Science.gov

Sample records for electrodynamic tether system

  1. Electrodynamic tether system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to define an Electrodynamic Tether System (ETS) that could be erected from the space station and/or platforms to function as an energy storage device. A schematic representation of the ETS concept mounted on the space station is presented. In addition to the hardware design and configuration efforts, studies are also documented involving simulations of the Earth's magnetic fields and the effects this has on overall system efficiency calculations. Also discussed are some preliminary computer simulations of orbit perturbations caused by the cyclic/night operations of the ETS. System cost estimates, an outline for future development testing for the ETS system, and conclusions and recommendations are also provided.

  2. Electrodynamic tether system study: Extended study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This document is the final report of a study performed by Ball Space Systems Division (BSSD) for the NASA Johnson Space Center under an extension to contract NAS9-17666. The tasks for the extended study were as follows: (1) Define an interface between the Electrodynamic Tether System (ETS) and the Space Station (SS); (2) Identify growth paths for the 100 kW ETS defined in the original study to a 200 kW level of performance; (3) Quantify orbit perturbations caused by cyclic day/night operations of a Plasma Motor/Generator (PMG) on the SS and explore methods of minimizing these effects; (4) Define the analyses, precursor technology, ground tests, and precursor demonstrations leading up to a demonstration mission for an electrodynamic tether system that would be capable of producing maneuvering thrust levels of 25 newtons; and (5) Propose a development schedule for the demonstration mission and preliminary cost estimates.

  3. Electrodynamic Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L. (Inventor); Ballance, Judy L. (Inventor); Welzyn, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Vaughn, Jason A. (Inventor); Lorenzini, Enrico (Inventor); Schuler, Peter S. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A tether system for providing thrust to or power subsystems of an artificial satellite in a low earth orbit. The tether has three main sections, an insulated section connected to the satellite, a conducting section connected to the insulating section for drawing in and releasing electrons from the space plasma and a non-conducting section for providing a tension to the other sections of the tether. An oxygen resistant coating is applied to the bare wire of the conducting section as well as the insulated wires of the insulated section that prevents breakdown during tether operations in the space plasma. The insulated and bare wire sections also surround a high tensile flexible polymer core to prevent any debris from breaking the tether during use.

  4. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  5. An Overview of Electrodynamic Tether Performance in the Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Johnson, Les; Bagenal, Fran; Moore, James

    1998-01-01

    The Jovian magnetosphere with its strong magnetic field and rapid planetary rotation present new opportunities and challenges for the use of electrodynamic tethers. An overview of the basic plasma physics properties of an electrodynamic tether moving through the Jovian magnetosphere is examined. Tether use for both propulsion and power generation are considered. Close to the planet, tether propulsive forces are found to be as high as 50 Newtons and power levels as high as 1 million Watts.

  6. Electrodynamic Bare Tether Systems as a Thruster for the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost(MXER)Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of electrodynamic tether propulsion has a number of attractive features and has been widely discussed for different applications. Different system designs have been proposed and compared during the last 10 years. In spite of this, the choice of proper design for any particular mission is a unique problem. Such characteristics of tether performance as system acceleration, efficiency, etc., should be calculated and compared on the basis of the known capability of a tether to collect electrical current. We discuss the choice of parameters for circular and tape tethers with regard to the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether project.

  7. Electrodynamic Propulsion System Tether Experiment (T-REX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    A Japanese-led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2010 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approximately 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approximately8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation

  8. On equilibrium positions and stabilization of electrodynamic tether system in the orbital frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, A. A.; Shcherbakova, L. F.

    2018-05-01

    An electrodynamic tether system (EDTS) in a near-Earth circular orbit is considered. EDTS contains conductive tether with lumped masses attached to it at the ends. Possible equilibrium positions of the stretched tether under the influence of gravity gradient, Ampere and Lorentz forces in orbital frame are investigated. It is shown that in addition to the vertical equilibrium position, the "inclined" equilibrium positions of the tensioned tether are also possible. Conditions are obtained for the EDTS parameters, under which there is only one vertical position of the tether equilibrium. On the basis of nonlinear differential equations of motion, using the Lyapunov functions method, sufficient conditions for the stability of the vertical position of the tether equi-librium are obtained. It is shown that stabilization of the tether in this position is possible in the presence of damping in the EDTS system. The results of numerical simulation are presented.

  9. The PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Johnson, C. Les; Wiegmann, Bruce M.; Alexander, Leslie; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoyt, Robert P.; Elder, Craig H.; Fuhrhop, Keith P.; Scadera, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The PROPEL ("Propulsion using Electrodynamics") mission will demonstrate the operation of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system in low Earth orbit and advance its technology readiness level for multiple applications. The PROPEL mission has two primary objectives: first, to demonstrate the capability of electrodynamic tether technology to provide robust and safe, near-propellantless propulsion for orbit-raising, de-orbit, plane change, and station keeping, as well as to perform orbital power harvesting and formation flight; and, second, to fully characterize and validate the performance of an integrated electrodynamic tether propulsion system, qualifying it for infusion into future multiple satellite platforms and missions with minimal modification. This paper provides an overview of the PROPEL system and design reference missions; mission goals and required measurements; and ongoing PROPEL mission design efforts.

  10. Advanced Electrodynamic Tether Systems: Modeling of Scattering and Unsteady Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-06

    SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18 . NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...Tether Simulation............................................................................................................... 18 4.3 Simulation of...panels) – the same for actual oxygen ions 18 r 10-1 100 101 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 4 r 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 100 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 EX

  11. Space Station Reboost with Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vas, Irwin E.; Kelly, Thomas J.; Scarl, Ethan A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of an electrodynamic tether system to reboost the International Space Station (ISS). One recommendation is to use a partially bare tether for electron collection. Locations are suggested as to where the tether system is to be attached at the space station. The effects of the tether system on the microgravity environment may actually be beneficial, because the system can neutralize aerodrag during quiescent periods and, if deployed from a movable boom, can permit optimization of laboratory positioning with respect to acceleration contours. Alternative approaches to tether deployment and retrieval are discussed. It is shown that a relatively short tether system, 7 km long, operating at a power level of 5 kW could provide cumulative savings or over a billion dollars during a 10-year period ending in 2012. This savings is the direct result of a reduction in the number or nights that would otherwise be required to deliver propellant for reboost, with larger cost savings for higher tether usage. In addition to economic considerations, an electrodynamic tether promises a practical backup system that could ensure ISS survival in the event of an (otherwise) catastrophic delay in propellant delivery.

  12. Implementation Options for the PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Johnson, Les; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoyt, Robert P.; Elder, Craig H.; Fuhrhop, Keith P.; Scadera, Michael P.; Stone, Nobie H.

    2014-01-01

    The PROPEL flight mission concept will demonstrate the safe use of an electrodynamic tether for generating thrust. PROPEL is being designed to be a versatile electrodynamic-tether system for multiple end users and to be flexible with respect to platform. As such, several implementation options are being explored, including a comprehensive mission design for PROPEL with a mission duration of six months; a space demonstration mission concept design with configuration of a pair of tethered satellites, one of which is the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle; and an ESPA-based system. We report here on these possible implementation options for PROPEL. electrodynamic tether; PROPEL demonstration mission; propellantless propulsion

  13. Spacecraft Solar Sails Containing Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Matloff, Greg

    2005-01-01

    A report discusses a proposal to use large, lightweight solar sails embedded with electrodynamic tethers (essentially, networks of wires) to (1) propel robotic spacecraft to distant planets, then (2) exploit the planetary magnetic fields to capture the spacecraft into orbits around the planets. The purpose of the proposal is, of course, to make it possible to undertake long interplanetary missions without incurring the large cost and weight penalties of conventional rocket-type propulsion systems. Through transfer of momentum from reflected solar photons, a sail would generate thrust outward from the Sun. Upon arrival in the vicinity of a planet, the electrodynamic tethers would be put to use: Motion of the spacecraft across the planetary magnetic field would induce electric currents in the tether wires, giving rise to an electromagnetic drag force that would be exploited to brake the spacecraft for capture into orbit. The sail with embedded tethers would be made to spin to provide stability during capture. Depending upon the requirements of a particular application, it could be necessary to extend the tether to a diameter greater than that of the sail.

  14. Optimal Electrodynamic Tether Phasing Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bitzer, Matthew S.; Hall, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    We study the minimum-time orbit phasing maneuver problem for a constant-current electrodynamic tether (EDT). The EDT is assumed to be a point mass and the electromagnetic forces acting on the tether are always perpendicular to the local magnetic field. After deriving and non-dimensionalizing the equations of motion, the only input parameters become current and the phase angle. Solution examples, including initial Lagrange costates, time of flight, thrust plots, and thrust angle profiles, are given for a wide range of current magnitudes and phase angles. The two-dimensional cases presented use a non-tilted magnetic dipole model, and the solutions are compared to existing literature. We are able to compare similar trajectories for a constant thrust phasing maneuver and we find that the time of flight is longer for the constant thrust case with similar initial thrust values and phase angles. Full three-dimensional solutions, which use a titled magnetic dipole model, are also analyzed for orbits with small inclinations.

  15. International Space Station Electrodynamic Tether Reboost Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Herrmann, M.

    1998-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will require periodic reboost due to atmospheric aerodynamic drag. This is nominally achieved through the use of thruster firings by the attached Progress M spacecraft. Many Progress flights to the ISS are required annually. Electrodynamic tethers provide an attractive alternative in that they can provide periodic reboost or continuous drag cancellation using no consumables, propellant, nor conventional propulsion elements. The system could also serve as an emergency backup reboost system used only in the event resupply and reboost are delayed for some reason.

  16. Electrodynamic tethers for energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobles, W.

    1986-01-01

    Conductive tethers have been proposed as a new method for converting orbital mechanical energy into electrical power for use on-board a satellite (generator mode) or conversely (motor mode) as a method of providing electric propulsion using electrical energy from the satellite. The operating characteristics of such systems are functionally dependent on orbit altitude and inclination. Effects of these relationships are examined to determine acceptable regions of application. To identify system design considerations, a specific set of system performance goals and requirements are selected. The case selected is for a 25 kW auxiliary power system for use on Space Station. Appropriate system design considerations are developed, and the resulting system is described.

  17. Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) electrodynamic tether experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, Mario D.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) flight of June 26, 1993 has been the most sophisticated and most successful mission that has been carried out thus far with an electrodynamic tether. Three papers from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Washington, DC concerned with the PMG, submitted at the Fourth International Space Conference on Tethers in Space, in Washington, DC, in April 1995, are contained in this document. The three papers are (1) Electromagnetic interactions between the PMG tether and the magneto-ionic medium of the Ionosphere; (2) Tether-current-voltage characteristics, as determined by the Hollow Cathode Operation Modes; and (3) Hawaii-Hilo ground observations on the occasion for the PMG flight of June 23, 1993.

  18. Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion and Power Generation at Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Johnson, L.; Moore, J.; Bagenal, F.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a study performed to evaluate the feasibility and merits of using an electrodynamic tether for propulsion and power generation for a spacecraft in the Jovian system are presented. The environment of the Jovian system has properties which are particularly favorable for utilization of an electrodynamic tether. Specifically, the planet has a strong magnetic field and the mass of the planet dictates high orbital velocities which, when combined with the planet's rapid rotation rate, can produce very large relative velocities between the magnetic field and the spacecraft. In a circular orbit close to the planet, tether propulsive forces are found to be as high as 50 N and power levels as high as 1 MW.

  19. The PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Mission and Connecting to the Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian; Bilen, Sven; Hoyt, Rob; Stone,Nobie; Vaughn, Jason; Fuhrhop, Keith; Krause, Linda; Khazanov, George; Johnson, Les

    2012-01-01

    The exponential increase of launch system size.and cost.with delta-V makes missions that require large total impulse cost prohibitive. Led by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, a team from government, industry, and academia has developed a flight demonstration mission concept of an integrated electrodynamic (ED) tethered satellite system called PROPEL: "Propulsion using Electrodynamics". The PROPEL Mission is focused on demonstrating a versatile configuration of an ED tether to overcome the limitations of the rocket equation, enable new classes of missions currently unaffordable or infeasible, and significantly advance the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) to an operational level. We are also focused on establishing a far deeper understanding of critical processes and technologies to be able to scale and improve tether systems in the future. Here, we provide an overview of the proposed PROPEL mission. One of the critical processes for efficient ED tether operation is the ability to inject current to and collect current from the ionosphere. Because the PROPEL mission is planned to have both boost and deboost capability using a single tether, the tether current must be capable of flowing in both directions and at levels well over 1 A. Given the greater mobility of electrons over that of ions, this generally requires that both ends of the ED tether system can both collect and emit electrons. For example, hollow cathode plasma contactors (HCPCs) generally are viewed as state-of-the-art and high TRL devices; however, for ED tether applications important questions remain of how efficiently they can operate as both electron collectors and emitters. Other technologies will be highlighted that are being investigated as possible alternatives to the HCPC such as Solex that generates a plasma cloud from a solid material (Teflon) and electron emission (only) technologies such as cold-cathode electron field emission or photo-electron beam generation (PEBG) techniques.

  20. Tethered satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisson, J.

    1986-01-01

    A reusable system is to be developed to enable a variety of scientific investigations to be accomplished from the shuttle, considering the use of a tethered system with manual or automated control, deployment of a satellite toward or away from the Earth, up to 100 km, and conducting or nonconducting tether. Experiments and scientific investigations are to be performed using the tether system for applications such as magnetometry, electrodynamics, atmospheric science, and chemical release. A program is being implemented as a cooperative U.S./Italian activity. The proposed systems, investigations, and the program are charted and briefly discussed.

  1. High voltage characteristics of the electrodynamic tether and the generation of power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) will deploy and retrieve a satellite from the Space Shuttle orbiter with a tether of up to 100 km in length attached between the satellite and the orbiter. The characteristics of the TSS which are related to high voltages, electrical currents, energy storage, power, and the generation of plasma waves are described. A number of specific features of the tether system of importance in assessing the operational characteristics of the electrodynamic TSS are identified.

  2. Implementation Options for the PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Johnson, C. Les; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoyt, Robert P.; Elder, Craig H.; Fuhrhop, Keith P.; Scadera, Michael; Stone, Nobie

    2014-01-01

    The PROPEL ("Propulsion using Electrodynamics") flight demonstration mission concept will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether (EDT) for generating thrust, which will allow the propulsion system to overcome the limitations of the rocket equation. The mission concept has been developed by a team of government, industry, and academia partners led by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). PROPEL is being designed for versatility of the EDT system with multiple end users in mind and to be flexible with respect to platform. Previously, we reported on a comprehensive mission design for PROPEL with a mission duration of six months or longer with multiple mission goals including demonstration of significant boost, deboost, inclination change, and drag make-up activities. To explore a range of possible configurations, primarily driven by cost considerations, other mission concept designs have been pursued. In partnership with the NASA's Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) Game Changing Program, NASA MSFC Leadership, and the MSFC Advanced Concepts Office, a mission concept design was developed for a near-term EDT propulsion flight validation mission. The Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion Study (ETPS) defined an EDT propulsion system capable of very large delta-V for use on future missions developed by NASA, DoD, and commercial customers. To demonstrate the feasibility of an ETPS, the study focused on a space demonstration mission concept design with configuration of a pair of tethered satellite busses, one of which is the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The HTV would fly its standard ISS resupply mission. When resupply mission is complete, the ISS reconfigures and releases the HTV to perform the EDT experiment at safe orbital altitudes below the ISS. Though the focus of this particular mission concept design addresses a scenario involving the HTV or a similar vehicle, the propulsion system's capability is relevant to a number of applications, as noted above

  3. Plasma Interactions With a Negative Biased Electrodynamic Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Curtis, Leslie; Welzyn, Ken J.

    2004-01-01

    The ProSEDS conductive tether design incorporates two distinct types of tethers from a plasma interaction viewpoint. The 200 m closest to the Delta II spacecraft is insulated from the plasma, and the remaining 4800 m is semi-bare. This latter portion is considered semi-bare because a conductive coating, which is designed to collect electrons from the plasma, was applied to the wires to regulate the overall tether temperature. Because the tether has both insulating and conductive tether sections, a transition point exists between the two that forms a triple point with the space plasma. Also, insulated tethers can arc to the space plasma if the insulation is weakened or breached by pinholes caused by either improper handling or small meteoroid and orbital debris strikes. Because electrodynamic tethers are typically long, they have a high probability of these impacts. The particles, which strike the tether, may not have sufficient size to severe the tether, but they can easily penetrate the tether insulation producing a plasma discharge to the ambient plasma. Samples of both the ProSEDS tether transition region and the insulated tether section with various size of pinholes were placed into the MSFC plasma chamber and biased to typical ProSEDS open circuit tether potentials (-500 V to -1600 V). The results of the testing showed that the transition region of the tether (i.e. the triple point) arced to the ambient plasma at -900 V, and the tethers damaged by a pinhole or simulated debris strike arced to the plasma between -700 V and -900 V. Specific design steps were taken to eliminate the triple point issue in the ProSEDS tether design and make it ready for flight. To reduce the pinhole arcing risk, ProSEDS mission operations were changed to eliminate the high negative potential on the insulated tether. The results of the testing campaign and the design changes implemented to ensure a successful flight are described.

  4. System engineering study of electrodynamic tether as a spaceborne generator and radiator of electromagnetic waves in the ULF/ELF frequency band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    An electrodynamic tether deployed from a satellite in low-Earth orbit can perform, if properly instrumented, as a partially self-powered generator of electromagnetic waves in the ULF/ELF band, potentially at power levels high enough to be of practical use. Two basic problems are examined. The first is that of the level of wave power that the system can be expected to generate in the ULF/ELF radiation band. The second major question is whether an electrodynamic tethered satellite system for transmitting waves can be made partially self-powering so that power requirements for drag compensation can be met within economical constraints of mass, cost, and complexity. The theoretical developments and the system applications study are presented. The basic design criteria, the drag-compensation method, the effects on the propagation paths from orbit to Earth surface of high-altitude nuclear debris patches, and the estimate of masses and sizes are covered. An outline of recommended analytical work, to be performed as a follow-on to the present study, is contained.

  5. The radiation impedance of an electrodynamic tether with end connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, Daniel E.; Wang, J.

    1987-01-01

    Electrodynamic tethers are wires deployed across the earth's geomagnetic field through which a current is flowing. The radiation impedance of a tether with end connectors carrying an ac current is computed from classical antenna theory. This simulates the use of a tether on a space structure. It is shown that the current flow pattern at the tether connector is critical to determining the overall radiation impedance. If the tether makes direct electrical contact with the ionosphere then radiation impedances of the order of several thousand Ohms can be expected. If the only electrical contact is through the end connectors then the impedance is only a few Ohms for a dc current rising to several tens of Ohms for an ac current with frequencies in the whistler range.

  6. Electrodynamic Tether Operations beyond the Ionosphere in the Low-Density Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H.

    2007-01-01

    In the classical concept for the operation of electrodynamic tethers in space, a voltage is generated across the tether, either by the tether's orbital motion through the earth's planetary magnetic field or by a power supply; electrons are then collected from the ionospheric plasma at the positive pole; actively emitted back into space at the negative pole; and the circuit is closed by currents driven through the ambient conducting ionosphere. This concept has been proven to work in space by the Tethered Satellite System TSS-1 and TSS-1R Space Shuttle missions; and the Plasma Motor-Generator (PMG) tether flight experiment. However, it limits electrodynamic tether operations to the F-region of the ionosphere where the plasma density is sufficient to conduct the required currents--in other words, between altitudes of approximately 200 to 1000 km in sunlight. In the earth's shadow, the ionospheric density drops precipitously and tether operations, using the above approach, are not effective--even within this altitude range. There are numerous missions that require in-space propulsion in the Earth's shadow and/or outside of the above altitude range. This paper will, therefore, present the fundamentals of a concept that would allow electrodynamic tethers to operate almost anywhere within the magnetosphere, the region of space containing the earth's planetary magnetic field. In other words, because operations would be virtually independent of any ambient plasma, the range of electrodynamic operations would be extended into the earth's shadow and out to synchronous orbit--forty times the present operational range. The key to this concept is the active generation of plasma at each pole of the tether so that current generation ,does not depend on the conductivity of the ambient ionosphere. Arguments will be presented, based on ,existing flight data, which shed light on the behavior of charge emissions in space and show the plausibility of the concept.

  7. Plasma issues associated with the use of electrodynamic tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The use of an electrodynamic tether to generate power or thrust on the space station raises important plasma issues associted with the current flow. In addition to the issue of current closure through the space station, high power tethers (equal to or greater than tens of kilowatts) require the use of plasma contactors to enhance the current flow. They will generate large amounts of electrostatic turbulence in the vicinity of the space station. This is because the contactors work best when a large amount of current driven turbulence is excited. Current work is reviewed and future directions suggested.

  8. Applications of the Electrodynamic Tether to Interstellar Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matloff, Gregory L.; Johnson, Les

    2005-01-01

    After considering relevant properties of the local interstellar medium and defining a sample interstellar mission, this paper considers possible interstellar applications of the electrodynamic tether, or EDT. These include use of the EDT to provide on-board power and affect trajectory modifications and direct application of the EDT to starship acceleration. It is demonstrated that comparatively modest EDTs can provide substantial quantities of on-board power, if combined with a large-area electron-collection device such as the Cassenti toroidal-field ramscoop. More substantial tethers can be used to accomplish large-radius thrustless turns. Direct application of the EDT to starship acceleration is apparently infeasible.

  9. 2006 Status of the Momentum eXchange Electrodynamic Re-Boost (MXER) Tether Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.; Sorensen, Kirk F.; Dankanich, John W.; Frame, Kyle L.

    2006-01-01

    The MXER Tether technology development is a high-payoff/high-risk investment area within the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Program. The ISPT program is managed by the NASA Headquarters Science Mission Directorate and implemented by the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The MXER concept was identified and competitively ranked within NASA's comprehensive Integrated In-Space Transportation Plan (IISTP); an agency-wide technology assessment activity. The objective of the MXER tether project within ISPT is to advance the technological maturation level for the MXER system, and its subsystems, as well as other space and terrestrial tether applications. Recent hardware efforts have focused on the manufacturability of space-survivable high-strength tether material and coatings, high-current electrodynamic tether, lightweight catch mechanism, high-accuracy propagator/predictor code, and efficient electron collection/current generation. Significant technical progress has been achieved with modest ISPT funding to the extent that MXER has evolved to a well-characterized system with greater capability as the design has been matured. Synergistic efforts in high-current electrodynamic tethers and efficient electron collection/current generation have been made possible through SBIR and STTR support. The entire development endeavor was orchestrated as a collaborative team effort across multiple individual contracts and has established a solid technology resource base, which permits a wide variety of future space cable/tether applications to be realized.

  10. Command Generation and Control of Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost Tethered Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The research completed for this NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellowship sought to enhance the current state-of-the-art dynamic models and control laws for Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost satellite systems by utilizing command generation, specifically Input Shaping. The precise control of tethered spacecraft with flexible appendages is extremely difficult. The complexity is magnified many times when the satellite must interact with other satellites as in a momentum exchange via a tether. The Momentum Exchange Electronic Reboost Tether (MXER) concept encapsulates all of these challenging tasks [l]. Input Shaping is a command generation technique that allows flexible spacecraft to move without inducing residual vibration [2], limit transient deflection [3] and utilize fuel-efficient actuation [4]. Input shaping is implemented by convolving a sequence of impulses, known as the input shaper, with a desired system command to produce a shaped input that is then used to drive the system. This process is demonstrated in Figure 1. The shaped command is then use to drive the system without residual vibration while meeting many other performance specifications. The completed work developed tether control algorithms for retrieval. A simple model of the tether response has been developed and command shaping was implemented to minimize unwanted dynamics. A model of a flexible electrodynamic tether has been developed to investigate the tether s response during reboost. Command shaping techniques have been developed to eliminate the tether oscillations and reduce the tether s deflection to pre-specified levels during reboost. Additionally, a model for the spin-up of a tethered system was developed. This model was used in determining the parameters for optimization the resulting angular velocity.

  11. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1984-01-01

    Tethered satellite system (TSS) dynamics were studied. The dynamic response of the TSS during the entire stationkeeping phase for the first electrodynamic mission was investigated. An out of plane swing amplitude and the tether's bowing were observed. The dynamics of the slack tether was studied and computer code, SLACK2, was improved both in capabilities and computational speed. Speed hazard related to tether breakage or plasma contactor failure was examined. Preliminary values of the potential difference after the failure and of the drop of the electric field along the tether axis have been computed. The update of the satellite rotational dynamics model is initiated.

  12. Application of the NASCAP Spacecraft Simulation Tool to Investigate Electrodynamic Tether Current Collection in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi; HabashKrause, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Recent interest in using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) for orbital maneuvering in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) has prompted the development of the Marshall ElectroDynamic Tether Orbit Propagator (MEDTOP) model. The model is comprised of several modules which address various aspects of EDT propulsion, including calculation of state vectors using a standard orbit propagator (e.g., J2), an atmospheric drag model, realistic ionospheric and magnetic field models, space weather effects, and tether librations. The natural electromotive force (EMF) attained during a radially-aligned conductive tether results in electrons flowing down the tether and accumulating on the lower-altitude spacecraft. The energy that drives this EMF is sourced from the orbital energy of the system; thus, EDTs are often proposed as de-orbiting systems. However, when the current is reversed using satellite charged particle sources, then propulsion is possible. One of the most difficult challenges of the modeling effort is to ascertain the equivalent circuit between the spacecraft and the ionospheric plasma. The present study investigates the use of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) to calculate currents to and from the tethered satellites and the ionospheric plasma. NASCAP is a sophisticated set of computational tools to model the surface charging of three-dimensional (3D) spacecraft surfaces in a time-varying space environment. The model's surface is tessellated into a collection of facets, and NASCAP calculates currents and potentials for each one. Additionally, NASCAP provides for the construction of one or more nested grids to calculate space potential and time-varying electric fields. This provides for the capability to track individual particles orbits, to model charged particle wakes, and to incorporate external charged particle sources. With this study, we have developed a model of calculating currents incident onto an electrodynamic tethered satellite system, and first results are shown

  13. Magnetobraking: Use of tether electrodynamic drag for Earth return from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    It has often been proposed that a vehicle returning from Mars will use aerobraking in the Earth's atmosphere to dissipate hyperbolic excess velocity to capture into Earth orbit. Here a different system for dissipating excess velocity without expenditure of reaction mass, magnetobraking, is proposed. Magnetobraking uses the force on an electrodynamic tether in the Earth's magnetic field to produce thrust. An electrodynamic tether is deployed from the spacecraft as it approaches the Earth. The Earth's magnetic field produces a force on electrical current in the tether. If the tether is oriented perpendicularly to the Earth's magnetic field and to the direction of motion of the spacecraft, force produced by the Earth's magnetic field can be used to either brake or accelerate the spacecraft without expenditure of reaction mass. The peak acceleration on the Mars return is 0.007 m/sq sec, and the amount of braking possible is dependent on the density and current-carrying capacity of the tether, but is independent of length. A superconducting tether is required. The required critical current is shown to be within the range of superconducting technology now available in the laboratory.

  14. System engineering study of electrodynamic tether as a spaceborne generator and radiator of electromagnetic waves in the ULF/ELF frequency band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. D.; Grossi, M. D.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The transmission and generation by orbiting tethered satellite systems of information carrying electromagnetic waves in the ULF/ELF frequency band to the Earth at suitably high signal intensities was examined and the system maintaining these intensities in their orbits for long periods of time without excessive onboard power requirements was investigated. The injection quantity power into electromagnetic waves as a function of system parameters such as tether length and orbital height was estimated. The basic equations needed to evaluate alternataing current tethered systems for external energy requirements are presented. The energy equations to tethered systems with various lengths, tether resistances, and radiation resistances, operating at different current values are applied. Radiation resistance as a function of tether length and orbital height is discussed. It is found that ULF/ELF continuously radiating systems could be maintained in orbit with moderate power requirements. The effect of tether length on the power going into electromagnetic waves and whether a single or dual tether system is preferable for the self-driven mode is discussed. It is concluded that the single tether system is preferable over the dual system.

  15. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in tethered satellite system dynamics research is reported. A retrieval rate control law with no angular feedback to investigate the system's dynamic response was studied. The initial conditions for the computer code which simulates the satellite's rotational dynamics were extended to a generic orbit. The model of the satellite thrusters was modified to simulate a pulsed thrust, by making the SKYHOOK integrator suitable for dealing with delta functions without loosing computational efficiency. Tether breaks were simulated with the high resolution computer code SLACK3. Shuttle's maneuvers were tested. The electric potential around a severed conductive tether with insulator, in the case of a tether breakage at 20 km from the Shuttle, was computed. The electrodynamic hazards due to the breakage of the TSS electrodynamic tether in a plasma are evaluated.

  16. Investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Arnold, D.

    1984-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in tether modelling among participants in the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Program, the slack tether and its behavior, and certain advanced applications of the tether to problems in orbital mechanics are identified. The features and applications of the TSS software set are reviewed. Modelling the slack tether analytically with as many as 50 mass points and the application of this new model to a study of the behavior of a broken tether near the Shuttle are described. A reel control algorithm developed by SAO and examples of its use are described, including an example which also demonstrates the use of the tether in transferring a heavy payload from a low-orbiting Shuttle to a high circular orbit. Capture of a low-orbiting payload by a Space Station in high circular orbit is described. Energy transfer within a dumbbell-type spacecraft by cyclical reeling operations or gravitational effects on the natural elasticity of the connecting tether, it is shown, can circularize the orbit of the spacecraft.

  17. Electrodynamic Tethers and E-Sails as Active Experiment Testbeds and Technologies in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Wiegmann, B.; Johnson, L.; Bilen, S. G.; Habash Krause, L.; Miars, G.; Leon, O.

    2017-12-01

    The use of small-to-large flexible structures in space such as tethers continues to be studied for scientific and technology applications. Here we will consider tether electrodynamic and electrostatic interactions with magneto-plasmas in ionospheres, magnetospheres, and interplanetary space. These systems are enabling fundamental studies of basic plasma physics phenomena, allowing direct studies of the space environment, and generating technological applications beneficial for science missions. Electrodynamic tethers can drive current through the tether based on the Lorenz force adding or extracting energy from its orbit allowing for the study of charged bodies or plasma plumes moving through meso-sonic magnetoplasmas [1]. Technologically, this also generates propulsive forces requiring no propellant and little or no consumables in any planetary system with a magnetic field and ionosphere, e.g., Jupiter [2]. Further, so called electric sails (E-sails) are being studied to provide thrust through momentum exchange with the hypersonic solar wind. The E-sail uses multiple, very long (10s of km) charged, mostly bare rotating conducting tethers to deflect solar wind protons. It is estimated that a spacecraft could achieve a velocity over 100 km/s with time [3,4]. 1. Banks, P.M., "Review of electrodynamic tethers for space plasma science," J. Spacecraft and Rockets, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 234-239, 1989. 2. Talley, C., J. Moore, D. Gallagher, and L. Johnson, "Propulsion and power from a rotating electrodynamic tether at Jupiter," 38th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 2000. 3. Janhunen, P., "The electric sail—A new propulsion method which may enable fast missions to the outer solar system," J. British Interpl. Soc., vol. 61, no. 8, pp. 322-325, 2008. 4. Wiegman, B., T. Scheider, A. Heaton, J. Vaughn, N. Stone, and K. Wright, "The Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System (HERTS)—Design, trades, and analyses performed in a two-year NASA investigation

  18. Practicality of Using a Tether for Electrodynamic Reboost of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumer, J. H.; Donahue, Benjamin B.; Bangham, Michal E.; Roth, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    ElectroDynamic (ED) Tethers can generate continuous low thrust in a low Earth orbit. An induced current running through the length of the tether reacts with the geomagnetic field to produce thrust. The amount of thrust scales with tether lens!th and current. The International Space Station (ISS) requires periodic reboost to maintain an approximately circular orbit t above the Earth. The baseline reboost method is a traditional bi-propellant rocket thruster and tankage system which must to be refueled via Soyuz / Progress or other launch vehicle. The estimated propellant costs associated with keeping ISS in the designated orbit over a 10-year life have been extremely high. The ED Tether would draw energy from the renewable ISS Solar Array electrical power system. Propulsion requirements for ISS vary depending on solar wind and other conditions. It is projected that a ED Tether could provide the majority of the required reboost thrust for ISS for a nominal solar year. For above nominal solar wind years the ISS would have to use the rocket reboost system, but at a greatly reduced level. Thus resulting in substantial cost savings, via the reduction in the number of Earth-to-orbit launch vehicle flights to the ISS that must bring reboost propellant. However, the purposes of this paper is to further Previous research on an ISS ED Tether and examine the operational and technical issues working against using a ED Tether on ISS. Issues such as Shuttle rendezvous and flight path concerns raise serious safety concerns and restrictions on tether use. Tether issues such as tether librations and off angle thrust raise concerns about impacts to microgravity payloads and the long-term effect on ISS orbital path and inclination. Operational issues such as peak power available to an ED Tether and allowable duty cycle may impose severe restrictions on tether design and ultimately limit the practicality of an ED Tether on ISS. Thus while at first glance the cost numbers appear to be

  19. The TSS-1R Electrodynamic Tether Experiment: Scientific and Technological Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H.; Raitt, John

    1998-01-01

    The bi-national, US-Italian, Tethered Satellite System (TSS) program was designed to provide a unique opportunity to explore certain space plasma- electrodynamic processes and the orbital mechanics of a gravity-gradient stabilized system of two satellites linked by a long conducting tether. The second flight, TSS-LR, was launched February 22, 1996 on STS-75 and satellite deployment began at MET 3/00:27. A unique data set was obtained over the next five hours, as the tether was deployed to a length of 19695 meters, which has allowed significant science to be accomplished. This presentation will focus on electrodynamic processes generated by the tether--in particular, the collection of electrical current from the ionospheric plasma. Of particular significance is an apparent transition of the physics of current collection when the potential of the collecting body becomes greater than the ram energy of the ionospheric atomic oxygen ions. Previous theoretical models of current collection were electrostatic--assuming that the orbital motion of the system, which is highly subsonic with respect to electron thermal motion, was un- important. This may still be acceptable for the case of relatively slow-moving sounding rockets. However, the TSS-LR results show that motion relative to the plasma must be accounted for in orbiting systems.

  20. Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Andrew Hall; Carroll, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    A tether of sufficient strength, capable of being lengthened or shortened and having appropriate apparatuses for capturing and releasing bodies at its ends, may be useful in propulsion applications. For example, a tether could allow rendezvous between spacecraft in substantially different orbits without using propellant. A tether could also allow co-orbiting spacecraft to exchange momentum and separate. Thus, a reentering spacecraft (such as the Shuttle) could give its momentum to one remaining on orbit (such as the space station). Similarly, a tether facility could gain momentum from a high I(sub sp)/low thrust mechanism (which could be an electrodynamics tether) and transfer than momentum by means of a tether to payloads headed for many different orbits. Such a facility would, in effect, combine high I(sub sp) with high thrust, although only briefly. An electrodynamic tether could propel a satellite from its launch inclination to a higher or lower inclination. Tethers could also allow samples to be taken from bodies such as the Moon. Three types of tether operations are illustrated. The following topics are discussed: (1) tether characteristics; (2) tether propulsion methods--basics, via momentum transfer, and electrodynamic tether propulsion; and (3) their use in planetary exploration.

  1. Proceedings of a Workshop on the Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Project overview; tether deployment; satellite system description; tether fundamentals; science applications; electrodynamic interactions; transportation; artificial gravity; and constellations; were described.

  2. Tethered Satellite System (TSS) core equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonifazi, C.

    1986-01-01

    To date, three Tethered Satellite System (TSS) missions of the Italian provided scientific satellite orbiting in the ionosphere connected to U.S. Space Shuttle is foreseen. The first mission will use an electrically conductive tether of 20 km deployed upward from the orbiter flying at 300 km altitude. This mission will allow investigation of the TSS electrodynamic interaction with the ionosphere due to the high voltage induced across the two terminators of the system during its motion throughout the geomagnetic field. The second mission will use a dielectric tether of 100 km deployed downward from the Orbiter flying at 230 km altitude. Tethered-vehicle access to altitude as low as 120 to 150 km from the Orbiter would permit direct long term observation of phenomena in the lower thermosphere and determination of other dynamical physical processes. The third mission would use the same configuration of the first electrodynamic mission with the complete Core Equipment. Study of power generation by tethered systems would be possible by operating the Core Equipment in the inverted current mode. This mode of operation would allow ion current collection upon the TSS satellite by controlling its potential with respect to the ambient ionospheric plasma. The main requirements of the Core Equipment configuration to date foreseen for the first TSS electrodynamic mission is described. Besides the Core Equipment purposes, its hardware and operational sub-modes of operation are described.

  3. Multiphysics elastodynamic finite element analysis of space debris deorbit stability and efficiency by electrodynamic tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gangqiang; Zhu, Zheng H.; Ruel, Stephane; Meguid, S. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper developed a new multiphysics finite element method for the elastodynamic analysis of space debris deorbit by a bare flexible electrodynamic tether. Orbital motion limited theory and dynamics of flexible electrodynamic tethers are discretized by the finite element method, where the motional electric field is variant along the tether and coupled with tether deflection and motion. Accordingly, the electrical current and potential bias profiles of tether are solved together with the tether dynamics by the nodal position finite element method. The newly proposed multiphysics finite element method is applied to analyze the deorbit dynamics of space debris by electrodynamic tethers with a two-stage energy control strategy to ensure an efficient and stable deorbit process. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the coupled effect between the motional electric field and the tether dynamics. The results reveal that the coupling effect has a significant influence on the tether stability and the deorbit performance. It cannot be ignored when the libration and deflection of the tether are significant.

  4. Two Tethered Balloon Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngbluth, Otto; Owens, Thomas L.; Storey, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Systems take meteorological measurements for variety of research projects. Report describes work done by NASA Langley Research Center in atmospheric research using tethered balloon systems composed of commercially available equipment. Two separate tethered balloon systems described in report have payloads and configurations tailored to requirements of specific projects. Each system capable of measuring atmospheric parameter or species in situ and then telemetering this data in real time to ground station. Meteorological data and concentration of ozone typically measured. Indicates instrumented tethered balloon systems have distinct advantages over other systems for gathering data on troposphere.

  5. Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include tethered satellites, tether deployment, satellite systems, science applications, electrodynamic interactions, transportation applications, artificial gravity, constellations, and technology and testing.

  6. Space station operations enhancement using tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekey, I.

    1984-10-01

    Space tethers represent a tool of unusual versatility for applications to operations involving space stations. The present investigation is concerned with a number of applications which exploit the dynamic, static, and electrodynamic properties of tethers. One of the simplest applications of a tethered system on the Space Station might be that of a remote docking port, allowing the Shuttle to dock with no contamination or disturbance effects. Attention is also given to tethered platforms, a tethered microgravity facility, a tethered space station propellant facility, electrodynamic tether principles, a tether power generator, a tether thrust generator (motor), and an electrodynamic tether for drag makeup and energy storage.

  7. Tether Transportation System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangham, M. E.; Lorenzini, E.; Vestal, L.

    1998-01-01

    The projected traffic to geostationary earth orbit (GEO) is expected to increase over the next few decades. At the same time, the cost of delivering payloads from the Earth's surface to low earth orbit (LEO) is projected to decrease, thanks in part to the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). A comparable reduction in the cost of delivering payloads from LEO to GEO is sought. The use of in-space tethers, eliminating the requirement for traditional chemical upper stages and thereby reducing the launch mass, has been identified as such an alternative. Spinning tethers are excellent kinetic energy storage devices for providing the large delta vee's required for LEO to GEO transfer. A single-stage system for transferring payloads from LEO to GEO was proposed some years ago. The study results presented here contain the first detailed analyses of this proposal, its extension to a two-stage system, and the likely implementation of the operational system.

  8. Free Re-boost Electrodynamic Tether on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.; Sorenson, Kirk F.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dankanich, John W.; Frame, Kyle L.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) currently experiences significant orbital drag that requires constant make up propulsion or the Station will quickly reenter the Earth's Atmosphere. The reboost propulsion is presently achieved through the firing of hydrazine rockets at the cost of considerable propellant mass. The problem will inevitably grow much worse as station components continue to be assembled, particularly when the full solar panel arrays are deployed. This paper discusses many long established themes on electrodynamic propulsion in the context of Exploration relevance, shows how to couple unique ISS electrical power system characteristics and suggests a way to tremendously impact ISS's sustainability. Besides allowing launch mass and volume presently reserved for reboost propellant to be reallocated for science experiments and other critically needed supplies, there are a series of technology hardware demonstrations steps that can be accomplished on ISS, which are helpful to NASA s Exploration mission. The suggested ElectroDynamic (ED) tether and flywheel approach is distinctive in its use of free energy currently unusable, yet presently available from the existing solar array panels on ISS. The ideas presented are intended to maximize the utility of Station and radically increase orbital safety.

  9. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    The tether control law to retrieve the satellite was modified in order to have a smooth retrieval trajectory of the satellite that minimizes the thruster activation. The satellite thrusters were added to the rotational dynamics computer code and a preliminary control logic was implemented to simulate them during the retrieval maneuver. The high resolution computer code for modelling the three dimensional dynamics of untensioned tether, SLACK3, was made fully operative and a set of computer simulations of possible tether breakages was run. The distribution of the electric field around an electrodynamic tether in vacuo severed at some length from the shuttle was computed with a three dimensional electrodynamic computer code.

  10. Power and charge dissipation from an electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Gerald E.

    1987-01-01

    The Plasma Motor-Generator project utilizes the influence of the geomagnetic field on a conductive tether attached to a LEO spacecraft to provide a reversible conversion of orbital energy into electrical energy. The behavior of the current into the ionospheric plasma under the influence of the geomagnetic field is of significant experimental and theoretical interest. Theoretical calculations are reviewed which start from Maxwell's equations and treat the ionospheric plasma as a linear dielectric medium. These calculations show a charge emitting tether moving in a magnetic field will generate electromagnetic waves in the plasma which carry the charge in the direction of the magnetic field. The ratio of the tether's speed to the ion cyclotron frequency which is about 25 m for a LEO is a characteristic length for the phenomena. Whereas for the dimensions of the contact plasma much larger than this value the waves are the conventional Alfven waves, when the dimensions are comparable or smaller, diffraction effects occur similar to those associated with Fresnel diffraction in optics. The power required to excite these waves for a given tether current is used to estimate the impedance associated with this mode of charge dissipation.

  11. Investigation of EM Emissions by the Electrodynamic Tether, Inclusive of an Observational Program (EMET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    Our TSS-1/R investigation, which we shall refer to as EMET in this report, was an integral part of the effort by the TSS-1/R Investigators' Working Group (IWG) to come to an understanding of the complex interaction between the tethered satellite system and the ionosphere. All of the space-borne experiments were designed to collect data relevant to the local interaction. Only the ground- based experiments, EMET and its Italian counterpart Observations on the Earth's Surface of Electromagnetic Emissions (OESEE), held out any hope of characterizing the long range effects of the interaction. This was to be done by detecting electromagnetic waves generated by the system in the ionosphere, assuming the signal reached the Earth's surface with sufficient amplitude. As the type of plasma waves excited to carry charge away from the charge-exchange regions of the system at each end of the tether is one of the theoretical points about which there is greatest disagreement, a definitive identification of tether-generated waves could mark significant progress in the so-called current closure problem of electrodynamic tethers. Dr. Mario Grossi of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) initiated the investigation, and his experience in the field of ULF-ELF waves and their detection was invaluable throughout its course. Rice University had the responsibility of setting up the EMET ULF-VLF ground stations under a subcontract from SAO. Principal Investigator (PI) for the Rice effort was Prof. William E. Gordon, who was primary observer at the Arecibo Observatory during TSS-LR. Dr. Steve Noble handled major day-to-day operations, training, and planning for the ground-based measurements. Dr. James McCoy of NASA JSC, a member of the Mona/Arecibo team, was pilot for the numerous flights ferrying personnel and equipment between Puerto Rico and Mona Island. Final responsibility for the measurements rested with SAO, and the activities of field personnel and SAO investigators were

  12. Electrodynamic Tethers. 1: Power Generator in LEO. 2: Thrust for Propulsion and Power Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    An electrodynamic tether consists of a long insulated wire in space whose orbital motion cuts across lines of magnetic flux to produce an induce voltage that in typical low orbits averages about 200 v/km. Such a system should be capable of generating substantial electrical power, at the expense of IXB drag acting on its orbital energy. If a reverse current is driven against the induced voltage, the system should act as a motor producing IXB thrust. A reference system was designed, capable of generating 20 KW of power into an electrical load located anywhere along the wire at the expense of 2.6N (20,000 J/sec) drag on the wire. In an ideal system, the conversion between mechanical and electrical energy would reach 100% efficiency. In the actual system part of the 20 KW is lost to internal resistance of the wire, plasma and ionosphere, while the drag force is increased by residual air drag. The 20 KW PMG system as designed is estimated to provide 18.7 KW net power to the load at total drag loss of 20.4 KJ/sec, or an overall efficiency of 92%. Similar systems using heavier wire appear capable of producing power levels in excess of 1 Megawatt at voltages of 2-4 KV, with conversion efficiency between mechanical and electrical power better than 95%. The hollow cathode based system should be readily reversible from generator to motor operation by driving a reverse current using onboard power.

  13. Near Space Environments: Tethering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucht, Nolan R.

    2013-01-01

    Near Space Environments, the Rocket University (Rocket U) program dealing with high altitude balloons carrying payloads into the upper earth atmosphere is the field of my project. The tethering from balloon to payload is the specific system I am responsible for. The tethering system includes, the lines that tie the payload to the balloon, as well as, lines that connect payloads together, if they are needed, as well as how to sever the tether to release payloads from the balloon. My objective is to design a tethering system that will carry a payload to any desired altitude and then sever by command at any given point during flight.

  14. Theoretical investigation of EM wave generation and radiation in the ULF, ELF, and VLF bands by the electrodynamic orbiting tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert D.; Grossi, Mario D.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of electromagnetic wave generation by an electrodynamic tethered satellite system is important both for the ordinary operation of such systems and for their possible application as orbiting transmitters. The tether's ionospheric circuit closure problem is closely linked with the propagation of charge-carrying electromagnetic wave packets away from the tethered system. Work is reported which represents a step towards a solution to the problem that takes into account the effects of boundaries and of vertical variations in plasma density, collision frequencies, and ion species. The theory of Alfen wave packet generation by an electrodynamic tethered system in an infinite plasma medium is reviewed, and brief summary of previous work on the problem is given. The consequences of the presence of the boundaries and the vertical nonuniformity are then examined. One of the most significant new features to emerge when ion-neutral collisions are taken into account is the coupling of the Alfven waves to the fast magnetosonic wave. This latter wave is important, as it may be confined by vertical variations in the Alfven speed to a sort of leaky ionospheric wave guide, the resonances of which could be of great importance to the signal received on the Earth's surface. The infinite medium solution for this case where the (uniform) geomagnetic field makes an arbitrary angle with the vertical is taken as the incident wave-packet. Even without a full solution, a number of conclusions can be drawn, the most important of which may be that the electromagnetic field associated with the operation of a steady-current tethered system will probably be too weak to detect on the Earth's surface, even for large tethered currents. This is due to the total reflection of the incident wave at the atmospheric boundary and the inability of a steady-current tethered system to excite the ionospheric wave-guide. An outline of the approach to the numerical problem is given. The use of

  15. Orbital Propagation of Momentum Exchange Tether Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerhoff, John

    2002-01-01

    An advanced concept in in-space transportation currently being studied is the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost Tether System (MXER). The system acts as a large momentum wheel, imparting a Av to a payload in low earth orbit (LEO) at the expense of its own orbital energy. After throwing a payload, the system reboosts itself using an electrodynamic tether to push against Earth's magnetic field and brings itself back up to an operational orbit to prepare for the next payload. The ability to reboost itself allows for continued reuse of the system without the expenditure of propellants. Considering the cost of lifting propellant from the ,ground to LEO to do the same Av boost at $10000 per pound, the system cuts the launch cost of the payload dramatically, and subsequently, the MXER system pays for itself after a small number of missions.1 One of the technical hurdles to be overcome with the MXER concept is the rendezvous maneuver. The rendezvous window for the capture of the payload is on the order of a few seconds, as opposed to traditional docking maneuvers, which can take as long ets necessary to complete a precise docking. The payload, therefore, must be able to match its orbit to meet up with the capture device on the end of the tether at a specific time and location in the future. In order to be able to determine that location, the MXER system must be numerically propagated forward in time to predict where the capture device will be at that instant. It should be kept in mind that the propagation computation must be done faster than real-time. This study focuses on the efforts to find and/or build the tools necessary to numerically propagate the motion of the MXER system as accurately as possible.

  16. Space Station tethered elevator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Michael H.; Anderson, Loren A.; Hosterman, K.; Decresie, E.; Miranda, P.; Hamilton, R.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The tethered elevator is an unmanned, mobile structure which operates on a ten-kilometer tether spanning the distance between Space Station Freedom and a platform. Its capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The report discusses the potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design. Emphasis is placed on the elevator's structural configuration and three major subsystem designs. First, the design of elevator robotics used to aid in elevator operations and tethered experimentation is presented. Second, the design of drive mechanisms used to propel the vehicle is discussed. Third, the design of an onboard self-sufficient power generation and transmission system is addressed.

  17. Tethered Satellite System Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Skyhook concept is reviewed and the use of a tethered satellite system (TSS) to enable scientific investigations from the shuttle using a closed loop control system is examined. The tethered satellite system has capabilities for deployment toward or away from Earth, for multiple round trip missions, and for deployment at distances up to 100 KN from the orbiter. The deployer, which consists of an entendable boom, a reel for the tether, and the tether itself, permits deployment and retrieval at a safe distance, allows alignment of the force vector of the tether through the center of gravity of the shuttle, and gives some initial gravity gradient separation to aid in deployment and ultimate retrieval of the tethered satellite. Charts show TSS activities in terms of systems studies, key guidelines, Italian and U.S. responsibilities, user activities, and major science and applications accommodation features. Scientific objectives for TSS-1 and TSS-2 verification missions and the current status of the project are also given.

  18. Active Space Debris Removal using European Modified Launch Vehicle Upper Stages Equipped with Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, Ali S.; Emanuelli, Matteo; Raval, Siddharth; Turconi, Andrea; Becker, Cristoph

    2013-08-01

    During the past few years, several research programs have assessed the current state and future evolution of the Low Earth Orbit region. These studies indicate that space debris density could reach a critical level such that there will be a continuous increase in the number of debris objects, primarily driven by debris-debris collision activity known as the Kessler effect. This cascade effect can be even more significant when intact objects as dismissed rocket bodies are involved in the collision. The majority of the studies until now have highlighted the urgency for active debris removal in the next years. An Active Debris Removal System (ADRS) is a system capable of approaching the debris object through a close-range rendezvous, establishing physical connection, stabilizing its attitude and finally de-orbiting the debris object using a type of propulsion system in a controlled manoeuvre. In its previous work, this group showed that a modified Fregat (Soyuz FG's 4th stage) or Breeze-M upper stage (Proton-M) launched from Plesetsk (Russian Federation) and equipped with an electro-dynamic tether (EDT) system can be used, after an opportune inclination's change, to de-orbit a Kosmos-3M second stage rocket body while also delivering an acceptable payload to orbit. In this paper, we continue our work on the aforementioned concept, presented at the 2012 Beijing Space Sustainability Conference, by comparing its performance to ADR missions using only chemical propulsion from the upper stage for the far approach and the de-orbiting phase. We will also update the EDT model used in our previous work and highlight some of the methods for creating physical contact with the object. Moreover, we will assess this concept also with European launch vehicles (Vega and Soyuz 2-1A) to remove space debris from space. In addition, the paper will cover some economic aspects, like the cost for the launches' operator in term of payload mass' loss at the launch. The entire debris removal

  19. Current-voltage characteristics of a cathodic plasma contactor with discharge chamber for application in electrodynamic tether propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kan; Martinez, Rafael A.; Williams, John D.

    2014-04-01

    This paper focuses on the net electron-emission current as a function of bias voltage of a plasma source that is being used as the cathodic element in a bare electrodynamic tether system. An analysis is made that enables an understanding of the basic issues determining the current-voltage (C-V) behaviour. This is important for the efficiency of the electrodynamic tether and for low impedance performance without relying on the properties of space plasma for varying orbital altitudes, inclinations, day-night cycles or the position of the plasma contactor relative to the wake of the spacecraft. The cathodic plasma contactor considered has a cylindrical discharge chamber (10 cm in diameter and ˜11 cm in length) and is driven by a hollow cathode. Experiments and a 1D spherical model are both used to study the contactor's C-V curves. The experiments demonstrate how the cathodic contactor would emit electrons into space for anode voltages in the range of 25-40 V, discharge currents in the range of 1-2.5 A, and low xenon gas flows of 2-4 sccm. Plasma properties are measured and compared with (3 A) and without net electron emission. A study of the dependence of relevant parameters found that the C-V behaviour strongly depends on electron temperature, initial ion energy and ion emission current at the contactor exit. However, it depended only weakly on ambient plasma density. The error in the developed model compared with the experimental C-V curves is within 5% at low electron-emission currents (0-2 A). The external ionization processes and high ion production rate caused by the discharge chamber, which dominate the C-V behaviour at electron-emission currents over 2 A, are further highlighted and discussed.

  20. Electrodynamics panel presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) concept is explained in detail. The PMG tether systems being used to calculate the estimated performance data is described. The voltage drops and current contact geometries involved in the operation of an electrodynamic tether are displayed illustrating the comparative behavior of hollow cathodes, electron guns, and passive collectors for current coupling into the ionosphere. The basic PMG design involving the massive tether cable with little or no satellite mass at the far end(s) are also described. The Jupiter mission and its use of electrodynamic tethers are given. The need for demonstration experiments is stressed.

  1. Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R)-Post Flight (STS-75) Engineering Performance Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavoie, Anthony R.

    1996-01-01

    The first mission of the Tethered Satellite deployer was flown onboard Atlantis in 1992 during the Space Transportation System (STS) flight STS-46. Due to a mechanical interference with the level wind mechanism the satellite was only Deployed to 256 m rather than the planned 20,000 m. Other problems were also experienced during the STS-46 flight and several modifications were made to the Deployer and Satellite. STS-75 was a reflight of the Tethered Satellite System 1 (TSS-1) designated as Tethered Satellite System 1 Reflight (TSS-1 R) onboard Columbia. As on STS-46, the TSS payload consisted of the Deployer, the Satellite, 3 cargo bay mounted experiments: Shuttle Electrodynamic Tether System (SETS), Shuttle Potential and Return Electron Experiment (SPREE), Deployer Core Equipment (DCORE) 4 Satellite mounted experiments: Research on Electrodynamics Tether Effects (RETE), Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE), Satellite Core Instruments (SCORE), Tether Magnetic Field Experiment (TEMAG) and an aft flight deck camera: Tether Optical Phenomena Experiment (TOP). Following successful pre-launch, launch and pre-deployment orbital operations, the Deployer deployed the Tethered Satellite to 19,695 m at which point the tether broke within the Satellite Deployment Boom (SDB). The planned length for On-Station I (OST1) was 20,700 m The Satellite flew away from the Orbiter with the tether attached. The satellite was "safed" and placed in a limited power mode via the RF link. The Satellite was contacted periodically during overflights of ground stations. Cargo bay science activities continued for the period of time allocated to TSS-1 R operations.

  2. A two-dimensional theory of plasma contactor clouds used in the ionosphere with an electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, D. E.; Gatsonis, N. A.; Rivas, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma contactors have been proposed as a means of making good electrical contact between biased surfaces such as found at the ends of an electrodynamic tether and the space environment. A plasma contactor is a plasma source which emits a plasma cloud which facilitates the electrical connection. The physics of this plasma cloud is investigated for contactors used as electron collectors and it is shown that contactor clouds in space will consist of a spherical core possibly containing a shock wave. Outside of the core the cloud will expand anisotropically across the magnetic field leading to a turbulent cigar shape structure along the field. This outer region is itself divided into two regions by the ion response to the electric field. A two-dimensional theory of the motion of the cloud across the magnetic field is developed. The current voltage characteristic of an Argon plasma contactor cloud is estimated for several ion currents in the range of 1-100 Amperes. It is shown that small ion current contactors are more efficient than large ion current contactors. This suggests that if a plasma contactor is used on an electrodynamic tether then a miltiple tether array will be more efficient than a single tether.

  3. Tethered Satellite System Contingency Investigation Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-46) on July 31, 1992. During the attempted on-orbit operations, the Tethered Satellite System failed to deploy successfully beyond 256 meters. The satellite was retrieved successfully and was returned on August 6, 1992. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Associate Administrator for Space Flight formed the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) Contingency Investigation Board on August 12, 1992. The TSS-1 Contingency Investigation Board was asked to review the anomalies which occurred, to determine the probable cause, and to recommend corrective measures to prevent recurrence. The board was supported by the TSS Systems Working group as identified in MSFC-TSS-11-90, 'Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Contingency Plan'. The board identified five anomalies for investigation: initial failure to retract the U2 umbilical; initial failure to flyaway; unplanned tether deployment stop at 179 meters; unplanned tether deployment stop at 256 meters; and failure to move tether in either direction at 224 meters. Initial observations of the returned flight hardware revealed evidence of mechanical interference by a bolt with the level wind mechanism travel as well as a helical shaped wrap of tether which indicated that the tether had been unwound from the reel beyond the travel by the level wind mechanism. Examination of the detailed mission events from flight data and mission logs related to the initial failure to flyaway and the failure to move in either direction at 224 meters, together with known preflight concerns regarding slack tether, focused the assessment of these anomalies on the upper tether control mechanism. After the second meeting, the board requested the working group to complete and validate a detailed integrated mission sequence to focus the fault tree analysis on a stuck U2 umbilical, level wind mechanical interference, and slack tether in upper tether

  4. Tethered Satellite System Contingency Investigation Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-46) on July 31, 1992. During the attempted on-orbit operations, the Tethered Satellite System failed to deploy successfully beyond 256 meters. The satellite was retrieved successfully and was returned on August 6, 1992. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Associate Administrator for Space Flight formed the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) Contingency Investigation Board on August 12, 1992. The TSS-1 Contingency Investigation Board was asked to review the anomalies which occurred, to determine the probable cause, and to recommend corrective measures to prevent recurrence. The board was supported by the TSS Systems Working group as identified in MSFC-TSS-11-90, 'Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Contingency Plan'. The board identified five anomalies for investigation: initial failure to retract the U2 umbilical; initial failure to flyaway; unplanned tether deployment stop at 179 meters; unplanned tether deployment stop at 256 meters; and failure to move tether in either direction at 224 meters. Initial observations of the returned flight hardware revealed evidence of mechanical interference by a bolt with the level wind mechanism travel as well as a helical shaped wrap of tether which indicated that the tether had been unwound from the reel beyond the travel by the level wind mechanism. Examination of the detailed mission events from flight data and mission logs related to the initial failure to flyaway and the failure to move in either direction at 224 meters, together with known preflight concerns regarding slack tether, focused the assessment of these anomalies on the upper tether control mechanism. After the second meeting, the board requested the working group to complete and validate a detailed integrated mission sequence to focus the fault tree analysis on a stuck U2 umbilical, level wind mechanical interference, and slack tether in upper tether

  5. Orbital transfer and release of tethered payloads. Continuation of investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Grossi, M. D.; Arnold, D.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of reeling operations on the orbital altitude of the tether system and the development of control laws to minimize tether rebound upon payload release were studied. The use of the tether for LEO/GEO payload orbital transfer was also investigated. It was concluded that (1) reeling operations can contribute a significant amount of energy to the orbit of the system and should be considered in orbit calculations and predictions, (2) deployment of payloads, even very large payloads, using tethers is a practical and fully stable operation, (3) tether augmented LEO/GEO transfer operations yield useful payload gains under the practical constraint of fixed size OTV's, and (4) orbit to orbit satellite retrieval is limited by useful revisit times to orbital inclinations of less than forty-five degrees.

  6. Design Concept for a Reusable/Propellantless MXER Tether Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCandless, B., II; Kustas, F. m.; Marshall, L. S.; Lytle, W. B.; Hansen, N. P.

    2005-01-01

    The Momentum Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether facility is a transformational concept that significantly reduces the fuel requirements (and associated costs) in transferring payloads above low earth orbit (LEO). Facility reboost is accomplished without propellant by driving current against a voltage created by a conducting tether's interaction with the Earth's magnetic field (electrodynamic reboost). This system can be used for transferring a variety of payloads (scientific, cargo, and human space vehicles) to multiple destinations including geosynchronous transfer orbit, the Moon or Mars. MXER technology advancement requires development in two key areas: survivable, high tensile strength non-conducting tethers and reliable, lightweight payload catch/release mechanisms. Fundamental requirements associated with the MXER non-conducting strength tether and catch mechanism designs will be presented. Key requirements for the tether design include high specific-strength (tensile strength/material density), material survivability to the space environment (atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation), and structural survivability to micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MM/OD) impacts. The driving mechanism key,gequirements include low mass-to-capture-volume ratio, positional and velocity error tolerance, and operational reliability. Preliminary tether and catch mechanism design criteria are presented, which have been used as guidelines to "screen" and down-select initial concepts. Candidate tether materials and protective coatings are summarized along with their performance in simulated space environments (e.g., oxygen plasma, thermal cycling). A candidate catch mechanism design concept is presented along with examples of demonstration hardware.

  7. Tether Elevator Crawler Systems (TECS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Frank R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the needs of the experimenters on the space station is access to steady and controlled-variation microgravity environments. A method of providing these environments is to place the experiment on a tether attached to the space station. This provides a high degree of isolation from structural oscillations and vibrations. Crawlers can move these experiments along the tethers to preferred locations, much like an elevator. This report describes the motion control laws developed for these crawlers and the testing of laboratory models of these tether elevator crawlers.

  8. Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    The tethered satellite system is described including tether fundamentals. Applications of very long tethers in space to a broad spectrum of future space missions are explored. Topics covered include: science, transportation, constellations, artificial gravity, technology and test, and electrodynamic interactions. Recommendations to NASA are included.

  9. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report is presented that deals with three major topics related to Tethered Satellite System Dynamics. The SAO rotational dynamics computer code was updated. The program is now suitable to deal with inclined orbits. The output has been also modified in order to show the satellite Euler angles referred to the rotating orbital frame. The three-dimensional high resolution computer program SLACK3 was developed. The code simulates the three-dimensional dynamics of a tether going slack taking into account the effect produced by boom rotations. Preliminary simulations on the three-dimensional dynamics of a recoiling slack tether are shown in this report. A program to evaluate the electric potential around a severed tether is immersed in a plasma. The potential is computed on a three-dimensional grid axially symmetric with respect to the tether longitudinal axis. The electric potential variations due to the plasma are presently under investigation.

  10. Tethered satellite system dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musetti, B.; Cibrario, B.; Bussolino, L.; Bodley, C. S.; Flanders, H. A.; Mowery, D. K.; Tomlin, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    The first tethered satellite system, scheduled for launch in May 1991, is reviewed. The system dynamics, dynamics control, and dynamics simulations are discussed. Particular attention is given to in-plane and out-of-plane librations; tether oscillation modes; orbiter and sub-satellite dynamics; deployer control system; the sub-satellite attitude measurement and control system; the Aeritalia Dynamics Model; the Martin-Marietta and NASA-MSFC Dynamics Model; and simulation results.

  11. The space station tethered elevator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The elevator is an unmanned mobile structure which operates on a ten kilometer tether spanning the distance between the Space Station and a tethered platform. Elevator capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design are discussed. Engineering development of the tethered elevator is the result of work conducted in the following areas: structural configurations; robotics, drive mechanisms; and power generation and transmission systems. The structural configuration of the elevator is presented. The structure supports, houses, and protects all systems on board the elevator. The implementation of robotics on board the elevator is discussed. Elevator robotics allow for the deployment, retrieval, and manipulation of tethered objects. Robotic manipulators also aid in hooking the elevator on a tether. Critical to the operation of the tethered elevator is the design of its drive mechanisms, which are discussed. Two drivers, located internal to the elevator, propel the vehicle along a tether. These modular components consist of endless toothed belts, shunt-wound motors, regenerative power braking, and computer controlled linear actuators. The designs of self-sufficient power generation and transmission systems are reviewed. Thorough research indicates all components of the elevator will operate under power provided by fuel cells. The fuel cell systems will power the vehicle at seven kilowatts continuously and twelve kilowatts maximally. A set of secondary fuel cells provides redundancy in the unlikely event of a primary system failure. Power storage exists in the form of Nickel-Hydrogen batteries capable of powering the elevator under maximum loads.

  12. Tether deployment monitoring system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An operational Tether Deployment Monitoring System (TEDEMS) was constructed that would show system functionality in a terrestrial environment. The principle function of the TEDEMS system is the launching and attachment of reflective targets onto the tether during its deployment. These targets would be tracked with a radar antenna that was pointed towards the targets by a positioning system. A spring powered launcher for the targets was designed and fabricated. An instrumentation platform and launcher were also developed. These modules are relatively heavy and will influence tether deployment scenarios, unless they are released with a velocity and trajectory closely matching that of the tether. Owing to the tracking range limitations encountered during field trails of the Radar system, final TEDEMS system integration was not completed. The major module not finished was the system control computer. The lack of this device prevented any subsystem testing or field trials to be conducted. Other items only partially complete were the instrumentation platform launcher and modules and the radar target launcher. The work completed and the tests performed suggest that the proposed system continues to be a feasible approach to tether monitoring, although additional effort is still necessary to increase the range at which modules can be detected. The equipment completed and tested, to the extent stated, is available to NASA for use on any future program that requires tether tracking capability.

  13. Investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers. [space shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, D. A.; Dobrowolny, M.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for using electric currents to control pendular oscillations induced by various perturbing forces on the Skyhook wire is considered. Transverse and vertical forces on the tether; tether instability modes and causes during retrieval by space shuttle; simple and spherical pendulum motion and vector damping; and current generation and control are discussed. A computer program for numerical integration of the in-plane and out-of-plane displacements of the tether vs time was developed for heuristic study. Some techniques for controlling instabilities during payload retrieval and methods for employing the tether for launching satellites from the space shuttle are considered. Derivations and analyses of a general nature used in all of the areas studied are included.

  14. Tether dynamics and control results for tethered satellite system's initial flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapel, Jim D.; Flanders, Howard

    The recent Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1) mission has provided a wealth of data concerning the dynamics of tethered systems in space and has demonstrated the effectiveness of operational techniques designed to control these dynamics. In this paper, we review control techniques developed for managing tether dynamics, and discuss the results of using these techniques for the Tethered Satellite System's maiden flight on STS-46. In particular, the flight results of controlling libration dynamics, string dynamics, and slack tether are presented. These results show that tether dynamics can be safely managed. The overall stability of the system was found to be surprisingly good even at relatively short tether lengths. In fact, the system operated in passive mode at a tether length of 256 meters for over 9 hours. Only monitoring of the system was required during this time. Although flight anomalies prevented the planned deployment to 20 km, the extended operations at shorter tether lengths have proven the viability of using tethers in space. These results should prove invaluable in preparing for future missions with tethered objects in space.

  15. Tether dynamics and control results for tethered satellite system's initial flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapel, Jim D.; Flanders, Howard

    1993-01-01

    The recent Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1) mission has provided a wealth of data concerning the dynamics of tethered systems in space and has demonstrated the effectiveness of operational techniques designed to control these dynamics. In this paper, we review control techniques developed for managing tether dynamics, and discuss the results of using these techniques for the Tethered Satellite System's maiden flight on STS-46. In particular, the flight results of controlling libration dynamics, string dynamics, and slack tether are presented. These results show that tether dynamics can be safely managed. The overall stability of the system was found to be surprisingly good even at relatively short tether lengths. In fact, the system operated in passive mode at a tether length of 256 meters for over 9 hours. Only monitoring of the system was required during this time. Although flight anomalies prevented the planned deployment to 20 km, the extended operations at shorter tether lengths have proven the viability of using tethers in space. These results should prove invaluable in preparing for future missions with tethered objects in space.

  16. UAH/NASA Workshop on The Uses of a Tethered Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Potential applications of the system are categorized into four areas: geological applications, atmospheric applications, electrodynamics and plasma studies, and technology applications. The multiple-use tethered system with feedback control, will be capable of supporting a payload or satellite suspended from the Shuttle cargo bay, at distances up to 100 kilometers from the Shuttle. Experiments proposed include: geomagnetic mapping, lower atmospheric measurements, ionospheric interactions with large space structures, solar wind transport, and magnetohydrodynamic measurements.

  17. NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Thomas L.; Storey, Richard W.; Youngbluth, Otto

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon system operations are covered in this report for the period of 1979 through 1983. Meteorological data, ozone concentrations, and other data were obtained from in situ measurements. The large tethered balloon had a lifting capability of 30 kilograms to 2500 meters. The report includes descriptions of the various components of the balloon systems such as the balloons, the sensors, the electronics, and the hardware. Several photographs of the system are included as well as a list of projects including the types of data gathered.

  18. Calculating Payload for a Tethered Balloon System

    Treesearch

    Charles D. Tangren

    1980-01-01

    A graph method to calculate payload for a tethered balloon system, with the supporting helium lift and payload equations. is described. The balloon system is designed to collect emissions data during the convective-lift and no-convective-lift phases of a forest fire. A description of the balloon system and a list of factors affecting balloon selection are included....

  19. The first mission of the Tethered Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, C. Blake (Editor); Shea, Charlotte; Mcmahan, Tracy

    1992-01-01

    The era of space-age tethered operations moves toward reality with the launch of Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1). The primary objective of this mission is to demonstrate the technology of long tethered systems in space and to demonstrate, through scientific investigations, that such systems are useful for research.

  20. Dynamics and offset control of tethered space-tug system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Yang, Keying; Qi, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Tethered space-tug system is regarded as one of the most promising active debris removal technologies to effectively decrease the steep increasing population of space debris. In order to suppress the spin of space debris, single-tethered space-tug system is employed by regulating the tether. Unfortunately, this system is underactuated as tether length is the only input, and there are two control objectives: the spinning debris and the vibration of tether. Thus, it may suffer great oscillations and result in failure in space debris removal. This paper presents the study of attitude stabilization of the single-tethered space-tug system using not only tether length but also the offset of tether attachment point to suppress the spin of debris, so as to accomplish the space debris removal mission. Firstly, a precise 3D mathematical model in which the debris and tug are both treated as rigid bodies is developed to study the dynamical evolution of the tethered space-tug system. The relative motion equation of the system is described using Lagrange method. Secondly, the dynamic characteristic of the system is analyzed and an offset control law is designed to stabilize the spin of debris by exploiting the variation of tether offset and the regulation of tether length. Besides, an estimation formula is proposed to evaluate the capability of tether for suppressing spinning debris. Finally, the effectiveness of attitude stabilization by the utilization of the proposed scheme is demonstrated via numerical case studies.

  1. Tethered Forth system for FPGA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goździkowski, Paweł; Zabołotny, Wojciech M.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents the tethered Forth system dedicated for testing and debugging of FPGA based electronic systems. Use of the Forth language allows to interactively develop and run complex testing or debugging routines. The solution is based on a small, 16-bit soft core CPU, used to implement the Forth Virtual Machine. Thanks to the use of the tethered Forth model it is possible to minimize usage of the internal RAM memory in the FPGA. The function of the intelligent terminal, which is an essential part of the tethered Forth system, may be fulfilled by the standard PC computer or by the smartphone. System is implemented in Python (the software for intelligent terminal), and in VHDL (the IP core for FPGA), so it can be easily ported to different hardware platforms. The connection between the terminal and FPGA may be established and disconnected many times without disturbing the state of the FPGA based system. The presented system has been verified in the hardware, and may be used as a tool for debugging, testing and even implementing of control algorithms for FPGA based systems.

  2. The use of tethers for payload orbital transfer. Continuation of investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Arnold, D.

    1982-01-01

    The SKYHOOK program was used to do simulations of two cases of the use of the tether for payload orbital transfer. The transport of a payload along the tether from a heavy lower platform to an upper launching platform is considered. A numerical example of the Shuttle launching a payload using an orbital tether facility is described.

  3. Shuttle/tethered satellite system conceptual design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A closed-loop control system was added to the tether reel which improves control over the tethered satellite. In addition to increasing the stability of the tethered satellite along local vertical, this control system is used for deployment and retrieval of tethered satellites. This conceptual design study describes a tether system for suspending a science payload at an altitude of 120 km from space shuttle orbiter flying at an altitude of 200 km. In addition to the hardware conceptual designs, various aspects concerning Orbiter accommodations are discussed.

  4. TESSX: A Mission for Space Exploration with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmo, Mario L.; Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gramer, Daniel J.; Hoffman, John H.; Mazzoleni, Andre P.

    2005-01-01

    Tethers offer significant potential for substantially increasing payload mass fraction, increasing spacecraft lifetime, enhancing long-term space travel, and enabling the understanding and development of gravity-dependent technologies required for Moon and Mars exploration. The development of the Tether Electrodynamic Spin-up and Survivability Experiment (TESSX) will support applications relevant to NASA's new exploration initiative, including: artificial gravity generation, formation flying, electrodynamic propulsion, momentum exchange, and multi-amp current collection and emission. Under the broad term TESSX, we are currently evaluating several different tether system configurations and operational modes. The initial results of this work are presented, including hardware development, orbital dynamics simulations, and electrodynamics design and analysis.

  5. Guidebook for analysis of tether applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    This guidebook is intended as a tool to facilitate initial analyses of proposed tether applications in space. Topics disscussed include: orbit and orbit transfer equations; orbital perturbations; aerodynamic drag; thermal balance; micrometeoroids; gravity gradient effects; tether control strategies; momentum transfer; orbit transfer by tethered release/rendezvous; impact hazards for tethers; electrodynamic tether principles; and electrodynamic libration control issues.

  6. Theory of plasma contractors for electrodynamic tethered satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, D. E.; Katz, I.

    1986-01-01

    Recent data from ground and space experiments indicate that plasma releases from an object dramatically reduce the sheath impedance between the object and the ambient plasma surrounding it. Available data is in qualitative accord with the theory developed to quantify the flow of current in the sheath. Electron transport in the theory is based on a fluid model of a collisionless plasma with an effective collision frequency comparable to frequencies of plasma oscillations. The theory leads to low effective impedances varying inversely with the square root of the injected plasma density. To support such a low impedance mode of operation using an argon plasma source for example requires that only one argon ion be injected for each thirty electrons extracted from the ambient plasma. The required plasma flow rates are quite low; to extract one ampere of electron current requires a mass flow rate of about one gram of argon per day.

  7. Effects of tether attachments on the Shuttle/Tethered Satellite System dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gresham, L. L.; Rupp, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamics of the Shuttle Tethered Satellite System are influenced by attaching the tether at some point other than the center-of-masses of the Shuttle and the subsatellite. At the Shuttle, the tether attachment is made at the end of a boom deployed out of the payload bay. This attachment noticeably affects retrieval dynamics of the satellite pendulous motion. At the satellite, the tether attachment is assumed to be made on the circumference of the satellite. This attachment greatly affects the attitude motion of the satellite about its own center-of-mass. Computer simulation results are presented showing the effects of the Shuttle boom in a three-dimensional model and the effects of satellite attachment in a planar model.

  8. Review of deployment technology for tethered satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, B. S.; Wen, H.; Jin, D. P.

    2018-03-01

    Tethered satellite systems (TSSs) have attracted significant attention due to their potential and valuable applications for scientific research. With the development of various launched on-orbit missions, the deployment of tethers is considered a crucial technology for operation of a TSS. Both past orbiting experiments and numerical results have shown that oscillations of the deployed tether due to the Coriolis force and environmental perturbations are inevitable and that the impact between the space tether and end-body at the end of the deployment process leads to complicated nonlinear phenomena. Hence, a set of suitable control methods plays a fundamental role in tether deployment. This review article summarizes previous work on aspects of the dynamics, control, and ground-based experiments of tether deployment. The relevant basic principles, analytical expressions, simulation cases, and experimental results are presented as well.

  9. An Approach to Optimal Control of Electrodynamic Tethers in a Stochastically Varying Drag Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-06

    and used to help address some of the complications and drawbacks of chemical propulsion systems. One such technology is electric propulsion, which...in and out of the orbital plane around its equilibrium point. The motion is similar to a swinging pendulum . These librations are due to the

  10. Tether Technology Interchange Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, James K. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This is a compilation of 25 papers presented at a tether technical interchange meeting in Huntsville, AL, on September 9-10, 1997. After each presentation, a technical discussion was held to clarify and expand the salient points. A wide range of subjects was covered including tether dynamics, electrodynamics, space power generation, plasma physics, ionospheric physics, towing tethers, tethered reentry schemes, and future tether missions.

  11. Study of tethered satellite active attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.

    1982-01-01

    Existing software was adapted for the study of tethered subsatellite rotational dynamics, an analytic solution for a stable configuration of a tethered subsatellite was developed, the analytic and numerical integrator (computer) solutions for this "test case' was compared in a two mass tether model program (DUMBEL), the existing multiple mass tether model (SKYHOOK) was modified to include subsatellite rotational dynamics, the analytic "test case,' was verified, and the use of the SKYHOOK rotational dynamics capability with a computer run showing the effect of a single off axis thruster on the behavior of the subsatellite was demonstrated. Subroutines for specific attitude control systems are developed and applied to the study of the behavior of the tethered subsatellite under realistic on orbit conditions. The effect of all tether "inputs,' including pendular oscillations, air drag, and electrodynamic interactions, on the dynamic behavior of the tether are included.

  12. Why Not Space Tethers?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Noble H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System Space Shuttle missions, TSS-1 in 1993 and TSS-1R in 1996, were the height of space tether technology development. Since NASA's investment of some $200M and two Shuttle missions in those two pioneering missions, there have been several smaller tether flight experiments, but interest in this promising technology has waned within NASA as well as the DOD agencies. This is curious in view of the unique capabilities of space tether systems and the fact that they have been flight validated and shown to perform as, or better than, expected in earth orbit. While it is true that the TSS-1, TSS-1R and SEDS-2 missions experienced technical difficulties, the causes of these early developmental problems are now known to be design or materials flaws that are (1) unrelated to the basic viability of space tether technology, and (2) they are readily corrected. The purpose of this paper is to review the dynamic and electrodynamic fundamentals of space tethers and the unique capabilities they afford (that are enabling to certain types of space missions); to elucidate the nature, cause, and solution of the early developmental problems; and to provide an update on progress made in development of the technology. Finally, it is shown that (1) all problems experienced during early development of the technology now have solutions; and (2) the technology has been matured by advances made in strength and robustness of tether materials, high voltage engineering in the space environment, tether health and status monitoring, and the elimination of the broken tether hazard. In view of this, it is inexplicable why this flight-validated technology has not been utilized in the past decade, considering the powerful and unique capabilities that space tethers can afford that are, not only required to carryout, otherwise, unobtainable missions, but can also greatly reduce the cost of certain on-going space operations.

  13. Dynamics of tether-assisted reentry vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Renzhang; Misra, A. K.; Lin, Huabao

    The dynamics of tether-assisted reentry of a capsule is considered in this paper. A major advantage in tethered-assisted reentry is the ability to replace a retro-rocket by a tether. In this reentry procedure, a capsule is deployed down to a design altitude near the local vertical, and at an appropriate time the capsule is disconnected from the tether and enters into a reentry trajectory. In addition to static release, swing release is also considered in this paper. Three deployment schemes appropriate for swing release are considered. A two-stage accelerated-exponential/decelerated-exponential deployment appears to be the best of the three. In comparison with static release, for the same duration of return, this swing release can lead to about 22 percent reduction in tether length at the cost of an increase in tension in the tether by only 8 to 12 percent, and thus, it could decrease the tether mass launched into space. The paper analyzes the detailed dynamics of the tethered system before release as well as the reentry dynamics of the capsule after release along with the heat generated during reentry.

  14. A control system for orbiting tethered-body operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eades, J. B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    This paper shows that through proper control logic the transfer of men and cargo between spacecrafts, or the 'positioning of packages' adjacent to orbiters, can be accomodated safely and predictably using tethers. Also, these systems may be adapted to rescue and retrieval operations where 'controlled motions' must be maintained. Shown here is a method which illustrates how tethered-body motions are controlled for 'reel-in' and 'reel-out' operations, and for precise 'positioning' purposes. Three control modes are examined; from these are derived sets of universal control parameters capable of predescribing systems of similar types. In addition, these parameters form a basis for designing tethered-body systems and operations.

  15. Applications of Tethers in Space: Workshop Proceedings, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracat, W. A. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: tethered orbital transfer vehicle operations, Centaur and Shuttle tether technology; tethered constellations, gravitational effects; Shuttle continuous open wind tunnel; optimal control laws, electrodynamic tether technology; and space station facilities.

  16. Application of the Trio-Tri-Star Carpal Wrist for use in a Solar Array Tracking Mechanism for the Momentum-eXchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) Tether Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Trio-Tri-Star Carpal Wrist to the Momentum Exchange Electro-Dynamic Re-boost (MXER) tether, an advanced space transportation concept being developed by the In-Space Propulsion Technology Office at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Dr. Joseph Bonometti and Mr. Kirk Sorensen are the principal engineers. In the paper, a brief overview of the MXER concept is given, with an emphasis on the design problem that this wrist is designed to address. The Trio-Tri-Star Carpal Wrist, a three degree of freedom parallel manipulator, invented by Dr. Stephen J. Canfield of Tennessee Tech University, is described with an overview of wrist geometry, kinematics, and stress analysis. A working model of the wrist was assembled at MSFC using Dr. Canfield s prototype to demonstrate its operation. Finally, a design description and supporting analysis of a MXER flight concept wrist is given, with recommendations for future development work.

  17. Selected tether applications in space: Phase 2. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorson, M. H.; Lippy, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The application of tether technology has the potential to increase the overall performance efficiency and capability of the integrated space operations and transportation systems through the decade of the 90s. The primary concepts for which significant economic benefits were identified are dependent on the space station as a storage device for angular momentum and as an operating base for the tether system. Concepts examined include: (1) tether deorbit of shuttle from space station; (2) tethered orbit insertion of a spacecraft from shuttle; (3) tethered platform deployed from space station; (4) tether-effected rendezvous of an OMV with a returning OTV; (5) electrodynamic tether as an auxiliary power source for space station; and (6) tether assisted launch of an OTV mission from space station.

  18. Bruce Wiegman with a tether for the Electostatic Propulsion System.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-30

    BRUCE WIEGMANN, AN ENGINEER AT NASA'S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER IN HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA, EXAMINES A HAIR-THIN TETHER THAT WILL BE PART OF AN ELECTROSTATIC PROPULSION SYSTEM THAT COULD SEND SPACECRAFT ON INTERSTELLAR MISSIONS.

  19. The investigation of tethered satellite system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the rotational dynamics of the satellite was focused on the rotational amplitude increase of the satellite, with respect to the tether, during retrieval. The dependence of the rotational amplitude upon the tether tension variation to the power 1/4 was thoroughly investigated. The damping of rotational oscillations achievable by reel control was also quantified while an alternative solution that makes use of a lever arm attached with a universal joint to the satellite was proposed. Comparison simulations between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Martin Marietta (MMA) computer code of reteival maneuvers were also carried out. The agreement between the two, completely independent, codes was extremely close, demonstrating the reliability of the models. The slack tether dynamics during reel jams was analytically investigated in order to identify the limits of applicability of the SLACK3 computer code to this particular case. Test runs with SLACK3 were also carried out.

  20. Tethered constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.

    1986-01-01

    The studies that have been carried out on Tethered Constellations are briefly addressed. A definition of a tethered constellation is any number of masses/platforms greater that two connected by tethers in a stable configuration. Configurations and stability constraints are reviewed. Conclusions reached are: (1) The 1-D, horizontal, passively stabilized constellations have been ruled out; (2) Fishbone constellations have been also ruled out; (3) Alternative stable 2-D configurations have been devised such as the quadrangular configuration stabilized by electrodynamic forces (ESC), the quadrangular configuration stabilized by differential air drag (DSC), and the pseudo elliptical configuration stabilized by electrodynamic forces (PEC). Typical dimensions for these constellations are 10 km (horizontal) by 20 km (vertical) with balloon diameters around 100 m in the case of a DSC and a power consumption around 7 KW for an ESC or PEC.

  1. Development of the Flight Tether for ProSEDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Leslie; Vaughn, Jason; Welzyn, Ken; Carroll, Joe; Brown, Norman S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system to generate thrust in space by decreasing the orbital altitude of a Delta 11 Expendable Launch Vehicle second stage. ProSEDS will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System to deploy a newly designed and developed tether which will provide tether generated drag thrust of approx. 0.4 N. The development and production of very long tethers with specific properties for performance and survivability will be required to enable future tether missions. The ProSEDS tether design and the development process may provide some lessons learned for these future missions. The ProSEDS system requirements drove the design of the tether to have three different sections of tether each serving a specialized purpose. The tether is a total of 15 kilometers long: 10 kilometers of a non-conductive Dyneema lead tether; 5 km of CCOR conductive coated wire; and 220 meters of insulated wire with a protective Kevlar overbraid. Production and joining of long tether lengths involved many development efforts. Extensive testing of tether materials including ground deployment of the full-length ProSEDS tether was conducted to validate the tether design and performance before flight.

  2. Dynamics and stability of spinning flexible space tether systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, George

    This dissertation focuses on a detailed dynamical investigation of a previously unexplored tether configuration that involves a spinning two-body tethered system with flexible appendages on each end-body where the spin axis is nominally aligned along the tether. The original motivation for this work came after the flight of the first Canadian sub-orbital tether mission OEDIPUS-A in 1989 which employed this spinning tethered configuration. To everyone's surprise, one of the end-bodies was observed to exhibit a rapid divergence of its nutation angle. It was clear after this flight that there were some fundamental mechanisms associated with the interaction between the tether and the end-body that were not fully understood at that time. Hence, a Tether Dynamics Experiment (TDE) was formed and became a formal part of the scientific agenda for the follow-on mission OEDIPUS-C which flew in 1995. This dissertation describes the work that was conducted as part of the TDE and involves: theoretical investigations into the dynamics of this spinning tethered flexible body system; ground testing to validate the models and establish the tether properties; application of the models to develop a stabilization approach for OEDIPUS-C, and comparisons between theory and flight data from both OEDIPUS-A and OEDIPUS-C. Nonlinear equations of motion are developed for a spinning tethered system where the tether could be either spinning with the end-bodies or attached to small de-spun platforms on the end-bodies. Since the tether used for the OEDIPUS missions is not a string, as is often assumed, but rather a wire that has some bending stiffness, albeit small, the tether bending was also taken into account in the formulation. Two sets of ground tests are described that were used to validate the stability conditions and gain confidence in the mathematical models. One set involved hanging a body by a tether and spinning at different speeds to investigate the end-body stability. The other set

  3. Laboratory simulation of the interaction between a tethered satellite system and the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannaroni, G.; Giovi, R.; de Venuto, F.

    1992-10-01

    The authors report on the measurements performed in the IFSI/CNR plasma chamber at Frascati related to the laboratory investigation of the interaction between a plasma source and an ambient plasma of ionospheric type. Such an interaction is of relevant interest for the possibility of using electrodynamic tethered satellite systems, orbiting at ionospheric altitude, for generating electric power or propulsion in space. The interaction region was analyzed at various conditions of ambient magnetic field (/0-0.5/ G) and at different polarization levels of the plasma source (/0-40/ V). The plasma measurements were carried out with a diagnostic system using an array of Langmuir probes movable in the chamber so that a map of the plasma parameters could be obtained at the different experimental conditions.

  4. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Estes, Robert D.; Grossi, Mario D.

    1994-01-01

    This final report covers nine years of research on future tether applications and on the actual flights of the Small Expendable Deployment System (SEDS). Topics covered include: (1) a description of numerical codes used to simulate the orbital and attitude dynamics of tethered systems during station keeping and deployment maneuvers; (2) a comparison of various tethered system simulators; (3) dynamics analysis, conceptual design, potential applications and propagation of disturbances and isolation from noise of a variable gravity/microgravity laboratory tethered to the Space Station; (4) stability of a tethered space centrifuge; (5) various proposed two-dimensional tethered structures for low Earth orbit for use as planar array antennas; (6) tethered high gain antennas; (7) numerical calculation of the electromagnetic wave field on the Earth's surface on an electrodynamically tethered satellite; (8) reentry of tethered capsules; (9) deployment dynamics of SEDS-1; (10) analysis of SEDS-1 flight data; and (11) dynamics and control of SEDS-2.

  5. Scientific and technical applications of a tethered satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snoddy, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    A Shuttle-borne tether system capable of deploying a tether to radial distances as great as 100 km was described by Rupp and Laue (1978). The system as discussed by Rupp and Laue would have a total mass of 700 kg and would be mounted on one Shuttle pallet. It would consist of a tether reel mechanism complete with a servo drive motor and control sensors, a boom with docking probe used for initial deployment and subsequent retrieval, some type of satellite weighing 175 kg, up to 100 km of synthetic or metallic tether approximately 1 mm in diameter, a digital control computer, and a control and display panel on the Orbiter aft flight deck for crew operation. The primary use of a tether system for geological applications would be in the measurement of those magnetic and gravitational fields associated with geological structures. The major appeal in connection with atmospheric applications is the system's ability to extend instrumentation down into the lower thermosphere and possibly the mesosphere.

  6. Shuttle-tethered satellite system definition study extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A system requirements definition and configuration study (Phase B) of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) was conducted during the period 14 November 1977 to 27 February 1979. Subsequently a study extension was conducted during the period 13 June 1979 to 30 June 1980, for the purpose of refining the requirements identified during the main phase of the study, and studying in some detail the implications of accommodating various types of scientific experiments on the initial verification flight mission. An executive overview is given of the Tethered Satellite System definition developed during the study. The results of specific study tasks undertaken in the extension phase of the study are reported. Feasibility of the Tethered Satellite System has been established with reasonable confidence and the groundwork laid for proceeding with hardware design for the verification mission.

  7. Tethered satellite system control using electromagnetic forces and reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandi Hallaj, Mohammad Amin; Assadian, Nima

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel non-rotating space tethered configuration is introduced which its relative positions controlled using electromagnetic forces. The attitude dynamics is controlled by three reaction wheels in the body axes. The nonlinear coupled orbital dynamics of a dumbbell tethered satellite formation flight are derived through a constrained Lagrangian approach. These equations are presented in the leader satellite orbital frame. The tether is assumed to be mass-less and straight, and the J2 perturbation is included to the analysis. The forces and the moments of the electromagnetic coils are modeled based on the far-filed model of the magnetic dipoles. A guidance scheme for generating the desired positions as a function of time in Cartesian form is presented. The satellite tethered formation with variable length is controlled utilizing a linear controller. This approach is applied to a specified scenario and it is shown that the nonlinear guidance method and the linear controller can control the nonlinear system of the tethered formation and the results are compared with optimal control approach.

  8. Tethered Satellite System (TSS)-1R survey photography

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-03-18

    STS075-325-014 (25 Feb. 1996) --- The frayed end of the tether portion of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is seen at the end of the supportive boom. On February 25, 1996, the crew deployed the TSS, which later broke free. The seven member crew was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 22, 1996, and landed on March 9, 1996. Crewmembers were Andrew M. Allen, mission commander; Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and Maurizio Cheli, European Space Agency (ESA); Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Claude Nicollier (ESA), all mission specialists; along with payload specialist Umberto Guidoni of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  9. Applications of Tethers in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the first workshop on applications of tethers in space are summarized. The workshop gathered personalities from industry, academic institutions and government to discuss the relatively new area of applied technology of very long tethers in space to a broad spectrum of future space missions. A large number of tethered concepts and configurations was presented covering electrodynamic interaction tethers, tethered transportation through angular momentum exchange, tethered constellations, low gravity utilization, applicable technology, and tethered test facilities. Specific recommendations were made to NASA in each area.

  10. Evaluation of a six-DOF electrodynamic shaker system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Danny Lynn; Smallwood, David Ora

    2009-03-01

    The paper describes the preliminary evaluation of a 6 degree of freedom electrodynamic shaker system. The 8 by 8 inch (20.3 cm) table is driven by 12 electrodynamic shakers producing motion in all 6 rigid body modes. A small electrodynamic shaker system suitable for small component testing is described. The principal purpose of the system is to demonstrate the technology. The shaker is driven by 12 electrodynamic shakers each with a force capability of about 50 lbs (220 N). The system was developed through an informal cooperative agreement between Sandia National Laboratories, Team Corp. and Spectral Dynamics Corporation. Sandia providedmore » the laboratory space and some development funds. Team provided the mechanical system, and Spectral Dynamics provided the control system. Spectral Dynamics was chosen to provide the control system partly because of their experience in MIMO control and partly because Sandia already had part of the system in house. The shaker system was conceived and manufactured by TEAM Corp. Figure 1 shows the overall system. The vibration table, electrodynamic shakers, hydraulic pumps, and amplifiers are all housed in a single cabinet. Figure 2 is a drawing showing how the electrodynamic shakers are coupled to the table. The shakers are coupled to the table through a hydraulic spherical pad bearing providing 5 degrees of freedom and one stiff degree of freedom. The pad bearing must be preloaded with a static force as they are unable to provide any tension forces. The horizontal bearings are preloaded with steel springs. The drawing shows a spring providing the vertical preload. This was changed in the final design. The vertical preload is provided by multiple strands of an O-ring material as shown in Figure 4. Four shakers provide excitation in each of the three orthogonal axes. The specifications of the shaker are outlined in Table 1. Four shakers provide inputs in each of the three orthogonal directions. By choosing the phase

  11. Dynamic stability of electrodynamic maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on mathematical models and experimental data. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis for motion-dependent magnetic-force-induced instability developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  12. Parametric control of maneuver of a space tether system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezglasnyi, S. P.; Piyakina, E. E.

    2015-07-01

    Planar motion of a space tether system (STS) simulated by a massless rod with two masses fixed on its edges and a third mass moving along the rod is considered. An equation of the pendulum-controlled motion of the system in an elliptical orbit is obtained. Problems of parametric control that takes the STS from one stable radial equilibrium state to another and stabilizes it with respect to planar excitations of two diametrically opposite positions of the relative equilibrium of the STS in a circular orbit are investigated. The control is a continuous law of motion for a moving mass along the tether on the swing principle. The solution is obtained in a closed form based on the second method of the classical stability theory by the construction of the corresponding Lyapunov functions. Asymptotic convergence of solutions is confirmed by the results of numerical modeling of the system motion.

  13. Dual-keel electrodynamic maglev system

    DOEpatents

    He, Jianliang; Wang, Zian; Rote, Donald M.; Coffey, Howard T.; Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.; Cal, Yigang

    1996-01-01

    A propulsion and stabilization system with a plurality of superconducting magnetic devices affixed to the dual-keels of a vehicle, where the superconducting magnetic devices produce a magnetic field when energized. The system also includes a plurality of figure-eight shaped null-flux coils affixed to opposing vertical sides of slots in a guideway. The figure-eight shaped null-flux coils are vertically oriented, laterally cross-connected in parallel, longitudinally connected in series, and continue the length of the vertical slots providing levitation and guidance force. An external power source energizes the figure-eight shaped null-flux coils to create a magnetic traveling wave that interacts with the magnetic field produced by the superconducting magnets to impart motion to the vehicle.

  14. Dual-keel electrodynamic maglev system

    DOEpatents

    He, J.L.; Wang, Z.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.; Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Cal, Y.

    1996-12-24

    A propulsion and stabilization system is disclosed with a plurality of superconducting magnetic devices affixed to the dual-keels of a vehicle, where the superconducting magnetic devices produce a magnetic field when energized. The system also includes a plurality of figure-eight shaped null-flux coils affixed to opposing vertical sides of slots in a guideway. The figure-eight shaped null-flux coils are vertically oriented, laterally cross-connected in parallel, longitudinally connected in series, and continue the length of the vertical slots providing levitation and guidance force. An external power source energizes the figure-eight shaped null-flux coils to create a magnetic traveling wave that interacts with the magnetic field produced by the superconducting magnets to impart motion to the vehicle. 6 figs.

  15. Bounded parametric control of plane motions of space tethered system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezglasnyi, S. P.; Mukhametzyanova, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    This paper is focused on the problem of control of plane motions of a space tethered system (STS). The STS is modeled as a heavy rod with two point masses. Point masses are fixed on the rod. A third point mass can move along the rod. The control is realized as a continuous change of the distance from the centre of mass of the tethered system to the movable mass. New limited control laws processes of excitation and damping are built. Diametric reorientation and gravitational stabilization to the local vertical of an STS were obtained. The problem is solved by the method of Lyapunov's functions of the classical theory of stability. The theoretical results are confirmed by numerical calculations.

  16. Spin Pumping in Electrodynamically Coupled Magnon-Photon Systems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lihui; Harder, M; Chen, Y P; Fan, X; Xiao, J Q; Hu, C-M

    2015-06-05

    We use electrical detection, in combination with microwave transmission, to investigate both resonant and nonresonant magnon-photon coupling at room temperature. Spin pumping in a dynamically coupled magnon-photon system is found to be distinctly different from previous experiments. Characteristic coupling features such as modes anticrossing, linewidth evolution, peculiar line shape, and resonance broadening are systematically measured and consistently analyzed by a theoretical model set on the foundation of classical electrodynamic coupling. Our experimental and theoretical approach paves the way for pursuing microwave coherent manipulation of pure spin current via the combination of spin pumping and magnon-photon coupling.

  17. Tethered-restraint system for blood collection from ferrets

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.K.; Kieffer, V.A.; Sauber, J.S.

    The laboratory ferret, Mustela putorius furo, recently has come into prominence as a laboratory animal for use in biomedical research. This laboratory has adopted the use of this species because the ferret's emetic response to radiation occurs at a lower dose and has a more rapid onset than that of dogs. One approach for determining the physiological basis of this response is to measure serum levels of various circulating substances before and after irradiation. However, blood collection from the ferret can be difficult because the lack of easily accessible veins and seasonal accumulation of subcutaneous body fat. This report describesmore » a method of tethered-restraint for the ferret in which an in-dwelling venous jugular catheter is implanted for withdrawing blood samples. No interference with the animal's normal activities occurs during the sampling procedure. Each animal is conditioned to the tethered-restraint prior to surgical placement of the catheter. The technique provides a minimally stressful method of restraint. A similar tethering system has been used successfully on several other animal species, such as non-human primates and rats.« less

  18. System protection from atmospheric electricity for aerostats with conducting tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, M. S.; Beach, G. R.; Jakubowski, P. R.; Fisher, F. A.

    1988-04-01

    Aerostat power tethers have demonstrated survival of lightning strikes, but they usually have to be reterminated or replaced afterward. Two requirements are given for the prevention of lightning damage to the tether to about 100 kA: installation of a metal-to-metal contact on the outer tether surface to ground the tether at the base flying sheave at typical flying positions; and installation of a shielding band within the outer tether jacket with a weight of about 0.05 lb/ft for a half-inch tether. This determination was made in part by high current tests and in part by electrical modeling.

  19. Tethered Vehicle Control and Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, David D. (Inventor); Aull, Mark J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A kite system includes a kite and a ground station. The ground station includes a sensor that can be utilized to determine an angular position and velocity of the kite relative to the ground station. A controller utilizes a fuzzy logic control system to autonomously fly the kite. The system may include a ground station having powered winding units that generate power as the lines to the kite are unreeled. The control system may be configured to fly the kite in a crosswind trajectory to increase line tension for power generation. The sensors for determining the position of the kite are preferably ground-based.

  20. Tethered Vehicle Control and Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, David D. (Inventor); Aull, Mark J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A kite system includes a kite and a ground station. The ground station includes a sensor that can be utilized to determine an angular position and velocity of the kite relative to the ground station. A controller utilizes a fuzzy logic control system to autonomously fly the kite. The system may include a ground station having powered winding units that generate power as the lines to the kite are unreeled. The control system may be configured to fly the kite in a crosswind trajectory to increase line tension for power generation. The sensors for determining the position of the kite are preferably ground-based.

  1. Operator's Manual for SHEBA Powered Tether Balloon System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lappen, Cara-Lyn; Randall, David A.

    1998-01-01

    The Surface Heat and Energy Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) was an intensive field project which took place in the Arctic Ocean from October 1997 through October 1998. Its purpose was to measure as many facets of the Arctic environment as possible so that we would be able to better understand the interaction between the ice, atmosphere, and ocean and their interactions with global climate. One aspect of the atmospheric field component was launching tethered balloons to monitor the profiles of temperature, wind, pressure, and humidity, as well as examine the vertical structure of cloud droplet sizes and distributions. The tethered balloon that we used was one specially designed for use in freezing climates by SPEC Corporation in Boulder, Colorado. A special winch that was able to withstand Arctic temperature and weather became necessary when the testing of simple winch systems used in warmer climates failed under these extreme conditions. The purpose of this manual is to acquaint any new user to the powered tethered balloon system deployed at the The Surface Heat and Energy Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA ice camp. It includes a description of the preparations necessary to get ready for a launch, the mechanics of the actual launch, and an account of the proper procedure for taking down the equipment when finished. It will also include tips on how to minimize potential equipment failures, some trouble shooting, and some safety ideas. This manual is designed so that new operators can use the system with minimal previous training. At the end of this manual, the reader will find a quick checklist.

  2. Future geodesy missions: Tethered systems and formation flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontdecaba, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Manuel; Pelaez, Jesus; Metris, Gilles; Exertier, Pierre

    Recent gravity field determination missions have shown the possibility of improving our Earth knowledge from space. GRACE has helped to the determination of temporal variations of low and mean degrees of the field while GOCE will improve the precision in the determination of higher degrees. But there is still some needs for geophysics which are not satisfied by these missions. Two areas where improvements must be done are (i) perenniality of the observations, and (ii) determination of temporal variations of higher degrees of the gravity field. These improvements can be achieved thanks to new measurement technologies with higher precision, but also using new observables. Historically, space determination of the gravity field has been done observing the perturbations of the orbit of the satellites. More recently, GRACE has introduced the use of satellite-tosatellite ranging. Goce will use onboard gradiometry. The authors have explored the possibilities of two new technologies for the determination of the gravity field: (i) tethered systems, and (ii) formation flying for all kind of configurations (not just leader-follower). To analyze the possibilities of these technologies, we obtain the covariance matrix of the coefficients of the gravity field for the different observables. This can be done providing some very reasonable hypothesis are accepted. This matrix contains a lot of information concerning the behavior of the observable. In order to obtain the matrix, we use the so-called lumped coefficients approach. We have used this method for three observables (i) tethered systems, (ii) formation flying and (iii) gradiometry (for comparison purposes). Tethers appear as a very long base gradiometers, with very interesting properties, but also very challenging from a technological point of view. One of the major advantages of the tethered systems is their multitask design. Indeed, the same cable can be used for propulsion purposes in some phases of the mission, and for

  3. Selected tether applications in space: An analysis of five selected concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ground rules and assumptions; operations; orbit considerations/dynamics; tether system design and dynamics; functional requirements; hardware concepts; and safety factors are examined for five scenarios: tethered effected separation of an Earth bound shuttle from the space station; tether effected orbit boost of a spacecraft (AXAF) into its operational orbit from the shuttle; an operational science/technology platform tether deployed from space station; a tether mediated rendezvous involving an OMV tether deployed from space station to rendezvous with an aerobraked OTV returning to geosynchronous orbit from a payload delivery mission; and an electrodynamic tether used in a dual motor/generator mode to serve as the primary energy storage facility for space station.

  4. The development of optimal control laws for orbiting tethered platform systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Woodard, S.; Juang, J.-N.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model of the open and closed loop in-orbit plane dynamics of a space platform-tethered-subsatellite system is developed. The system consists of a rigid platform from which an (assumed massless) tether is deploying (retrieving) a subsatellite from an attachment point which is, in general, offset from the platform's mass center. A Lagrangian formulation yields equations describing platform pitch, subsatellite tether-line swing, and varying tether length motions. These equations are linearized about the nominal station keeping motion. Control can be provided by both modulation of the tether tension level and by a momentum type platform-mounted device; system controllability depends on the presence of both control inputs. Stability criteria are developed in terms of the control law gains, the platform inertia ratio, and tether offset parameter. Control law gains are obtained based on linear quadratic regulator techniques. Typical transient responses of both the state and required control effort are presented.

  5. Dynamic analysis of the tether transportation system using absolute nodal coordinate formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xin; Xu, Ming; Zhong, Rui

    2017-10-01

    Long space tethers are becoming a rising concern as an alternate way for transportation in space. It benefits from fuel economizing. This paper focuses on the dynamics of the tether transportation system, which consists of two end satellites connected by a flexible tether, and a movable vehicle driven by the actuator carried by itself. The Absolute Nodal Coordinate Formulation is applied to the establishment of the equation of motion, so that the influence caused by the distributed mass and elasticity of the tether is introduced. Moreover, an approximated method for accelerating the calculation of the generalized gravitational forces on the tether is proposed by substituting the volume integral every step into summation of finite terms. Afterwards, dynamic evolutions of such a system in different configurations are illustrated using numerical simulations. The deflection of the tether and the trajectory of the crawler during the transportation is investigated. Finally, the effect on the orbit of the system due to the crawler is revealed.

  6. Electrodynamic Tether Operations and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    2001-01-01

    This Final Report is organized by tasks from the statement of work (SOW). A brief statement of each task with its task description followed by a discussion of the work performed is presented. The period of performance for this contract phase was from July 21, 2000 to March 19, 2001.

  7. Optimal Control of Electrodynamic Tethers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    the out-of- plane component of the magnetic field which produces the required in- track thrust is reduced (see Eq. as th sp lo e a (4... the same orbital plane using an EDT. For the sake of testing the algorithm against a known solution we seek the maximum altitude an EDT can reach...be incl planes co gnetic equatorial plane ent of latit and m mi ains constant as the EDT ity the Eart e tilted with respect to the

  8. Study of Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) tether system for orbit reboost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Detailed designs were produced for a 2 kW plasma motor generator tether system based largely on existing hardware and hardware designs. Specifically, the hollow cathode design and electronics are derived from ion propulsion equipment. A prototype tether was constructed and will be tested for deployment, strength, resistance to breakage and abrasion and electrical properties. In addition, laboratory development models of the electronics will be used to operate two plasma motor generator hollow cathode assemblies with this tether to verify electrical performance parameters for the complete system. Results show that a low cost demonstration of a plasma motor generator tether system appears to be feasible by the middle of the 1990s.

  9. Configuration maintaining control of three-body ring tethered system based on thrust compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Panfeng; Liu, Binbin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    Space multi-tethered systems have shown broad prospects in remote observation missions. This paper mainly focuses on the dynamics and configuration maintaining control of space spinning three-body ring tethered system for such mission. Firstly, we establish the spinning dynamic model of the three-body ring tethered system considering the elasticity of the tether using Newton-Euler method, and then validate the suitability of this model by numerical simulation. Subsequently, LP (Likins-Pringle) initial equilibrium conditions for the tethered system are derived based on rigid body's equilibrium theory. Simulation results show that tether slack, snapping and interaction between the tethers exist in the three-body ring system, and its' configuration can not be maintained without control. Finally, a control strategy based on thrust compensation, namely thrust to simulate tether compression under LP initial equilibrium conditions is designed to solve the configuration maintaining control problem. Control effects are verified by numerical simulation compared with uncontrolled situation. Simulation results show that the configuration of the three-body ring tethered system could maintain under this active control strategy.

  10. Space Tethers Design Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlin, Donald D.; Faile, Gwyn C.; Hayashida, Kazuo B.; Frost, Cynthia L.; Wagner, Carole Y.; Mitchell, Michael L.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Galuska, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    The small expendable deployable system and tether satellite system programs did not have a uniform written criteria for tethers. The JSC safety panel asked what criteria was used to design the tethers. Since none existed, a criteria was written based on past experience for future tether programs.

  11. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  12. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  13. Tethers in space handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, T. G.; Baracat, W. A.; Butner, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    The handbook provides a list and description of ongoing tether programs. This includes the joint U.S.-Italy demonstration project, and individual U.S. and Italian studies and demonstration programs. An overview of the current activity level and areas of emphasis in this emerging field is provided. The fundamental physical principles behind the proposed tether applications are addressed. Four basic concepts of gravity gradient, rotation, momentum exchange, and electrodynamics are discussed. Information extracted from literature, which supplements and enhances the tether applications is also presented. A bibliography is appended.

  14. The detection of gravitational waves using electrodynamic system of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunskaya, Lubov; Isakevich, Valiriy

    There is studied the interconnection of tide processes of geophysical and astrophysical origin with the Earth electromagnetic fields. There has been developed a programme-analytical system (PAS) to investigate signal structures in spectral and time series, caused by geophysical and astrophysical processes based on the method of eigen vectors. There were discovered frequencies in the electrical and geomagnetical field of ELF range with PAS, which coincide with the frequency of gravitational -wave radiation of a number of double stellar systems. In the electrical and geomagnetic field there was discovered a specific axion frequency VA=0.5*10-5 Hz belonging to the ELF range which was predicted by the theory. The problem of the anomalous behavior of the electrodynamic system response to the gravitational - wave affect is being discussed. On the basis of the rich experimental material have been investigated the frequencies of gravitational-wave radiation of a number of binary systems: J0700+6418, J1012+5307, J1537+1155, J1959+2048, J2130+1210, J1915+1606. The work is carried out with supporting of RFFI No. 14-07-97510, State Task to Universities on 2014-2016.

  15. The development of optimal control laws for orbiting tethered platform systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model of the open and closed loop in orbit plane dynamics of a space platform-tethered-subsatellite system is developed. The system consists of a rigid platform from which an (assumed massless) tether is deploying (retrieving) a subsatellite from an attachment point which is, in general, offset from the platform's mass center. A Langrangian formulation yields equations describing platform pitch, subsatellite tetherline swing, and varying tether length motions. These equations are linearized about the nominal station keeping motion. Control can be provided by both modulation of the tether tension level and by a momentum type platform-mounted device; system controllability depends on the presence of both control inputs. Stability criteria are developed in terms of the control law gains, the platform inertia ratio, and tether offset parameter. Control law gains are obtained based on linear quadratic regulator techniques. Typical transient responses of both the state and required control effort are presented.

  16. Tether System for Exchanging Payloads Between the International Space Station and the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Robert P.

    1998-01-01

    Systems composed of several rotating and/or hanging tethers may provide a means of exchanging supplies between low Earth orbit facilities and lunar bases without requiring the use of propellant. This work develops methods for designing a tether system capable of repeatedly exchanging payloads between a LEO facility such as the International Space Station or a Space Business Park and a base on the lunar surface. In this system, a hanging tether extended upwards from the LEO facility, places a payload into a slightly elliptical orbit, where it is caught by a rotating tether in a higher elliptical orbit. This rotating tether then tosses the payload to the moon. At the moon, a long rotating "Lunavator" tether catches the payload and deposits it on the surface of the moon. By transporting an equal mass of lunar materials such as oxygen back down to the LEO facility through the tether transport system, the momentum and energy of the system is conserved, allowing frequent traffic between LEO and the lunar surface with minimal propellant requirements.

  17. A Magnetic Bumper-Tether System Using ZFC Y123

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Obot, Victor; Liu, Jianxiong; Arndt, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the use of magnetic forces in a bumper system, to soften docking procedures. We investigate a system which exhibits no magnetic field except during the docking process, which, if desired, can automatically tether two craft together, and which provides lateral stability during docking. A system composed of zero field cooled Y(1.7)Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) (Y123) tiles and electromagnets is proposed. The Y123 high temperature superconductor (HTS) is mounted on one craft, and the electromagnet on the other. Results of small prototype laboratory experiments are reported. The electromagnet has, for convenience, been replaced by a permanent SmCo ferromagnet in these measurements. When the two craft approach, a mirror image of the ferromagnet is induced in the Y123, and a repulsive bumper force, F(sub B), results. F(sub B) is velocity dependent, and increases with v. For presently available HTS materials, bumper pressure of approx. 3.7 N/cm(exp 2) is achieved using SmCo. This extrapolates to approx. 18 N/cm(exp 2) for an electromagnet, or a force of up to 20 tons for a 1 m(exp 2) system. After reaching a minimum distance of approach, the two colliding craft begin to separate. However, the consequent change of SmCo magnetic field at the Y123 results in a reversal of current in the Y123 so that the Y123 is attractive to the SmCo. The attractive (tether) force, F(sub T), is a function of R = B(sub Fe)/B(sub t, max), where B(sub Fe) is the field at the surface of the ferromagnet, and B(sub t, max) is the maximum trapped field of the Y123, i.e., the trapped field in the so-called critical state. For R greater than or equal to 2, F(sub T) saturates at a value comparable to F(sub B). For a range of initial approach velocities the two craft are tethered following the bumper sequence. Most of the kinetic energy of the collision is first converted to magnetic field energy in the Y123, and then into heat via the creep mechanism. About 15% of the work done against magnetic forces

  18. The motion and control of a complex three-body space tethered system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Gefei; Zhu, Zhanxia; Chen, Shiyu; Yuan, Jianping; Tang, Biwei

    2017-11-01

    This paper is mainly devoted to investigating the dynamics and stability control of a three body-tethered satellite system which contains a main satellite and two subsatellites connected by two straight, massless and inextensible tethers. Firstly, a detailed mathematical model is established in the central gravitational field. Then, the dynamic characteristics of the established system are investigated and analyzed. Based on the dynamic analysis, a novel sliding mode prediction model (SMPM) control strategy is proposed to suppress the motion of the built tethered system. The numerical results show that the proposed underactuated control law is highly effective in suppressing the attitude/libration motion of the underactuated three-body tethered system. Furthermore, cases of different target angles are also examined and analyzed. The simulation results reveal that even if the final equilibrium states differ from different selections of the target angles, the whole system can still be maintained in acceptable areas.

  19. Anti-sway control of tethered satellite systems using attitude control of the main satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefian, Peyman; Salarieh, Hassan

    2015-06-01

    In this study a new method is introduced to suppress libration of a tethered satellite system (TSS). It benefits from coupling between satellites and tether libration dynamics. The control concept uses the main satellite attitude maneuvers to suppress librational motion of the tether, and the main satellite's actuators for attitude control are used as the only actuation in the system. The study considers planar motion of a two body TSS system in a circular orbit and it is assumed that the tether's motion will not change it. Governing dynamic equations of motion are derived using the extended Lagrange method. Controllability of the system around the equilibrium state is studied and a linear LQG controller is designed to regulate libration of the system. Tether tension and satellite attitude are assumed as only measurable outputs of the system. The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used to estimate states of the system to be used as feedback to the controller. The designed controller and observer are implemented to the nonlinear plant and simulations demonstrate that the controller lead to reduction of the tether libration propoerly. By the way, because the controller is linear, it is applicable only at low amplitudes in the vicinity of equilibrium point. To reach global stability, a nonlinear controller is demanded.

  20. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1989-01-01

    The use is studied of tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station. Particular emphasis is placed by the microgravity community on the achievement of high quality microgravity conditions. The tether capability is explored for active control of the center of gravity and the analysis of possible tethered configurations.

  1. Dynamics Simulation Model for Space Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, E. M.; Pearson, J.; Oldson, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the development of an accurate model for the dynamics of the Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) system. The MXER is a rotating tether about 100-km long in elliptical Earth orbit designed to catch payloads in low Earth orbit and throw them to geosynchronous orbit or to Earth escape. To ensure successful rendezvous between the MXER tip catcher and a payload, a high-fidelity model of the system dynamics is required. The model developed here quantifies the major environmental perturbations, and can predict the MXER tip position to within meters over one orbit.

  2. Dynamics and control of three-body tethered system in large elliptic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Gefei; Zhu, Zhanxia; Zhu, Zheng H.

    2018-03-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic characteristics a three-body tethered satellite system in large elliptic orbits and the control strategy to suppress the libration of the system in orbital transfer process. The system is modeled by a two-piece dumbbell model in the domain of true anomaly. The model consists of one main satellite and two subsatellites connected with two straight, massless and inextensible tethers. Two control strategies based on the sliding mode control are developed to control the libration to the zero state and the steady state respectively. The results of numerical simulations show that the proposed control scheme has good performance in controlling the libration motion of a three-body tethered satellite system in an elliptic orbit with large eccentricity by limited control inputs. Furthermore, Hamiltonians in both states are examined and it shows that less control input is required to control the libration motion to the steady state than that of zero state.

  3. On safe configurations of a natural-artificial space tether system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodnikov, A. V.

    2018-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a particle moving under gravitation of precessing dynamically symmetric rigid body if the particle motion is restricted by two unilateral (flexible) constraints realized by two weightless unstretchable tethers with ends fixed at body poles, formed as the intersection of the body surface with the axis of its dynamical symmetry. The system under consideration is a simple model of an original natural-artificial space construction consisting of an asteroid and a space station tethered to each other via two cables. We note that the problem is integrable for the system safe configurations, i.e. for motions along the constraints common boundary (both tethers are tensed) if the body gravitational potential is invariant with respect to rotation about the axis of dynamical symmetry. We study these motions depicting phase portraits for possible values of system parameters. We also deduce conditions for the particle coming off the boundary of constraint(s) (if the tether(s) are slackened) and analyze these conditions, eliminating corresponding areas from phase portraits. We also formulate some statements, concerning the particle safety.

  4. Developing Capture Mechanisms and High-Fidelity Dynamic Models for the MXER Tether System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    A team consisting of collaborators from Tennessee Technological University (TTU), Marshall Space Flight Center, BD Systems, and the University of Delaware (herein called the TTU team) conducted specific research and development activities in MXER tether systems during the base period of May 15, 2004 through September 30, 2006 under contract number NNM04AB13C. The team addressed two primary topics related to the MXER tether system: 1) Development of validated high-fidelity dynamic models of an elastic rotating tether and 2) development of feasible mechanisms to enable reliable rendezvous and capture. This contractor report will describe in detail the activities that were performed during the base period of this cycle-2 MXER tether activity and will summarize the results of this funded activity. The primary deliverables of this project were the quad trap, a robust capture mechanism proposed, developed, tested, and demonstrated with a high degree of feasibility and the detailed development of a validated high-fidelity elastic tether dynamic model provided through multiple formulations.

  5. Tether fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Some fundamental aspects of tethers are presented and briefly discussed. The effects of gravity gradients, dumbbell libration in circular orbits, tether control strategies and impact hazards for tethers are among those fundamentals. Also considered are aerodynamic drag, constraints in momentum transfer applications and constraints with permanently deployed tethers. The theoretical feasibility of these concepts are reviewed.

  6. Orbital Winch for High-Strength, Space-Survivable Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Robert; Barnes, Ian; Slostad, Jeffrey; Frank, Scott

    2010-01-01

    An Orbital Winch mechanism enables high-load, multi-line tethers to be deployed and retracted without rotating the spool on which the tether is wound. To minimize damage to the tether and the wound package during retraction or deployment under load, it can incorporate a Tension Management Module that reduces the infeed tension by a factor of 15 through the use of a powered capstan with guide rollers. This design eliminates the need for rotating high-voltage electrical connections in tether systems that use propellantless electro-dynamic propulsion. It can also eliminate the need for rotating optical connections in applications where the tether contains optical fibers. This winch design was developed to deploy a 15-km-long, 15-kg high-strength Hoytether structure incorporating conductive wires as part of the MXER-1 demonstration mission concept. Two slewing rings that orbit around the tether spool, combined with translation of one of the slewing rings back and forth along the spool axis to traverse the wind point, enables the winch to wind the tether. Variations of the traverse motion of the slewing ring can accomplish level winds and conical pirn winds. By removing the non-traversing slewing ring, and adding an actuated guide arm, the winch can manage rapid, low-drag deployment of a tether off the end of a pirn-wound spool, followed by controlled retraction and rewinding, in a manner very similar to a spin-casting reel. The winch requires at least two motor driver controller units to coordinate the action of two stepper motors to accomplish tether deployment or retraction.

  7. Downward-deployed tethered satellite systems, measurement techniques, and instrumentation - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth G.; Melfi, Leonard T., Jr.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a number of scheduled and proposed Shuttle-based downward-deployed tethered satellite systems (TSSs) the purpose of which is to determine the structure of the lower thermosphere and to measure the atmospheric and aerodynamic effects in the vicinity of the satellite, the aerothermodynamic effects on the satellite's surface, and the dynamics of the tether and its endmass, the satellite. The instruments for the downward-deployed tethered missions will include mass spectrometers and other density sensors, plasma instrumentation, optical spectrophotometers, magnetometers, and instrumentation to measure the effects on satellite surface (such as the surface temperature, heat transfer, and pressure; gas adsorption on surfaces, chemistry with other gas molecules and surface material, and desorption from the surface; and surface charging).

  8. Tethered satellite system dynamics and control review panel and related activities, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Two major tests of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) engineering and flight units were conducted to demonstrate the functionality of the hardware and software. Deficiencies in the hardware/software integration tests (HSIT) led to a recommendation for more testing to be performed. Selected problem areas of tether dynamics were analyzed, including verification of the severity of skip rope oscillations, verification or comparison runs to explore dynamic phenomena observed in other simulations, and data generation runs to explore the performance of the time domain and frequency domain skip rope observers.

  9. In-Space Transportation with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico; Estes, Robert D.; Cosmo, Mario L.

    1998-01-01

    The annual report covers the research conducted on the following topics related to the use of spaceborne tethers for in-space transportation: ProSEDS tether modeling (current collection analyses, influence of a varying tether temperature); proSEDS mission analysis and system dynamics (tether thermal model, thermo-electro-dynamics integrated simulations); proSEDS-tether development and testing (tether requirements, deployment test plan, tether properties testing, deployment tests); and tethers for reboosting the space-based laser (mission analysis, tether system preliminary design, evaluation of attitude constraints).

  10. Shuttle Orbiter tethered subsatellite for exploring and tapping space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Williamson, P. R.; Oyama, K. I.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to the possibilities for studies in space plasma physics offered by a subsatellite mechanically tethered above the Space Shuttle Orbiter by a long conducting wire. The proposed experiment, designated the Shuttle Electrodynamic Tether Systems (SETS) is based on the concept of collecting electrons at the subsatellite and ejecting them from the Orbiter, made possible by the emf generated by the motion of the tether across geomagnetic field lines. The power generated in this manner can be used both for practical purposes within the Orbiter and for the creation of large-amplitude plasma and electromagnetic waves within the surrounding plasma. For a conducting spherical subsatellite 30 m in diameter with a 10-km tether drawing 1 A, calculations show that emfs on the order of 1000-2000 V and energy dissipation of as much as 10,000 W can be obtained, accompanied by the generation of two regions of net electric charge in the ionosphere. Scientific studies considered for SETS include the measurement of MHD waves artificially generated in the ionosphere, the investigation of current-driven plasma instabilities, VLF wave generation and the simulation of electrodynamics associated with the motion of celestial bodies through plasma.

  11. Study of Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) tether system for orbit reboost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A progress report is given on a system study by TRW begun in January 1987 of a 2 kW Plasma Motor Generator Tether to be used for orbit reboost. Following the completion of the initial phase in September 1987, additional tasks were agreed on and work on them begun in March 1988. These tasks fell into three categories: tests on the prototype tether fabricated during the first phase, simulations of the spacecraft and tether system after deployment using GTOSS, and a brief investigation of the impact and feasibility of increasing the system to 20 kW and hosting it on the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle. The subcontractor, Energy Sciences Laboratory, was assigned the responsibility of performing the simulations and some mechanical tests on the prototype tether to supplement those done at TRW. A summary of the significant findings and issues from each task follows. Recommendations for future work constitutes the third section. A copy of the final briefing is in Appendix A, plus additional reports for each task and additional analysis.

  12. Tethered subsatellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. P.; Dunkin, J. A.; Galaboff, Z. J.; Johnston, K. D.; Kissel, R. R.; Rheinfurth, M. H.; Siebel, M. P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of studies performed relating to the feasibility of deploying a subsatellite from the shuttle by means of a tether. The dynamics, the control laws, the aerodynamics, the heating, and some communication considerations of the tethered subsatellite system are considered. Nothing was found that prohibits the use of a subsatellite joined to the shuttle by a long (100 km) tether. More detailed studies directed at specific applications are recommended.

  13. Stabilization of a programmed rotation mode for a satellite with electrodynamic attitude control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A. Yu.; Aleksandrova, E. B.; Tikhonov, A. A.

    2018-07-01

    The paper deals with a dynamically symmetric satellite in a circular near-Earth orbit. The satellite is equipped with an electrodynamic attitude control system based on Lorentz and magnetic torque properties. The programmed satellite attitude motion is such that the satellite slowly rotates around the axis of its dynamical symmetry. Unlike previous publications, we consider more complex and practically more important case where the axis is fixed in the orbital frame in an inclined position with respect to the local vertical axis. The satellite stabilization in the programmed attitude motion is studied. The gravitational disturbing torque acting on the satellite attitude dynamics is taken into account since it is the largest disturbing torque. The novelty of the proposed approach is based on the usage of electrodynamic attitude control system. With the aid of original construction of a Lyapunov function, new conditions under which electrodynamic control solves the problem are obtained. Sufficient conditions for asymptotic stability of the programmed motion are found in terms of inequalities for the values of control parameters. The results of a numerical simulation are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. A Model for Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Tether Momentum Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen; Johnson, David; Sorensen, Kirk; Welzyn, Ken; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems may enable high-energy missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by serving as an 'upper stage in space'. Existing rockets that use an MXER tether station could double their capability to launch communications satellites and help improve US competitiveness. A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, using the same principles that make an electric motor work, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum by pushing against the Earth's magnetic field-without using any propellant. One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether systems is in the analysis and design of the capture mechanism and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. This paper will present a model for a momentum-exchange tether system that can simulate and evaluate the performance and requirements of such a system.

  15. Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. L.; Bergeron, G.; Drobot, A. D.; Papadopoulos, K.; Riyopoulos, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by SAIC's Applied Physics Operation on the modeling and support of Tethered Satellite System missions (TSS-1 and TSS-1R). The SAIC team, known to be Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether (TMST) investigation, was one of the original twelve teams selected in July, 1985 for the first TSS mission. The accomplishments described in this report cover the period December 19, 1985 to September 31, 1999 and are the result of a continuous effort aimed at supporting the TSS missions in the following major areas. During the contract period, the SAIC's TMST investigation acted to: Participate in the planning and the execution on both of the TSS missions; Provide scientific understanding on the issues involved in the electrodynamic tether system operation prior to the TSS missions; Predict ionospheric conditions encountered during the re-flight mission (TSS-lR) based on realtime global ionosounde data; Perform post mission analyses to enhance our understanding on the TSS results. Specifically, we have 1) constructed and improved current collection models and enhanced our understanding on the current-voltage data; 2) investigated the effects of neutral gas in the current collection processes; 3) conducted laboratory experiments to study the discharge phenomena during and after tether-break; and 4) perform numerical simulations to understand data collected by plasma instruments SPES onboard the TSS satellite; Design and produce multi-media CD that highlights TSS mission achievements and convey the knowledge of the tether technology to the general public. Along with discussions of this work, a list of publications and presentations derived from the TMST investigation spanning the reporting period is compiled.

  16. Clustering of tethered satellite system simulation data by an adaptive neuro-fuzzy algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Sunanda; Pemmaraju, Surya

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments in neuro-fuzzy systems indicate that the concepts of adaptive pattern recognition, when used to identify appropriate control actions corresponding to clusters of patterns representing system states in dynamic nonlinear control systems, may result in innovative designs. A modular, unsupervised neural network architecture, in which fuzzy learning rules have been embedded is used for on-line identification of similar states. The architecture and control rules involved in Adaptive Fuzzy Leader Clustering (AFLC) allow this system to be incorporated in control systems for identification of system states corresponding to specific control actions. We have used this algorithm to cluster the simulation data of Tethered Satellite System (TSS) to estimate the range of delta voltages necessary to maintain the desired length rate of the tether. The AFLC algorithm is capable of on-line estimation of the appropriate control voltages from the corresponding length error and length rate error without a priori knowledge of their membership functions and familarity with the behavior of the Tethered Satellite System.

  17. Change in the coil distribution of electrodynamic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hisashi

    1992-01-01

    At the Miyazaki Maglev Test Center, the initial test runs were completed using a system design that required the superconducting coils to be parallel with the ground levitation coils. Recently, the coil distribution was changed to a system such that the two types of coils were perpendicular to each other. Further system changes will lead to the construction of a side wall levitation system. It is hoped that the development will culminate in a system whereby a superconducting coil will maintain all the functions: levitation, propulsion, and guidance.

  18. Multibody dynamics driving GNC and system design in tethered nets for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, Riccardo; Lavagna, Michèle; Salvi, Samuele

    2016-07-01

    Debris removal in Earth orbits is an urgent issue to be faced for space exploitation durability. Among different techniques, tethered-nets present appealing benefits and some open points to fix. Former and latter are discussed in the paper, supported by the exploitation of a multibody dynamics tool. With respect to other proposed capture mechanisms, tethered-net solutions are characterised by a safer capturing distance, a passive angular momentum damping effect and the highest flexibility to unknown shape, material and attitude of the target to interface with. They also allow not considering the centre of gravity alignment with thrust axis as a constraint, as it is for any rigid link solution. Furthermore, the introduction of a closing thread around the net perimeter ensures safer and more reliable grasping and holding. In the paper, a six degrees of freedom multibody dynamics simulator is presented: it was developed at Politecnico di Milano - Department of Aerospace Science and Technologies - and it is able to describe the orbital and attitude dynamics of tethered-nets systems and end-bodies during different phases, with great flexibility in dealing with different topologies and configurations. Critical phases as impact and wrapping are analysed by simulation to address the tethered-stack controllability. It is shown how the role of contact modelling is fundamental to describe the coupled dynamics: it is demonstrated, as a major novel contribution, how friction between the net and a tumbling target allows reducing its angular motion, stabilizing the system and allowing safer towing operations. Moreover, the so-called tethered space tug is analysed: after capture, the two objects, one passive and one active, are connected by the tethered-net flexible link, the motion of the system being excited by the active spacecraft thrusters. The critical modes prevention during this phase, by means of a closed-loop control synthesis is shown. Finally, the connection between

  19. Nonlinear normal modes in electrodynamic systems: A nonperturbative approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kudrin, A. V., E-mail: kud@rf.unn.ru; Kudrina, O. A.; Petrov, E. Yu.

    2016-06-15

    We consider electromagnetic nonlinear normal modes in cylindrical cavity resonators filled with a nonlinear nondispersive medium. The key feature of the analysis is that exact analytic solutions of the nonlinear field equations are employed to study the mode properties in detail. Based on such a nonperturbative approach, we rigorously prove that the total energy of free nonlinear oscillations in a distributed conservative system, such as that considered in our work, can exactly coincide with the sum of energies of the normal modes of the system. This fact implies that the energy orthogonality property, which has so far been known tomore » hold only for linear oscillations and fields, can also be observed in a nonlinear oscillatory system.« less

  20. Protection of children in forward-facing child restraint systems during oblique side impact sled tests: Intrusion and tether effects.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Hans W; Humm, John R; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Kaufman, Bruce; Kim, Jinyong; Maltese, Matthew R; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2016-09-01

    Testing was conducted to quantify the kinematics, potential for head impact, and influence on head injury metrics for a center-seated Q3s in a forward-facing child restraint system (FFCRS) in oblique impacts. The influences of a tether and intruded door on these measures were explored. Nine lateral oblique sled tests were conducted on a convertible forward-facing child restraint seat (FFCRS). The FFCRSs were secured to a bench seat from a popular production small SUV at the center seating position utilizing the lower anchor and tether for children (LATCH). The vehicle seat was fixed on the sled carriage at 60° and 80° from full frontal (30° and 10° forward rotation from pure lateral) providing an oblique lateral acceleration to the Q3s and FFCRS. A structure simulating an intruded door was mounted to the near (left) side of vehicle seat. The sled input acceleration was the proposed FMVSS 213 lateral pulse scaled to a 35 km/h delta-V. Tests were conducted with and without the tether attached to the FFCRS. Results indicate the influence of the tether on kinematics and injury measures in oblique side impact crashes for a center- or far-side-seated child occupant. All tests without a tether resulted in head contact with the simulated door, and 2 tests at the less oblique angle (80°) with a tether also resulted in head contact. No head-to-door contact was observed in 2 tests utilizing a tether. High-speed video analysis showed that the head moved beyond the CRS head side wings and made contact with the simulated intruded door. Head injury criterion (HIC) 15 median values were 589 without the tether vs. 332 with the tether attached. Tests utilizing a tether had less lateral head excursion than tests without a tether (median 400 vs. 442 mm). These tests demonstrate the important role of the tether in controlling head excursion for center- or far-side-seated child occupants in oblique side impact crashes and limiting the head injury potential with an intruded door

  1. Space Environmental Effects on Coated Tether Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gittemeier, Keith A.; Hawk, Clark W.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville s Propulsion Research Center has teamed with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to research the effects of atomic oxygen (AO) bombardment on coated tether materials. Tethers Unlimited Inc. has provided several candidate tether materials with various coatings for AO exposure in MSFC s Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility. Additional samples were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation at MSFC. AO erodes most organic materials, and ultraviolet radiation embrittles polymers. This test series was performed to determine the effect of AO and UV on the mechanical integrity of tether materials that were treated with AO-protective coatings, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) or metallization. Both TUI's Multi-Application Survivable Tether (MAST) Experiment and Marshall Space Flight Center s Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) programs will benefit from this research by helping to determine tether materials and coatings that give the longest life with the lowest mass penalty.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Effects on Coated Tether Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gittemeier, Keith A.; Hawk, Clark W.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville s Propulsion Research Center has teamed with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to research the effects of atomic oxygen (AO) bombardment on coated tether materials. Tethers Unlimited Inc. has provided several candidate tether materials with various coatings for (AO) exposure in MSFC's Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility. Additional samples were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation at MSFC. AO erodes most organic materials, and ultraviolet radiation embrittles polymers. This test series was performed to determine the effect of AO and UV on the mechanical integrity of tether materials that were treated with AO-protective coatings, such as Photosil or metallization. Both TUI's Multi-Application Survivable Tether (MAST) Experiment and Marshall Space Flight Center's Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) programs will benefit from this research by helping to determine tether materials and coatings that give the longest life with the lowest mass penalty.

  3. Chaotic Motions in the Dynamics of Space Tethered Systems. 1. Analysis of the Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozhenko, A. V.

    The determined-chaos phenomenon in the dynamics of space tethered systems is analyzed. A model problem, the essence of stochastic regimes of motion in the oscillation of masses in the internal degrees of freedom is formulated. A number of calculus approaches to the phenomenon is considered and the supposition is made that it is impossible to define the essence of the phenomenon by the mathematical methods traditional for mechanics.

  4. Lifting options for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering: advantages of tethered balloon systems.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Peter; Burgoyne, Chris; Hunt, Hugh; Causier, Matt

    2012-09-13

    The Royal Society report 'Geoengineering the Climate' identified solar radiation management using albedo-enhancing aerosols injected into the stratosphere as the most affordable and effective option for geoengineering, but did not consider in any detail the options for delivery. This paper provides outline engineering analyses of the options, both for batch-delivery processes, following up on previous work for artillery shells, missiles, aircraft and free-flying balloons, as well as a more lengthy analysis of continuous-delivery systems that require a pipe connected to the ground and supported at a height of 20 km, either by a tower or by a tethered balloon. Towers are shown not to be practical, but a tethered balloon delivery system, with high-pressure pumping, appears to have much lower operating and capital costs than all other delivery options. Instead of transporting sulphuric acid mist precursors, such a system could also be used to transport slurries of high refractive index particles such as coated titanium dioxide. The use of such particles would allow useful experiments on opacity, coagulation and atmospheric chemistry at modest rates so as not to perturb regional or global climatic conditions, thus reducing scale-up risks. Criteria for particle choice are discussed, including the need to minimize or prevent ozone destruction. The paper estimates the time scales and relatively modest costs required if a tethered balloon system were to be introduced in a measured way with testing and development work proceeding over three decades, rather than in an emergency. The manufacture of a tether capable of sustaining the high tensions and internal pressures needed, as well as strong winds, is a significant challenge, as is the development of the necessary pumping and dispersion technologies. The greatest challenge may be the manufacture and launch of very large balloons, but means have been identified to significantly reduce the size of such balloons or aerostats.

  5. Overload control of artificial gravity facility using spinning tether system for high eccentricity transfer orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Xing-wang; Li, Ai-jun; Tian, Hao-chang; Wang, Chang-qing; Lu, Hong-shi

    2018-06-01

    As the major part of space life supporting systems, artificial gravity requires further study before it becomes mature. Spinning tether system is a good alternative solution to provide artificial gravity for the whole spacecraft other than additional devices, and its longer tether length could significantly reduce spinning velocity and thus enhance comfortability. An approximated overload-based feedback method is proposed to provide estimated spinning velocity signals for controller, so that gravity level could be accurately controlled without complicated GPS modules. System behavior in high eccentricity transfer orbits is also studied to give a complete knowledge of the spinning stabilities. The application range of the proposed method is studied in various orbit cases and spinning velocities, indicating that it is accurate and reliable for most of the mission phases especially for the final constant gravity level phase. In order to provide stable gravity level for transfer orbit missions, a sliding mode controller based on estimated angular signals is designed for closed-loop control. Numerical results indicate that the combination of overload-based feedback and sliding mode controller could satisfy most of the long-term artificial gravity missions. It is capable of forming flexible gravity environment in relatively good accuracy even in the lowest possible orbital radiuses and high eccentricity orbits of crewed space missions. The proposed scheme provides an effective tether solution for the artificial gravity construction in interstellar travel.

  6. Study of an orbiting tethered dumbbell system having positive orbital energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, David A.

    1988-01-01

    For very long tethered systems the sum of the kinetic and potential energy can be positive. The system remains in a circular orbit as long as the masses remain vertically aligned. The system is unstable without constant control of the alignment. If the upper mass rotates forward in the direction of the orbital motion, the system escapes out of orbit. If the upper mass rotates backward, the system falls out of orbit and the lower mass impacts the body around which the system is orbiting.

  7. A magnetic tether system to investigate visual and olfactory mediated flight control in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Duistermars, Brian J; Frye, Mark

    2008-11-21

    It has been clear for many years that insects use visual cues to stabilize their heading in a wind stream. Many animals track odors carried in the wind. As such, visual stabilization of upwind tracking directly aids in odor tracking. But do olfactory signals directly influence visual tracking behavior independently from wind cues? Also, the recent deluge of research on the neurophysiology and neurobehavioral genetics of olfaction in Drosophila has motivated ever more technically sophisticated and quantitative behavioral assays. Here, we modified a magnetic tether system originally devised for vision experiments by equipping the arena with narrow laminar flow odor plumes. A fly is glued to a small steel pin and suspended in a magnetic field that enables it to yaw freely. Small diameter food odor plumes are directed downward over the fly's head, eliciting stable tracking by a hungry fly. Here we focus on the critical mechanics of tethering, aligning the magnets, devising the odor plume, and confirming stable odor tracking.

  8. Bistatic LIDAR experiment proposed for the shuttle/tethered satellite system missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Spense, H. E.; Karl, R. R.; Horak, H. G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    A new experiment concept has been proposed for the shuttle/tethered satellite system missions, which can provide high resolution, global density mappings of certain ionospheric species. The technique utilizes bistatic LIDAR to take advantage of the unique dual platform configuration offered by these missions. A tuned, shuttle-based laser is used to excite a column of the atmosphere adjacent to the tethered satellite, while triangulating photometic detectors on the satellite are employed to measure the fluorescence from sections of the column. The fluorescent intensity at the detectors is increased about six decades over both ground-based and monostatic shuttle-based LIDAR sounding of the same region. In addition, the orbital motion of the Shuttle provides for quasi-global mapping unattainable with ground-based observations. Since this technique provides such vastly improved resolution on a synoptic scale, many important middle atmospheric studies, heretofore untenable, may soon be addressed.

  9. A tethering system for direct measurement of cardiovascular function in the caged baboon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    A device suitable for the continuous measurement of physiological activity in large, conscious monkeys has permitted the direct recording of systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate in caged baboons. The device comprises a lightweight fiberglass backpack, retained in place on the baboon by a thoracic elastic band and shoulder straps, and a flexible stainless steel tether connecting the pack to an electrocannular slip-ring in the top center of the baboon's cage. A chronically indwelling arterial catheter inserted retrograde into the abdominal aorta via the internal iliac artery and connected to a small pressure transducer on the pack provides direct measurement of blood pressure and heart rate. Body fluids can be sampled or drugs administered via an indwelling catheter in the inferior vena cava. Electrical and fluid connections between the fiberglass pack and recording and infusion equipment located outside the cage pass through the flexible tether and remain protected from the subject. The reliability of the tethering system has been demonstrated in physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral experiments with baboons.

  10. Effect of mass variation on dynamics of tethered system in orbital maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liang; Zhao, Guowei; Huang, Hai

    2018-05-01

    In orbital maneuvering, the mass variation due to fuel consumption has an obvious impact on the dynamics of tethered system, which cannot be neglected. The contributions of the work are mainly shown in two aspects: 1) the improvement of the model; 2) the analysis of dynamics characteristics. As the mass is variable, and the derivative of the mass is directly considered in the traditional Lagrange equation, the expression of generalized force is complicated. To solve this problem, the coagulated derivative is adopted in the paper; besides, the attitude dynamics equations derived in this paper take into account the effect of mass variation and the drift of orbital trajectory at the same time. The bifurcation phenomenon, the pendular motion angular frequency, and amplitudes of tether vibration revealed in this paper can provide a reference for the parameters and controller design in practical engineering. In the article, a dumbbell model is adopted to analyze the dynamics of tethered system, in which the mass variation of base satellite is fully considered. Considering the practical application, the case of orbital transfer under a transversal thrust is mainly studied. Besides, compared with the analytical solutions of librational angles, the effects of mass variation on stability and librational characteristic are studied. Finally, in order to make an analysis of the effect on vibrational characteristic, a lumped model is introduced, which reveals a strong coupling of librational and vibrational characteristics.

  11. Tethered Satellites as an Enabling Platform for Operational Space Weather Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian E.; Krause, Linda Habash; Gallagher, Dennis Lee; Bilen, Sven Gunnar; Fuhrhop, Keith; Hoegy, Walt R.; Inderesan, Rohini; Johnson, Charles; Owens, Jerry Keith; Powers, Joseph; hide

    2013-01-01

    Tethered satellites offer the potential to be an important enabling technology to support operational space weather monitoring systems. Space weather "nowcasting" and forecasting models rely on assimilation of near-real-time (NRT) space environment data to provide warnings for storm events and deleterious effects on the global societal infrastructure. Typically, these models are initialized by a climatological model to provide "most probable distributions" of environmental parameters as a function of time and space. The process of NRT data assimilation gently pulls the climate model closer toward the observed state (e.g., via Kalman smoothing) for nowcasting, and forecasting is achieved through a set of iterative semi-empirical physics-based forward-prediction calculations. Many challenges are associated with the development of an operational system, from the top-level architecture (e.g., the required space weather observatories to meet the spatial and temporal requirements of these models) down to the individual instruments capable of making the NRT measurements. This study focuses on the latter challenge: we present some examples of how tethered satellites (from 100s of m to 20 km) are uniquely suited to address certain shortfalls in our ability to measure critical environmental parameters necessary to drive these space weather models. Examples include long baseline electric field measurements, magnetized ionospheric conductivity measurements, and the ability to separate temporal from spatial irregularities in environmental parameters. Tethered satellite functional requirements are presented for two examples of space environment observables.

  12. Optimal Orbit Maneuvers with Electrodynamic Tethers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    orbital elements , which completely describe a unique orbit ; equinoctial elements are not employed but left for future iterations of the formulation...periods in the maneuver. Follow on work, uch as the transformation of this state vector from classical orbital elements to the quinoctial set of...

  13. Plasma contactor design for electrodynamic tether applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.; Laupa, Thomas G.

    1988-01-01

    The plasma contacting process is described and experiments are discussed that suggest the key role that cold ions play in establishing a low impedance plasma bridge that can conduct current in either direction between a contactor electrode and a dilute plasma. A ring cusp contactor is shown to provide from 1000-mA of electron emission to 500-mA of electron collection as its bias relative to a simulated space plasma is varied through an 80-v range.

  14. Energy dissipation/transfer and stable attitude of spatial on-orbit tethered system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weipeng; Song, Mingzhe; Deng, Zichen

    2018-01-01

    For the Tethered Satellite System, the coupling between the platform system and the solar panel is a challenge in the dynamic analysis. In this paper, the coupling dynamic behaviors of the Tethered Satellite System that is idealized as a planar flexible damping beam-spring-mass composite system are investigated via a structure-preserving method. Considering the coupling between the plane motion of the system, the oscillation of the spring and the transverse vibration of the beam, the dynamic model of the composite system is established based on the Hamiltonian variational principle. A symplectic dimensionality reduction method is proposed to decouple the dynamic system into two subsystems approximately. Employing the complex structure-preserving approach presented in our previous work, numerical iterations are performed between the two subsystems with weak damping to study the energy dissipation/transfer in the composite system, the effect of the spring stiffness on the energy distribution and the effect of the particle mass on the stability of the composite system. The numerical results show that: the energy transfer approach is uniquely determined by the initial attitude angle, while the energy dissipation speed is mainly depending on the initial attitude angle and the spring stiffness besides the weak damping. In addition, the mass ratio between the platform system and the solar panel determines the stable state as well as the time needed to reach the stable state of the composite system. The numerical approach presented in this paper provides a new way to deal with the coupling dynamic system and the conclusions obtained give some useful advices on the overall design of the Tethered Satellite System.

  15. Tethered gravity laboratories study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchetti, F.

    1990-01-01

    The scope of the study is to investigate ways of controlling the microgravity environment of the International Space Station by means of a tethered system. Four main study tasks were performed. First, researchers analyzed the utilization of the tether systems to improve the lowest possible steady gravity level on the Space Station and the tether capability to actively control the center of gravity position in order to compensate for activities that would upset the mass distribution of the Station. The purpose of the second task was to evaluate the whole of the experiments performable in a variable gravity environment and the related beneficial residual accelerations, both for pure and applied research in the fields of fluid, materials, and life science, so as to assess the relevance of a variable g-level laboratory. The third task involves the Tethered Variable Gravity Laboratory. The use of the facility that would crawl along a deployed tether and expose experiments to varying intensities of reduced gravity is discussed. Last, a study performed on the Attitude Tether Stabilizer concept is discussed. The stabilization effect of ballast masses tethered to the Space Station was investigated as a means of assisting the attitude control system of the Station.

  16. The Science and Applications Tethered Platform (SATP) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merlina, P.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of tether systems in orbit are going to be demonstrated by the first planned flights of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS). These test flights will investigate the properties of tether systems as low altitude atmospheric research facilities and as electric power generators. Studies are being conducted with the purpose of testing a variety of concepts and approaches. A comparative analysis of results will allow the choosing of the most promising ideas for further development. The broad range of applications presently under study include applications in electrodynamics, transportation, microgravity in addition to basic research. The SATP project definition study is now about midway through its first phase. The analyses conducted have led to an appraisal of users interest in the project and to a deeper understanding of the problems associated with large, long-lived tether systems in space. In addition, two specialized platform designs, devoted to microgravity and precise pointing applications, are being studied because of their potential usefulness and the promise of technical feasibility.

  17. Design Rules and Analysis of a Capture Mechanism for Rendezvous between a Space Tether and Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Kirk F.; Canfield, Stephen L.; Norris, Marshall A.

    2006-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems have been proposed to serve as an "upper stage in space". A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum through electrodynamic thrust, minimizing the use of propellant. One of the primary challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether system as identified by the 2003 MXER Technology Assessment Group is in the development of a mechanism that will enable the processes of capture, carry and release of a payload by the rotating tether as required by the MXER tether approach. This paper will present a concept that will achieve the desired goals of the capture system. This solution is presented as a multi-DOF (degree-of-freedom) capture mechanism with nearly passive operation that features matching of the capture space and expected window of capture error, efficient use of mass and nearly passive actuation during the capture process. This paper will describe the proposed capture mechanism concept and provide an evaluation of the concept through a dynamic model and experimental tests performed on a prototype article of the mechanism in a dynamically similar environment. This paper will also develop a set of rules to guide the design of such a capture mechanism based on analytical and experimental analyses. The primary contributions of this paper will be a description of the proposed capture mechanism concept, a collection of rules to guide its design, and empirical and model information that can be used to evaluate the capability of the concept

  18. T-Rex: A Japanese Space Tether Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    serves both to drive the current and then to act on the current to decelerate the system. One of the most important features of tether thrusters is that they use renewable energy sources to drive the electrical current flow in either the orbit-raising or orbit-lowering modes. Sources inherent to Earth orbit are used. To raise the orbit, sunlight can be converted to the electrical energy required to drive the tether current. To lower the orbit, the orbital energy itself (supplied by the Earth-to-orbit launcher when it raises the system into orbit) is the energy source of the tether current via the action of the Lorentz Force. Electrodynamic tethers can be directly applied to a wide spectrum of uses in space. As a propulsion system, they include satellite de-orbit, transfer of a satellite from one orbit to another, altitude maintenance for large spacecraft such as the International Space Station, and since it works wherever there is a magnetic field and an ionosphere planetary exploration missions. An electrodynamic tether upper stage could be used as an Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) to move payloads within low earth orbit. The OTV would rendezvous with the payload and launch vehicle, grapple the payload and maneuver it to a new orbital altitude or inclination without the use of boost propellant. The tug could then lower its orbit to rendezvous with the next payload and repeat the process. Conceivably, such a system could perform several orbital maneuvering assignments without resupply, making it relatively inexpensive to operate.

  19. Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    1998-01-01

    This final report summarizes some of the important scientific contributions to the Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) investigation, to the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) mission, and to NASA that resulted from the work carried out under this contract at Carmel Research Center. These include Dr. Intriligator's participation in the PIT for the TSS-1R simulations and flight, her participation in ROPE team meetings and IWG meetings, her scientific analyses, and her writing and submitting technical papers to scientific journals. The scientific analyses concentrated on the characterization of energetic ions and their possible relation to pickup ion effects, correlation of particle and other effects (e.g., magnetic field, satellite surface), and collaboration with theorists including with ROPE co-investigators. In addition, scientific analyses were carried out of the effects due to satellite gas releases.

  20. Tethered Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Lynden

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a familymore » of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.« less

  1. Feasibility Study of Space Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, Stephen J.; Leete, Stephen J.; Jaffe, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of two-stage Space-Based Solar Power to Tethered Aerostat to Earth (SSP-TA) system architectures that offer significant advantages over conventional single stage space-to-earth architectures is being studied. There have been many proposals for the transmission of solar power collected in space to the surface of the earth so that solar energy could provide a major part of the electric power requirements on earth. There are, however, serious difficulties in implementing the single stage space-based solar power systems that have been previously studied. These difficulties arise due to: i) the cost of transporting the components needed for the extremely large microwave transmit beaming aperture into space orbit, ii) the even larger collection apertures required on earth, iii) the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) a lack of flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. Two candidate system architectures are described here to overcome these difficulties. In both cases a two-stage space to tethered aerostat to earth transmission system (SSP-TA) is proposed. The use of high altitude tethered aerostats (or powered airships) avoids the effects of attenuation of EM energy propagating through the earth s lower atmosphere. This allows the use of beaming frequencies to be chosen from the range of high millimeter (THz) to near-infra-red (NIR) to the visible. This has the potential for: i) greatly reduced transportation costs to space, ii) much smaller receiver collection apertures and ground stations, iii) elimination of the potential radiation hazard to personnel and equipment on earth, and iv) ease in transportation and flexibility in location of the collection station on the earth. A preliminary comparison of system performance and efficiencies is presented.

  2. Avionics Tether Operations Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    2001-01-01

    The activities described in this Final Report were authorized and performed under Purchase Order Number H32835D, issued as part of NASA contract number NAS8-00114. The period of performance of this PO was from March 1 to September 30, 2001. The primary work activity was the continued development and updating of the tether dynamic simulation tools GTOSS (Generalized Tethered Object System Simulation) and TSSIM (Tethered Satellite System) and use of these and other tools in the analysis of various tether dynamics problems. Several updated versions of GTOSS were delivered during the period of performance by the author of the simulation, Lang Associates' David Lang. These updates had mainly to do with updated documentation and an updated coordinate system definition to the J2000 standards. This Final Report is organized by the months in which the activities described were performed. The following sections review the Statement of Work (SOW) and activities performed to satisfy it.

  3. Middle atmospheric electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of the advances made during the last few years with respect to the study of the electrodynamics in the earth's middle atmosphere. In a report of the experimental work conducted, attention is given to large middle atmospheric electric fields, the downward coupling of high altitude processes into the middle atmosphere, and upward coupling of tropospheric processes into the middle atmosphere. It is pointed out that new developments in tethered balloons and superpressure balloons should greatly increase the measurement duration of earth-ionospheric potential measurements and of stratospheric electric field measurements in the next few years. Theoretical work considered provides an excellent starting point for study of upward coupling of transient and dc electric fields. Hays and Roble (1979) were the first to construct a model which included orographic features as well as the classical thunderstorm generator.

  4. Study on figure-eight-shaped coil electrodynamic suspension magnetic levitation systems without cross-connection

    SciTech Connect

    Ribani, P.L.; Urbano, N.

    2000-01-01

    Two figure-eight-shaped coils for electrodynamic suspension (EDS) magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) systems without cross-connection are proposed and analyzed. The guideway coils are positioned under the MAGLEV vehicle; they are parallel to the horizontal plane. The interaction of a magnetic module on the vehicle, composed of three or four superconducting (SC) coils, with a guideway module, comprised of two figure-eight coils, is studied by means of the dynamic circuit theory. The currents in the SC coils are supposed to be constant in time while they move as a rigid body, with a constant velocity. Some results are presented and compared with thosemore » for a standard side-wall cross-connected system.« less

  5. ARM Tethered Balloon System & AALCO Activities at AMF3 Site at Oliktok Point, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardesty, J.; Dexheimer, D.; Mei, F.; Roesler, E. L.; Longbottom, C.; Hillman, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has operated the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's (ARM) third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) and the restricted airspace associated with it at Oliktok Point, Alaska, since October 2013. The site hosts ground-based instrumentation which collects a variety of continuous atmospheric measurements as well as user-conducted unmanned aircraft and tethered balloon campaigns. SNL has operated ARM's tethered balloon system (TBS) as part of the Inaugural Campaigns for ARM Research using Unmanned Systems (ICARUS) since 2016. AALCO (Aerial Assessment of Liquid in Clouds at Oliktok), is an ARM Intensive Operations Period conducted by SNL at the AMF3 since 2016. The operation of the TBS during ICARUS and AALCO to altitudes above 4,000' AGL in a variety of seasons and conditions is addressed. A Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system and supercooled liquid water content (SLWC) sensors have been deployed under both campaigns. The performance of these sensors is discussed and results are presented. DTS measurements and their relationship to concurrent temperature measurements from unmanned aircraft and radiosondes are shown. SLWC sensor in situ measurements are compared with microwave radiometer and radiosonde-derived measurements. Preliminary analysis of using Large Eddy Simulations to compare with the SLWC measurements reveals three-dimensional properties of the observed clouds.

  6. Currents between tethered electrodes in a magnetized laboratory plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on important plasma physics issues of electrodynamic tethers were performed. These included current propagation, formation of wave wings, limits of current collection, nonlinear effects and instabilities, charging phenomena, and characteristics of transmission lines in plasmas. The experiments were conducted in a large afterglow plasma. The current system was established with a small electron-emitting hot cathode tethered to an electron-collecting anode, both movable across the magnetic field and energized by potential difference up to V approx.=100 T(sub e). The total current density in space and time was obtained from complete measurements of the perturbed magnetic field. The fast spacecraft motion was reproduced in the laboratory by moving the tethered electrodes in small increments, applying delayed current pulses, and reconstructing the net field by a linear superposition of locally emitted wavelets. With this technique, the small-amplitude dc current pattern is shown to form whistler wings at each electrode instead of the generally accepted Alfven wings. For the beam electrode, the whistler wing separates from the field-aligned beam which carries no net current. Large amplitude return currents to a stationary anode generate current-driven microinstabilities, parallel electric fields, ion depletions, current disruptions and time-varying electrode charging. At appropriately high potentials and neutral densities, excess neutrals are ionized near the anode. The anode sheath emits high-frequency electron transit-time oscillations at the sheath-plasma resonance. The beam generates Langmuir turbulence, ion sound turbulence, electron heating, space charge fields, and Hall currents. An insulated, perfectly conducting transmission line embedded in the plasma becomes lossy due to excitation of whistler waves and magnetic field diffusion effects. The implications of the laboratory observations on electrodynamic tethers in space are discussed.

  7. A revolutionary and operational tethered aerostat system illustrating new LTA technology. [for ground-air-ground communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menke, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    An operational tethered aerostat system, which demonstrates utility of LTA systems, is described. It was made possible by development of a reliable tethered aerostat that is used to support broadcast equipment at an altitude of 10,000 feet. Two elements of the TCOM system, the aerostat and mooring station, are particularly relevant to the LTA Workshop. They demonstrate the feasibility of using LTA vehicles in real, operational, all-weather applications and, in addition, illustrate an advance in the overall technology base of LTA. The aerostat and the mooring station, including their technical design features and demonstrated performance characteristics, are described.

  8. In-Space Transportation with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    1999-01-01

    Any analysis of electrodynamic tethers for Space Station applications will soon arrive at the conclusion that currents on the order of 10 A are required. For power generation, we have to foresee needs of several kilowatts even for an emergency backup system. For reboost, we need thrust forces on the order of a Newton, due to the large aerodynamic drag of the Station. In addition, we are restricted by the need to keep perturbations to the Station environment to a minimum. Very long tethers are ruled out by this condition, as they would move the system's center of gravity too much and pose additional operational problems when the Station is docking with other spacecraft. It is easy to show that "standard" tether systems, such as TSS-1, which rely on a large spherical surface to collect electron current from the ionosphere, are unsuitable for ISS applications. A study conducted by MSFC into the possible use of the TSS - 1/R system on the Space Station came to the conclusion that it did not make sense. A quick calculation, using the 10 A benchmark, shows why. TSS-LR collected I A, while the satellite was biased to 1.5 kV. This was twice what had been predicted. Even so, the current collected by the satellite was observed to increase only as the square root of the bias voltage. Thus, to achieve 10 A with the TSS-1 system under the same (daytime) conditions would require a bias voltage of 150 kV, or a tether length of over 850 km! Going to a larger surface would help some, but there is a strong law of diminishing returns for that route. Even if very large spheres were to be allowed (say of 8 m radius), which might achieve useful power levels during optimal conditions of daytime plasma densities with a tether 10 km long, they would suffer from the other Achilles heel of passive spherical collectors: a strong drop in the current (and power goes as the square of the current), as the low plasma densities are encountered during the third of the orbit which is in the Earth

  9. Corrigendum to "Dynamics of a flexible tethered satellite system utilising various materials for coplanar and non-coplanar models" [Adv. Space Res. 56 (2015) 648-663

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Aaron Aw Teik; Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2015-12-01

    The authors would like to thank Dr. N.A. Ismail for some of the discussions found in her thesis as these discussions have facilitated to achieve some of the results published in this article. Therefore, Ismail, N.A., "The Dynamics of a Flexible Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether (MMET)", PhD. thesis, University of Glasgow, UK, pp. 26-41, 2012 is cited accordingly herein. The thesis was missed out from the reference list in the original version of this article due to an oversight with no other intention. Similarly the thesis by Stevens, R.E., "Optimal Control of Electrodynamic Tether Satellites", PhD. thesis, Air Force Institute of Technology, USA, pp. 87-96, 2008 is referred for a further readership completeness.

  10. Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie is of NASA's Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System experiment (ProSEDS). ProSEDS will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether, basically a long, thin wire, for propulsion. An electrodynamic tether uses the same principles as electric motors in toys, appliances and computer disk drives, and generators in automobiles and power plants. When electrical current is flowing through the tether, a magnetic field is produced that pushes against the magnetic field of the Earth. For ProSEDS, the current in the tether results by virtue of the voltage generated when the tether moves through the Earth's magnetic field at more than 17,000 mph. This approach can produce drag thrust generating useable power. Since electrodynamic tethers require no propellant, they could substantially reduce the weight of the spacecraft and provide a cost-effective method of reboosting spacecraft. The tether would be a 3.1-mile (5 kilometer) long, ultrathin base-wire tether connected with a 6.2-mile (10 kilometer) long nonconducting tether. The ProSEDS experiment is managed by the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Optimization of motion control laws for tether crawler or elevator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Frank R.; Von Tiesenhausen, Georg

    1988-01-01

    Based on the proposal of a motion control law by Lorenzini (1987), a method is developed for optimizing motion control laws for tether crawler or elevator systems in terms of the performance measures of travel time, the smoothness of acceleration and deceleration, and the maximum values of velocity and acceleration. The Lorenzini motion control law, based on powers of the hyperbolic tangent function, is modified by the addition of a constant-velocity section, and this modified function is then optimized by parameter selections to minimize the peak acceleration value for a selected travel time or to minimize travel time for the selected peak values of velocity and acceleration. It is shown that the addition of a constant-velocity segment permits further optimization of the motion control law performance.

  12. A corrected tether-mission to Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Arriaga, G.; Charro, M.

    2012-09-01

    A spacecraft slowly descending in equatorial orbit through the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter over a period of months would provide a wealth of knowledge through space and time resolved observations. An electrodynamic (ED) bare-foil tether has been proposed as allowing a spacecraft to attain a circular orbit below Jovian radiation belts and Halo ring (so as to then carry out scientific observations) using Lorentz drag on the current induced in the tether for orbit insertion, followed by a series of perijove passes to progressively lower the apojove. Accumulated radiation dose was reasonable when using a 50 km long tether. It was recently shown, however, that electron collection by the tether would then be in a relativistic regime. This yields a penetration depth in aluminum exceeding foil thickness. Reducing the length to 10 km is here proposed, followed by a reconsideration of the scientific mission objectives.

  13. Electric Sail (E-Sail) Tether Team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-03

    Electric Sail (E-Sail) Tether Team Discusses 6U CubeSat Test Article and Tether Deployment System (Right to left: Tom Bryan, Davis Hunter (student intern), Jonathan MacArthur (student intern), Charles Cowen, Mike Tinker)

  14. Bekenstein inequalities and nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñafiel, M. L.; Falciano, F. T.

    2017-12-01

    Bekenstein and Mayo proposed a generalized bound for the entropy, which implies some inequalities between the charge, energy, angular momentum, and size of the macroscopic system. Dain has shown that Maxwell's electrodynamics satisfies all three inequalities. We investigate the validity of these relations in the context of nonlinear electrodynamics and show that Born-Infeld electrodynamics satisfies all of them. However, contrary to the linear theory, there is no rigidity statement in Born-Infeld. We study the physical meaning and the relationship between these inequalities, and in particular, we analyze the connection between the energy-angular momentum inequality and causality.

  15. Tethers in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Les; Bilén, Sven G.; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Krause, Linda Habash

    2017-09-01

    This Special Section of Acta Astronautica contains several peer-reviewed papers selected from among those presented at the Fifth International Conference on Tethers in Space (TiS2016). After a hiatus of 21 years since the last Conference on Tethers in Space, TiS2016 brought together experts, practitioners, and other interested in space tethers and related fields. TiS2016 was held May 24-26, 2016 at The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A. Leveraging the hard work of a great many volunteers, the conference co-chairs Prof. Brian Gilchrist and Prof. Sven Bilén welcomed an international contingent with authors from the U.S., Canada, Japan, Spain, China, Finland, Estonia, and Italy. The community provided updates on what has transpired since their last gathering by providing lessons learned; describing new technologies and subsystems; and proposing new tether missions and applications. Papers overviewed de-orbit systems, power generation, orbital maneuvering, momentum capture, debris removal, space tugs, space elevators, collision avoidance, and tether dynamics, among others.

  16. Space Tethers: Design Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlin, D. D.; Faile, G. C.; Hayashida, K. B.; Frost, C. L.; Wagner, C. Y.; Mitchell, M. L.; Vaughn, J. A.; Galuska, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is prepared to provide a systematic process for the selection of tethers for space applications. Criteria arc provided for determining the strength requirement for tether missions and for mission success from tether severing due to micrometeoroids and orbital debris particle impacts. Background information of materials for use in space tethers is provided, including electricity-conducting tethers. Dynamic considerations for tether selection is also provided. Safety, quality, and reliability considerations are provided for a tether project.

  17. Tethered orbital propellant depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, D. A.; Rudolph, L. K.; Kiefel, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A planned function of the Space Station is to refurbish and refuel an advanced space-based LO2/LH2 orbit transfer vehicle. An alternative to propellant storage at the station is to use a remote facility tied to the station with a log tether. Preliminary design of such a facility is described with emphasis on fluid transfer and storage requirements. Using tether lengths of at least 300 ft, gravity gradient forces will dominate surface tension in such a system. Although gravity given transfer is difficult because of line pressure drops, fluid settling over the tank outlet greatly alleviates acquisition concerns and will facilitate vented tank fills. The major concern with a tethered orbital refueling facility is its considerable operational complexity including transport of the OTV to and from the facility.

  18. Proposed tethered unmanned aerial system for the detection of pollution entering the Chesapeake Bay area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, J.; McKay, J.; Evans, W.; Gadsden, S. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    This paper is based on a proposed unmanned aerial system platform that is to be outfitted with high-resolution sensors. The proposed system is to be tethered to a moveable ground station, which may be a research vessel or some form of ground vehicle (e.g., car, truck, or rover). The sensors include, at a minimum: camera, infrared sensor, thermal, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) camera, global positioning system (GPS), and a light-based radar (LIDAR). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of existing methods for pollution detection of failing septic systems, and to introduce the proposed system. Future work will look at the high-resolution data from the sensors and integrating the data through a process called information fusion. Typically, this process is done using the popular and well-published Kalman filter (or its nonlinear formulations, such as the extended Kalman filter). However, future work will look at using a new type of strategy based on variable structure estimation for the information fusion portion of the data processing. It is hypothesized that fusing data from the thermal and NDVI sensors will be more accurate and reliable for a multitude of applications, including the detection of pollution entering the Chesapeake Bay area.

  19. Towards routine measurements of meteorological and aerosol parameters using small unmanned aerial and tethered balloon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Dexheimer, D.; Hubbe, J. M.; deBoer, G.; Schmid, B.; Ivey, M.; Longbottom, C.; Carroll, P.

    2017-12-01

    The Inaugural Campaigns for ARM Research using Unmanned Systems (ICARUS) had been launched in 2016 and then the effort has been continued in 2017. ICARUS centered on Oliktok Point, Alaska focusses on developing routine operations of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and Tethered Balloon Systems (TBS). The operation routine practiced during ICARUS 2016 provided valuable guidance for the ICARUS 2017 deployment. During two intensive operation periods in 2017, a small DataHawk II UAS has been deployed to collect data for two weeks each in May and August. Coordinated with DataHawk flights, the TBS has been launched with meteorology sensors such as iMet and Tethersondes, therefore vertical profiles of the basic atmospheric state (temperature, humidity, and horizontal wind) were observed simultaneously by UAS and TBS. In addition, an aerosol payload was attached and launched with 2 TBS flights in April and 7 TBS flights in May, which include a condensation particle counter (CPC, TSI 3007) and two printed optical particle spectrometers (POPS, Handix TBS version). The two POPS were operated at different inlet temperatures. This approach provided potential measurements for aerosol optical closure in future. Measured aerosol properties include total particle number concentrations, particle size distribution, at different ambient temperature and relative humidity. Vertical profiles of atmospheric state and aerosol properties will be discussed based on the coordinated flights. Monthly variation will be assessed with data from the upcoming August flights.

  20. New Tether Ozonesonde System Developed for Uintah Basin Ozone Study in February, 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. J.; Cullis, P.; Wendell, J.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Albee, R.; Schnell, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    NOAA/ESRL/GMD participated in the February, 2012 UINTAH basin air quality campaign to measure ozone concentrations from surface to 300 meters above ground level. The study region, southwest of Vernal, Utah, is an active oil and gas production and exploration area. During the previous winter in 2011, an air quality study led by state and local agencies and Utah State University measured very high ozone at several sites, exceeding 140 ppbv centered near Ouray, Utah under shallow boundary layer with surface snow-cover conditions. The high ozone conditions never developed during the 2012 campaign. The weather remained dry and warm with typical ozone mixing rations ranging from 20 to 60 ppbv. In order to provide near continuous ozone profiles without consuming a balloon and ozonesonde for each sounding, a tether system was developed by the Global Monitoring Division based upon a motorized deep sea fishing rod and reel with 50 pound line. The lightweight system was shown to be rugged and reliable and capable of conducting an ascending and descending profile to 300 m within 90 minutes. Communication software and data loggers continuously monitor the radiosonde pressure to control the ascent/descent rates and altitude. The system can operate unmanned as it will ascend, descend and hold an altitude as controlled from a laptop computer located up to 30 m distant.

  1. Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System experiment (ProSEDS) will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether, basically a long, thin wire, for propulsion. An electrodynamic tether uses the same principles as electric motors in toys, appliances and computer disk drives, and generators in automobiles and power plants. When electrical current is flowing through the tether, a magnetic field is produced that pushes against the magnetic field of the Earth. For ProSEDS, the current in the tether results by virtue of the voltage generated when the tether moves through the Earth's magnetic field at more than 17,000 mph. This approach can produce drag thrust generating useable power. Since electrodynamic tethers require no propellant, they could substantially reduce the weight of the spacecraft and provide a cost-effective method of reboosting spacecraft. The initial flight of ProSEDS is scheduled to fly aboard an Air Force Delta II rocket in the summer of 2002. In orbit, ProSEDS will deploy from a Delta II second stage. It will be a 3.1-mile (5 kilometer) long, ultrathin base-wire cornected with a 6.2-mile (10 kilometer) long nonconducting tether. This photograph shows Less Johnson, a scientist at MSFC inspecting the nonconducting part of a tether as it exits a deployer similar to the one to be used in the ProSEDS experiment. The ProSEDS experiment is managed by the Space Transportation Directorate at MSFC.

  2. Adolescent and Caregiver use of a Tethered Personal Health Record System

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Matthew K.; Wilcox, Lauren; Feustel, Clayton; Wasileski-Masker, Karen; Olson, Thomas A.; Simoneaux, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Supporting adolescent patient engagement in care is an important yet underexplored topic in consumer health informatics. Personal Health Records (PHRs) show potential, but designing PHR systems to accommodate both emerging adults and their parents is challenging. We conducted a mixed-methods study with teenage adolescent patients (ages 13-17) with cancer and blood disorders, and their parents, to investigate their experiences with My-Chart, a tethered PHR system. Through analyses of usage logs and independently-conducted surveys and interviews, we found that patients and parents both valued MyChart, but had different views about the role of the PHR for care communication and management, and different attitudes about its impact on the patient’s ability to manage care. Specific motivations for using MyChart included patient–parent coordination of care activities, communication around hospital encounters, and support for transitioning to adult care. Finally, some parents had concerns about certain diagnostic test results being made available to their children. PMID:28269859

  3. Radar cross-section measurements and simulation of a tethered satellite. The small expendable deployer system end-mass payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Fralick, Dion T.; Vedeler, Erik

    1995-01-01

    The first Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS-1), a tethered satellite system, was developed by NASA and launched March 29, 1993 as a secondary payload on a United State Air Force (USAF) Delta-2 launch vehicle. The SEDS-1 successfully deployed an instrumented end-mass payload (EMP) on a 20-km nonconducting tether from the second stage of the Delta 2. This paper describes the effort of NASA Langley Research Center's Antenna and Microwave Research Branch to provide assistance to the SEDS Investigators Working Group (IWG) in determining EMP dynamics by analyzing the mission radar skin track data. The radar cross section measurements taken and simulations done for this study are described and comparisons of the measured data with the simulated data for the EMP at 6 GHz are presented.

  4. Orbital Injection of the SEDSAT Satellite: Tethered Systems Dynamics and Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Ruiz, Manuel; Pelaez, Jesus

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with the following topics which are all related to the orbital injection of the SEDSAT satellite: Dynamics and Stability of Tether Oscillations after the First Cut. The dynamics of the tether after the first cut (i.e., without the Shuttle attached to it) is investigated. The tether oscillations with the free end are analyzed in order to assess the stability of the rectilinear configuration in between the two tether cuts; analysis of Unstable Modes. The unstable modes that appear for high libration angles are further investigated in order to determine their occurrences and the possible transition from bound librations to rotations; Orbital Release Strategies for SEDSAT. A parametric analysis of the orbital decay rate of the SEDSAT satellite after the two tether cuts has been carried out as a function of the following free parameters: libration amplitude at the end of deployment, deviation angle from LV at the first cut, and orbital anomaly at the second cut. The values of these parameters that provide a minimum orbital decay rate of the satellite (after the two cuts) have been computed; and Dynamics and Control of SEDSAT. The deployment control law has been modified to cope with the new ejection velocity of the satellite from the Shuttle cargo bay. New reference profiles have been derived as well as new control parameters. Timing errors at the satellite release as a function of the variations of the initial conditions and the tension model parameters have been estimated for the modified control law.

  5. BOU: Development of a low-cost tethered balloon sensing system for monitoring the lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picos, Rodrigo; Lopez-Grifol, Alvaro; Martinez-Villagrassa, Daniel; Simó, Gemma; Wenger, Burkhard; Dünnermann, Jens; Jiménez, Maria Antonia; Cuxart, Joan

    2016-04-01

    The study of the atmospheric boundary layer, the lowest part of the atmosphere, and the processes that occur therein often requires the observation of vertical profiles of the main meteorological variables, i.e. air temperature and humidity, wind vector and barometric pressure. In particular, when the interest is focused on the air-surface interactions, a high vertical resolution over the first 500 m is required for the observations to describe the physical processes that occur immediately above the surface. Typically, these needs are covered with the use of captive balloons, which are helium-filled balloons tethered to a winch on the ground and a sensor package suspended a short distance below the balloon. Since the commercial version of such instrumental platforms are scarce and expensive, a new low-cost device has been developed in the last years: BOU (tethered Balloon sonde OWL-UIB). In this paper, we focus on the sensor package and data acquisition system part, that is able to fulfill the low-cost requirements. The system uses a low-cost Arduino Mega board as the processor, and stores all the data in a SD card, though an RF connection is also possible but more unreliable. The system has been configured to sample temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind speed, having also a magnetometer and an accelerometer. Sampling time was 1 second, though it was possible to set it faster. It is worth mentioning that the system is easily reconfigurable, and more sensors can be added. The system is powered by a Polymer battery of 1800mA , allowing the system to run continously for more than 6 hours. The temperature is acquired using three different sensors (a HYT 271 calibrated sensor with an accuracy of ±0.2 °C, plus the internal temperature sensors of the wind and pressure sensors, with accuracies around ±0.5 °C). The humidity is also sensed using the calibrated HYT 271 sensor, which features an accuracy of ±1.8%. Air pressure is sensed using a BMP080 sensor, which

  6. The role of tethers on space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of research and development that addressed the usefulness of tether applications in space, particularly for space station are described. A well organized and structured effort of considerable magnitude involving NASA, industry and academia have defined the engineering and technological requirements of space tethers and their broad range of economic and operational benefits. The work directed by seven NASA Field Centers is consolidated and structured to cover the general and specific roles of tethers in space as they apply to NASA's planned space station. This is followed by a description of tether systems and operations. A summary of NASA's plans for tether applications in space for years to come is given.

  7. Dynamics of tethered satellites in the vicinity of the Lagrangian point L2 of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baião, M. F.; Stuchi, T. J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamical evolution of satellites formed by two masses connected by a cable— tethered satellites. We derive the Lagrangian equations of motion in the neighborhood of the collinear equilibrium points, especially for the L2 , of the restricted problem of three bodies. The rigid body configuration is expanded in Legendre polynomials up to fourth degree. We present some numerical simulations of the influence of the parameters such as cable length, mass ratio and initial conditions in the behavior of the tethered satellites. The equation for the collinear equilibrium point is derived and numerically solved. The evolution of the equilibria with the variation of the cable length as a parameter is studied. We also present a discussion of the linear stability around these equilibria. Based on this analysis calculate some unstable Lyapunov orbits associated to these equilibrium points. We found periodic orbits in which the tether travels parallel to itself without involving the angular motion. The numerical applications are focused on the Earth-Moon system. However, the general character of the equations allows applications to the L1 equilibrium and obviously to systems other than the Earth-Moon.

  8. Artist's Concept of Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Pictured is an artist's concept of NASA's Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System experiment (ProSEDS). ProSEDS will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether, basically a long, thin wire, for propulsion. An electrodynamic tether uses the same principles as electric motors in toys, appliances and computer disk drives, and generators in automobiles and power plants. When electrical current is flowing through the tether, a magnetic field is produced that pushes against the magnetic field of the Earth. For ProSEDS, the current in the tether results by virtue of the voltage generated when the tether moves through the Earth's magnetic field at more than 17,000 mph. This approach can produce drag thrust generating useable power. Since electrodynamic tethers require no propellant, they could substantially reduce the weight of the spacecraft and provide a cost-effective method of reboosting spacecraft. The initial flight of ProSEDS is scheduled to fly aboard an Air Force Delta II rocket in summer of 2002. In orbit, ProSEDS will deploy from a Delta II second stage. It will be a 3.1-mile (5 kilometer) long, ultrathin base-wire tether cornected with a 6.2-mile (10 kilometer) long nonconducting tether. The ProSEDS experiment is managed by the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  9. Space Station tethered waste disposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupp, Charles C.

    1988-01-01

    The Shuttle Transportation System (STS) launches more payload to the Space Station than can be returned creating an accumulation of waste. Several methods of deorbiting the waste are compared including an OMV, solid rocket motors, and a tether system. The use of tethers is shown to offer the unique potential of having a net savings in STS launch requirement. Tether technology is being developed which can satisfy the deorbit requirements but additional effort is required in waste processing, packaging, and container design. The first step in developing this capability is already underway in the Small Expendable Deployer System program. A developmental flight test of a tether initiated recovery system is seen as the second step in the evolution of this capability.

  10. Snags hit tethered satellite mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuiling, Roelof

    1993-01-01

    The processing and course of the STS-46 Space Shuttle Atlantis mission are described. Problems experienced by the astronaut team in deploying the Tethered Satellite System during the mission are recounted.

  11. The dynamic phenomena of a tethered satellite: NASA's first Tethered Satellite Mission, TSS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.; Mowery, D. K.; Tomlin, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    The tethered satellite system (TSS) was envisioned as a means of extending a satellite from its base (space shuttle, space station, space platform) into a lower or higher altitude in order to more efficiently acquire data and perform science experiments. This is accomplished by attaching the satellite to a tether, deploying it, then reeling it in. When its mission is completed, the satellite can be returned to its base for reuse. If the tether contains a conductor, it can also be used as a means to generate and flow current to and from the satellite to the base. When current is flowed, the tether interacts with the Earth's magnetic field, deflecting the tether. When the current flows in one direction, the system becomes a propulsive system that can be used to boost the orbiting system. In the other direction, it is a power generating system. Pulsing the current sets up a dynamic oscillation in the tether, which can upset the satellite attitude and preclude docking. A basic problem occurs around 400-m tether length, during satellite retrieval when the satellite's pendulous (rotational) mode gets in resonance with the first lateral tether string mode. The problem's magnitude is determined by the amount of skiprope present coming into this resonance condition. This paper deals with the tethered satellite, its dynamic phenomena, and how the resulting problems were solved for the first tethered satellite mission (TSS-1). Proposals for improvements for future tethered satellite missions are included. Results from the first tethered satellite flight are summarized.

  12. Applications of Tethers in Space: Workshop Proceedings, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracat, W. A. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The complete documentation of the workshop including all addresses, panel reports, charts, and summaries are presented. This volume presents all the reports on the fundamentals of applications of tethers in space. These applications include electrodynamic interactions, transportation, gravity utilization, constellations, technology and test, and science applications.

  13. Atmospheric tether mission analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of tethered satellites to explore regions of the atmosphere inaccessible to spacecraft or high altitude research balloons. This report summarizes the Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA) effort for the engineering study team assessment of an Orbiter-based atmospheric tether mission. Lockheed Martin responsibilities included design recommendations for the deployer and tether, as well as tether dynamic analyses for the mission. Three tether configurations were studied including single line, multistrand (Hoytether) and tape designs.

  14. Controlled tether extends satellite's orbital range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigotsky, V.

    1984-06-01

    A low orbit satellite tethered to the Space Shuttle Orbiter's cargo bay would be able to conduct upper atmosphere experiments without fear of orbit deterioration. NASA has in light of this initiated a Tethered Satellite System program aimed at the 1987 deployment of a 1,100-lb, 5 ft-diameter satellite to a distance of 6-12 miles from the Space Shuttle on a Kevlar tether. The distance of the fully developed system will be 62 miles, representing an altitude of 80 miles above the earth. Tether diameters under consideration are in the 0.065-0.1 inch range. The satellite control system will consist of a reel drive, a deployment boom, and a boom-mounted tether control, in order to vary tether tension during gravity gradient changes.

  15. Space Test of Bare-Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    An international team, lead by Tokyo Metropolitan University, is developing a mission concept for a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare-wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether propulsion. The tether is a tape with a 50-mm width, 0.05-mm thickness, and 1-km length. This will be the first space test of the OML theory. In addition, by being an engineering demonstration (of space tethers), the mission will demonstrate electric beam generation for "sounding" determination of the neutral density profile in the ionospheric "E-layer." If selected by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the mission will launch in early 2009 using an $520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above =100 km in attitude, the 1-km tape tether will be deployed at a rate of 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow.This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using electrodynamic tethers for propulsion or power generation.

  16. Selected tether applications in space: Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsen, M. H.; Lippy, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    System characteristics and design requirements are assessed for tether deployment. Criteria are established for comparing alternate concepts for: (1) deployment of 220 klb space shuttle from the space station; (2) tether assisted launch of a 20,000 lb payload to geosynchronous orbit; (3) placement of the 20,000 lb AXAF into 320 nmi orbit via orbiter; (4) retrieval of 20,000 lb AXAF from 205 nmi circular orbit for maintenance and reboost to 320 nmi; and (5) tethered OMV rendezvous and retrieval of OTV returning from a geosynchronous mission. Tether deployment systems and technical issues are discussed.

  17. Tethered Prominence-CME Systems Captured during the 2012 November 13 and 2013 November 3 Total Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druckmüller, Miloslav; Habbal, Shadia R.; Alzate, Nathalia; Emmanouilidis, Constantinos

    2017-12-01

    We report on white light observations of high latitude tethered prominences acquired during the total solar eclipses of 2012 November 13 and 2013 November 3, at solar maximum, with a field of view spanning several solar radii. Distinguished by their pinkish hue, characteristic of emission from neutral hydrogen and helium, the four tethered prominences were akin to twisted flux ropes, stretching out to the limit of the field of view, while remaining anchored at the Sun. Cotemporal observations in the extreme ultraviolet from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA) clearly showed that the pinkish emission from the cool (≈ {10}4-{10}5 K) filamentary prominences was cospatial with the 30.4 nm He II emission, and was directly linked to filamentary structures emitting at coronal temperatures ≥slant {10}6 K in 17.1 and 19.3 nm. The tethered prominences evolved from typical tornado types. Each one formed the core of different types of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), as inferred from coordinated LASCO C2, C3, and STEREO A and B coronagraph observations. Two of them evolved into a series of faint, unstructured puffs. One was a normal CME. The most striking one was a “light-bulb” type CME, whose three-dimensional structure was confirmed from all four coronagraphs. These first uninterrupted detections of prominence-CME systems anchored at the Sun, and stretching out to at least the edge of the field of view of LASCO C3, provide the first observational confirmation for the source of counter-streaming electron fluxes measured in interplanetary CMEs, or ICMEs.

  18. Tethered Space Satellite-1 (TSS-1): Technical Roundabouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian; Stevens, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990's US and Italian scientists collaborated to study the electrodynamics of dragging a satellite on a tether through the electrically charged portion of Earth's atmosphere called the ionosphere. An electrical current induced in the long wire could be used for power and thrust generation for a satellite. Other tether uses include momentum exchange, artificial gravity, deployment of sensors or antennas, and gravity-gradient stabilization for satellites. Before the Tethered Space Satellite (TSS-1), no long tether had ever been flown, so many questions existed on how it would actually behave. The TSS consisted of a satellite with science experiments attached to a 12.5 mile long, very thin (0.10 inch diameter) copper wire assembly wound around a spool in the deployer reel mechanism. With the Space Shuttle at an altitude of 160 nautical miles above earth, the satellite was to be deployed by raising it from the Shuttle bay on a boom facing away from Earth. Once cleared of the bay, the deployer mechanism was to slowly feed out the 12-plus miles of tether. Scientific data would be collected throughout the operation, after which the satellite would be reeled back in. Pre-flight testing system level tests involved setting up a tether receiver to catch the 12.5 mile tether onto another reel as it was being unwound by the deployer reel mechanism. Testing only the reel mechanism is straightforward. This test becomes more complicated when the TSS is mounted on the flight pallet at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The system level tests must be passed before the pallet can be installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay. A few months before flight, the TSS payload had been integrated onto the Spacelab pallet and system level tests, including unreeling and reeling the tether, had been successfully completed. Some of this testing equipment was then shipped back to the contractor Martin Marietta. Systems-level load analyses, which cannot be run until all information about

  19. Tethered Satellites as Enabling Platforms for an Operational Space Weather Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Gilchrist, B. E.; Bilen, S.; Owens, J.; Voronka, N.; Furhop, K.

    2013-01-01

    Space weather nowcasting and forecasting models require assimilation of near-real time (NRT) space environment data to improve the precision and accuracy of operational products. Typically, these models begin with a climatological model to provide "most probable distributions" of environmental parameters as a function of time and space. The process of NRT data assimilation gently pulls the climate model closer toward the observed state (e.g. via Kalman smoothing) for nowcasting, and forecasting is achieved through a set of iterative physics-based forward-prediction calculations. The issue of required space weather observatories to meet the spatial and temporal requirements of these models is a complex one, and we do not address that with this poster. Instead, we present some examples of how tethered satellites can be used to address the shortfalls in our ability to measure critical environmental parameters necessary to drive these space weather models. Examples include very long baseline electric field measurements, magnetized ionospheric conductivity measurements, and the ability to separate temporal from spatial irregularities in environmental parameters. Tethered satellite functional requirements will be presented for each space weather parameter considered in this study.

  20. Introduction to Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, David J.

    2017-06-01

    1. Vector analysis; 2. Electrostatics; 3. Potentials; 4. Electric fields in matter; 5. Magnetostatics; 6. Magnetic fields in matter; 7. Electrodynamics; 8. Conservation laws; 9. Electromagnetic waves; 10. Potentials and fields; 11. Radiation; 12. Electrodynamics and relativity; Appendix A. Vector calculus in curvilinear coordinates; Appendix B. The Helmholtz theorem; Appendix C. Units; Index.

  1. Tethered satellite control mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrias, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    The tethered satellite control mechanisms consist of four major subsystems. The reel drive mechanism stores the tether. It is motor driven and includes a level wind to uniformly feed the tether to the reel. The lower boom mechanism serves two primary functions: (1) it measures tether length and velocity as the tether runs through the mechanism, and (2) it reads the tether tension at the reel. It also provides change the direction for the tether from the reel to the upper boom mechanism. The deployment boom positions the upper boom mechanism with satellite out of the cargo bay. The deployment function places the 500-kg satellite 20 m away from the Space Shuttle (producing a small natural gravity gradient force), impacts an initial velocity to the satellite for deployment, and allows for satellite docking at a safe distance from the body of the Space Shuttle. The upper boom mechanism (UBM) services three functions: (1) it provides tether control to the satellite as the satellite swings in and out of plane; (2) it reads tether tension in the low range during the early deployment and final retrieval parts of the mission; and (3) it produces additional tether tension at the reel when tether tension to the satellite is in the low range.

  2. Tuned mass damping system for a pendulum in gravity and microgravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atour, Farah

    2016-07-01

    An electrodynamic tether is a simple idea, but one with an amazing number of uses. Electrodynamic tether is a long conductor wire that is attached to the satellite, which can act as a generator or motor, from its motion through the earth's magnetic field. And it has the potential to make space travel significantly cheaper. The lack of electrodynamic tether's widespread in common applications can be attributed to the variable Lorentz forces occuring on the tethers, which will cause them to oscillate and may go out of control, de-orbit the satellite and fall to Earth. A tuned mass damper system, for short refered as tilger, is suggested as damper of oscillations of tethers. A system composed of a tuned mass damper and a simple pendulum simulating the tether was therefore constructed. 350 sets of experimental trials were done on the system, while it was installed inside a drop tower capsule resting on the ground, in order to pick four optimum setup experiments that will undergo a series of microgravity experiments at the Bremen Drop Tower in Bremen, Germany. The GJU Bachelor Research students found that the oscillations of the simple pendulum will not be affected by the tilger during the free fall experiment, except if a feedback mechanism is installed between the simple pendulum and the tilger. In this case, the tilger will dampen the simple pendulum oscillations during free fall.

  3. Flow around a tethered cylinder, the effect of tether length at high layover angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Kris

    2011-07-01

    Tethered cylinder systems constitute a natural extension of the lightly damped, hydro-elastically mounted cylinder. In this case, the cylinder is constrained to travel along an arc prescribed by the tether length. The analysis of the tethered cylinder system is hampered by the dependence of the natural frequency of the system on both the fluid forces acting on the system and the curved motion (which in turn alters the added mass coefficient away from unity). These difficulties have precluded prior studies considering the natural frequency or reduced velocity as a controlling parameter, making direct comparison with the hydro-elastically mounted cylinder system difficult.This investigation considers the case of a tethered cylinder at low Reynolds number (Re=200) for a mass ratio m*=0.2. It notes a local maximum in the amplitude of oscillation when the normalized tether length L*≃2.0, in agreement with prior studies. By instead considering the amplitude of oscillation in a rotational framework, we are able to explain the existence of this peak, and identify two regions of amplitude response, the first region exists for very small tether lengths (L*≲0.3), while the second exists for larger tether lengths. The transition from small tether lengths to large tether lengths exhibits the highest amplitude angular oscillations.Several wake states are also considered for a tethered cylinder which is oscillating about a horizontal mean layover angle. By considering these wake states, coupled with the definition of the natural frequency, an estimate of the added mass coefficient is made. Here we predict that CA≃0.5 for a tether length of L*=1.5. This prediction is based not only on the tether length, but also on the amplitude of oscillation, and hence is Reynolds number dependent.

  4. Tether applications for space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobles, W.

    1986-01-01

    A wide variety of space station applications for tethers were reviewed. Many will affect the operation of the station itself while others are in the category of research or scientific platforms. One of the most expensive aspects of operating the space station will be the continuing shuttle traffic to transport logistic supplies and payloads to the space station. If a means can be found to use tethers to improve the efficiency of that transportation operation, it will increase the operating efficiency of the system and reduce the overall cost of the space station. The concept studied consists of using a tether to lower the shuttle from the space station. This results in a transfer of angular momentum and energy from the orbiter to the space station. The consequences of this transfer is studied and how beneficial use can be made of it.

  5. Selected Tether Applications Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    Diverse cost-estimating techniques and data combined into single program. Selected Tether Applications Cost Model (STACOM 1.0) is interactive accounting software tool providing means for combining several independent cost-estimating programs into fully-integrated mathematical model capable of assessing costs, analyzing benefits, providing file-handling utilities, and putting out information in text and graphical forms to screen, printer, or plotter. Program based on Lotus 1-2-3, version 2.0. Developed to provide clear, concise traceability and visibility into methodology and rationale for estimating costs and benefits of operations of Space Station tether deployer system.

  6. Tethered body problems and relative motion orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eades, J. B., Jr.; Wolf, H.

    1972-01-01

    Selected problems dealing with orbiting tethered body systems have been studied. In addition, a relative motion orbit determination program was developed. Results from these tasks are described and discussed. The expected tethered body motions were examined, analytically, to ascertain what influence would be played by the physical parameters of the tether, the gravity gradient and orbit eccentricity. After separating the motion modes these influences were determined; and, subsequently, the effects of oscillations and/or rotations, on tether force, were described. A study was undertaken, by examining tether motions, to see what type of control actions would be needed to accurately place a mass particle at a prescribed position relative to a main vehicle. Other applications for tethers were studied. Principally these were concerned with the producing of low-level gee forces by means of stabilized tether configurations; and, the initiation of free transfer trajectories from tether supported vehicle relative positions.

  7. Method and apparatus for advancing tethers

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor

    1998-01-01

    A tether puller for advancing a tether through a channel may include a bellows assembly having a leading end fixedly attached to the tether at a first position and a trailing end fixedly attached to the tether at a second position so that the leading and trailing ends of the bellows assembly are located a substantially fixed distance apart. The bellows assembly includes a plurality of independently inflatable elements each of which may be separately inflated to an extended position and deflated to a retracted position. Each of the independently inflatable elements expands radially and axially upon inflation. An inflation system connected to the independently inflatable elements inflates and deflates selected ones of the independently inflatable elements to cause the bellows assembly to apply a tractive force to the tether and advance it in the channel.

  8. The tether inspection and repair experiment (TIRE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M.; Loria, Alberto; Harrison, James K.

    1988-01-01

    The successful development and deployment of reusable tethers for space applications will require methods for detecting, locating, and repairing damage to the tether. This requirement becomes especially important whenever the safety of the STS or the Space Station may be diminished or when critical supplies or systems would be lost in the event of a tether failure. A joint NASA/PSN study endeavor has recently been initiated to evaluate and address the problems to be solved for such an undertaking. The objectives of the Tether Inspection and Repair Experiment (TIRE) are to develop instrumentation and repair technology for specific classes of tethers defined as standards, and to demonstrate the technologies in ground-based and in-flight testing on the STS.

  9. Method and apparatus for advancing tethers

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1998-06-02

    A tether puller for advancing a tether through a channel may include a bellows assembly having a leading end fixedly attached to the tether at a first position and a trailing end fixedly attached to the tether at a second position so that the leading and trailing ends of the bellows assembly are located a substantially fixed distance apart. The bellows assembly includes a plurality of independently inflatable elements each of which may be separately inflated to an extended position and deflated to a retracted position. Each of the independently inflatable elements expands radially and axially upon inflation. An inflation system connected to the independently inflatable elements inflates and deflates selected ones of the independently inflatable elements to cause the bellows assembly to apply a tractive force to the tether and advance it in the channel. 9 figs.

  10. Tether Optical Phenomena (TOP) experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-03-14

    STS075-310-002 (22 Feb.-9 March 1996) --- Astronaut Maurizio Cheli, STS-75 mission specialist, works with the Tether Optical Phenomenon System (TOPS) on the flight deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. Cheli, representing the European Space Agency (ESA), joined four other astronauts and an international payload specialists for 16 days of scientific research in Earth-orbit.

  11. Tethering sockets and wrenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. P.

    1990-01-01

    The tethering of sockets and wrenches was accomplished to improve the safety of working over motor segments. To accomplish the tethering of the sockets to the ratchets, a special design was implemented in which a groove was machined into each socket. Each socket was then fitted with a snap ring that can spin around the machined groove. The snap ring is tethered to the handle of the ratchet. All open end wrenches are also tethered to the ratchet or to the operator, depending upon the type. Tests were run to ensure that the modified tools meet torque requirements. The design was subsequently approved by Space Safety.

  12. Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballance, Judy; Johnson, Les; Rogacki, John R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system to generate thrust in space by decreasing the orbital altitude of a Delta II Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) second stage. ProSEDS, which is planned to fly in 2001, will use the flight proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a tether (5km bare wire plus 10 km spectra or dyneema) from a Delta II second stage to achieve approximately 0.4N drag thrust. ProSEDS will utilize the tether-generated current to provide limited spacecraft power. The ProSEDs instrumentation includes a Langmuir probe and Differential Ion Flux Probe, which will determine the characteristics of the ambient ionospheric plasma. Two Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers will be used (one on the Delta and one on the endmass) to help determine tether dynamics and to limit transmitter operations to occasions when the spacecraft is over selected ground stations, The flight experiment is a precursor to the more ambitious electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission, which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes-all using electrodynamic thrust. An immediate application of ProSEDS technology is for the deorbit of spent satellites for orbital debris mitigation. In addition to the use of this technology to provide orbit transfer and debris mitigation it may also be an attractive option for future missions to Jupiter and any other planetary body with a magnetosphere.

  13. Space Tethers Programmatic Infusion Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Frame, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Programmatic opportunities abound for space Cables, Stringers and Tethers, justified by the tremendous performance advantages that these technologies offer and the rather wide gaps that must be filled by the NASA Exploration program, if the "sustainability goal" is to be met. A definition and characterization of the three categories are presented along with examples. A logical review of exploration requirements shows how each class can be infused throughout the program, from small experimental efforts to large system deployments. The economics of tethers in transportation is considered along with the impact of stringers for structural members. There is an array of synergistic methodologies that interlace their fabrication, implementation and operations. Cables, stringers and tethers can enhance a wide range of other space systems and technologies, including power storage, formation flying, instrumentation, docking mechanisms and long-life space components. The existing tether (i.e., MXER) program's accomplishments are considered consistent with NASA's new vision and can readily conform to requirements-driven technology development.

  14. Tethered Space Satellite-1 (TSS-1): Wound About a Bolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian; Stevens, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990's US and Italian scientists collaborated to study the electrodynamics on a long tether between two satellites as it moved through the electrically charged portion of Earth's atmosphere called the ionosphere. Potential uses for the electrical current induced in the long wire include power and thrust generation for a satellite, momentum exchange, artificial gravity, deployment of sensors or antennas, and gravity-gradient stabilization. The Tethered Space Satellite (TSS) was a first-of-its-kind experiment with long tethers in space. It consisted of a satellite with science experiments attached to a 12.5 mile long, very thin (0.10 inch diameter) copper wire assembly wound around a spool in the deployer reel mechanism. The whole mechanism sits on a pallet that is installed into the Shuttle bay. At an altitude of 160 nautical miles above earth, the satellite would be deplodeployed from the Shuttle bay by raising it on a boom facing away from Earth. Once cleared of the bay, the deployer mechanism would slowly feed out the 12-plus miles of tether. Scientific data would be collected throughout the operation, after which the satellite would be reeled back in. A receiver spool to catch the 12.5 mile tether as it was being unwound by the deployer reel mechanism was set up to do the system-level test of deployer real mechanism prior to installing the loaded pallet into the Shuttle bay. The system level tests were required before the pallet could be installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay. A few months before flight, the system level tests, including unreeling and reeling the tether, were completed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the TSS payload was installed onto the Spacelab pallet. Some of this testing equipment was then shipped back to the contractor, Martin Marietta. Integration with the Shuttle began. Systems-level load analyses, which cannot be run until all information about each payload is finalized, was run in parallel with the physical

  15. Electrodynamics on extrasolar giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, T. T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.

    2014-11-20

    Strong ionization on close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) suggests that their atmospheres may be affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Recent models of ion drag on these planets, however, are based on thermal ionization only and do not include the upper atmosphere above the 1 mbar level. These models are also based on simplified equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics that are not always valid in extrasolar planet atmospheres. We show that photoionization dominates over thermal ionization over much of the dayside atmosphere above the 100 mbar level, creating an upper ionosphere dominated by ionization of Hmore » and He and a lower ionosphere dominated by ionization of metals such as Na, K, and Mg. The resulting dayside electron densities on close-in exoplanets are higher than those encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the conductivities are comparable to the chromosphere of the Sun. Based on these results and assumed magnetic fields, we constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in EGPs and use a generalized Ohm's law to study the basic effects of electrodynamics in their atmospheres. We find that ion drag is important above the 10 mbar level where it can also significantly alter the energy balance through resistive heating. Due to frequent collisions of the electrons and ions with the neutral atmosphere, however, ion drag is largely negligible in the lower atmosphere below the 10 mbar level for a reasonable range of planetary magnetic moments. We find that the atmospheric conductivity decreases by several orders of magnitude in the night side of tidally locked planets, leading to a potentially interesting large-scale dichotomy in electrodynamics between the day and night sides. A combined approach that relies on UV observations of the upper atmosphere, phase curve and Doppler measurements of global dynamics, and visual transit observations to probe the alkali metals can

  16. Theoretical investigation of the generation and injection of electromagnetic waves in space plasma by means of a long-orbiting tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrowolny, M.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of the various mechanisms of electromagnetic wave generation by the shuttle-borne orbiting tether of the T.S.S. Facility shows that significant electrodynamic power levels are available even when overestimating the loss mechanisms expected to intervene. This electrodynamic power is in part dissipated by Joule losses in the tether, in part goes to accelerate electrons through the sheath surrounding the balloon (when in a downward deployment), and in part goes into e.m. wave generation. A preliminary estimate shows that a 100 km tether in orbit would produce ULF/ELF signals that are detectable on the ground with state-of-the-art magnetometric instrumentation.

  17. Structure of Aristotelian electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Ted

    2015-07-01

    Aristotelian electrodynamics (AE) describes the regime of a plasma with a very strong electric field that is not shorted out, with the charge current determined completely by pair production and the balance of the Lorentz 4-force against the curvature radiation reaction. Here it is shown how the principal null directions and associated eigenvalues of the field tensor govern AE, and how force-free electrodynamics arises smoothly from AE when the eigenvalues (and therefore the electric field in some frame) vanish. A criterion for validity of AE and force-free electrodynamics is proposed in terms of a pair of "field curvature scalars" formed from the first derivative of the principal null directions.

  18. Classical Electrodynamics: Lecture notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likharev, Konstantin K.

    2018-06-01

    Essential Advanced Physics is a series comprising four parts: Classical Mechanics, Classical Electrodynamics, Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics. Each part consists of two volumes, Lecture notes and Problems with solutions, further supplemented by an additional collection of test problems and solutions available to qualifying university instructors. This volume, Classical Electrodynamics: Lecture notes is intended to be the basis for a two-semester graduate-level course on electricity and magnetism, including not only the interaction and dynamics charged point particles, but also properties of dielectric, conducting, and magnetic media. The course also covers special relativity, including its kinematics and particle-dynamics aspects, and electromagnetic radiation by relativistic particles.

  19. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzanehpour, Mehdi; Tokatly, Ilya; Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group; ETSF Scientific Development Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v-representable. Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Grant No. FIS2013-46159-C3-1-P), Grupos Consolidados UPV/EHU del Gobierno Vasco (Grant No. IT578-13), COST Actions CM1204 (XLIC) and MP1306 (EUSpec).

  20. Arctic Atmospheric Measurements Using Manned and Unmanned Aircraft, Tethered Balloons, and Ground-Based Systems at U.S. DOE ARM Facilities on the North Slope Of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivey, M.; Dexheimer, D.; Roesler, E. L.; Hillman, B. R.; Hardesty, J. O.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides scientific infrastructure and data to the international Arctic research community via research sites located on the North Slope of Alaska and an open data archive maintained by the ARM program. In 2016, DOE continued investments in improvements to facilities and infrastructure at Oliktok Point Alaska to support operations of ground-based facilities and unmanned aerial systems for science missions in the Arctic. The Third ARM Mobile Facility, AMF3, now deployed at Oliktok Point, was further expanded in 2016. Tethered instrumented balloons were used at Oliktok to make measurements of clouds in the boundary layer including mixed-phase clouds and to compare measurements with those from the ground and from unmanned aircraft operating in the airspace above AMF3. The ARM facility at Oliktok Point includes Special Use Airspace. A Restricted Area, R-2204, is located at Oliktok Point. Roughly 4 miles in diameter, it facilitates operations of tethered balloons and unmanned aircraft. R-2204 and a new Warning Area north of Oliktok, W-220, are managed by Sandia National Laboratories for DOE Office of Science/BER. These Special Use Airspaces have been successfully used to launch and operate unmanned aircraft over the Arctic Ocean and in international airspace north of Oliktok Point.A steady progression towards routine operations of unmanned aircraft and tethered balloon systems continues at Oliktok. Small unmanned aircraft (DataHawks) and tethered balloons were successfully flown at Oliktok starting in June of 2016. This poster will discuss how principal investigators may apply for use of these Special Use Airspaces, acquire data from the Third ARM Mobile Facility, or bring their own instrumentation for deployment at Oliktok Point, Alaska.

  1. Tether Deployer And Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Design concept promises speed, control, and reliability. Scheme for deploying tether provides for fast, free, and snagless payout and fast, dependable braking. Developed for small, expendable tethers in outer space, scheme also useful in laying transoceanic cables, deploying guidance wires to torpedoes and missiles, paying out rescue lines from ship to ship via rockets, deploying antenna wires, releasing communication and power cables to sonobuoys and expendable bathythermographs, and in reeling out lines from fishing rods.

  2. Quantum Electrodynamics: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    The Standard Model of particle physics is composed of several theories that are added together. The most precise component theory is the theory of quantum electrodynamics or QED. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains how theoretical QED calculations can be done. This video links to other videos, giving the viewer a deep understanding of the process.

  3. Quantum Electrodynamics: Theory

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2018-01-16

    The Standard Model of particle physics is composed of several theories that are added together. The most precise component theory is the theory of quantum electrodynamics or QED. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains how theoretical QED calculations can be done. This video links to other videos, giving the viewer a deep understanding of the process.

  4. Electrodynamics; Problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina C.; Schrecengost, Zachariah S.

    2018-05-01

    This book of problems and solutions is a natural continuation of Ilie and Schrecengost's first book Electromagnetism: Problems and Solutions. Aimed towards students who would like to work independently on more electrodynamics problems in order to deepen their understanding and problem-solving skills, this book discusses main concepts and techniques related to Maxwell's equations, conservation laws, electromagnetic waves, potentials and fields, and radiation.

  5. Causality in Classical Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Causality in electrodynamics is a subject of some confusion, especially regarding the application of Faraday's law and the Ampere-Maxwell law. This has led to the suggestion that we should not teach students that electric and magnetic fields can cause each other, but rather focus on charges and currents as the causal agents. In this paper I argue…

  6. Tethers in Space Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmo, M. L. (Editor); Lorenzini, E. C. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A new edition of the Tethers in Space Handbook was needed after the last edition published in 1989. Tether-related activities have been quite busy in the 90's. We have had the flights of TSSI and TSSI-R, SEDS-1 and -2, PMG, TIPS and OEDIPUS. In less than three years there have been one international Conference on Tethers in Space, held in Washington DC, and three workshops, held at ESA/Estec in the Netherlands, at ISAS in Japan and at the University of Michigan, Ann Harbor. The community has grown and we finally have real flight data to compare our models with. The life of spaceborne tethers has not been always easy and we got our dose of setbacks, but we feel pretty optimistic for the future. We are just stepping out of the pioneering stage to start to use tethers for space science and technological applications. As we are writing this handbook TiPs, a NRL tether project is flying above our heads. There is no emphasis in affirming that as of today spacebome tethers are a reality and their potential is far from being fully appreciated. Consequently, a large amount of new information had to be incorporated into this new edition. The general structure of the handbook has been left mostly unchanged. The past editors have set a style which we have not felt needed change. The section on the flights has been enriched with information on the scientific results. The categories of the applications have not been modified, and in some cases we have mentioned the existence of related flight data. We felt that the section contributed by Joe Carroll, called Tether Data, should be maintained as it was, being a "classic" and still very accurate and not at all obsolete. We have introduced a new chapter entitled Space Science and Tethers since flight experience has shown that tethers can complement other space-based investigations. The bibliography has been updated. Due to the great production in the last few years %e had to restrict our search to works published in refereed journal

  7. Formation Flying of Tethered and Nontethered Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.

    2005-01-01

    A paper discusses the effect of the dynamic interaction taking place within a formation composed of a rigid and a deformable vehicle, and presents the concept of two or more tethered spacecraft flying in formation with one or more separated free-flying spacecraft. Although progress toward formation flight of nontethered spacecraft has already been achieved, the document cites potential advantages of tethering, including less consumption of fuel to maintain formation, very high dynamic stability of a rotating tethered formation, and intrinsically passive gravity-gradient stabilization. The document presents a theoretical analysis of the dynamics of a system comprising one free-flying spacecraft and two tethered spacecraft in orbit, as a prototype of more complex systems. The spacecraft are modeled as rigid bodies and the tether as a mass-less spring with structural viscous damping. Included in the analysis is a study of the feasibility of a centralized control system for maintaining a required formation in low Earth orbit. A numerical simulation of a retargeting maneuver is reported to show that even if the additional internal dynamics of the system caused by flexibility is considered, high pointing precision can be achieved if a fictitious rigid frame is used to track the tethered system, and it should be possible to position the spacecraft with centimeter accuracy and to orient the formation within arc seconds of the desired direction also in the presence of low Earth orbit environmental perturbations. The results of the study demonstrate that the concept is feasible in Earth orbit and point the way to further study of these hybrid tethered and free-flying systems for related applications in orbit around other Solar System bodies.

  8. Top tether effectiveness during side impacts.

    PubMed

    Majstorovic, Jordan; Bing, Julie; Dahle, Eric; Bolte, John; Kang, Yun-Seok

    2018-02-28

    Few studies have looked at the effectiveness of the top tether during side impacts. In these studies, limited anthropomorphic test device (ATD) data were collected and/or few side impact scenarios were observed. The goal of this study was to further understand the effects of the top tether on ATD responses and child restraint system (CRS) kinematics during various side impact conditions. A series of high-speed near-side and far-side sled tests were performed using the FMVSS213 side impact sled buck and Q3s ATD. Tests were performed at both 10° and 30° impacts with respect to the pure lateral direction. Two child restraints, CRS A and CRS B, were attached to the bench using flexible lower anchors. Each test scenario was performed with the presence and absence of a top tether. Instrumentation recorded Q3s responses and CRS kinematics, and the identical test scenarios with and without a top tether attachment were compared. For the far-side lateral (10°) and oblique (30°) impacts, top tether attachment increased resultant head accelerations by 8-38% and head injury criterion (HIC 15 ) values by 20-140%. However, the top tether was effective in reducing lateral head excursion by 5-25%. For near-side impacts, the top tether resulted in less than 10% increases in both resultant head acceleration and HIC 15 in the lateral impact direction. For near-side oblique impacts, the top tether increased HIC 15 by 17.3% for CRS A and decreased it by 19.5% for CRS B. However, the injury values determined from both impact conditions were below current injury assessment reference values (IARVs). Additionally, the top tether proved beneficial in preventing forward and lateral CRS rotations. The results show that the effects of the top tether on Q3s responses were dependent on impact type, impact angle, and CRS. Tether attachments that increased head accelerations and HIC 15 values were generally counterbalanced by a reduction in head excursion and CRS rotation compared to

  9. System noise analysis of the dumbbell tethered satellite for gravity-gradient measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the dumbbell gravity gradiometer concept for measuring short wavelength variations in the earth's gravity gradient is presented. Variations in the gradient are recorded by measuring tension variations in a vertically stabilized satellite consisting of heavy masses connected by a long wire or rod. Tension noise arises from the excitation of various mechanical oscillations of the system. The principal noise sources that were identified are fluctuations in atmospheric drag heating and drag force resulting from density variations and winds. Approximate analytical expressions are presented for the tension noise as a function of the system design parameters for various possible configurations. Computer simulations using numerical integration were performed to study the tension noise for several sample cases. Three designs consistent with Shuttle launch capabilities are discussed.

  10. Phase 3 study of selected tether applications in space, mid-term review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: guidelines for the Space Transportation System (STS) payload deployer design; mini-orbital maneuvering vehicle (MOMV) design: shuttle tether deployer systems (STEDS); cost modeling; tethered platform analysis; fuel savings analysis; and STEDS control simulation.

  11. Tethered to work: A family systems approach linking mobile device use to turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Merideth; Carlson, Dawn; Boswell, Wendy; Whitten, Dwayne; Butts, Marcus M; Kacmar, K Michele Micki

    2016-04-01

    We examined the use of a mobile device for work during family time (mWork) to determine the role that it plays in employee turnover intentions. Using a sample of 344 job incumbents and their spouses, we propose a family systems model of turnover and examine 2 paths through which we expect mWork to relate to turnover intentions: the job incumbent and the spouse. From the job incumbent, we found that the job incumbent's mWork associated with greater work-to-family conflict and burnout, and lower organizational commitment. From the spouse, we found that incumbent mWork and greater work-to-family conflict associated with increased resentment by the spouse and lower spousal commitment to the job incumbent's organization. Both of these paths played a role in predicting job incumbent turnover intentions. We discuss implications and opportunities for future research on mWork for integrating work and family into employee turnover intentions. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Testing Relativity with Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Quentin; Kostelecky, Alan

    2004-04-01

    Lorentz and CPT violation is a promising candidate signal for Planck-scale physics. Low-energy effects of Lorentz and CPT violation are described by the general theoretical framework called the Standard-Model Extension (SME). This talk focuses on Lorentz-violating effects arising in the classical electrodynamics limit of the SME. Analysis of the theory shows that suitable experiments could improve by several orders of magnitude certain sensitivities achieved in modern Michelson-Morley and Kennedy-Thorndike tests.

  13. Tethered orbital refueling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, Dale A.; Rudolph, L. Kevin; Kiefel, Erlinda R.; Abbott, Peter W.; Grossrode, Pat

    1986-01-01

    One of the major applications of the space station will be to act as a refueling depot for cryogenic-fueled space-based orbital transfer vehicles (OTV), Earth-storable fueled orbit maneuvering vehicles, and refurbishable satellite spacecraft using hydrazine. One alternative for fuel storage at the space station is a tethered orbital refueling facility (TORF), separated from the space station by a sufficient distance to induce a gravity gradient force that settles the stored fuels. The technical feasibility was examined with the primary focus on the refueling of LO2/LH2 orbital transfer vehicles. Also examined was the tethered facility on the space station. It was compared to a zero-gravity facility. A tethered refueling facility should be considered as a viable alternative to a zero-gravity facility if the zero-gravity fluid transfer technology, such as the propellant management device and no vent fill, proves to be difficult to develop with the required performance.

  14. Tether Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are presented. The objective was to provide a forum for the discussion of the structure and status of existing computer programs which are used to simulate the dynamics of a variety of tether applications in space. A major topic was different simulation models and the process of validating them. Guidance on future work in these areas was obtained from a panel discussion; the panel was composed of resource and technical managers and dynamic analysts in the tether field. The conclusions of this panel are also presented.

  15. Electrodynamics of quantum spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Martin; Pustogow, Andrej

    2018-05-01

    Quantum spin liquids attract great interest due to their exceptional magnetic properties characterized by the absence of long-range order down to low temperatures despite the strong magnetic interaction. Commonly, these compounds are strongly correlated electron systems, and their electrodynamic response is governed by the Mott gap in the excitation spectrum. Here we summarize and discuss the optical properties of several two-dimensional quantum spin liquid candidates. First we consider the inorganic material herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2 and related compounds, which crystallize in a kagome lattice. Then we turn to the organic compounds -EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2, κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Ag2(CN)3 and κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3, where the spins are arranged in an almost perfect triangular lattice, leading to strong frustration. Due to differences in bandwidth, the effective correlation strength varies over a wide range, leading to a rather distinct behavior as far as the electrodynamic properties are concerned. We discuss the spinon contributions to the optical conductivity in comparison to metallic quantum fluctuations in the vicinity of the Mott transition.

  16. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  17. Modelling Tethered Enzymatic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Goyette, Jesse; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel; Allard, Jun; Maini, Philip; Dushek, Omer

    Enzymatic reactions are key to cell functioning, and whilst much work has been done in protein interaction in cases where diffusion is possible, interactions of tethered proteins are poorly understood. Yet, because of the large role cell membranes play in enzymatic reactions, several reactions may take place where one of the proteins is bound to a fixed point in space. We develop a model to characterize tethered signalling between the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a tethered, phosphorylated protein. We compare our model to experimental data obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We show that a single SPR experiment recovers 5 independent biophysical/biochemical constants. We also compare the results between a three dimensional model and a two dimensional model. The work gives the opportunity to use known techniques to learn more about signalling processes, and new insights into how enzyme tethering alters cellular signalling. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  18. Ionospheric Multi-Point Measurements Using Tethered Satellite Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Heelis, R. A.; Raitt, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Many scientific questions concerning the distribution of electromagnetic fields and plasma structures in the ionosphere require measurements over relatively small temporal and spatial scales with as little ambiguity as possible. It is also often necessary to differentiate several geophysical parameters between horizontal and vertical gradients unambiguously. The availability of multiple tethered satellites or sensors, so-called "pearls-on-a-string," may make the necessary measurements practical. In this report we provide two examples of scientific questions which could benefit from such measurements (1) high-latitude magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling; and, (2) plasma structure impact on large and small-scale electrodynamics. Space tether state-of-the-art and special technical considerations addressing mission lifetime, sensor pointing, and multi-stream telemetry are reviewed.

  19. Fortissimo: A Japanese Space Test Of Bare Wire Anode Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Fujii, H. A.; Sanmartin, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    A Japanese led international team is developing a suborbital test of orbital-motion-limited (OML) bare wire anode current collection for application to electrodynamic tether (EDT) propulsion. The tether is a tape with a width of 25 mm, thickness of 0.05 mm, and is 300 m in length. This will be the first space test of OML theory. The mission will launch in the summer of 2009 using an S520 Sounding Rocket. During ascent, and above approx. 100 km in attitude, the tape tether will be deployed at a rate of approx. 8 m/s. Once deployed, the tape tether will serve as an anode, collecting ionospheric electrons. The electrons will be expelled into space by a hollow cathode device, thereby completing the circuit and allowing current to flow. The total amount of current collected will be used to assess the validity of OML theory. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the technologies to be employed, and the application of the results to future space missions using EDTs for propulsion or power generation.

  20. Tension waves in tethered satellite cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    A one-degree-of-freedom simulation of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) was programmed using a distributed system model of the tether based on the one-dimensional wave equation. This model represents the time varying tension profile along the tether as the sum of two traveling waves of tension moving in opposite directions. A control loop was devised which combines a deployment rate command with the measured tension at the deployer to produce a smooth, stable rate of deployment of the subsatellite. Simulation results show a buildup of periodic bursts of high frequency oscillation in tension. This report covers the mathematical modelling and simulation results and explains the reason for the observed oscillations. The design of a possible vibration damping device is discussed.

  1. Semi-classical Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestone, John

    2016-03-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. We describe semi-classical approaches that can be used to obtain a more intuitive physical feel for several QED processes including electro-statics, Compton scattering, pair annihilation, the anomalous magnetic moment, and the Lamb shift, that could be taught easily to undergraduate students. Any physicist who brings their laptop to the talk will be able to build spread sheets in less than 10 minutes to calculate g/2 =1.001160 and a Lamb shift of 1057 MHz.

  2. Dynamics and control of tethered antennas/reflectors in orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liangdong; Bainum, Peter M.

    The system linear equations for the motion of a tethered shallow spherical shell in orbit with its symmetry axis nominally following the local vertical are developed. The shell roll, yaw, tether out-of-plane swing motion and elastic vibrations are decoupled from the shell and tether in-plane pitch motions and elastic vibrations. The neutral gravity stability conditions for the special case of a constant length rigid tether are given for in-plane motion and out-of-plant motion. It is proved that the in-plane motion of the system could be asymptotically stable based on Rupp's tension control law, for a variable length tether. However, the system simulation results indicate that the transient responses can be improved significantly, especially for the damping of the tether and shell pitch motion, by an optimal feedback control law for the rigid variable length tether model. It is also seen that the system could be unstable when the effect of tether flexibility is included if the control gains are not chosen carefully. The transient responses for three different tension control laws are compared during typical station keeping operations.

  3. ProSEDS Telemetry System Utilization of GPS Position Data for Transmitter Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Paul; Sims, Herb

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center will launch the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment in late 2000. ProSEDS will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system and will utilize a conducting wire tether to generate limited spacecraft power. This paper will provide an overview of the ProSEDS mission and will discuss the design, development and test of the spacecraft telemetry system which utilizes a custom designed GPS subsystem to determine spacecraft position relative to ground station location and to control transmitter on/off cycling based on spacecraft state vector and ground station visibility.

  4. A Space Station tethered orbital refueling facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, D. A.; Rudolph, L. K.; Kiefel, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A planned function of the Space Station is to refurbish and refuel an advanced space-based LO2/LH2 orbit transfer vehicle. An alternative to propellant storage at the station is to use a remote facility tied to the station with a long tether. Preliminary design of such a facility is described with emphasis on fluid transfer and storage requirements. Using tether lengths of at least 300 ft, gravity gradient forces will dominate surface tension in such a system. Although gravity driven transfer is difficult because of line pressure drops, fluid settling over the tank outlet greatly alleviates acquisition concerns and will facilitate vented tank fills. The major concern with a tethered orbital refueling facility is its considerable operational complexity including transport of the OTV to and from the facility.

  5. Input profile for satellite orbit transfer by tether mechanism; Part I: Tether length profile using feed-forward procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokamoto, Shinji

    This study deals with orbital transfer of a satellite using a tether extension / retrieval mechanism. Instead of using propellant for the orbital transfer, the present concept uses electrical energy. By controlling the pitch motion of the tether system, we can achieve a prescribed velocity of the satellite at a prescribed position. By cutting the tether at that instant, we can inject the satellite into a designed new orbit. This paper considers co-planar motion and proposes a technique to achieve the desired tether length, pitch angle, and pitch angular rate at a designated position in orbit by using only tether length control. These three state variables are adjusted to their target values in three consecutive sections in the orbit; 1) control for the angular momentum of the pitching motion, which implies to adjust the tether length, 2) control for the pitch angle, and 3) control for the pitch angular rate. In each section, a pitch acceleration profile can be formed by using Fourier series as an alternative input for tether length profile. Their coefficients can be obtained without numerical iterations by using the simple initial / final relationships for the pitch angle and pitch angular rate. Therefore, this proposed procedure requires less computational cost than a numerical search, is easily applicable for different models and orbits, and can cope with physical restrictions of the system, such as tether tension or maximum tether length. Furthermore, the resulting final states precisely coincide with the target values. To demonstrate that the proposed procedure can successfully generate proper input profiles, this paper presents an orbital transfer problem as an example, and verifies its effectiveness. The simulation results show that the maximum tether length is less than 5km, and that the tether tension is kept positive during the mission.

  6. The Tethered Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Lupu, Roxana Elena; Dubrovolskis, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    that the Moon's orbit evolves is limited by the modest radiative cooling rate of Earth's atmosphere, which in effect tethers the Moon to the Earth. Consequently the Moon's orbit evolves orders of magnitude more slowly than in conventional models. Slow orbital evolution promotes capture by orbital resonances that may have been important in the Earth-Moon system

  7. Theseus: tethered distributed robotics (TDR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digney, Bruce L.; Penzes, Steven G.

    2003-09-01

    The Defence Research and Development Canada's (DRDC) Autonomous Intelligent System's program conducts research to increase the independence and effectiveness of military vehicles and systems. DRDC-Suffield's Autonomous Land Systems (ALS) is creating new concept vehicles and autonomous control systems for use in outdoor areas, urban streets, urban interiors and urban subspaces. This paper will first give an overview of the ALS program and then give a specific description of the work being done for mobility in urban subspaces. Discussed will be the Theseus: Thethered Distributed Robotics (TDR) system, which will not only manage an unavoidable tether but exploit it for mobility and navigation. Also discussed will be the prototype robot called the Hedgehog, which uses conformal 3D mobility in ducts, sewer pipes, collapsed rubble voids and chimneys.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of a Tethered Harpoon for Comet Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a dynamic model and simulation results of a tethered harpoon for comet sampling. This model and simulation was done in order to carry out an initial sensitivity analysis for key design parameters of the tethered system. The harpoon would contain a canister which would collect a sample of soil from a cometary surface. Both a spring ejected canister and a tethered canister are considered. To arrive in close proximity of the spacecraft at the end of its trajectory so it could be captured, the free-flying canister would need to be ejected at the right time and with the proper impulse, while the tethered canister must be recovered by properly retrieving the tether at a rate that would avoid an excessive amplitude of oscillatory behavior during the retrieval. The paper describes the model of the tether dynamics and harpoon penetration physics. The simulations indicate that, without the tether, the canister would still reach the spacecraft for collection, that the tether retrieval of the canister would be achievable with reasonable fuel consumption, and that the canister amplitude upon retrieval would be insensitive to variations in vertical velocity dispersion.

  9. Atmospheric verification mission for the TSS/STARFAC tethered satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M., Jr.; Stuart, Thomas D.; Crouch, Donald S.; Deloach, Richard; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1991-01-01

    Two types of a tethered satellite system (TSS) - a basic 1.8-m-diameter spherical spacecraft and the Shuttle Tethered Aerothermodynamic Research Facility (STARFAC) are considered. Issues related to the deployment and retrieval of a large satellite with exceedingly long tethers are discussed, and the objectives of an Atmospheric Verification Mission (ATM) are outlined. Focus is concentrated on the ATM satellite which will fly after TSS-1 and before the fully instrumented and costlier TSS-2. The differences between the AVM and TSS-2, including the configuration of the aerodynamic stabilizers, instrumentation, and the materials of construction are outlined. The basic Kevlar tether defined for the TSS-2 is being considered for use with the AVM, however, a complex tether is under consideration as well.

  10. Space tether dynamics: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2018-05-01

    The dynamics of orbiting tethers (space elevators and skyhooks) is developed from an unusual direction: Lagrangian rather than Newtonian mechanics. These basic results are derived among others: space elevator required length with and without counterweight, location and magnitude of maximum tether tension, skyhook orbital parameters and tether tension. These conceptual devices are being increasingly discussed as technologically feasible; here they make an interesting pedagogical application of Lagrangian mechanics suitable for undergraduate physics students.

  11. The propagator of stochastic electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalleri, G.

    1981-01-01

    The "elementary propagator" for the position of a free charged particle subject to the zero-point electromagnetic field with Lorentz-invariant spectral density ~ω3 is obtained. The nonstationary process for the position is solved by the stationary process for the acceleration. The dispersion of the position elementary propagator is compared with that of quantum electrodynamics. Finally, the evolution of the probability density is obtained starting from an initial distribution confined in a small volume and with a Gaussian distribution in the velocities. The resulting probability density for the position turns out to be equal, to within radiative corrections, to ψψ* where ψ is the Kennard wave packet. If the radiative corrections are retained, the present result is new since the corresponding expression in quantum electrodynamics has not yet been found. Besides preceding quantum electrodynamics for this problem, no renormalization is required in stochastic electrodynamics.

  12. Timelike Momenta In Quantum Electrodynamics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brodsky, S. J.; Ting, S. C. C.

    1965-12-01

    In this note we discuss the possibility of studying the quantum electrodynamics of timelike photon propagators in muon or electron pair production by incident high energy muon or electron beams from presently available proton or electron accelerators.

  13. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  14. Atmospheric Electricity and Tethered Aerostats, Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-11

    vs Altitude (Non- conducting or Conducting Tethers...Effect of Corona Charge Plume 15 3.1 Tether Current vs Balloon Altitude , BJ+3 - 25 Sep 73 20 3.2 Tether Current vs Balloon Altitude , Baldy - 17 Oct 73 21...3.3 Tether Current vs Balloon Altitude , Baldy - 31 Oct 73 22 3.4 Tether Current vs Balloon Altitude , Baldy - 2 Nov 73 23 3.5 Tether Current vs

  15. EMC Test Report Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmody, Lynne M.; Boyette, Carl B.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the Electromagnetic Interference E M I evaluation performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) which is part of the MISSE-X System under the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center. Measurements are performed to document the emissions environment associated with the EDS units. The purpose of this report is to collect all information needed to reproduce the testing performed on the Electrodynamic Dust Shield units, document data gathered during testing, and present the results. This document presents information unique to the measurements performed on the Bioculture Express Rack payload; using test methods prepared to meet SSP 30238 requirements. It includes the information necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer per work order number 1037104. The information presented herein should only be used to meet the requirements for which it was prepared.

  16. TMBM: Tethered Micro-Balloons on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, M. H.; Greeley, R.; Cutts, J. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Murbach, M.

    2000-01-01

    The use of balloons/aerobots on Mars has been under consideration for many years. Concepts include deployment during entry into the atmosphere from a carrier spacecraft, deployment from a lander, use of super-pressurized systems for long duration flights, 'hot-air' systems, etc. Principal advantages include the ability to obtain high-resolution data of the surface because balloons provide a low-altitude platform which moves relatively slowly. Work conducted within the last few years has removed many of the technical difficulties encountered in deployment and operation of balloons/aerobots on Mars. The concept proposed here (a tethered balloon released from a lander) uses a relatively simple approach which would enable aspects of Martian balloons to be tested while providing useful and potentially unique science results. Tethered Micro-Balloons on Mars (TMBM) would be carried to Mars on board a future lander as a stand-alone experiment having a total mass of one to two kilograms. It would consist of a helium balloon of up to 50 cubic meters that is inflated after landing and initially tethered to the lander. Its primary instrumentation would be a camera that would be carried to an altitude of up to tens of meters above the surface. Imaging data would be transmitted to the lander for inclusion in the mission data stream. The tether would be released in stages allowing different resolutions and coverage. In addition during this staged release a lander camera system may observe the motion of the balloon at various heights above he lander. Under some scenarios upon completion of the primary phase of TMBM operations, the tether would be cut, allowing TMBM to drift away from the landing site, during which images would be taken along the ground.

  17. Tethered float liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Daily, III, William Dean

    2016-09-06

    An apparatus for sensing the level of a liquid includes a float, a tether attached to the float, a pulley attached to the tether, a rotation sensor connected to the pulley that senses vertical movement of said float and senses the level of the liquid.

  18. Dynamics and Control of Tethered Antennas/Reflectors in Orbit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    reflector system. The optimal linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) digital con- trol of the orbiting tethered antenna/reflector system is analyzed. The...flexibility of both the antenna and the tether are included in this high order system model. With eight point actuators optimally positioned together with...able to maintain satisfactory pointing accuracy for low and moderate altitude orbits under the influence of solar pressure. For the higher altitudes a

  19. Elastic-Tether Suits for Artificial Gravity and Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrance, Paul; Biesinger, Paul; Rybicki, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    Body suits harnessed to systems of elastic tethers have been proposed as means of approximating the effects of normal Earth gravitation on crewmembers of spacecraft in flight to help preserve the crewmembers physical fitness. The suits could also be used on Earth to increase effective gravitational loads for purposes of athletic training. The suit according to the proposal would include numerous small tether-attachment fixtures distributed over its outer surface so as to distribute the artificial gravitational force as nearly evenly as possible over the wearer s body. Elastic tethers would be connected between these fixtures and a single attachment fixture on a main elastic tether that would be anchored to a fixture on or under a floor. This fixture might include multiple pulleys to make the effective length of the main tether great enough that normal motions of the wearer cause no more than acceptably small variations in the total artificial gravitational force. Among the problems in designing the suit would be equalizing the load in the shoulder area and keeping tethers out of the way below the knees to prevent tripping. The solution would likely include running tethers through rings on the sides. Body suits with a weight or water ballast system are also proposed for very slight spinning space-station scenarios, in which cases the proposed body suits will easily be able to provide the equivalency of a 1-G or even greater load.

  20. SPHERES tethered formation flight testbed: advancements in enabling NASA's SPECS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Adams, Danielle; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Kong, Edmund; Miller, David W.; Leisawitz, David; Lorenzini, Enrico; Sell, Steve

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on efforts to control a tethered formation flight spacecraft array for NASA's SPECS mission using the SPHERES test-bed developed by the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. Specifically, advances in methodology and experimental results realized since the 2005 SPIE paper are emphasized. These include a new test-bed setup with a reaction wheel assembly, a novel relative attitude measurement system using force torque sensors, and modeling of non-ideal tethers to account for tether vibration modes. The nonlinear equations of motion of multi-vehicle tethered spacecraft with elastic flexible tethers are derived from Lagrange's equations. The controllability analysis indicates that both array resizing and spin-up are fully controllable by the reaction wheels and the tether motor, thereby saving thruster fuel consumption. Based upon this analysis, linear and nonlinear controllers have been successfully implemented on the tethered SPHERES testbed, and tested at the NASA MSFC's flat floor facility using two and three SPHERES configurations.

  1. Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Leslie; Johnson, Les; Brown, Norman S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system to generate thrust in space by decreasing the orbital altitude of a Delta 11 Expendable Launch Vehicle second stage. ProSEDS, which is planned on an Air Force GPS Satellite replacement mission in June 2002, will use the flight proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a tether (5 km bare wire plus 10 km non-conducting Dyneema) from a Delta 11 second stage to achieve approx. 0.4N drag thrust. ProSEDS will utilize the tether-generated current to provide limited spacecraft power. The ProSEDS instrumentation includes Langmuir probes and Differential Ion Flux Probes, which will determine the characteristics of the ambient ionospheric plasma. Two Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers will be used (one on the Delta and one on the endmass) to help determine tether dynamics and to limit transmitter operations to occasions when the spacecraft is over selected ground stations. The flight experiment is a precursor to the more ambitious electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission, which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes-all using electrodynamic thrust. An immediate application of ProSEDS technology is for the removal of spent satellites for orbital debris mitigation. In addition to the use of this technology to provide orbit transfer and debris mitigation it may also be an attractive option for future missions to Jupiter and any other planetary body with a magnetosphere.

  2. The Ship Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS): Observations of Small-Scale Surface Lateral Transport During the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. F.; Novelli, G.; Guigand, C.; Özgökmen, T.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Molemaker, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE) will carry out the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER) to study the role of small-scale processes in the transport and dispersion of oil and passive tracers. The Ship-Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS) will observe small-scale surface dispersion in the open ocean. STARRS is built around a high-lift-capacity (30 kg) helium-filled aerostat. STARRS is equipped with a high resolution digital camera. An integrated GNSS receiver and inertial navigation system permit direct geo-rectification of the imagery. Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE) will carry out the LAgrangian Submesoscale ExpeRiment (LASER) to study the role of small-scale processes in the transport and dispersion of oil and passive tracers. The Ship-Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARRS) was developed to produce observational estimates of small-scale surface dispersion in the open ocean. STARRS is built around a high-lift-capacity (30 kg) helium-filled aerostat. STARRS is equipped with a high resolution digital camera. An integrated GNSS receiver and inertial navigation system permit direct geo-rectification of the imagery. Thousands of drift cards deployed in the field of view of STARRS and tracked over time provide the first observational estimates of small-scale (1-500 m) surface dispersion in the open ocean. The STARRS imagery will be combined with GPS-tracked surface drifter trajectories, shipboard observations, and aerial surveys of sea surface temperature in the DeSoto Canyon. In addition to obvious applications to oil spill modelling, the STARRS observations will provide essential benchmarks for high resolution numerical modelsDrift cards deployed in the field of view of STARRS and tracked over time provide the first observational estimates of small-scale (1-100 m) surface dispersion in the open ocean. The STARRS

  3. Electromagnetically induced transparency in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Hsiang-Sheng; Long, Junling; Wu, Xian; Lake, Russell; Gu, Xiu; Liu, Yu-Xi; Pappas, David

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a phenomenon caused by quantum interference between distinct transition paths in a three-level system. In general, it is difficult to realize EIT in a system of three-level superconducting quantum circuit, because the decay rates and the Rabi frequency of the driving field do not normally satisfy the conditions for EIT. However, we propose to achieve EIT within a driven circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) system by creating polariton states and engineering the decay rates of their levels with the driving field. In this talk we present spectroscopic measurements of the polariton states that will enable demonstration of EIT within cQED.

  4. Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2014-11-04

    A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

  5. MS Musgrave tethered to starboard sill longeron floats outside PLB

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-07

    STS006-22-036 (7 April 1983) --- Astronaut F. Story Musgrave, one of two STS-6 mission specialists, participates in a safety tether dynamics checkout procedure during the mission’s April 7 extravehicular activity (EVA). Dr. Musgrave is tethered to both the near and far slide wire systems in this 35mm frame, exposed by astronaut Donald H. Peterson, who shared the cargo bay with Dr. Musgrave for the EVA. Clouds and mountains are visible on Earth below. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Large structures and tethers working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, G.; Garrett, H.; Samir, U.; Barnett, A.; Raitt, J.; Sullivan, J.; Katz, I.

    1986-01-01

    The Large Structures and Tethers Working Group sought to clarify the meaning of large structures and tethers as they related to space systems. Large was assumed to mean that the characteristic length of the structure was greater than one of such relevant plasma characteristics as ion gyroradius or debey length. Typically, anything greater than or equal to the Shuttle dimensions was considered large. It was agreed that most large space systems that the tether could be better categorized as extended length, area, or volume structures. The key environmental interactions were then identified in terms of these three categories. In the following Working Group summary, these categories and the related interactions are defined in detail. The emphasis is on how increases in each of the three spatial dimensions uniquely determine the interactions with the near-Earth space environment. Interactions with the environments around the other planets and the solar wind were assumed to be similar or capable of being extrapolated from the near-Earth results. It should be remembered in the following that the effects on large systems do not just affect specific technologies but will quite likely impact whole missions. Finally, the possible effects of large systems on the plasma environment, although only briefly discussed, were felt to be of potentially great concern.

  7. SPHERES tethered formation flight testbed: application to NASA's SPECS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Kong, Edmund M.; Miller, David W.

    2005-08-01

    This paper elaborates on theory and experiment of the formation flight control for the future space-borne tethered interferometers. The nonlinear equations of multi-vehicle tethered spacecraft system are derived by Lagrange equations and decoupling method. The preliminary analysis predicts unstable dynamics depending on the direction of the tether motor. The controllability analysis indicates that both array resizing and spin-up are fully controllable only by the reaction wheels and the tether motor, thereby eliminating the need for thrusters. Linear and nonlinear decentralized control techniques have been implemented into the tethered SPHERES testbed, and tested at the NASA MSFC's flat floor facility using two and three SPHERES configurations. The nonlinear control using feedback linearization technique performed successfully in both two SPHERES in-line configuration and three triangular configuration while varying the tether length. The relative metrology system, using the ultra sound metrology system and the inertial sensors as well as the decentralized nonlinear estimator, is developed to provide necessary state information.

  8. Elastic issues and vibration reduction in a tethered deorbiting mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Marco; Gasbarri, Paolo; Palmerini, Giovanni B.

    2016-05-01

    Recently proposed mission concepts involving harpoons or nets to capture and de-orbit debris represent an interesting application of the tethered systems, where the orbiting bodies are connected by a flexible link. These systems present a complex behavior, as flexible characteristics combine with orbital dynamics. The focus of the paper is on the dynamic behavior of the tethered system in the final phase of the de-orbiting mission, when a powerful apogee motor is used to change the debris orbit. The thrust action introduces significant issues, as elastic waves propagate along the tether, and the relevant oscillations couple with the orbital dynamics. Input shaping techniques are proposed to limit or cancel these oscillations. However, the performance of these techniques drops when non-ideal scenarios are considered. In particular, an initially slack tether is a serious issue that must be solved if acceptably low oscillations of the tether are to be obtained. Three strategies are proposed and discussed in this paper to remove the slack condition: a natural drift of the chaser by means of a single impulse, a controlled maneuver for precisely adjusting the relative distance between chaser spacecraft and debris, and a retrieval mechanism for changing the tether length.

  9. Exciplex ensemble modulated by excitation mode in intramolecular charge-transfer dyad: effects of temperature, solvent polarity, and wavelength on photochemistry and photophysics of tethered naphthalene-dicyanoethene system.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yoshiaki; Matsuki, Nobuo; Mori, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-19

    Solvent, temperature, and excitation wavelength significantly affected the photochemical outcomes of a naphthalene-dicyanoethene system tethered by different number (n) of methylene groups (1-3). The effect of irradiation wavelength was almost negligible for 2a but pronounced for 3a. The temperature dependence and theoretical calculations indicated the diversity of exciplex conformations, an ensemble of which can be effectively altered by changing excitation wavelength to eventually switch the regioselectivity of photoreactions.

  10. Brownian motion of tethered nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ota, Sadao; Li, Tongcang; Li, Yimin; Ye, Ziliang; Labno, Anna; Yin, Xiaobo; Alam, Mohammad-Reza; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    Brownian motion of slender particles near a boundary is ubiquitous in biological systems and in nanomaterial assembly, but the complex hydrodynamic interaction in those systems is still poorly understood. Here, we report experimental and computational studies of the Brownian motion of silicon nanowires tethered on a substrate. An optical interference method enabled direct observation of microscopic rotations of the slender bodies in three dimensions with high angular and temporal resolutions. This quantitative observation revealed anisotropic and angle-dependent hydrodynamic wall effects: rotational diffusivity in inclined and azimuth directions follows different power laws as a function of the length, ∼ L(-2.5) and ∼ L(-3), respectively, and is more hindered for smaller inclined angles. In parallel, we developed an implicit simulation technique that takes the complex wire-wall hydrodynamic interactions into account efficiently, the result of which agreed well with the experimentally observed angle-dependent diffusion. The demonstrated techniques provide a platform for studying the microrheology of soft condensed matters, such as colloidal and biological systems near interfaces, and exploring the optimal self-assembly conditions of nanostructures.

  11. Tethered nuclear power for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear space power system the SP-100 is being developed for future missions where large amounts of electrical power will be required. Although it is primarily intended for unmanned spacecraft, it can be adapted to a manned space platform by tethering it above the station through an electrical transmission line which isolates the reactor far away from the inhabited platform and conveys its power back to where it is needed. The transmission line, used in conjunction with an instrument rate shield, attenuates reactor radiation in the vicinity of the space station to less than one-one hundredth of the natural background which is already there. This combination of shielding and distance attenuation is less than one-tenth the mass of boom-mounted or onboard man-rated shields that are required when the reactor is mounted nearby. This paper describes how connection is made to the platform (configuration, operational requirements) and introduces a new element the coaxial transmission tube which enables efficient transmission of electrical power through long tethers in space. Design methodology for transmission tubes and tube arrays is discussed. An example conceptual design is presented that shows SP-100 at three power levels 100 kWe, 300 kWe, and 1000 kWe connected to space station via a 2 km HVDC transmission line/tether. Power system performance, mass, and radiation hazard are estimated with impacts on space station architecture and operation.

  12. Tethered nuclear power for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear space power system the SP-100 is being developed for future missions where large amounts of electrical power will be required. Although it is primarily intended for unmanned spacecraft, it can be adapted to a manned space platform by tethering it above the station through an electrical transmission line which isolates the reactor far away from the inhabited platform and conveys its power back to where it is needed. The transmission line, used in conjunction with an instrument rate shield, attenuates reactor radiation in the vicinity of the space station to less than one-one hundredth of the natural background which is already there. This combination of shielding and distance attenuation is less than one-tenth the mass of boom-mounted or onboard man-rated shields that are required when the reactor is mounted nearby. This paper describes how connection is made to the platform (configuration, operational requirements) and introduces a new element the coaxial transmission tube which enables efficient transmission of electrical power through long tethers in space. Design methodology for transmission tubes and tube arrays is discussed. An example conceptual design is presented that shows SP-100 at three power levels 100 kWe, 300 kWe, and 1000 kWe connected to space station via a 2 km HVDC transmission line/tether. Power system performance, mass, and radiation hazard are estimated with impacts on space station architecture and operation.

  13. Quantum Electrodynamical Shifts in Multivalent Heavy Ions.

    PubMed

    Tupitsyn, I I; Kozlov, M G; Safronova, M S; Shabaev, V M; Dzuba, V A

    2016-12-16

    The quantum electrodynamics (QED) corrections are directly incorporated into the most accurate treatment of the correlation corrections for ions with complex electronic structure of interest to metrology and tests of fundamental physics. We compared the performance of four different QED potentials for various systems to access the accuracy of QED calculations and to make a prediction of highly charged ion properties urgently needed for planning future experiments. We find that all four potentials give consistent and reliable results for ions of interest. For the strongly bound electrons, the nonlocal potentials are more accurate than the local potential.

  14. Single-photon-driven high-order sideband transitions in an ultrastrongly coupled circuit-quantum-electrodynamics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Wang, Yimin; Li, Tiefu; Tian, Lin; Qiu, Yueyin; Inomata, Kunihiro; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Han, Siyuan; Nori, Franco; Tsai, J. S.; You, J. Q.

    2017-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of high-order sideband transitions at the single-photon level in a quantum circuit system of a flux qubit ultrastrongly coupled to a coplanar waveguide resonator. With the coupling strength reaching 10% of the resonator's fundamental frequency, we obtain clear signatures of higher order red-sideband and first-order blue-sideband transitions, which are mainly due to the ultrastrong Rabi coupling. Our observation advances the understanding of ultrastrongly coupled systems and paves the way to study high-order processes in the quantum Rabi model at the single-photon level.

  15. Laboratory Scale Prototype of a Low-Speed Electrodynamic Levitation System Based on a Halbach Magnet Array

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iniguez, J.; Raposo, V.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the behaviour of a small-scale model of a magnetic levitation system based on the Inductrack concept. Drag and lift forces acting on our prototype, moving above a continuous copper track, are studied analytically following a simple low-speed approach. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical…

  16. Flowing Plasma Interaction with an Electric Sail Tether Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason; Wright, Kenneth; Anderson, Allen; Stone, Nobie

    2017-01-01

    Harnessing the power of the solar wind, an Electric Sail, or E-sail, is a relatively new concept that promises to deliver high speed propellant-less propulsion. The electric sail is an invention made in 2006 at the Kumpula Space Centre in Finland by Pekka Janhunen [Janhunen and Sandroos, 2007]. At its core, an electric sail utilizes multiple positively biased tethers which exchange momentum with solar wind protons via the repelling electric field established around each tether, in other words, by reflecting the solar wind protons. Recognizing the solar wind is a plasma, the effective repelling area of each tether is increased significantly by the formation a plasma sheath around each tether. Fig. 1 shows schematically a spacecraft employing an electric sail. The positive voltage bias (greater than10kV) applied to each tether naturally results in electron collection. Therefore, the electric sail concept necessarily includes an electron source (electron gun) to return collected electrons to space and maintain the positive bias of the tether system.

  17. Morpheus Alhat Tether Test Preparations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-27

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers and technicians prepare the Project Morpheus prototype lander for a tether test near a new launch site at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch pad was moved to a different location at the landing facility to support the next phase of flight testing. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces. The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  18. Morpheus Alhat Tether Test Preparations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-27

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Technicians watch as a crane lowers the Project Morpheus prototype lander onto a launch pad at a new launch site at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Preparations are underway for a tether test. The launch pad was moved to a different location at the landing facility to support the next phase of flight testing. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces. The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  19. Morpheus Alhat Tether Test Preparations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-27

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A crane lowers the Project Morpheus prototype lander onto a launch pad at a new launch site at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Preparations are underway for a tether test. The launch pad was moved to a different location at the landing facility to support the next phase of flight testing. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces. The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  20. Morpheus Alhat Tether Test Preparations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-27

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Project Morpheus prototype lander is positioned near a new launch site at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a tether test. The launch pad was moved to a different location at the landing facility to support the next phase of flight testing. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces. The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  1. Morpheus Alhat Tether Test Preparations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-27

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Engineers and technicians monitor the progress as a crane lifts the Project Morpheus prototype lander off the ground for a tether test near a new launch site at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch pad was moved to a different location at the landing facility to support the next phase of flight testing. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces. The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  2. Morpheus Alhat Tether Test Preparations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-27

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Project Morpheus prototype lander is positioned near a new launch site at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a tether test. The launch pad was moved to a different location at the landing facility to support the next phase of flight testing. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces. In the foreground of the photo is the ALHAT field. The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  3. Morpheus Alhat Tether Test Preparations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-27

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A technician prepares the Project Morpheus prototype lander for a tether test near a new launch site at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The launch pad was moved to a different location at the landing facility to support the next phase of flight testing. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces. The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  4. Single-photon driven high-order sideband transitions in an ultrastrongly coupled circuit quantum electrodynamics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiefu; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Yimin; Tian, Lin; Qiu, Yueyin; Inomata, Kunihiro; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Han, Siyuan; Nori, Franco; Tsai, Jaw-Shen; You, J. Q.

    We report the experimental observation of high-order sideband transitions at the single-photon level in a quantum circuit system of a flux qubit ultrastrongly coupled to a coplanar waveguide resonator. With the coupling strength reaching 10 % of the resonator's fundamental frequency, we obtain clear signatures of higher-order red- and first-order blue-sideband transitions. These transitions are owing to the ultrastrong Rabi coupling, instead of the driving power. Our observation advances the understanding of ultrastrongly-coupled systems and paves the way to study high-order processes in the quantum Rabi model. This work is supported by the National Basic Research Program of China and the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  5. On spacetime structure and electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2016-10-01

    Electrodynamics is the most tested fundamental physical theory. Relativity arose from the completion of Maxwell-Lorentz electrodynamics. Introducing the metric gij as gravitational potential in 1913, versed in general (coordinate-)covariant formalism in 1914 and shortly after the completion of general relativity, Einstein put the Maxwell equations in general covariant form with only the constitutive relation between the excitation and the field dependent on and connected by the metric in 1916. Further clarification and developments by Weyl in 1918, Murnaghan in 1921, Kottler in 1922 and Cartan in 1923 together with the corresponding developments in electrodynamics of continuous media by Bateman in 1910, Tamm in 1924, Laue in 1952 and Post in 1962 established the premetric formalism of electrodynamics. Since almost all phenomena electrodynamics deal with have energy scales much lower than the Higgs mass energy and intermediate boson energy, electrodynamics of continuous media should be applicable and the constitutive relation of spacetime/vacuum should be local and linear. What is the key characteristic of the spacetime/vacuum? It is the Weak Equivalence Principle I (WEP I) for photons/wave packets of light which states that the spacetime trajectory of light in a gravitational field depends only on its initial position and direction of propagation, and does not depend on its frequency (energy) and polarization, i.e. nonbirefringence of light propagation in spacetime/vacuum. With this principle it is proved by the author in 1981 in the weak field limit, and by Lammerzahl and Hehl in 2004 together with Favaro and Bergamin in 2011 without assuming the weak-field condition that the constitutive tensor must be of the core metric form with only two additional degrees of freedom — the pseudoscalar (Abelian axion or EM axion) degree of freedom and the scalar (dilaton) degree of freedom (i.e. metric with axion and dilaton). In this paper, we review this connection and the

  6. Electrodynamics and Spacetime Geometry: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the intimate connection between spacetime geometry and electrodynamics. This link is already implicit in the constitutive relations between the field strengths and excitations, which are an essential part of the axiomatic structure of electromagnetism, clearly formulated via integration theory and differential forms. We review the foundations of classical electromagnetism based on charge and magnetic flux conservation, the Lorentz force and the constitutive relations. These relations introduce the conformal part of the metric and allow the study of electrodynamics for specific spacetime geometries. At the foundational level, we discuss the possibility of generalizing the vacuum constitutive relations, by relaxing the fixed conditions of homogeneity and isotropy, and by assuming that the symmetry properties of the electro-vacuum follow the spacetime isometries. The implications of this extension are briefly discussed in the context of the intimate connection between electromagnetism and the geometry (and causal structure) of spacetime.

  7. Multisubunit tethering complexes in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Raksha; Steiner, Alexander; Assaad, Farhah F

    2017-12-01

    Tethering complexes mediate the initial, specific contact between donor and acceptor membranes. This review focuses on the modularity and function of multisubunit tethering complexes (MTCs) in higher plants. One emphasis is on molecular interactions of plant MTCs. Here, a number of insights have been gained concerning interactions between different tethering complexes, and between tethers and microtubule-associated proteins. The roles of tethering complexes in abiotic stress responses appear indirect, but in the context of biotic stress responses it has been suggested that some tethers are direct targets of pathogen effectors or virulence factors. In light of the central roles tethering complexes play in plant development, an emerging concept is that tethers may be co-opted for plant adaptive responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Apparent Paradoxes in Classical Electrodynamics: Relativistic Transformation of Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kholmetskii, A. L.; Yarman, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse a number of paradoxical teaching problems of classical electrodynamics, dealing with the relativistic transformation of force for complex macro systems, consisting of a number of subsystems with nonzero relative velocities such as electric circuits that change their shape in the course of time. (Contains 7 figures.)

  9. A reformulation of mechanics and electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Mario J

    2017-07-01

    Classical mechanics, as commonly taught in engineering and science, are confined to the conventional Newtonian theory. But classical mechanics has not really changed in substance since Newton formulation, describing simultaneous rotation and translation of objects with somewhat complicate drawbacks, risking interpretation of forces in non-inertial frames. In this work we introduce a new variational principle for out-of-equilibrium, rotating systems, obtaining a set of two first order differential equations that introduces a thermodynamic-mechanistic time into Newton's dynamical equation, and revealing the same formal symplectic structure shared by classical mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. The results is a more consistent formulation of dynamics and electrodynamics, explaining natural phenomena as the outcome from a balance between energy and entropy, embedding translational with rotational motion into a single equation, showing centrifugal and Coriolis force as derivatives from the transport of angular momentum, and offering a natural method to handle variational problems, as shown with the brachistochrone problem. In consequence, a new force term appears, the topological torsion current, important for spacecraft dynamics. We describe a set of solved problems showing the potential of a competing technique, with significant interest to electrodynamics as well. We expect this new approach to have impact in a large class of scientific and technological problems.

  10. The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    2002-01-01

    This Annual Report covers the following main topics: 1) Updated Reference Mission. The reference ProSEDS (Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System) mission is evaluated for an updated launch date in the Summer of 2002 and for the new 80-s current operating cycle. Simulations are run for nominal solar activity condition at the time of launch and for extreme conditions of dynamic forcing. Simulations include the dynamics of the system, the electrodynamics of the bare tether, the neutral atmosphere and the thermal response of the tether. 2) Evaluation of power delivered by the tether system. The power delivered by the tethered system during the battery charging mode is computed under the assumption of minimum solar activity for the new launch date. 3) Updated Deployment Control Profiles and Simulations. A number of new deployment profiles were derived based on the latest results of the deployment ground tests. The flight profile is then derived based on the friction characteristics obtained from the deployment tests of the F-1 tether. 4) Analysis/estimation of deployment flight data. A process was developed to estimate the deployment trajectory of the endmass with respect to the Delta and the final libration amplitude from the data of the deployer turn counters. This software was tested successfully during the ProSEDS mission simulation at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) EDAC (Environments Data Analysis Center).

  11. Space webs based on rotating tethered formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerini, Giovanni B.; Sgubini, Silvano; Sabatini, Marco

    2009-07-01

    Several on-going studies indicate the interest for large, light orbiting structures, shaped as fish nets or webs: along the ropes of the web small spacecraft can move like spiders to position and re-locate, at will, pieces of hardware devoted to specific missions. The concept could be considered as an intermediate solution between the large monolithic structure, heavy and expensive to realize, but easy to control, and the formations of satellites, where all system members are completely free and should manoeuvre in order to acquire a desired configuration. Instead, the advantage of having a "hard-but-light" link among the different grids lays in the partition of the tasks among system components and in a possible overall reduction of the control system complexity and cost. Unfortunately, there is no stable configuration for an orbiting, two-dimensional web made by light, flexible tethers which cannot support compression forces. A possible solution is to make use of centrifugal forces to pull the net, with a reduced number of simple thrusters located at the tips of the tethers to initially acquire the required spin. In this paper a dynamic analysis of a simplified rotating web is performed, in order to evaluate the spinning velocity able to satisfy the requirement for the stability of the system. The model adopted overlaps simpler elements, each of them given by a tether (made up of a number of linear finite elements) connecting two extreme bodies accommodating the spinning thrusters. The combination of these "diameter-like" elements provides the web, shaped according to the specific requirements. The net is primarily considered as subjected to Keplerian attraction and J2 and drag perturbations only, but its behaviour under thermal inputs is also investigated.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Tethered Underwater Kites for Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Amirmahdi; Olinger, David; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    An emerging renewable energy technology, tethered undersea kites (TUSK), which is used to extract hydrokinetic energy from ocean and tidal currents, is studied. TUSK systems consist of a rigid-winged ``kite,'' or glider, moving in an ocean current which is connected by tethers to a floating buoy on the ocean surface. The TUSK kite is a current speed enhancement device since the kite can move in high-speed, cross-current motion at 4-6 times the current velocity, thus producing more power than conventional marine turbines. A computational simulation is developed to simulate the dynamic motion of an underwater kite and extendable tether. A two-step projection method within a finite volume formulation, along with an Open MP acceleration method, is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. An immersed boundary method is incorporated to model the fluid-structure interaction of the rigid kite (with NACA 0012 airfoil shape in 2D and NACA 0021 airfoil shape in 3D simulations) and the fluid flow. PID control methods are used to adjust the kite angle of attack during power (tether reel-out) and retraction (reel-in) phases. Two baseline simulations (for kite motions in two and three dimensions) are studied, and system power output, flow field vorticity, tether tension, and hydrodynamic coefficients (lift and drag) for the kite are determined. The simulated power output shows good agreement with established theoretical results for a kite moving in two-dimensions.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Anchorlipids for Tethered Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jakob; Knobloch, Jacqueline J; Perkins, Michael V; Holt, Stephen A; Köper, Ingo

    2017-05-09

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes are versatile solid-supported model membrane systems. Core to these systems is an anchorlipid that covalently links a lipid bilayer to a support. The molecular structure of these lipids can have a significant impact on the properties of the resulting bilayer. Here, the synthesis of anchorlipids containing ester groups in the tethering part is described. The lipids are used to form bilayer membranes, and the resulting structures are compared with membranes formed using conventional anchorlipids or sparsely tethered membranes. All membranes showed good electrical sealing properties; the disulphide-terminated anchorlipids could be used in a sparsely tethered system without significantly reducing the sealing properties of the lipid bilayers. The sparsely tethered systems also allowed for higher ion transport across the membrane, which is in good correlation with higher hydration of the spacer region as seen by neutron scattering.

  14. Flight mechanics applications for tethers in space: Cooperative Italian-US programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevilacqua, Franco; Merlina, Pietro; Anderson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Since the 1974 proposal by Giuseppe Colombo to fly a tethered subsatellite from the Shuttle Orbiter, the creative thinking of many scientists and engineers from Italy and U.S. has generated a broad range of potential tether applications in space. Many of these applications have promise for enabling innovative research and operational activities relating to flight mechanics in earth orbit and at suborbital altitudes. From a flight mechanics standpoint the most interesting of the currently proposed flight demonstrations are: the second Tethered Satellite System experiment which offers both the potential for aerothermodynamics and hypersonics research and for atmospheric science research; the Tethered Initiated Space Recovery System which would enable orbital deboost and recovery of a re-entry vehicle and waste removal from a space station; and the Tether Elevator/Crawler System which would provide a variable microgravity environment and space station center of mass management. The outer atmospheric and orbital flight mechanics characteristics of these proposed tether flight demonstrations are described. The second Tethered Satellite System mission will deploy the tethered satellite earthward and will bring it as low as 130 km from ground and thus into the transition region between the atmosphere (non-ionized) and the partially ionized ionosphere. The atmospheric flight mechanics of the tethered satellite is discussed and simulation results are presented. The Tether Initiated Space Recovery System experiment will demonstrate the ability of a simple tether system to deboost and recover a reentry vehicle. The main feature of this demonstration is the utilization of a Small Expendable Deployment System (SEDS) and the low-tension deployment assumed to separate the reentry vehicle from the Shuttle. This low-tension deployment maneuver is discussed and its criticalities are outlined. The Tether Elevator/Crawler System is a new space element able to move in a controlled way

  15. Tethered Pyrotechnic Apparatus for Acquiring a Ground Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Zimmerman, Wayne; Wu, Jiunn Jenq; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    A proposed alternative design for the balloon-borne ground-sampling system described in the immediately preceding article would not rely on free fall to drive a harpoonlike sample-collecting device into the ground. Instead, the harpoon-like sample-collecting device would be a pyrotechnically driven, tethered projectile. The apparatus would include a tripod that would be tethered to the gondola. A gun for shooting the projectile into the ground would be mounted at the apex of the tripod. The gun would include an electronic trigger circuit, a chamber at the breech end containing a pyrotechnic charge, and a barrel. A sabot would be placed in the barrel just below the pyrotechnic charge, and the tethered projectile would be placed in the barrel just below the sabot. The tripod feet would be equipped with contact sensors connected to the trigger circuit. In operation, the tripod would be lowered to the ground on its tether. Once contact with the ground was detected by the sensors on all three tripod feet, the trigger circuit would fire the pyrotechnic charge to drive the projectile into the ground. (Requiring contact among all three tripod feet and the ground would ensure that the projectile would be fired into the ground, rather than up toward the gondola or the balloon.) The tethered projectile would then be reeled back up to the gondola for analysis of the sample.

  16. Investigation of dynamic noise affecting geodynamics information in a tethered subsatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gullahorn, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of a tethered satellite system's internal dynamics on the subsatellite were calculated including both overall motions (libration and attitude oscillations) and internal tether oscillations. The SKYHOOK tether simulation program was modified to operate with atmospheric density variations and to output quantities of interest. Techniques and software for analyzing the results were developed including noise spectral analysis. A program was begun for computing a stable configuration of a tether system subject to air drag. These configurations will be of use as initial conditions for SKYHOOK and, through linearized analysis, directly for stability and dynamical studies. A case study in which the subsatellite traverses an atmospheric density enhancement confirmed some theoretical calculations, and pointed out some aspects of the interaction with the tether system dynamics.

  17. Conceptual Assessment Tool for Advanced Undergraduate Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baily, Charles; Ryan, Qing X.; Astolfi, Cecilia; Pollock, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    As part of ongoing investigations into student learning in advanced undergraduate courses, we have developed a conceptual assessment tool for upper-division electrodynamics (E&M II): the Colorado UppeR-division ElectrodyNamics Test (CURrENT). This is a free response, postinstruction diagnostic with 6 multipart questions, an optional 3-question…

  18. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Estes, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on Tethering in Earth Orbit deals with three topics: (1) Investigation of the propagation of longitudinal and transverse waves along the upper tether. Specifically, the upper tether is modeled as three massive platforms connected by two perfectly elastic continua (tether segments). The tether attachment point to the station is assumed to vibrate both longitudinally and transversely at a given frequency. Longitudinal and transverse waves propagate along the tethers affecting the acceleration levels at the elevator and at the upper platform. The displacement and acceleration frequency-response functions at the elevator and at the upper platform are computed for both longitudinal and transverse waves. An analysis to optimize the damping time of the longitudinal dampers is also carried out in order to select optimal parameters. The analytical evaluation of the performance of tuned vs. detuned longitudinal dampers is also part of this analysis. (2) The use of the Shuttle primary Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters for blowing away a recoiling broken tether is discussed. A microcomputer system was set up to support this operation. (3) Most of the effort in the tether plasma physics study was devoted to software development. A particle simulation code has been integrated into the Macintosh II computer system and will be utilized for studying the physics of hollow cathodes.

  19. Self-assembled tethered bimolecular lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Ritz, Sandra; Naumann, Renate; Schiller, Stefan; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the strategies developed in our group for designing, constructing and structurally and functionally characterizing tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLM). We introduce this platform as a novel model membrane system that complements the existing ones, for example, Langmuir monolayers, vesicular liposomal dispersions and bimolecular ("black") lipid membranes. Moreover, it offers the additional advantage of allowing for studies of the influence of membrane structure and order on the function of integral proteins, for example, on how the composition and organization of lipids in a mixed membrane influence the ion translocation activity of integral channel proteins. The first strategy that we introduce concerns the preparation of tethered monolayers by the self-assembly of telechelics. Their molecular architecture with a headgroup, a spacer unit (the "tether") and the amphiphile that mimics the lipid molecule allows them to bind specifically to the solid support thus forming the proximal layer of the final architecture. After fusion of vesicles that could contain reconstituted proteins from a liposomal dispersion in contact to this monolayer the tethered bimolecular lipid membrane is obtained. This can then be characterized by a broad range of surface analytical techniques, including surface plasmon spectroscopies, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques, to mention a few. It is shown that this concept allows for the construction of tethered lipid bilayers with outstanding electrical properties including resistivities in excess of 10 MOmega cm2. A modified strategy uses the assembly of peptides as spacers that couple covalently via their engineered sulfhydryl or lipoic acid groups at the N-terminus to the employed gold substrate, while their C-terminus is being activated afterward for the coupling of, for example, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanol amine (DMPE) lipid molecules

  20. Tethered balloon-based measurements of meteorological variables and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentell, R. J.; Storey, R. W.; Chang, J. J. C.; Jacobsen, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tethered balloon based measurements of the vertical distributions of temperature, humidity, wind speed, and aerosol concentrations were taken over a 4-hour period beginning at sunrise on June 29, 1976, at Wallops Island, Virginia. Twelve consecutive profiles of each variable were obtained from ground to about 500 meters. These measurements were in conjuction with a noise propagation study on remotely arrayed acoustic range (ROMAAR) at Wallops Flight Center. An organized listing of these vertical soundings is presented. The tethered balloon system configuration utilized for these measurements is described.

  1. View of the TSS-1R after the tether broke

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-04-03

    STS075-360-021 (22 Feb.- 9 March 1996) --- The loose tether forms a faint diagonal line in this scene recorded on a later fly-by. On Feb. 25, 1996, the crew deployed the Tethered Satellite System (TSS), which later broke free. The seven member crew was launched aboard the space shuttle Columbia on Feb. 22, 1996, and landed on March 9, 1996. Crew members were Andrew M. Allen, mission commander; Scott J. Horowitz, pilot; Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, payload commander; and Maurizio Cheli, European Space Agency (ESA); Jeffrey A. Hoffman and Claude Nicollier, ESA, all mission specialists; along with payload specialist Umberto Guidoni of the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  2. Jupiter, Tether, and Lenz's Law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Russell

    1999-01-01

    Jupiter has a large, complex, and intense magnetic field that is thought to arise from electrical currents in the rapidly spinning metallic hydrogen interior. The strong magnetic field can induce currents when the conductive tether is directed toward or away from Jupiter. The currents can be stored and used for both propulsion and power generation. Therefore, our spacecraft might be able to visit several Jovian moons or maintain in the orbit around Jupiter. In our future space traveling, we also can use this technical skill to travel to other planets without any fuel. First-year physics textbooks describe Lenz's Law in which current is induced in a conductor moving through a stationary magnetic field. A demonstration of induced current in a stationary conductor and moving magnetic field is described, which may have space-tether application.

  3. Dynamic modeling and Super-Twisting Sliding Mode Control for Tethered Space Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yakun; Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan

    2018-02-01

    Recent years, tethered space capturing systems have been considered as one of the most promising solutions for active space debris removal due to the increasing threat of space debris to spacecraft and astronauts. In this paper, one of the tethered space capturing systems, Tethered Space Robot (TSR), is investigated. TSR includes a space platform, a space tether, and a gripper as the terminal device. Based on the assumptions that the platform and the gripper are point masses and the tether is rigid, inextensible and remaining straight, the dynamic model of TSR is presented, in which the disturbances from space environment is considered. According to the previous study, the in-plane and out-of-plane angles of the tether oscillate periodically although the tether is released to the desired length. A super-twisting adaptive sliding mode control scheme is designed for TSR to eliminate the vibration of the tether to assure a successful capture in station-keeping phase. Both uncontrolled and controlled situations are simulated. The simulation results show that the proposed controller is effective. Additionally, after comparing with normal sliding mode control algorithm, it is verified that the proposed control scheme can avoid the chattering of normal sliding mode control and is robust for unknown boundary perturbations.

  4. Design and fabrication of the 20 km/10 kV electromechanical tether for TSS-1 using high impact conductor (Hiwire)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scala, E.; Bentley, D. P.; Marshall, L. S.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a 20-km electromechanical tether for the tethered satellite system (TSS) is described. The basic design requirements for electromagnetic cables and for conductors in cables subject to stresses and cyclic loading are discussed. The tether fabricatioon procedures involve: (1) conductor twisting around the core, (2) insulation extrusion, (3) strength member braiding, and (4) protective jacket braiding.

  5. Two-Way Tether Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Safety-tether device enables crewmembers on spacecraft to retrieve crewmember drifting away from spacecraft. Alternatively, drifting crewmember who carries device uses it to grasp and return to spacecraft. Also used on Earth. For example, rescuer on vessel or pier uses it to retrieve and haul drowning or unconscious person to safety; drifting person or rescuer in water uses it to grasp and hold onto support.

  6. Hybrid test on building structures using electrodynamic fatigue test machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhao-Dong; Wang, Kai-Yang; Guo, Ying-Qing; Wu, Min-Dong; Xu, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid simulation is an advanced structural dynamic experimental method that combines experimental physical models with analytical numerical models. It has increasingly been recognised as a powerful methodology to evaluate structural nonlinear components and systems under realistic operating conditions. One of the barriers for this advanced testing is the lack of flexible software for hybrid simulation using heterogeneous experimental equipment. In this study, an electrodynamic fatigue test machine is made and a MATLAB program is developed for hybrid simulation. Compared with the servo-hydraulic system, electrodynamic fatigue test machine has the advantages of small volume, easy operation and fast response. A hybrid simulation is conducted to verify the flexibility and capability of the whole system whose experimental substructure is one spring brace and numerical substructure is a two-storey steel frame structure. Experimental and numerical results show the feasibility and applicability of the whole system.

  7. Dynamics and stability of a tethered centrifuge in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, B. M.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional attitude dynamics of a spaceborne tethered centrifuge for artificial gravity experiments in low earth orbit is analyzed using two different methods. First, the tethered centrifuge is modeled as a dumbbell with a straight viscoelastic tether, point tip-masses, and sophisticated environmental models such as nonspherical gravity, thermal perturbations, and a dynamic atmospheric model. The motion of the centrifuge during spin-up, de-spin, and steady-rotation is then simulated. Second, a continuum model of the tether is developed for analyzing the stability of lateral tether oscillations. Results indicate that the maximum fluctuation about the 1-g radial acceleration level is less than 0.001 g; the time required for spin-up and de-spin is less than one orbit; and lateral oscillations are stable for any practical values of the system parameters.

  8. Electrodynamics of ionospheric weather over low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil Ali

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic state of the ionosphere at low latitudes is largely controlled by electric fields originating from dynamo actions by atmospheric waves propagating from below and the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction from above. These electric fields cause structuring of the ionosphere in wide ranging spatial and temporal scales that impact on space-based communication and navigation systems constituting an important segment of our technology-based day-to-day lives. The largest of the ionosphere structures, the equatorial ionization anomaly, with global maximum of plasma densities can cause propagation delays on the GNSS signals. The sunset electrodynamics is responsible for the generation of plasma bubble wide spectrum irregularities that can cause scintillation or even disruptions of satellite communication/navigation signals. Driven basically by upward propagating tides, these electric fields can suffer significant modulations from perturbation winds due to gravity waves, planetary/Kelvin waves, and non-migrating tides, as recent observational and modeling results have demonstrated. The changing state of the plasma distribution arising from these highly variable electric fields constitutes an important component of the ionospheric weather disturbances. Another, often dominating, component arises from solar disturbances when coronal mass ejection (CME) interaction with the earth's magnetosphere results in energy transport to low latitudes in the form of storm time prompt penetration electric fields and thermospheric disturbance winds. As a result, drastic modifications can occur in the form of layer restructuring (Es-, F3 layers etc.), large total electron content (TEC) enhancements, equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) latitudinal expansion/contraction, anomalous polarization electric fields/vertical drifts, enhanced growth/suppression of plasma structuring, etc. A brief review of our current understanding of the ionospheric weather variations and the

  9. Electrostatic and electrodynamic response properties of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz, Yuksel

    1999-11-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of nanostructure dielectric response to excitation by electric fields, both in the electrostatic c→infinity and the electrodynamic regimes. The nanostructures treated include planar quantum wells and quantum wires embedded in the vicinity of the bounding surface of the host semiconductor medium. Various cases are analyzed, including a single well or wire, a double well or wire, a lattice of N wells or wires and an infinite superlattice of wells or wires. The host medium is considered to have phonons and/or a bulk semiconductor plasma which interact with the plasmons of the embedded quantum wells or wires, and the host plasma is treated in both the local "cold" plasma regime and the nonlocal "hot" plasma regime. New hybridized quantum plasma collective modes emerge from these studies. The techniques employed here include the variational differential formulation of integral equations for the inverse dielectric function (in electrostatic case) and the dyadic Green's function (in the electrodynamic case) for the various systems described above. These integral equations are then solved in frequency-position representation by a variety of techniques depending on the geometrical features of the particular problem. Explicit closed form solutions for the inverse dielectric function or dyadic Green's function facilitate identification of the coupled collective modes in terms of their frequency poles, and the residues at the pole positions provide the relative amplitudes with which these normal modes respond to external excitation. Interesting features found include, for example, explicit formulas showing the transference of coupling of a two dimensional (2D) quantum well plasmon from a surface phonon to a bulk phonon as the 2D quantum well is displaced away from the bounding surface, deeper into the medium.

  10. Tethers as Debris: Hydrocode Simulation of Impacts of Polymer Tether Fragments on Aluminum Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2003-01-01

    Tethers promise to find use in a variety of space applications. Despite being narrow objects, their great lengths result in them having large total areas. Consequently, tethers are very susceptible to being severed by orbital debris. Extensive work has been done designing tethers that resist severs by small debris objects, in order to lengthen their working lives. It is from this perspective that most recent work has considered the tether - debris question. The potential of intact tethers, or severed tether fragments, as debris, to pose a significant collision risk to other spacecraft has been less well studied. Understanding the consequences of such collisions is important in assessing the risks tethers pose to other spacecraft. This paper discusses the damage that polymer tethers may produce on aluminum plates, as revealed by hypervelocity impact simulations using the SPHC hydrodynamic code.

  11. Astronaut James Newman evaluates tether devices in Discovery's payload bay

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-09-16

    Astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, uses a 35mm camera to take a picture of fellow astronaut Carl E. Walz (out of frame) in Discovery's cargo bay. The two were engaged in an extravehicular activity (EVA) to test equipment to be used on future EVA's. Newman is tethered to the starboard side, with the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod just behind him.

  12. Modeling and Control of a Tethered Rotorcraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-30

    viscous damper with damping coefficient Cv. Visco-elastic line force is written in terms of components Δx, Δy, and Δz, of the difference vector formed...tether drag coefficient CS = tether damping coefficient Cv = viscous damping coefficient d = diameter of the tether En = n x n identity matrix FA...matrix consisting of Iyy and Izz k = rotor head stiffness KLAT, KLON = steady state flapping gains Ks, Kv = static and viscous stiffness Lj

  13. Non-existence of rest-frame spin-eigenstate spinors in their own electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Luca; da Rocha, Roldão

    2018-05-01

    We assume a physical situation where gravity with torsion is neglected for an electrodynamically self-interacting spinor that will be taken in its rest-frame and spin-eigenstate: we demonstrate that under this circumstance no solution exists for the system of field equations. Despite such a situation might look artificial nevertheless it represents the instance that is commonly taken as the basis for all computations of quantum electrodynamics.

  14. Notes on Born-Infeld-type electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2017-11-01

    We propose a new model of nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED) with three parameters. Born-Infeld (BI) electrodynamics and exponential electrodynamics are particular cases of this model. The phenomenon of vacuum birefringence in the external magnetic field is studied. We show that there is no singularity of the electric field at the origin of point-like charged particles. The corrections to Coulomb’s law at r →∞ are obtained. We calculate the total electrostatic energy of charges, for different parameters of the model, which is finite.

  15. Remarks on Heisenberg-Euler-type electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2017-05-01

    We consider Heisenberg-Euler-type model of nonlinear electrodynamics with two parameters. Heisenberg-Euler electrodynamics is a particular case of this model. Corrections to Coulomb’s law at r →∞ are obtained and energy conditions are studied. The total electrostatic energy of charged particles is finite. The charged black hole solution in the framework of nonlinear electrodynamics is investigated. We find the asymptotic of the metric and mass functions at r →∞. Corrections to the Reissner-Nordström solution are obtained.

  16. Laboratory simulation of the electrodynamic interactions of a tethered satellite with an ionospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonifazi, C.; Lebreton, J. P.; Vannaroni, G.; Cosmovici, C.; Debrie, R.; Hamelin, M.; Pomathiod, L.; Arends, H.

    1986-01-01

    An improved experimental set-up in the Orleans Plasma Chamber allowed investigations of the I-V characteristics of a conductive spherical body (10 cm diameter) in a plasma environment. Moreover, the influence of a transversal magnetic field at 0.6 and 1.2 G was investigated, for the first time, both on the sheath potential profile and current collection. Floating potential profiles were measured at 16 different radial distances from the test body up to 9 body radii in 8 different angular positions. The test body potential could be increased in the range from -200 V up to +100 V. Preliminary results are shown and discussed.

  17. Pathfinder

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This picture is an artist's concept of an orbiting vehicle using the Electrodynamic Tethers Propulsion System. Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to push against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant.

  18. Analysis of ProSEDS Test of Bare-Tether Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanmartin, J. R.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Estes, R. D.; Charro, M.; Cosmo, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's tether experiment ProSEDS will be placed in orbit on board a Delta-II rocket to test bare-tether electron collection, deorbiting of the rocket second stage, and the system dynamic stability. ProSEDS performance will vary because ambient conditions change along the orbit and tether-circuit bulk elements at the cathodic end follow the step-by-step sequence for the current cycles of operating modes (open-circuit, shunt and resistor modes for primary cycles; shunt and battery modes for secondary cycles). In this work we discuss expected ProSEDS values of the ratio L,/L*, which jointly with cathodic bulk elements determines bias and current tether profiles; L, is tether length, and L* (changing with tether temperature and ionospheric plasma density and magnetic field) is a characteristic length gauging ohmic versus baretether collection impedances. We discuss how to test bare-tether electron collection during primary cycles, using probe measurements of plasma density, measurements of cathodic current in resistor and shunt modes, and an estimate of tether temperature based on ProSEDS orbital position at the particular cycle concerned. We discuss how a temperature misestimate might occasionally affect the test of bare-tether collection, and how introducing the battery mode in some primary cycles, for an additional current measurement, could obviate the need of a temperature estimate. We also show how to test bare-tether collection by estimating orbit-decay rate from measurements of cathodic current for the shunt and battery modes of secondary cycles.

  19. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.; Arnold, D. A.; Grossi, M. D.; Gullahorn, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a two dimensional analytical model that describes the dynamics of an n-mass vertical tethered system is reported. Two different approaches are described: in the first one the control quantities are the independent variables while in the second one the Cartesian coordinates of each mass expressed in the orbiting reference frame are the independent variables. The latter model was used in the 3-mass version to simulate the dynamics of the tethered system in applications involving the displacement of the middle mass along the tether. In particular, issues related to reproducing predetermined acceleration profiles and g-tuning are reported.

  20. Experiments and simulation of a net closing mechanism for tether-net capture of space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Inna; Thomsen, Benjamin; Botta, Eleonora M.; Misra, Arun K.

    2017-10-01

    This research addresses the design and testing of a debris containment system for use in a tether-net approach to space debris removal. The tether-net active debris removal involves the ejection of a net from a spacecraft by applying impulses to masses on the net, subsequent expansion of the net, the envelopment and capture of the debris target, and the de-orbiting of the debris via a tether to the chaser spacecraft. To ensure a debris removal mission's success, it is important that the debris be successfully captured and then, secured within the net. To this end, we present a concept for a net closing mechanism, which we believe will permit consistently successful debris capture via a simple and unobtrusive design. This net closing system functions by extending the main tether connecting the chaser spacecraft and the net vertex to the perimeter and around the perimeter of the net, allowing the tether to actuate closure of the net in a manner similar to a cinch cord. A particular embodiment of the design in a laboratory test-bed is described: the test-bed itself is comprised of a scaled-down tether-net, a supporting frame and a mock-up debris. Experiments conducted with the facility demonstrate the practicality of the net closing system. A model of the net closure concept has been integrated into the previously developed dynamics simulator of the chaser/tether-net/debris system. Simulations under tether tensioning conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the closure concept for debris containment, in the gravity-free environment of space, for a realistic debris target. The on-ground experimental test-bed is also used to showcase its utility for validating the dynamics simulation of the net deployment, and a full-scale automated setup would make possible a range of validation studies of other aspects of a tether-net debris capture mission.

  1. Electric Sail (E-Sail) Tether Team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-03

    Electric Sail (E-Sail) Tether Team with 6U CubeSat Prototypes and Current Version of Tether Deployer Test Article, (Right to left: Tom Bryan, Davis Hunter (student intern), Jonathan MacArthur (student intern), Charles Cowen, Mike Tinker)

  2. Three dimensional dynamics of a flexible Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, N. A.; Cartmell, M. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new flexural model for the three dimensional dynamics of the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether (MMET) concept. This study has uncovered the relationships between planar and nonplanar motions, and the effect of the coupling between these two parameters on pragmatic circular and elliptical orbits. The tether sub-spans are modelled as stiffened strings governed by partial differential equations of motion, with specific boundary conditions. The tether sub-spans are flexible and elastic, thereby allowing three dimensional displacements. The boundary conditions lead to a specific frequency equation and the eigenvalues from this provide the natural frequencies of the orbiting flexible motorised tether when static, accelerating in monotonic spin, and at terminal angular velocity. A rotation transformation matrix has been utilised to get the position vectors of the system's components in an assumed inertial frame. Spatio-temporal coordinates are transformed to modal coordinates before applying Lagrange's equations, and pre-selected linear modes are included to generate the equations of motion. The equations of motion contain inertial nonlinearities which are essentially of cubic order, and these show the potential for intricate intermodal coupling effects. A simulation of planar and non-planar motions has been undertaken and the differences in the modal responses, for both motions, and between the rigid body and flexible models are highlighted and discussed.

  3. Sliding mode control of electromagnetic tethered satellite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallaj, Mohammad Amin Alandi; Assadian, Nima

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the control of tethered satellite formation actuated by electromagnetic dipoles and reaction wheels using the robust sliding mode control technique. Generating electromagnetic forces and moments by electric current coils provides an attractive control actuation alternative for tethered satellite system due to the advantages of no propellant consumption and no obligatory rotational motion. Based on a dumbbell model of tethered satellite in which the flexibility and mass of the tether is neglected, the equations of motion in Cartesian coordinate are derived. In this model, the J2 perturbation is taken into account. The far-field and mid-field models of electromagnetic forces and moments of two satellites on each other and the effect of the Earth's magnetic field are presented. A robust sliding mode controller is designed for precise trajectory tracking purposes and to deal with the electromagnetic force and moment uncertainties and external disturbances due to the Earth's gravitational and magnetic fields inaccuracy. Numerical simulation results are presented to validate the effectiveness of the developed controller and its superiority over the linear controller.

  4. Application Number 3: Using Tethers for Attitude Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Past application of the gravity gradient concept to satellite attitude control produced attitude stabilities of from 1 to 10 degrees. The satellite members were rigigly interconnected and any motion in one part of the satellite would cause motion in all members. This experience has restricted gravity gradient stabilization to applications that need attitude stability no better than 1 degree. A gravity gradient technique that combines the flexible tether with an active control that will allow control stability much better than 1 degree is proposed. This could give gravity gradient stabilization much broader application. In fact, for a large structure like a space station, it may become the preferred method. Two possible ways of demonstrating the techniques using the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) tether to control the attitude of the shuttle are proposed. Then a possible space station tether configuration is shown that could be used to control the initial station. It is then shown how the technique can be extended to the control of space stations of virtually any size.

  5. Eukaryotic membrane tethers revisited using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Hosu, Basarab G; Sun, Mingzhai; Marga, Françoise; Grandbois, Michel; Forgacs, Gabor

    2007-04-19

    Membrane nanotubes, under physiological conditions, typically form en masse. We employed magnetic tweezers (MTW) to extract tethers from human brain tumor cells and compared their biophysical properties with tethers extracted after disruption of the cytoskeleton and from a strongly differing cell type, Chinese hamster ovary cells. In this method, the constant force produced with the MTW is transduced to cells through super-paramagnetic beads attached to the cell membrane. Multiple sudden jumps in bead velocity were manifest in the recorded bead displacement-time profiles. These discrete events were interpreted as successive ruptures of individual tethers. Observation with scanning electron microscopy supported the simultaneous existence of multiple tethers. The physical characteristics, in particular, the number and viscoelastic properties of the extracted tethers were determined from the analytic fit to bead trajectories, provided by a standard model of viscoelasticity. Comparison of tethers formed with MTW and atomic force microscopy (AFM), a technique where the cantilever-force transducer is moved at constant velocity, revealed significant differences in the two methods of tether formation. Our findings imply that extreme care must be used to interpret the outcome of tether pulling experiments performed with single molecular techniques (MTW, AFM, optical tweezers, etc). First, the different methods may be testing distinct membrane structures with distinct properties. Second, as soon as a true cell membrane (as opposed to that of a vesicle) can attach to a substrate, upon pulling on it, multiple nonspecific membrane tethers may be generated. Therefore, under physiological conditions, distinguishing between tethers formed through specific and nonspecific interactions is highly nontrivial if at all possible.

  6. Eukaryotic membrane tethers revisited using magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosu, Basarab G.; Sun, Mingzhai; Marga, Françoise; Grandbois, Michel; Forgacs, Gabor

    2007-06-01

    Membrane nanotubes, under physiological conditions, typically form en masse. We employed magnetic tweezers (MTW) to extract tethers from human brain tumor cells and compared their biophysical properties with tethers extracted after disruption of the cytoskeleton and from a strongly differing cell type, Chinese hamster ovary cells. In this method, the constant force produced with the MTW is transduced to cells through super-paramagnetic beads attached to the cell membrane. Multiple sudden jumps in bead velocity were manifest in the recorded bead displacement-time profiles. These discrete events were interpreted as successive ruptures of individual tethers. Observation with scanning electron microscopy supported the simultaneous existence of multiple tethers. The physical characteristics, in particular, the number and viscoelastic properties of the extracted tethers were determined from the analytic fit to bead trajectories, provided by a standard model of viscoelasticity. Comparison of tethers formed with MTW and atomic force microscopy (AFM), a technique where the cantilever-force transducer is moved at constant velocity, revealed significant differences in the two methods of tether formation. Our findings imply that extreme care must be used to interpret the outcome of tether pulling experiments performed with single molecular techniques (MTW, AFM, optical tweezers, etc). First, the different methods may be testing distinct membrane structures with distinct properties. Second, as soon as a true cell membrane (as opposed to that of a vesicle) can attach to a substrate, upon pulling on it, multiple nonspecific membrane tethers may be generated. Therefore, under physiological conditions, distinguishing between tethers formed through specific and nonspecific interactions is highly nontrivial if at all possible.

  7. Triviality of Quantum Electrodynamics Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djukanovic, D.; Gegelia, J.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is often considered to be a trivial theory. This is based on a number of evidences, both numerical and analytical. One of the strong indications for triviality of QED is the existence of the Landau pole for the running coupling. We show that by treating QED as the leading order approximation of an effective field theory and including the next-to-leading order corrections, the Landau pole is removed. We also analyze the cutoff dependence of the bare coupling at two-loop order and conclude that the conjecture, that for reasons of self-consistency, QED needs to be trivial is a mere artefact of the leading order approximation to the corresponding effective field theory. Supported in part by DFG and NSFC through funds provided to the Sino-German CRC 110 “Symmetries and the Emergence of Structure in QCD” National Natural Science Foundation of under Grant No. 11621131001, DFG under Grant No. TRR110, the Georgian Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation (Grant FR/417/6-100/14) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences President’s International Fellowship Initiative (PIFI) under Grant No. 2017VMA0025

  8. Global electrodynamics from superpressure balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Hu, H.

    1995-01-01

    Electric field and conductivity measurements in the stratosphere between November 1992 and March 1993 have been made using superpressure balloons in the southern hemisphere. Over 400 payload-days of data have been made during a record setting experiment called ELBBO (Extended Life Balloon Borne Observatories). This experiment resulted in 4 flights aloft simultaneously for over 2 months including one flight which lasted over 4 months. Electrodynamical coupling between the atmosphere and ionosphere is studied using the measured electric fields, and a simple empirical model of the stratospheric conductivity. Altitude profiles of conductivity have been obtained from several superpressure balloon flights using the large end-of-flight altitude swings on the last few days of each flight (as the balloon begins to loose superpressure). Coupling between the fields and atmospheric inertial waves has been observed. Effects and dynamics of the global circuit suggest that standard models are missing significant phenomena. Large scale ionospheric convection activity has been studied from the polar cap to the middle latitudes. Cusp latitude fields have been continuously measured for many days in a row.

  9. Nonlocal electrodynamics in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, B.; Kao, H. C.; Lewkowicz, M.

    2017-02-01

    Recently synthesized three-dimensional materials with Dirac spectrum exhibit peculiar electric transport qualitatively different from its two-dimensional analog, graphene. By neglecting impurity scattering, the real part of the conductivity is strongly frequency dependent, while the imaginary part is nonzero unlike in undoped, clean graphene. The Coulomb interaction between electrons is unscreened as in a dielectric and hence is long range. We demonstrate that the interaction correction renders the electrodynamics nonlocal on a mesoscopic scale. The longitudinal conductivity σL and the transverse conductivity σT are different in the long-wavelength limit and consequently the standard local Ohm's law description does not apply. This leads to several remarkable effects in optical response. The p -polarized light generates in these materials bulk plasmons as well as the transversal waves. At a specific frequency the two modes coincide, a phenomenon impossible in a local medium. For any frequency there is a Brewster angle where total absorption occurs, turning the Weyl semimetals opaque. The effect of the surface, including the Fermi arcs, is discussed.

  10. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  11. Nonlinear electrodynamics and CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J.; Lambiase, G.

    2011-03-01

    Recently WMAP and BOOMERanG experiments have set stringent constraints on the polarization angle of photons propagating in an expanding universe: Δα = (-2.4±1.9)°. The polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) is reviewed in the context of nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED). We compute the polarization angle of photons propagating in a cosmological background with planar symmetry. For this purpose, we use the Pagels-Tomboulis (PT) Lagrangian density describing NLED, which has the form L ~ (X/Λ4)δ-1 X, where X = ¼FαβFαβ, and δ the parameter featuring the non-Maxwellian character of the PT nonlinear description of the electromagnetic interaction. After looking at the polarization components in the plane orthogonal to the (x)-direction of propagation of the CMB photons, the polarization angle is defined in terms of the eccentricity of the universe, a geometrical property whose evolution on cosmic time (from the last scattering surface to the present) is constrained by the strength of magnetic fields over extragalactic distances.

  12. Transportation using spinning tethers with emphasis on phasing and plane change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, David G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper studies the potential uses of spinning tethers as components in a transportation system. Additional degrees of freedom in the selection of transfer orbits as well as phasing control are introduced by allowing both the spin rate of the tethers to be controllable and by allowing the ejection and capture points to be anywhere along the tether length. Equations are derived for the phasing of the planar transfer problem. A construction algorithm for nonplanar transfers is developed and nonplanar phasing conditions are examined.

  13. Non-US electrodynamic launchers research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Batteh, J.H.; Greig, J.R.

    Electrodynamic launcher research and development work of scientists outside the United States is analyzed and assessed by six internationally recognized US experts in the field of electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers. The assessment covers five broad technology areas: (1) Experimental railguns; (2) Railgun theory and design; (3) Induction launchers; (4) Electrothermal guns; (5) Energy storage and power supplies. The overall conclusion is that non-US work on electrodynamic launchers is maturing rapidly after a relatively late start in many countries. No foreign program challenges the US efforts in scope, but it is evident that the United States may be surpassed in somemore » technologies within the next few years. Until recently, published Russian work focused on hypervelocity for research purposes. Within the last two years, large facilities have been described where military-oriented development has been underway since the mid-1980s. Financial support for these large facilities appears to have collapsed, leaving no effective effort to develop practical launchers for military or civilian applications. Electrodynamic launcher research in Europe is making rapid progress by focusing on a single application, tactical launchers for the military. Four major laboratories, in Britain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands, are working on this problem. Though narrower in scope than the US effort, the European work enjoys a continuity of support that has accelerated its progress. The next decade will see the deployment of electrodynamic launcher technology, probably in the form of an electrothermal-chemical upgrade for an existing gun system. The time scale for deployment of electromagnetic launchers is entirely dependent on the level of research-and-development effort. If resources remain limited, the advantage will lie with cooperative efforts that have reasonably stable funding such as the present French-German program.« less

  14. Tethers in space: Birth and growth of a new avenue to space utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of the ideas of tether applications in space are traced from its origin in the last century past a dormant period of sixty-five years to the mid-seventies. At that time as a consequence of major revival efforts, NASA entered into serious investigations of the theoretical and practical feasibility of a large number of tethered concepts in space. These efforts culminated in the establishment of the Tethered Satellite System Project now at NASA in the advanced development phase. Extensive planning efforts are described, first, through a Tether Applications in Space Workshop which generated additional concepts and provided overall assessments and recommendations to NASA, and then through a NASA inter-center Tether Applications in Space Task Group which generated a four year program plan in the areas of further studies, technology, work and science and applications of tethers in space. An outlook into the future of tether applications that approaches some of the goals of the early visionaries is offered.

  15. Autonomous Vision-Based Tethered-Assisted Rover Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dorian; Nesnas, Issa A.D.; Zarzhitsky, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    Many intriguing science discoveries on planetary surfaces, such as the seasonal flows on crater walls and skylight entrances to lava tubes, are at sites that are currently inaccessible to state-of-the-art rovers. The in situ exploration of such sites is likely to require a tethered platform both for mechanical support and for providing power and communication. Mother/daughter architectures have been investigated where a mother deploys a tethered daughter into extreme terrains. Deploying and retracting a tethered daughter requires undocking and re-docking of the daughter to the mother, with the latter being the challenging part. In this paper, we describe a vision-based tether-assisted algorithm for the autonomous re-docking of a daughter to its mother following an extreme terrain excursion. The algorithm uses fiducials mounted on the mother to improve the reliability and accuracy of estimating the pose of the mother relative to the daughter. The tether that is anchored by the mother helps the docking process and increases the system's tolerance to pose uncertainties by mechanically aligning the mating parts in the final docking phase. A preliminary version of the algorithm was developed and field-tested on the Axel rover in the JPL Mars Yard. The algorithm achieved an 80% success rate in 40 experiments in both firm and loose soils and starting from up to 6 m away at up to 40 deg radial angle and 20 deg relative heading. The algorithm does not rely on an initial estimate of the relative pose. The preliminary results are promising and help retire the risk associated with the autonomous docking process enabling consideration in future martian and lunar missions.

  16. Radiation and matter: Electrodynamics postulates and Lorenz gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, V. B.; Trigger, S. A.; van Heijst, G. J.; Schram, P. P.

    2016-11-01

    In general terms, we have considered matter as the system of charged particles and quantized electromagnetic field. For consistent description of the thermodynamic properties of matter, especially in an extreme state, the problem of quantization of the longitudinal and scalar potentials should be solved. In this connection, we pay attention that the traditional postulates of electrodynamics, which claim that only electric and magnetic fields are observable, is resolved by denial of the statement about validity of the Maxwell equations for microscopic fields. The Maxwell equations, as the generalization of experimental data, are valid only for averaged values. We show that microscopic electrodynamics may be based on postulation of the d'Alembert equations for four-vector of the electromagnetic field potential. The Lorenz gauge is valid for the averages potentials (and provides the implementation of the Maxwell equations for averages). The suggested concept overcomes difficulties under the electromagnetic field quantization procedure being in accordance with the results of quantum electrodynamics. As a result, longitudinal and scalar photons become real rather than virtual and may be observed in principle. The longitudinal and scalar photons provide not only the Coulomb interaction of charged particles, but also allow the electrical Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  17. Global ionospheric dynamics and electrodynamics during geomagnetic storms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Tsurutani, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Komjathy, A.; Butala, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Globally distributed total electron content (TEC) data has become an important tool for exploring the consequences of storm-time electrodynamics. Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling during the main phase is responsible for the largest ionospheric effects observed during geomagnetic storms, mediated by global scale electrodynamics. Recent research using case studies reveals a complex picture of M-I coupling and its relationship to interplanetary drivers such as the solar wind electric field. Periods of direct coupling exist where the solar wind electric field is strongly correlated with prompt penetration electric fields, observed as enhanced vertical plasma drifts or an enhanced electrojet in the daytime equatorial ionosphere. Periods of decoupling between low latitude electric fields and the solar wind electric field are also observed, but the factors distinguishing these two types of response have not been clearly identified. Recent studies during superstorms suggest a role for the transverse (y-component) of the interplanetary magnetic field, which affects magnetospheric current systems and therefore may affect M-I coupling, with significant ionospheric consequences. Observations of the global ionospheric response to a range of geomagnetic storm intensities are presented. Scientific understanding of the different factors that affect electrodynamic aspects of M-I coupling are discussed.

  18. Analysis of the effect of attachment point bias during large space debris removal using a tethered space tug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhongyi; Di, Jingnan; Cui, Jing

    2017-10-01

    Space debris occupies a valuable orbital resource and is an inevitable and urgent problem, especially for large space debris because of its high risk and the possible crippling effects of a collision. Space debris has attracted much attention in recent years. A tethered system used in an active debris removal scenario is a promising method to de-orbit large debris in a safe manner. In a tethered system, the flexibility of the tether used in debris removal can possibly induce tangling, which is dangerous and should be avoided. In particular, attachment point bias due to capture error can significantly affect the motion of debris relative to the tether and increase the tangling risk. Hence, in this paper, the effect of attachment point bias on the tethered system is studied based on a dynamic model established based on a Newtonian approach. Next, a safety metric of avoiding a tangle when a tether is tensioned with attachment point bias is designed to analyse the tangling risk of the tethered system. Finally, several numerical cases are established and simulated to validate the effects of attachment point bias on a space tethered system.

  19. Failsafe multistrand tether structures for space propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1992-07-01

    The development of a circularly symmetric singly crosslinked multistrand space tether, named Hoytether, is reported. The Hoytether consists of a number of primary strands running the full length of the structure, with nearest neighbor primary strands crosslinked at intervals by secondary strands that are put under load only if a section of primary strand is cut by space debris. It has been demonstrated that a multistrand tether of the singly crosslinked Hoytether design can provide a long-lived failsafe multistrand replacement for a single-strand tether while imposing a minimal mass ratio penalty.

  20. Computational study of small molecule binding for both tethered and free conditions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Using a calix[4]arene-benzene complex as a test system we compare the potential of mean force for when the calix[4]arene is tethered versus free. When the complex is in vacuum our results show that the difference between tethered and free is primarily due to the entropic contribution to the potential of mean force resulting in a significant binding free energy difference of 6.6 kJ/mol. By contrast, when the complex is in water our results suggest that there is no appreciable difference between tethered and free. This study elucidates the roles of entropy and enthalpy for this small molecule system and emphasizes the point that tethering the receptor has the potential to dramatically impact the binding properties. These findings should be taken into consideration when using calixarene molecules in nanosensor design. PMID:20369865

  1. Tethered Ozonesonde Measurements During FRAPPE July-August 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B.; Sterling, C. W.; Cullis, P.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.; Wendell, J.; Schnell, R. C.; McClure-Begley, A.; Thompson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    O3 and temperature profiles were measured from tethered ozonesondes from surface to 400 m above ground level on 9 days during the summer of 2014 Colorado Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE). The portable tethered ozonesonde system was set up at one of 3 sites located next to a Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment surface monitoring station. The day and site chosen were based on the previous day O3 and weather forecast. Measurements typically began at 8:30 AM and ended at 4:30 PM, averaging 40 profiles in one day. The ozonesonde when sampling at the surface consistently read within 0-3 ppbv of the surface monitor at each of the sites with a typical daytime range of 20-90 ppbv. The hourly values were averaged at 50 meter intervals showing O3 production rates were consistently around 8 ppbv per hour from 50 to 300 meters above ground level. On sunny, light wind days the O3 mixing ratio reached a maximum of 80-90 ppbv between 14:00 and 15:00 local time. The generally constant mixing ratio with height and highest mixing ratios above the surface indicate that photochemical O3 production was taking place throughout the profile. Continuous O3 profiles from a tall tower (5 and 300 m) and daily ozonesondes tracked O3 variability through the experiment. High O3 at each site was associated with different local wind directions. At Ft. Collins winds were generally out of the southeast, at Chatfield from the northeast, and at City Park Golf Course more variable. The tether system was developed at NOAA/ESRL to provide a cost effective method to measure O3 profiles on a continuous basis. The tether system consisted of a deep sea fishing pole, electric motor driving the reel with light-weight fishing line attached to the balloon ozonesonde, a tether control box, and laptop. The in house software package monitored data and controlled the tether speed and turn-around point based on real time GPS altitude from the transmitting radiosonde.

  2. Renormalizable Electrodynamics of Scalar and Vector Mesons. Part II

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, Abdus; Delbourgo, Robert

    1964-01-01

    The "gauge" technique" for solving theories introduced in an earlier paper is applied to scalar and vector electrodynamics. It is shown that for scalar electrodynamics, there is no {lambda}φ*2φ2 infinity in the theory, while with conventional subtractions vector electrodynamics is completely finite. The essential ideas of the gauge technique are explained in section 3, and a preliminary set of rules for finite computation in vector electrodynamics is set out in Eqs. (7.28) - (7.34).

  3. Tethers in space handbook, second edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzo, Paul A. (Editor); Ammann, Paul W. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Tethers in Space Handbook, Second Edition represents an update to the initial volume issued in September 1986. As originally intended, this handbook is designed to serve as a reference manual for policy makers, program managers, educators, engineers, and scientists alike. It contains information for the uninitiated, providing insight into the fundamental behavior of tethers in space. For those familiar with space tethers, it includes a summary of past and ongoing studies and programs, a complete bibliography of tether publications, and names, addresses, and phone numbers of workers in the field. Perhaps its most valuable asset is the brief description of nearly 50 tether applications which have been proposed and analyzed over the past 10 years. The great variety of these applications, from energy generation to boosting satellites to gravity wave detection is an indication that tethers will play a significant part in the future of space development. This edition of the handbook preserves the major characteristics of the original; however, some significant rearrangements and additions have been made. The first section on Tether Programs has been brought up to date, and now includes a description of TSS-2, the aerodynamic NASA/Italian Space Agency (ASI) mission. Tether Applications follows, and this section has been substantially rearranged. First, the index and cross-reference for the applications have been simplified. Also, the categories have changed slightly, with Technology and Test changed to Aerodynamics, and the Constellations category removed. In reality, tether constellations may be applicable to many of the other categories, since it is simply a different way of using tethers. Finally, to separate out those applications which are obviously in the future, a Concepts category has been added. A new section included here on Conference Summaries recognizes the fact that the tether community is growing internationally, and that meetings provide a means of

  4. Magnetic cleanliness verification approach on tethered satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messidoro, Piero; Braghin, Massimo; Grande, Maurizio

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic cleanliness testing was performed on the Tethered Satellite as the last step of an articulated verification campaign aimed at demonstrating the capability of the satellite to support its TEMAG (TEthered MAgnetometer) experiment. Tests at unit level and analytical predictions/correlations using a dedicated mathematical model (GANEW program) are also part of the verification activities. Details of the tests are presented, and the results of the verification are described together with recommendations for later programs.

  5. Trace gas measurements from tethered balloon platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Bandy, Terese L.; Youngbluth, Otto; Owens, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    Instrumentation and chemical sampling and analysis procedures are described for making measurements of atmospheric carbon disulfide in the concentration range 1-1000 pptv from tethered balloon platforms. Results of a study on the CS2 composition of air downward of a saltwater marsh are reported. A method for obtaining the necessary data for solving the budget equations for surface fluxes, chemical formation rates and chemical destruction rates using data acquired from tethered balloon platforms is presented.

  6. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, V. M.; Chmyrev, V. M.

    observed effects as excitation of plasma density inhomogeneities, field-aligned currents, and ULF/ELF emissions and the modification of electron and ion altitude profiles in the upper ionosphere. The electrodynamic model of the ionosphere modification under the influence of some natural and man-made processes in the atmosphere is also discussed. The model is based on the satellite and ground measurements of electromagnetic field and plasma perturbations and on the data on atmospheric radioactivity and soil gas injection into the atmosphere.

  7. Transport governs flow-enhanced cell tethering through L-selectin at threshold shear.

    PubMed

    Yago, Tadayuki; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I; Klopocki, Arkadiusz G; McEver, Rodger P; Zhu, Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Flow-enhanced cell adhesion is a counterintuitive phenomenon that has been observed in several biological systems. Flow augments L-selectin-dependent adhesion by increasing the initial tethering of leukocytes to vascular surfaces and by strengthening their subsequent rolling interactions. Tethering or rolling might be influenced by physical factors that affect the formation or dissociation of selectin-ligand bonds. We recently demonstrated that flow enhanced rolling of L-selectin-bearing microspheres or neutrophils on P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 by force decreased bond dissociation. Here, we show that flow augmented tethering of these microspheres or cells to P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 by three transport mechanisms that increased bond formation: sliding of the sphere bottom on the surface, Brownian motion, and molecular diffusion. These results elucidate the mechanisms for flow-enhanced tethering through L-selectin.

  8. Construction and Structural Analysis of Tethered Lipid Bilayer Containing Photosynthetic Antenna Proteins for Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sumino, Ayumi; Dewa, Takehisa; Takeuchi, Toshikazu

    2011-07-11

    The construction and structural analysis of a tethered planar lipid bilayer containing bacterial photosynthetic membrane proteins, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2), and light-harvesting core complex (LH1-RC) is described and establishes this system as an experimental platform for their functional analysis. The planar lipid bilayer containing LH2 and/or LH1-RC complexes was successfully formed on an avidin-immobilized coverglass via an avidin-biotin linkage. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that a smooth continuous membrane was formed there. Lateral diffusion of these membrane proteins, observed by a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAY), is discussed in terms of the membrane architecture. Energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RCmore » within the tethered membrane architecture. Energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC within the tethered membrane was observed by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, indicating that the tethered membrane can mimic the natural situation.« less

  9. Electrodynamics of the middle atmosphere: Superpressure balloon program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    In this experiment a comprehensive set of electrical parameters were measured during eight long duration flights in the southern hemisphere stratosphere. These flight resulted in the largest data set ever collected from the stratosphere. The stratosphere has never been electrodynamically sampled in the systematic manner before. New discoveries include short term variability in the planetary scale electric current system, the unexpected observation of stratospheric conductivity variations over thunderstorms and the observation of direct stratospheric conductivity variations following a relatively small solar flare. Major statistical studies were conducted of the large scale current systems, the stratospheric conductivity and the neutral gravity waves (from pressure and temperature data) using the entire data set.

  10. Uses of tethered atmospheric research probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, Richard

    1991-01-01

    In situ measurements in the lower thermosphere are rare because of the difficulty of reaching these altitudes with conventional instrument platforms. The emerging technology of tethered satellites as a means to probe these altitudes from above has matured to the point that a flight program is planned to verify the operational performance of a low-cost deployer mechanism for tethered satellites, and to demonstrate a basic understanding of the dynamics of tethered satellite deployment. With such operational developments at hand, it is appropriate to review some of the potential applications of tethered measurement platforms for acquiring in situ data in the upper atmosphere. This paper focuses on downward-deployed tethered satellite measurements of interest to atmospheric scientists and to hypersonic aerodynamicists, and discusses ways in which this technology may be able to support selected long-range research programs currently in progress or in various stages of pre-flight development. The intent is to illustrate for the potential user community some of the unique advantages of tethered measurement platform technology now under development, and to stimulate creative thinking about ways in which this new capability may be used in support of future research programs.

  11. Results from a tethered rocket experiment (Charge-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, N.; Sasaki, S.; Oyama, K. I.; Hirao, K.; Obayashi, T.; Raitt, W. J.; White, A. B.; Williamson, P. R.; Banks, P. M.; Sharp, W. F.

    A tethered payload experiment (Charge-2) was carried out as an international program between Japan and the USA using a NASA sounding rocket at White Sands Missile Range. The objective of the experiment was to perform a new type of active experiment in space by injecting an electron beam from a mother-daughter rocket system connected with a long tether wire. The electron beam with voltage and current up to 1 kV and 80 mA (nominal) was injected from the mother payload. An insulated conductive wire of 426 m length connected the two payloads, the longest tether system flown so far. The electron gun system and diagnostic instruments (plasma, optical, particle and wave) functioned correctly throughout the flight. The potential rise of the mother payload during the electron beam emission was measured with respect to the daughter payload. The beam trajectory was detected by a camera onboard the mother rocket. Wave generation and current induction in the wire during the beam emission were also studied.

  12. Simulation of a tethered microgravity robot pair and validation on a planar air bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantellato, R.; Lorenzini, E. C.; Sternberg, D.; Roascio, D.; Saenz-Otero, A.; Zachrau, H. J.

    2017-09-01

    A software model has been developed to simulate the on-orbit dynamics of a dual-mass tethered system where one or both of the tethered spacecraft are able to produce propulsive thrust. The software simulates translations and rotations of both spacecraft, with the visco-elastic tether being simulated as a lumped-mass model. Thanks to this last feature, tether longitudinal and lateral modes of vibration and tether tension can be accurately assessed. Also, the way the spacecraft motion responds to sudden tether tension spikes can be studied in detail. The code enables the simulation of different scenarios, including space tug missions for deorbit maneuvers in a debris mitigation context and general-purpose tethered formation flight missions. This study aims to validate the software through a representative test campaign performed with the MIT Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) planar air bearing system. Results obtained with the numerical simulator are compared with data from direct measurements in different testing setups. The studied cases take into account different initial conditions of the spacecraft velocities and relative attitudes, and thrust forces. Data analysis is presented comparing the results of the simulations with direct measurements of acceleration and Azimuth rate of the two bodies in the planar air bearing test facility using a Nylon tether. Plans for conducting a microgravity test campaign using the SPHERES satellites aboard the International Space Station are also being scheduled in the near future in order to further validate the simulation using data from the relevant operational environment of extended microgravity with full six degree of freedom (per body) motion.

  13. Morpheus Campaign 2A Tether Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-27

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Project Morpheus prototype lander is positioned near a new launch site at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a tethered test. The test will be performed to verify the lander's recently installed autonomous landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, sensors and integration system. The launch pad was moved to a different location at the landing facility to support the next phase of flight testing. Project Morpheus tests NASA’s ALHAT, and an engine that runs on liquid oxygen and methane, or green propellants, into a fully-operational lander that could deliver cargo to other planetary surfaces. The landing facility provides the lander with the kind of field necessary for realistic testing, complete with rocks, craters and hazards to avoid. Morpheus’ ALHAT payload allows it to navigate to clear landing sites amidst rocks, craters and other hazards during its descent. Project Morpheus is being managed under the Advanced Exploration Systems, or AES, Division in NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The efforts in AES pioneer new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. For more information on Project Morpheus, visit http://morpheuslander.jsc.nasa.gov/. Photo credit: NASA/Glenn Benson

  14. Space time neural networks for tether operations in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Villarreal, James A.; Jani, Yashvant; Copeland, Charles

    1993-01-01

    A space shuttle flight scheduled for 1992 will attempt to prove the feasibility of operating tethered payloads in earth orbit. due to the interaction between the Earth's magnetic field and current pulsing through the tether, the tethered system may exhibit a circular transverse oscillation referred to as the 'skiprope' phenomenon. Effective damping of skiprope motion depends on rapid and accurate detection of skiprope magnitude and phase. Because of non-linear dynamic coupling, the satellite attitude behavior has characteristic oscillations during the skiprope motion. Since the satellite attitude motion has many other perturbations, the relationship between the skiprope parameters and attitude time history is very involved and non-linear. We propose a Space-Time Neural Network implementation for filtering satellite rate gyro data to rapidly detect and predict skiprope magnitude and phase. Training and testing of the skiprope detection system will be performed using a validated Orbital Operations Simulator and Space-Time Neural Network software developed in the Software Technology Branch at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center.

  15. Lamb Shift in Nonrelativistic Quantum Electrodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotch, Howard

    1981-01-01

    The bound electron self-energy or Lamb shift is calculated in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. Retardation is retained and also an interaction previously dropped in other nonrelativistic approaches is kept. Results are finite without introducing a cutoff and lead to a Lamb shift in hydrogen of 1030.9 MHz. (Author/JN)

  16. Testing Born-Infeld electrodynamics in waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Rafael

    2007-12-07

    Waveguides can be employed to test nonlinear effects in electrodynamics. We solve Born-Infeld equations for TE waves in a rectangular waveguide. We show that the energy velocity acquires a dependence on the amplitude, and harmonic components appear as a consequence of the nonlinear behavior.

  17. Electrodynamics in One Dimension: Radiation and Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asti, G.; Coisson, R.

    2011-01-01

    Problems involving polarized plane waves and currents on sheets perpendicular to the wavevector involve only one component of the fields, so it is possible to discuss electrodynamics in one dimension. Taking for simplicity linearly polarized sinusoidal waves, we can derive the field emitted by currents (analogous to dipole radiation in three…

  18. Linear Response Laws and Causality in Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuffa, Alex J.; Scales, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear response laws and causality (the effect cannot precede the cause) are of fundamental importance in physics. In the context of classical electrodynamics, students often have a difficult time grasping these concepts because the physics is obscured by the intermingling of the time and frequency domains. In this paper, we analyse the linear…

  19. Students' Difficulties with Vector Calculus in Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Laurens; van Kampen, Paul; De Cock, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Understanding Maxwell's equations in differential form is of great importance when studying the electrodynamic phenomena discussed in advanced electromagnetism courses. It is therefore necessary that students master the use of vector calculus in physical situations. In this light we investigated the difficulties second year students at KU Leuven…

  20. Formations of Tethered Spacecraft as Stable Platforms for Far IR and Sub-mm Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Shao, Michael; Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe current research in tethered formations for interferometry, and a roadmap to demonstrating the required key technologies via on-ground and in-orbit testing. We propose an integrated kilometer-size tethered spacecraft formation flying concept which enables Far IR and Sub-mm astronomy observations from space. A rather general model is used to predict the dynamics, control, and estimation performance of formations of spacecraft connected by tethers in LEO and deep space. These models include the orbital and tethered formation dynamics, environmental models, and models of the formation estimator/controller/commander. Both centralized and decentralized control/sensing/estimation schemes are possible, and dynamic ranges of interest for sensing/control are described. Key component/subsystem technologies are described which need both ground-based and in-orbit demonstration prior to their utilization in precision space interferometry missions using tethered formations. Defining an orbiting formation as an ensemble of orbiting spacecraft performing a cooperative task, recent work has demonstrated the validity of the tethering the spacecraft to provide both the required formation rigidity and satisfy the formation reconfiguration needs such as interferometer baseline control. In our concept, several vehicles are connected and move along the tether, so that to reposition them the connecting tether links must vary in length. This feature enables variable and precise baseline control while the system spins around the boresight. The control architecture features an interferometer configuration composed of one central combiner spacecraft and two aligned collector spacecraft. The combiner spacecraft acts as the formation leader and is also where the centralized sensing and estimation functions reside. Some of the issues analyzed with the model are: dynamic modes of deformation of the distributed structure, architecture of the formation sensor, and sources

  1. Space Environmental Testing of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Mackey, P. J.; Hogue, M. D.; Johansen, M .R.; Yim, H.; Delaune, P. B.; Clements, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's exploration missions to Mars and the moon may be jeopardized by dust that will adhere to surfaces of (a) Optical systems, viewports and solar panels, (b) Thermal radiators, (c) Instrumentation, and (d) Spacesuits. We have developed an active dust mitigation technology, the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, a multilayer coating that can remove dust and also prevents its accumulation Extensive testing in simulated laboratory environments and on a reduced gravity flight shows that high dust removal performance can be achieved Long duration exposure to the space environment as part of the MISSE-X payload will validate the technology for lunar missions.

  2. Capabilities of electrodynamic shakers when used for mechanical shock testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keegan, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a research task to investigate the capabilities of electrodynamic vibrators (shakers) to perform mechanical shock tests are presented. The simulation method employed was that of developing a transient whose shock response spectrum matched the desired shock response spectrum. Areas investigated included the maximum amplitude capabilities of the shaker systems, the ability to control the shape of the resultant shock response spectrum, the response levels induced at frequencies outside the controlled bandwidth, and the nonlinearities in structural response induced by a change in test level.

  3. Global modeling of storm-time thermospheric dynamics and electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Richmond, A. D.; Maruyama, N.

    Understanding the neutral dynamic and electrodynamic response of the upper atmosphere to geomagnetic storms, and quantifying the balance between prompt penetration and disturbance dynamo effects, are two of the significant challenges facing us today. This paper reviews our understanding of the dynamical and electrodynamic response of the upper atmosphere to storms from a modeling perspective. After injection of momentum and energy at high latitude during a geomagnetic storm, the neutral winds begin to respond almost immediately. The high-latitude wind system evolves quickly by the action of ion drag and the injection of kinetic energy; however, Joule dissipation provides the bulk of the energy source to change the dynamics and electrodynamics globally. Impulsive energy injection at high latitudes drives large-scale gravity waves that propagate globally. The waves transmit pressure gradients initiating a change in the global circulation. Numerical simulations of the coupled thermosphere, ionosphere, plasmasphere, and electrodynamic response to storms indicate that although the wind and waves are dynamic, with significant apparent "sloshing" between the hemispheres, the net effect is for an increased equatorward wind. The dynamic changes during a storm provide the conduit for many of the physical processes that ensue in the upper atmosphere. For instance, the increased meridional winds at mid latitudes push plasma parallel to the magnetic field to regions of different composition. The global circulation carries molecular rich air from the lower thermosphere upward and equatorward, changing the ratio of atomic and molecular neutral species, and changing loss rates for the ionosphere. The storm wind system also drives the disturbance dynamo, which through plasma transport modifies the strength and location of the equatorial ionization anomaly peaks. On a global scale, the increased equatorward meridional winds, and the generation of zonal winds at mid latitudes via the

  4. Study of selected tether applications in space, phase 3, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The results of a Phase 3 study of two Selected Tether Applications in Space (STAIS); deorbit of a Shuttle and launch of an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), both from the space station using a tether were examined. The study objectives were to: perform a preliminary engineering design, define operational scenarios, develop a common cost model, perform cost benefits analyses, and develop a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). Key features of the performance analysis were to identify the net increases in effective Shuttle cargo capability if tethers are used to assist in the deorbit of Shuttles and the launching of the OTVs from the space station and to define deployer system designs required to accomplish these tasks. Deployer concepts were designed and discussed. Operational scenarios, including timelines, for both tethered and nontethered Shuttle and OTV operations at the space station were evaluated. A summary discussion of the Selected Tether Applications Cost Model (STACOM) and the results of the cost benefits analysis are presented. Several critical technologies needed to implement tether assisted deployment of payloads are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  5. The mechanics of motorised momentum exchange tethers when applied to active debris removal from LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldecott, Ralph; Kamarulzaman, Dayangku N. S.; Kirrane, James P.; Cartmell, Matthew P.; Ganilova, Olga A.

    2014-12-01

    The concept of momentum exchange when applied to space tethers for propulsion is well established, and a considerable body of literature now exists on the on-orbit modelling, the dynamics, and also the control of a large range of tether system applications. The authors consider here a new application for the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether by highlighting three key stages of development leading to a conceptualisation that can subsequently be developed into a technology for Active Debris Removal. The paper starts with a study of the on-orbit mechanics of a full sized motorised tether in which it is shown that a laden and therefore highly massasymmetrical tether can still be forced to spin, and certainly to librate, thereby confirming its possible usefulness for active debris removal (ADR). The second part of the paper concentrates on the modelling of the centripetal deployment of a symmetrical MMET in order to get it initialized for debris removal operations, and the third and final part of the paper provides an entry into scale modelling for low cost mission design and testing. It is shown that the motorised momentum exchange tether offers a potential solution to the removal of large pieces of orbital debris, and that dynamic methodologies can be implemented to in order to optimise the emergent design.

  6. Biomimicry enhances sequential reactions of tethered glycolytic enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Bergkvist, Magnus; Nelson, Jacquelyn L; Hinchman, Meleana M; Travis, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase). We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices.

  7. Biomimicry Enhances Sequential Reactions of Tethered Glycolytic Enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Bergkvist, Magnus; Nelson, Jacquelyn L.; Hinchman, Meleana M.; Travis, Alexander J.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase). We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices. PMID:23626684

  8. Space Station tethered refueling facility operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefel, E. R.; Rudolph, L. K.; Fester, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The space-based orbital transfer vehicle will require a large cryogenic fuel storage facility at the Space Station. An alternative to fuel storage onboard the Space Station, is on a tethered orbital refueling facility (TORF) which is separated from the Space Station by a sufficient distance to induce a gravity gradient to settle the propellants. Facility operations are a major concern associated with a tethered LO2/LH2 storage depot. A study was carried out to analyze these operations so as to identify the preferred TORF deployment direction (up or down) and whether the TORF should be permanently or intermittently deployed. The analyses considered safety, contamination, rendezvous, servicing, transportation rate, communication, and viewing. An upwardly, intermittently deployed facility is the preferred configuration for a tethered cryogenic fuel storage.

  9. Conceptual assessment tool for advanced undergraduate electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baily, Charles; Ryan, Qing X.; Astolfi, Cecilia; Pollock, Steven J.

    2017-12-01

    As part of ongoing investigations into student learning in advanced undergraduate courses, we have developed a conceptual assessment tool for upper-division electrodynamics (E&M II): the Colorado UppeR-division ElectrodyNamics Test (CURrENT). This is a free response, postinstruction diagnostic with 6 multipart questions, an optional 3-question preinstruction test, and accompanying grading rubrics. The instrument's development was guided by faculty-consensus learning goals and research into common student difficulties. It can be used to gauge the effectiveness of transformed pedagogy, and to gain insights into student thinking in the covered topic areas. We present baseline data representing 500 students across 9 institutions, along with validity, reliability, and discrimination measures of the instrument and scoring rubric.

  10. Students' difficulties with vector calculus in electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, Laurens; van Kampen, Paul; De Cock, Mieke

    2015-12-01

    Understanding Maxwell's equations in differential form is of great importance when studying the electrodynamic phenomena discussed in advanced electromagnetism courses. It is therefore necessary that students master the use of vector calculus in physical situations. In this light we investigated the difficulties second year students at KU Leuven encounter with the divergence and curl of a vector field in mathematical and physical contexts. We have found that they are quite skilled at doing calculations, but struggle with interpreting graphical representations of vector fields and applying vector calculus to physical situations. We have found strong indications that traditional instruction is not sufficient for our students to fully understand the meaning and power of Maxwell's equations in electrodynamics.

  11. Middle Atmosphere Electrodynamics During a Thunderstorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croskey, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    Rocket-based instrumentation investigations of middle atmospheric electrodynamics during thunderstorms were conducted in coordination with balloon-measurements at Wallops Island, Virginia. Middle atmosphere electrodynamics and energy coupling are of particular importance to associated electrical processes at lower and higher altitudes. Objectives of this research effort included: (1) investigation of thunderstorm effects on middle atmosphere electrical structure, including spatial and temporal dependence; (2) characterization of electric field transients and the associated energy deposited at various altitudes; (3) evaluation of the vertical Maxwell current density over a thunderstorm to study the coupling of energy to higher altitudes; and (4) investigation of the coupling of energy to the ionosphere and the current supplied to the 'global circuit.'

  12. Topological solitons in 8-spinor mie electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P., E-mail: soliton4@mail.ru

    2013-10-15

    We investigate the effective 8-spinor field model suggested earlier as the generalization of nonlinear Mie electrodynamics. We first study in pure spinorial model the existence of topological solitons endowed with the nontrivial Hopf invariant Q{sub H}, which can be interpreted as the lepton number. Electromagnetic field being included as the perturbation, we estimate the energy and the spin of the localized charged configuration.

  13. Tests of Lorentz Symmetry with Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Quentin; Kostelecky, Alan

    2004-05-01

    Lorentz and CPT violation is a promising candidate signal for Planck-scale physics. Low-energy effects of Lorentz and CPT violation are described by the general theoretical framework called the Standard-Model Extension (SME). This talk focuses on Lorentz-violating effects arising in the limit of classical electrodynamics. Analysis of the theory shows that suitable experiments could improve by several orders of magnitude on the sensitivities achieved in modern Michelson-Morley and Kennedy-Thorndike tests.

  14. Problems of Technical Electrodynamics (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-11

    copy available. ii DC 83143001 PAGE 1 PROBLEMS OF TECHNICAL ELECTRODYNAMICS. DOC - 83143001 PAGE 2 In the collector /collection are connected the...composite/ compound reliable in mechanical sense forgings of rotors with a weight of 250 t and it is more and rotor binding bands. These K forgings must be...go - calculated coefficient, which considers the character of temperature field. With a linear change in temperature .=1, with parabolic =3

  15. Tethered acoustic doppler current profiler platforms for measuring streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, Michael S.; Stewart, James A.; Morlock, Scott E.

    2003-01-01

    A tethered-platform design with a trimaran hull and 900-megahertz radio modems is now commercially available. Continued field use has resulted in U.S. Geological Survey procedures for making tethered-platform discharge measurements, including methods for tethered-boat deployment, moving-bed tests, and measurement of edge distances.

  16. Tethered spacecraft in asteroid gravitational environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Alexander A.; Guerman, Anna D.; Kosenko, Ivan I.; Nikonov, Vasily I.

    2018-02-01

    Relative equilibria of a pendulum attached to the surface of a uniformly rotating celestial body are considered. The locations of the tether anchor that correspond to a given spacecraft position are defined. The domains, where the spacecraft can be held with the help of such a pendulum, are also described. Stability of the found relative equilibria is studied.

  17. Tethered Aerostat Effects on Nearby Seismometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Daniel

    This report assesses seismic interference generated by a tethered aerostat. The study was motivated by a planned aerostat deployment within the footprint of the Dry Alluvium Geology seismic network. No evidence was found for seismic interference generated by the aerostat, and thus the e ects on the Dry Alluvium Geology sensors will be negligible.

  18. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (6g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (1 millipascal). Further development of the technology is underway to reduce the size of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment X (MISSE-X). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the moon

  19. Electromagnetic compatibility test report for the tethered satellite data acquisition and control assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, Douglas; Snead, Robert

    1988-05-01

    This report details the results of an electromagnetic compatibility test on the SCI Systems Data Acquisition and Control Assembly (DACA). This assembly is an electronic processor which controls the central communication link from the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) to the Space Transportation System Orbiter Space Shuttle.

  20. Transitions of tethered chain molecules under tension.

    PubMed

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Binder, Kurt

    2014-09-21

    An applied tension force changes the equilibrium conformations of a polymer chain tethered to a planar substrate and thus affects the adsorption transition as well as the coil-globule and crystallization transitions. Conversely, solvent quality and surface attraction are reflected in equilibrium force-extension curves that can be measured in experiments. To investigate these effects theoretically, we study tethered chains under tension with Wang-Landau simulations of a bond-fluctuation lattice model. Applying our model to pulling experiments on biological molecules we obtain a good description of experimental data in the intermediate force range, where universal features dominate and finite size effects are small. For tethered chains in poor solvent, we observe the predicted two-phase coexistence at transitions from the globule to stretched conformations and also discover direct transitions from crystalline to stretched conformations. A phase portrait for finite chains constructed by evaluating the density of states for a broad range of solvent conditions and tensions shows how increasing tension leads to a disappearance of the globular phase. For chains in good solvents tethered to hard and attractive surfaces we find the predicted scaling with the chain length in the low-force regime and show that our results are well described by an analytical, independent-bond approximation for the bond-fluctuation model for the highest tensions. Finally, for a hard or slightly attractive surface the stretching of a tethered chain is a conformational change that does not correspond to a phase transition. However, when the surface attraction is sufficient to adsorb a chain it will undergo a desorption transition at a critical value of the applied force. Our results for force-induced desorption show the transition to be discontinuous with partially desorbed conformations in the coexistence region.

  1. Microcinematographic analysis of tethered Leptospira illini.

    PubMed Central

    Charon, N W; Daughtry, G R; McCuskey, R S; Franz, G N

    1984-01-01

    A model of Leptospira motility was recently proposed. One element of the model states that in translating cells the anterior spiral-shaped end gyrates counterclockwise and the posterior hook-shaped end gyrates clockwise. We tested these predictions by analyzing cells tethered to a glass surface. Leptospira illini was incubated with antibody-coated latex beads (Ab-beads). These beads adhered to the cells, and subsequently some cells became attached to either the slide or the cover glass via the Ab-beads. As previously reported, these cells rapidly moved back and forth across the surface of the beads. In addition, a general trend was observed: cells tethered to the cover glass rotated clockwise around the Ab-bead; cells tethered to the slide rotated counterclockwise around the Ab-bead. A computer-aided microcinematographic analysis of tethered cells indicated that the direction of rotation of cells around the Ab-bead was a function of both the surface of attachment and the shape of the cell ends. The results can best be explained by assuming that the gyrating ends interact with the glass surface to cause rotation around the Ab-beads. The analysis obtained indicates that the hook- and spiral-shaped ends rotate in the directions predicted by the model. In addition, the tethered cell assay permitted detection of rapid, coordinated reversals of the cell ends, e.g., cells rapidly switched from a hook-spiral configuration to a spiral-hook configuration. These results suggest the existance of a mechanism which coordinates the shape of the cell ends of L. illini. Images PMID:6501226

  2. Technology update: Tethered aerostat structural design and material developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    Requirements exist for an extremely stable, high performance, all-weather tethered aerostat system. This requirement has been satisfied by a 250,000 cubic foot captive buoyant vehicle as demonstrated by over a year of successful field operations. This achievement required significant advancements in several technology areas including composite materials design, aerostatics and aerodynamics, structural design, electro-mechanical design, vehicle fabrication and mooring operations. This paper specifically addresses the materials and structural design aspects of pressurized buoyant vehicles as related to the general class of Lighter Than Air vehicles.

  3. Tether-Based Investigation of the Ionosphere and Lower Thermosphere Concept Definition Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. (Editor); Herrmann, M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the plasma and atmosphere around the Earth in the lower altitude regions of the mesosphere, lower thermosphere, and ionosphere is important in the global electric system. An upper atmosphere tether has been proposed to NASA that would collect much-needed data to further our knowledge of the regions. The mission is proposed as a shuttle experiment that would lower a tethered probe into certain regions of Earth's atmosphere, collecting data over a 6-day period. This report is a summary of the results of a concept definition study to design engineering system that will achieve the scientific objectives of this mission.

  4. Phase 3 study of selected tether applications in space. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering designs were developed relative to a tethered launch assist from the Shuttle for payloads up to 10,000 kg mass and the tethering of a 15,000 kg science platform from the space station. These designs are used for a cost benefit analysis which assesses the feasibility of using such systems as a practical alternative to what would otherwise be accomplished by conventional means. The term conventional as related to both these applications is intended to apply to the use of some form(s) of chemical propulsion system.

  5. Altering surface fluctuations by blending tethered and untethered chains

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. K.; Akgun, B.; Jiang, Z.

    "Partially tethering" a thin film of a polymer melt by covalently attaching to the substrate a fraction of the chains in an unentangled melt dramatically increases the relaxation time of the surface height fluctuations. This phenomenon is observed even when the film thickness, h, is 20 times the unperturbed chain radius, R g,tethered, of the tethered chains, indicating that partial tethering is more influential than any physical attraction with the substrate. Furthermore, a partially tethered layer of a low average molecular weight of 5k showed much slower surface fluctuations than did a reference layer of pure untethered chains of muchmore » greater molecular weight (48k), so the partial tethering effect is stronger than the effects of entanglement and increase in glass transition temperature, Tg, with molecular weight. Partial tethering offers a means of tailoring these fluctuations which influence wetting, adhesion, and tribology of the surface.« less

  6. Altering surface fluctuations by blending tethered and untethered chains

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, J. K.; Akgun, B.; Jiang, Z.; ...

    2017-10-16

    "Partially tethering" a thin film of a polymer melt by covalently attaching to the substrate a fraction of the chains in an unentangled melt dramatically increases the relaxation time of the surface height fluctuations. This phenomenon is observed even when the film thickness, h, is 20 times the unperturbed chain radius, R g,tethered, of the tethered chains, indicating that partial tethering is more influential than any physical attraction with the substrate. Furthermore, a partially tethered layer of a low average molecular weight of 5k showed much slower surface fluctuations than did a reference layer of pure untethered chains of muchmore » greater molecular weight (48k), so the partial tethering effect is stronger than the effects of entanglement and increase in glass transition temperature, Tg, with molecular weight. Partial tethering offers a means of tailoring these fluctuations which influence wetting, adhesion, and tribology of the surface.« less

  7. Research on Orbital Plasma-Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Wright, K.

    1994-01-01

    Since the development of probe theory by Langmuir and Blodgett, the problem of current collection by a charged spherically or cylindrically symmetric body has been investigated by a number of authors. This paper overviews the development of a fully three-dimensional particle simulation code which can be used to understand the physics of current collection in three dimensions and can be used to analyze data resulting from the future tethered satellite system (TSS). According to the TSS configurations, two types of particle simulation models were constructed: a simple particle simulation (SIPS) and a super particle simulation (SUPS). The models study the electron transient response and its asymptotic behavior around a three dimensional, highly biased satellite. The potential distribution surrounding the satellite is determined by solving Laplace's equation in the SIPS model and by solving Poisson's equation in the SUPS model. Thus, the potential distribution in space is independent of the density distribution of the particles in the SUPS model but it does depend on the density distribution of the particles in the SUPS model. The evolution of the potential distribution in the SUPS model is described. When the spherical satellite is charged to a highly positive potential and immersed in a plasma with a uniform magnetic field, the formation of an electron torus in the equatorial plane (the plane in perpendicular to the magnetic field) and elongation of the torus along the magnetic field are found in both the SIPS and the SUPS models but the shape of the torus is different. The areas of high potential that exist in the polar regions in the SUPS model exaggerate the elongation of the electron torus along the magnetic field. The current collected by the satellite for different magentic field strengths is investigated in both models. Due to the nonlinear effects present in SUPS, the oscillating phenomenon of the current collection curve during the first 10 plasma periods

  8. Kinetics of DNA-mediated docking reactions between vesicles tethered to supported lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yee-Hung M.; Lenz, Peter; Boxer, Steven G.

    2007-01-01

    Membrane–membrane recognition and binding are crucial in many biological processes. We report an approach to studying the dynamics of such reactions by using DNA-tethered vesicles as a general scaffold for displaying membrane components. This system was used to characterize the docking reaction between two populations of tethered vesicles that display complementary DNA. Deposition of vesicles onto a supported lipid bilayer was performed by using a microfluidic device to prevent mixing of the vesicles in bulk during sample preparation. Once tethered onto the surface, vesicles mixed via two-dimensional diffusion. DNA-mediated docking of two reacting vesicles results in their colocalization after collision and their subsequent tandem motion. Individual docking events and population kinetics were observed via epifluorescence microscopy. A lattice-diffusion simulation was implemented to extract from experimental data the probability, Pdock, that a collision leads to docking. For individual vesicles displaying small numbers of docking DNA, Pdock shows a first-order relationship with copy number as well as a strong dependence on the DNA sequence. Both trends are explained by a model that includes both tethered vesicle diffusion on the supported bilayer and docking DNA diffusion over each vesicle's surface. These results provide the basis for the application of tethered vesicles to study other membrane reactions including protein-mediated docking and fusion. PMID:18025472

  9. A tethering complex drives the terminal stage of SNARE-dependent membrane fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Massimo; Risselada, Herre Jelger; Lürick, Anna; Ungermann, Christian; Mayer, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Membrane fusion in eukaryotic cells mediates the biogenesis of organelles, vesicular traffic between them, and exo- and endocytosis of important signalling molecules, such as hormones and neurotransmitters. Distinct tasks in intracellular membrane fusion have been assigned to conserved protein systems. Tethering proteins mediate the initial recognition and attachment of membranes, whereas SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein complexes are considered as the core fusion engine. SNARE complexes provide mechanical energy to distort membranes and drive them through a hemifusion intermediate towards the formation of a fusion pore. This last step is highly energy-demanding. Here we combine the in vivo and in vitro fusion of yeast vacuoles with molecular simulations to show that tethering proteins are critical for overcoming the final energy barrier to fusion pore formation. SNAREs alone drive vacuoles only into the hemifused state. Tethering proteins greatly increase the volume of SNARE complexes and deform the site of hemifusion, which lowers the energy barrier for pore opening and provides the driving force. Thereby, tethering proteins assume a crucial mechanical role in the terminal stage of membrane fusion that is likely to be conserved at multiple steps of vesicular traffic. We therefore propose that SNAREs and tethering proteins should be considered as a single, non-dissociable device that drives fusion. The core fusion machinery may then be larger and more complex than previously thought.

  10. Electrodynamics of the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, S. A.; Brecht, S. H.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of the Martian crustal magnetic fields makes a significant modification to the interaction between the solar wind/IMF and the ionosphere of the planet. This paper presents the results of 3-D hybrid simulations of Martian solar wind interaction containing the Martian crustal fields., self-consistent ionospheric chemistry and planetary rotation. It has already been reported that the addition of the crustal fields and planetary rotation makes a significant modification of the ionospheric loss from Mars, Brecht et al., 2016. This paper focuses on two other aspects of the interaction, the electric fields and the current systems created by the solar wind interaction. The results of several simulations will be analyzed and compared. The electric fields around Mars due to its interaction with the solar wind will be examined. Special attention will be paid to the electric field constituents (∇ X B, ∇Pe, ηJ). Regions where the electric field is parallel to the magnetic field will be found and the implications of these regions will be discussed. Current systems for each ion species will be shown. Finally the effects on the electric fields and the current systems due to the rotation of Mars will be examined.

  11. The Ptolemaic Approach to Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliunas, V. M.

    2010-12-01

    The conventional treatment of ionospheric electrodynamics (as expounded in standard textbooks and tutorial publications) consists of a set of equations, plus verbal descriptions of the physical processes supposedly represented by the equations. Key assumptions underlying the equations are: electric field equal to the gradient of a potential, electric current driven by an Ohm's law (with both electric-field and neutral-wind terms), continuity of current then giving a second-order elliptic differential equation for calculating the potential; as a separate assumption, ion and electron bulk flows are determined by ExB drifts plus collision effects. The verbal descriptions are in several respects inconsistent with the equations; furthermore, both the descriptions and the equations are not compatible with the more rigorous physical understanding derived from the complete plasma and Maxwell's equations. The conventional ionospheric equations are applicable under restricted conditions, corresponding to a quasi-steady-state equilibrium limit, and are thus intrinsically incapable of answering questions about causal relations or dynamic developments. Within their limited range of applicability, however, the equations are in most cases adequate to explain the observations, despite the deficient treatment of plasma physics. (A historical precedent that comes to mind is that of astronomical theory at the time of Copernicus and for some decades afterwards, when the Ptolemaic scheme could explain the observations at least as well if not better than the Copernican. Some of the verbal descriptions in conventional ionospheric electrodynamics might be considered Ptolemaic also in the more literal sense of being formulated exclusively in terms of a fixed Earth.) I review the principal differences between the two approaches, point out some questions where the conventional ionospheric theory does not provide unambiguous answers even within its range of validity (e.g., topside and

  12. Metallic phases from disordered (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Goswami, Pallab; Goldman, Hart; Raghu, S.

    2017-06-15

    Metallic phases have been observed in several disordered two-dimensional (2D) systems, including thin films near superconductor-insulator transitions and quantum Hall systems near plateau transitions. The existence of 2D metallic phases at zero temperature generally requires an interplay of disorder and interaction effects. Consequently, experimental observations of 2D metallic behavior have largely defied explanation. We formulate a general stability criterion for strongly interacting, massless Dirac fermions against disorder, which describe metallic ground states with vanishing density of states. We show that (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED 3) with a large, even number of fermion flavors remains metallic in the presence of weakmore » scalar potential disorder due to the dynamic screening of disorder by gauge fluctuations. In conclusion, we also show that QED 3 with weak mass disorder exhibits a stable, dirty metallic phase in which both interactions and disorder play important roles.« less

  13. Metallic phases from disordered (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Pallab; Goldman, Hart; Raghu, S.

    2017-06-01

    Metallic phases have been observed in several disordered two-dimensional (2D) systems, including thin films near superconductor-insulator transitions and quantum Hall systems near plateau transitions. The existence of 2D metallic phases at zero temperature generally requires an interplay of disorder and interaction effects. Consequently, experimental observations of 2D metallic behavior have largely defied explanation. We formulate a general stability criterion for strongly interacting, massless Dirac fermions against disorder, which describe metallic ground states with vanishing density of states. We show that (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED3) with a large, even number of fermion flavors remains metallic in the presence of weak scalar potential disorder due to the dynamic screening of disorder by gauge fluctuations. We also show that QED3 with weak mass disorder exhibits a stable, dirty metallic phase in which both interactions and disorder play important roles.

  14. Entangling distant resonant exchange qubits via circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, V.; Taylor, J. M.; Tahan, Charles

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a hybrid quantum system consisting of spatially separated resonant exchange qubits, defined in three-electron semiconductor triple quantum dots, that are coupled via a superconducting transmission line resonator. Drawing on methods from circuit quantum electrodynamics and Hartmann-Hahn double resonance techniques, we analyze three specific approaches for implementing resonator-mediated two-qubit entangling gates in both dispersive and resonant regimes of interaction. We calculate entangling gate fidelities as well as the rate of relaxation via phonons for resonant exchange qubits in silicon triple dots and show that such an implementation is particularly well suited to achieving the strong coupling regime. Our approach combines the favorable coherence properties of encoded spin qubits in silicon with the rapid and robust long-range entanglement provided by circuit QED systems.

  15. Computer program for the load and trajectory analysis of two DOF bodies connected by an elastic tether: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, G. R., Jr.; Burbick, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The derivation of the differential equations of motion of a 3 Degrees of Freedom body joined to a 3 Degrees of Freedom body by an elastic tether. The tether is represented by a spring and dashpot in parallel. A computer program which integrates the equations of motion is also described. Although the derivation of the equations of motions are for a general system, the computer program is written for defining loads in large boosters recovered by parachutes.

  16. Soliton configurations in generalized Mie electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P., E-mail: soliton4@mail.ru

    2011-07-15

    The generalization of the Mie electrodynamics within the scope of the effective 8-spinor field model is suggested, with the Lagrangian including Higgs-like potential and higher degrees of the invariant A{sub Micro-Sign }A{sup Micro-Sign }. Using special Brioschi 8-spinor identity, we show that the model includes the Skyrme and the Faddeev models as particular cases. We investigate the large-distance asymptotic of static solutions and estimate the electromagnetic contribution to the energy of the localized charged configuration.

  17. Modelling of depth stabilization and submerging of tethered underwater garage in conditions of sea oscillating motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayvoronskiy, S. A.; Ezangina, T. A.; Khozhaev, I. V.

    2018-03-01

    The paper is dedicated to examining dynamics of a submersible underwater garage in conditions of significant sea oscillation. During the considered research, the mathematical model of the electromechanical depth control system, considering interval parametric uncertainty of the system and distribution of tether mass, was developed. An influence of sea oscillation on submerging underwater garages and their depth stabilization processes was analyzed.

  18. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit (phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E.; Arnold, D. A.; Grossi, M. D.; Gullahorn, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    The deployment maneuver of three axis vertical constellations with elastic tethers is analyzed. The deployment strategy devised previously was improved. Dampers were added to the system. Effective algorithms for damping out the fundamental vibrational modes of the system were implemented. Simulations of a complete deployment and a subsequent station keeping phase of a three mass constellation is shown.

  19. Drop Tower tests in preparation of a Tethered Electromagnetic Docking space demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Lorenzo; Francesconi, Alessandro; Antonello, Andrea; Bettiol, Laura; Branz, Francesco; Duzzi, Matteo; Mantellato, Riccardo; Sansone, Francesco; Savioli, Livia

    2016-07-01

    A group of students of the University of Padova is recently developing some technologies to implement a Tethered Electromagnetic Docking (TED) experiment, a novel system for close rendezvous and mating manoeuvres between two spacecraft, consisting in a small tethered probe ejected by the chaser and magnetically guided by a receiving electromagnet mounted on the target. Because of the generated magnetic field, automatic self-alignment and mating are possible; then, as the tether is rewinded, the chaser is able to dock with the target. This concept allows to simplify standard docking procedures, thanks to the reduction of proximity navigation and guidance requirements, as well as consequent fuel reduction. Other interesting applications are expected, from active debris removal to space tugging; in particular, the utilization of the tethered connection for detumbling operations is considered. The realization of a space demonstrator requires a preliminary verification of the critical technologies employed in TED, in particular the magnetic guidance and the probe deploy and retrieve; in the framework of ESA "Drop your Thesis!" 2014 and 2016 campaigns the experiments FELDs (Flexible Electromagnetic Leash Docking system) and STAR (System for Tether Automatic Retrieval) have been focused on the test of such critical elements in the relevant microgravity environment of ZARM Drop Tower in Bremen. In particular, FELDs consisted in a simplified model of TED with a magnetic target interface, a passive tethered probe and its launch system: the experiment allowed to assess the passive self-alignment of the probe with respect to the target and to study the effect of friction between the tether and the release system. Similarly, STAR is investigating the tether actively controlled deployment and retrieval, with the experiment campaign planned on November 2016. In addition, another microgravity experiment is in preparation for the investigation of active magnetic navigation: PACMAN

  20. Modelling of auroral electrodynamical processes: Magnetosphere to mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Gorney, D. J.; Kishi, A. M.; Newman, A. L.; Schulz, M.; Walterscheid, R. L.; CORNWALL; Prasad, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research conducted on auroral electrodynamic coupling between the magnetosphere and ionosphere-atmosphere in support of the development of a global scale kinetic plasma theory is reviewed. Topics covered include electric potential structure in the evening sector; morning and dayside auroras; auroral plasma formation; electrodynamic coupling with the thermosphere; and auroral electron interaction with the atmosphere.

  1. Stability analysis and trend study of a balloon tethered in a wind, with experimental comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L. T.; Bland, S. R.; Bennett, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A stability analysis and trend study for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are presented. The linearized, stability-derivative type analysis includes balloon aerodynamics, buoyancy, mass (including apparent mass), and static forces resulting from the tether cable. The analysis has been applied to a balloon 7.64 m in length, and the results are compared with those from tow tests of this balloon. This comparison shows that the analysis gives reasonable predictions for the damping, frequencies, modes of motion, and stability boundaries exhibited by the balloon. A trend study for the 7.64-m balloon was made to illustrate how the stability boundaries are affected by changes in individual stability parameters. The trends indicated in this study may also be applicable to many other tethered-balloon systems.

  2. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.

    1987-01-01

    A control law was developed to control the elevator during short-distance maneuvers along the tether of a 4-mass tethered system. This control law (called retarded exponential or RE) was analyzed parametrically in order to assess which control parameters provide a good dynamic response and a smooth time history of the acceleration on board the elevator. The short-distance maneuver under investigation consists of a slow crawling of the elevator over the distance of 10 m that represents a typical maneuver for fine tuning the acceleration level on board the elevator. The contribution of aerodynamic and thermal perturbations upon acceleration levels was also evaluated and acceleration levels obtained when such pertubations are taken into account were compared to those obtained by neglecting the thermal and aerodynamic forces. In addition, the preparation of a tether simulation questionnaire is illustrated. Analytic solutions to be compared to numerical cases and simulator test cases are also discussed.

  3. Electro-dynamic machine, system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Wen; Ramanan, Varagur

    One embodiment is a unique Vernier machine comprising a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a back portion and a plurality of permanent magnets. The stator comprises a plurality of ferromagnetic arm structures, a plurality of ferromagnetic pole structures extending from each of the ferromagnetic arm structures in a direction toward the permanent magnets, and a plurality of conductive windings disposed about respective ones of the plurality of ferromagnetic arm structures. The ferromagnetic pole structures are structured to collect magnetic flux from the permanent magnets. The ferromagnetic pole structures of each of said ferromagnetic arm structures are spaced apartmore » from one another according to a non-uniform pattern such that the ferromagnetic pole structures of a given ferromagnetic arm structure have substantially the same angular position relative to the permanent magnets radially opposite from the ferromagnetic pole structures of the given ferromagnetic arm structure.« less

  4. Electrodynamic eigenmodes in cellular morphology.

    PubMed

    Cifra, M

    2012-09-01

    Eigenmodes of the spherical and ellipsoidal dielectric electromagnetic resonator have been analysed. The sizes and shape of the resonators have been chosen to represent the shape of the interphase and dividing animal cell. Electromagnetic modes that have shape exactly suitable for positioning of the sufficiently large organelles in cell (centrosome, nucleus) have been identified. We analysed direction and magnitude of dielectrophoretic force exerted on large organelles by electric field of the modes. We found that the TM(1m1) mode in spherical resonator acts by centripetal force which drags the large organelles which have higher permittivity than the cytosol to the center of the cell. TM-kind of mode in the ellipsoidal resonator acts by force on large polarizable organelles in a direction that corresponds to the movement of the centrosomes (also nucleus) observed during the cell division, i.e. to the foci of the ellipsoidal cell. Minimal required force (10(-16) N), gradient of squared electric field and corresponding energy (10(-16) J) of the mode have been calculated to have biological significance within the periods on the order of time required for cell division. Minimal required energy of the mode, in order to have biological significance, can be lower in the case of resonance of organelle with the field of the cellular resonator mode. In case of sufficient energy in the biologically relevant mode, electromagnetic field of the mode will act as a positioning or steering mechanism for centrosome and nucleus in the cell, thus contribute to the spatial and dynamical self-organization in biological systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamics and Control of Tethered Satellite Formations for the Purpose of Space-Based Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    remote sensing mission. Energy dissipation is found to have an adverse effect on foundational rigid body (Likins-Pringle) equilibria. It is shown that a continuously earth-facing equilibrium condition for a fixed-length tethered system does not exist since the spin rate required for the proper precession would not be high enough to maintain tether tension. The range of required spin rates for steady-spin motion is numerically defined here, but none of these conditions can meet the continuously earth-facing criteria. Of particular note is the discovery that applying certain

  6. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Arnold, D. A.; Grossi, M. D.; Gullahorn, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    The g-tuning maneuvers of a 3-mass, vertical tethered system are considered. In particular, the case of reaching a zero-g acceleration level on board the middle mass from a non-zero initial condition is analyzed. A control law that provides a satisfactory transient response is derived. The constellation dynamics in the case of the middle mass travelling from one tether tip to the other is also investigated. Instabilities that take place at the end of the maneuver are analyzed and accommodated by devising suitable damping algorithms.

  7. Environmental Assessment for Termination of Lease and the Transfer of Property Back to the Landowner for the Morgan City, LA, Tethered Aerostat Radar System (TARS) Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    infrastructure would be affected under Alternative A since all buildings, utility systems, roads, pavements, fences, etc. would be removed. Physical... affect the TARS program objectives. 1.4 ORGANIZATION OF THE DOCUMENT This EA is organized into seven chapters plus appendices. Chapter 1...Action affects public health or safety; • Unique characteristics of the geographic area such as proximity to historic or cultural resources, park

  8. Precision tethered satellite attitude control. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Tethered spacecraft possess unique dynamic characteristics which make them advantageous for certain classes of experiments. One use for which tethers are particularly well suited is to provide an isolated platform for spaceborne observatories. The advantages of tethering a pointing platform 1 or 2 km from a space shuttle or space station are that, compared to placing the observatory on the parent spacecraft, vibrational disturbances are attenuated and contamination is eliminated. In practice, all satellites have some requirement on the attitude control of the spacecraft, and tethered satellites are no exception. It has previously been shown that conventional means of performing attitude control for tethered satellites are insufficient for any mission with pointing requirements more stringent than about 1 deg. This is due mainly to the relatively large force applied by the tether to the spacecraft. A particularly effective method of implementing attitude control for tethered satellites is to use this tether tension force to generate control torques by moving the tether attach point relative to the subsatellite center of mass. A demonstration of this attitude control technique on an astrophysical pointing platform has been proposed for a space shuttle flight test project and is referred to as the Kinetic Isolation Tether Experiment (KITE).

  9. Launching a Tethered Balloon in the Artic

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2017-08-14

    Sandia atmospheric scientist Dari Dexheimer regularly flies tethered balloons out of Sandia’s dedicated Arctic airspace on Oliktok Point, the northernmost point of Alaska’s Prudhoe Bay. These 13-foot-tall balloons carry distributed temperature sensors to collect Arctic atmospheric temperature profiles, or the temperature of the air at different heights above the ground, among other atmospheric sensors. The data Sandia collects is critical for understanding Arctic clouds to inform global climate models.

  10. Closed Loop Control of a Tethered Magnetic Capsule Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Taddese, Addisu Z.; Slawinski, Piotr R.; Obstein, Keith L.; Valdastri, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic field gradients have repeatedly been shown to be the most feasible mechanism for gastrointestinal capsule endoscope actuation. An inverse quartic magnetic force variation with distance results in large force gradients induced by small movements of a driving magnet; this necessitates robotic actuation of magnets to implement stable control of the device. A typical system consists of a serial robot with a permanent magnet at its end effector that actuates a capsule with an embedded permanent magnet. We present a tethered capsule system where a capsule with an embedded magnet is closed loop controlled in 2 degree-of-freedom in position and 2 degree-of-freedom in orientation. Capitalizing on the magnetic field of the external driving permanent magnet, the capsule is localized in 6-D allowing for both position and orientation feedback to be used in a control scheme. We developed a relationship between the serial robot's joint parameters and the magnetic force and torque that is exerted onto the capsule. Our methodology was validated both in a dynamic simulation environment where a custom plug-in for magnetic interaction was written, as well as on an experimental platform. The tethered capsule was demonstrated to follow desired trajectories in both position and orientation with accuracy that is acceptable for colonoscopy. PMID:28286886

  11. Closed Loop Control of a Tethered Magnetic Capsule Endoscope.

    PubMed

    Taddese, Addisu Z; Slawinski, Piotr R; Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic field gradients have repeatedly been shown to be the most feasible mechanism for gastrointestinal capsule endoscope actuation. An inverse quartic magnetic force variation with distance results in large force gradients induced by small movements of a driving magnet; this necessitates robotic actuation of magnets to implement stable control of the device. A typical system consists of a serial robot with a permanent magnet at its end effector that actuates a capsule with an embedded permanent magnet. We present a tethered capsule system where a capsule with an embedded magnet is closed loop controlled in 2 degree-of-freedom in position and 2 degree-of-freedom in orientation. Capitalizing on the magnetic field of the external driving permanent magnet, the capsule is localized in 6-D allowing for both position and orientation feedback to be used in a control scheme. We developed a relationship between the serial robot's joint parameters and the magnetic force and torque that is exerted onto the capsule. Our methodology was validated both in a dynamic simulation environment where a custom plug-in for magnetic interaction was written, as well as on an experimental platform. The tethered capsule was demonstrated to follow desired trajectories in both position and orientation with accuracy that is acceptable for colonoscopy.

  12. Covariant electrodynamics in linear media: Optical metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert T.

    2018-03-01

    While the postulate of covariance of Maxwell's equations for all inertial observers led Einstein to special relativity, it was the further demand of general covariance—form invariance under general coordinate transformations, including between accelerating frames—that led to general relativity. Several lines of inquiry over the past two decades, notably the development of metamaterial-based transformation optics, has spurred a greater interest in the role of geometry and space-time covariance for electrodynamics in ponderable media. I develop a generally covariant, coordinate-free framework for electrodynamics in general dielectric media residing in curved background space-times. In particular, I derive a relation for the spatial medium parameters measured by an arbitrary timelike observer. In terms of those medium parameters I derive an explicit expression for the pseudo-Finslerian optical metric of birefringent media and show how it reduces to a pseudo-Riemannian optical metric for nonbirefringent media. This formulation provides a basis for a unified approach to ray and congruence tracing through media in curved space-times that may smoothly vary among positively refracting, negatively refracting, and vacuum.

  13. A Process Algebra Approach to Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulis, William

    2017-12-01

    The process algebra program is directed towards developing a realist model of quantum mechanics free of paradoxes, divergences and conceptual confusions. From this perspective, fundamental phenomena are viewed as emerging from primitive informational elements generated by processes. The process algebra has been shown to successfully reproduce scalar non-relativistic quantum mechanics (NRQM) without the usual paradoxes and dualities. NRQM appears as an effective theory which emerges under specific asymptotic limits. Space-time, scalar particle wave functions and the Born rule are all emergent in this framework. In this paper, the process algebra model is reviewed, extended to the relativistic setting, and then applied to the problem of electrodynamics. A semiclassical version is presented in which a Minkowski-like space-time emerges as well as a vector potential that is discrete and photon-like at small scales and near-continuous and wave-like at large scales. QED is viewed as an effective theory at small scales while Maxwell theory becomes an effective theory at large scales. The process algebra version of quantum electrodynamics is intuitive and realist, free from divergences and eliminates the distinction between particle, field and wave. Computations are carried out using the configuration space process covering map, although the connection to second quantization has not been fully explored.

  14. Force-free electrodynamics in dynamical curved spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    We present results on our study of force-free electrodynamics in curved spacetimes. Specifically, we present several improvements to what has become the established set of evolution equations, and we apply these to study the nonlinear stability of analytically known force-free solutions for the first time. We implement our method in a new pseudo-spectral code built on top of the SpEC code for evolving dynamic spacetimes. Finally, we revisit these known solutions and attempt to clarify some interesting properties that render them analytically tractable. Finally, we preview some new work that similarly revisits the established approach to solving another problem in numerical relativity: the post-merger recoil from asymmetric gravitational-wave emission. These new results may have significant implications for the parameter dependence of recoils, and consequently on the statistical expectations for recoil velocities of merged systems.

  15. Rigorous approaches to tether dynamics in deployment and retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antona, Ettore

    1987-01-01

    Dynamics of tethers in a linearized analysis can be considered as the superposition of propagating waves. This approach permits a new way for the analysis of tether behavior during deployment and retrieval, where a tether is composed by a part at rest and a part subjected to propagation phenomena, with the separating section depending on time. The dependence on time of the separating section requires the analysis of the reflection of the waves travelling toward the part at rest. Such a reflection generates a reflected wave, whose characteristics are determined. The propagation phenomena of major interest in a tether are transverse waves and longitudinal waves, all mathematically modelled by the vibrating chord equations, if the tension is considered constant along the tether. An interesting problem also considered is concerned with the dependence of the tether tension from the longitudinal position, due to microgravity, and the influence of this dependence on the propagation waves.

  16. Models of dynamic extraction of lipid tethers from cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Sarah A; Chou, Tom

    2010-05-07

    When a ligand that is bound to an integral membrane receptor is pulled, the membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton can deform before either the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton or the ligand detaches from the receptor. If the membrane delaminates from the cytoskeleton, it may be further extruded and form a membrane tether. We develop a phenomenological model for this process by assuming that deformations obey Hooke's law up to a critical force at which the cell membrane locally detaches from the cytoskeleton and a membrane tether forms. We compute the probability of tether formation and show that tethers can be extruded only within an intermediate range of force loading rates and pulling velocities. The mean tether length that arises at the moment of ligand detachment is computed as are the force loading rates and pulling velocities that yield the longest tethers.

  17. Analysis of thermionic bare tether operation regimes in passive mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmartín, J. R.; Chen, Xin; Sánchez-Arriaga, G.

    2017-01-01

    A thermionic bare tether (TBT) is a long conductor coated with a low work-function material. In drag mode, a tether segment extending from anodic end A to a zero-bias point B, with the standard Orbital-motion-limited current collection, is followed by a complex cathodic segment. In general, as bias becomes more negative in moving from B to cathodic end C, one first finds space-charge-limited (SCL) emission covering up to some intermediate point B*, then full Richardson-Dushman (RD) emission reaching from B* to end C. An approximate analytical study, which combines the current and voltage profile equations with results from asymptotic studies of the Vlasov-Poisson system for emissive probes, is carried out to determine the parameter domain covering two limit regimes, which are effectively controlled by just two dimensionless parameters involving ambient plasma and TBT material properties. In one such limit regime, no point B* is reached and thus no full RD emission develops. In an opposite regime, SCL segment BB* is too short to contribute significantly to the current balance.

  18. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kirsty A.; Hunt, Hugh E. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal analysis is used to determine the variation of pressures and velocities along the pipe length. Results show that transport of small quantities of hydrogen to power fuel cells and maintain balloon buoyancy can be achieved at pressures and temperatures that are tolerable in terms of both the pipe strength and the current state of pumping technologies. To avoid solidification, transport of SO2 would require elevated temperatures that cannot be tolerated by the strength fibres in the pipe. While the use of particle-based slurries rather than SO2 for climate engineering can reduce the pipe size significantly, the pumping pressures are close to the maximum bursting pressure of the pipe. PMID:26543573

  19. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kirsty A; Hunt, Hugh E M

    2015-06-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal analysis is used to determine the variation of pressures and velocities along the pipe length. Results show that transport of small quantities of hydrogen to power fuel cells and maintain balloon buoyancy can be achieved at pressures and temperatures that are tolerable in terms of both the pipe strength and the current state of pumping technologies. To avoid solidification, transport of SO2 would require elevated temperatures that cannot be tolerated by the strength fibres in the pipe. While the use of particle-based slurries rather than SO2 for climate engineering can reduce the pipe size significantly, the pumping pressures are close to the maximum bursting pressure of the pipe.

  20. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Tether Fragments on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    The SPHC hydrodynamic code was used to simulate impacts of Kevlar and aluminum projectiles on a model of the LI-900 type insulating tiles used on Space Shuffle Orbiters The intent was to examine likely damage that such tiles might experience if impacted by orbital debris consisting of tether fragments. Projectile speeds ranged from 300 meters per second to 10 kilometers per second. Damage is characterized by penetration depth, tile surface-hole diameter, tile body-cavity diameter, coating fracture diameter, tether and cavity wall material phases, and deformation of the aluminum backwall.

  1. Preliminary studies of a spinning tether-connected TRIO concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crellin, E. B.

    1985-04-01

    Use of a slowly spinning interferometer configuration with the telescopes attached to the central station using tethers of equal length, including tether configuration, mass and storage is discussed. Slow rotation allows measurements of each source at different baseline angles. When the maximum baseline length is reached, the tethers can be retracted (stopping at intermediate lengths for further measurements, if required) and the telescopes recaptured by the central station. The attitude change to another source can be performed with the rigid configuration.

  2. Magnetized black holes and nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    A new model of nonlinear electrodynamics with two parameters is proposed. We study the phenomenon of vacuum birefringence, the causality and unitarity in this model. There is no singularity of the electric field in the center of pointlike charges and the total electrostatic energy is finite. We obtain corrections to the Coulomb law at r →∞. The weak, dominant and strong energy conditions are investigated. Magnetized charged black hole is considered and we evaluate the mass, metric function and their asymptotic at r →∞ and r → 0. The magnetic mass of the black hole is calculated. The thermodynamic properties and thermal stability of regular black holes are discussed. We calculate the Hawking temperature of black holes and show that there are first-order and second-order phase transitions. The parameters of the model when the black hole is stable are found.

  3. Parametric resonance in quantum electrodynamics vacuum birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arza, Ariel; Elias, Ricardo Gabriel

    2018-05-01

    Vacuum magnetic birefringence is one of the most interesting nonlinear phenomena in quantum electrodynamics because it is a pure photon-photon result of the theory and it directly signalizes the violation of the classical superposition principle of electromagnetic fields in the full quantum theory. We perform analytical and numerical calculations when an electromagnetic wave interacts with an oscillating external magnetic field. We find that in an ideal cavity, when the external field frequency is around the electromagnetic wave frequency, the normal and parallel components of the wave suffer parametric resonance at different rates, producing a vacuum birefringence effect growing in time. We also study the case where there is no cavity and the oscillating magnetic field is spatially localized in a region of length L . In both cases we find also a rotation of the elliptical axis.

  4. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    Dust mitigation technology has been highlighted by NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. Further development is underway to improve the operation and reliability of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the Moon.

  5. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruilong; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding

    2017-05-01

    Previous investigations on ionospheric responses to solar flares focused mainly on the photoionization caused by the increased X-rays and extreme ultraviolet irradiance. However, little attention was paid to the related electrodynamics. In this letter, we explored the equatorial electric field (EEF) and electrojet (EEJ) in the ionosphere at Jicamarca during flares from 1998 to 2008. It is verified that solar flares increase dayside eastward EEJ but decrease dayside eastward EEF, revealing a negative correlation between EEJ and EEF. The decreased EEF weakens the equatorial fountain effect and depresses the low-latitude electron density. During flares, the enhancement in the Cowling conductivity may modulate ionospheric dynamo and decrease the EEF. Besides, the decreased EEF is closely related to the enhanced ASY-H index that qualitatively reflects Region 2 field-aligned current (R2 FAC). We speculated that solar flares may also decrease EEF through enhancing R2 FAC that leads to an overshielding-like effect.

  6. Enhancing nanoparticle electrodynamics with gold nanoplate mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zijie; Bao, Ying; Manna, Uttam; Shah, Raman A; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-05-14

    Mirrors and optical cavities can modify and enhance matter-radiation interactions. Here we report that chemically synthesized Au nanoplates can serve as micrometer-size mirrors that enhance electrodynamic interactions. Because of their plasmonic properties, the Au nanoplates enhance the brightness of scattered light from Ag nanoparticles near the nanoplate surface in dark-field microscopy. More importantly, enhanced optical trapping and optical binding of Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated in interferometric optical traps created from a single laser beam and its reflection from individual Au nanoplates. The enhancement of the interparticle force constant is ≈20-fold more than expected from the increased intensity due to standing wave interference. We show that the additional stability for optical binding arises from the restricted axial thermal motion of the nanoparticles that couples to and reduces the fluctuations in the lateral plane. This new mechanism greatly advances the photonic synthesis of ultrastable nanoparticle arrays and investigation of their properties.

  7. Unified theory of nonlinear electrodynamics and gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Gomez, Alexander; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2011-01-15

    We describe a class of unified theories of electromagnetism and gravity. The Lagrangian is of the BF type, with a potential for the B field, the gauge group is U(2) (complexified). Given a choice of the potential function the theory is a deformation of (complex) general relativity and electromagnetism, and describes just two propagating polarizations of the graviton and two of the photon. When gravity is switched off the theory becomes the usual nonlinear electrodynamics with a general structure function. The Einstein-Maxwell theory can be recovered by sending some of the parameters of the defining potential to zero, but formore » any generic choice of the potential the theory is indistinguishable from Einstein-Maxwell at low energies. A real theory is obtained by imposing suitable reality conditions. We also study the spherically-symmetric solution and show how the usual Reissner-Nordstrom solution is recovered.« less

  8. Nuclear pore complex tethers to the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Martin W

    2017-08-01

    The nuclear envelope is tethered to the cytoskeleton. The best known attachments of all elements of the cytoskeleton are via the so-called LINC complex. However, the nuclear pore complexes, which mediate the transport of soluble and membrane bound molecules, are also linked to the microtubule network, primarily via motor proteins (dynein and kinesins) which are linked, most importantly, to the cytoplasmic filament protein of the nuclear pore complex, Nup358, by the adaptor BicD2. The evidence for such linkages and possible roles in nuclear migration, cell cycle control, nuclear transport and cell architecture are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Guidebook for analysis of tether applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    This guidebook is intended as a tool to facilitate initial analyses of proposed tether applications in space. The guiding philosophy is that a brief analysis of all the common problem areas is far more useful than a detailed study in any one area. Such analyses can minimize the waste of resources on elegant but fatally flawed concepts, and can identify the areas where more effort is needed on concepts which do survive the initial analyses. The simplified formulas, approximations, and analytical tools included should be used only for preliminary analyses. For detailed analyses, the references with each topic and in the bibliography may be useful.

  10. Research Technology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This is an artist's concept of an orbiting space vehicle in the Jovian system using an electrodynamic tether propellantless propulsion system. Electrodynamic tethers offer the potential to greatly extend and enhance future scientific missions to Jupiter and the Jovian system. Like Earth, Jupiter posses a strong magnetic field and a significant magnetosphere. This may make it feasible to operate electrodynamic tethers for propulsion and power generation.

  11. Lorentz-violating electrodynamics and the cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Kostelecký, V Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2007-07-06

    Possible Lorentz-violating effects in the cosmic microwave background are studied. We provide a systematic classification of renormalizable and nonrenormalizable operators for Lorentz violation in electrodynamics and use polarimetric observations to search for the associated violations.

  12. Flowing Plasma Interaction with an Electric Sail Tether Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason; Wright, Kenneth; Andersen, Allen; Stone, Nobie

    2017-01-01

    Electric sails are a relatively new concept for providing high speed propellant-less propulsion. Employing multiple tethers biased to high positive voltage levels (kV), electric sails are designed to gain momentum from the solar wind by repelling solar wind protons. To maximize the area of the sail that interacts with the solar wind, electric sails rely on the formation of a large plasma sheath around each small diameter tether. Motivated by interest in advancing the development of electric sails, a set of laboratory tests has been conducted to study the interaction of a drifting plasma with a sheath formed around a small diameter tether element biased at positive voltages. The laboratory test setup was created with Debye length scaling in mind to offer a path to extrapolate (via modeling) to full scale electric sail missions. Using an instrument known as a Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP) the interaction between a positively biased tether element and a drifting plasma has been measured for several scenarios. Clear evidence of the tether element sheath deflecting ions has been obtained. Maps of the flow angle downstream from the tether element have been made and they show the influence of the plasma sheath. Finally, electron current collection measurements have been made for a wide range of plasma conditions and tether element bias voltages. The electron collection data will have an impact on electric sail power requirements, as high voltage power supplies and electron guns will have to be sized to accommodate the electron currents collected by each tether.

  13. Attitude control analysis of tethered de-orbiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, T. V.; Briz Valero, José Francisco; Escorial Olmos, Diego; Lappas, V.; Jakowski, P.; Gray, I.; Tsourdos, A.; Schaub, H.; Biesbroek, R.

    2018-05-01

    The increase of satellites and rocket upper stages in low earth orbit (LEO) has also increased substantially the danger of collisions in space. Studies have shown that the problem will continue to grow unless a number of debris are removed every year. A typical active debris removal (ADR) mission scenario includes launching an active spacecraft (chaser) which will rendezvous with the inactive target (debris), capture the debris and eventually deorbit both satellites. Many concepts for the capture of the debris while keeping a connection via a tether, between the target and chaser have been investigated, including harpoons, nets, grapples and robotic arms. The paper provides an analysis on the attitude control behaviour for a tethered de-orbiting mission based on the ESA e.Deorbit reference mission, where Envisat is the debris target to be captured by a chaser using a net which is connected to the chaser with a tether. The paper provides novel insight on the feasibility of tethered de-orbiting for the various mission phases such as stabilization after capture, de-orbit burn (plus stabilization), stabilization during atmospheric pass, highlighting the importance of various critical mission parameters such as the tether material. It is shown that the selection of the appropriate tether material while using simple controllers can reduce the effort needed for tethered deorbiting and can safely control the attitude of the debris/chaser connected with a tether, without the danger of a collision.

  14. An Experiment on the Limits of Quantum Electro-dynamics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Barber, W. C.; Richter, B.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; O'Neill, G. K.; Gittelman, B.

    1959-06-01

    The limitations of previously performed or suggested electrodynamic cutoff experiments are reviewed, and an electron-electron scattering experiment to be performed with storage rings to investigate further the limits of the validity of quantum electrodynamics is described. The foreseen experimental problems are discussed, and the results of the associated calculations are given. The parameters and status of the equipment are summarized. (D.C.W.)

  15. Nonholonomic Closed-loop Velocity Control of a Soft-tethered Magnetic Capsule Endoscope.

    PubMed

    Taddese, Addisu Z; Slawinski, Piotr R; Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate velocity-level closed-loop control of a tethered magnetic capsule endoscope that is actuated via serial manipulator with a permanent magnet at its end-effector. Closed-loop control (2 degrees-of-freedom in position, and 2 in orientation) is made possible with the use of a real-time magnetic localization algorithm that utilizes the actuating magnetic field and thus does not require additional hardware. Velocity control is implemented to create smooth motion that is clinically necessary for colorectal cancer diagnostics. Our control algorithm generates a spline that passes through a set of input points that roughly defines the shape of the desired trajectory. The velocity controller acts in the tangential direction to the path, while a secondary position controller enforces a nonholonomic constraint on capsule motion. A soft nonholonomic constraint is naturally imposed by the lumen while we enforce a strict constraint for both more accurate estimation of tether disturbance and hypothesized intuitiveness for a clinician's teleoperation. An integrating disturbance force estimation control term is introduced to predict the disturbance of the tether. This paper presents the theoretical formulations and experimental validation of our methodology. Results show the system's ability to achieve a repeatable velocity step response with low steady-state error as well as ability of the tethered capsule to maneuver around a bend.

  16. The conical pendulum: the tethered aeroplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Anthony P.; Metcalf, William E.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Lynch, John J.

    2007-01-01

    The introductory physics lab curriculum usually has one experiment on uniform circular motion (UCM). Physics departments typically have several variable-speed rotators in storage that, if they work, no longer work well. Replacing these rotators with new ones is costly, especially when they are only used once a year. This article describes how an inexpensive (ap10) tethered aeroplane, powered by a small electric motor, can be used to study UCM. The aeroplane is easy to see and entertaining to watch. For a given string length and air speed, a tethered aeroplane quickly finds a stable, horizontal, circular orbit. Using a digital video (DV) camcorder, VideoPoint Capture, QuickTime player, metre sticks and a stopwatch, data on the aeroplane's motion were obtained. The length of the string was varied from 120 to 340 cm while the air speed ranged from 200 to 480 cm s-1. For each string length and air speed, the period of the orbit and the diameter of the path were carefully measured. Theoretical values of path radii were then calculated using Newton's second law. The agreement between experiment and theory was usually better than 2%.

  17. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  18. Quantized Faraday and Kerr rotation and axion electrodynamics of a 3D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liang; Salehi, M.; Koirala, N.; Moon, J.; Oh, S.; Armitage, N. P.

    2016-12-01

    Topological insulators have been proposed to be best characterized as bulk magnetoelectric materials that show response functions quantized in terms of fundamental physical constants. Here, we lower the chemical potential of three-dimensional (3D) Bi2Se3 films to ~30 meV above the Dirac point and probe their low-energy electrodynamic response in the presence of magnetic fields with high-precision time-domain terahertz polarimetry. For fields higher than 5 tesla, we observed quantized Faraday and Kerr rotations, whereas the dc transport is still semiclassical. A nontrivial Berry’s phase offset to these values gives evidence for axion electrodynamics and the topological magnetoelectric effect. The time structure used in these measurements allows a direct measure of the fine-structure constant based on a topological invariant of a solid-state system.

  19. Tether cutting maneuver in swing-by trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tsubasa; Bando, Mai; Hokamoto, Shinji

    2018-01-01

    The swing-by maneuver is known as a method to change the velocity of a spacecraft by using the gravity force of the celestial body. The powered swing-by has been studied to enhance the velocity change during the swing-by maneuver. This paper studies another way of the powered swing-by using tether cutting, which does not require additional propellant consumption, and shows that the proposed powered swing-by can increase the effect of the swing-by as same as using impulsive thrust. Moreover, it is discussed whether the system has possibility to realize both the powered swing-by of a mother satellite and the planetary capture of a subsatellite simultaneously.

  20. Small expendable deployer system measurement analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrington, Connie K.

    1988-01-01

    The first on-orbit experiment of the Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) for tethered satellites will collect telemetry data for tether length, rate of deployment, and tether tension. The post-flight analysis will use this data to reconstruct the deployment history and determine dynamic characteristics such as tether shape and payload position. Linearized observability analysis has determined that these measurements are adequate to define states for a two-mass tether model, and two state estimators were written.

  1. Longitudinal Differences of Ionospheric Vertical Density Distribution and Equatorial Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M. B.; Damtie, B.; Mebrahtu, A.; Valledares, C.E.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of global vertical distribution of ionospheric and plasmaspheric density as a function of local time, season, and magnetic activity is required to improve the operation of space-based navigation and communication systems. The vertical density distribution, especially at low and equatorial latitudes, is governed by the equatorial electrodynamics that produces a vertical driving force. The vertical structure of the equatorial density distribution can be observed by using tomographic reconstruction techniques on ground-based global positioning system (GPS) total electron content (TEC). Similarly, the vertical drift, which is one of the driving mechanisms that govern equatorial electrodynamics and strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the ionosphere in the low/midlatitude region, can be estimated using ground magnetometer observations. We present tomographically reconstructed density distribution and the corresponding vertical drifts at two different longitudes: the East African and west South American sectors. Chains of GPS stations in the east African and west South American longitudinal sectors, covering the equatorial anomaly region of meridian approx. 37 deg and 290 deg E, respectively, are used to reconstruct the vertical density distribution. Similarly, magnetometer sites of African Meridian B-field Education and Research (AMBER) and INTERMAGNET for the east African sector and South American Meridional B-field Array (SAMBA) and Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) are used to estimate the vertical drift velocity at two distinct longitudes. The comparison between the reconstructed and Jicamarca Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) measured density profiles shows excellent agreement, demonstrating the usefulness of tomographic reconstruction technique in providing the vertical density distribution at different longitudes. Similarly, the comparison between magnetometer estimated vertical drift and other independent drift observation

  2. The Tethered Balloon Current Generator - A space shuttle-tethered subsatellite for plasma studies and power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, P. R.; Banks, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of the Tethered Balloon Current Generator experiment are to: (1) generate relatively large regions of thermalized, field-aligned currents, (2) produce controlled-amplitude Alfven waves, (3) study current-driven electrostatic plasma instabilities, and (4) generate substantial amounts of power or propulsion through the MHD interaction. A large balloon (a diameter of about 30 m) will be deployed with a conducting surface above the space shuttle at a distance of about 10 km. For a generally eastward directed orbit at an altitude near 400 km, the balloon, connected to the shuttle by a conducting wire, will be positive with respect to the shuttle, enabling it to collect electrons. At the same time, the shuttle will collect positive ions and, upon command, emit an electron beam to vary current flow in the system.

  3. Assessing tether anchor labeling and usability in pickup trucks.

    PubMed

    Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Malik, Laura A; Flannagan, Carol A; Jermakian, Jessica S

    2018-04-03

    The objective of this study was to investigate vehicle factors associated with child restraint tether use and misuse in pickup trucks and evaluate 4 labeling interventions designed to educate consumers on proper tether use. Volunteer testing was performed with 24 subjects and 4 different pickup trucks. Each subject performed 8 child restraint installations among the 4 pickups using 2 forward-facing restraints: a Britax Marathon G4.1 and an Evenflo Triumph. Vehicles were selected to represent 4 different implementations of tether anchors among pickups: plastic loop routers (Chevrolet Silverado), webbing routers (Ram), back wall anchors (Nissan Frontier), and webbing routers plus metal anchors (Toyota Tundra). Interventions included a diagram label, Quick Response (QR) Code linked to video instruction, coordinating text label, and contrasting text tag. Subjects used the child restraint tether in 93% of trials. However, tether use was completely correct in only 9% of trials. An installation was considered functional if the subject attached the tether to a tether anchor and had a tight installation (ignoring routing and head restraint position); 28% of subjects achieved a functional installation. The most common installation error was attaching the tether hook to the anchor/router directly behind the child restraint (near the top of the seatback) rather than placing the tether through the router and attaching it to the anchor in the adjacent seating position. The Nissan Frontier, with the anchor located on the back wall of the cab, had the highest rate of correct installations but also had the highest rate of attaching the tether to components other than the tether anchor (seat adjustor, child restraint storage hook, around head restraint). None of the labeling interventions had a significant effect on correct installation; not a single subject scanned the QR Code to access the video instruction. Subjects with the most successful installations spent extensive time

  4. Tethered by Self-Generated Flow: Mucus String Augmented Feeding Current Generation in Larval Oysters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Wheeler, J.; Anderson, E.

    2016-02-01

    Marine zooplankton live in a nutritionally dilute environment. To survive, they must process an enormous volume of water relative to their own body volume for food. To achieve this, many zooplankters including copepods, invertebrate larvae, and protists create a feeding current to concentrate and transport food items to their food gathering structures. To enhance the efficiency of the feeding current, these zooplankters often rely on certain "tethering" mechanisms to retard their translational motion for producing a strong feeding current. The tethering force may include excess weight due to gravity, force from attachment to solid surfaces, and drag experienced by strategically placed morphological structures. Larval oysters are known from previous studies to release mucus strings during feeding, presumably for supplying a tethering force to enhance their feeding-current efficiency. But the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we used a high-speed microscale imaging system (HSMIS) to observe the behavior of freely swimming and feeding larval oysters. We also used HSMIS to measure larval imposed feeding currents via a micro-particle image velocimetry (µPIV) technique. HSMIS allows observations along a vertically oriented focal plane in a relatively large water vessel with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. Our high-speed videos show that a feeding larval oyster continuously released a long mucus string into its feeding current that flows downward; the feeding current subsequently dragged the mucus string downward. Analysis of our µPIV data combined with a hydrodynamic model further suggests that the drag force experienced by the mucus string in the feeding current contributes significantly to the tethering force required to generate the feeding current. Thus, mucus strings in larval oysters act as "anchors" in larval self-generated flow to actively tether the feeding larvae.

  5. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, P. J.; Johansen, M. R.; Olsen, R. C.; Raines, M. G.; Phillips, J. R., III; Pollard, J. R. S.; Calle, C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (one-sixth g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (10(exp -6) kPa).

  6. Circuit quantum electrodynamics with a spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Petersson, K D; McFaul, L W; Schroer, M D; Jung, M; Taylor, J M; Houck, A A; Petta, J R

    2012-10-18

    Electron spins trapped in quantum dots have been proposed as basic building blocks of a future quantum processor. Although fast, 180-picosecond, two-quantum-bit (two-qubit) operations can be realized using nearest-neighbour exchange coupling, a scalable, spin-based quantum computing architecture will almost certainly require long-range qubit interactions. Circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) allows spatially separated superconducting qubits to interact via a superconducting microwave cavity that acts as a 'quantum bus', making possible two-qubit entanglement and the implementation of simple quantum algorithms. Here we combine the cQED architecture with spin qubits by coupling an indium arsenide nanowire double quantum dot to a superconducting cavity. The architecture allows us to achieve a charge-cavity coupling rate of about 30 megahertz, consistent with coupling rates obtained in gallium arsenide quantum dots. Furthermore, the strong spin-orbit interaction of indium arsenide allows us to drive spin rotations electrically with a local gate electrode, and the charge-cavity interaction provides a measurement of the resulting spin dynamics. Our results demonstrate how the cQED architecture can be used as a sensitive probe of single-spin physics and that a spin-cavity coupling rate of about one megahertz is feasible, presenting the possibility of long-range spin coupling via superconducting microwave cavities.

  7. Haltere mechanosensory influence on tethered flight behavior in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mureli, Shwetha; Fox, Jessica L

    2015-08-01

    In flies, mechanosensory information from modified hindwings known as halteres is combined with visual information for wing-steering behavior. Haltere input is necessary for free flight, making it difficult to study the effects of haltere ablation under natural flight conditions. We thus used tethered Drosophila melanogaster flies to examine the relationship between halteres and the visual system, using wide-field motion or moving figures as visual stimuli. Haltere input was altered by surgically decreasing its mass, or by removing it entirely. Haltere removal does not affect the flies' ability to flap or steer their wings, but it does increase the temporal frequency at which they modify their wingbeat amplitude. Reducing the haltere mass decreases the optomotor reflex response to wide-field motion, and removing the haltere entirely does not further decrease the response. Decreasing the mass does not attenuate the response to figure motion, but removing the entire haltere does attenuate the response. When flies are allowed to control a visual stimulus in closed-loop conditions, haltereless flies fixate figures with the same acuity as intact flies, but cannot stabilize a wide-field stimulus as accurately as intact flies can. These manipulations suggest that the haltere mass is influential in wide-field stabilization, but less so in figure tracking. In both figure and wide-field experiments, we observe responses to visual motion with and without halteres, indicating that during tethered flight, intact halteres are not strictly necessary for visually guided wing-steering responses. However, the haltere feedback loop may operate in a context-dependent way to modulate responses to visual motion. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Polyelectrolytes tethered to a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubreuil, F.; Guenoun, P.

    Several attempts have been already carried out in order to tether charged chains by an end at a free fluctuating surface. We review here most of these attempts and focus on how close the physics of charged brushes can be investigated by such an approach. We first describe results about films of charged-neutral diblock copolymers spread at the surface of water. Results can be mostly rationalized in terms of charged brushes although additional structurations and fluctuations of the interface can be observed. The latter deformations are also observed when adsorbed layers of charged-neutral diblock copolymers are considered. At last, we examine how free suspended films of charged-neutral diblock copolymers can be viewed as two opposing charged brushes, both in terms of thickness and pressure.

  9. Magnetic Tethering of Microswimmers in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawan, Aschvin; Jana, Saikat; Ghosh, Suvojit; Jung, Sunghwan; Puri, Ishwar

    2013-03-01

    Exercising control over animal locomotion is well known in the macro world. In the micro-scale world, such methods require more sophistication. We magnetize Paramecium multimicronucleatum by internalization of magnetite nanoparticles coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). This enables control of their motion in a microfluidic device using a magnetic field. Miniature permanent magnets embedded within the device are used to tether the magnetized organisms to specific locations along a micro-channel. Ciliary beatings of the microswimmer generate shear flows nearby. We apply this setup to enhance cross-stream mixing in a microfluidic device by supplementing molecular diffusion. The device is similar to an active micromixer but requires no external power sources or artificial actuators. We optically characterize the effectiveness of the mechanism in a variety of flow situations.

  10. Derivation and precision of mean field electrodynamics with mesoscale fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2018-06-01

    Mean field electrodynamics (MFE) facilitates practical modelling of secular, large scale properties of astrophysical or laboratory systems with fluctuations. Practitioners commonly assume wide scale separation between mean and fluctuating quantities, to justify equality of ensemble and spatial or temporal averages. Often however, real systems do not exhibit such scale separation. This raises two questions: (I) What are the appropriate generalized equations of MFE in the presence of mesoscale fluctuations? (II) How precise are theoretical predictions from MFE? We address both by first deriving the equations of MFE for different types of averaging, along with mesoscale correction terms that depend on the ratio of averaging scale to variation scale of the mean. We then show that even if these terms are small, predictions of MFE can still have a significant precision error. This error has an intrinsic contribution from the dynamo input parameters and a filtering contribution from differences in the way observations and theory are projected through the measurement kernel. Minimizing the sum of these contributions can produce an optimal scale of averaging that makes the theory maximally precise. The precision error is important to quantify when comparing to observations because it quantifies the resolution of predictive power. We exemplify these principles for galactic dynamos, comment on broader implications, and identify possibilities for further work.

  11. Conductivity of higher dimensional holographic superconductors with nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykhi, Ahmad; Hashemi Asl, Doa; Dehyadegari, Amin

    2018-06-01

    We investigate analytically as well as numerically the properties of s-wave holographic superconductors in d-dimensional spacetime and in the presence of Logarithmic nonlinear electrodynamics. We study three aspects of this kind of superconductors. First, we obtain, by employing analytical Sturm-Liouville method as well as numerical shooting method, the relation between critical temperature and charge density, ρ, and disclose the effects of both nonlinear parameter b and the dimensions of spacetime, d, on the critical temperature Tc. We find that in each dimension, Tc /ρ 1 / (d - 2) decreases with increasing the nonlinear parameter b while it increases with increasing the dimension of spacetime for a fixed value of b. Then, we calculate the condensation value and critical exponent of the system analytically and numerically and observe that in each dimension, the dimensionless condensation get larger with increasing the nonlinear parameter b. Besides, for a fixed value of b, it increases with increasing the spacetime dimension. We confirm that the results obtained from our analytical method are in agreement with the results obtained from numerical shooting method. This fact further supports the correctness of our analytical method. Finally, we explore the holographic conductivity of this system and find out that the superconducting gap increases with increasing either the nonlinear parameter or the spacetime dimension.

  12. Tethers as Debris: Simulating Impacts of Kevlar Tethers on Shuttle Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper I examined the effects of impacts of polymer tethers on aluminum plates using the SPHC hydrodynamic code. In this paper I apply tether models to a new target - models of Space Shuttle tiles developed during the STS 107 accident investigation. In this three-dimensional simulation, a short tether fragment strikes a single tile supported on an aluminum backing plate. A tile of the LI-900 material is modeled. Penetration and damage to the tile and the backwall are characterized for three normal impact velocities. The tether is modeled as a bundle of eight 1-mm strands, with the bundle having dimensions 2-mm x 4-mm x 20-cm. The bulk material properties used are those of Kevlar(TradeMark) 49, for which a Mie-Gruneisen multiphase equation of state (eos) is used. In addition, the strength model is applied in a linear sense, such that tensile loads along the strand length are supported, but there is no strength in the lateral directions. Tile models include the various layers making up the tile structure. The outermost layer is a relatively dense borosilicate glass, known as RCG, 0.5-mm thick. The RCG layer is present on the top and four sides of the tile. Below this coating is the bulk of the tile, 1.8- in thick, made of LI-900, a product consisting of rigidized fiberous silica with a density of 9 lWft3. Below the main insulating layer is a bottom layer of the same material that has been treated to increase its density by approximately 69% to improve its strength. This densified layer is bonded to a Strain Isolation Pad (SIP), modeled as a refractory felt fabric. The SIP is bonded to an aluminum 2024 wall 0.1-in thick. The tile and backwall materials use a Me-Gruneisen multiphase eos, with the exception of the SIP felt, which uses a fabric equation of state. Fabrics must be crushed to the full bulk material density before bulk material properties and a Mie-Gruneisen eos are applied. Tether fragment impact speeds of 3,7, and 10 km/s are simulated, with

  13. Fluid-membrane tethers: minimal surfaces and elastic boundary layers.

    PubMed

    Powers, Thomas R; Huber, Greg; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2002-04-01

    Thin cylindrical tethers are common lipid bilayer membrane structures, arising in situations ranging from micromanipulation experiments on artificial vesicles to the dynamic structure of the Golgi apparatus. We study the shape and formation of a tether in terms of the classical soap-film problem, which is applied to the case of a membrane disk under tension subject to a point force. A tether forms from the elastic boundary layer near the point of application of the force, for sufficiently large displacement. Analytic results for various aspects of the membrane shape are given.

  14. Proceedings of a Workshop on Applications of Tethers in Space, Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The objectives were to identify potential applications for tethers in space; develop a first order assessment of the feasibility and benefits of tether applications; recommend future actions necessary to enable tether applications, including required technology advancements; and stimulate industry and government planners to consider the unique properties of tethers in designs for future missions.

  15. Propulsion and Levitation with a Large Electrodynamic Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Nathan; Lane, Hannah

    We constructed an electrodynamic wheel using a motorized bicycle wheel with a radius of 12 inches and 36 one-inch cube magnets attached to the rim of the wheel. The radial magnetic field on the outside of the wheel was maximized by arranging the magnets into a series of Halbach arrays which amplify the field on one side of the array and reduce it on the other side. Rotating the wheel produces a rapidly oscillating magnetic field. When a conductive metal ``track'' is placed in this area of strong magnetic flux, eddy currents are produced in the track. These eddy currents create magnetic fields that interact with the magnetic fields from the electrodynamic wheel. The interaction of the magnetic fields produces lift and drag forces on the track which were measured with force gauges. Measurements were taken at a variety of wheel speeds, and the results were compared to the theoretical prediction that there should be a linear relationship between the lift and drag forces with increasing wheel speed. Partial levitation was achieved with the current electrodynamic wheel. In the future, the wheel will be upgraded to include 72 magnets rather than 36 magnets. This will double the frequency at which the magnetic field oscillates, increasing the magnetic flux. Electrodynamic wheels have applications to the transportation industry, since multiple electrodynamic wheels could be used on a vehicle to produce a lift and propulsion force over a conductive track.

  16. Working group report on advanced high-voltage high-power and energy-storage space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, H. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Evans, R. W.; Hastings, D.; Jongeward, G.; Laframboise, J. G.; Mahaffey, D.; Mcintyre, B.; Pfizer, K. A.; Purvis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Space systems in the future will probably include high-voltage, high-power energy-storage and -production systems. Two such technologies are high-voltage ac and dc systems and high-power electrodynamic tethers. The working group identified several plasma interaction phenomena that will occur in the operation of these power systems. The working group felt that building an understanding of these critical interaction issues meant that several gaps in our knowledge had to be filled, and that certain aspects of dc power systems have become fairly well understood. Examples of these current collection are in quiescent plasmas and snap over effects. However, high-voltage dc and almost all ac phenomena are, at best, inadequately understood. In addition, there is major uncertainty in the knowledge of coupling between plasmas and large scale current flows in space plasmas. These gaps in the knowledge are addressed.

  17. Electrostatics in Stueckelberg-Horwitz electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Martin

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we study fundamental aspects of electrostatics as a special case in Stueckelberg-Horwitz electromagnetic theory. In this theory, spacetime events xμ(τ) evolve in an unconstrained 8-dimensional phase space, interacting through five τ-dependent gauge fields induced by the current densities associated with their evolutions. The chronological time τ was introduced as an independent evolution parameter in order to free the laboratory clock x0 to evolve alternately 'forward' and 'backward' in time according to the sign of the energy, thus providing a classical implementation of the Feynman-Stueckelberg interpretation of pair creation/annihilation. The resulting theory differs in its underlying mechanics from conventional electromagnetism, but coincides with Maxwell theory in an equilibrium limit. After a brief review of Stueckelberg-Horwitz electrodynamics, we obtain the field produced by an event in uniform motion and verify that it satisfies the field equations. We study this field in the rest frame of the event, where it depends explicitly on coordinate time x0 and the parameter τ, as well as spatial distance R. Calculating with this generalized Coulomb field, we demonstrate how Gauss's theorem and Stoke's theorem apply in 4D spacetime, and obtain the fields associated with a charged line and a charged sheet. Finally, we use the field of the charged sheet to study a static event in the vicinity of a potential barrier. In all of these cases, we observe a small transfer of mass from the field to the particle. It is seen that for an event in the field of an oppositely charged sheet of sufficient density, the event can reverse time direction, providing a specific model for pair phenomena.

  18. A new electrodynamic balance design for low temperature studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, H.-J.; Ouyang, B.; Pope, F. D.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we describe a newly designed cold electrodynamic balance (CEDB) system, which was built to study the evaporation kinetics and freezing properties of supercooled water droplets. The temperature of the CEDB chamber at the location of the levitated water droplet can be controlled in the range: -40 to +40 °C, which is achieved using a combination of liquid nitrogen cooling and heating by positive temperature coefficient heaters. The measurement of liquid droplet radius is obtained by analyzing the Mie elastic light scattering from a 532 nm laser. The Mie scattering signal was also used to characterize and distinguish droplet freezing events; liquid droplets produce a regular fringe pattern whilst the pattern from frozen particles is irregular. The evaporation rate of singly levitated water droplets was calculated from time resolved measurements of the radii of evaporating droplets and a clear trend of the evaporation rate on temperature was measured. The statistical freezing probabilities of aqueous pollen extracts (pollen washing water) are obtained in the temperature range: -4.5 to -40 °C. It was found that that pollen washing water from water birch (Betula fontinalis occidentalis) pollen can act as ice nuclei in the immersion freezing mode at temperatures as warm as -22.45 (±0.65) °C.

  19. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Arnold, D. A.; Cosmo, M.; Grossi, M. D.

    1986-10-01

    The following topics related to the dynamics of the 4-mass tethered system are addressed: (1) the development of damping algorithms for damping the out-of-plane libration of the system and the interaction of the out-of-plane control with the other degrees of freedom; and (2) the development of environmental models to be added to the dynamics simulation computer code. The environmental models are specifically a new drag routine based on the Jacchia's 1977 model, a J(2) model and an accurate thermal model of the wire. Regarding topic (1) a survey of various out-of-plane libration control laws was carried out. Consequently a yo-yo control law with amplitude of the tether length variation proportional to the amplitude of the out-of-game libration has been selected. This control law provides good damping when applied to a (theoretical) two-dimensional system. In the actual 3-dimensional 4-mass tethered system, however, energy is transferred to the least damped degrees of freedom (the out-of-plane lateral deflections are still undamped in the present simulations) in such a way as to decrease the effectiveness of the algorithm for out-of-plane libration control. The addition of damping algorithms for the out-of-plane lateral deflections is therefore necessary.

  20. Analytical investigation of the dynamics of tethered constellations in Earth orbit, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, E. C.; Arnold, D. A.; Cosmo, M.; Grossi, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The following topics related to the dynamics of the 4-mass tethered system are addressed: (1) the development of damping algorithms for damping the out-of-plane libration of the system and the interaction of the out-of-plane control with the other degrees of freedom; and (2) the development of environmental models to be added to the dynamics simulation computer code. The environmental models are specifically a new drag routine based on the Jacchia's 1977 model, a J(2) model and an accurate thermal model of the wire. Regarding topic (1) a survey of various out-of-plane libration control laws was carried out. Consequently a yo-yo control law with amplitude of the tether length variation proportional to the amplitude of the out-of-game libration has been selected. This control law provides good damping when applied to a (theoretical) two-dimensional system. In the actual 3-dimensional 4-mass tethered system, however, energy is transferred to the least damped degrees of freedom (the out-of-plane lateral deflections are still undamped in the present simulations) in such a way as to decrease the effectiveness of the algorithm for out-of-plane libration control. The addition of damping algorithms for the out-of-plane lateral deflections is therefore necessary.

  1. Pilot Hartsfield in sleep restraint tethered to forward middeck lockers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Hartsfield demonstrates the sleeping accomodations onboard the Earth-orbiting Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. The sleep restraint is located in the middeck area of the spacecraft and is tethered to forward middeck lockers.

  2. Astronaut James Newman with latch hook for tether device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronaut James H. Newman, mission specialist, shows off a latch hook for a tether device used during the STS-51 extravehicular activity (EVA) on September 16, 1993. Newman, on Discovery's middeck, appears surrounded by sleep restraints.

  3. 5. TETHERED MINUTEMAN MISSILE LAUNCH, TEST AREA 1100. Original is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TETHERED MINUTEMAN MISSILE LAUNCH, TEST AREA 1-100. Original is a color print. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Sequential Reactions of Surface-Tethered Glycolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Bergkvist, Magnus; Nelson, Jacquelyn L.; Travis, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The development of complex hybrid organic-inorganic devices faces several challenges, including how they can generate energy. Cells face similar challenges regarding local energy production. Mammalian sperm solve this problem by generating ATP down the flagellar principal piece by means of glycolytic enzymes, several of which are tethered to a cytoskeletal support via germ cell-specific targeting domains. Inspired by this design, we have produced recombinant hexokinase type 1 and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase capable of oriented immobilization on a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid modified surface. Specific activities of enzymes tethered via this strategy were substantially higher than when randomly adsorbed. Furthermore, these enzymes showed sequential activities when tethered onto the same surface. This is the first demonstration of surface-tethered pathway components showing sequential enzymatic activities, and it provides a first step toward reconstitution of glycolysis on engineered hybrid devices. PMID:19778729

  5. Partial Gravity Biological Tether Experiment on the Deep Space Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, S.; Graham, L.

    2018-02-01

    A tether-based partial gravity bacterial biological experiment represents a viable biological experiment to investigate the fundamental internal cellular processes between altered levels of gravity and cellular adaption.

  6. Precession and circularization of elliptical space-tether motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapel, Jim D.; Grosserode, Patrick

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simplified analytic model for predicting motion of long space tethers. The perturbation model developed here addresses skip rope motion, where each end of the tether is held in place and the middle of the tether swings with a motion similar to that of a child's skip rope. If the motion of the tether midpoint is elliptical rather than circular, precession of the ellipse complicates the procedures required to damp this motion. The simplified analytic model developed in this paper parametrically predicts the precession of elliptical skip rope motion. Furthermore, the model shows that elliptic skip rope motion will circularize when damping is present in the longitudinal direction. Compared with high-fidelity simulation results, this simplified model provides excellent predictions of these phenomena.

  7. Applications of tethers in space: A review of workshop recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Well-organized and structured efforts of considerable magnitude involving NASA, industry, and academia have explored and defined the engineering and technological requirements of the use of tethers in space and have discovered their broad range of operational and economic benefits. The results of these efforts have produced a family of extremely promising candidate applications. The extensive efforts now in progress are gaining momentum and a series of flight demonstrations are being planned and can be expected to take place in a few years. This report provides an analysis and a review of NASA's second major workshop on Applications of Tethers in Space held in October 15 to 17, 1985, in Venice, Italy. It provides a summary of an up-to-date assessment and recommendations by the NASA Tether Applications in Space Program Planning Group, consisting of representatives of seven NASA Centers and responsible for tether applications program planning implementation as recommended by the workshop panels.

  8. Magnetour: Surfing planetary systems on electromagnetic and multi-body gravity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantoine, Gregory; Russell, Ryan P.; Anderson, Rodney L.; Garrett, Henry B.

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive tour of the complex outer planet systems is a central goal in space science. However, orbiting multiple moons of the same planet would be extremely prohibitive using traditional propulsion and power technologies. In this paper, a new mission concept, named Magnetour, is presented to facilitate the exploration of outer planet systems and address both power and propulsion challenges. This approach would enable a single spacecraft to orbit and travel between multiple moons of an outer planet, without significant propellant or onboard power source. To achieve this free-lunch 'Grand Tour', Magnetour exploits the unexplored combination of magnetic and multi-body gravitational fields of planetary systems, with a unique focus on using a bare electrodynamic tether for power and propulsion. Preliminary results indicate that the Magnetour concept is sound and is potentially highly promising at Jupiter.

  9. The stochastic dynamics of tethered microcantilevers in a viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Brian A.; Paul, Mark R.; Radiom, Milad

    2014-10-28

    We explore and quantify the coupled dynamics of a pair of micron scale cantilevers immersed in a viscous fluid that are also directly tethered to one another at their tips by a spring force. The spring force, for example, could represent the molecular stiffness or elasticity of a biomolecule or material tethered between the cantilevers. We use deterministic numerical simulations with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to compute the stochastic dynamics of the cantilever pair for the conditions of experiment when driven only by Brownian motion. We validate our approach by comparing directly with experimental measurements in the absence of the tethermore » which shows excellent agreement. Using numerical simulations, we quantify the correlated dynamics of the cantilever pair over a range of tether stiffness. Our results quantify the sensitivity of the auto- and cross-correlations of equilibrium fluctuations in cantilever displacement to the stiffness of the tether. We show that the tether affects the magnitude of the correlations which can be used in a measurement to probe the properties of an attached tethering substance. For the configurations of current interest using micron scale cantilevers in water, we show that the magnitude of the fluid coupling between the cantilevers is sufficiently small such that the influence of the tether can be significant. Our results show that the cross-correlation is more sensitive to tether stiffness than the auto-correlation indicating that a two-cantilever measurement has improved sensitivity when compared with a measurement using a single cantilever.« less

  10. Feedback between neutral winds and auroral arc electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Walterscheid, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The feedback between neutral atmospheric winds and the electrodynamics of a stable, discrete auroral arc is analyzed. The ionospheric current continuity equation and the equation for neutral gas acceleration by ion drag are solved simultaneously, as a function of time. The results show that, in general, the electric field in the ionosphere adjusts to neutral wind acceleration so as to keep auroral field-aligned currents and electron acceleration approximately independent of time. It is thus concluded that the neutral winds that develop as a result of the electrodynamical forcing associated with an arc do not significantly affect the intensity of the arc.

  11. Classical Electrodynamics: Problems with solutions; Problems with solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likharev, Konstantin K.

    2018-06-01

    l Advanced Physics is a series comprising four parts: Classical Mechanics, Classical Electrodynamics, Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics. Each part consists of two volumes, Lecture notes and Problems with solutions, further supplemented by an additional collection of test problems and solutions available to qualifying university instructors. This volume, Classical Electrodynamics: Lecture notes is intended to be the basis for a two-semester graduate-level course on electricity and magnetism, including not only the interaction and dynamics charged point particles, but also properties of dielectric, conducting, and magnetic media. The course also covers special relativity, including its kinematics and particle-dynamics aspects, and electromagnetic radiation by relativistic particles.

  12. Dynamics of single-stranded DNA tethered to a solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiom, Milad; Paul, Mark R.; Ducker, William A.

    2016-06-01

    Tethering is used to deliver specific biological and industrial functions. For example, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is tethered to polymerases and long sequences of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during replication, and to solids in DNA microarrays. However, tethering ssDNA to a large object limits not only the available ssDNA conformations, but also the range of time-scales over which the mechanical responses of ssDNA are important. In this work we examine the effect of tethering by measurement of the mechanical response of ssDNA that is tethered at each end to two separate atomic force microscope cantilevers in aqueous solution. Thermal motion of the cantilevers drives the ends of the ssDNA chain at frequencies near 2 kHz. The presence of a tethered molecule makes a large difference to the asymmetric cross-correlation of two cantilevers, which enables resolution of the mechanical properties in our experiments. By analysis of the correlated motion of the cantilevers we extract the friction and stiffness of the ssDNA. We find that the measured friction is much larger than the friction that is usually associated with the unencumbered motion of ssDNA. We also find that the measured relaxation time, ∼30 μs, is much greater than prior measurements of the free-molecule relaxation time. We attribute the difference to the loss of conformational possibilities as a result of constraining the ends of the ssDNA.

  13. Rate limit of protein elastic response is tether dependent.

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Ronen; Hermans, Rodolfo I; Popa, Ionel; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Berne, Bruce J; Fernandez, Julio M

    2012-09-04

    The elastic restoring force of tissues must be able to operate over the very wide range of loading rates experienced by living organisms. It is surprising that even the fastest events involving animal muscle tissues do not surpass a few hundred hertz. We propose that this limit is set in part by the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins extending and relaxing under a changing load. Here we study the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins using a fast force spectrometer with sub-millisecond time resolution, combined with Brownian and Molecular Dynamics simulations. We show that the act of tethering a polypeptide to an object, an inseparable part of protein elasticity in vivo and in experimental setups, greatly reduces the attempt frequency with which the protein samples its free energy. Indeed, our data shows that a tethered polypeptide can traverse its free-energy landscape with a surprisingly low effective diffusion coefficient D(eff) ~ 1,200 nm(2)/s. By contrast, our Molecular Dynamics simulations show that diffusion of an isolated protein under force occurs at D(eff) ~ 10(8) nm(2)/s. This discrepancy is attributed to the drag force caused by the tethering object. From the physiological time scales of tissue elasticity, we calculate that tethered elastic proteins equilibrate in vivo with D(eff) ~ 10(4)-10(6) nm(2)/s which is two to four orders magnitude smaller than the values measured for untethered proteins in bulk.

  14. The effects of tether placement on antibody stability on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grawe, Rebecca W.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2017-06-01

    Despite their potential benefits, antibody microarrays have fallen short of performing reliably and have not found widespread use outside of the research setting. Experimental techniques have been unable to determine what is occurring on the surface of an atomic level, so molecular simulation has emerged as the primary method of investigating protein/surface interactions. Simulations of small proteins have indicated that the stability of the protein is a function of the residue on the protein where a tether is placed. The purpose of this research is to see whether these findings also apply to antibodies, with their greater size and complexity. To determine this, 24 tethering locations were selected on the antibody Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID: 1IGT. Replica exchange simulations were run on two different surfaces, one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic, to determine the degree to which these tethering sites stabilize or destabilize the antibody. Results showed that antibodies tethered to hydrophobic surfaces were in general less stable than antibodies tethered to hydrophilic surfaces. Moreover, the stability of the antibody was a function of the tether location on hydrophobic surfaces but not hydrophilic surfaces.

  15. Rate limit of protein elastic response is tether dependent

    PubMed Central

    Berkovich, Ronen; Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Popa, Ionel; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2012-01-01

    The elastic restoring force of tissues must be able to operate over the very wide range of loading rates experienced by living organisms. It is surprising that even the fastest events involving animal muscle tissues do not surpass a few hundred hertz. We propose that this limit is set in part by the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins extending and relaxing under a changing load. Here we study the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins using a fast force spectrometer with sub-millisecond time resolution, combined with Brownian and Molecular Dynamics simulations. We show that the act of tethering a polypeptide to an object, an inseparable part of protein elasticity in vivo and in experimental setups, greatly reduces the attempt frequency with which the protein samples its free energy. Indeed, our data shows that a tethered polypeptide can traverse its free-energy landscape with a surprisingly low effective diffusion coefficient Deff ∼ 1,200 nm2/s. By contrast, our Molecular Dynamics simulations show that diffusion of an isolated protein under force occurs at Deff ∼ 108 nm2/s. This discrepancy is attributed to the drag force caused by the tethering object. From the physiological time scales of tissue elasticity, we calculate that tethered elastic proteins equilibrate in vivo with Deff ∼ 104–106 nm2/s which is two to four orders magnitude smaller than the values measured for untethered proteins in bulk. PMID:22895787

  16. P-Tether-Mediated, Iterative SN2'-Cuprate Alkylation Strategy to Skipped Polyol Stereotetrads: Utility of an Oxidative "Function Switch" with Phosphite-Borane Tethers.

    PubMed

    Markley, Jana L; Hanson, Paul R

    2017-05-19

    The development of a P-tether-mediated, iterative S N 2'-cuprate alkylation protocol for the formation of 1,3-skipped polyol stereotetrads is reported. This two-directional synthetic strategy builds molecular complexity from simple, readily prepared C 2 -symmetric dienediols and unites the chemistry of both temporary phosphite-borane tethers and temporary phosphate tethers-through an oxidative "function switch" of the P-tether itself-to generate intermediates that were previously inaccessible via either method alone.

  17. Nonlinear electrodynamics of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutic, Igor

    We investigate the effects of nonlinear electrodynamics in unconventional superconductors. These effects can serve as fingerprints to identify the symmetry of the superconducting pairing state and to provide information about the unknown pairing mechanism in High Temperature Superconductors (HTSC). In the Meissner regime, at low temperatures, a nonlinear magnetic response arises from the presence of lines on the Fermi surface where the superconducting energy gap is very small or zero. This can be used to perform "node spectroscopy", that is, as a sensitive bulk probe to locate the angular position of those lines. We first compute the nonlinear magnetic moment as a function of applied field and geometry, assuming d-wave pairing and anisotropic penetration depth, for realistic finite sample. Our novel, numerically implemented, perturbative procedure exploits the small ratio of the penetration depths to the sample size and substantially reduces the computational work required. We next generalize these considerations to other candidates for the energy gap and to perform node spectroscopy. In calculating the nonlinear supercurrent response, we include the effects of orthorhombic distortion and a-b plane anisotropy. Analytic results presented demonstrate a systematic way to experimentally distinguish order parameters of different symmetries, including cases with mixed symmetry (for example, d+s and s+id). We finally extend our findings to the case of low frequency harmonic magnetic field. The nonlinear magnetic response for various physical quantities generates higher harmonics of the frequency of the applied field. We discuss how examination of the field and angular dependences of these harmonics allows determination of the structure of the energy gap. We show how to distinguish nodes from small minima ("quasinodes"). Gaps with nodal lines give rise to universal power law field dependences for the nonlinear magnetic moment and torque. They both have separable temporal

  18. Understanding Plasma Interactions with the Atmosphere: The Geospace Electrodynamic Connections (GEC) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Geospace Electrodynamic Connections (GEC) mission is a multispacecraft Solar-Terrestrial Probe that has been specifically designed to advance the level of physical insight of our understanding of the coupling among the ionosphere, thermosphere, and magnetosphere. GEC is NASA's fifth Solar-Terrestrial Probe. Through multipoint measurements in the Earth's ionosphere-thermosphere (I-T) system, GEC will (i) discover the spatial and temporal scales on which magnetospheric energy input into the I-T region occurs, (ii) determine the spatial and temporal scales for the response of the I-T system to this input of energy, and (iii) quantify the altitude dependence of the response.

  19. Power transmission studies for tethered SP-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The tether and/or transmission line connecting the SP-100 to space station presents some unorthodox challenges in high voltage engineering, power transmission, and distribution. The line, which doubles as a structural element of this unusual spacecraft, will convey HVDC from SP-100 to the platform in low Earth orbit, and environment where the local plasma is sufficient to cause breakdown of exposed conductors at potentials of only a few hundred volts. Its anticipated several years operation, and continuously accumulating exposure to meteoroids and debris, raises an increasing likelihood that mechanical damage, including perforation, will be sustained in service. The present concept employs an array of gas insulated solid wall aluminum coaxial tubes; a conceptual design which showed basic feasibility of the SP-100 powered space station. Practical considerations of launch, deployment and assembly have lead to investigation of reel deployable, dielectric insulated coaxial cables. To be competitive, the dielectric would have to operate reliably in a radiation environment under electrical stresses exceeding 50 kV/cm. The SP-100 transmission line high voltage interfaces are also considered.

  20. Power transmission studies for tethered SP-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The tether and/or transmission line connecting the SP-100 to Space Station presents some unorthodox challenges in high voltage engineering, power transmission, and distribution. The line, which doubles as a structural element of this unusual spacecraft, will convey HVDC from SP-100 to the platform in low Earth orbit, and environment where the local plasma is sufficient to cause breakdown of exposed conductors at potentials of only a few hundred volts. Its anticipated several years operation, and continuously accumulating exposure to meteoroids and debris, raises an increasing likelihood that mechanical damage, including perforation, will be sustained in service. The present concept employs an array of gas insulated solid wall aluminum coaxial tubes; a conceptual design which showed basic feasibility of the SP-100 powered Space Station. Practical considerations of launch, deployment and assembly have led to investigation of reel deployable, dielectric insulated coaxial cables. To be competitive, the dielectric would have to operate reliably in a radiation environment under electrical stresses exceeding 50 kV/cm. The SP-100 transmission line high voltage interfaces are also considered.