticed that it rotates by itself when gets trapped by optical tweezers and undergoes folding. Further shape deformations can be observed attributed to the competition between alignment and rotational torque which are transferred by laser light to the cell. In hypotonic buffer RBCs become spherical and do not rotate or fold since the resultant force due to rays emerging from diametrically opposite points of the cell leads to zero torque. Manipulation of fresh red blood cells in isotonic solution by line optical tweezers leads to folding and elongation of trapped RBCs. Membrane elasticity properties such as bending modulus can be estimated by measuring RBC's folding time in function with laser power.

  18. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Oene, Maarten M.; Dickinson, Laura E.; Cross, Bronwen; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magnetic field experienced by a magnetic bead linked to the motor, and we probe the motor’s response. A simple model describes the average motor speed over the entire range of applied fields. We extract the motor torque at stall and find it to be similar to the motor torque at drag-limited speed. In addition, use of the magnetic tweezers allows us to force motor rotation in both forward and backward directions. We monitor the motor’s performance before and after periods of forced rotation and observe no destructive effects on the motor. Our experiments show how magnetic tweezers can provide active and fast control of the external load while also exposing remaining challenges in calibration. Through their non-invasive character and straightforward parallelization, magnetic tweezers provide an attractive platform to study nanoscale rotary motors at the single-motor level. PMID:28266562

  19. Listening to proteins and viruses with nanoaperture optical tweezers (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Reuven

    2015-08-01

    This talk will present a nanoaperture tweezer approach to measure the acoustic spectra of viruses and single proteins. The approach, termed extraordinary optical Raman (EAR), shows promise for uncovering the structure and mechanical properties of nanoparticles as well as the effects of their interactions.

  20. High Spatiotemporal-Resolution Magnetic Tweezers: Calibration and Applications for DNA Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, David; Cui, Tao Ju; Cnossen, Jelmer; Docter, Margreet W.; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2015-01-01

    The observation of biological processes at the molecular scale in real time requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Magnetic tweezers are straightforward to implement, free of radiation or photodamage, and provide ample multiplexing capability, but their spatiotemporal resolution has lagged behind that of other single-molecule manipulation techniques, notably optical tweezers and AFM. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a new high-resolution magnetic tweezers apparatus. We systematically characterize the achievable spatiotemporal resolution for both incoherent and coherent light sources, different types and sizes of beads, and different types and lengths of tethered molecules. Using a bright coherent laser source for illumination and tracking at 6 kHz, we resolve 3 Å steps with a 1 s period for surface-melted beads and 5 Å steps with a 0.5 s period for double-stranded-dsDNA-tethered beads, in good agreement with a model of stochastic bead motion in the magnetic tweezers. We demonstrate how this instrument can be used to monitor the opening and closing of a DNA hairpin on millisecond timescales in real time, together with attendant changes in the hairpin dynamics upon the addition of deoxythymidine triphosphate. Our approach opens up the possibility of observing biological events at submillisecond timescales with subnanometer resolution using camera-based detection. PMID:26588570

  1. Research Advances: Nanoscale Molecular Tweezers; Cinnamon as Pesticide?; Recently Identified Dietary Sources of Antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Angela G.

    2004-12-01

    This Report from Other Journals surveys articles of interest to chemists that have been recently published in other science journals. Topics surveyed include reports that receptors have been designed to act as molecular tweezers; cinnamon has potential in the fight against mosquitoes; and high levels of antioxidants are found in some surprising foods. See Featured Molecules .

  2. Stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans caused by optical tweezers: wavelength, power, and time dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Leitz, Guenther; Fällman, Erik; Tuck, Simon; Axner, Ove

    2002-01-01

    Optical tweezers have emerged as a powerful technique for micromanipulation of living cells. Although the technique often has been claimed to be nonintrusive, evidence has appeared that this is not always the case. This work presents evidence that near-infrared continuous-wave laser light from optical tweezers can produce stress in Caenorhabditis elegans. A transgenic strain of C. elegans, carrying an integrated heat-shock-responsive reporter gene, has been exposed to laser light under a variety of illumination conditions. It was found that gene expression was most often induced by light of 760 nm, and least by 810 nm. The stress response increased with laser power and irradiation time. At 810 nm, significant gene expression could be observed at 360 mW of illumination, which is more than one order of magnitude above that normally used in optical tweezers. In the 700-760-nm range, the results show that the stress response is caused by photochemical processes, whereas at 810 nm, it mainly has a photothermal origin. These results give further evidence that the 700-760-nm wavelength region is unsuitable for optical tweezers and suggest that work at 810 nm at normal laser powers does not cause stress at the cellular level. PMID:11916877

  3. Inversion of product selectivity in an enzyme-inspired metallosupramolecular tweezer catalyzed epoxidation reaction†

    PubMed Central

    Ulmann, Pirmin A.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Lee, One-Sun; Wiester, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a heteroligated, hemilabile PtII–P,S tweezer coordination complex that combines a chiral Jacobsen–Katsuki MnIII-salen epoxidation catalyst with an amidopyridine receptor, which leads to an inversion of the major epoxide product compared to catalysts without a recognition group. PMID:20448966

  4. Multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer for non-invasive cell/organism manipulation and tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kwok Ho; Li, Ying; Li, Yang; Lim, Hae Gyun; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, Koping Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Non-contact precise manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms has attracted considerable interest in biophysics and biomedical engineering. Similar to optical tweezers, acoustic tweezers have been proposed to be capable of manipulating microparticles and even cells. Although there have been concerted efforts to develop tools for non-contact manipulation, no alternative to complex, unifunctional tweezer has yet been found. Here we report a simple, low-cost, multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer (SBAT) that is capable of manipulating an individual micrometer scale non-spherical cell at Rayleigh regime and even a single millimeter scale organism at Mie regime, and imaging tissue as well. We experimentally demonstrate that the SBAT with an ultralow f-number (f# = focal length/aperture size) could manipulate an individual red blood cell and a single 1.6 mm-diameter fertilized Zebrafish egg, respectively. Besides, in vitro rat aorta images were collected successfully at dynamic foci in which the lumen and the outer surface of the aorta could be clearly seen. With the ultralow f-number, the SBAT offers the combination of large acoustic radiation force and narrow beam width, leading to strong trapping and high-resolution imaging capabilities. These attributes enable the feasibility of using a single acoustic device to perform non-invasive multi-functions simultaneously for biomedical and biophysical applications. PMID:27874052

  5. Multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer for non-invasive cell/organism manipulation and tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kwok Ho; Li, Ying; Li, Yang; Lim, Hae Gyun; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, Koping Kirk

    2016-11-01

    Non-contact precise manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms has attracted considerable interest in biophysics and biomedical engineering. Similar to optical tweezers, acoustic tweezers have been proposed to be capable of manipulating microparticles and even cells. Although there have been concerted efforts to develop tools for non-contact manipulation, no alternative to complex, unifunctional tweezer has yet been found. Here we report a simple, low-cost, multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer (SBAT) that is capable of manipulating an individual micrometer scale non-spherical cell at Rayleigh regime and even a single millimeter scale organism at Mie regime, and imaging tissue as well. We experimentally demonstrate that the SBAT with an ultralow f-number (f# = focal length/aperture size) could manipulate an individual red blood cell and a single 1.6 mm-diameter fertilized Zebrafish egg, respectively. Besides, in vitro rat aorta images were collected successfully at dynamic foci in which the lumen and the outer surface of the aorta could be clearly seen. With the ultralow f-number, the SBAT offers the combination of large acoustic radiation force and narrow beam width, leading to strong trapping and high-resolution imaging capabilities. These attributes enable the feasibility of using a single acoustic device to perform non-invasive multi-functions simultaneously for biomedical and biophysical applications.

  6. Force Spectroscopy with Dual-Trap Optical Tweezers: Molecular Stiffness Measurements and Coupled Fluctuations Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Ritort, F.

    2012-01-01

    Dual-trap optical tweezers are often used in high-resolution measurements in single-molecule biophysics. Such measurements can be hindered by the presence of extraneous noise sources, the most prominent of which is the coupling of fluctuations along different spatial directions, which may affect any optical tweezers setup. In this article, we analyze, both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view, the most common source for these couplings in dual-trap optical-tweezers setups: the misalignment of traps and tether. We give criteria to distinguish different kinds of misalignment, to estimate their quantitative relevance and to include them in the data analysis. The experimental data is obtained in a, to our knowledge, novel dual-trap optical-tweezers setup that directly measures forces. In the case in which misalignment is negligible, we provide a method to measure the stiffness of traps and tether based on variance analysis. This method can be seen as a calibration technique valid beyond the linear trap region. Our analysis is then employed to measure the persistence length of dsDNA tethers of three different lengths spanning two orders of magnitude. The effective persistence length of such tethers is shown to decrease with the contour length, in accordance with previous studies. PMID:23199920

  7. Adhesion of nanoparticles to polymer brushes studied with the ghost tweezers method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianli; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2015-01-21

    Mechanisms of interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and polymer brushes (PBs) are explored using dissipative particle dynamics simulations and an original "ghost tweezers" method that emulates lab experiments performed with optical or magnetic tweezers. The ghost tweezers method is employed to calculate the free energy of adhesion. Ghost tweezers represents a virtual harmonic potential, which tethers NP with a spring to a given anchor point. The average spring force represents the effective force of NP-PB interaction as a function of the NP coordinate. The free energy landscape of NP-PB interactions is calculated as the mechanical work needed to transfer NP from the solvent bulk to a particular distance from the substrate surface. With this technique, we explore the adhesion of bare and ligand-functionalized spherical NPs to polyisoprene natural rubber brush in acetone-benzene binary solvent. We examine two basic mechanisms of NP-PB interactions, NP adhesion at PB exterior and NP immersion into PB, which are governed by interplay between entropic repulsive forces and enthalpic attractive forces caused by polymer adsorption at the NP surface and ligand adsorption at the substrate. The relative free energies of the equilibrium adhesion states and the potential barriers separating these states are calculated at varying grafting density, NP size, and solvent composition.

  8. RBC aggregation dynamics in autologous plasma and serum studied with double-channel optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Danilina, Anna; Potkin, Anton; Kinnunen, Matti; Priezzhev, Alexander; Meglinski, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Red blood cells aggregating and disaggregating forces were measured in the autologous plasma and serum using the double-channeled optical tweezers. A significant, three-fold decrease of the both forces was observed in the serum compared to the plasma. The results of this study help to better assess the RBC aggregation mechanism.

  9. Photoelectrochemical electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The surface of a moderate band gap semiconductor such as p-type molybdenum sulfide is modified to contain an adherent film of charge mediating ionene polymer containing an electroactive unit such as bipyridimium. Electron transport between the electrode and the mediator film is favorable and photocorrosion and recombination processes are suppressed. Incorporation of particles of catalyst such as platinum within the film provides a reduction in overvoltage. The polymer film is readily deposited on the electrode surface and can be rendered stable by ionic or addition crosslinking. Catalyst can be predispersed in the polymer film or a salt can be impregnated into the film and reduced therein.

  10. Development of high frequency focused transducers for single beam acoustic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng

    Contactless particle trapping and manipulation have found many potential applications in diverse fields, especially in biological and medical research. Among the various methods, optical tweezers is the most well-known and extensively investigated technique. However, there are some limitations for particle manipulation based on optical tweezers. Due to the conceptual similarity with the optical tweezers and recent advances in high frequency ultrasonic transducer, a single beam acoustic tweezer using high frequency (≥ 20 MHz) focused transducer has recently been considered, and its feasibility was theoretically and experimentally investigated. This dissertation mainly describes the development of high frequency focused ultrasonic transducers for single beam acoustic tweezers applications. Three different types of transducers were fabricated. First, a 60 MHz miniature focused transducer (<1 mm) was made using press-focusing technique. The single beam acoustic trapping experiment was performed to manipulate 15 microm polystyrene microspheres using this transducer. In vitro ultrasonic biomicroscopy imaging on the rabbit eye was also obtained with this device. Second approach is to build a 200 MHz self-focused ZnO transducer by sputtering ZnO film on a curved surface of the aluminum backing material. An individual 10 microm microsphere was effectively manipulated in two dimensions by this type of transducer. Another ultrahigh frequency focused transducer based on silicon lens design has also been developed, where a 330 MHz silicon lens transducer was fabricated and evaluated. Microparticle trapping experiment was carried out to demonstrate that silicon lens transducer can manipulate a single microsphere as small as 5 microm. The realization of single beam acoustic tweezers using high frequency focused transducers can offer wide range of applications in biomedical and chemical sciences including intercellular kinetics studies and cell stimulation. Additionally, we

  11. 77 FR 65713 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products... the United States after importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications... importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic communications, components thereof, and...

  12. Time-Resolved Measurements in Optoelectronic Microbioanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory; Kossakovski, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    A report presents discussion of time-resolved measurements in optoelectronic microbioanalysis. Proposed microbioanalytical laboratory-on-a-chip devices for detection of microbes and toxic chemicals would include optoelectronic sensors and associated electronic circuits that would look for fluorescence or phosphorescence signatures of multiple hazardous biomolecules in order to detect which ones were present in a given situation. The emphasis in the instant report is on gating an active-pixel sensor in the time domain, instead of filtering light in the wavelength domain, to prevent the sensor from responding to a laser pulse used to excite fluorescence or phosphorescence while enabling the sensor to respond to the decaying fluorescence or phosphorescence signal that follows the laser pulse. The active-pixel sensor would be turned on after the laser pulse and would be used to either integrate the fluorescence or phosphorescence signal over several lifetimes and many excitation pulses or else take time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence or phosphorescence. The report also discusses issues of multiplexing and of using time-resolved measurements of fluorophores with known different fluorescence lifetimes to distinguish among them.

  13. Optoelectronic inventory system for special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    In support of the Department of Energy`s Dismantlement Program, the Optoelectronics Characterization and Sensor Development Department 2231 at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico has developed an in situ nonintrusive Optoelectronic Inventory System (OIS) that has the potential for application wherever periodic inventory of selected material is desired. Using a network of fiber-optic links, the OIS retrieves and stores inventory signatures from data storage devices (which are permanently attached to material storage containers) while inherently providing electromagnetic pulse immunity and electrical noise isolation. Photovoltaic cells (located within the storage facility) convert laser diode optic power from a laser driver to electrical energy. When powered and triggered, the data storage devices sequentially output their digital inventory signatures through light-emitting diode/photo diode data links for retrieval and storage in a mobile data acquisition system. An item`s exact location is determined through fiber-optic network and software design. The OIS provides an on-demand method for obtaining acceptable inventory reports while eliminating the need for human presence inside the material storage facility. By using modularization and prefabricated construction with mature technologies and components, an OIS installation with virtually unlimited capacity can be tailored to the customer`s requirements.

  14. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  15. Improved thermal oxidation stability of solution-processable silver nanowire transparent electrode by reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Youngu

    2012-12-01

    Solution-processable silver nanowire-reduced graphene oxide (AgNW-rGO) hybrid transparent electrode was prepared in order to replace conventional ITO transparent electrode. AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited high optical transmittance and low sheet resistance, which is comparable to ITO transparent electrode. In addition, it was found that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities due to excellent gas-barrier property of rGO passivation layer onto AgNW film. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode showed good photovoltaic behavior as much as solar cells with AgNW transparent electrode. It is expected that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode can be used as a key component in various optoelectronic application such as display panels, touch screen panels, and solar cells.

  16. Oscillating optical tweezer-based 3-D confocal microrheometer for investigating the intracellular micromechanics and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, H. D.; Rickter, E. A.; Pu, C.; Latinovic, O.; Kumar, A.; Mengistu, M.; Lowe-Krentz, L.; Chien, S.

    2005-08-01

    Mechanical properties of living biological cells are important for cells to maintain their shapes, support mechanical stresses and move through tissue matrix. The use of optical tweezers to measure micromechanical properties of cells has recently made significant progresses. This paper presents a new approach, the oscillating optical tweezer cytorheometer (OOTC), which takes advantage of the coherent detection of harmonically modulated particle motions by a lock-in amplifier to increase sensitivity, temporal resolution and simplicity. We demonstrate that OOTC can measure the dynamic mechanical modulus in the frequency range of 0.1-6,000 Hz at a rate as fast as 1 data point per second with submicron spatial resolution. More importantly, OOTC is capable of distinguishing the intrinsic non-random temporal variations from random fluctuations due to Brownian motion; this capability, not achievable by conventional approaches, is particular useful because living systems are highly dynamic and often exhibit non-thermal, rhythmic behavior in a broad time scale from a fraction of a second to hours or days. Although OOTC is effective in measuring the intracellular micromechanical properties, unless we can visualize the cytoskeleton in situ, the mechanical property data would only be as informative as that of "Blind men and the Elephant". To solve this problem, we take two steps, the first, to use of fluorescent imaging to identify the granular structures trapped by optical tweezers, and second, to integrate OOTC with 3-D confocal microscopy so we can take simultaneous, in situ measurements of the micromechanics and intracellular structure in living cells. In this paper, we discuss examples of applying the oscillating tweezer-based cytorheometer for investigating cultured bovine endothelial cells, the identification of caveolae as some of the granular structures in the cell as well as our approach to integrate optical tweezers with a spinning disk confocal microscope.

  17. Fullerene recognition with molecular tweezers made up of efficient buckybowls: a dispersion-corrected DFT study.

    PubMed

    Josa, Daniela; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M

    2015-05-28

    In 2007, Sygula and co-workers introduced a novel type of molecular tweezers with buckybowl pincers that have attracted the substantial interest of researchers due to their ideal architecture for recognizing fullerenes by concave-convex π∙∙∙π interactions (A. Sygula et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 3842). Although in recent years some modifications have been performed on these original molecular tweezers to improve their ability for catching fullerenes, very few improvements were achieved to date. For that reason, in the present work a series of molecular tweezers have been devised and their supramolecular complexes with C60 studied at the B97-D2/TZVP//SCC-DFTB-D and B97-D2/TZVP levels. Three different strategies have been tested: (1) changing the corannulene pincers to other buckybowls, (2) replacing the tetrabenzocyclooctatetraene tether by a buckybowl, and (3) adding methyl groups on the molecular tweezers. According to the results, all the three approaches are effective, in such a way that a combination of the three strategies results in buckycatchers with complexation energies (with C60) up to 2.6 times larger than that of the original buckycatcher, reaching almost -100 kcal mol(-1). The B97-D2/TZVP//SCC-DFTB-D approach can be a rapid screening tool for testing new molecular tweezers. However, since this approach does not reproduce correctly the deformation energy and this energy represents an important contribution to the total complexation energy of complexes, subsequent higher-level re-optimization is compulsory to achieve reliable results (the full B97-D2/TZVP level is used herein). This re-optimization could be superfluous when quite rigid buckycatchers are studied.

  18. Optoelectronic hit/miss transform for screening cervical smear slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanswamy, R.; Turner, R. M.; McKnight, D. J.; Johnson, K. M.; Sharpe, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    An optoelectronic morphological processor for detecting regions of interest (abnormal cells) on a cervical smear slide using the hit/miss transform is presented. Computer simulation of the algorithm tested on 184 Pap-smear images provided 95% detection and 5% false alarm. An optoelectronic implementation of the hit/miss transform is presented, along with preliminary experimental results.

  19. Optoelectronic sensors for subsea oil and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McStay, D.; Shiach, G.; Nolan, A.; McAvoy, S.

    2007-07-01

    The potential for optoelectronic sensor technology to provide the monitoring and control systems required for advanced subsea hydrocarbon production management is described. The utilisation of optoelectronic sensor technology to produce a new class of subsea Christmas Tree with in-built enhanced production monitoring and control systems as well as effective environmental monitoring systems is reported.

  20. Six Classes of Diffraction-Based Optoelectronic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan; Fuhr, Peter; Schipper, John

    2003-01-01

    Six classes of diffraction-based optoelectronic instruments have been invented as means for wavelength-based processing of light. One family of anticipated applications lies in scientific instrumentation for studying chemical and physical reactions that affect and/or are affected differently by light of different wavelengths or different combinations of wavelengths. Another family of anticipated applications lies in optoelectronic communication systems.

  1. Microvoltammetric Electrodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-25

    Microvoltammetric Electrodes, J. 0. Howell, R. M. Wightman, Anal. Chem., 56, 524-529 (1984). 2. Flow Rate Independent Amperometric Cell , W. L. Caudill...Electroanal. Chem., 182, 113-122 (1985). C. List of all publications 1. Flow Rate Independent Amperometric Cell , W. L. Caudill, J. 0. Howell, R. M

  2. The tunneling magnetoresistance and spin-polarized optoelectronic properties of graphyne-based molecular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Ouyang, Bin; Lan, Guoqing; Xu, Li-Chun; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Xuguang

    2017-02-01

    Using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green’s function method, we investigate the spin-dependent transport and optoelectronic properties of the graphyne-based molecular magnetic tunnel junctions (MMTJs). We find that these MMTJs exhibit an outstanding tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. The TMR value is as high as 106%. When the magnetization directions of two electrodes are antiparallel under positive or negative bias voltages, two kinds of pure spin currents can be obtained in the systems. Furthermore, under the irradiation of infrared, visible or ultraviolet light, spin-polarized photocurrents can be generated in the MMTJs, but the corresponding microscopic mechanisms are different. More importantly, if the magnetization directions of two electrodes are antiparallel, the photocurrents with different spins are spatially separated, appearing at different electrodes. This phenomenon provides a new way to simultaneously generate two spin currents.

  3. Integration of optical and electrochemical sensors on a microfluidic platform using organic optoelectronic components and silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Poorahong, Sujittra; Lefevre, Florent; Perron, Marie-Claude; Juneau, Philippe; Izquierdo, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Since the emergence of microfluidic platforms sensors integration has been a major challenge. With the advances in miniaturization of these platforms, there is a need for solutions to integrate various optical components in order to build sensors, which will offer different detection characteristics such as several emission and sensing wavelengths. Moreover, the integration of an electrochemical sensor including a transparent electrode that will be compatible with the optical sensor represents an additional challenge. In this perspective, organic optoelectronic devices combined with silver nanowire electrodes could be a solution. The integration of a fluorescent sensor and an electrochemical oxygen sensor into a microfluidic platform and the different characteristics, advantages and disadvantages that offer organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), organic photodetectors (OPD) and silver nanowire electrodes are discussed. Finally, an example of the integration of an optical and an electrochemical sensor into a microfluidic chip for water pollution detection will be described.

  4. Chip scale low dimensional materials: optoelectronics & nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Tingyi

    The CMOS foundry infrastructure enables integration of high density, high performance optical transceivers. We developed integrated devices that assemble resonators, waveguide, tapered couplers, pn junction and electrodes. Not only the volume standard manufacture in silicon foundry is promising to low-lost optical components operating at IR and mid-IR range, it also provides a robust platform for revealing new physical phenomenon. The thesis starts from comparison between photonic crystal and micro-ring resonators based on chip routers, showing photonic crystal switches have small footprint, consume low operation power, but its higher linear loss may require extra energy for signal amplification. Different designs are employed in their implementation in optical signal routing on chip. The second part of chapter 2 reviews the graphene based optoelectronic devices, such as modulators, lasers, switches and detectors, potential for group IV optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEIC). In chapter 3, the highly efficient thermal optic control could act as on-chip switches and (transmittance) tunable filters. Local temperature tuning compensates the wavelength differences between two resonances, and separate electrode is used for fine tuning of optical pathways between two resonators. In frequency domain, the two cavity system also serves as an optical analogue of Autler-Towns splitting, where the cavity-cavity resonance detuning is controlled by the length of pathway (phase) between them. The high thermal sensitivity of cavity resonance also effectively reflects the heat distribution around the nanoheaters, and thus derives the thermal conductivity in the planar porous suspended silicon membrane. Chapter 4 & 5 analyze graphene-silicon photonic crystal cavities with high Q and small mode volume. With negligible nonlinear response to the milliwatt laser excitation, the monolithic silicon PhC turns into highly nonlinear after transferring the single layer graphene with

  5. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  6. Optoelectronic determination of insect presence in fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bim P.; Guyer, Daniel E.; Ariana, Diwan P.

    2004-03-01

    Opto-electronic methods represent a potential to identify the presence of insect activities on or within agricultural commodities. Such measurements may detect actual insect presence or indirect secondary changes in the product resulting from past or present insect activities. Preliminary imaging studies have demonstrated some unique spectral characteristics of insect larvae on cherries. A detailed study on spectral characteristics of healthy and infested tart cherry tissue with and without larvae (Plum Curculio) was conducted for reflectance, transmittance and interactance modes for each of UV and visible/NIR light sources. The intensity of transmitted UV signals through the tart cherry was found to be weak; however, the spectral properties of UV light in reflectance mode has revealed some typical characteristics of larvae on healthy and infested tissue. The larvae on tissue were found to exhibit UV induced fluorescence signals in the range of 400-700 nm. Multi spectral imaging of the halved tart cherry has also corroborated this particular behavior of plum curculio larvae. The gray scale subtraction between corresponding pixels in these multi-spectral images has helped to locate the larvae precisely on the tart cherry tissue background, which otherwise was inseparable. The spectral characteristics of visible/NIR energy in transmittance and reflectance mode are capable of estimating the secondary effect of infestation in tart cherry tissue. The study has shown the shifting in peaks of reflected and transmitted signals from healthy and infested tissues and coincides with the concept of browning of tissue at cell level as a process of infestation. Interactance study has been carried out to study the possibility of coupling opto-electronic devices with the existing pitting process. The shifting of peaks has been observed for the normalized intensity of healthy and infested tissues. The study has been able to establish the inherent spectral characteristic of these

  7. Adhesion of functional layer on polymeric substrates for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendola, E.; Cammarano, A.; Pezzuto, M.; Acierno, D.

    2009-06-01

    The use of plastic film substrates for organic electronic devices promises to enable new applications, such as flexible displays. Plastic substrates have several distinct advantages, such as ruggedness, robustness, ultra lightness, conformability and impact resistance over glass substrates, which are primarily used in flat panel displays (FPDs) today. However, high transparency, proper surface roughness, low gas permeability and high transparent electrode conductivity of the plastic substrate are required for commercial applications. Polyesters, both amorphous and semicrystalline, are a promising class of commercial polymer for optoelectronic applications. Surface modification of polyester films was performed via chemical solution determining hydrolysis or oxidation. Hydrolysis was carried out by means of sodium hydroxide solution and oxidation by using standard clean 1 (SC-1) of RCA procedure [1]. For this work we have used commercial polymer films of 100μm in thickness: AryLite [2], supplied by Ferrania Imaging Technologies S.p.A. and characterised by very high glass transition temperature, Mylar (Polyethylene Terephthalate PET) and Teonex (Polyethylene Naphthalate PEN) both supplied by Dupont. More over, a bioriented and semicrystalline PET have been used. The aim of this study is modifying the polymer surface to improve the adhesion between organic-inorganic layer. It was found that the NaOH and SC-1 treatment cause a decrease of contact angles. In the present study we have deposited a thin films of amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) and its oxide (SiO2) on a new high temperature polymer substrate, AryLite, by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) [3], with a radio frequency plasma system.

  8. Towards an optoelectronic luminescent sensing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitry B.; Ponomarev, Gely V.; Ogurtsov, Vladimir I.; Dvornikov, Alexey A.

    1994-02-01

    The new dye which has improved spectral characteristics synthesized on the basis of platinum complex of the porphyrin-like compound was studied with the view of its application to oxygen sensing. It resulted in a new solid-state oxygen-sensitive material with advanced working characteristics which is highly compatible with excitation with yellow LEDs. This new sensing material makes it possible to develop simple fiber-optoelectronic devices -- prototype oxygen sensors. One of the embodiments was constructed which utilizes powerful yellow LED as a light source, silicone photodiode as a photodetector, and has a fiber-optic output terminated with an active element (oxygen membrane). The electronic scheme of the device provides modulation of LED at a kilohertz range frequency and is capable of measuring specific luminescent signal. The system is now under improvement and optimization with emphasis to lifetime measurements performed by phase method.

  9. Implantable optoelectronic probes for in vivo optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ege; Kuzum, Duygu

    2017-02-15

    More than a decade has passed since optics and genetics came together and lead to the emerging technologies of optogenetics. The advent of light-sensitive opsins made it possible to optically trigger the neurons into activation or inhibition by using visible light. The importance of spatiotemporally isolating a segment of a neural network and controlling nervous signaling in a precise manner has driven neuroscience researchers and engineers to invest great efforts in designing high precision in vivo implantable devices. These efforts have focused on delivery of sufficient power to deep brain regions, while monitoring neural activity with high resolution and fidelity. In this review, we report the progress made in the field of hybrid optoelectronic neural interfaces that combine optical stimulation with electrophysiological recordings. Different approaches that incorporate optical or electrical components on implantable devices are discussed in detail. Advantages of various different designs as well as practical and fundamental limitations are summarized to illuminate the future of neurotechnology development.

  10. Implantable optoelectronic probes for in vivo optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseri, Ege; Kuzum, Duygu

    2017-06-01

    More than a decade has passed since optics and genetics came together and lead to the emerging technologies of optogenetics. The advent of light-sensitive opsins made it possible to optically trigger the neurons into activation or inhibition by using visible light. The importance of spatiotemporally isolating a segment of a neural network and controlling nervous signaling in a precise manner has driven neuroscience researchers and engineers to invest great efforts in designing high precision in vivo implantable devices. These efforts have focused on delivery of sufficient power to deep brain regions, while monitoring neural activity with high resolution and fidelity. In this review, we report the progress made in the field of hybrid optoelectronic neural interfaces that combine optical stimulation with electrophysiological recordings. Different approaches that incorporate optical or electrical components on implantable devices are discussed in detail. Advantages of various different designs as well as practical and fundamental limitations are summarized to illuminate the future of neurotechnology development.

  11. Optoelectronic date acquisition system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Liu, Chunyang; Song, De; Tong, Zhiguo; Liu, Xiangqing

    2015-11-01

    An optoelectronic date acquisition system is designed based on FPGA. FPGA chip that is EP1C3T144C8 of Cyclone devices from Altera corporation is used as the centre of logic control, XTP2046 chip is used as A/D converter, host computer that communicates with the date acquisition system through RS-232 serial communication interface are used as display device and photo resistance is used as photo sensor. We use Verilog HDL to write logic control code about FPGA. It is proved that timing sequence is correct through the simulation of ModelSim. Test results indicate that this system meets the design requirement, has fast response and stable operation by actual hardware circuit test.

  12. Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics for sensor applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Czaplewski, David A.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Olsson, Roy H., III; Bogart, Gregory R.; Krishnamoorthy, Uma; Warren, Mial E.; Carr, Dustin Wade; Okandan, Murat; Peterson, Kenneth Allen

    2008-01-01

    This work utilized advanced engineering in several fields to find solutions to the challenges presented by the integration of MEMS/NEMS with optoelectronics to realize a compact sensor system, comprised of a microfabricated sensor, VCSEL, and photodiode. By utilizing microfabrication techniques in the realization of the MEMS/NEMS component, the VCSEL and the photodiode, the system would be small in size and require less power than a macro-sized component. The work focused on two technologies, accelerometers and microphones, leveraged from other LDRD programs. The first technology was the nano-g accelerometer using a nanophotonic motion detection system (67023). This accelerometer had measured sensitivity of approximately 10 nano-g. The Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics LDRD supported the nano-g accelerometer LDRD by providing advanced designs for the accelerometers, packaging, and a detection scheme to encapsulate the accelerometer, furthering the testing capabilities beyond bench-top tests. A fully packaged and tested die was never realized, but significant packaging issues were addressed and many resolved. The second technology supported by this work was the ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain and future combat systems (93518). This application utilized a diffraction-based sensing technique with different optical component placement and a different detection scheme from the nano-g accelerometer. The Integrated NEMS LDRD supported the microphone array LDRD by providing custom designs, VCSELs, and measurement techniques to accelerometers that were fabricated from the same operational principles as the microphones, but contain proof masses for acceleration transduction. These devices were packaged at the end of the work.

  13. Metal-free molecular junctions on ITO via amino-silane binding-towards optoelectronic molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Sergani, S; Furmansky, Y; Visoly-Fisher, I

    2013-11-15

    Light control over currents in molecular junctions is desirable as a non-contact input with high spectral and spatial resolution provided by the photonic input and the molecular electronics element, respectively. Expanding the study of molecular junctions to non-metallic transparent substrates, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), is vital for the observation of molecular optoelectronic effects. Non-metallic electrodes are expected to decrease the probability of quenching of molecular photo-excited states, light-induced plasmonic effects, or significant electrode expansion under visible light. We have developed micron-sized, metal free, optically addressable ITO molecular junctions with a conductive polymer serving as the counter-electrode. The electrical transport was shown to be dominated by the nature of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The use of amino-silane (APTMS) as the chemical binding scheme to ITO was found to be significant in determining the transport properties of the junctions. APTMS allows high junction yields and the formation of dense molecular layers preventing electrical short. However, polar amino-silane binding to the ITO significantly decreased the conductance compared to thiol-bound SAMs, and caused tilted geometry and disorder in the molecular layer. As the effect of the molecular structure on transport properties is clearly observed in our junctions, such metal-free junctions are suitable for characterizing the optoelectronic properties of molecular junctions.

  14. Metal-free molecular junctions on ITO via amino-silane binding—towards optoelectronic molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergani, S.; Furmansky, Y.; Visoly-Fisher, I.

    2013-11-01

    Light control over currents in molecular junctions is desirable as a non-contact input with high spectral and spatial resolution provided by the photonic input and the molecular electronics element, respectively. Expanding the study of molecular junctions to non-metallic transparent substrates, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), is vital for the observation of molecular optoelectronic effects. Non-metallic electrodes are expected to decrease the probability of quenching of molecular photo-excited states, light-induced plasmonic effects, or significant electrode expansion under visible light. We have developed micron-sized, metal free, optically addressable ITO molecular junctions with a conductive polymer serving as the counter-electrode. The electrical transport was shown to be dominated by the nature of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The use of amino-silane (APTMS) as the chemical binding scheme to ITO was found to be significant in determining the transport properties of the junctions. APTMS allows high junction yields and the formation of dense molecular layers preventing electrical short. However, polar amino-silane binding to the ITO significantly decreased the conductance compared to thiol-bound SAMs, and caused tilted geometry and disorder in the molecular layer. As the effect of the molecular structure on transport properties is clearly observed in our junctions, such metal-free junctions are suitable for characterizing the optoelectronic properties of molecular junctions.

  15. Stretchable and transparent electrodes based on in-plane structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, Joohee; Hyun, Byung Gwan; Ji, Sangyoon; Kim, So-Yun; Kim, Sungwon; An, Byeong Wan; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-08-01

    Stretchable electronics has attracted great interest with compelling potential applications that require reliable operation under mechanical deformation. Achieving stretchability in devices, however, requires a deeper understanding of nanoscale materials and mechanics beyond the success of flexible electronics. In this regard, tremendous research efforts have been dedicated toward developing stretchable electrodes, which are one of the most important building blocks for stretchable electronics. Stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, which retain their electrical conductivity and optical transparency under mechanical deformation, are particularly important for the favourable application of stretchable devices. This minireview summarizes recent advances in stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, especially employing strategies based on in-plane structures. Various approaches using metal nanomaterials, carbon nanomaterials, and their hybrids are described in terms of preparation processes and their optoelectronic/mechanical properties. Some challenges and perspectives for further advances in stretchable transparent electrodes are also discussed.

  16. A new iterative Fourier transform algorithm for optimal design in holographic optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Ferraro, P.; Netti, P. A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose a new Iterative Fourier Transform Algorithm (IFTA) capable to suppress ghost traps and noise in Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT), maintaining a high diffraction efficiency in a computational time comparable with the others iterative algorithms. The process consists in the planning of the suitable ideal target of optical tweezers as input of classical IFTA and we show we are able to design up to 4 real traps, in the field of view imaged by the microscope objective, using an IFTA built on fictitious phasors, located in strategic positions in the Fourier plane. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is evaluated both for numerical and optical reconstructions and compared with the other techniques known in literature.

  17. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers.

    PubMed

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmir; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip

    2015-05-01

    A method for in vitro identification of individual bacterial cells is presented. The method is based on a combination of optical tweezers for spatial trapping of individual bacterial cells and Raman microspectroscopy for acquisition of spectral “Raman fingerprints” obtained from the trapped cell. Here, Raman spectra were taken from the biofilm-forming cells without the influence of an extracellular matrix and were compared with biofilm-negative cells. Results of principal component analyses of Raman spectra enabled us to distinguish between the two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, we propose that Raman tweezers can become the technique of choice for a clearer understanding of the processes involved in bacterial biofilms which constitute a highly privileged way of life for bacteria, protected from the external environment.

  18. Evolution of Nanoflowers and Nanospheres of Zinc Bisporphyrinate Tweezers at the Air/water Interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fan; Zhuo, Congcong; Hu, Chuanjiang; Liu, Ming Hua

    2017-03-22

    While the sophisticated Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett technique facilitates the fabrication of uniform ultrathin monolayer and films, it is also revealed as a powerful tool for the bottom-up constructions of the nanostructures through the air/water interface. In this paper, unique nanoflowers or nanospheres were constructed based on the synthesized m-phthalic diamide-linked Zinc bis-porphyrinate tweezers using the Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. It was found that both the two tweezer type Zinc bisporphyrinates could form stable two-dimensional spreading films at the air/water interface, which could be subsequently transferred onto solid substrates by the vertical lifting method. The atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed that at the initial spreading stage the compound formed flat disk-like domains and then hierarchically evolved into nanoflowers or nanospheres upon compressing the floating film. Such nanostructures have not been reported before and cannot be fabricated using the other self-assembly methods.

  19. Multiple Optical Traps with a Single-Beam Optical Tweezer Utilizing Surface Micromachined Planar Curved Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ju-Nan; Chen, Kuan-Yu

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we present a single-beam optical tweezer integrated with a planar curved diffraction grating for microbead manipulation. Various curvatures of the surface micromachined planar curved grating are systematically investigated. The planar curved grating was fabricated using multiuser micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) processes (MUMPs). The angular separation and the number of diffracted orders were determined. Experimental results indicate that the diffraction patterns and curvature of the planar curved grating are closely related. As the curvature of the planar curved grating increases, the vertical diffraction angle increases, resulting in the strip patterns of the planar curved grating. A single-beam optical tweezer integrated with a planar curved diffraction grating was developed. We demonstrate a technique for creating multiple optical traps from a single laser beam using the developed planar curved grating. The strip patterns of the planar curved grating that resulted from diffraction were used to trap one row of polystyrene beads.

  20. Exact Theory of Optical Tweezers and Its Application to Absolute Calibration.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Rafael S; Viana, Nathan B; Neto, Paulo A Maia; Nussenzveig, H Moysés

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool for basic and applied research in cell biology. Here, we describe an experimentally verified theory for the trapping forces generated by optical tweezers based on first principles that allows absolute calibration. For pedagogical reasons, the steps that led to the development of the theory over the past 15 years are outlined. The results are applicable to a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Protocols for implementing absolute calibration are given, explaining how to measure all required experimental parameters, and including a link to an applet for stiffness calculations.

  1. Neural Network for Image-to-Image Control of Optical Tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Weiland, Kenneth E.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2004-01-01

    A method is discussed for using neural networks to control optical tweezers. Neural-net outputs are combined with scaling and tiling to generate 480 by 480-pixel control patterns for a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM can be combined in various ways with a microscope to create movable tweezers traps with controllable profiles. The neural nets are intended to respond to scattered light from carbon and silicon carbide nanotube sensors. The nanotube sensors are to be held by the traps for manipulation and calibration. Scaling and tiling allow the 100 by 100-pixel maximum resolution of the neural-net software to be applied in stages to exploit the full 480 by 480-pixel resolution of the SLM. One of these stages is intended to create sensitive null detectors for detecting variations in the scattered light from the nanotube sensors.

  2. Design of Fresnel Lens-Type Multi-Trapping Acoustic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Tu, You-Lin; Chen, Shih-Jui; Hwang, Yean-Ren

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, acoustic tweezers which use beam forming performed by a Fresnel zone plate are proposed. The performance has been demonstrated by finite element analysis, including the acoustic intensity, acoustic pressure, acoustic potential energy, gradient force, and particle distribution. The acoustic tweezers use an ultrasound beam produced by a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer operating at 2.4 MHz and 100 Vpeak-to-peak in a water medium. The design of the Fresnel lens (zone plate) is based on air reflection, acoustic impedance matching, and the Fresnel half-wave band (FHWB) theory. This acoustic Fresnel lens can produce gradient force and acoustic potential wells that allow the capture and manipulation of single particles or clusters of particles. Simulation results strongly indicate a good trapping ability, for particles under 150 µm in diameter, in the minimum energy location. This can be useful for cell or microorganism manipulation. PMID:27886050

  3. Thermophoretic Tweezers for Low-Power and Versatile Manipulation of Biological Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Wei, Xiaoling; Mao, Zhangming; Xie, Chong; Zheng, Yuebing

    2017-03-28

    Optical manipulation of biological cells and nanoparticles is significantly important in life sciences, early disease diagnosis, and nanomanufacturing. However, low-power and versatile all-optical manipulation has remained elusive. Herein, we have achieved light-directed versatile thermophoretic manipulation of biological cells at an optical power 100-1000 times lower than that of optical tweezers. By harnessing the permittivity gradient in the electric double layer of the charged surface of the cell membrane, we succeed at the low-power trapping of suspended biological cells within a light-controlled temperature gradient field. Furthermore, through dynamic control of optothermal potentials using a digital micromirror device, we have achieved arbitrary spatial arrangements of cells at a resolution of ∼100 nm and precise rotation of both single and assemblies of cells. Our thermophoretic tweezers will find applications in cellular biology, nanomedicine, and tissue engineering.

  4. Studying taxis in real time using optical tweezers: applications for Leishmania amazonensis parasites.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, L Y; Fontes, A; de Thomaz, A A; Santos, B S; Farias, P M A; Ayres, D C; Giorgio, S; Cesar, C L

    2009-01-01

    Beads trapped by an optical tweezers can be used as a force transducer for measuring forces of the same order of magnitude as typical forces induced by flagellar motion. We used an optical tweezers to study chemotaxis by observing the force response of a flagellated microorganism when placed in a gradient of attractive chemical substances. This report shows such observations for Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for leishmaniasis, a serious disease. We quantified the movement of this protozoan for different gradients of glucose. We were able to observe both the strength and the directionality of the force. The characterization of the chemotaxis of these parasites can help to understand the mechanics of infection and improve the treatments employed for this disease. This methodology can be used to quantitatively study the taxis of any kind of flagellated microorganisms under concentration gradients of different chemical substances, or even other types of variable gradients such as temperature and pressure.

  5. Design of Fresnel Lens-Type Multi-Trapping Acoustic Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Tu, You-Lin; Chen, Shih-Jui; Hwang, Yean-Ren

    2016-11-23

    In this paper, acoustic tweezers which use beam forming performed by a Fresnel zone plate are proposed. The performance has been demonstrated by finite element analysis, including the acoustic intensity, acoustic pressure, acoustic potential energy, gradient force, and particle distribution. The acoustic tweezers use an ultrasound beam produced by a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer operating at 2.4 MHz and 100 Vpeak-to-peak in a water medium. The design of the Fresnel lens (zone plate) is based on air reflection, acoustic impedance matching, and the Fresnel half-wave band (FHWB) theory. This acoustic Fresnel lens can produce gradient force and acoustic potential wells that allow the capture and manipulation of single particles or clusters of particles. Simulation results strongly indicate a good trapping ability, for particles under 150 µm in diameter, in the minimum energy location. This can be useful for cell or microorganism manipulation.

  6. An Improved Optical Tweezers Assay for Measuring the Force Generation of Single Kinesin Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Numerous microtubule-associated molecular motors, including several kinesins and cytoplasmic dynein, produce opposing forces that regulate spindle and chromosome positioning during mitosis. The motility and force generation of these motors are therefore critical to normal cell division, and dysfunction of these processes may contribute to human disease. Optical tweezers provide a powerful method for studying the nanometer motility and piconewton force generation of single motor proteins in vitro. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we present a set of step-by-step, optimized protocols for expressing a kinesin construct (K560-GFP) in Escherichia coli, purifying it, and studying its force generation in an optical tweezers microscope. We also provide detailed instructions on proper alignment and calibration of an optical trapping microscope. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of similar experiments. PMID:24633799

  7. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmir; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika; Růžička, Filip

    2015-05-01

    A method for in vitro identification of individual bacterial cells is presented. The method is based on a combination of optical tweezers for spatial trapping of individual bacterial cells and Raman microspectroscopy for acquisition of spectral "Raman fingerprints" obtained from the trapped cell. Here, Raman spectra were taken from the biofilm-forming cells without the influence of an extracellular matrix and were compared with biofilm-negative cells. Results of principal component analyses of Raman spectra enabled us to distinguish between the two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thus, we propose that Raman tweezers can become the technique of choice for a clearer understanding of the processes involved in bacterial biofilms which constitute a highly privileged way of life for bacteria, protected from the external environment.

  8. Low cost optical tweezers systems using double coil driving stepping motor to controlling sample stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laowattanatham, N.; Cheamanunkul, N.; Plaipichit, S.; Buranasiri, P.; Nuansri, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this research, the low cost optical tweezers systems using X-Y stage has been developed by using 5-phase stepping motor. By using sequential double coil driving, we can obtain the driving torque larger than using the single coil driving. The moving scale is fine resolution at 0.2 micrometer. The overall systems based on microcontroller PIC18F458 and joystick controller with LabView® graphical user interface (GUI). The mechanical damping has been included in the system for decreasing the vibrational noise. By using this method, our optical tweezers system is cheaper than the other commercial system that has been used the piezoelectric driving, and still has the same efficiency.

  9. Flexion bonding transfer of multilayered graphene as a top electrode in transparent organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tae Lim, Jong; Lee, Hyunkoo; Cho, Hyunsu; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Sung Cho, Nam; Kuk Lee, Bong; Park, Jonghyurk; Kim, Jaesu; Han, Jun-Han; Yang, Jong-Heon; Yu, Byoung-Gon; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Chu Lim, Seong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2015-12-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention as a next-generation transparent conducting electrode, because of its high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. Various optoelectronic devices comprising graphene as a bottom electrode, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics, quantum-dot LEDs, and light-emitting electrochemical cells, have recently been reported. However, performance of optoelectronic devices using graphene as top electrodes is limited, because the lamination process through which graphene is positioned as the top layer of these conventional OLEDs is a lack of control in the surface roughness, the gapless contact, and the flexion bonding between graphene and organic layer of the device. Here, a multilayered graphene (MLG) as a top electrode is successfully implanted, via dry bonding, onto the top organic layer of transparent OLED (TOLED) with flexion patterns. The performance of the TOLED with MLG electrode is comparable to that of a conventional TOLED with a semi-transparent thin-Ag top electrode, because the MLG electrode makes a contact with the TOLED with no residue. In addition, we successfully fabricate a large-size transparent segment panel using the developed MLG electrode. Therefore, we believe that the flexion bonding technology presented in this work is applicable to various optoelectronic devices.

  10. Flexion bonding transfer of multilayered graphene as a top electrode in transparent organic light-emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Tae Lim, Jong; Lee, Hyunkoo; Cho, Hyunsu; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Sung Cho, Nam; Kuk Lee, Bong; Park, Jonghyurk; Kim, Jaesu; Han, Jun-Han; Yang, Jong-Heon; Yu, Byoung-Gon; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Chu Lim, Seong; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2015-01-01

    Graphene has attracted considerable attention as a next-generation transparent conducting electrode, because of its high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. Various optoelectronic devices comprising graphene as a bottom electrode, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics, quantum-dot LEDs, and light-emitting electrochemical cells, have recently been reported. However, performance of optoelectronic devices using graphene as top electrodes is limited, because the lamination process through which graphene is positioned as the top layer of these conventional OLEDs is a lack of control in the surface roughness, the gapless contact, and the flexion bonding between graphene and organic layer of the device. Here, a multilayered graphene (MLG) as a top electrode is successfully implanted, via dry bonding, onto the top organic layer of transparent OLED (TOLED) with flexion patterns. The performance of the TOLED with MLG electrode is comparable to that of a conventional TOLED with a semi-transparent thin-Ag top electrode, because the MLG electrode makes a contact with the TOLED with no residue. In addition, we successfully fabricate a large-size transparent segment panel using the developed MLG electrode. Therefore, we believe that the flexion bonding technology presented in this work is applicable to various optoelectronic devices. PMID:26626439

  11. Red blood cell membrane viscoelasticity, agglutination and zeta potential measurements with double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-02-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) viscoelastic membrane contains proteins and glycolproteins embedded in, or attached, to a fluid lipid bilayer and are negatively charged, which creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. There are techniques, however, to decrease the zeta potential to allow cell agglutination which are the basis of most of the tests of antigen-antibody interactions in blood banks. This report shows the use of a double optical tweezers to measure RBC membrane viscosity, agglutination and zeta potential. In our technique one of the optical tweezers trap a silica bead that binds strongly to a RBC at the end of a RBCs rouleaux and, at the same time, acts as a pico-Newton force transducer, after calibration through its displacement from the equilibrium position. The other optical tweezers trap the RBC at the other end. To measure the membrane viscosity the optical force is measured as a function of the velocity between the RBCs. To measure the adhesion the tweezers are slowly displaced apart until the RBCs disagglutination happens. The RBC zeta potential is measured in two complimentary ways, by the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied electric field, and the conventional way, by the measurement of terminal velocity of the RBC after released from the optical trap. These two measurements provide information about the RBC charges and, also, electrolytic solution properties. We believe this can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.

  12. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  13. Light-induced rotations of chiral birefringent microparticles in optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Donato, M. G.; Mazzulla, A.; Pagliusi, P.; Magazzù, A.; Hernandez, R. J.; Provenzano, C.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Maragò, O. M.; Cipparrone, G.

    2016-01-01

    We study the rotational dynamics of solid chiral and birefringent microparticles induced by elliptically polarized laser light in optical tweezers. We find that both reflection of left circularly polarized light and residual linear retardance affect the particle dynamics. The degree of ellipticity of laser light needed to induce rotations is found. The experimental results are compared with analytical calculations of the transfer of angular moment from elliptically polarized light to chiral birefringent particles. PMID:27601200

  14. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-10-27

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 μm, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  15. Bismuth chalcohalides and oxyhalides as optoelectronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao -Hua; Shi, Hongliang; Ming, Wenmei

    2016-03-29

    Several Tl and Pb based halides and chalcohalides have recently been discovered as promising optoelectronic materials [i.e., photovoltaic (PV) and gamma-ray detection materials]. Efficient carrier transport in these materials is attributed partly to the special chemistry of ns2 ions (e.g., Tl+, Pb2+, and Bi3+). However, the toxicity of Tl and Pb is challenging to the development and the wide use of Tl and Pb based materials. In this paper, we investigate materials that contain Bi3+, which is also an ns2 ion. By combining Bi halides with Bi chalcogenides or oxides, the resulting ternary compounds exhibit a wide range of band gaps, offering opportunities in various optoelectronic applications. Density functional calculations of electronic structure, dielectric properties, optical properties, and defect properties are performed on selected Bi3+ based chalcohalides and oxyhalides, i.e., BiSeBr, BiSI, BiSeI, and BiOBr. We propose different applications for these Bi compounds based on calculated properties, i.e., n-BiSeBr, p-BiSI, and p-BiSeI as PV materials, BiSeBr and BiSI as room-temperature radiation detection materials, and BiOBr as a p-type transparent conducting material. BiSeBr, BiSI, and BiSeBr have chain structures while BiOBr has a layered structure. However, in BiSI, BiSeI, and BiOBr, significant valence-band dispersion is found in the directions perpendicular to the atomic chain or layer because the valence-band edge states are dominated by the halogen states that have strong interchain or interlayer coupling. We find significantly enhanced Born effective charges and anomalously large static dielectric constants of the Bi compounds, which should reduce carrier scattering and trapping and promote efficient carrier transport in these materials. The strong screening and the small anion coordination numbers in Bi chalcohalides should lead to weak potentials for electron localization at

  16. Bismuth chalcohalides and oxyhalides as optoelectronic materials

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Mao -Hua; Shi, Hongliang; Ming, Wenmei

    2016-03-29

    Several Tl and Pb based halides and chalcohalides have recently been discovered as promising optoelectronic materials [i.e., photovoltaic (PV) and gamma-ray detection materials]. Efficient carrier transport in these materials is attributed partly to the special chemistry of ns2 ions (e.g., Tl+, Pb2+, and Bi3+). However, the toxicity of Tl and Pb is challenging to the development and the wide use of Tl and Pb based materials. In this paper, we investigate materials that contain Bi3+, which is also an ns2 ion. By combining Bi halides with Bi chalcogenides or oxides, the resulting ternary compounds exhibit a wide range of bandmore » gaps, offering opportunities in various optoelectronic applications. Density functional calculations of electronic structure, dielectric properties, optical properties, and defect properties are performed on selected Bi3+ based chalcohalides and oxyhalides, i.e., BiSeBr, BiSI, BiSeI, and BiOBr. We propose different applications for these Bi compounds based on calculated properties, i.e., n-BiSeBr, p-BiSI, and p-BiSeI as PV materials, BiSeBr and BiSI as room-temperature radiation detection materials, and BiOBr as a p-type transparent conducting material. BiSeBr, BiSI, and BiSeBr have chain structures while BiOBr has a layered structure. However, in BiSI, BiSeI, and BiOBr, significant valence-band dispersion is found in the directions perpendicular to the atomic chain or layer because the valence-band edge states are dominated by the halogen states that have strong interchain or interlayer coupling. We find significantly enhanced Born effective charges and anomalously large static dielectric constants of the Bi compounds, which should reduce carrier scattering and trapping and promote efficient carrier transport in these materials. The strong screening and the small anion coordination numbers in Bi chalcohalides should lead to weak potentials for electron localization at anion vacancies. As a result, defect calculations indeed show that

  17. Magnetometer Based on Optoelectronic Microwave Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey

    2005-01-01

    proposed instrument, intended mainly for use as a magnetometer, would include an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) stabilized by an atomic cell that could play the role of a magnetically tunable microwave filter. The microwave frequency would vary with the magnetic field in the cell, thereby providing an indication of the magnetic field. The proposed magnetometer would offer a combination of high accuracy and high sensitivity, characterized by flux densities of less than a picotesla. In comparison with prior magnetometers, the proposed magnetometer could, in principle, be constructed as a compact, lightweight instrument: It could fit into a package of about 10 by 10 by 10 cm and would have a mass <0.5 kg. As described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, an OEO is a hybrid of photonic and electronic components that generates highly spectrally pure microwave radiation, and optical radiation modulated by the microwave radiation, through direct conversion between laser light and microwave radiation in an optoelectronic feedback loop. As used here, "atomic cell" signifies a cell containing a vapor, the constituent atoms of which can be made to undergo transitions between quantum states, denoted hyperfine levels, when excited by light in a suitable wavelength range. The laser light must be in this range. The energy difference between the hyperfine levels defines the microwave frequency. In the proposed instrument (see figure), light from a laser would be introduced into an electro-optical modulator (EOM). Amplitude-modulated light from the exit port of the EOM would pass through a fiber-optic splitter having two output branches. The light in one branch would be sent through an atomic cell to a photodiode. The light in the other branch would constitute the microwave-modulated optical output. Part of the light leaving the atomic cell could also be used to stabilize the laser at a frequency in the vicinity of the desired hyperfine or other quantum transition. The

  18. Bismuth chalcohalides and oxyhalides as optoelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Ming, Wenmei; Du, Mao-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Several Tl and Pb based halides and chalcohalides have recently been discovered as promising optoelectronic materials [i.e., photovoltaic (PV) and gamma-ray detection materials]. Efficient carrier transport in these materials is attributed partly to the special chemistry of n s2 ions (e.g., T l+ , P b2 + , and B i3 + ). However, the toxicity of Tl and Pb is challenging to the development and the wide use of Tl and Pb based materials. In this paper, we investigate materials that contain B i3 + , which is also an n s2 ion. By combining Bi halides with Bi chalcogenides or oxides, the resulting ternary compounds exhibit a wide range of band gaps, offering opportunities in various optoelectronic applications. Density functional calculations of electronic structure, dielectric properties, optical properties, and defect properties are performed on selected B i3 + based chalcohalides and oxyhalides, i.e., BiSeBr, BiSI, BiSeI, and BiOBr. We propose different applications for these Bi compounds based on calculated properties, i.e., n -BiSeBr, p -BiSI, and p -BiSeI as PV materials, BiSeBr and BiSI as room-temperature radiation detection materials, and BiOBr as a p -type transparent conducting material. BiSeBr, BiSI, and BiSeBr have chain structures while BiOBr has a layered structure. However, in BiSI, BiSeI, and BiOBr, significant valence-band dispersion is found in the directions perpendicular to the atomic chain or layer because the valence-band edge states are dominated by the halogen states that have strong interchain or interlayer coupling. We find significantly enhanced Born effective charges and anomalously large static dielectric constants of the Bi compounds, which should reduce carrier scattering and trapping and promote efficient carrier transport in these materials. The strong screening and the small anion coordination numbers in Bi chalcohalides should lead to weak potentials for electron localization at anion vacancies. Defect calculations indeed show that the

  19. Ag nanoparticles/PPV composite nanofibers with high and sensitive opto-electronic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinfeng; Yang, Peipei; Wang, Chunjiao; Zhan, Sumei; Zhang, Lianji; Huang, Zonghao; Li, Wenwen; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Zijiang; Shao, Chen

    2011-12-01

    The novel Ag nanoparticles/poly( p-phenylene vinylene) [PPV] composite nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning. The transmission electron microscope image shows that the average diameter of composite fibers is about 500 nm and Ag nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in the PPV matrix with an average diameter of about 25 nm. The Fourier transform infrared spectra suggest that there could be a coordination effect to a certain extent between the Ag atom and the π system of PPV, which is significantly favorable for the dissociation of photoexcitons and the charge transfer at the interface between the Ag nanoparticle and the PPV. The Au top electrode device of the single Ag/PPV composite nanofiber exhibits high and sensitive opto-electronic responses. Under light illumination of 5.76 mW/cm2 and voltage of 20 V, the photocurrent is over three times larger than the dark current under same voltage, which indicates that this kind of composite fiber is an excellent opto-electronic nanomaterial.

  20. Tunable optoelectronic properties of CBD-CdS thin films via bath temperature alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumarage, W. G. C.; Wijesundera, R. P.; Seneviratne, V. A.; Jayalath, C. P.; Dassanayake, B. S.

    2016-03-01

    The tunability of the band-gap value and electron affinity of the n-CdS by adjusting the growth parameters is very important as it paves the way to improve the efficiency of CdS-based solar cells by adjusting the band lineup with other p-type semiconductors. In this respect, polycrystalline n-CdS thin films were grown on FTO glass substrates at different bath temperatures (40-80 °C) by the chemical bath deposition technique. The structural, morphological and optoelectronic properties of CdS thin films were studied using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectrometry, profilometry, atomic force microscopy, photoelectrochemical and Mott-Schottky measurements. Absorption measurements reveal that an energy-gap value of n-CdS can be adjusted from 2.27 to 2.57 eV and Mott-Schottky measurements indicate that the flat-band potential is increased from  -699 to  -835 V with respect to a Ag/AgCl electrode by decreasing the deposition bath temperature from 60 to 40 °C. This tunability of optoelectronic properties of n-CdS is very useful for applications in thin film solar cells and other devices.

  1. Optoelectronic Evaluation and Loss Analysis of PEDOT:PSS/Si Hybrid Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhai; Fang, Zebo; Sheng, Jiang; Ling, Zhaoheng; Liu, Zhaolang; Zhu, Juye; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun

    2017-12-01

    The organic/silicon (Si) hybrid heterojunction solar cells (HHSCs) have attracted considerable attention due to their potential advantages in high efficiency and low cost. However, as a newly arisen photovoltaic device, its current efficiency is still much worse than commercially available Si solar cells. Therefore, a comprehensive and systematical optoelectronic evaluation and loss analysis on this HHSC is therefore highly necessary to fully explore its efficiency potential. Here, a thoroughly optoelectronic simulation is provided on a typical planar polymer poly (3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/Si HHSC. The calculated spectra of reflection and external quantum efficiency (EQE) match well with the experimental results in a full-wavelength range. The losses in current density, which are contributed by both optical losses (i.e., reflection, electrode shield, and parasitic absorption) and electrical recombination (i.e., the bulk and surface recombination), are predicted via carefully addressing the electromagnetic and carrier-transport processes. In addition, the effects of Si doping concentrations and rear surface recombination velocities on the device performance are fully investigated. The results drawn in this study are beneficial to the guidance of designing high-performance PEDOT:PSS/Si HHSCs.

  2. Optoelectronic Evaluation and Loss Analysis of PEDOT:PSS/Si Hybrid Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenhai; Fang, Zebo; Sheng, Jiang; Ling, Zhaoheng; Liu, Zhaolang; Zhu, Juye; Gao, Pingqi; Ye, Jichun

    2017-01-01

    The organic/silicon (Si) hybrid heterojunction solar cells (HHSCs) have attracted considerable attention due to their potential advantages in high efficiency and low cost. However, as a newly arisen photovoltaic device, its current efficiency is still much worse than commercially available Si solar cells. Therefore, a comprehensive and systematical optoelectronic evaluation and loss analysis on this HHSC is therefore highly necessary to fully explore its efficiency potential. Here, a thoroughly optoelectronic simulation is provided on a typical planar polymer poly (3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)/Si HHSC. The calculated spectra of reflection and external quantum efficiency (EQE) match well with the experimental results in a full-wavelength range. The losses in current density, which are contributed by both optical losses (i.e., reflection, electrode shield, and parasitic absorption) and electrical recombination (i.e., the bulk and surface recombination), are predicted via carefully addressing the electromagnetic and carrier-transport processes. In addition, the effects of Si doping concentrations and rear surface recombination velocities on the device performance are fully investigated. The results drawn in this study are beneficial to the guidance of designing high-performance PEDOT:PSS/Si HHSCs.

  3. An opto-electronic joint detection system based on DSP aiming at early cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiya; Jia, Mengyu; Gao, Feng; Yang, Lihong; Qu, Pengpeng; Zou, Changping; Liu, Pengxi; Zhao, Huijuan

    2015-02-01

    The cervical cancer screening at a pre-cancer stage is beneficial to reduce the mortality of women. An opto-electronic joint detection system based on DSP aiming at early cervical cancer screening is introduced in this paper. In this system, three electrodes alternately discharge to the cervical tissue and three light emitting diodes in different wavelengths alternately irradiate the cervical tissue. Then the relative optical reflectance and electrical voltage attenuation curve are obtained by optical and electrical detection, respectively. The system is based on DSP to attain the portable and cheap instrument. By adopting the relative reflectance and the voltage attenuation constant, the classification algorithm based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) discriminates abnormal cervical tissue from normal. We use particle swarm optimization to optimize the two key parameters of SVM, i.e. nuclear factor and cost factor. The clinical data were collected on 313 patients to build a clinical database of tissue responses under optical and electrical stimulations with the histopathologic examination as the gold standard. The classification result shows that the opto-electronic joint detection has higher total coincidence rate than separate optical detection or separate electrical detection. The sensitivity, specificity, and total coincidence rate increase with the increasing of sample numbers in the training set. The average total coincidence rate of the system can reach 85.1% compared with the histopathologic examination.

  4. Amyloid β-Protein Assembly: The Effect of Molecular Tweezers CLR01 and CLR03

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The early oligomerization of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) has been shown to be an important event in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Designing small molecule inhibitors targeting Aβ oligomerization is one attractive and promising strategy for AD treatment. Here we used ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to study the different effects of the molecular tweezers CLR01 and CLR03 on Aβ self-assembly. CLR01 was found to bind to Aβ directly and disrupt its early oligomerization. Moreover, CLR01 remodeled the early oligomerization of Aβ42 by compacting the structures of dimers and tetramers and as a consequence eliminated higher-order oligomers. Unexpectedly, the negative-control derivative, CLR03, which lacks the hydrophobic arms of the tweezer structure, was found to facilitate early Aβ oligomerization. Our study provides an example of IMS as a powerful tool to study and better understand the interaction between small molecule modulators and Aβ oligomerization, which is not attainable by other methods, and provides important insights into therapeutic development of molecular tweezers for AD treatment. PMID:25751170

  5. Grating-flanked plasmonic coaxial apertures for efficient fiber optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Amr A E; Sheikhoelislami, Sassan; Gastelum, Steven; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-09-05

    Subwavelength plasmonic apertures have been foundational for direct optical manipulation of nanoscale specimens including sub-100 nm polymeric beads, metallic nanoparticles and proteins. While most plasmonic traps result in two-dimensional localization, three-dimensional manipulation has been demonstrated by integrating a plasmonic aperture on an optical fiber tip. However, such 3D traps are usually inefficient since the optical mode of the fiber and the subwavelength aperture only weakly couple. In this paper we design more efficient optical-fiber-based plasmonic tweezers combining a coaxial plasmonic aperture with a plasmonic grating coupler at the fiber tip facet. Using full-field finite difference time domain analysis, we optimize the grating design for both gold and silver fiber-based coaxial tweezers such that the optical transmission through the apertures is maximized. With the optimized grating, we show that the maximum transmission efficiency increases from 2.5% to 19.6% and from 1.48% to 16.7% for the gold and silver structures respectively. To evaluate their performance as optical tweezers, we calculate the optical forces and the corresponding trapping potential on dielectric particles interacting with the apertures. We demonstrate that the enahncement in the transmission translates into an equivalent increase in the optical forces. Consequently, the optical power required to achieve stable optical trapping is significantly reduced allowing for efficient localization and 3D manipulation of sub-30 nm dielectric particles.

  6. Stable optical trapping and sensitive characterization of nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mu-Ying; Ling, Dong-Xiong; Ling, Lin; Li, William; Li, Yong-Qing

    2017-02-01

    Optical manipulation and label-free characterization of nanoscale structures open up new possibilities for assembly and control of nanodevices and biomolecules. Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped particle, but is generally less effective for individual nanoparticles. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  7. Stable optical trapping and sensitive characterization of nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mu-ying; Ling, Dong-xiong; Ling, Lin; Li, William; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-01-01

    Optical manipulation and label-free characterization of nanoscale structures open up new possibilities for assembly and control of nanodevices and biomolecules. Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped particle, but is generally less effective for individual nanoparticles. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints. PMID:28211526

  8. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-05-15

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  9. Quantitation of malaria parasite-erythrocyte cell-cell interactions using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Crick, Alex J; Theron, Michel; Tiffert, Teresa; Lew, Virgilio L; Cicuta, Pietro; Rayner, Julian C

    2014-08-19

    Erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites is an essential step for parasite survival and hence the pathogenesis of malaria. Invasion has been studied intensively, but our cellular understanding has been limited by the fact that it occurs very rapidly: invasion is generally complete within 1 min, and shortly thereafter the merozoites, at least in in vitro culture, lose their invasive capacity. The rapid nature of the process, and hence the narrow time window in which measurements can be taken, have limited the tools available to quantitate invasion. Here we employ optical tweezers to study individual invasion events for what we believe is the first time, showing that newly released P. falciparum merozoites, delivered via optical tweezers to a target erythrocyte, retain their ability to invade. Even spent merozoites, which had lost the ability to invade, retain the ability to adhere to erythrocytes, and furthermore can still induce transient local membrane deformations in the erythrocyte membrane. We use this technology to measure the strength of the adhesive force between merozoites and erythrocytes, and to probe the cellular mode of action of known invasion inhibitory treatments. These data add to our understanding of the erythrocyte-merozoite interactions that occur during invasion, and demonstrate the power of optical tweezers technologies in unraveling the blood-stage biology of malaria.

  10. Scanning a DNA Molecule for Bound Proteins Using Hybrid Magnetic and Optical Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Loenhout, Marijn T. J.; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Flebus, Benedetta; den Blanken, Johan F.; Zweifel, Ludovit P.; Hooning, Koen M.; Kerssemakers, Jacob W. J.; Dekker, Cees

    2013-01-01

    The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ∼17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33±5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions. PMID:23755219

  11. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-05-01

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  12. Micro-rheology and interparticle interactions in aerosols probed with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jonathan P.; Power, Rory M.; Cai, Chen; Simpson, Stephen H.

    2014-09-01

    Using optical tweezers for micro-rheological investigations of a surrounding fluid has been routinely demonstrated. In this work, we will demonstrate that rheological measurements of the bulk and surface properties of aerosol particles can be made directly using optical tweezers, providing important insights into the phase behavior of materials in confined environments and the rate of molecular diffusion in viscous phases. The use of holographic optical tweezers to manipulate aerosol particles has become standard practice in recent years, providing an invaluable tool to investigate particle dynamics, including evaporation/ condensation kinetics, chemical aging and phase transformation. When combined with non-linear Raman spectroscopy, the size and refractive index of a particle can be determined with unprecedented accuracy <+/- 0.05%). Active control of the relative positions of pairs of particles can allow studies of the coalescence of particles, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the bulk and surface properties that govern the hydrodynamic relaxation in particle shape. In particular, we will show how the viscosity and surface tension of particles can be measured directly in the under-damped regime at low viscosity. In the over-damped regime, we will show that viscosity measurements can extend close to the glass transition, allowing measurements over an impressive dynamic range of 12 orders of magnitude in relaxation timescale and viscosity. Indeed, prior to the coalescence event, we will show how the Brownian trajectories of trapped particles can yield important and unique insights into the interactions of aerosol particles.

  13. Mechanics of the human red blood cell deformed by optical tweezers*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, M.; Lim, C. T.; Suresh, S.

    2003-11-01

    The mechanical deformation characteristics of living cells are known to influence strongly their chemical and biological functions and the onset, progression and consequences of a number of human diseases. The mechanics of the human red blood cell (erythrocyte) subjected to large deformation by optical tweezers forms the subject of this paper. Video photography of the cell deformed in a phosphate buffered saline solution at room temperature during the imposition of controlled stretching forces, in the tens to several hundreds picoNewton range, is used to assess experimentally the deformation characteristics. The mechanical responses of the cell during loading and upon release of the optical force are then analysed to extract the elastic properties of the cell membrane by recourse to several different constitutive formulations of the elastic and viscoelastic behavior within the framework of a fully three-dimensional finite element analysis. A parametric study of various geometric, loading and structural factors is also undertaken in order to develop quantitative models for the mechanics of deformation by means of optical tweezers. The outcome of the experimental and computational analyses is then compared with the information available on the mechanical response of the red blood cell from other independent experimental techniques. Potential applications of the optical tweezers method described in this paper to the study of mechanical deformation of living cells under different stress states and in response to the progression of some diseases are also highlighted.

  14. Measurement of macrophage adhesion using optical tweezers with backward-scattered detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sung-Yang; Su, Yi-Jr; Shih, Po-Chen; Yang, Shih-Mo; Hsu, Long

    2010-08-01

    Macrophages are members of the leukocyte family. Tissue damage causes inflammation and release of vasoactive and chemotactic factors, which trigger a local increase in blood flow and capillary permeability. Then, leukocytes accumulate quickly to the infection site. The leukocyte extravasation process takes place according to a sequence of events that involve tethering, activation by a chemoattractant stimulus, adhesion by integrin binding, and migrating to the infection site. The leukocyte extravasation process reveals that adhesion is an important part of the immune system. Optical tweezers have become a useful tool with broad applications in biology and physics. In force measurement, the trapped bead as a probe usually uses a polystyrene bead of 1 μm diameter to measure adhesive force between the trapped beads and cell by optical tweezers. In this paper, using the ray-optics model calculated trapping stiffness and defined the linear displacement ranges. By the theoretical values of stiffness and linear displacement ranges, this study attempted to obtain a proper trapped particle size in measuring adhesive force. Finally, this work investigates real-time adhesion force measurements between human macrophages and trapped beads coated with lipopolysaccharides using optical tweezers with backscattered detection.

  15. New biodiagnostics based on optical tweezers: typing red blood cells, and identification of drug resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia-Wen; Lin, Chuen-Fu; Wang, Shyang-Guang; Lee, Yi-Chieh; Chiang, Chung-Han; Huang, Min-Hui; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Vitrant, Guy; Pan, Ming-Jeng; Lee, Horng-Mo; Liu, Yi-Jui; Baldeck, Patrice L.; Lin, Chih-Lang

    2013-09-01

    Measurements of optical tweezers forces on biological micro-objects can be used to develop innovative biodiagnostics methods. In the first part of this report, we present a new sensitive method to determine A, B, D types of red blood cells. Target antibodies are coated on glass surfaces. Optical forces needed to pull away RBC from the glass surface increase when RBC antigens interact with their corresponding antibodies. In this work, measurements of stripping optical forces are used to distinguish the major RBC types: group O Rh(+), group A Rh(+) and group B Rh(+). The sensitivity of the method is found to be at least 16-folds higher than the conventional agglutination method. In the second part of this report, we present an original way to measure in real time the wall thickness of bacteria that is one of the most important diagnostic parameters of bacteria drug resistance in hospital diagnostics. The optical tweezers force on a shell bacterium is proportional to its wall thickness. Experimentally, we determine the optical tweezers force applied on each bacteria family by measuring their escape velocity. Then, the wall thickness of shell bacteria can be obtained after calibrating with known bacteria parameters. The method has been successfully applied to indentify, from blind tests, Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including VSSA (NCTC 10442), VISA (Mu 50), and heto-VISA (Mu 3)

  16. Acoustic tweezers for studying intracellular calcium signaling in SKBR-3 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Yoon, Chi Woo; Lim, Hae Gyun; Park, Jin Man; Yoon, Sangpil; Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, K Kirk

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin (FNT) play crucial roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. For better understanding of these associated cellular activities, various microscopic manipulation tools have been used to study their intracellular signaling pathways. Recently, it has appeared that acoustic tweezers may possess similar capabilities in the study. Therefore, we here demonstrate that our newly developed acoustic tweezers with a high-frequency lithium niobate ultrasonic transducer have potentials to study intracellular calcium signaling by FNT-binding to human breast cancer cells (SKBR-3). It is found that intracellular calcium elevations in SKBR-3 cells, initially occurring on the microbead-contacted spot and then eventually spreading over the entire cell, are elicited by attaching an acoustically trapped FNT-coated microbead. Interestingly, they are suppressed by either extracellular calcium elimination or phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. Hence, this suggests that our acoustic tweezers may serve as an alternative tool in the study of intracellular signaling by FNT-binding activities.

  17. A simple encapsulation method for organic optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qian-Qian; An, Qiao-Shi; Zhang, Fu-Jun

    2014-08-01

    The performances of organic optoelectronic devices, such as organic light emitting diodes and polymer solar cells, have rapidly improved in the past decade. The stability of an organic optoelectronic device has become a key problem for further development. In this paper, we report one simple encapsulation method for organic optoelectronic devices with a parafilm, based on ternary polymer solar cells (PSCs). The power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of PSCs with and without encapsulation decrease from 2.93% to 2.17% and from 2.87% to 1.16% after 168-hours of degradation under an ambient environment, respectively. The stability of PSCs could be enhanced by encapsulation with a parafilm. The encapsulation method is a competitive choice for organic optoelectronic devices, owing to its low cost and compatibility with flexible devices.

  18. Metal-dielectric hybrid surfaces as integrated optoelectronic interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Narasimhan, Vijay K.; Hymel, Thomas M.; Lai, Ruby A.; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-03

    An optoelectronic device has a hybrid metal-dielectric optoelectronic interface including an array of nanoscale dielectric resonant elements (e.g., nanopillars), and a metal film disposed between the dielectric resonant elements and below a top surface of the resonant elements such that the dielectric resonant elements protrude through the metal film. The device may also include an anti-reflection coating. The device may further include a metal film layer on each of the dielectric resonant elements.

  19. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qingwu [Chelmsford, MA; Li, Wenguang [Andover, MA; Jiang, Hua [Methuen, MA

    2012-01-03

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  20. Synthesis of Continuous Conductive PEDOT:PSS Nanofibers by Electrospinning: A Conformal Coating for Optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Bessaire, Bastien; Mathieu, Maillard; Salles, Vincent; Yeghoyan, Taguhi; Celle, Caroline; Simonato, Jean-Pierre; Brioude, Arnaud

    2017-01-11

    A process to synthesize continuous conducting nanofibers were developed using PEDOT:PSS as a conducting polymer and an electrospinning method. Experimental parameters were carefully explored to achieve reproducible conductive nanofibers synthesis in large quantities. In particular, relative humidity during the electrospinning process was proven to be of critical importance, as well as doping post-treatment involving glycols and alcohols. The synthesized fibers were assembled as a mat on glass substrates, forming a conductive and transparent electrode and their optoelectronic have been fully characterized. This method produces a conformable conductive and transparent coating that is well-adapted to nonplanar surfaces, having very large aspect ratio features. A demonstration of this property was made using surfaces having deep trenches and high steps, where conventional transparent conductive materials fail because of a lack of conformability.

  1. Predicting the optoelectronic properties of nanowire films based on control of length polydispersity

    PubMed Central

    Large, Matthew J.; Burn, Jake; King, Alice A.; Ogilvie, Sean P.; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the optoelectronic properties of percolating thin films of silver nanowires (AgNWs) are predominantly dependent upon the length distribution of the constituent AgNWs. A generalized expression is derived to describe the dependence of both sheet resistance and optical transmission on this distribution. We experimentally validate the relationship using ultrasonication to controllably vary the length distribution. These results have major implications where nanowire-based films are a desirable material for transparent conductor applications; in particular when application-specific performance criteria must be met. It is of particular interest to have a simple method to generalize the properties of bulk films from an understanding of the base material, as this will speed up the optimisation process. It is anticipated that these results may aid in the adoption of nanowire films in industry, for applications such as touch sensors or photovoltaic electrode structures. PMID:27158132

  2. Optoelectronic devices incorporating fluoropolymer compositions for protection

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xuming; Chum, Pak-Wing S.; Howard, Kevin E.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Sumner, William C.; Wu, Shaofu

    2015-12-22

    The fluoropolymer compositions of the present invention generally incorporate ingredients comprising one or more fluoropolymers, an ultraviolet light protection component (hereinafter UV protection component), and optionally one or more additional ingredients if desired. The UV protection component includes a combination of at least one hindered tertiary amine (HTA) compound having a certain structure and a weight average molecular weight of at least 1000. This tertiary amine is used in combination with at least one organic, UV light absorbing compound (UVLA compound) having a weight average molecular weight greater than 500. When the HTA compound and the UVLA compound are selected according to principles of the present invention, the UV protection component provides fluoropolymer compositions with significantly improved weatherability characteristics for protecting underlying materials, features, structures, components, and/or the like. In particular, fluoropolymer compositions incorporating the UV protection component of the present invention have unexpectedly improved ability to resist blackening, coloration, or other de gradation that may be caused by UV exposure. As a consequence, devices protected by these compositions would be expected to have dramatically improved service life. The compositions have a wide range of uses but are particularly useful for forming protective layers in optoelectronic devices.

  3. Colloidal quantum dot materials for infrared optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arinze, Ebuka S.; Nyirjesy, Gabrielle; Cheng, Yan; Palmquist, Nathan; Thon, Susanna M.

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are an attractive material for optoelectronic applications because they combine flexible, low-cost solution-phase synthesis and processing with the potential for novel functionality arising from their nanostructure. Specifically, the bandgap of films composed of arrays of CQDs can be tuned via the quantum confinement effect for tailored spectral utilization. PbS-based CQDs can be tuned throughout the near and mid-infrared wavelengths and are a promising materials system for photovoltaic devices that harvest non-visible solar radiation. The performance of CQD solar cells is currently limited by an absorption-extraction compromise, whereby photon absorption lengths in the near infrared spectral regime exceed minority carrier diffusion lengths in the bulk films. Several light trapping strategies for overcoming this compromise and increasing the efficiency of infrared energy harvesting will be reviewed. A thin-film interference technique for creating multi-colored and transparent solar cells will be presented, and a discussion of designing plasmonic nanomaterials based on earth-abundant materials for integration into CQD solar cells is developed. The results indicate that it should be possible to achieve high absorption and color-tunability in a scalable nanomaterials system.

  4. Emissive polymeric materials for optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shiang, Joseph John; Chichak, Kelly Scott; Cella, James Anthony; Lewis, Larry Neil; Janora, Kevin Henry

    2011-07-05

    Polymers including at least one structural unit derived from a compound of formula I or including at least one pendant group of formula II may be used in optoelectronic devices ##STR00001## wherein R.sup.1, R.sup.3, R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are independently hydrogen, alkyl, alkoxy, oxaalkyl, alkylaryl, aryl, arylalkyl, heteroaryl, substituted alkyl; substituted alkoxy, substituted oxaalkyl, substituted alkylaryl, substituted aryl, substituted arylalkyl, or substituted heteroaryl; R.sup.1a is hydrogen or alkyl; R.sup.2 is alkylene, substituted alkylene, oxaalkylene, CO, or CO.sub.2; R.sup.2a is alkylene; R.sup.5 is independently at each occurrence hydrogen, alkyl, alkylaryl, aryl, arylalkyl, alkoxy, carboxy, substituted alkyl; substituted alkylaryl, substituted aryl, substituted arylalkyl, or substituted alkoxy, X is halo, triflate, --B(OR.sup.1a).sub.2, or ##STR00002## located at the 2, 5- or 2, 7-positions; and L is derived from phenylpyridine, tolylpyridine, benzothienylpyridine, phenylisoquinoline, dibenzoquinozaline, fluorenylpyridine, ketopyrrole, 2-(1-naphthyl)benzoxazole)), 2-phenylbenzoxazole, 2-phenylbenzothiazole, coumarin, thienylpyridine, phenylpyridine, benzothienylpyridine, 3-methoxy-2-phenylpyridine, thienylpyridine, phenylimine, vinylpyridine, pyridylnaphthalene, pyridylpyrrole, pyridylimidazole, phenylindole, derivatives thereof or combinations thereof.

  5. Software for Use with Optoelectronic Measuring Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Kim C.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program has been written to facilitate and accelerate the process of measurement by use of the apparatus described in "Optoelectronic Tool Adds Scale Marks to Photographic Images" (KSC-12201). The tool contains four laser diodes that generate parallel beams of light spaced apart at a known distance. The beams of light are used to project bright spots that serve as scale marks that become incorporated into photographic images (including film and electronic images). The sizes of objects depicted in the images can readily be measured by reference to the scale marks. The computer program is applicable to a scene that contains the laser spots and that has been imaged in a square pixel format that can be imported into a graphical user interface (GUI) generated by the program. It is assumed that the laser spots and the distance(s) to be measured all lie in the same plane and that the plane is perpendicular to the line of sight of the camera used to record the image

  6. Optical and optoelectronic properties of organic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satapathi, Soumitra

    In this dissertation research, organic nanomaterials, such as semiconducting polymer nanoparticles, graphene nanosheets and organic small molecules were successfully utilized for fabrication of organic solar cells, optical sensors and for high contrast imaging of cancer cells. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple miniemulsion technique. These size controllable polymeric nanoparticles were proven to be able to optimize the morphologies of the bulk heterojunction solar cells and to provide fundamental insight into the evolution of the nanostructures. Highly sensitive optical sensors were fabricated using these polymeric nanoparticles for efficient detection of nitroaromatic explosives, such as 2,4 dinitrotoluene (DNT) and 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) in aqueous medium as well as in vapor the phase. Moreover, these water dispersible and fluorescent polymer nanodots were two-photon active and could be internalized by tumor cells as demonstrated by two-photon confocal imaging. In addition to the polymer nanoparticles, the role of the graphene nanosheets in the performance enhancement of dye sensitized solar cells was also investigated. The use of organic small molecules for optical sensing of different nerve gas agents and their potential use in multiphoton imaging of cancer cells were discussed. Controlling material properties at nanoscale for optoelectronics and imaging application as discussed in this dissertation would provide new dimensions in the areas of applied physics and materials science researches.

  7. Recent progress in opto-electronic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    The optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) is a unique device based on photonics techniques to generate highly spectrally pure microwave signals [1]. The development of the OEO was motivated by the need for high performance oscillators in the frequency range larger than 10 GHz, where conventional electronic oscillators have a number of limitations. These limitations typically stem from the product of fQ, where f is the oscillator frequency and Q is the quality factor of the resonator in the oscillator. In conventional resonators, whether electromagnetic or piezoelectric, this product is usually a constant. Thus, as the oscillator frequency is pushed higher, the quality factor degrades, resulting in degradation of the phase noise of the oscillator. An approach to mitigate the problem is to start with a very high quality signal in the 5 to 100 MHz range generated by a quartz oscillator and multiply the frequency to achieve the desired microwave signal. Here again, frequency multiplication also results in an increase of the phase noise by a factor of 2010gN, where N is the multiplication factor.

  8. Functionalized polyfluorenes for use in optoelectronic devices

    DOEpatents

    Chichak, Kelly Scott [Clifton Park, NY; Lewis, Larry Neil [Scotia, NY; Cella, James Anthony [Clifton Park, NY; Shiang, Joseph John [Niskayuna, NY

    2011-11-08

    The present invention relates to process comprising reacting a polyfluorenes comprising at least one structural group of formula I ##STR00001## with an iridium (III) compound of formula II ##STR00002## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl, substituted aryl or a combination thereof; R.sup.5is H or CHO; R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 are independently hydrogen, alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl, substituted aryl or a combination thereof; R.sup.11 and R.sup.12 taken together form a substituted or unsubstituted monocyclic or bicyclic heteroaromatic ring; R.sup.13 is independently at each occurrence halo, nitro, hydroxy, amino, alkyl, aryl, arylalkyl, alkoxy, substituted alkoxy, substituted alkyl, substituted aryl, or substituted arylalkyl; Ar is aryl, heteroaryl, substituted aryl, substituted heteroaryl, or a combination thereof; X is selected from a direct bond, alky, substituted alkyl, and combinations thereof; Y is CHO or NH.sub.2; Z is CHO or NH.sub.2 where Z does not equal Y; and p is 0, 1 or 2. The invention also relates to the polyfluorenes, which are products of the reaction, and the use of the polyfluorenes in optoelectronic devices.

  9. Assessment of dental plaque by optoelectronic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Bortun, Cristina Maria; Levai, Mihaela-Codrina; Topala, Florin Ionel; Crǎciunescu, Emanuela Lidia; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of dental biofilm follows specific mechanisms of initial colonization on the surface, microcolony formation, development of organized three dimensional community structures, and detachment from the surface. The structure of the plaque biofilm might restrict the penetration of antimicrobial agents, while bacteria on a surface grow slowly and display a novel phenotype; the consequence of the latter is a reduced sensitivity to inhibitors. The aim of this study was to evaluate with different optoelectronic methods the morphological characteristics of the dental biofilm. The study was performed on samples from 25 patients aged between 18 and 35 years. The methods used in this study were Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) working at 870 nm for in vivo evaluations and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for validations. For each patient a sample of dental biofilm was obtained directly from the vestibular surface of the teeth's. SD-OCT produced C- and B-scans that were used to generate three dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the sample. The results were compared with SEM evaluations. The biofilm network was dramatically destroyed after the professional dental cleaning. OCT noninvasive methods can act as a valuable tool for the 3D characterization of dental biofilms.

  10. Superenhancers: Novel opportunities for nanowire optoelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Khudiyev, Tural; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Nanowires play a crucial role in the development of new generation optoelectronic devices ranging from photovoltaics to photodetectors, as these designs capitalize on the low material usage, utilize leaky-mode optical resonances and possess high conversion efficiencies associated with nanowire geometry. However, their current schemes lack sufficient absorption capacity demanded for their practical applicability, and more efficient materials cannot find widespread usage in these designs due to their rarity and cost. Here we suggest a novel and versatile nanoconcentrator scheme utilizing unique optical features of non-resonant Mie (NRM) scattering regime associated with low-index structures. The scattering regime is highly compatible with resonant Mie absorption effect taking place in nanowire absorbers. This technique in its optimized forms can provide up to 1500% total absorption enhancement, 400-fold material save and is suitable for large-area applications with significant area preservation compared to thin-film of same materials. Proposed superenhancer concept with its exceptional features such as broadband absorption enhancement, polarization immunity and material-independent manner paves the way for development of efficient nanowire photosensors or solar thermophotovoltaic devices and presents novel design opportunities for self-powered nanosystems. PMID:25511865

  11. Admin interface of Optoelectronics Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolae, Popescu R.; Schiopu, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The scope of the Optoelectronics Research Center website is to provide useful information about the center such as: member's cv, projects, conferences, as well as many other related information's. Based upon a worldwide study a visitor pay attention to a website for about 50-60 seconds, in this time he(she) is searching the website pages for the desired information, if the information it's found in this period the visitor will be pleased, if not he will look the information on other websites. For the CCO website a user-friendly environment has been designed, this interface has been severely tested, the results matching the 50-60 seconds time. In more than 80% of the cases the webmasters are not the same with the webdesigners; this is the point where the problems frequently occur. The content of a website has to be updated in order for visitors to get the proper information's, and not to be misled. To overcome this problem an administrator interface has been constructed. Using the admin interface the webmaster will easily update the whole website with only few clicks of a button, without need to know anything about programming or webdesign.

  12. Terahertz biochip based on optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ja-Yu; Chen, Li-Jin; Kao, Tzeng-Fu; Chang, Hsu-Hao; Liu, An-Shyi; Yu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Ruey-Beei; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Pan, Ci-Ling; Tsai, Ming-Cheng; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2005-10-01

    The accurate detection of minute amounts of chemical and biological substances has been a major goal in bioanalytical technology throughout the twentieth century. Fluorescence dye labeling detection remains the effective analysis method, but it modifies the surroundings of molecules and lowering the precision of detection. An alternative label free detecting tool with little disturbance of target molecules is highly desired. Theoretical calculations and experiments have demonstrated that many biomolecules have intrinsic resonance due to vibration or rotation level transitions, allowing terahertz (THz)-probing technique as a potential tool for the label-free and noninvasive detection of biomolecules. In this paper, we first ever combined the THz optoelectronic technique with biochip technology to realize THz biosensing. By transferring the edge-coupled photonic transmitter into a thin glass substrate and by integrating with a polyethylene based biochip channel, near field THz detection of the biomolecules is demonstrated. By directly acquiring the absorption micro-spectrum in the THz range, different boiomecules can then be identified according to their THz fingerprints. For preliminary studies, the capability to identity different illicit drug powders is successfully demonstrated. This novel biochip sensing system has the advantages including label-free detection, high selectivity, high sensitivity, ease for sample preparation, and ease to parallel integrate with other biochip functionality modules. Our demonstrated detection capability allows specifying various illicit drug powders with weight of nano-gram, which also enables rapid identification with minute amounts of other important molecules including DNA, biochemical agents in terrorism warfare, explosives, viruses, and toxics.

  13. GaAs-based optoelectronic neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Steven H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae H. (Inventor); Psaltis, Demetri (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An integrated, optoelectronic, variable thresholding neuron implemented monolithically in GaAs integrated circuit and exhibiting high differential optical gain and low power consumption is presented. Two alternative embodiments each comprise an LED monolithically integrated with a detector and two transistors. One of the transistors is responsive to a bias voltage applied to its gate for varying the threshold of the neuron. One embodiment is implemented as an LED monolithically integrated with a double heterojunction bipolar phototransistor (detector) and two metal semiconductor field effect transistors (MESFET's) on a single GaAs substrate and another embodiment is implemented as an LED monolithically integrated with three MESFET's (one of which is an optical FET detector) on a single GaAs substrate. The first noted embodiment exhibits a differential optical gain of 6 and an optical switching energy of 10 pJ. The second embodiment has a differential optical gain of 80 and an optical switching energy of 38 pJ. Power consumption is 2.4 and 1.8 mW, respectively. Input 'light' power needed to turn on the LED is 2 micro-W and 54 nW, respectively. In both embodiments the detector is in series with a biasing MESFET and saturates the other MESFET upon detecting light above a threshold level. The saturated MESFET turns on the LED. Voltage applied to the biasing MESFET gate controls the threshold.

  14. Optoelectronic retinal prosthesis: system design and performance.

    PubMed

    Loudin, J D; Simanovskii, D M; Vijayraghavan, K; Sramek, C K; Butterwick, A F; Huie, P; McLean, G Y; Palanker, D V

    2007-03-01

    The design of high-resolution retinal prostheses presents many unique engineering and biological challenges. Ever smaller electrodes must inject enough charge to stimulate nerve cells, within electrochemically safe voltage limits. Stimulation sites should be placed within an electrode diameter from the target cells to prevent 'blurring' and minimize current. Signals must be delivered wirelessly from an external source to a large number of electrodes, and visual information should, ideally, maintain its natural link to eye movements. Finally, a good system must have a wide range of stimulation currents, external control of image processing and the option of either anodic-first or cathodic-first pulses. This paper discusses these challenges and presents solutions to them for a system based on a photodiode array implant. Video frames are processed and imaged onto the retinal implant by a head-mounted near-to-eye projection system operating at near-infrared wavelengths. Photodiodes convert light into pulsed electric current, with charge injection maximized by applying a common biphasic bias waveform. The resulting prosthesis will provide stimulation with a frame rate of up to 50 Hz in a central 10 degrees visual field, with a full 30 degrees field accessible via eye movements. Pixel sizes are scalable from 100 to 25 microm, corresponding to 640-10,000 pixels on an implant 3 mm in diameter.

  15. Determining the structure-mechanics relationships of dense microtubule networks with confocal microscopy and magnetic tweezers-based microrheology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yali; Valentine, Megan T

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential in maintaining the shape, strength, and organization of cells. Its spatiotemporal organization is fundamental for numerous dynamic biological processes, and mechanical stress within the MT cytoskeleton provides an important signaling mechanism in mitosis and neural development. This raises important questions about the relationships between structure and mechanics in complex MT structures. In vitro, reconstituted cytoskeletal networks provide a minimal model of cell mechanics while also providing a testing ground for the fundamental polymer physics of stiff polymer gels. Here, we describe our development and implementation of a broad tool kit to study structure-mechanics relationships in reconstituted MT networks, including protocols for the assembly of entangled and cross-linked MT networks, fluorescence imaging, microstructure characterization, construction and calibration of magnetic tweezers devices, and mechanical data collection and analysis. In particular, we present the design and assembly of three neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnetic tweezers devices optimized for use with MT networks: (1) high-force magnetic tweezers devices that enable the application of nano-Newton forces and possible meso- to macroscale materials characterization; (2) ring-shaped NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers devices that enable oscillatory microrheology measurements; and (3) portable magnetic tweezers devices that enable direct visualization of microscale deformation in soft materials under applied force.

  16. Optoelectronic System Measures Distances to Multiple Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl Christian; Abramovici, Alexander; Bartman, Randall; Chapsky, Jacob; Schmalz, John; Coste, Keith; Litty, Edward; Lam, Raymond; Jerebets, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    An optoelectronic metrology apparatus now at the laboratory-prototype stage of development is intended to repeatedly determine distances of as much as several hundred meters, at submillimeter accuracy, to multiple targets in rapid succession. The underlying concept of optoelectronic apparatuses that can measure distances to targets is not new; such apparatuses are commonly used in general surveying and machining. However, until now such apparatuses have been, variously, constrained to (1) a single target or (2) multiple targets with a low update rate and a requirement for some a priori knowledge of target geometry. When fully developed, the present apparatus would enable measurement of distances to more than 50 targets at an update rate greater than 10 Hz, without a requirement for a priori knowledge of target geometry. The apparatus (see figure) includes a laser ranging unit (LRU) that includes an electronic camera (photo receiver), the field of view of which contains all relevant targets. Each target, mounted at a fiducial position on an object of interest, consists of a small lens at the output end of an optical fiber that extends from the object of interest back to the LRU. For each target and its optical fiber, there is a dedicated laser that is used to illuminate the target via the optical fiber. The targets are illuminated, one at a time, with laser light that is modulated at a frequency of 10.01 MHz. The modulated laser light is emitted by the target, from where it returns to the camera (photodetector), where it is detected. Both the outgoing and incoming 10.01-MHz laser signals are mixed with a 10-MHz local-oscillator to obtain beat notes at 10 kHz, and the difference between the phases of the beat notes is measured by a phase meter. This phase difference serves as a measure of the total length of the path traveled by light going out through the optical fiber and returning to the camera (photodetector) through free space. Because the portion of the path

  17. Semiselective Optoelectronic Sensors for Monitoring Microbes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Chuang, Han; Taylor,Laura; Russo, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    Sensor systems are under development for use in real-time detection and quantitation of microbes in water without need for sampling. These systems include arrays of optical sensors; miniature, portable electronic data-acquisition circuits; and optoelectronic interfaces between the sensor arrays and data-acquisition circuits. These systems are intended for original use in long-term, inline monitoring of waterborne micro-organisms in water-reclamation systems aboard future spacecraft. They could also be adapted to similar terrestrial uses with respect to municipal water supplies, stored drinking water, and swimming water; for detecting low-level biological contamination in biotechnological, semiconductor, and pharmaceutical process streams; and in verifying the safety of foods and beverages. In addition, they could be adapted to monitoring of airborne microbes and of surfaces (e.g., to detect and/or quantitate biofilms). The designs of the sensors in these systems are based partly on those of sensors developed previously for monitoring airborne biological materials. The designs exploit molecular- recognition and fluorescence-spectroscopy techniques, such that in the presence of micro-organisms of interest, fluorescence signals change and the changes can be measured. These systems are characterized as semiselective because they respond to classes of micro-organisms and can be used to discriminate among the classes. This semiselectivity is a major aspect of the design: It is important to distinguish between (1) the principle of detection and quantitation of classes of micro-organisms by use of these sensors and (2) the principle of detection and quantitation of individual microbiological species by means of prior immuno-diagnostic and/or molecular-biology techniques. Detection of classes (in contradistinction to species) is particularly valuable when the exact nature of a contaminant is unknown.

  18. Designed self-organization for molecular optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael; Neff, David; Towler, Ian; Day, Scott; Grambos, Zachary; Shremshock, Mikala; Butts, Heather; Meadows, Christiaan; Samiso, Yuko; Cao, Huan; Rahman, Mashiur

    2006-05-01

    The convergence of terahertz spectroscopy and single molecule experimentation offer significant promise of enhancement in sensitivity and selectivity in molecular recognition, identification and quantitation germane to military and security applications. This presentation reports the results of experiments which address fundamental barriers to the integration of large, patterned bio-compatible molecular opto-electronic systems with silicon based microelectronic systems. The central thrust of this approach is sequential epitaxy on surface bound single stranded DNA one-dimensional substrates. The challenge of producing highly structured macromolecular substrates, which are necessary in order to implement molecular nanolithography, has been addressed by combining "designer" synthetic DNA with biosynthetically derived plasmid components. By design, these one dimensional templates are composed of domains which contain sites which are recognized, and therefore addressable by either complementary DNA sequences and/or selected enzymes. Such design is necessary in order to access the nominal 2 nm linewidth potential resolution of nanolithography on these one-dimensional substrates. The recognition and binding properties of DNA ensure that the lithographic process is intrinsically self-organizing, and therefore self-aligning, a necessity for assembly processes at the requisite resolution. Another requirement of this molecular epitaxy approach is that the substrate must be immobilized. The challenge of robust surface immobilization is being addressed via the production of the equivalent of molecular tube sockets. In this application, multi-valent core-shell fluorescent quantum dots provide a mechanism to prepare surface attachment sites with a pre-determined 1:1 attachment site : substrate (DNA) molecule ratio.

  19. Optoelectronic Sensor System for Guidance in Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Book, Michael L.; Jackson, John L.

    2004-01-01

    The Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) system is an optoelectronic sensor that provides automated guidance between two vehicles. In the original intended application, the two vehicles would be spacecraft docking together, but the basic principles of design and operation of the sensor are applicable to aircraft, robots, vehicles, or other objects that may be required to be aligned for docking, assembly, resupply, or precise separation. The system includes a sensor head containing a monochrome charge-coupled- device video camera and pulsed laser diodes mounted on the tracking vehicle, and passive reflective targets on the tracked vehicle. The lasers illuminate the targets, and the resulting video images of the targets are digitized. Then, from the positions of the digitized target images and known geometric relationships among the targets, the relative position and orientation of the vehicles are computed. As described thus far, the VGS system is based on the same principles as those of the system described in "Improved Video Sensor System for Guidance in Docking" (MFS-31150), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 21, No. 4 (April 1997), page 9a. However, the two systems differ in the details of design and operation. The VGS system is designed to operate with the target completely visible within a relative-azimuth range of +/-10.5deg and a relative-elevation range of +/-8deg. The VGS acquires and tracks the target within that field of view at any distance from 1.0 to 110 m and at any relative roll, pitch, and/or yaw angle within +/-10deg. The VGS produces sets of distance and relative-orientation data at a repetition rate of 5 Hz. The software of this system also accommodates the simultaneous operation of two sensors for redundancy

  20. resterilizable electrode for electrosurgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engstrom, E. R.; Houge, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Required properties of flexibility, electrical conductivity, tensile strength, and tear resistance of electrosurgical electrodes is retained through utilization of flexible-polymer/conductive particle composites for electrodes.

  1. Highly efficient and stable cupronickel nanomesh electrode for flexible organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Jung; Song, Myungkwan; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Kim, Chang Su; Surabhi, Srivathsava; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Dae-Geun

    2016-11-01

    Advances in flexible optoelectronic devices have led to increasing need for developing high performance, low cost, and flexible transparent conducting electrodes. Copper-based electrodes have been unattainable due to the relatively thermal instability and poor oxidation resistance. Herein, we present oxidation-resistive CuNi nanomesh electrodes that exhibit a low sheet resistance of ∼7.5 Ω/□ and a high optical transmittance of ∼81% at 550 nm. Further, high long-term stability against the effects of oxidation, heat, and chemicals is exhibited by the CuNi nanomesh, in comparison with the behavior of a pure Cu nanomesh sample.

  2. Three-dimensional image and spatial spectrum analysis of behavior of small animal erythrocytes in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui Chi; Shen, Wen-Tai; Kong, Yu-Han; Chuang, Chun-Hao

    2008-02-01

    Because of the softness of membrane, erythrocytes (red blood cell, RBC) have different shapes while being immersed in buffer with different osmotic pressure. While affecting by different viruses and illnesses, RBC may change its shape, or its membrane may become rigid. Moreover, RBC will ford and stretch when it is trapped by optical tweezers. Therefore, the behaviors of RBC in optical tweezers raise more discussion. In this report, we set up an optical tweezers to trap RBC of small animals like feline and canine. By adding a long working distance objective to collect the side-viewing image, a 3-D image system was constructed to detect the motion of trapped RBC. To improve the image quality for side-view, an aperture and narrow glass plate were used. From the video of these images and their spatial spectrum, the shape of trapped RBC was studied.

  3. Synthesis and surface self-assembly of [3]rotaxane-porphyrin conjugates: toward the development of a supramolecular surface tweezer for C60.

    PubMed

    Marois, Jean-Sébastien; Morin, Jean-François

    2008-10-07

    Surface immobilization of pristine C60 by supramolecular interactions is an attractive way to introduce C60 on surfaces since the pi-electron network and the electronic properties of C60 remain intact. Several hosts have been developed for surface complexation of C60. With few exceptions, the hosts reported to date are "electronically inert", limiting the potential applications of pristine C60-based devices. In this study, we present the synthesis and self-assembly of a potential tweezer-like host for C60 having a light-harvesting moiety and an electron-donating unit. More precisely, an azide-containing [3]rotaxane scaffold having ferrocene moieties as blocking group and thioctic acid as anchoring group for a gold surface has been synthesized. This [3]rotaxane has been self-assembled on gold in its protonated (NH2+) (1p) and neutral (NH) (1n) forms and characterized using electrochemistry, XPS, and contact angle measurements. The SAMs were functionalized with free-base and zinc porphyrin using copper-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition in optimized conditions. In combination with C60, this new host is expected to form a triad that could potentially be used as active building block in the preparation of nanostructured electrodes for photoelectrochemical application.

  4. The design and biological applications of dual-beam oscillating optical tweezer-based imaging cytorheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, H. D.; Wang, J.

    2006-08-01

    Because of its non-invasive nature, optical tweezers have emerged as a popular tool for the studies of complex fluids and biological cells and tissues. The capabilities of optical tweezer-based experimental instruments continue to evolve for better and broader applications, through new apparatus designs and integrations with microscopic imaging techniques. In this paper, we present the design, calibration and applications of a powerful microrheometer that integrates a novel high temporal and spatial resolution dual-beam oscillating optical tweezer-based cytorheometer (DOOTC) with spinning disk confocal microscopy. The oscillating scheme detects the position of micron-size probe particles via a phase-sensitive lock-in amplifier to greatly enhance sensitivity. The dual-beam scheme ensures that the cytorheometer is insensitive to sample specimen background parameter variances, and thus enables the investigation of micromechanical properties of biological samples, which are intrinsically inhomogeneous. The cytorheometer system is demonstrated to be capable of measuring dynamic local mechanical moduli in the frequency range of 0.1-150 Hz at up to 2 data point per second and with nanometer spatial resolutions, while visualizing and monitoring structural properties in situ. We report the results of system applications in the studies of bovine skin gelatin gel, purified microtubule assemblies, and human alveolar epithelial cells. The time evolution of the storage moduli G' and the loss moduli G'' of the gel is recorded for undisturbed gel-forming process with high temporal resolution. The micromechanical modulus G* of polymerized microtubule network as a function of frequency are shown to be both inhomogeneous and anisotropic consistent with local structures revealed by confocal imaging. The mechanical properties of A549 human lung cells as a function of temperature will be reported showing significant decrease in cell stiffness at higher temperature.

  5. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-15

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm{sup 2}, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle’s position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  6. Optical macro-tweezers: trapping of highly motile micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalhammer, G.; Steiger, R.; Bernet, S.; Ritsch-Marte, M.

    2011-04-01

    Optical micromanipulation stands for contact-free handling of microscopic particles by light. Optical forces can manipulate non-absorbing objects in a large range of sizes, e.g., from biological cells down to cold atoms. Recently much progress has been made going from the micro- down to the nanoscale. Less attention has been paid to going the other way, trapping increasingly large particles. Optical tweezers typically employ a single laser beam tightly focused by a microscope objective of high numerical aperture to stably trap a particle in three dimensions (3D). As the particle size increases, stable 3D trapping in a single-beam trap requires scaling up the optical power, which eventually induces adverse biological effects. Moreover, the restricted field of view of standard optical tweezers, dictated by the use of high NA objectives, is particularly unfavorable for catching actively moving specimens. Both problems can be overcome by traps with counter-propagating beams. Our 'macro-tweezers' are especially designed to trap highly motile organisms, as they enable three-dimensional all-optical trapping and guiding in a volume of 2 × 1 × 2 mm3. Here we report for the first time the optical trapping of large actively swimming organisms, such as for instance Euglena protists and dinoflagellates of up to 70 µm length. Adverse bio-effects are kept low since trapping occurs outside high intensity regions, e.g., focal spots. We expect our approach to open various possibilities in the contact-free handling of 50-100 µm sized objects that could hitherto not be envisaged, for instance all-optical holding of individual micro-organisms for taxonomic identification, selective collecting or tagging.

  7. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm(2), a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle's position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  8. Ion-Selective Electrodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Mark A.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) is reviewed in seven sections: books, conferences, reviews; potentiometric membrane electrodes; glass and solid-state membrane electrodes; liquid and polymer membrane ISEs; coated wire electrodes, ion-selective field effect transistors, and microelectrodes; gas sensors and selective bioelectrode…

  9. Transparent Electrodes Printed with Nanocrystal Inks for Flexible Smart Devices.

    PubMed

    Song, Jizhong; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-08-17

    Transparent electrodes (TEs) are crucial in a wide range of modern electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, traditional TEs cannot meet the requirements of smart devices under development in unique fields, such as electronic skins, wearable electronics, robotic skins, flexible and stretchable displays, and solar cells. Emerging TEs printed with nanocrystal (NC) inks are inexpensive and compatible with solution processes, and have huge potential in flexible, stretchable, and wearable devices. Every development in ink-based electrodes makes them more competitive for practical applications in various smart devices. Herein, we provide an overview of emergent ink-based electrodes, such as transparent conducting oxides, metal nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, and their application in solution-based flexible and stretchable devices.

  10. Optoelectronic implementation of multilayer perceptron and Hopfield neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanski, Andrzej W.; Olszewski, Mikolaj K.; Wolinski, Tomasz R.

    2004-11-01

    In this paper we present an optoelectronic implementation of two networks based on multilayer perceptron and the Hopfield neural network. We propose two different methods to solve a problem of lack of negative optical signals that are necessary for connections between layers of perceptron as well as within the Hopfield network structure. The first method applied for construction of multilayer perceptron was based on division of signals into two channels and next to use both of them independently as positive and negative signals. The second one, applied for implementation of the Hopfield model, was based on adding of constant value for elements of matrix weight. Both methods of compensation of lack negative optical signals were tested experimentally as optoelectronic models of multilayer perceptron and Hopfield neural network. Special configurations of optical fiber cables and liquid crystal multicell plates were used. In conclusion, possible applications of the optoelectronic neural networks are briefly discussed.

  11. Optoelectronics based on 2D TMDs and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Nengjie; Yang, Yujue; Li, Jingbo

    2017-03-01

    2D materials including graphene and TMDs have proven interesting physical properties and promising optoelectronic applications. We reviewed the growth, characterization and optoelectronics based on 2D TMDs and their heterostructures, and demonstrated their unique and high quality of performances. For example, we observed the large mobility, fast response and high photo-responsivity in MoS2, WS2 and WSe2 phototransistors, as well as the novel performances in vdW heterostructures such as the strong interlayer coupling, am-bipolar and rectifying behaviour, and the obvious photovoltaic effect. It is being possible that 2D family materials could play an increasingly important role in the future nano- and opto-electronics, more even than traditional semiconductors such as silicon.

  12. Low-cost packaging of high-performance optoelectronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.; Lu, Shin-Yee; Pocha, M.; Strand, O.T.

    1994-08-01

    Optoelectronic component costs are often dominated by the costs of attaching fiber optic pigtails--especially for the case of single transverse mode devices. We present early results of our program in low-cost packaging. We are employing machine-vision controlled automated positioning and silicon microbench technology to reduce the costs of optoelectronic components. Our machine vision approach to automated positioning has already attained a positional accuracy of less than 5 microns in less than 5 minutes; accuracies and times are expected to improve significantly as the development progresses. Complementing the machine vision assembly is our manufacturable approach to silicon microbench technology. We will describe our silicon microbench optoelectronic device packages that incorporate built-in heaters for solder bonding reflow.

  13. Development of an opto-electronic fiber device with multiple nano-probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, N.; Cocking, A.; Zhang, C.; Ma, D.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2016-11-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of an opto-electronic fiber device which can allow for both electromechanical functionality and optical waveguiding capability. The air holes of a photonic crystal fiber are selectively sealed and then pumped with molten metal under pressure. The metal filled holes act as electrodes to which individual carbon nanotubes (CNT) are attached precisely by a laser-welding technique or a focused ion beam assisted pick-and-bond technique. The optical modal profile and the group velocity dispersion of the fabricated device are studied both numerically and experimentally. We also present preliminary experimental proof showing the feasibility of electric actuation of a pair of nanotubes by applying up to 40 V potential difference between the filled electrodes. Furthermore, numerical simulations are carried out which agree with the experimentally observed displacement of the CNT upon electric actuation. The unique aspect of our device is that it provides optical waveguiding and electromechanical nano-probing capability in a single package. Such combined functionality can potentially enable simultaneous electrical and optical manipulation and interrogation at the nanoscale.

  14. Raman tweezers spectroscopy study of free radical induced oxidative stress leading to eryptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkur, Surekha; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2016-11-01

    Raman tweezers spectroscopy study of effect of free radicals was carried out on erythrocytes. We prepared hydroxyl radicals using Fenton reaction (which yields hydroxyl radicals). Raman spectra were acquired from single, trapped erythrocytes after supplementing with these free radicals. The changes in the Raman bands such as 1211 cm-1, 1224 cm-1, 1375 cm-1 indicate deoxygenation of red blood cells (RBCs). Our study shows that free radicals can induce oxidative stress on erythrocytes. The changes in the Raman spectra as well as shape of erythrocytes indicate that oxidative stress can trigger eryptosis in erythrocytes.

  15. Temporal response of three-dimensional biological cells to high-frequency optical jumping tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyao; Sheng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the temporal responses of biological cells in the jumping optical tweezers for tugging, wiggling, and stretching the cells in the time-sharing regime with the finite-element method. We showed that the jumping of local stress and local strain is independently omnipresent on the recovery time of the viscoelastic material and the jumping frequency of the load. We demonstrated that the elongation of a three-dimensional (3-D) viscoelastic object under a jumping load cannot be evaluated using the one-dimensional spring-dashpot material model without considering its 3-D structure.

  16. Temporal response of biological cells to high-frequency optical jumping and vibrating tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyao; Sheng, Yunlong

    2014-09-01

    We analyzed the temporal responses of biological cells in the jumping and vibrating optical tweezers for tugging, wiggling and stretching the cells with the finite element method. Some new concepts were established, which might be investigated in the future experiments, such as the jumping of local stress and local strain, independently on the recovery time of the viscoelastic material and on the jumping frequency, the energy dissipation in the hysteresis cycles, the cytoplasm fluid field and its interaction with the cell membrane. The cell was modeled with full 3D structure and viscoelastic continuum materials.

  17. Simultaneous Single-Molecule Force and Fluorescence Sampling of DNA Nanostructure Conformations Using Magnetic Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Swoboda, Marko; Kauert, Dominik J; Grieb, M Svea; Hahn, Steffen; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Seidel, Ralf; Schlierf, Michael

    2016-01-13

    We present a hybrid single-molecule technique combining magnetic tweezers and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Through applying external forces to a paramagnetic sphere, we induce conformational changes in DNA nanostructures, which are detected in two output channels simultaneously. First, by tracking a magnetic bead with high spatial and temporal resolution, we observe overall DNA length changes along the force axis. Second, the measured FRET efficiency between two fluorescent probes monitors local conformational changes. The synchronized orthogonal readout in different observation channels will facilitate deciphering the complex mechanisms of biomolecular machines.

  18. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Priezzhev, Alexander V; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  19. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  20. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses. PMID:26157436

  1. A journey in bioinspired supramolecular chemistry: from molecular tweezers to small molecules that target myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes part of the author’s research in the area of supramolecular chemistry, beginning with his early life influences and early career efforts in molecular recognition, especially molecular tweezers. Although designed to complex DNA, these hosts proved more applicable to the field of host–guest chemistry. This early experience and interest in intercalation ultimately led to the current efforts to develop small molecule therapeutic agents for myotonic dystrophy using a rational design approach that heavily relies on principles of supramolecular chemistry. How this work was influenced by that of others in the field and the evolution of each area of research is highlighted with selected examples. PMID:26877815

  2. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong; Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk; Kong, Chi-Wing; Li, Ronald A.

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  3. Effect of Surface Layer on Electromechanical Stability of Tweezers and Cantilevers Fabricated from Conductive Cylindrical Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, Maryam; Koochi, Ali; Sedighi, Hamid M.; Abadyan, Mohamadreza; Farrokhabadi, Amin; Shahedin, Abed Moheb

    2016-12-01

    Herein, the impact of surface layer on the stability of nanoscale tweezers and cantilevers fabricated from nanowires with cylindrical cross section is studied. A modified continuum based on the Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is applied for incorporating the presence of surface layer. Considering the cylindrical geometry of the nanowire, the presence of the Coulomb attraction and dispersion forces are incorporated in the derived formulations. Three different approaches, i.e. numerical differential quadrature method (DQM), an approximated homotopy perturbation method (HPM) and developing lumped parameter model (LPM) have been employed to solve the governing equations. The impact of surface layer on the instability of the system is demonstrated.

  4. Measuring stall forces in vivo with optical tweezers through light momentum changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, J.; Farré, A.; López-Quesada, C.; Fernández, X.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2011-10-01

    The stall forces of processive molecular motors have been widely studied previously in vitro. Even so, in vivo experiments are required for determining the actual performance of each molecular motor in its natural environment. We report the direct measurement of light momentum changes in single beam optical tweezers as a suitable technique for measuring forces inside living cells, where few alternatives exist. The simplicity of this method, which does not require force calibration for each trapped object, makes it convenient for measuring the forces involved in fast dynamic biological processes such us intracellular traffic. Here we present some measurements of the stall force of processive molecular motors inside living Allium cepa cells.

  5. Polymeric optical fiber tweezers as a tool for single cell micro manipulation and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Soppera, O.; Guerreiro, A.; Jorge, P. A...

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a new type of polymeric fiber optic tweezers for single cell manipulation is reported. The optical trapping of a yeast cell using a polymeric micro lens fabricated by guided photo polymerization at the fiber tip is demonstrated. The 2D trapping of the yeast cells is analyzed and maximum optical forces on the pN range are calculated. The experimental results are supported by computational simulations using a FDTD method. Moreover, new insights on the potential for simultaneous sensing and optical trapping, are presented.

  6. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuxun; Cheng, Jinping; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han Cheng, Shuk; Li, Ronald A.; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  7. Applications of Optical Tweezers and an Integrated Force Measurement Module for Biomedical Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    away from the bead trapped in the tweezers by moving the DC motor -driven microscope stage rightward. The bead (A) and its diffraction pattern (B...the cell by moving the DC motor -driven stage rightward at a constant velocity of -I micron/sec. There was a membrane tether (not shown at this focal...motion driven by the DC - motor . Using fluid flow assay, we estimated that the maximal force our experimental configuration could exert was -12pN on a

  8. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering in optical tweezers using co-axial second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Pamela; Cooper, Jon; McNay, Graeme; Docherty, Frances; Graham, Duncan; Smith, W; Sinclair, Gavin; Padgett, Miles

    2005-05-30

    Silica particles were partially coated with silver, and a suitable chromophore, such that they could be simultaneously trapped within an optical tweezers system, and emit a surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) response. A standard 1064 nm TEM00 mode laser was used to trap the bead whilst a frequency doubling crystal inserted into the beam gave several microwatts of 532 nm co-linear light to excite the SERRS emission. The con fi guration has clear applications in providing apparatus that can simultaneously manipulate a particle whilst obtaining surface sensitive sensory information.

  9. Physical and optoelectronic characterization of reactively sputtered molybdenum-silicon-nitride alloy metal gate electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, P.; Nadesalingam, M.; Wallace, R. M.; Buchanan, D. A.

    2009-01-01

    With continued transistor scaling, work function tuning of metal gates has become important for advanced complementary-metal-oxide-silicon applications. The work function tuning of reactively sputtered MoxSiyNz (also referred to as MoSiN) gates has been studied through the incorporation of nitrogen. The nitrogen concentration in the MoSiN films was altered by controlling the gas flow ratio, RN=N2/(N2+Ar), during gate deposition. The sheet resistance (Rs) of blanket MoSiN films, measured using four-point resistance method, was found to increase as the gas flow ratio was varied from 10% to 40%. Current-voltage measurements confirmed excellent electrical stability of MoSiN/SiO2/p-Si gate stack for applied electric fields ranging up to 6 MV/cm. High frequency capacitance-voltage measurements were used to extract the MoSiN work function (Φm) using the relationship between the flatband voltage (VFB) and the oxide thickness (tox). The extracted MoSiN/SiO2 interfacial barrier heights, obtained through the internal photoemission of electrons, were used to corroborate the extracted values of MoSiN work function. The MoSiN work functions (Φm), extracted independently using both techniques, were consistent and were observed to decrease with increasing gas flow ratio [N2/(N2+Ar)]. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth analysis revealed uniform distribution of nitrogen throughout the bulk MoSiN films, with no piling up at gate-dielectric interface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analysis suggested a steady increase in the Mo-N bonds, and therefore the total nitrogen concentration (from ˜20% to 32%), as the gas flow ratio is increased from 10% to 40%. A similar trend was observed in the nitrogen concentration (in percent), measured using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, for these gate deposition conditions. These material characterization results demonstrate that the increase in nitrogen concentration in MoSiN films is consistent with the lowering of MoSiN work function. Moreover, the work function of reactively sputtered MoxSiyNz films was found to be variable over ˜0.3 eV by adjusting the nitrogen concentration.

  10. HSPES membrane electrode assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved fuel cell electrode, as well as fuel cells and membrane electrode assemblies that include such an electrode, in which the electrode includes a backing layer having a sintered layer thereon, and a non-sintered free-catalyst layer. The invention also features a method of forming the electrode by sintering a backing material with a catalyst material and then applying a free-catalyst layer.

  11. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for Radio Frequency and Optical Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic integrated circuits offer radiation-hardened solutions for satellite systems in addition to improved size, weight, power, and bandwidth characteristics. ODIS, Inc., has developed optoelectronic integrated circuit technology for sensing and data transfer in phased arrays. The technology applies integrated components (lasers, amplifiers, modulators, detectors, and optical waveguide switches) to a radio frequency (RF) array with true time delay for beamsteering. Optical beamsteering is achieved by controlling the current in a two-dimensional (2D) array. In this project, ODIS integrated key components to produce common RF-optical aperture operation.

  12. High bandgap III-V alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics

    DOEpatents

    Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Wanlass, Mark

    2017-01-10

    High bandgap alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics are disclosed. An exemplary optoelectronic device may include a substrate, at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer, and a step-grade buffer between the substrate and at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer. The buffer may begin with a layer that is substantially lattice matched to GaAs, and may then incrementally increase the lattice constant in each sequential layer until a predetermined lattice constant of Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP is reached.

  13. Optoelectronic devices, plasmonics, and photonics with topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politano, Antonio; Viti, Leonardo; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2017-03-01

    Topological insulators are innovative materials with semiconducting bulk together with surface states forming a Dirac cone, which ensure metallic conduction in the surface plane. Therefore, topological insulators represent an ideal platform for optoelectronics and photonics. The recent progress of science and technology based on topological insulators enables the exploitation of their huge application capabilities. Here, we review the recent achievements of optoelectronics, photonics, and plasmonics with topological insulators. Plasmonic devices and photodetectors based on topological insulators in a wide energy range, from terahertz to the ultraviolet, promise outstanding impact. Furthermore, the peculiarities, the range of applications, and the challenges of the emerging fields of topological photonics and thermo-plasmonics are discussed.

  14. Monolithic and Flexible ZnS/SnO2 Ultraviolet Photodetectors with Lateral Graphene Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Xie, Yunchao; Deng, Heng; Tumlin, Travis; Zhang, Chi; Su, Jheng-Wun; Yu, Ping; Lin, Jian

    2017-03-15

    A continuing trend of miniaturized and flexible electronics/optoelectronic calls for novel device architectures made by compatible fabrication techniques. However, traditional layer-to-layer structures cannot satisfy such a need. Herein, a novel monolithic optoelectronic device fabricated by a mask-free laser direct writing method is demonstrated in which in situ laser induced graphene-like materials are employed as lateral electrodes for flexible ZnS/SnO2 ultraviolet photodetectors. Specifically, a ZnS/SnO2 thin film comprised of heterogeneous ZnS/SnO2 nanoparticles is first coated on polyimide (PI) sheets by a solution process. Then, CO2 laser irradiation ablates designed areas of the ZnS/SnO2 thin film and converts the underneath PI into highly conductive graphene as the lateral electrodes for the monolithic photodetectors. This in situ growth method provides good interfaces between the graphene electrodes and the semiconducting ZnS/SnO2 resulting in high optoelectronic performance. The lateral electrode structure reduces total thickness of the devices, thus minimizing the strain and improving flexibility of the photodetectors. The demonstrated lithography-free monolithic fabrication is a simple and cost-effective method, showing a great potential for developement into roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible electronics.

  15. Controlled porosity in electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Bae, Chang-Jun; Halloran, John William; Fu, Qiang; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Erdonmez, Can K.

    2015-06-23

    Porous electrodes in which the porosity has a low tortuosity are generally provided. In some embodiments, the porous electrodes can be designed to be filled with electrolyte and used in batteries, and can include low tortuosity in the primary direction of ion transport during charge and discharge of the battery. In some embodiments, the electrodes can have a high volume fraction of electrode active material (i.e., low porosity). The attributes outlined above can allow the electrodes to be fabricated with a higher energy density, higher capacity per unit area of electrode (mAh/cm.sup.2), and greater thickness than comparable electrodes while still providing high utilization of the active material in the battery during use. Accordingly, the electrodes can be used to produce batteries with high energy densities, high power, or both compared to batteries using electrodes of conventional design with relatively highly tortuous pores.

  16. Micromachined electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  17. Flexible retinal electrode array

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  18. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  19. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  20. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  1. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M.; Ritort, F.

    2013-04-15

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  2. Measuring integrated cellular mechanical stress response at focal adhesions by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeleau, François; Bessard, Judicael; Marceau, Normand; Sheng, Yunlong

    2011-09-01

    The ability of cells to sustain mechanical stress is largely modulated by the cytoskeleton. We present a new application of optical tweezers to study cell's mechanical properties. We trap a fibronectin-coated bead attached to an adherent H4II-EC3 rat hepatoma cell in order to apply the force to the cell surface membrane. The bead position corresponding to the cell's local mechanical response at focal adhesions is measured with a quadrant detector. We assessed the cell response by tracking the evolution of the equilibrium force for 40 cells selected at random and selected a temporal window to assess the cell initial force expression at focal adhesions. The mean value of the force within this time window over 40 randomly selected bead/cell bounds was 52.3 pN. Then, we assessed the responses of the cells with modulation of the cytoskeletons, namely the ubiquitous actin-microfilaments and microtubules, plus the differentiation-dependent keratin intermediate filaments. Notably, a destabilization of the first two networks led to around 50 and 30% reductions in the mean equilibrium forces, respectively, relative to untreated cells, whereas a loss of the third one yielded a 25% increase. The differences in the forces from untreated and treated cells are resolved by the optical tweezers experiment.

  3. A combined double-tweezers and wavelength-tunable laser nanosurgery microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qingyuan; Parsa, Shahab; Shi, Linda Z.; Harsono, Marcellinus; Wakida, Nicole M.; Berns, Michael W.

    2009-08-01

    In two previous studies we have conducted combined laser subcellular microsurgery and optical trapping on chromosomes in living cells1, 2. In the latter study we used two separate microscopes, one for the trap and one for the laser scissors, thus requiring that we move the cell specimen between microscopes and relocate the irradiated cells. In the former paper we combined the 1064 nm laser trap and the 532 nm laser scissors into one microscope. However, in neither study did we have multiple traps allowing for more flexibility in application of the trapping force. In the present paper we describe a combined laser scissors and tweezers microscope that (1) has two trapping beams (both moveable via rapid scanning mirrors (FSM- 300, Newport Corp.), (2) uses a short pulsed tunable 200 fs 710-990 nm Ti:Sapphire laser for laser microsurgery, and (3) also has the option to use a 337 nm 4 ns UV laser for subcellular surgery. The two laser tweezers and either of the laser ablation beams can be used in a cell surgery experiment. The system is integrated into the robotic-controlled RoboLase system3. Experiments on mitotic chromosomes of rat kangaroo PTK2 cells are described.

  4. Optical tweezers and cell biomechanics in macro- and nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Spyratou, Ellas

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical properties of cells, as well as their dysfunction, have been implicated in many aspects of human physiology and patho-physiology. Hence, new biophysical techniques, as optical tweezers, are of great importance for biomechanical measurements in both cells and cell simulators (e.g. liposomes). Liposomes are used, among other applications, as drug delivery nanosystems in cancer therapy. In this work, experimental measurements of the optical forces exerted by line optical tweezers on trapped cells (erythrocytes) and liposomes, using the dielectrophoresis method for calibration, are presented. Folding and elongation of trapped red blood cells was observed, in the direction of the electric field of incident beam, while, upon removal of the optical trap, the red blood cells were observed to unfold to their original biconcave shape. By measuring the folding and unfolding times, membrane elasticity properties such as bending modulus were estimated. Shear and bending modulus of liposomes were also estimated by measuring the liposome deformations, induced by optical forces along the beam long axis. The optical force is quasi-linearly increased with the increase of liposome diameter. In the elasticity regime, when the laser was turned off, the liposome acquired gradually its initial shape without any hysteresis.

  5. Analysis of cell mechanics in single vinculin-deficient cells using a magnetic tweezer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alenghat, F. J.; Fabry, B.; Tsai, K. Y.; Goldmann, W. H.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetic tweezer was constructed to apply controlled tensional forces (10 pN to greater than 1 nN) to transmembrane receptors via bound ligand-coated microbeadswhile optically measuring lateral bead displacements within individual cells. Use of this system with wild-type F9 embryonic carcinoma cells and cells from a vinculin knockout mouse F9 Vin (-/-) revealed much larger differences in the stiffness of the transmembrane integrin linkages to the cytoskeleton than previously reported using related techniques that measured average mechanical properties of large cell populations. The mechanical properties measured varied widely among cells, exhibiting an approximately log-normal distribution. The median lateral bead displacement was 2-fold larger in F9 Vin (-/-) cells compared to wild-type cells whereas the arithmetic mean displacement only increased by 37%. We conclude that vinculin serves a greater mechanical role in cells than previously reported and that this magnetic tweezer device may be useful for probing the molecular basis of cell mechanics within single cells. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  7. In situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells with infrared laser-based optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, G. J.; Liu, Y.; Iturriaga, R. H.

    1995-11-01

    We describe the application of infrared optical tweezers to the in situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells. A Nd:YAG laser (lambda=3D 1064 nm) trap is used to confine and manipulate single Nannochloris and Synechococcus cells in an enriched seawater medium while spectral fluorescence and Lorenz-Mie backscatter signals are simultaneously acquired under a variety of excitation and trapping conditions. Variations in the measured fluorescence intensities of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and phycoerythrin pigments in phytoplankton cells are observed. These variations are related, in part, to basic intrasample variability, but they also indicate that increasing ultraviolet-exposure time and infrared trapping power may have short-term effects on cellular physiology that are related to Chl a photobleaching and laser-induced heating, respectively. The use of optical tweezers to study the factors that affect marine cell physiology and the processes of absorption, scattering, and attenuation by individual cells, organisms, and particulate matter that contribute to optical closure on a microscopic scale are also described. (c)1995 Optical Society of America

  8. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  9. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and laser tweezers based experiments to understand dentine-bacteria interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Sum Chee; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gupta, P. K.; Kishen, Anil

    2007-02-01

    Failure of endodontic treatment is commonly due to Enterococcal infection. In this study influence of chemical treatments of type-I collagen membrane by chemical agents commonly used in endodontic treatment on Enterococcus faecalis cell adherence was evaluated. In order to determine the change in number of adhering bacteria after chemical treatment, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used. For this, overnight culture of E faecalis in All Culture broth was applied to chemically treated type-I collagen membrane. It was found that Ca(OH) II treated groups had statistically significant (p value=0.05) increase in population of bacteria adherence. The change in adhesion force between bacteria and collagen was determined by using optical tweezers (1064 nm). For this experiment, Type-I collagen membrane was soaked for 5 mins in a media that contained 50% all culture media and 50% saturated Ca(OH) II . The membrane was spread on the coverslip, on which diluted bacterial suspension was added. The force of laser tweezers on the bacteria was estimated at different trap power levels using viscous drag method and trapping stiffness was calculated using Equipartition theorem method. Presence of Ca(OH) II was found to increase the cell-substrate adherence force from 0.38pN to >2.1pN. Together, these experiments show that it was highly probable that the increase in adherence to collagen was due to a stronger adhesion in the presence of Ca (OH) II.

  10. Chemotaxis study using optical tweezers to observe the strength and directionality of forces of Leishmania amazonensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Ayres, Diana C.; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-08-01

    The displacements of a dielectric microspheres trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences. This system can measure forces on the 50 femto Newtons to 200 pico Newtons range, of the same order of magnitude of a typical forces induced by flagellar motion. The process in which living microorganisms search for food and run away from poison chemicals is known is chemotaxy. Optical tweezers can be used to obtain a better understanding of chemotaxy by observing the force response of the microorganism when placed in a gradient of attractors and or repelling chemicals. This report shows such observations for the protozoa Leishmania amazomenzis, responsible for the leishmaniasis, a serious tropical disease. We used a quadrant detector to monitor the movement of the protozoa for different chemicals gradient. This way we have been able to observe both the force strength and its directionality. The characterization of the chemotaxis of these parasites can help to understand the infection mechanics and improve the diagnosis and the treatments employed for this disease.

  11. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation.

    PubMed

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F

    2013-04-01

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  12. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  13. Crosstalk elimination in the detection of dual-beam optical tweezers by spatial filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Dino; Oddershede, Lene B.; Reihani, S. Nader S.

    2014-05-15

    In dual-beam optical tweezers, the accuracy of position and force measurements is often compromised by crosstalk between the two detected signals, this crosstalk leading to systematic and significant errors on the measured forces and distances. This is true both for dual-beam optical traps where the splitting of the two traps is done by polarization optics and for dual optical traps constructed by other methods, e.g., holographic tweezers. If the two traps are orthogonally polarized, most often crosstalk is minimized by inserting polarization optics in front of the detector; however, this method is not perfect because of the de-polarization of the trapping beam introduced by the required high numerical aperture optics. Here we present a simple and easy-to-implement method to efficiently eliminate crosstalk. The method is based on spatial filtering by simply inserting a pinhole at the correct position and is highly compatible with standard back focal plane photodiode based detection of position and force. Our spatial filtering method reduces crosstalk up to five times better than polarization filtering alone. The effectiveness is dependent on pinhole size and distance between the traps and is here quantified experimentally and reproduced by theoretical modeling. The method here proposed will improve the accuracy of force-distance measurements, e.g., of single molecules, performed by dual-beam optical traps and hence give much more scientific value for the experimental efforts.

  14. A modular assembling platform for manufacturing of microsystems by optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksouri, Sarah Isabelle; Aumann, Andreas; Ghadiri, Reza; Prüfer, Michael; Baer, Sebastian; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Due to the increased complexity in terms of materials and geometries for microsystems new assembling techniques are required. Assembling techniques from the semiconductor industry are often very specific and cannot fulfill all specifications in more complex microsystems. Therefore, holographic optical tweezers are applied to manipulate structures in micrometer range with highest flexibility and precision. As is well known non-spherical assemblies can be trapped and controlled by laser light and assembled with an additional light modulator application, where the incident laser beam is rearranged into flexible light patterns in order to generate multiple spots. The complementary building blocks are generated by a two-photon-polymerization process. The possibilities of manufacturing arbitrary microstructures and the potential of optical tweezers lead to the idea of combining manufacturing techniques with manipulation processes to "microrobotic" processes. This work presents the manipulation of generated complex microstructures with optical tools as well as a storage solution for 2PP assemblies. A sample holder has been developed for the manual feeding of 2PP building blocks. Furthermore, a modular assembling platform has been constructed for an `all-in-one' 2PP manufacturing process as a dedicated storage system. The long-term objective is the automation process of feeding and storage of several different 2PP micro-assemblies to realize an automated assembly process.

  15. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  16. Optical Tweezers as a New Biomedical Tool to Measure Zeta Potential of Stored Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos A. L.; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Filho, Milton M.; Lucena, Sheyla C.; Costa, Ana Maria D. N.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; Santos, Beate S.; Fontes, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    During storage, red blood cells (RBCs) for transfusion purposes suffer progressive deterioration. Sialylated glycoproteins of the RBC membrane are responsible for a negatively charged surface which creates a repulsive electrical zeta potential. These charges help prevent the interaction between RBCs and other cells, and especially among each RBCs. Reports in the literature have stated that RBCs sialylated glycoproteins can be sensitive to enzymes released by leukocyte degranulation. Thus, the aim of this study was, by using an optical tweezers as a biomedical tool, to measure the zeta potential in standard RBCs units and in leukocyte reduced RBC units (collected in CPD-SAGM) during storage. Optical tweezers is a sensitive tool that uses light for measuring cell biophysical properties which are important for clinical and research purposes. This is the first study to analyze RBCs membrane charges during storage. In addition, we herein also measured the elasticity of RBCs also collected in CPD-SAGM. In conclusion, the zeta potential decreased 42% and cells were 134% less deformable at the end of storage. The zeta potential from leukodepleted units had a similar profile when compared to units stored without leukoreduction, indicating that leukocyte lyses were not responsible for the zeta potential decay. Flow cytometry measurements of reactive oxygen species suggested that this decay is due to membrane oxidative damages. These results show that measurements of zeta potentials provide new insights about RBCs storage lesion for transfusion purposes. PMID:22363729

  17. Measurement of particle motion in optical tweezers embedded in a Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Galinskiy, Ivan; Isaksson, Oscar; Salgado, Israel Rebolledo; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Mehlig, Bernhard; Hanstorp, Dag

    2015-10-19

    We have constructed a counterpropagating optical tweezers setup embedded in a Sagnac interferometer in order to increase the sensitivity of position tracking for particles in the geometrical optics regime. Enhanced position determination using a Sagnac interferometer has previously been described theoretically by Taylor et al. [Journal of Optics 13, 044014 (2011)] for Rayleigh-regime particles trapped in an antinode of a standing wave. We have extended their theory to a case of arbitrarily-sized particles trapped with orthogonally-polarized counter-propagating beams. The working distance of the setup was sufficiently long to optically induce particle oscillations orthogonally to the axis of the tweezers with an auxiliary laser beam. Using these oscillations as a reference, we have experimentally shown that Sagnac-enhanced back focal plane interferometry is capable of providing an improvement of more than 5 times in the signal-to-background ratio, corresponding to a more than 30-fold improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio. The experimental results obtained are consistent with our theoretical predictions. In the experimental setup, we used a method of optical levitator-assisted liquid droplet delivery in air based on commercial inkjet technology, with a novel method to precisely control the size of droplets.

  18. Optical Tweezers Studies on Notch: Single-molecule Interaction Strength is Independent of Ligand Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Bhupinder; Meloty-Kapella, Laurence; Musse, Abdiwahab A.; Weinmaster, Gerry; Botvinick, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Notch signaling controls diverse cellular processes critical to development and disease. Cell surface ligands bind Notch on neighboring cells yet require endocytosis to activate signaling. The role ligand endocytosis plays in Notch activation has not been established. Here we integrate optical tweezers with cell biological and biochemical methods to test the prevailing model that ligand endocytosis facilitates recycling to enhance ligand interactions with Notch necessary to trigger signaling. Specifically, single-molecule measurements indicate that interference of ligand endocytosis and/or recycling does not alter the force required to rupture bonds formed between cells expressing the Notch ligand Delta-like1 (Dll1) and laser-trapped Notch1-beads. Together, our analyses eliminate roles for ligand endocytosis and recycling in Dll1-Notch1 interactions, and indicate that recycling indirectly affects signaling by regulating the accumulation of cell-surface ligand. Importantly, our study demonstrates the utility of optical tweezers to test a role for ligand endocytosis in generating cell-mediated mechanical force. PMID:22658935

  19. A novel single fiber optical tweezers based on light-induced thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Liang, Peibo; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    We present and demonstrate a novel single fiber optical tweezers which can trap and launch (clean) a target polystyrene (PS) microsphere (diameter~10μm) with independent control by using two wavelengths beams: 980nm and 1480nm. We employ 980nm laser beam to trap the target PS microsphere by molding the fiber tip into a special tapered-shape; and we employ 1480nm laser beam to launch the trapped PS microsphere with a certain velocity by using the thermophoresis force generated from the thermal effect due to the high absorption of the 1480nm laser beams in water. When the launching force is smaller than the trapping force, the PS microsphere will be trapped near the fiber tip, and the launching force will blow away other PS microspheres in the workspace realizing the cleaning function; When the launching force is larger than the trapping force, the trapped PS microsphere will be launched away from the fiber tip with a certain velocity and towards a certain direction, realizing the launching function. This PS microsphere launching and cleaning functions expanded new features of single fiber optical tweezers, providing for the possibility of more practical applications in the micro manipulation research fields.

  20. Understanding local forces in electrophoretic ink systems: utilizing optical tweezers to explore electrophoretic display devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, David L.; Dickinson, Mark R.; Smith, N.; Gleeson, Helen F.

    2016-09-01

    Optical tweezers can be used as a valuable tool to characterize electrophoretic display (EPD) systems. EPDs are ubiquitous with e-readers and are becoming a commonplace technology where reflective, low-power displays are required; yet the physics of some features crucial to their operation remains poorly defined. We utilize optical tweezers as a tool to understand the motion of charged ink particles within the devices and show that the response of optically trapped electrophoretic particles can be used to characterize electric fields within these devices. This technique for mapping the force can be compared to simulations of the electric field in our devices, thus demonstrating that the electric field itself is the sole governor of the particle motion in an individual-particle regime. By studying the individual-particle response to the electric field, we can then begin to characterize particle motion in `real' systems with many particles. Combining optical tweezing with particle tracking techniques, we can investigate deviations in many particle systems from the single-particle case.

  1. Design of hybrid optical tweezers system for controlled three-dimensional micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Tsutsui, Shogo; Kitajima, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) micro/nano-manipulation using optical tweezers is a significant technique for various scientific fields ranging from biology to nanotechnology. For the dynamic handling of multiple/individual micro-objects in a true 3D working space, we present an improved hybrid optical tweezers system consisting of two multibeam techniques. These two techniques include the generalized phase contrast method with a spatial light modulator and the time-shared scanning method with a two-axis steering mirror and an electrically focus-tunable lens. Unlike our previously reported system that could only handle micro-objects in a two and half dimensional working space, the present system has high versatility for controlled manipulation of multiple micro-objects in a true 3D working space. The controlled rotation of five beads forming a pentagon, that of four beads forming a tetrahedron about arbitrary axes, and the fully automated assembly and subsequent 3D translation of micro-bead arrays are successfully demonstrated as part of the 3D manipulation experiment.

  2. Natural user interface as a supplement of the holographic Raman tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomori, Zoltan; Kanka, Jan; Kesa, Peter; Jakl, Petr; Sery, Mojmir; Bernatova, Silvie; Antalik, Marian; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-09-01

    Holographic Raman tweezers (HRT) manipulates with microobjects by controlling the positions of multiple optical traps via the mouse or joystick. Several attempts have appeared recently to exploit touch tablets, 2D cameras or Kinect game console instead. We proposed a multimodal "Natural User Interface" (NUI) approach integrating hands tracking, gestures recognition, eye tracking and speech recognition. For this purpose we exploited "Leap Motion" and "MyGaze" low-cost sensors and a simple speech recognition program "Tazti". We developed own NUI software which processes signals from the sensors and sends the control commands to HRT which subsequently controls the positions of trapping beams, micropositioning stage and the acquisition system of Raman spectra. System allows various modes of operation proper for specific tasks. Virtual tools (called "pin" and "tweezers") serving for the manipulation with particles are displayed on the transparent "overlay" window above the live camera image. Eye tracker identifies the position of the observed particle and uses it for the autofocus. Laser trap manipulation navigated by the dominant hand can be combined with the gestures recognition of the secondary hand. Speech commands recognition is useful if both hands are busy. Proposed methods make manual control of HRT more efficient and they are also a good platform for its future semi-automated and fully automated work.

  3. Optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices with low-reflectance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Low angle V-grooves are provided in the target surfaces of optoelectronic or photovoltaic devices such as solar cells and photodetectors. The low angle V-grooves increase the efficiency of the devices by promoting total internal reflection of light reflected from the target surface at the interface of the coverglass and the external environment.

  4. An Active Metamaterial Platform for Chiral Responsive Optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lei; Lan, Shoufeng; Cui, Yonghao; Rodrigues, Sean P; Liu, Yongmin; Werner, Douglas H; Cai, Wenshan

    2015-08-05

    Chiral-selective non-linear optics and optoelectronic signal generation are demonstrated in an electrically active photonic metamaterial. The metamaterial reveals significant chiroptical responses in both harmonic generation and the photon drag effect, correlated to the resonance behavior in the linear regime. The multifunctional chiral metamaterial with dual electrical and optical functionality enables transduction of chiroptical responses to electrical signals for integrated photonics.

  5. Intersatellite communications optoelectronics research at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A review is presented of current optoelectronics research and development at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for high-power, high-bandwidth laser transmitters; high-bandwidth, high-sensitivity optical receivers; pointing, acquisition, and tracking components; and experimental and theoretical system modeling at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Program hardware and space flight opportunities are presented.

  6. Magnetometer Based on the Opto-Electronic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B.; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    We theoretically propose and discuss properties of two schemes of an all-optical self-oscillating magnetometer based on an opto-electronic oscillator stabilized with an atomic vapor cell. Proof of the principle DC magnetic field measurements characterized with 2 x 10(exp -7) G sensitivity and 1 - 1000 mG dynamic range in one of the schemes are demonstrated.

  7. Microwave filter based on Lamb modes for optoelectronic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitko, V. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Kondrashov, A. V.; Nikitin, A. A.; Ustinov, A. B.; Belyavskiy, P. Yu; Kalinikos, B. A.; Butler, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results for narrowband filter based on yttrium iron garnet film epitaxially grown on gadolinium gallium garnet substrate have been shown. The principle of operation of the filter is based on excitation of Lamb modes in the substrate. We demonstrated also that the use of single crystal diamond as a substrate will significantly reduce the phase noise of the designed optoelectronic microwave generator.

  8. The Use of Opto-Electronics in Viscometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, R. J.; Washbourn, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a semi-automatic viscometer which incorporates a microprocessor system and uses optoelectronics to detect flow of liquid through the capillary, flow time being displayed on a timer with accuracy of 0.01 second. The system could be made fully automatic with an additional microprocessor circuit and inclusion of a pump. (Author/JN)

  9. Organic photosensitive optoelectronic device having a phenanthroline exciton blocking layer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Mark E.; Li, Jian; Forrest, Stephen; Rand, Barry

    2011-02-22

    An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having an anode, a cathode, and an organic blocking layer between the anode and the cathode is described, wherein the blocking layer comprises a phenanthroline derivative, and at least partially blocks at least one of excitons, electrons, and holes.

  10. Simultaneous thermoelectric and optoelectronic characterization of individual nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Leonard, Francois; Wang, George T.; Swartzentruber, Brian S.; ...

    2015-11-03

    Semiconducting nanowires have been explored for a number of applications in optoelectronics such as photodetectors and solar cells. Currently, there is ample interest in identifying the mechanisms that lead to photoresponse in nanowires in order to improve and optimize performance. However, distinguishing among the different mechanisms, including photovoltaic, photothermoelectric, photoemission, bolometric, and photoconductive, is often difficult using purely optoelectronic measurements. In this work, we present an approach for performing combined and simultaneous thermoelectric and optoelectronic measurements on the same individual nanowire. We apply the approach to GaN/AlGaN core/shell and GaN/AlGaN/GaN core/shell/shell nanowires and demonstrate the photothermoelectric nature of the photocurrentmore » observed at the electrical contacts at zero bias, for above- and below-bandgap illumination. Furthermore, the approach allows for the experimental determination of the temperature rise due to laser illumination, which is often obtained indirectly through modeling. We also show that under bias, both above- and below-bandgap illumination leads to a photoresponse in the channel with signatures of persistent photoconductivity due to photogating. Finally, we reveal the concomitant presence of photothermoelectric and photogating phenomena at the contacts in scanning photocurrent microscopy under bias by using their different temporal response. Furthermore, our approach is applicable to a broad range of nanomaterials to elucidate their fundamental optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties.« less

  11. Simultaneous thermoelectric and optoelectronic characterization of individual nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Francois; Wang, George T.; Swartzentruber, Brian S.; Martinez, Julio A.; Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming

    2015-11-03

    Semiconducting nanowires have been explored for a number of applications in optoelectronics such as photodetectors and solar cells. Currently, there is ample interest in identifying the mechanisms that lead to photoresponse in nanowires in order to improve and optimize performance. However, distinguishing among the different mechanisms, including photovoltaic, photothermoelectric, photoemission, bolometric, and photoconductive, is often difficult using purely optoelectronic measurements. In this work, we present an approach for performing combined and simultaneous thermoelectric and optoelectronic measurements on the same individual nanowire. We apply the approach to GaN/AlGaN core/shell and GaN/AlGaN/GaN core/shell/shell nanowires and demonstrate the photothermoelectric nature of the photocurrent observed at the electrical contacts at zero bias, for above- and below-bandgap illumination. Furthermore, the approach allows for the experimental determination of the temperature rise due to laser illumination, which is often obtained indirectly through modeling. We also show that under bias, both above- and below-bandgap illumination leads to a photoresponse in the channel with signatures of persistent photoconductivity due to photogating. Finally, we reveal the concomitant presence of photothermoelectric and photogating phenomena at the contacts in scanning photocurrent microscopy under bias by using their different temporal response. Furthermore, our approach is applicable to a broad range of nanomaterials to elucidate their fundamental optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties.

  12. Optoelectronic devices utilizing materials having enhanced electronic transitions

    DOEpatents

    Black, Marcie R [Newton, MA

    2011-02-22

    An optoelectronic device that includes a material having enhanced electronic transitions. The electronic transitions are enhanced by mixing electronic states at an interface. The interface may be formed by a nano-well, a nano-dot, or a nano-wire.

  13. Optoelectronic devices utilizing materials having enhanced electronic transitions

    DOEpatents

    Black, Marcie R.

    2013-04-09

    An optoelectronic device that includes a material having enhanced electronic transitions. The electronic transitions are enhanced by mixing electronic states at an interface. The interface may be formed by a nano-well, a nano-dot, or a nano-wire.

  14. Stabilizing an optoelectronic microwave oscillator with photonic filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, D.; Aveline, D.; Yu, N.; Thompson, R.; Matsko, A. B.; Maleki, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares methods of active stabilization of an optoelectronic microwave oscillator (OEO) based on insertion of a source of optical group delay into an OEO loop. The performance of an OEO stabilized with either a high- optical cavity or an atomic cell is analyzed. We show that the elements play a role of narrow-band microwave filters improving an OEO stability.

  15. New Results with the Opto-Electronic Oscillators (OEO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    A new class of oscillators based on photonic devices is presented. These opto-electronic oscillators (OEOs) generate microwave oscillation by converting continuous energy from a light source using a feedback circuit which includes a delay element, an electro-optic switch, and a photodetctor.

  16. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-06-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system.

  17. High performance cermet electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of increasing the operating cell voltage of a solid oxide electrochemical cell having metal electrode particles in contact with an oxygen-transporting ceramic electrolyte. The metal electrode is heated with the cell, and oxygen is passed through the oxygen-transporting ceramic electrolyte to the surface of the metal electrode particles so that the metal electrode particles are oxidized to form a metal oxide layer between the metal electrode particles and the electrolyte. The metal oxide layer is then reduced to form porous metal between the metal electrode particles and the ceramic electrolyte.

  18. FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS. RAW MATERIAL SELECTION INFLUENCES POLARIZATION BUT IS NOT A SINGLE CONTROLLING FACTOR. AVAILABLE...DATA INDICATES THAT AN INTERRELATIONSHIP OF POROSITY, AVERAGE PORE VOLUME, AND PERMEABILITY CONTRIBUTES TO ELECTRODE FUEL CELL BEHAVIOR.

  19. Improved biomedical electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Newly designed electrode is prefilled, disposable, electrolyte-saturated spong. New design permits longe periods of storage without deterioration, and readiness in matter of seconds. Electrodes supply signals for electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram, and electrocardiogram.

  20. Corneal-shaping electrode

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; Hutson, Richard L.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a circulating saline electrode for changing corneal shape in eyes. The electrode comprises a tubular nonconductive electrode housing having an annular expanded base which has a surface substantially matched to a subject corneal surface. A tubular conductive electrode connected to a radiofrequency generating source is disposed within the electrode housing and longitudinally aligned therewith. The electrode has a generally hemispherical head having at least one orifice. Saline solution is circulated through the apparatus and over the cornea to cool the corneal surface while radiofrequency electric current emitted from the electrode flows therefrom through the cornea to a second electrode, on the rear of the head. This current heats the deep corneal stroma and thereby effects corneal reshaping as a biological response to the heat.

  1. The CMG Nickel Electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaul, R. A.; Gutridge, I.

    1981-01-01

    The development and design of the Controlled Microgeometry electrode are described. Advantages of the electrode over others in existance include a higher number of ampere hours per kilogram and the ability to make them over a wide range of thicknesses. The parameters that control the performance of the electrode can be individually controlled over a wide range. Therefore, the electrode may be designed to give the optimum performance for a given duty cycle.

  2. Low resistance fuel electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Maskalick, Nichols J.; Folser, George R.

    1989-01-01

    An electrode 6 bonded to a solid, ion conducting electrolyte 5 is made, where the electrode 6 comprises a ceramic metal oxide 18, metal particles 17, and heat stable metal fibers 19, where the metal fibers provide a matrix structure for the electrode. The electrolyte 5 can be bonded to an air electrode cathode 4, to provide an electrochemical cell 2, preferably of tubular design.

  3. Compartmented electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Shimotake, Hiroshi; Gay, Eddie C.; Martino, Fredric J.

    1977-06-14

    Electrodes for secondary electrochemical cells are provided with compartments for containing particles of the electrode reactant. The compartments are defined by partitions that are generally impenetrable to the particles of reactant and, in some instances, to the liquid electrolyte used in the cell. During cycling of the cell, reactant material initially loaded into a particular compartment is prevented from migrating and concentrating within the lower portion of the electrode or those portions of the electrode that exhibit reduced electrical resistance.

  4. Insulated ECG electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portnoy, W. M.; David, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Insulated, capacitively coupled electrode does not require electrolyte paste for attachment. Other features of electrode include wide range of nontoxic material that may be employed for dielectric because of sputtering technique used. Also, electrode size is reduced because there is no need for external compensating networks with FET operational amplifier.

  5. Fuel cell electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Strmcnik, Dusan; Cuesta, Angel; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad

    2015-06-23

    A process includes patterning a surface of a platinum group metal-based electrode by contacting the electrode with an adsorbate to form a patterned platinum group metal-based electrode including platinum group metal sites blocked with adsorbate molecules and platinum group metal sites which are not blocked.

  6. Aerospace electrode line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.

    1980-04-01

    A facility which produces electrodes for spacecraft power supplies is described. The electrode assembly procedures are discussed. A number of design features in the production process are reported including a batch operation mode and an independent equipment module design approach for transfering the electrode materials from process tank to process tank.

  7. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  8. Microresonator electrode design

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, III, Roy H.; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Branch, Darren W.

    2016-05-10

    A microresonator with an input electrode and an output electrode patterned thereon is described. The input electrode includes a series of stubs that are configured to isolate acoustic waves, such that the waves are not reflected into the microresonator. Such design results in reduction of spurious modes corresponding to the microresonator.

  9. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  10. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Miller, J.L.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-08-23

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window. 2 figs.

  11. Longitudinal discharge laser electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Miller, John L.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    The improved longitudinal discharge laser electrode with IR baffle includes an electrode made up of washers spaced along the laser axis in order to form inter-washer spaces for hollow cathode discharge to take place and for IR radiation to be trapped. Additional IR baffles can be placed between the electrode ann the window.

  12. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Håti, Armend Gazmeno; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase–polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ), lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0) and free energies (ΔG#) were determined for the different epimerase–alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate. Together with the

  13. Multilayer Graphene with Chemical Modification as Transparent Conducting Electrodes in Organic Light-Emitting Diode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yilin; Yu, Haojian; Wang, Cong; Cao, Jin; Chen, Yigang; Ma, Zhongquan; You, Ying; Wan, Jixiang; Fang, Xiaohong; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-12-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for the replacement of the typical transparent electrode indium tin oxide in optoelectronic devices. Currently, the application of polycrystalline graphene films grown by chemical vapor deposition is limited for their low electrical conductivity due to the poor transfer technique. In this work, we developed a new method of preparing tri-layer graphene films with chemical modification and explored the influence of doping and patterning process on the performance of the graphene films as transparent electrodes. In order to demonstrate the application of the tri-layer graphene films in optoelectronics, we fabricated the organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on them and found that plasma etching is feasible with certain influence on the quality of the graphene films and the performance of the OLEDs.

  14. Measurement of PLGA-NP interaction with single smooth muscle cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Mondal, Argha; Homayoni, Homa; Nguyen, Kytai; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-10-01

    For intervention of cardiovascular diseases, biodegradable and biocompatible, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) are emerging as agents of choice for controlled and targeted drug delivery. Therefore development of PLGA-NP with optimal physico-chemical properties will allow efficient binding and thus delivery of drug to targeted cells under various patho-physiological conditions. The force kinetics and its dependence on size of the NPs will be crucial for designing the NPs. Since optical tweezers allow non-contact, highly sensitive force measurement with high spatial and temporal resolution, we utilized it for studying interaction forces between magnetic PLGA nanoparticles with smooth muscle cells (SMC). In order to investigate effect of size, interaction force for 200 to 1100nm PLGA NP was measured. For similar interaction duration, the force was found to be higher with increase in size. The rupture force was found to depend on time of interaction of SMC with NPs.

  15. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Sood, A. K.

    2005-11-01

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and become twisted in hypertonic phosphate buffer saline and when trapped, experience an unbalanced radiation pressure force. The torque generated from the unbalanced force causes the trapped RBC to rotate. Addition of Ca^{++} ions in the solution, keeping the osmolarity same, makes the cell membranes stiffer and the cells deform less. Thus the speed of rotation of the red blood cells can be controlled, as less deformation and in turn less asymmetry in shape produces less torque under the radiation pressure resulting in slower rotation at the same laser power.

  16. Inhibition of Huntingtin Exon-1 Aggregation by the Molecular Tweezer CLR01.

    PubMed

    Vöpel, Tobias; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Mittal, Sumit; Vachharajani, Shivang; Gnutt, David; Sharma, Abhishek; Steinhof, Anne; Fatoba, Oluwaseun; Ellrichmann, Gisa; Nshanian, Michael; Heid, Christian; Loo, Joseph A; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Wanker, Erich E; Ebbinghaus, Simon; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa

    2017-04-13

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with the expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the exon-1 domain of the huntingtin protein (htt(e1)). Above a threshold of 37 glutamine residues, htt(e1) starts to aggregate in a nucleation-dependent manner. A 17-residue N-terminal fragment of htt(e1) (N17) has been suggested to play a crucial role in modulating the aggregation propensity and toxicity of htt(e1). Here we identify N17 as a potential target for novel therapeutic intervention using the molecular tweezer CLR01. A combination of biochemical experiments and computer simulations shows that binding of CLR01 induces structural rearrangements within the htt(e1) monomer and inhibits htt(e1) aggregation, underpinning the key role of N17 in modulating htt(e1) toxicity.

  17. Detection of doxorubicin-induced apoptosis of leukemic T-lymphocytes by laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Tobias J.; Taylor, Douglas S.; Krol, Denise M.; Fritch, John; Chan, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) was used to acquire the Raman spectra of leukemic T lymphocytes exposed to the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin at different time points over 72 hours. Changes observed in the Raman spectra were dependent on drug exposure time and concentration. The sequence of spectral changes includes an intensity increase in lipid Raman peaks, followed by an intensity increase in DNA Raman peaks, and finally changes in DNA and protein (phenylalanine) Raman vibrations. These Raman signatures are consistent with vesicle formation, cell membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, and the cytoplasm of dead cells during the different stages of drug-induced apoptosis. These results suggest the potential of LTRS as a real-time single cell tool for monitoring apoptosis, evaluating the efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatments, or pharmaceutical testing. PMID:21258536

  18. Micro-particle manipulation by single beam acoustic tweezers based on hydrothermal PZT thick film

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Benpeng; Xu, Jiong; Li, Ying; Wang, Tian; Xiong, Ke; Lee, Changyang; Yang, Xiaofei; Shiiba, Michihisa; Takeuchi, Shinichi; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Single-beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT), used in laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC) device has promising implications for an individual micro-particle contactless manipulation. In this study, a freestanding hydrothermal PZT thick film with excellent piezoelectric property (d33 = 270pC/N and kt = 0.51) was employed for SBAT applications and a press-focusing technology was introduced. The obtained SBAT, acting at an operational frequency of 50MHz, a low f-number (∼0.9), demonstrated the capability to trap and manipulate a micro-particle sized 10μm in the distilled water. These results suggest that such a device has great potential as a manipulator for a wide range of biomedical and chemical science applications. PMID:27014504

  19. Studies of cochlear outer hair cell membrane mechanics using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, David R.; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-06-01

    An optical tweezers system was used to study the mechanical characteristics of outer hair cell (OHC) and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell plasma membranes. The effect of the cationic amphipath chlorpromazine (CPZ) on the equilibrium tethering force, (Feq) force relaxation time constant,(τ) and effective membrane viscosity (ηeff) was measured. The Feq for the OHC lateral wall plasma membrane was ~60 pN and was unchanged by addition of CPZ. A significantly greater τ value was observed in CPZ-treated OHCs (30.5 +/- 12.6 s) than in control OHCs (19.0 +/- 13.2 s). The Feq and τ values for control HEK cells were >60% lower than the respective OHC values but increased by ~3 times following CPZ addition. Effective viscosity ranged between 1.49-1.81 pN•s/μm for CPZ-treated OHCs. This represents a decrease from reported control OHC membrane viscosities.

  20. Optical tweezers study of viscoelastic properties in the outer hair cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, David R.; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Qian, Feng; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-06-01

    An optical tweezers system was used to study the mechanical characteristics of the outer hair cell (OHC) lateral wall by forming plasma membrane tethers. A 2nd order generalized Kelvin model was applied to describe the viscoelastic behavior of OHC membrane tethers. The measured parameters included equilibrium tethering force, (Feq), force relaxation times (τ), stiffness values (κ), and coefficients of friction (μ). An analysis of force relaxation in membrane tethers indicated that the force decay is a biphasic process containing both an elastic and a viscous phase. In general, we observed an overall negative trend in the measured parameters upon application of the cationic amphipath chlorpromazine (CPZ). CPZ was found to cause up to a 40 pN reduction in Feq in OHCs. A statistically significant reduction in relaxation times and coefficients of friction was also observed, suggesting an increase in rate of force decay and a decrease in plasma membrane viscosity.

  1. Freely orbiting magnetic tweezers to directly monitor changes in the twist of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Wiggin, Matthew; Kerssemakers, Jacob W.J.; Pedaci, Francesco; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded nature of DNA links its replication, transcription and repair to rotational motion and torsional strain. Magnetic tweezers (MT) are a powerful single-molecule technique to apply both forces and torques to individual DNA or RNA molecules. However, conventional MT do not track rotational motion directly and constrain the free rotation of the nucleic acid tether. Here we present freely orbiting MT (FOMT) that allow the measurement of equilibrium fluctuations and changes in the twist of tethered nucleic acid molecules. Using a precisely aligned vertically oriented magnetic field, FOMT enable tracking of the rotation angle from straight forward (x,y)-position tracking and permits the application of calibrated stretching forces, without biasing the tether's free rotation. We utilize FOMT to measure the force-dependent torsional stiffness of DNA from equilibrium rotational fluctuations and to follow the assembly of recombination protein A filaments on DNA. PMID:21863006

  2. Optical levitation and manipulation of stuck particles with pulsed optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Ambardekar, Amol Ashok; Li, Yong-Qing

    2005-07-15

    We report on optical levitation and manipulation of microscopic particles that are stuck on a glass surface with pulsed optical tweezers. An infrared pulse laser at 1.06 microm was used to generate a large gradient force (up to 10(-9) N) within a short duration (approximately 45 micros) that overcomes the adhesive interaction between the particles and the glass surface. Then a low-power continuous-wave diode laser at 785 nm was used to capture and manipulate the levitated particle. We have demonstrated that both stuck dielectric and biological micrometer-sized particles, including polystyrene beads, yeast cells, and Bacillus cereus bacteria, can be levitated and manipulated with this technique. We measured the single-pulse levitation efficiency for 2.0 microm polystyrene beads as a function of the pulse energy and of the axial displacement from the stuck particle to the pulsed laser focus, which was as high as 88%.

  3. Microfluidic platform combining droplets and magnetic tweezers: application to HER2 expression in cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Davide; Champ, Jérôme; Teste, Bruno; Serra, Marco; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; de Cremoux, Patricia; Descroix, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision medicine, together with the multiplication of targeted therapies and associated molecular biomarkers, call for major progress in genetic analysis methods, allowing increased multiplexing and the implementation of more complex decision trees, without cost increase or loss of robustness. We present a platform combining droplet microfluidics and magnetic tweezers, performing RNA purification, reverse transcription and amplification in a fully automated and programmable way, in droplets of 250nL directly sampled from a microtiter-plate. This platform decreases sample consumption about 100 fold as compared to current robotized platforms and it reduces human manipulations and contamination risk. The platform’s performance was first evaluated on cell lines, showing robust operation on RNA quantities corresponding to less than one cell, and then clinically validated with a cohort of 21 breast cancer samples, for the determination of their HER2 expression status, in a blind comparison with an established routine clinical analysis. PMID:27157697

  4. Characterization of the mechanical properties of HL-1 cardiomyocytes with high throughput magnetic tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, La; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-08-03

    We characterized the mechanical properties of cardiomyocyte-like HL-1 cells using our recently developed multi-pole magnetic tweezers. With the optimized design, both high force and high throughput are achieved at the same time. Force up to 100 pN can be applied on a 1 μm diameter superparamagnetic bead in a workspace with 60 μm radius, which is encircled symmetrically by 3 sharp magnetic tips. By adjusting the coil currents, both the strength and direction of force can be controlled. The result shows that both viscosity and shear elastic modulus of HL-1 cells exhibit an approximately log-normal distribution. The cells became stiffer as they matured, consistent with a transition from proliferating cells to contractile muscle tissue. Moreover, the mechanical properties of HL-1 cells show high heterogeneity, which agrees well with their physiological structure.

  5. 3D Manipulation of Protein Microcrystals with Optical Tweezers for X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikima, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Murakami, H.; Ueno, G.; Kawano, Y.; Hirata, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Kumasaka, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2013-03-01

    In some synchrotron facilities such as SPring-8, X-ray microbeams have been utilized for protein crystallography, allowing users to collect diffraction data from a protein microcrystal. Usually, a protein crystal is picked up manually from a crystallization droplet. However it is very difficult to manipulate the protein microcrystals which are very small and fragile against a shock and changes of temperature and solvent condition. We have been developing an automatic system applying the optical tweezers with two lensed fiber probes to manipulate the fragile protein microcrystal. The system succeeded in trapping a crystal and levitating it onto the cryoloop in the solvent. X-ray diffraction measurement for the manipulated protein microcrystals indicated that laser irradiation and trap with 1064nm wavelength hardly affected the result of X-ray structural analysis.

  6. Identification of volume phase transition of a single microgel particle using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthickeyan, D.; Gupta, Deepak K.; Tata, B. V. R.

    2016-10-01

    Poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPAM-co-Aac) microgel particles are pH responsive and exhibit volume phase transition (VPT) upon variation of pH. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is used conventionally to identify VPT and requires a dilute suspension with particle concentration ˜107 particles cm-3 and if particles are polydisperse in nature, DLS data interpretation is relatively difficult. Here we show that optical tweezers allow one to measure the VPT of a single microgel particle by measuring the optical trap stiffness, κ of trapped particle as a function of pH. We report here a sudden change in κ at VPT, which is shown to arise from a sudden decrease in particle diameter with a concomitant increase in the refractive index of the particle at VPT.

  7. Optical tweezers based active microrheology of sodium polystyrene sulfonate (NaPSS).

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chia-Chun; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Chen, Yin-Quan; Yen, Pei-Wen; Huang, Yi-Chiao; Chen, Jun-Yeh; Lavastre, Olivier; Guillaume, Husson; Guillaume, Darsy; Chiou, Arthur

    2011-04-25

    We used oscillatory optical tweezers to investigate the microrheological properties of Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (NaPSS; Mw = 70 kDa) polymer solutions with different concentrations from 0.001 mM to 10 mM in terms of elastic modulus G'(ω) and loss modulus G"(ω) as a function of angular frequency (ω) in the range of 6 rad/s to 6000 rad/s. The viscoelastic properties (including zero-shear-rate viscosity, crossing frequency and transition frequency) as a function of polymer concentration, deduced from our primary data, reveal the subtle structural changes in the polymer solutions as the polymer concentration increases from dilute to semi-dilute regimes, passing through the critical micelle formation concentration and the polymer overlapping concentration. The experimental results are consistent with the Maxwell model in some regime, and with the Rouse model in other, indicating the transient network character and the micelles formation in different regimes.

  8. Surface modes of a sessile water drop: An optical tweezer based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shankar; Sharma, Prerna; Bhattacharya, S.

    2007-11-01

    A high-precision method to study the dynamics of two-fluid interfaces using an optical tweezer and a phase-sensitive detection technique are described. The disturbances set up at the interface are studied by analyzing the motion of an optically trapped particle in the bulk of the fluid, i.e., away from the interface. The usefulness of the technique is demonstrated for the well-known problem of a horizontally vibrated sessile liquid drop. The vibrational modes of the liquid drop excited by sinusoidally vibrating the support in a horizontal plane appear as resonances in the motion of the trapped particle. The nature of the resonance is studied in detail by measuring the real part, the imaginary part, and the phase response of the motion of the particle as a function of the "effective" size of the liquid drop. Excellent quantitative agreement with the theoretically predicted values of the eigenfrequencies and damping of the surface modes is obtained.

  9. Surface modes of a sessile water drop: an optical tweezer based study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shankar; Sharma, Prerna; Bhattacharya, S

    2007-11-01

    A high-precision method to study the dynamics of two-fluid interfaces using an optical tweezer and a phase-sensitive detection technique are described. The disturbances set up at the interface are studied by analyzing the motion of an optically trapped particle in the bulk of the fluid, i.e., away from the interface. The usefulness of the technique is demonstrated for the well-known problem of a horizontally vibrated sessile liquid drop. The vibrational modes of the liquid drop excited by sinusoidally vibrating the support in a horizontal plane appear as resonances in the motion of the trapped particle. The nature of the resonance is studied in detail by measuring the real part, the imaginary part, and the phase response of the motion of the particle as a function of the "effective" size of the liquid drop. Excellent quantitative agreement with the theoretically predicted values of the eigenfrequencies and damping of the surface modes is obtained.

  10. Controlled modulation of laser beam and dynamic patterning of colloidal particles using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Singh Mehta, Dalip; Kumar, Ranjeet; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2016-02-01

    We present controlled generation of complex-structured beam profiles using diffractive optical element and demonstrate multiple dynamic trapping of colloidal particles. The phase element is programmed to generate various tailored optical fields having structures, similar to that of number three, spiral, and circle but in a tractable manner. Thus, the generated spatially tailored optical fields are confined to focal volume in optical tweezers. This enabled real-time trapping of multiple microscopic objects whereby its transverse organization was controlled in a dynamic manner from one structure to another with the help of spatial light modulator. Such a controlled beam shaping finds potential applications in biophotonics, super resolution imaging, and measurement of biophysical parameters, cell sorting, and micro-manipulation of colloidal particles.

  11. Coherence and Raman sideband cooling of a single atom in an optical tweezer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J D; Tiecke, T G; Zibrov, A S; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2013-03-29

    We investigate quantum control of a single atom in a tightly focused optical tweezer trap. We show that inevitable spatially varying polarization gives rise to significant internal-state decoherence but that this effect can be mitigated by an appropriately chosen magnetic bias field. This enables Raman sideband cooling of a single atom close to its three-dimensional ground state (vibrational quantum numbers n(x)=n(y)=0.01, n(z)=8) even for a trap beam waist as small as w=900  nm. The small atomic wave packet with δx=δy=24  nm and δz=270  nm represents a promising starting point for future hybrid quantum systems where atoms are placed in close proximity to surfaces.

  12. Stretching single DNA molecules to demonstrate high-force capabilities of holographic optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Farré, Arnau; van der Horst, Astrid; Blab, Gerhard A; Downing, Benjamin P B; Forde, Nancy R

    2010-04-01

    The well calibrated force-extension behaviour of single double-stranded DNA molecules was used as a standard to investigate the performance of phase-only holographic optical tweezers at high forces. Specifically, the characteristic overstretch transition at 65 pN was found to appear where expected, demonstrating (1) that holographic optical trap calibration using thermal fluctuation methods is valid to high forces; (2) that the holographic optical traps are harmonic out to >250 nm of 2.1 mum particle displacement; and (3) that temporal modulations in traps induced by the spatial light modulator (SLM) do not affect the ability of optical traps to hold and steer particles against high forces. These studies demonstrate a new high-force capability for holographic optical traps achievable by SLM technologies.

  13. Study of a colloidal sphere near flat walls using oscillating optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Chungil; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2009-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a micron-sized colloidal sphere in two cases; one is for a particle near a single flat wall and the other is for a particle confined between two parallel flat walls. In this geometry, the force felt by a moving particle is quite different from that of a moving particle in unbounded space. Even though the presence of wall(s) complicates the flow field surrounding the colloidal sphere, the dynamics of a colloidal sphere near flat walls provides a model system with which to understand the phenomenon of more complex systems whose boundaries can be modeled as effective walls.[1] In this work, hydrodynamic interactions of colloidal sphere with nearby plat wall(s) are studied by using oscillating optical tweezers and compared with known theories and other experimental results using different techniques.

  14. Evaluating cell matrix mechanics using an integrated nonlinear optical tweezer-confocal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Berney; Alonzo, Carlo A. C.; Xia, Lawrence; Speroni, Lucia; Georgakoudi, Irene; Soto, Ana M.; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Cronin-Golomb, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Biomechanics plays a central role in breast epithelial morphogenesis. In this study we have used 3D cultures in which normal breast epithelial cells are able to organize into rounded acini and tubular ducts, the main structures found in the breast tissue. We have identified fiber organization as a main determinant of ductal organization. While bulk rheological properties of the matrix seem to play a negligible role in determining the proportion of acini versus ducts, local changes may be pivotal in shape determination. As such, the ability to make microscale rheology measurements coupled with simultaneous optical imaging in 3D cultures can be critical to assess the biomechanical factors underlying epithelial morphogenesis. This paper describes the inclusion of optical tweezers based microrheology in a microscope that had been designed for nonlinear optical imaging of collagen networks in ECM. We propose two microrheology methods and show preliminary results using a gelatin hydrogel and collagen/Matrigel 3D cultures containing mammary gland epithelial cells.

  15. Mechanism of termination of bacteriophage DNA packaging investigated with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    delToro, Damian J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2012-10-01

    The genomes of many dsDNA viruses are replicated by a mechanism that produces a long concatemer of multiple genomes. These viruses utilize multifunctional molecular motor complexes referred to as "terminases" that can excise a unit genome length of DNA and package it into preformed viral shells. Remarkably, the terminase motor can initiate packaging at the appropriate start point, translocate DNA, sense when a sufficient length has been packaged, and then switch into a mode where it arrests and cleaves the DNA to release a filled virus particle. We have recently developed an improved method to measure single phage lambda DNA packaging using dual-trap optical tweezers and pre-stalled motor-DNA-procapsid complexes. We are applying this method to test proposed mechanisms for the sensor that triggers termination; specifically a velocity-monitor model vs. energy-monitor model vs. capsid-filling monitor model.

  16. Microfluidic platform combining droplets and magnetic tweezers: application to HER2 expression in cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Davide; Champ, Jérôme; Teste, Bruno; Serra, Marco; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis; de Cremoux, Patricia; Descroix, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    The development of precision medicine, together with the multiplication of targeted therapies and associated molecular biomarkers, call for major progress in genetic analysis methods, allowing increased multiplexing and the implementation of more complex decision trees, without cost increase or loss of robustness. We present a platform combining droplet microfluidics and magnetic tweezers, performing RNA purification, reverse transcription and amplification in a fully automated and programmable way, in droplets of 250nL directly sampled from a microtiter-plate. This platform decreases sample consumption about 100 fold as compared to current robotized platforms and it reduces human manipulations and contamination risk. The platform’s performance was first evaluated on cell lines, showing robust operation on RNA quantities corresponding to less than one cell, and then clinically validated with a cohort of 21 breast cancer samples, for the determination of their HER2 expression status, in a blind comparison with an established routine clinical analysis.

  17. Implementation and Tuning of an Optical Tweezers Force-Clamp Feedback System.

    PubMed

    Bugiel, Michael; Jannasch, Anita; Schäffer, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Feedback systems can be used to control the value of a system variable. In optical tweezers, active feedback is often implemented to either keep the position or tension applied to a single biomolecule constant. Here, we describe the implementation of the latter: an optical force-clamp setup that can be used to study the motion of processive molecular motors under a constant load. We describe the basics of a software-implemented proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, how to tune it, and how to determine its optimal feedback rate. Limitations, possible feed-forward applications, and extensions into two- and three-dimensional optical force clamps are discussed. The feedback is ultimately limited by thermal fluctuations and the compliance of the involved molecules. To investigate a particular mechanical process, understanding the basics and limitations of the feedback system will be helpful for choosing the proper feedback hardware, for optimizing the system parameters, and for the design of the experiment.

  18. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; Milstein, Joshua N.

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices.

  19. Semi-automated sorting using holographic optical tweezers remotely controlled by eye/hand tracking camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomori, Zoltan; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Kaůka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    We proposed the improved control software for the holographic optical tweezers (HOT) proper for simple semi-automated sorting. The controller receives data from both the human interface sensors and the HOT microscope camera and processes them. As a result, the new positions of active laser traps are calculated, packed into the network format and sent to the remote HOT. Using the photo-polymerization technique, we created a sorting container consisting of two parallel horizontal walls where one wall contains "gates" representing a place where the trapped particle enters into the container. The positions of particles and gates are obtained by image analysis technique which can be exploited to achieve the higher level of automation. Sorting is documented on computer game simulation and the real experiment.

  20. The influence of target erosion grade in the optoelectronic properties of AZO coatings growth by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubizarreta, C.; G-Berasategui, E.; Ciarsolo, I.; Barriga, J.; Gaspar, D.; Martins, R.; Fortunato, E.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) transparent conductor coating has emerged as promising substitute to tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) as electrode in optoelectronic applications such as photovoltaics or light emitting diodes (LEDs). Besides its high transmission in the visible spectral region and low resistivity, AZO presents a main advantage over other candidates such as graphene, carbon nanotubes or silver nanowires; it can be deposited using the technology industrially implemented to manufacture ITO layers, the magnetron sputtering (MS). This is a productive, reliable and green manufacturing technique. But to guarantee the robustness, reproducibility and reliability of the process there are still some issues to be addressed, such as the effect and control of the target state. In this paper a thorough study of the influence of the target erosion grade in developed coatings has been performed. AZO films have been deposited from a ceramic target by RF MS. Structure, optical transmittance and electrical properties of the produced coatings have been analyzed as function of the target erosion grade. No noticeable differences have been found neither in optoelectronic properties nor in the structure of the coatings, indicating that the RF MS is a stable and consistent process through the whole life of the target.