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Sample records for electromagnetic cascades produced

  1. Hadron cascades produced by electromagnetic cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, T.M.; Ranft, J.

    1986-12-01

    A method for calculating high energy hadron cascades induced by multi-GeV electron and photon beams is described. Using the EGS4 computer program, high energy photons in the EM shower are allowed to interact hadronically according to the vector meson dominance (VMD) model, facilitated by a Monte Carlo version of the dual multistring fragmentation model which is used in the hadron cascade code FLUKA. The results of this calculation compare very favorably with experimental data on hadron production in photon-proton collisions and on the hadron production by electron beams on targets (i.e., yields in secondary particle beam lines). Electron beam induced hadron star density contours are also presented and are compared with those produced by proton beams. This FLUKA-EGS4 coupling technique could find use in the design of secondary beams, in the determination high energy hadron source terms for shielding purposes, and in the estimation of induced radioactivity in targets, collimators and beam dumps.

  2. Nuclear cascades in electromagnetic showers produced by primary gamma-quanta in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilova, T. V.; Erlykin, A. D.; Mironov, A. V.; Tukish, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Distributions were calculated for the number of electrons N sub e, number of muons with the energy above 5 GeV N sub mu and the energy of hadron component E sub h in electromagnetic showers, produced by primary gamma-quanta with energies theta approx. equals 30 deg and observed at the mountain level 700 g/square centimeters. The mean number of nuclear interactions of photos with the energy above 5 GeV is about 0.3 per each TeV of the primary energy and nuclear cascades take out in average about 2% of the total shower energy. The mean number of 5 GeV muons for the electromagnetic shower is (2 to 5)% from the number of muons in cosmic ray showers with the same number of electrons at the observation level. similar value for the total energy of hadron component is also (2 to 5)%. N sub mu and N sub e values as well as E sub h and n sub e don't correlate at the fixed primary energy E sug gamma (o). Between N sub mu and E sub h there is a positive correlation at the given E sub gamma.

  3. Electromagnetic cascades in pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Harding, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The development of pair photon cascades initiated by high energy electrons above a pulsar polar cap is simulated numerically. The calculation uses the energy of the primary electron, the magnetic field strength, and the period of rotation as parameters and follows the curvature radiation emitted by the primary, the conversion of this radiation e(+) - e(-) pairs in the intense fields, and the quantized synchrotron radiation by the secondary pairs. A recursive technique allows the tracing of an indefinite number of generations using a Monte Carlo method. Gamma ray and pair spectra are calculated for cascades in different parts of the polar cap and with different acceleration models. It is found that synchrotron radiation from secondary pairs makes an important contribution to the gamma ray spectrum above 25 MeV, and that the final gamma ray and pair spectra are insensitive to the height of the accelerating region, as long as the acceleration of the primary electrons is not limited by radiation reaction.

  4. Analytical model for electromagnetic cascades in rotating electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Nerush, E. N.; Bashmakov, V. F.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2011-08-15

    Electromagnetic cascades attract a lot of attention as an important quantum electrodynamics effect that will reveal itself in various electromagnetic field configurations at ultrahigh intensities. We study cascade dynamics in rotating electric field analytically and numerically. The kinetic equations for the electron-positron plasma and gamma-quanta are formulated. The scaling laws are derived and analyzed. For the cascades arising far above the threshold the dependence of the cascade parameters on the field frequency is derived. The spectra of high-energy cascade particles are calculated. The analytical results are verified by numerical simulations.

  5. Design of pressure vessel cascades for electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrenthold, E.P. )

    1989-08-01

    The relatively recent development of very high-energy density pulsed power supplies has motivated a renewed interest in the structural design of electromagnetic launchers. Cascade design electromagnetic launcher pressure vessels offer convenient maintenance access to high wear rate components of the structure while satisfying an unusual combination of electromagnetic, strength, and preloading constraints imposed on the system designer. This analysis for design of such structures focuses on the accurate characterization of fluid-structure interaction under dynamic asymmetric loading.

  6. Guiding of laser beams in plasmas by electromagnetic cascade compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, S.; Shvets, G.

    2006-10-01

    The near-resonant beatwave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating trains of few- femtosecond electromagnetic pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a co-moving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the difference frequency. As a result, the cascade of sidebands red- and blue-shifted by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the phase chirp enables laser beatnote compression by the group velocity dispersion. In the 3D cylindrical geometry, the frequency-downshifted EPW not only modulates the laser phase, but also causes the pulse to self-focus [P. Gibbon, Phys. Fluids B 2, 2196 (1990)]. After self-focusing, the laser beam inevitably diverges. Remarkably, the longitudinal beatnote compression can compensate the intensity drop due to diffraction. Thus, a train of high intensity radiation spikes with continually evolving longitudinal profile can be self- guided over several Rayleigh lengths in homogeneous plasma. High amplitude of the EPW is maintained over the entire propagation length. Numerical experiments on the electron acceleration in the cascade-driven (cascade-guided) EPW show that achieving GeV energy is possible under realistic experimental conditions.

  7. Development of electromagnetic cascades in the atmosphere including the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streitmatter, R. E.; Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical solutions have been obtained for the one-dimensional atmospheric electromagnetic cascade diffusion equations, including the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal and screening effects. Spectra produced by primary gamma rays of various energies are given at a number of deths in the atmosphere.

  8. Measurement of the nuclear electromagnetic cascade development in glass at energies above 200 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, C. R.; Huggett, R. W.; Humphreys, D. R.; Jones, W. V.; Levit, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    The longitudinal development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascades with energies greater than 200 GeV was measured in a low-Z (glass) absorber. This was done in the course of operating an ionization spectrometer at mountain altitude in an experiment to study the properties of gamma rays emitted from individual interactions at energies around 10,000 GeV. The ionization produced by a cascade is sampled by 20 sheets of plastic scintillator spaced uniformly in depth every 2.2 radiation lengths. Adjacent pairs of scintillators are viewed by photomultipliers which measure the mean ionization produced by an individual cascade in 10 layers each 1.1 interaction length (4.4 radiation lengths) thick. The longitudinal development of the cascades was measured for about 250 cascades having energies ranging from 200 GeV to 2500 GeV. The observations are compared with the predictions of calculations made for this specific spectrometer using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascade.

  9. Numerical analysis of electromagnetic cascades in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plyasheshnikov, A. V.; Vorobyev, K. V.

    1985-01-01

    A new calculational scheme of the Monte Carlo method assigned for the investigation of the development of high and extremely high energy electromagnetic cascades (EMC) in the matter was elaborated. The scheme was applied to the analysis of angular and radial distributions of EMC electrons in the atmosphere. By means of this scheme the EMC development in dense medium is investigated and some preliminary data are presented on the behavior of EMC in emulsion chambers. The results of more detailed theoretical analysis of the EMC development in emulsion chambers are discussed.

  10. Simulating electromagnetic cascades in magnetospheres of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Christoph; Glawion, Dorit; Shukla, Amit; Mannheim, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Context: At the low accretion-rates typical for BL Lac-objects, magnetospheres of active galactic nuclei can develop vacuum gaps with strong electric fields accelerating charged seed particles parallel to the magnetic fields up to ultra-relativistic energies. The seed particles sustain electromagnetic cascades by inverse-Compton-scattering and subsequent pair-production in soft background-radiation-fields from the accretion-disk and/or photo-ionised clouds, along the direction of the primary particle beams. Method: The one-dimensional kinetic equation describing this linear inverse-Compton-Klein-Nishina-pair-cascade is inferred. We have developed a novel code, that can numerically solve this kinetic equation for an ample variety of input-parameters. By this, quasi-stationary particle- and photon-spectra are obtained. Application: We use the code to model the cascaded interaction of electrons, that have been accelerated in a vacuum gap in the magnetosphere of Mrk 501, with Lyman-alpha-photons. The resulting spectrum on top of a synchrotron-self-Compton-background can cause a narrow TeV-bump in the spectrum of of Mrk 501.

  11. Electromagnetic Radiation in the Atmosphere Generated by Excess Negative Charge in a Nuclear-Electromagnetic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshevsky, V. S.; Fomin, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of the analytical model "PARMA" (PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere), developed to model particle fluxes of secondary cosmic radiation in the Earth's atmosphere, we have calculated the characteristics of radio waves emitted by excess negative charge in an electromagnetic cascade. The results may be of use in an analysis of experimental data on radio emission of electron-photon showers in the atmosphere.

  12. The electromagnetic component of albedo from superhigh energy cascades in dense media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golynskaya, R. M.; Hein, L. A.; Plyasheshnikov, A. V.; Vorobyev, K. V.

    1985-01-01

    Albedo from cascades induced in iron by high energy gamma quanta were Monte Carlo simulated. Thereafter the albedo electromagnetic component from proton induced cascades were calculated analytically. The calculations showed that the albedo electromagnetic component increases more rapidly than the nuclear active component and will dominate at sufficiently high energies.

  13. QED-PIC simulations of electromagnetic cascades at the surface of pulsar's polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grismayer, Thomas; Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2016-10-01

    The recent implementation of the QED module in the OSIRIS 3.0 framework has enabled to simulate various scenarios where pair production or gamma-rays emission can be produced with ultra-intense lasers and/or relativistic particles beams. In this study we leverage on these numerical tools to study extreme astrophysical scenarios where self-consistent produced electron-positron pair plasmas are of relevance such as in pulsar magnetospheres. The dynamics of pulsar's polar cap cascade, based on the Ruderman-Sutherland model, has been investigated for the first time numerically in one dimension by Timokhin. Including quantum synchrotron radiation additionally to curvature photon radiation for the possible processes responsible for photon emission, we present the results of one and two dimensional QED-PIC simulations of the development of electromagnetic cascades at the surface of the polar cap and the subsequent plasma discharges that are accompanied by strong electrostatic waves.

  14. Probing intergalactic magnetic fields with simulations of electromagnetic cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves Batista, Rafael; Saveliev, Andrey; Sigl, Günter; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2016-10-01

    We determine the effect of intergalactic magnetic fields on the distribution of high-energy gamma rays by performing three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of the development of gamma-ray-induced electromagnetic cascades in the magnetized intergalactic medium. We employ the so-called "Large Sphere Observer" method to efficiently simulate blazar gamma ray halos. We study magnetic fields with a Batchelor spectrum and with maximal left- and right-handed helicities. We also consider the case of sources whose jets are tilted with respect to the line of sight. We verify the formation of extended gamma ray halos around the source direction, and observe spiral-like patterns if the magnetic field is helical. We apply the Q -statistics to the simulated halos to extract their spiral nature and also propose an alternative method, the S -statistics. Both methods provide a quantitative way to infer the helicity of the intervening magnetic fields from the morphology of individual blazar halos for magnetic field strengths B ≳10-15 G and magnetic coherence lengths Lc≳100 Mpc . We show that the S -statistics has a better performance than the Q -statistics when assessing magnetic helicity from the simulated halos.

  15. Electromagnetic cascades and the depletion of intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Stepan; Seipt, Daniel; Heinzl, Thomas; Marklund, Mattias; Ji, Qing; Steinke, Sven; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim P.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of electrons, positrons, and photons with intense electromagnetic fields gives rise to multi-photon Compton and Breit-Wheeler processes. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution. Moreover the multi-photon nature of Compton and Breit-Wheeler processes implies the absorption of a significant number of photons. As a result, the interaction of a highly charged electron bunch with an intense laser pulse can lead to a significant depletion of the laser pulse energy, thus rendering the external field approximation invalid. The relevance of these results to the proposed BELLA-i beamline at BELLA center at LBNL is discussed. We acknowledge support from the Office of Science of the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  16. Electromagnetic cascade masquerade: a way to mimic γ-axion-like particle mixing effects in blazar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhatdoev, T. A.; Khalikov, E. V.; Kircheva, A. P.; Lyukshin, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Most of the studies on extragalactic γ-ray propagation performed up to now only accounted for primary γ-ray absorption and adiabatic losses, known as the "absorption-only model". However, there is growing evidence that this model is oversimplified and must be modified in some way. In particular, it was found that the intensity extrapolated from the optically-thin energy range of some blazar spectra is insufficient to explain the optically-thick part of these spectra. This effect was interpreted as an indication for γ-axion-like particle (ALP) oscillation. On the other hand, there are many hints that a secondary component from electromagnetic cascades initiated by primary γ-rays or nuclei may be observed in the spectra of some blazars. Aims: We study the impact of electromagnetic cascades from primary γ-rays or protons on the physical interpretation of blazar spectra obtained with imaging Cherenkov telescopes. Methods: We used the publicly-available code ELMAG to compute observable spectra of electromagnetic cascades from primary γ-rays. For the case of primary proton, we developed a simple, fast and reasonably accurate hybrid method to calculate the observable spectrum. We performed the fitting of the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with various physical models: the absorption-only model, the "electromagnetic cascade model" for the case of primary γ-rays, and several versions of the hadronic cascade model for the case of primary protons. We distinguish the following species of hadronic cascade models: 1) the "basic hadronic model", in which it is assumed that the proton beam travels undisturbed by the extragalactic magnetic field and that all observable γ-rays are produced by primary protons through photohadronic processes with subsequent development of electromagnetic cascades; 2) the "intermediate hadronic model", which is the same as the basic hadronic model, but the primary beam is terminated at some redshift zc; and 3) the

  17. Neutrino production in electromagnetic cascades: An extra component of cosmogenic neutrino at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Li, Zhuo; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2017-03-01

    Muon pairs can be produced in the annihilation of ultrahigh energy (UHE, E ≳1 018 eV ) photons with low energy cosmic background radiation in the intergalactic space, giving birth to neutrinos. Although the branching ratio of muon pair production is low, products of other channels, which are mainly electron/positron pairs, will probably transfer most of their energies into the new generated UHE photon in the subsequent interaction with the cosmic background radiation via Compton scattering in deep Klein-Nishina regime. The regeneration of these new UHE photons then provides a second chance to produce the muon pairs, enhancing the neutrino flux. We investigate the neutrino production in the propagation of UHE photons in the intergalactic space at different redshifts, considering various competing processes such as pair production, double pair production for UHE photons, and triplet production and synchrotron radiation for UHE electrons. Following the analytic method raised by Gould and Rephaeli, we firstly study the electromagnetic cascade initiated by an UHE photon, with paying particular attention to the leading particle in the cascade process. Regarding the least energetic outgoing particles as energy loss, we obtain the effective penetration length of the leading particle, as well as energy loss rate including the neutrino emission rate in the cascade process. Finally, we find that an extra component of UHE neutrinos will arise from the propagation of UHE cosmic rays due to the generated UHE photons and electron/positrons. However, the flux of this component is quite small, with a flux of at most 10% of that of the conventional cosmogenic neutrino at a few EeV, in the absence of a strong intergalactic magnetic field and a strong cosmic radio background. The precise contribution of extra component depends on several factors, e.g., cosmic radio background, intergalactic magnetic field, and the spectrum of proton, which are discussed in this work.

  18. Nonlinear evolution of the plasma beat wave: Compressing the laser beat notes via electromagnetic cascading.

    PubMed

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-04-01

    The near-resonant beat wave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating the trains of few-femtosecond electromagnetic (EM) pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a comoving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the difference frequency. As a result, the cascade of sidebands red and blue shifted by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. The bandwidth of the phase-modulated laser is proportional to the product of the plasma length, laser wavelength, and amplitude of the electron density perturbation. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the redshifted spectral components are advanced in time with respect to the blueshifted ones near the center of each laser beat note. The group velocity dispersion of plasma compresses so chirped beat notes to a few-laser-cycle duration thus creating a train of sharp EM spikes with the beat periodicity. Depending on the plasma and laser parameters, chirping and compression can be implemented either concurrently in the same, or sequentially in different plasmas. Evolution of the laser beat wave and electron density perturbations is described in time and one spatial dimension in a weakly relativistic approximation. Using the compression effect, we demonstrate that the relativistic bistability regime of the EPW excitation [G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 195004 (2004)] can be achieved with the initially subthreshold beat wave pulse.

  19. Electromagnetic vibration process for producing bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takuya; Amiya, Kenji; Rachmat, Rudi S; Mizutani, Yoshiki; Miwa, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    It is known that the cooling rate from the liquid state is an important factor in the production of bulk metallic glasses. However, the effects of other factors such as electric and magnetic fields have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we present a new method for producing bulk metallic glasses by using electromagnetic vibrations with simultaneous imposition of an alternating electric current and a magnetic field. This method was found to be effective in enhancing apparent glass-forming ability in Mg65-Cu25-Y10 (atomic percent) alloys. Indeed, larger bulk metallic glasses could be obtained by the electromagnetic vibration process under the same cooling conditions. We presume that disappearance or decrement of clusters by the electromagnetic vibrations applied to the liquid state cause suppression of crystal nucleation. This electromagnetic vibration process should be effective in other bulk metallic glass systems if the clusters in the liquid state cause the crystal nucleation.

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency in a cascade-type quantum well subband system under intense picosecond excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S.; Eichenberg, B.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Ustinov, V. M.; Seilmeier, A.

    2016-01-01

    The coherent light-matter interaction in a 4-level cascade-type subband system of an asymmetric GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well structure is studied in pump-probe transmission experiments with picosecond (ps) time resolution. Coupling two excited subbands by an intense mid-infrared laser pulse at low sample temperatures is found to result in a substantially increased transparency of the fundamental e1-e2 transition. We find a reduction of the absorption coefficient by ~80%, which is one of the most pronounced electromagnetically induced transparency in solid state systems observed so far.

  1. Loophole to the universal photon spectrum in electromagnetic cascades and application to the cosmological lithium problem.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-03-06

    The standard theory of electromagnetic cascades onto a photon background predicts a quasiuniversal shape for the resulting nonthermal photon spectrum. This has been applied to very disparate fields, including nonthermal big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). However, once the energy of the injected photons falls below the pair-production threshold the spectral shape is much harder, a fact that has been overlooked in past literature. This loophole may have important phenomenological consequences, since it generically alters the BBN bounds on nonthermal relics; for instance, it allows us to reopen the possibility of purely electromagnetic solutions to the so-called "cosmological lithium problem," which were thought to be excluded by other cosmological constraints. We show this with a proof-of-principle example and a simple particle physics model, compared with previous literature.

  2. Loophole to the Universal Photon Spectrum in Electromagnetic Cascades and Application to the Cosmological Lithium Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-03-01

    The standard theory of electromagnetic cascades onto a photon background predicts a quasiuniversal shape for the resulting nonthermal photon spectrum. This has been applied to very disparate fields, including nonthermal big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). However, once the energy of the injected photons falls below the pair-production threshold the spectral shape is much harder, a fact that has been overlooked in past literature. This loophole may have important phenomenological consequences, since it generically alters the BBN bounds on nonthermal relics; for instance, it allows us to reopen the possibility of purely electromagnetic solutions to the so-called "cosmological lithium problem," which were thought to be excluded by other cosmological constraints. We show this with a proof-of-principle example and a simple particle physics model, compared with previous literature.

  3. Optical Analog to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Cascaded Ring-Resonator Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghua; Zheng, Hua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical methods has shown great potential in slow light and sensing applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a coupled resonator induced transparency system with three cascaded ring coupled resonators in a silicon chip. The structure was modeled by using the transfer matrix method. Influences of various parameters including coupling ratio of couplers, waveguide loss and additional loss of couplers on transmission characteristic and group index have been investigated theoretically and numerically in detail. The transmission character of the system was measured by the vertical grating coupling method. The enhanced quality factor reached 1.22 × 105. In addition, we further test the temperature performance of the device. The results provide a new method for the manipulation of light in highly integrated optical circuits and sensing applications. PMID:27463720

  4. Optical Analog to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Cascaded Ring-Resonator Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonghua; Zheng, Hua; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong

    2016-07-25

    The analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency in optical methods has shown great potential in slow light and sensing applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrated a coupled resonator induced transparency system with three cascaded ring coupled resonators in a silicon chip. The structure was modeled by using the transfer matrix method. Influences of various parameters including coupling ratio of couplers, waveguide loss and additional loss of couplers on transmission characteristic and group index have been investigated theoretically and numerically in detail. The transmission character of the system was measured by the vertical grating coupling method. The enhanced quality factor reached 1.22 × 10⁵. In addition, we further test the temperature performance of the device. The results provide a new method for the manipulation of light in highly integrated optical circuits and sensing applications.

  5. Sample space reducing cascading processes produce the full spectrum of scaling exponents.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Hanel, Rudolf; Thurner, Stefan

    2017-09-11

    Sample Space Reducing (SSR) processes are simple stochastic processes that offer a new route to understand scaling in path-dependent processes. Here we define a cascading process that generalises the recently defined SSR processes and is able to produce power laws with arbitrary exponents. We demonstrate analytically that the frequency distributions of states are power laws with exponents that coincide with the multiplication parameter of the cascading process. In addition, we show that imposing energy conservation in SSR cascades allows us to recover Fermi's classic result on the energy spectrum of cosmic rays, with the universal exponent -2, which is independent of the multiplication parameter of the cascade. Applications of the proposed process include fragmentation processes or directed cascading diffusion on networks, such as rumour or epidemic spreading.

  6. The Impact of Electromagnetic Cascades of Very-high Energy Gamma Rays on the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, Tonia

    2012-01-01

    As very high energy (VHE) photons propagate through the extragalactic background light (EBL), they interact with the soft photons of the EBL and initiate electromagnetic cascades of photons and electrons. The collective intensity of a cosmological population emitting at VHEs (such as blazars) will be attenuated at the highest energies through interactions with the EBL and enhanced at lower energies by the resulting cascade. As such, depending on the space density and spectra of the sources and the model of the EBL, cascade radiation can provide a significant contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB). Through deflections of the charged particles of the cascade, an intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the anisotropy properties of the EGB. The impact of a strong IGMF is to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the EGB. We discuss the implications of cascade radiation for the origins of the EGB and the nature of the IGMF, as well as insight that will be provided by data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the upcoming years.

  7. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  8. ELMAG: A Monte Carlo simulation of electromagnetic cascades on the extragalactic background light and in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachelrieß, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Tomàs, R.

    2012-04-01

    A Monte Carlo program for the simulation of electromagnetic cascades initiated by high-energy photons and electrons interacting with extragalactic background light (EBL) is presented. Pair production and inverse Compton scattering on EBL photons as well as synchrotron losses and deflections of the charged component in extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMF) are included in the simulation. Weighted sampling of the cascade development is applied to reduce the number of secondary particles and to speed up computations. As final result, the simulation procedure provides the energy, the observation angle, and the time delay of secondary cascade particles at the present epoch. Possible applications are the study of TeV blazars and the influence of the EGMF on their spectra or the calculation of the contribution from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or dark matter to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background. As an illustration, we present results for deflections and time delays relevant for the derivation of limits on the EGMF.

  9. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields activate the ERK cascade, increase hsp70 protein levels and promote regeneration in Planaria.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Reba; Lin-Ye, Avary; Geddis, Matthew S; Wickramaratne, Priya J; Hodge, Susan E; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Blank, Martin; Ambron, Richard T

    2009-01-01

    To use regenerating Planaria Dugesia dorotocethala as a model to determine whether an intermittent modulated extremely low frequency electro-magnetic field (ELF-EMF) produces elevated levels of the heat shock protein hsp70 and stimulates intracellular pathways known to be involved in injury and repair. We focused on serum response element (SRE) binding through the extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Planaria were transected equidistant between the tip of the head and the tip of the tail. Individual head and tail portions from the same worm were exposed to a 60 Hertz 80 milliGauss ELF-EMF for 1 h twice daily for 15 days post-transection under carefully controlled exposure conditions. The regenerating heads and tails were photographed and the lengths measured at three-day intervals. In other experiments, the timing of the appearance of pigmented eyes was monitored in the tail portion at 12-h intervals following transection in both ELF-EMF exposed and sham control. In some experiments protein lysates were analysed for hsp70 levels, doubly phosphorylated (pp)-ERK, Elk-1 kinase activity and serum response factor (SRF)-SRE binding. ELF-EMF exposure during the initial 3-days post-surgery caused a significant increase in regeneration for both heads and tails, but especially tails. The first appearance of eyes occurred at day seven post-transection in tail portions exposed to ELF-EMF. In the sham control tail samples the initial appearance of eyes occurred 48 h later. Concurrently, ELF-EMF-exposed heads and tails exhibited an elevation in the level of hsp70 protein, an activation of an ERK cascade, and an increase in SRF-SRE binding. Exposures to a modulated sinusoidal ELF-EMF were delivered by a Helmholtz configuration at a frequency of 60 Hz and 80 mG twice a day for one hour. This is accompanied by an increase in hsp70 protein levels, activation of specific kinases and upregulation of transcription factors that are generally associated with repair

  10. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields activate the ERK cascade, increase hsp70 protein levels and promote regeneration in Planaria

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Reba; Lin-Ye, Avary; Geddis, Matthew S.; Wickramaratne, Priya J.; Hodge, Susan E.; Pantazatos, Spiro; Blank, Martin; Ambron, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To use regenerating Planaria Dugesia dorotocethala as a model to determine whether an intermittent modulated extremely low frequency electro-magnetic field (ELF-EMF) produces elevated levels of the heat shock protein hsp70 and stimulates intracellular pathways known to be involved in injury and repair. We focused on serum response element (SRE) binding through the extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Materials and methods Planaria were transected equidistant between the tip of the head and the tip of the tail. Individual head and tail portions from the same worm were exposed to a 60 Hertz 80 milliGauss ELF- EMF for one hour twice daily for 15 days post transection under carefully controlled exposure conditions. The regenerating heads and tails were photographed and the lengths measured at 3-day intervals. In other experiments, the timing of the appearance of pigmented eyes was monitored in the tail portion at 12 hour intervals following transection in both ELF-EMF exposed and sham control. In some experiments protein lysates were analyzed for hsp70 levels, doubly phosphorylated (pp)-ERK, Elk-1 kinase activity and serum response factor (SRF) -SRE binding. Results ELF-EMF exposure during the initial 3-days post surgery caused a significant increase in regeneration for both heads and tails, but especially tails. The first appearance of eyes occurred at day seven post-transection in tail portions exposed to ELF-EMF. In the sham control tail samples the initial appearance of eyes occurred 48 hours later. Concurrently, ELF-EMF-exposed heads and tails exhibited an elevation in the level of hsp70 protein, an activation of an ERK cascade, and an increase in SRF-SRE binding. Conclusion Exposures to a modulated sinusoidal ELF-EMF were delivered by a Helmholtz configuration at a frequency of 60Hz and 80mG twice a day for one hour. This is accompanied by an increase in hsp70 protein levels, activation of specific kinases and up-regulation of

  11. Electromagnetic Fields Produced by Inclined Return Stroke Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemamcha, Abdelmalek; Houabes, Mourad

    2014-05-01

    In this paper further theoretical investigations to understand and elucidate recently raised questions on the characteristics of lightning return-strokes curried out. Using Antenna Theory (AT) model, which is extended to take into account the channel inclination, the electromagnetic fields expressions for vertical dipole are completed, and an inclined channel is properly modeled, vertical electric and azimuthally magnetic fields are computed at different distances (close, intermediate and far distance ranges). The computations show that amplitudes and wave forms of the electromagnetic fields at close and intermediate lightning environment are considerably affected by the channel inclination.

  12. Influence of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phone on some biophysical blood properties in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Bediwi, Abu Bakr; Saad, Mohamed; El-kott, Attall F; Eid, Eman

    2013-04-01

    Effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phone on blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hemolysis, Osmotic fragility, and blood components of rats have been investigated. Experimental results show that there are significant change on blood components and its viscosity which affects on a blood circulation due to many body problems. Red blood cells, White blood cells, and Platelets are broken after exposure to electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phone. Also blood viscosity and plasma viscosity values are increased but Osmotic fragility value decreased after exposure to electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phone.

  13. Interstitial dislocation loop nucleation and growth and swelling produced by high-energy cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Sommer, W.F.; Bradbury, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Structural materials for advanced energy sources such as magnetically-and inertially-confined thermonuclear reactors are subjected to a radiation enviornment that produces high-energy displacement cascades and transmutation products that include helium. We address these characteristics and formulate their effect on the microstructural evolution of a material. We consider that, immediately after a high energy cascade event, a vacancy-rich region exists near the primary event site and that an interstitial-rich zone, formed by collision chains, exists some distance from the primary event site. Transmutation-product helium can diffuse into the vacancy-rich zone and stabilize bubble nuclei that will later grow if sufficient vacancies and helium atoms diffuse to the nucleus. These bubbles are the sinks for excess radiation-produced vacancies. The excess radiation-produced interstitials migrate and bond; if the binding energy is high eneough, a di-interstitial is considered to be a stable dislocation-loop nucleus. The loop nuclei grow if they receive more interstitials than vacancies; this represents material swelling since the bubbles do not cause a lattice contraction to offset the dilation caused by the growing dislocation loops.

  14. Efficient calculation of full waveform time domain inversion for electromagnetic problem using fictitious wave domain method and cascade decimation decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, N.; Schultz, A.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, a full waveform time domain inverse solution has been developed for the magnetotelluric (MT) and controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods. The ultimate goal of this approach is to obtain a computationally tractable direct waveform joint inversion to solve simultaneously for source fields and earth conductivity structure in three and four dimensions. This is desirable on several grounds, including the improved spatial resolving power expected from use of a multitude of source illuminations, the ability to operate in areas of high levels of source signal spatial complexity, and non-stationarity. This goal would not be obtainable if one were to adopt the pure time domain solution for the inverse problem. This is particularly true for the case of MT surveys, since an enormous number of degrees of freedom are required to represent the observed MT waveforms across a large frequency bandwidth. This means that for the forward simulation, the smallest time steps should be finer than that required to represent the highest frequency, while the number of time steps should also cover the lowest frequency. This leads to a sensitivity matrix that is computationally burdensome to solve a model update. We have implemented a code that addresses this situation through the use of cascade decimation decomposition to reduce the size of the sensitivity matrix substantially, through quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition. We also use a fictitious wave domain method to speed up computation time of the forward simulation in the time domain. By combining these refinements, we have developed a full waveform joint source field/earth conductivity inverse modeling method. We found that cascade decimation speeds computations of the sensitivity matrices dramatically, keeping the solution close to that of the undecimated case. For example, for a model discretized into 2.6x105 cells, we obtain model updates in less than 1 hour on a 4U rack-mounted workgroup Linux server, which

  15. Primary afferent second messenger cascades interact with specific integrin subunits in producing inflammatory hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Dina, Olayinka A; Hucho, Tim; Yeh, Jenny; Malik-Hall, Misbah; Reichling, David B; Levine, Jon D

    2005-05-01

    We recently reported that hyperalgesia induced by the inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) requires intact alpha1, alpha3 and beta1 integrin subunit function, whereas epinephrine-induced hyperalgesia depends on alpha5 and beta1. PGE(2)-induced hyperalgesia is mediated by protein kinase A (PKA), while epinephrine-induced hyperalgesia is mediated by a combination of PKA, protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK). We hypothesized that inflammatory mediator-induced hyperalgesia involves specific interactions between different subsets of integrin subunits and particular second messenger species. In the present study, function-blocking anti-integrin antibodies and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were used to elucidate these interactions in rat. Hyperalgesia produced by an activator of adenylate cyclase (forskolin) depended on alpha1, alpha3 and beta1 integrins. However, hyperalgesia induced by activation of the cascade at a point farther downstream (by cAMP analog or PKA catalytic subunit) was independent of any integrins tested. In contrast, hyperalgesia induced by a specific PKCepsilon agonist depended only on alpha5 and beta1 integrins. Hyperalgesia induced by agonism of MAPK/ERK depended on all four integrin subunits tested (alpha1, alpha3, alpha5 and beta1). Finally, disruption of lipid rafts antagonized hyperalgesia induced by PGE(2) and by forskolin, but not that induced by epinephrine. Furthermore, alpha1 integrin, but not alpha5, was present in detergent-resistant membrane fractions (which retain lipid raft components). These observations suggest that integrins play a critical role in inflammatory pain by interacting with components of second messenger cascades that mediate inflammatory hyperalgesia, and that such interaction with the PGE(2)-activated pathway may be organized by lipid rafts.

  16. Exact Electromagnetic Fields Produced by a Finite Wire with Constant Current

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, I.; Aquino, N.

    2008-01-01

    We solve exactly the problem of calculating the electromagnetic fields produced by a finite wire with a constant current, by using two methods: retarded potentials and Jefimenko's formalism. One result in this particular case is that the usual Biot-Savart law of magnetostatics gives the correct magnetic field of the problem. We also show…

  17. Exact Electromagnetic Fields Produced by a Finite Wire with Constant Current

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campos, I.; Aquino, N.

    2008-01-01

    We solve exactly the problem of calculating the electromagnetic fields produced by a finite wire with a constant current, by using two methods: retarded potentials and Jefimenko's formalism. One result in this particular case is that the usual Biot-Savart law of magnetostatics gives the correct magnetic field of the problem. We also show…

  18. Simulations of electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin plasma by a continuously injected electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Annenkov, V. V.; Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin beam-plasma system are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, the problem of emission generation in such a system is considered in a realistic formulation allowing for the continuous injection of a relativistic electron beam through a plasma boundary. Specific attention is given to the thin plasma case in which the transverse plasma size is comparable to the typical wavelength of beam-driven oscillations. Such a case is often implemented in laboratory beam-plasma experiments and has a number of peculiarities. Emission from a thin plasma does not require intermediate generation of the electromagnetic plasma eigenmodes, as in an infinite case, and is more similar to the regular antenna radiation. In this work, we determine how efficiently the fundamental and the second harmonic emissions can be generated in previously modulated and initially homogeneous plasmas.

  19. Simulations of electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin plasma by a continuously injected electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin beam-plasma system are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, the problem of emission generation in such a system is considered in a realistic formulation allowing for the continuous injection of a relativistic electron beam through a plasma boundary. Specific attention is given to the thin plasma case in which the transverse plasma size is comparable to the typical wavelength of beam-driven oscillations. Such a case is often implemented in laboratory beam-plasma experiments and has a number of peculiarities. Emission from a thin plasma does not require intermediate generation of the electromagnetic plasma eigenmodes, as in an infinite case, and is more similar to the regular antenna radiation. In this work, we determine how efficiently the fundamental and the second harmonic emissions can be generated in previously modulated and initially homogeneous plasmas.

  20. Apparatus and method for enhanced chemical processing in high pressure and atmospheric plasmas produced by high frequency electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Helfritch, D.J.

    1989-11-28

    This paper describes an apparatus which creates a plasma for chemical processing of gaseous fluid. It comprises an electro-magnetic resonator cavity having first and second conductive walls and a resonant frequency; an electro-magnetic energy source which produces electro-magnetic energy having a frequency corresponding to the resonant frequency and a power level sufficient for breaking down the gaseous fluid and creating a plasma within the electro-magnetic resonator cavity; an electro-magnetic wave guiding structure connecting the electro-magnetic energy source to the first wall of the electro-magnetic cavity; the wave guiding structure having an intake port for introducing the gaseous fluid into the wave guiding structure; the second wall of the resonator cavity having an exhaust port for discharging processed gaseous fluid in the form of a plasma from the cavity; and plasma confinement means for causing the gaseous fluid to flow into the electro-magnetic resonator cavity through the aperture along with the electro-magnetic energy for confining and stabilizing the plasma within the electro-magnetic resonator cavity.

  1. Negative-Refractive Bicrystal with Broken Symmetry Produces Asymmetric Electromagnetic Fields in Guided-Wave Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krowne, Clifford M.

    2004-07-01

    Heterostructure arrangements of uniaxial bicrystals have been discovered to produce electromagnetic fields with asymmetric distributions in guide wave structures. The property behind this remarkable phenomenon is the broken crystalline symmetry which allows the new physics to be seen in unsymmetric distributions. Here the theory behind this phenomenon is presented, numerical calculations are performed using an ab initio anisotropic Green’s function approach, and the results provided at 10 GHz for a realistic crystal system with nominal permittivity of 5. Asymmetric distributions seen here are one facet of the broken symmetry property which generates negative refraction for impinging waves on a bicrystal.

  2. Coherent frequency combs produced by self frequency modulation in quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Khurgin, J. B.; Dikmelik, Y.; Hugi, A.; Faist, J.

    2014-02-24

    One salient characteristic of Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) is its very short τ ∼ 1 ps gain recovery time that so far thwarted the attempts to achieve self-mode locking of the device into a train of single pulses. We show theoretically that four wave mixing, combined with the short gain recovery time causes QCL to operate in the self-frequency-modulated regime characterized by a constant power in time domain and stable coherent comb in the frequency domain. Coherent frequency comb may enable many potential applications of QCL's in sensing and measurement.

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor-Induced Electromagnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario J.-E.

    Spontaneous electromagnetic fields can be important to the dynamic evolution of a plasma by directing heat flow as well as providing additional pressures on the conducting fluids through the Lorentz force. Electromagnetic fields are predicted to affect fluid behavior during the core-collapse of supernovae through generation of fields due to hydrodynamic instabilities. In the coronae of stars, self-generated magnetic fields lead to filamentary structure in the hot plasma. Recent experiments by Gregori et al. investigated sources of protogalactic magnetic fields generated by laser-produced shock waves. In inertial confinement fusion experiments, self-generated electromagnetic fields can also play a role and have recently become of great interest to the community. Present day laser facilities provide a unique opportunity to study spontaneous field-generation in these extreme environments under controlled conditions. Instability-induced electromagnetic fields were investigated using a novel monoenergetic-proton radiography system. Fusion protons generated by an 'exploding-pusher' implosion were used to probe laser-irradiated plastic foils with various preimposed surface perturbations. Imaging protons are sensitive to electromagnetic fields and density modulations in the plasma through the Lorentz force and Coulomb collisions, respectively. Corresponding x-ray radiographs of these targets provided mass density distributions and Coulomb effects on protons were assessed using a Monte Carlo code written using the Geant4 framework. Proton fluence distributions were recorded on CR-39 detectors and Fourier analyzed to infer path-integrated field strengths. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth of preimposed surface perturbations generated magnetic fields by the RT-induced Biermann battery and were measured for the first time. Good data were obtained during linear growth and when compared to ideal calculations, demonstrated that field diffusion near the source played an important role

  4. Comparison of electromagnetic shielding with polyaniline nanopowders produced in solvent-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Tantawy, Hesham Ramzy; Aston, D Eric; Smith, Jacob R; Young, Jeffrey L

    2013-06-12

    Nanoparticle synthesis (~10-50 nm) of HCl-doped polyaniline elucidates the impact of limiting solvent (water) and oxidizing agent (ammonium peroxydisulfate) on morphology (XRD and TEM), chemical structure (FTIR), conductivity (two-point DC) and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (SE) in microwave frequencies (i.e., X-band S-parameter measurements). Detailed comparison of these properties with respect to three distinct polymerization environments indicate that a solvent-free or limited solvent polymerization accomplished through a wet grinding solid-phase reaction produces superior conductivity (27 S/cm) with intermediate crystallinity (66%) for the highest EM shielding-an order of magnitude improvement over conventional polymerization with respect to EM power transmission reduction for all loadings per shielding area (0.04 to 0.17 g/cm(2)). By contrast, the classic oxidation of aniline in a well-dispersed aqueous reaction phase with an abundance of available oxidant in free solution yielded low conductivity (3.3 S/cm), crystallinity (54%), and SE, whereas similar solvent-rich reactions with limiting oxidizer produced similar conductivity (2.9 S/cm) and significantly lower SE with the highest crystallinity (72%). This work is the first to demonstrate that limiting solvent and oxidizer enhances electromagnetic interactions for shielding microwaves in polyaniline nanopowders. This appears connected to having the highest overall extent of oxidation achieved in the wet solid-phase reaction.

  5. Detection of electromagnetic pulses produced by hypervelocity micro particle impact plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Sigrid; Lee, Nicolas; Johnson, Theresa; Goel, Ashish; Fletcher, Alexander; Linscott, Ivan; Strauss, David; Lauben, David; Srama, Ralf; Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian

    2013-09-15

    Hypervelocity micro particles (mass < 1 ng), including meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and produce plasmas that are initially dense (∼10{sup 28} m{sup −3}), but rapidly expand into the surrounding vacuum. We report the detection of radio frequency (RF) emission associated with electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) from hypervelocity impacts of micro particles in ground-based experiments using micro particles that are 15 orders of magnitude less massive than previously observed. The EMP production is a stochastic process that is influenced by plasma turbulence such that the EMP detection rate that is strongly dependent on impact speed and on the electrical charge conditions at the impact surface. In particular, impacts of the fastest micro particles occurring under spacecraft charging conditions representative of high geomagnetic activity are the most likely to produce RF emission. This new phenomenon may provide a source for unexplained RF measurements on spacecraft charged to high potentials.

  6. [A Case of an Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenoma Removed via Electromagnetic-Guided Neuroendoscopy].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yusuke; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kenichi; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Isao

    2016-06-01

    The use of navigation systems is safe and reliable for neurological surgery. We performed endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery to totally resect an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing pituitary adenoma associated with oculomotor nerve palsy. A 70-year-old woman developed right ptosis 4 months before admission. She developed anisocoria 2 months later and was referred to the department of neurology from clinic. Brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed an intrasellar tumor that partially invaded the right cavernous sinus, and she was then referred to our department. She exhibited a round face ("moon face") and central obesity. Laboratory test results showed a high urinary cortisol level and high serum ACTH level, and neither the serum cortisol nor ACTH level was suppressed by a low-dose dexamethasone test. We performed transsphenoidal surgery using high-dimensional endoscopy under electromagnetic navigation. The tumor invading the cavernous sinus was visualized via endoscopy and confirmed on navigation using a flexible needle probe. Postoperative MRI showed total removal of the tumor, and the serum ACTH level recovered to the normal range. The patient's right oculomotor palsy resolved within 1 week postoperatively. In summary, electromagnetic navigation was useful for total resection of a pituitary tumor invading the cavernous sinus, contributing to normalization of the ACTH level and improvement in neurological symptoms.

  7. Analytical-numerical methods of calculations of energy and three-dimensional particle distributions in electromagnetic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanenko, I. P.; Kanevsky, B. L.; Roganova, T. M.; Sizov, V. V.; Triphonova, S. V.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and numerical methods of calculation of the energy and three dimensional EPS characteristics are reported. The angular and lateral functions of electrons in EPS have been obtained by the Landau and small angle approximations A and B and compared with earlier data. A numerical method of solution of cascade equations for the EPS distribution function moments has been constructed. Considering the equilibrium rms angle as an example, errors appearing when approximating the elementary process cross sections by their asymptotic expressions are analyzed.

  8. On the electromagnetic fields produced by marine frequency domain controlled sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, Alan D.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, marine controlled source electromagnetics (CSEM) has found increasing use in hydrocarbon exploration due to its ability to detect thin resistive zones beneath the seafloor. Although it must be recognized that the quantitative interpretation of marine CSEM data over petroleum-bearing formations will typically require 2-D surveys and 2-D or 3-D modelling, the use of the 1-D approximation is useful under some circumstances and provides considerable insight into the physics of marine CSEM. It is the purpose of this paper to thoroughly explore the 1-D solutions for all four fundamental source types-vertical and horizontal, electric and magnetic dipole (VED, HED, VMD and HMD)-using a set of canonical reservoir models that encompass brine to weak to strong hydrocarbon types. The paper introduces the formalism to solve the Maxwell equations for a 1-D structure in terms of independent and unique toroidal and poloidal magnetic modes that circumscribe the salient diffusion physics. Green's functions for the two modes from which solutions for arbitrary source current distributions can be constructed are derived and used to obtain the electromagnetic (EM) fields produced by finite VED, HED, VMD and HMD sources overlying an arbitrary 1-D electrical structure. Field behaviour is analysed using the Poynting vector that represents the time-averaged flow of energy through the structure and a polarization ellipse decomposition of the triaxial seafloor EM field that is a complete field description. The behaviour of the two EM modes using unimodal VED and VMD sources is presented. The paper closes by extending these results to the bimodal HED and HMD sources.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of the nuclear-electromagnetic cascade development and the energy response of ionization spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Modifications to the basic computer program for performing the simulations are reported. The major changes include: (1) extension of the calculations to include the development of cascades initiated by heavy nuclei, (2) improved treatment of the nuclear disintegrations which occur during the interactions of hadrons in heavy absorbers, (3) incorporation of accurate multi-pion final-state cross sections for various interactions at accelerator energies, (4) restructuring of the program logic so that calculations can be made for sandwich-type detectors, and (5) logic modifications related to execution of the program.

  10. Electromagnetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-07

    Radiation Patterns Predicted and measured Beam Steering integration to Shadow Harvest Sensor Pod Lockheed Martin and OSU 29 DISTRIBUTION A...spatial filtering system, with an appropriate phase mask, can produce an Airy beam 18 DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution is...ES) arrays attain 7 dB realizable gain, 5 dB higher than any previous ES antenna . • Can be used to replace much larger Yagi antennas . • Paves

  11. Influences of Electromagnetic Articulography Sensors on Speech Produced by Healthy Adults and Individuals with Aphasia and Apraxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, William F.; Bharadwaj, Sneha V.; Stettler, Monica P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether the intraoral transducers used in electromagnetic articulography (EMA) interfere with speech and whether there is an added risk of interference when EMA systems are used to study individuals with aphasia and apraxia. Method: Ten adult talkers (5 individuals with aphasia/apraxia, 5 controls) produced 12 American…

  12. Influences of Electromagnetic Articulography Sensors on Speech Produced by Healthy Adults and Individuals with Aphasia and Apraxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, William F.; Bharadwaj, Sneha V.; Stettler, Monica P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether the intraoral transducers used in electromagnetic articulography (EMA) interfere with speech and whether there is an added risk of interference when EMA systems are used to study individuals with aphasia and apraxia. Method: Ten adult talkers (5 individuals with aphasia/apraxia, 5 controls) produced 12 American…

  13. Microwave frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) produce widespread neuropsychiatric effects including depression.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2016-09-01

    Non-thermal microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) act via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Calcium channel blockers block EMF effects and several types of additional evidence confirm this mechanism. Low intensity microwave EMFs have been proposed to produce neuropsychiatric effects, sometimes called microwave syndrome, and the focus of this review is whether these are indeed well documented and consistent with the known mechanism(s) of action of such EMFs. VGCCs occur in very high densities throughout the nervous system and have near universal roles in release of neurotransmitters and neuroendocrine hormones. Soviet and Western literature shows that much of the impact of non-thermal microwave exposures in experimental animals occurs in the brain and peripheral nervous system, such that nervous system histology and function show diverse and substantial changes. These may be generated through roles of VGCC activation, producing excessive neurotransmitter/neuroendocrine release as well as oxidative/nitrosative stress and other responses. Excessive VGCC activity has been shown from genetic polymorphism studies to have roles in producing neuropsychiatric changes in humans. Two U.S. government reports from the 1970s to 1980s provide evidence for many neuropsychiatric effects of non-thermal microwave EMFs, based on occupational exposure studies. 18 more recent epidemiological studies, provide substantial evidence that microwave EMFs from cell/mobile phone base stations, excessive cell/mobile phone usage and from wireless smart meters can each produce similar patterns of neuropsychiatric effects, with several of these studies showing clear dose-response relationships. Lesser evidence from 6 additional studies suggests that short wave, radio station, occupational and digital TV antenna exposures may produce similar neuropsychiatric effects. Among the more commonly reported changes are sleep disturbance/insomnia, headache, depression

  14. Plasma channel produced by femtosecond laser pulses as a medium for amplifying electromagnetic radiation of the subterahertz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatskaya, A V; Volkova, E A; Popov, A M

    2013-12-31

    The electron energy distribution function in the plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 248 nm in atmospheric-pressure gases was considered. Conditions were determined whereby this channel may be employed for amplifying electromagnetic waves up to the terahertz frequency range over the energy spectrum relaxation time ∼10{sup -7} s. Gains were calculated as functions of time and radiation frequency. The effect of electron – electron collisions on the rate of relaxation processes in the plasma and on its ability to amplify the electromagnetic radiation was investigated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  15. Electromagnetic signals are produced by aqueous nanostructures derived from bacterial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Montagnier, Luc; Aïssa, Jamal; Ferris, Stéphane; Montagnier, Jean-Luc; Lavallée, Claude

    2009-06-01

    A novel property of DNA is described: the capacity of some bacterial DNA sequences to induce electromagnetic waves at high aqueous dilutions. It appears to be a resonance phenomenon triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency waves. The genomic DNA of most pathogenic bacteria contains sequences which are able to generate such signals. This opens the way to the development of highly sensitive detection system for chronic bacterial infections in human and animal diseases.

  16. The diatom-produced polyunsaturated aldehydes can induce trophic cascades in the planktonic food web in productive coastal waters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzè, G.; Stoecker, D. K.; Pierson, J. J.; Lavrentyev, P.

    2016-02-01

    Allelopathy is wide spread among marine phytoplankton, including diatoms that produce cytotoxic secondary metabolites such as polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA). Most published PUA studies focused on the reproduction and development of specific marine invertebrates under laboratory conditions. In this study, we examined the effect of PUA on the trophic interactions between the copepod Acartia tonsa and natural microplankton collected from the Chesapeake Bay and the Virginia coastal waters. A set of bottle incubation experiments was conducted using the environmentally realistic concentrations of dissolved 2E, 4E-heptadienal and 2E, 4E-octadienal. Although PUA did not change phytoplankton growth, microzooplankton growth was affected at the species-specific level and their community herbivory rates declined. At the same time, the rates of copepod herbivory and predation on ciliates increased in the PUA treatments. These preliminary results suggest that production of cytotoxic compounds by diatoms may be a defense mechanism primarily against microzooplankton. The cascading effects induced by PUA can alter the composition and dynamics of microbial plankton communities, which in turn could have strong implication for the carbon cycling in productive coastal ecosystems.

  17. Assessment of the temporal trend of the exposure of people to electromagnetic fields produced by base stations for mobile telephones.

    PubMed

    Silvi, A M; Zari, A; Licitra, G

    2001-01-01

    Monitoring of electric field levels produced by base stations (BSs) for mobile telephones of different typologies (TACS. GSM, DCS) has been carried out. Results show that BSs can be classified as 'business' or 'residential'. The mean value of six minutes averaged E-field value measured between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. corresponds to the 84% of the maximum daily six minutes averaged value. Comparison between electromagnetic field levels produced by BSs and their phone traffic data, supplied by companies, is shown. Finally, on an hourly average basis, a daily curve has been constructed of the exposure trend produced by such installations.

  18. Modeling the electromagnetic processes in a technological device for producing ultradispersed particles in pulsed arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. D.; Yashkardin, R. V.; Sorokin, K. S.; Fiskin, E. M.

    2017-07-01

    The article contains a brief description of the operation principles of the device for creating ultrafine metal powders under the action of electrically charged flows with a high power density. The results of creating a mathematical model of electromagnetic processes in the installation are presented. The results of solving the problem of current flow in the installation during its operation are presented. The dependence of the magnetic field strength in the section of the plasma bunch during the operation of the apparatus is illustrated.

  19. Visualizing electromagnetic fields in laser-produced counterstreaming plasma experiments for collisionless shock laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, Nathan

    2012-10-01

    In astrophysical settings, large and stable structures often emerge from turbulent supersonic plasma flows. Examples include the cosmic magnetic field and the collisionless shocks [1] in supernova remnants. In a scaled environment created with the high power lasers at OMEGA EP, proton imaging shows that large, stable electromagnetic field structures arise within counterstreaming supersonic plasmas [2]. These field structures are large compared to the fundamental turbulence scale lengths of the plasma (e.g. the Debye length and the ion skin-depth), indicating a high degree of self-organization. These features remain in place from 4 to 7 ns, indicating a high degree of stability. At early times out to at least 8 ns, intra-jet ion collisions are strong (due to relatively low thermal velocities) but inter-jet ion collisions are rare (due to relatively high flow velocities), permitting the evolution of both hydrodynamic and collisionless plasma instabilities [3, 4]. This paper will present detailed results from our laboratory astrophysics experiments. Prepared by LLNL for US DOE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.[4pt] [1] H. S. Park et al, HEDP, 8, 38 (2011).[0pt] [2] N.L. Kugland et al, submitted to Nature Physics (2012).[0pt] [3] J.S. Ross et al, Phys. Plas., 19, 056501 (2012).[0pt] [3] D.D. Ryutov et al, Phys. Plas., 19, 076532 (2012).

  20. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Entanglement Properties Between Two Spatially Separated Atoms with Cascade Configuration in Free Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Feng; Miao, Xiang-Yang; Zhou, Ling

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the entanglement properties between two identical atoms with cascade configuration through the retarded dipole-dipole interaction in free space when their spatial separation is on the order of radiation wavelength or less. We analyze the function of Hamiltonian induced by dipole-dipole interaction. By solving master equation, we show that the spontaneous emission induce entanglement and destroy entanglement too. We also show the long life time of entanglement within cascade configuration.

  1. Evaluation of mouse embryos produced in vitro after electromagnetic waves exposure; Morphometric study

    PubMed Central

    Rostamzadeh, Ayoob; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Ahmadi, Reza; Nazari, Afshin; Ghaderi, Omar; Anjomshoa, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Today, the use of electromagnetic waves in medical diagnostic devices, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has increased, and many of its biological effects have been reported. The aim of the present study was to assess the biological effects of 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on fertility and reproductive parameters. Methods Eighty adult male and female NMRI mice (NMRI: Naval Medical Research Institute) of age 6–8 weeks were studied and randomly divided into two study and control groups. After confirmation of pregnancy, the mice in the study group were exposed to the MRI (1.5 T) machine’s waves over the next three weeks, once a week for 36 minutes. One day and thirty-five days after the last radiation, the mice were killed in order to do the in vitro fertilization (IVF) by neck beads’ displacement and the impact on the evolution of embryos, and its quality was studied. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 and the significance level of less than 0.05 was considered. Results Embryo morphometry showed that the total diameter and the cytoplasm diameter of the study group embryos suffered significant reduction compared to the control group, 1 day after the last irradiation (p < 0.05), but the diameter of the perivitelline space of this group’s embryos had a significant increase (p < 0.05). The qualitative results during 35 days after irradiation showed that morphologically parameters of the embryos in the study group had no significant differences from the control group. Conclusion Exposure to MRI irradiation can transiently disturb the development of mouse embryos and fertility, but these effects are reversible 35 days after the last irradiation. PMID:26955439

  2. The immune response of women with prolonged exposure to electromagnetic fields produced by radiotelevision broadcasting stations.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, P; Di Giampaolo, L; Di Donato, A; Antonucci, A; Paiardini, G; Morelli, S; Vasile, R; Spagnoli, G; Reale, M; Dadorante, V; Kouri, M; Di Gioacchino, M

    2006-01-01

    Twelve women, five of them housewives, exposed in their residences to electromagnetic fields (EMFs)emitted by radio-television broadcasting stations for a mean period of 13 years, were investigated. The EMFs in the balconies of the homes were (mean + S.D.) 4.3 + 1.4 V/m in the year 2000 and 3.7 + 1.3 V/m in 2005, while the exposure in the nearby area was <2.0 V/m. The EMF exposed women showed in 2000 reduced blood NK lymphocytes as well as PHA stimulated PBMC proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-gamma release. In the year 2005, the EMF exposed women and 48 control women with similar ages(mean 43 years), smoking habits, atopy and social level were investigated. State (temporary) and trait(tendency of the personality) anxiety were determined by STAI I and II, respectively. Blood cytotoxic activity and lymphocyte subsets were also determined. The ratio STAI I/STAI II of the EMF exposed group was lower than that of the control group. The blood cytotoxic activity of the exposed women was lower (p<0.01), percent of B CD45+-CD19+ lymphocytes higher and percent of CD45+-CD3+-CD8+ cells lower (p<0.05). Moreover, cytotoxic activity/CD45+-CD16+-56+ NK lymphocytes of the controls was negatively correlated with STAI I and STAI II (p<0.001). In conclusion, this study demonstrates reduced blood cytotoxic activity and increased trait anxiety in relation to state anxiety in EMF exposed women. An effect of EMFs on immune functions, in part mediated by nervous mechanisms, may be hypothesized. However, the influence of lifestyle may not be excluded.

  3. Effects of electromagnetic fields produced by radiotelevision broadcasting stations on the immune system of women.

    PubMed

    Boscol, P; Di Sciascio, M B; D'Ostilio, S; Del Signore, A; Reale, M; Conti, P; Bavazzano, P; Paganelli, R; Di Gioacchino, M

    2001-06-12

    The object of this study was to investigate the immune system of 19 women with a mean age of 35 years, for at least 2 years (mean = 13 years) exposed to electromagnetic fields (ELMFs) induced by radiotelevision broadcasting stations in their residential area. In September 1999, the ELMFs (with range 500 KHz-3 GHz) in the balconies of the homes of the women were (mean +/- S.D.) 4.3 +/- 1.4 V/m. Forty-seven women of similar age, smoking habits and atopy composed the control group, with a nearby resident ELMF exposure of < 1.8 V/m. Blood lead and urinary trans-trans muconic acid (a metabolite of benzene), markers of exposure to urban traffic, were higher in the control women. The ELMF exposed group showed a statistically significant reduction of blood NK CD16+-CD56+, cytotoxic CD3(-)-CD8+, B and NK activated CD3(-)-HLA-DR+ and CD3(-)-CD25+ lymphocytes. 'In vitro' production of IL-2 and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of the ELMF exposed group, incubated either with or without phytohaemoagglutinin (PHA), was significantly lower; the 'in vitro' production of IL-2 was significantly correlated with blood CD16+-CD56+ lymphocytes. The stimulation index (S.I.) of blastogenesis (ratio between cell proliferation with and without PHA) of PBMC of ELMF exposed women was lower than that of the control subjects. The S.I. of blastogenesis of the ELMF exposed group (but not blood NK lymphocytes and the 'in vitro' production of IL-2 and INF-gamma by PBMC) was significantly correlated with the ELMF levels. Blood lead and urinary trans-trans muconic acid were barely correlated with immune parameters: the urinary metabolite of benzene of the control group was only correlated with CD16+-CD56+ cells indicating a slight effect of traffic on the immune system. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that high frequency ELMFs reduce cytotoxic activity in the peripheral blood of women without a dose-response effect.

  4. Effects of electromagnetic field produced by mobile phones on the oxidant and antioxidant status of rats.

    PubMed

    Elhag, M A; Nabil, Ghada M; Attia, Atef M M

    2007-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of EMR produced by GSM Mobile Phones (MP) on the oxidant and antioxidant status in rats. Rats were divided into three groups: (1) controls, (2) rats exposed to a fractionated dose of EMR (15 min day(-1) for four days) (EMR-F) and (3) rats exposed to an acute dose of EMR (EMR-A). A net drop in the plasma concentration of vitamin C (-47 and -59.8%) was observed in EMR-F and EMR-A groups, respectively, when compared to controls. While, a significant decrease in the levels of lypophilic antioxidant vitamins: vitamin E (-33 and -65.8%), vitamin A (-44.4 and -46.8%) was observed in EMR-F and EMR-A groups, respectively, when compared to controls. A net drop in plasma level of reduced glutathione (GSH) (-19.8 and -35.3%) was observed in EMR-F and EMR-A groups, respectively. EMR exposure of rats produced a significant decrease in catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, with the values of these activities for EMR-A group is significantly lower than those of EMR-F. These results indicate that the effects of acute doses of EMR produced by mobile phones on the rat's antioxidant status is significantly higher than those of fractionated doses of the same type of radiation. On the basis of present results, it can be concluded that exposure to acute doses of EMR produced by mobile phones is more hazardous than that produced by fractionated doses of the same type of radiation.

  5. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca2+/calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca2+-mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects. PMID:23802593

  6. Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Pall, Martin L

    2013-08-01

    The direct targets of extremely low and microwave frequency range electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in producing non-thermal effects have not been clearly established. However, studies in the literature, reviewed here, provide substantial support for such direct targets. Twenty-three studies have shown that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) produce these and other EMF effects, such that the L-type or other VGCC blockers block or greatly lower diverse EMF effects. Furthermore, the voltage-gated properties of these channels may provide biophysically plausible mechanisms for EMF biological effects. Downstream responses of such EMF exposures may be mediated through Ca(2+) /calmodulin stimulation of nitric oxide synthesis. Potentially, physiological/therapeutic responses may be largely as a result of nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway stimulation. A well-studied example of such an apparent therapeutic response, EMF stimulation of bone growth, appears to work along this pathway. However, pathophysiological responses to EMFs may be as a result of nitric oxide-peroxynitrite-oxidative stress pathway of action. A single such well-documented example, EMF induction of DNA single-strand breaks in cells, as measured by alkaline comet assays, is reviewed here. Such single-strand breaks are known to be produced through the action of this pathway. Data on the mechanism of EMF induction of such breaks are limited; what data are available support this proposed mechanism. Other Ca(2+) -mediated regulatory changes, independent of nitric oxide, may also have roles. This article reviews, then, a substantially supported set of targets, VGCCs, whose stimulation produces non-thermal EMF responses by humans/higher animals with downstream effects involving Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide increases, which may explain therapeutic and pathophysiological effects.

  7. Spectral characteristics of quantum-cascade laser operating at 10.6 μm wavelength for a seed application in laser-produced-plasma extreme UV source.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Ohta, Takeshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Yokotsuka, Toshio; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Endo, Akira

    2012-11-15

    In this Letter, we investigate, for the first time to our knowledge, the spectral properties of a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) from a point of view of a new application as a laser seeder for a nanosecond-pulse high-repetition frequency CO(2) laser operating at 10.6 μm wavelength. The motivation for this work is a renewed interest in such a pulse format and wavelength driven by a development of extreme UV (EUV) laser-produced-plasma (LPP) sources. These sources use pulsed multikilowatt CO(2) lasers to drive the EUV-emitting plasmas. Basic spectral performance characteristics of a custom-made QCL chip are measured, such as tuning range and chirp rate. The QCL is shown to have all essential qualities of a robust seed source for a high-repetition nanosecond-pulsed CO(2) laser required by EUV LPP sources.

  8. Defect cascades produced by neutron irradiation in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Frischherz, M.C. |; Kirk, M.A.; Farmer, J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Weber, H.W.

    1992-12-01

    The defect cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} single crystals were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The visible defects were found to have sizes between 1 and 5 nm. Defect densities were obtained as a function of neutron fluence between 2 and 8 {times} 10{sup 21}m{sup {minus}2} (E>0.1 MeV) and compared to damage calculations. The measured defect density was found to scale linearly with fluence and to be 1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} at 2 {times} 10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}2}. The defect stability was studied at room temperature and through annealing to 400{degrees}C. The high fluence regime ({approximately}10{sup 22}m{sup {minus}2}) was investigated as well.

  9. Effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by 3G mobile phones on rat brains: magnetic resonance spectroscopy, biochemical, and histopathological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dogan, M; Turtay, M G; Oguzturk, H; Samdanci, E; Turkoz, Y; Tasdemir, S; Alkan, A; Bakir, S

    2012-06-01

    The effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) produced by a third-generation (3G) mobile phone (MP) on rat brain tissues were investigated in terms of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), biochemistry, and histopathological evaluations. The rats were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 is composed of 3G-EMR-exposed rats (n = 9) and Group 2 is the control group (n = 9). The first group was subjected to EMR for 20 days. The control group was not exposed to EMR. Choline (Cho), creatinin (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels were evaluated by MRS. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzyme activities were measured by spectrophotometric method. Histopathological analyses were carried out to evaluate apoptosis in the brain tissues of both groups. In MRS, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cho ratios were not significantly different between Groups 1 and 2. Neither the oxidative stress parameters, CAT and GSH-Px, nor the number of apoptotic cells were significantly different between Groups 1 and 2. Usage of short-term 3G MP does not seem to have a harmful effect on rat brain tissue.

  10. Dominance of second Bessel peak in relativistic electromagnetic ion cyclotron instabilities driven by fusion-produced fast ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K. R.; Chen, H. K.; Lee, S. H.

    2007-09-15

    Relativistic electromagnetic ion cyclotron instabilities driven by fusion-produced fast ions in magnetized plasmas can have two peaks in their growth rate spectrum. The wave numbers of these two peaks are close to the first and second peaks, respectively, of the Bessel function that is in the resonance driving term. The driving of the second Bessel and growth rate peak occurring at a higher wave number is weaker than that of the first peak. Surprisingly, as in contrast to conventional wisdom, the second peak can dominate near the instability threshold. For the higher energy of fusion-produced fast ion such as 14.7 MeV, the slow ion temperature is required to be higher for overcoming the threshold to drive a cubic instability, which is determined by an Alfvenic condition. This cubic instability is due to the coupling of the first-order slow ion resonance and second-order fast ion resonance. This finite temperature effect is on the slow ion resonance and increases with wave number and thus the threshold is first satisfied near the second peak. Therefore, the second peak appears earlier in the instability spectrum and dominates near the threshold. The cubic instability has a much larger frequency mismatch than a coupled quadratic instability; a larger frequency mismatch indicates more fast ion energy to loss before the nonlinear saturation of the instability. When the slow ion temperature or density is about twice that of the threshold, the second peak has transited from the cubic to the coupled quadratic instability while the first peak remains as the cubic instability, in contrast to the previous 3.02 MeV proton case.

  11. Apparatus and method for enhanced chemical processing in high pressure and atmospheric plasmas produced by high frequency electromagnetic waves

    DOEpatents

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1989-11-28

    An apparatus and method for creating high temperature plasmas for enhanced chemical processing of gaseous fluids, toxic chemicals, and the like, at a wide range of pressures, especially at atmospheric and high pressures includes an electro-magnetic resonator cavity, preferably a reentrant cavity, and a wave guiding structure which connects an electro-magnetic source to the cavity. The cavity includes an intake port and an exhaust port, each having apertures in the conductive walls of the cavity sufficient for the intake of the gaseous fluids and for the discharge of the processed gaseous fluids. The apertures are sufficiently small to prevent the leakage of the electro-magnetic radiation from the cavity. Gaseous fluid flowing from the direction of the electro-magnetic source through the guiding wave structure and into the cavity acts on the plasma to push it away from the guiding wave structure and the electro-magnetic source. The gaseous fluid flow confines the high temperature plasma inside the cavity and allows complete chemical processing of the gaseous fluids at a wide range of pressures.

  12. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Effect of Carried-Envelope Phase on Transient Process in a Cascade-Type System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Li; Yu, Ling-Yan

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of carried-envelope phase on transient process in a cascade-type atomic system, which is driven by two ultrashort laser pulses (probe and signal laser). It is found that the one- and two-photon processes corresponding to pathway |0> → |1> and |0> → |1> → |2> can be enhanced or suppressed by modulating the carried-envelope phases of probe laser pulse. Our numerical results also show that the transient populations of two excited states can be periodically affected by the carried-envelope phase of probe laser pulse. With certain time, the partial population transfer between two exited states can be realized just by adjusting the carried-envelope phase of probe laser pulse.

  13. Practicing Reiki does not appear to routinely produce high-intensity electromagnetic fields from the heart or hands of Reiki practitioners.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Ann Linda; Rand, William Lee; Schwartz, Gary E

    2013-06-01

    The study objective was to determine whether Reiki practice increases the electromagnetic field strength from the heart and hands of Reiki practitioners. This study repeated experiments performed 20 years ago that detected exceptionally high-strength electromagnetic fields (100 nT) from the hands of several energy healers. The equipment used was far more sensitive than in the original studies. Using a Magnes 2500 WH SQUID, the electromagnetic field from the hands and heart of each of 3 Reiki masters was measured when they were (1) not practicing Reiki, (2) sending Reiki to a distant person, and (3) sending Reiki to a person in the room. Similar measurements were made on 4 Reiki-naïve volunteers before and after they received a Reiki training/attunement enabling them to self-administer Reiki. The study setting was the Scripps Institute, San Diego, CA. Magnetic field intensity of hands and heart recorded over 5-minute sessions with corresponding frequency spectra. For all subjects, under all conditions, sensors closest to the heart and the hands produced spikes of 2 pT corresponding to the heartbeat. Recordings from 2 Masters and 1 volunteer showed a low-intensity sine wave oscillation of 0.25-0.3 Hz (intensity 0.1-0.5 pT) whether or not they were practicing Reiki. This oscillation probably reflected respiratory sinus arrhythmia, judged by comparison with recent previous studies. These signals were not detected in the original studies. In the current study, no electromagnetic field intensities greater than 3 pT were observed in any of the recordings. Practicing Reiki does not appear to routinely produce high-intensity electromagnetic fields from the heart or hands. Alternatively, it is possible that energy healing is stimulated by tuning into an external environmental radiation, such as the Schumann resonance, which was blocked in the present study by the strong magnetic shielding surrounding the SQUID.

  14. Effect of laser polarization on quantum electrodynamical cascading

    SciTech Connect

    Bashmakov, V. F.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Fedotov, A. M.; Narozhny, N. B.

    2014-01-15

    Development of quantum electrodynamical (QED) cascades in a standing electromagnetic wave for circular and linear polarizations is simulated numerically with a 3D PIC-MC code. It is demonstrated that for the same laser energy the number of particles produced in a circularly polarized field is greater than in a linearly polarized field, though the acquiring mean energy per particle is larger in the latter case. The qualitative model of laser-assisted QED cascades is extended by including the effect of polarization of the field. It turns out that cascade dynamics is notably more complicated in the case of linearly polarized field, where separation into the qualitatively different “electric” and “magnetic” regions (where the electric field is stronger than the magnetic field and vice versa) becomes essential. In the “magnetic” regions, acceleration is suppressed, and moreover the high-energy electrons are even getting cooled by photon emission. The volumes of the “electric” and “magnetic” regions evolve periodically in time and so does the cascade growth rate. In contrast to the linear polarization, the charged particles can be accelerated by circularly polarized wave even in “magnetic region.” The “electric” and “magnetic” regions do not evolve in time, and cascade growth rate almost does not depend on time for circular polarization.

  15. Effect of electromagnetic irradiation produced by 3G mobile phone on male rat reproductive system in a simulated scenario.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Nirala, Jay Prakash; Behari, J; Paulraj, R

    2014-09-01

    Reports of declining male fertility have renewed interest in assessing the role of electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Testicular function is particularly susceptible to the radiation emitted by EMFs. Significant decrease in sperm count, increase in the lipid peroxidation damage in sperm cells, reduction in seminiferous tubules and testicular weight and DNA damage were observed following exposure to EMF in male albino rats. The results suggest that mobile phone exposure adversely affects male fertility.

  16. The Cascade Forestry Service Nursery

    Treesearch

    Don Westefer

    2002-01-01

    Cascade Forestry Service, Inc., is a private reforestation nursery and service company that has grown from a shoestring operation into an employee-owned company that both produces reforestation trees and assists landowners with forestry development and management. The Northeastern Forest and Conservation Nursery Association has proven instrumental in Cascade Forestry...

  17. Study of human neurovegetative and hematologic effects of environmental low-frequency (50-Hz) electromagnetic fields produced by transformers.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme-Faivre, L; Marion, S; Bezie, Y; Auclair, H; Fredj, G; Hommeau, C

    1998-01-01

    A survey of neurovegetative and hematologic disorders was conducted in a population (n = 13) exposed occupationally to environmental electromagnetic fields; the population was matched with 13 control subjects. The exposed subjects worked at least 8 h/d for 1-5 y in premises located above transformers and high-tension cables, and the subjects were submitted to low-frequency electromagnetic fields (i.e., 50 Hz) of 0.2 microT-6.6 microT. The subjects were matched with respect to socioeconomic category, sex, and age with a control population of subjects that worked in premises outside of the immediate vicinity of transformers or high-tension cables. The exposed population had a significant increase in degree of certain neurovegetative disorders (i.e., physical fatigue, psychical asthenia, lipothymia, decreased libido, melancholy, depressive tendency, and irritability). In addition, the population experienced a significant fall in total lymphocytes and CD4, CD3, and CD2 lymphocytes, as well as a rise in NK cells. Leukopenia and neutropenia were also observed in two persons permanently exposed to doses of 1.2-6.6 microT. The disorders disappeared when exposure stopped, and they reappeared on reexposure.

  18. Management experiments for high-elevation agroforestry systems jointly producing matsutake mushrooms and high-quality timber in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon.

    Treesearch

    James F. Weigand

    1998-01-01

    Experimental prescriptions compare agroforestry systems designed to increase financial returns from high-elevation stands in the southern Oregon Cascade Range. The prescriptions emphasize alternative approaches for joint production of North American matsutake mushrooms (also known as North American pine mushrooms; Tricholoma magnivelare) and high-...

  19. Explicit electromagnetic algorithm for 2D using a multi-fluid model in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, S.; Fuentes, F.; Paz, C.

    2000-05-01

    A new algorithm is presented for the explicit calculation of the electromagnetic fields in 2D simulation plasmas. This paper describes a multi-fluid model for the simulation of laser plasma interaction. Our description includes a simple two-electron fluid model and the background ions in a laser target, as coupled fluid components moving relative to a fixed Eulerian mesh. The electrons become a perfect gas obeying the non relativistic Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Braginskii's expression is used. The magnetic field equation is integrated in time by the Lax-Wendroff modified scheme, a method that is known to be stable as long as the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition is satisfied. The first approximation step B m+1/2=+(×B m)Δt/2 is followed by the full step B m+1=B m+(v m+1/2×B m+1/2)Δt. With the explicit treatment of V× B in the fluid equation used, the matrix equation solved for the magnetic field reduces, from a 7-point coupling to a 5-point one to its nearest neighbors, in the direction z (B z) , which leads to a 5-diagonal, sparse matrix that can be solved by both ADI an TDMA.

  20. Physics of cosmological cascades and observable properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitoussi, T.; Belmont, R.; Malzac, J.; Marcowith, A.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Jean, P.

    2017-04-01

    TeV photons from extragalactic sources are absorbed in the intergalactic medium and initiate electromagnetic cascades. These cascades offer a unique tool to probe the properties of the universe at cosmological scales. We present a new Monte Carlo code dedicated to the physics of such cascades. This code has been tested against both published results and analytical approximations, and is made publicly available. Using this numerical tool, we investigate the main cascade properties (spectrum, halo extension and time delays), and study in detail their dependence on the physical parameters (extragalactic magnetic field, extragalactic background light, source redshift, source spectrum and beaming emission). The limitations of analytical solutions are emphasized. In particular, analytical approximations account only for the first generation of photons and higher branches of the cascade tree are neglected.

  1. Inflation from flux cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Guido; Gobbetti, Roberto; Kleban, Matthew; Schillo, Marjorie L.

    2013-10-01

    When electric-type flux threads compact extra dimensions, a quantum nucleation event can break a flux line and initiate a cascade that unwinds many units of flux. Here, we present a novel mechanism for inflation based on this phenomenon. From the 4D point of view, the cascade begins with the formation of a bubble containing an open Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology, but the vacuum energy inside the bubble is initially only slightly reduced, and subsequently decreases gradually throughout the cascade. If the initial flux number Q0 ≳ O (100), during the cascade the universe can undergo N ≳ 60 efolds of inflationary expansion with gradually decreasing Hubble constant, producing a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations with amplitude and tilt consistent with observation, and a potentially observable level of non-Gaussianity and tensor modes. The power spectrum has a small oscillatory component that does not decay away during inflation, with a period set approximately by the light-crossing time of the compact dimension(s). Since the ingredients are fluxes threading compact dimensions, this mechanism fits naturally into the string landscape, but does not appear to suffer from the eta problem or require fine-tuning (beyond the usual anthropic requirement of small vacuum energy after reheating).

  2. Contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background from the cascades of very-high energy gamma rays from blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venters, Tonia M.

    2009-06-01

    As very-high-energy photons propagate through the extragalactic background light (EBL), they interact with the soft photons and initiate electromagnetic cascades of lower energy photons and electrons. The collective intensity of a cosmological population emitting at very-high energies (VHE) will be attenuated at the highest energies through interactions with the EBL and enhanced at lower energies by the resulting cascade. We calculate the cascade radiation created by VHE photons produced by blazars and investigate the effects of cascades on the collective intensity of blazars and the resulting effects on the extragalactic gamma-ray background. We find that cascade radiation greatly enhances the collective intensity from blazars at high energies before turning over due to attenuation. The prominence of the resulting features depends on the blazar gamma-ray luminosity function, spectral index distribution, and the model of the EBL. We additionally calculate the cascade radiation from the distinct spectral sub-populations of blazars, BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), finding that the collective intensity of BL Lacs is considerably more enhanced by cascade radiation than that of the FSRQs. Finally, we discuss the implications that this analysis and upcoming Fermi observations could have for the nature of the EBL, the evolution of blazars, blazar spectra, and other sources of gamma-ray emission.

  3. Ionization-induced laser-driven QED cascade in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, I. I.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    A formula for the ionization rate in an extremely intense electromagnetic field is proposed and used for numerical study of QED cascades in noble gases in the field of two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is shown that the number of the electron-positron pairs produced in the cascade increases with the atomic number of the gas, where the gas density is taken to be inversely proportional to the atomic number. While most of the electrons produced in the laser pulse front are expelled by the ponderomotive force from the region occupied by the strong laser field, there is a small portion of electrons staying in the laser field for a long time until the instance when the laser field is strong enough for cascading. This mechanism is relevant for all gases. For high-Z gases there is an additional mechanism associated with the ionization of inner shells at the instance when the laser field is strong enough for cascading. The role of both mechanisms for cascade initiation is revealed.

  4. Stopping pions in high-energy nuclear cascades.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Johnson, D. P.; Thompson, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Results of Monte Carlo calculations for the number and energy spectra of charged pions from nuclear-electromagnetic cascades developing in rock are presented for primary hadron energies ranging from 3 to 3000 GeV. These spectra are given as functions of the longitudinal depth in the absorber and the lateral distance from the cascade axis. The number of charged pions which stop in the absorber increases with the primary energy of the hadron initiating the cascade.

  5. Stopping pions in high-energy nuclear cascades.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Johnson, D. P.; Thompson, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Results of Monte Carlo calculations for the number and energy spectra of charged pions from nuclear-electromagnetic cascades developing in rock are presented for primary hadron energies ranging from 3 to 3000 GeV. These spectra are given as functions of the longitudinal depth in the absorber and the lateral distance from the cascade axis. The number of charged pions which stop in the absorber increases with the primary energy of the hadron initiating the cascade.

  6. Characterization of magnetically confined low-pressure plasmas produced by an electromagnetic field in argon-acetylene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdessi, G. Al; Margot, J.; Clergereaux, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles formation was investigated in magnetically confined low-pressure plasma produced in argon-acetylene mixtures. The plasma characteristics were measured in order to identify the species involved in the dust particles formation. Their dependence on the operating conditions including magnetic field intensity, acetylene fraction in the gas mixture and operating pressure was examined. In contrast with noble gases, in the presence of acetylene, the electron temperature increases with the magnetic field intensity, indicating additional charged particles losses in the plasma. Indeed, in these conditions, larger hydrocarbon ions are produced leading to the formation of dust particles in the plasma volume. The observed dependence of positive ion mass distribution and density and relative negative ion density on the operating parameters suggests that the dust particles are formed through different pathways, where negative and positive ions are both involved in the nucleation.

  7. Frequency Upshift and Radiation of the THz Electromagnetic Wave via an Ultrashort-Laser-Produced Ionization Front

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Nishimai, Hirofumi; Yugami, Noboru; Muggli, Patric

    2009-01-22

    We report the generation of radiation in the terahertz (THz) spectral region from an electrostatic field converted by a laser-produced relativistic ionization front. The THz radiation is generated through spatiotemporal change in electron density induced by a relativistic ionization front propagating in a ZnSe crystal enclosed in a capacitor array. The measured central radiation frequency is 1.2 THz with a bandwidth of 0.7 THz (FWHM), which is attributed to production of an electron density of the order of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. The amplitude of the linearly polarized THz radiation increased linearly with the voltage applied to the capacitors.

  8. Electromagnetic nonuniformly correlated beams.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhisong; Korotkova, Olga

    2012-10-01

    A class of electromagnetic sources with nonuniformly distributed field correlations is introduced. The conditions on source parameters guaranteeing that the source generates a physical beam are derived. It is shown that the new sources are capable of producing beams with polarization properties that evolve on propagation in a manner much more complex compared to the well-known electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

  9. A cascade thermoacoustic engine.

    PubMed

    Gardner, D L; Swift, G W

    2003-10-01

    A cascade thermoacoustic engine is described, consisting of one standing-wave stage plus two traveling-wave stages in series. Most of the acoustic power is produced in the efficient traveling-wave stages. The straight-line series configuration is easy to build and allows no Gedeon streaming. The engine delivers up to 2 kW of acoustic power, with an efficiency (the ratio of acoustic power to heater power) of up to 20%. An understanding of the pressure and volume-velocity waves is very good. The agreement between measured and calculated powers and temperatures is reasonable. Some of the measured thermal power that cannot be accounted for by calculation can be attributed to Rayleigh streaming in the two thermal buffer tubes with the largest aspect ratios. A straightforward extension of this work should yield cascade thermoacoustic engines with efficiencies of around 35-40% of the Carnot efficiency.

  10. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D.E.; Kahana, S.H.

    1998-02-01

    A two phase cascade, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy Ion-Ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy ion experiments at the CERN SPS.

  11. Electromagnetic leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nicole F.; Law, Sandy S. C.; Kayser, Boris J.

    2008-10-15

    We present a new leptogenesis scenario, where the lepton asymmetry is generated by CP-violating decays of heavy electroweak singlet neutrinos via electromagnetic dipole moment couplings to the ordinary light neutrinos. Akin to the usual scenario where the decays are mediated through Yukawa interactions, we have shown, by explicit calculations, that the desired asymmetry can be produced through the interference of the corresponding tree-level and one-loop decay amplitudes involving the effective dipole moment operators. We also find that the relationship of the leptogenesis scale to the light neutrino masses is similar to that for the standard Yukawa-mediated mechanism.

  12. Simultaneous Processing of Noun Cue and to-be-Produced Verb in Verb Generation Task: Electromagnetic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Butorina, Anna V.; Pavlova, Anna A.; Nikolaeva, Anastasia Y.; Prokofyev, Andrey O.; Bondarev, Denis P.; Stroganova, Tatiana A.

    2017-01-01

    A long-standing but implicit assumption is that words strongly associated with a presented cue are automatically activated in the memory through rapid spread of activation within brain semantic networks. The current study was aimed to provide direct evidence of such rapid access to words’ semantic representations and to investigate its neural sources using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and distributed source localization technique. Thirty-three neurotypical subjects underwent the MEG recording during verb generation task, which was to produce verbs related to the presented noun cues. Brain responses evoked by the noun cues were examined while manipulating the strength of association between the noun and the potential verb responses. The strong vs. weak noun-verb association led to a greater noun-related neural response at 250–400 ms after cue onset, and faster verb production. The cortical sources of the differential response were localized in left temporal pole, previously implicated in semantic access, and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), thought to subserve controlled semantic retrieval. The strength of the left VLPFC’s response to the nouns with strong verb associates was positively correlated to the speed of verbs production. Our findings empirically validate the theoretical expectation that in case of a strongly connected noun-verb pair, successful access to target verb representation may occur already at the stage of lexico-semantic analysis of the presented noun. Moreover, the MEG results suggest that contrary to the previous conclusion derived from fMRI studies left VLPFC supports selection of the target verb representations, even if they were retrieved from semantic memory rapidly and effortlessly. The discordance between MEG and fMRI findings in verb generation task may stem from different modes of neural activation captured by phase-locked activity in MEG and slow changes of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal in fMRI. PMID

  13. Simultaneous Processing of Noun Cue and to-be-Produced Verb in Verb Generation Task: Electromagnetic Evidence.

    PubMed

    Butorina, Anna V; Pavlova, Anna A; Nikolaeva, Anastasia Y; Prokofyev, Andrey O; Bondarev, Denis P; Stroganova, Tatiana A

    2017-01-01

    A long-standing but implicit assumption is that words strongly associated with a presented cue are automatically activated in the memory through rapid spread of activation within brain semantic networks. The current study was aimed to provide direct evidence of such rapid access to words' semantic representations and to investigate its neural sources using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and distributed source localization technique. Thirty-three neurotypical subjects underwent the MEG recording during verb generation task, which was to produce verbs related to the presented noun cues. Brain responses evoked by the noun cues were examined while manipulating the strength of association between the noun and the potential verb responses. The strong vs. weak noun-verb association led to a greater noun-related neural response at 250-400 ms after cue onset, and faster verb production. The cortical sources of the differential response were localized in left temporal pole, previously implicated in semantic access, and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), thought to subserve controlled semantic retrieval. The strength of the left VLPFC's response to the nouns with strong verb associates was positively correlated to the speed of verbs production. Our findings empirically validate the theoretical expectation that in case of a strongly connected noun-verb pair, successful access to target verb representation may occur already at the stage of lexico-semantic analysis of the presented noun. Moreover, the MEG results suggest that contrary to the previous conclusion derived from fMRI studies left VLPFC supports selection of the target verb representations, even if they were retrieved from semantic memory rapidly and effortlessly. The discordance between MEG and fMRI findings in verb generation task may stem from different modes of neural activation captured by phase-locked activity in MEG and slow changes of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal in fMRI.

  14. Guiding of Laser Beams in Plasmas by Radiation Cascade Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-11-27

    The near-resonant heatwave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating trains of few-fs electromagnetic pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a co-moving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the beat frequency. Consequently, the cascade of sidebands red- and blue-shifted from the fundamental by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the phase chirp enables laser beatnote compression by the group velocity dispersion [S. Kalmykov and G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. E 73, 046403 (2006)]. In the 3D cylindrical geometry, the frequency-downshifted EPW not only modulates the laser frequency, but also causes the pulse to self-focus [P. Gibbon, Phys. Fluids B 2, 2196 (1990)]. After self-focusing, the multi-frequency laser beam inevitably diverges. Remarkably, the longitudinal beatnote compression can compensate the intensity drop due to diffraction. A train of high-intensity radiation spikes with continually evolving longitudinal profile can be self-guided over several Rayleigh lengths in homogeneous plasmas. High amplitude of the EPW is maintained over the entire propagation length. Numerical experiments on the electron acceleration in the cascade-driven (cascade-guided) EPW [using the code WAKE by P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] show that achieving GeV electron energy is possible under realistic experimental parameters.

  15. Guiding of Laser Beams in Plasmas by Radiation Cascade Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady

    2006-11-01

    The near-resonant heatwave excitation of an electron plasma wave (EPW) can be employed for generating trains of few-fs electromagnetic pulses in rarefied plasmas. The EPW produces a co-moving index grating that induces a laser phase modulation at the beat frequency. Consequently, the cascade of sidebands red- and blue-shifted from the fundamental by integer multiples of the beat frequency is generated in the laser spectrum. When the beat frequency is lower than the electron plasma frequency, the phase chirp enables laser beatnote compression by the group velocity dispersion [S. Kalmykov and G. Shvets, Phys. Rev. E 73, 046403 (2006)]. In the 3D cylindrical geometry, the frequency-downshifted EPW not only modulates the laser frequency, but also causes the pulse to self-focus [P. Gibbon, Phys. Fluids B 2, 2196 (1990)]. After self-focusing, the multi-frequency laser beam inevitably diverges. Remarkably, the longitudinal beatnote compression can compensate the intensity drop due to diffraction. A train of high-intensity radiation spikes with continually evolving longitudinal profile can be self-guided over several Rayleigh lengths in homogeneous plasmas. High amplitude of the EPW is maintained over the entire propagation length. Numerical experiments on the electron acceleration in the cascade-driven (cascade-guided) EPW [using the code WAKE by P. Mora and T. M. Antonsen Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4, 217 (1997)] show that achieving GeV electron energy is possible under realistic experimental parameters.

  16. Wavefront measurement of single-mode quantum cascade laser beam for seed application in laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet system.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Ohta, Takeshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Yokotsuka, Toshio; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2012-12-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a very attractive seed source for a multikilowatt pulsed CO2 lasers applied for driving extreme ultraviolet emitting plasmas. In this Letter, we investigate output beam properties of a QCL designed to address P18 and P20 lines of 10.6 micron band of CO2 molecule. In particular, output beam quality and stability are investigated for the first time. A well-defined linear polarization and a single-mode operation enabled a use of phase retrieval method for full description of QCL output beam. A direct, multi-image numerical phase retrieval technique was developed and successfully applied to the measured intensity patterns of a QCL beam. Very good agreement between the measured and reconstructed beam profiles was observed at distances ranging from QCL aperture to infinity, proving a good understanding of the beam propagation. The results also confirm a high spatial coherence and high stability of the beam parameters, the features expected from an excellent seed source.

  17. Novel Downhole Electromagnetic Flowmeter for Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow in High-Water-Cut Oil-Producing Wells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanjun; Li, Haoyu; Liu, Xingbin; Zhang, Yuhui; Xie, Ronghua; Huang, Chunhui; Hu, Jinhai; Deng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    First, the measuring principle, the weight function, and the magnetic field of the novel downhole inserted electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) are described. Second, the basic design of the EMF is described. Third, the dynamic experiments of two EMFs in oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. The experimental errors are analyzed in detail. The experimental results show that the maximum absolute value of the full-scale errors is better than 5%, the total flowrate is 5–60 m3/d, and the water-cut is higher than 60%. The maximum absolute value of the full-scale errors is better than 7%, the total flowrate is 2–60 m3/d, and the water-cut is higher than 70%. Finally, onsite experiments in high-water-cut oil-producing wells are conducted, and the possible reasons for the errors in the onsite experiments are analyzed. It is found that the EMF can provide an effective technology for measuring downhole oil-water two-phase flow. PMID:27754412

  18. Novel Downhole Electromagnetic Flowmeter for Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow in High-Water-Cut Oil-Producing Wells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanjun; Li, Haoyu; Liu, Xingbin; Zhang, Yuhui; Xie, Ronghua; Huang, Chunhui; Hu, Jinhai; Deng, Gang

    2016-10-14

    First, the measuring principle, the weight function, and the magnetic field of the novel downhole inserted electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) are described. Second, the basic design of the EMF is described. Third, the dynamic experiments of two EMFs in oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. The experimental errors are analyzed in detail. The experimental results show that the maximum absolute value of the full-scale errors is better than 5%, the total flowrate is 5-60 m³/d, and the water-cut is higher than 60%. The maximum absolute value of the full-scale errors is better than 7%, the total flowrate is 2-60 m³/d, and the water-cut is higher than 70%. Finally, onsite experiments in high-water-cut oil-producing wells are conducted, and the possible reasons for the errors in the onsite experiments are analyzed. It is found that the EMF can provide an effective technology for measuring downhole oil-water two-phase flow.

  19. Cascade Harvest’ red raspberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cascade Harvest’ is a new floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). ‘Cascade Harvest’ produces a high yield of large, firm fruit suited to machine harves...

  20. Terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Ruedeger; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Beltram, Fabio; Beere, Harvey E.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. G.; Ritchie, David A.

    2003-07-01

    The terahertz region (1-10 THz) of the electromagnetic spectrum offers ample opportunities in spectroscopy, free space communications, remote sensing and medical imaging. Yet, the use of THz radiation in all these fields has been hampered by the lack of appropriate, convenient sources. We here report on unipolar semiconductor injection lasers that emit at THz frequencies (4.3 THz, λ ~ 69μm and 3.5 THz, λ ~ 85μm) and possess the potential for device-like implementation. They are based on the quantum cascade scheme employing interminiband transitions in the technologically mature AlGaAs/GaAs material system and feature a novel kind of waveguide loosely relying on the surface plasmon concpt. Continuous-wave laser emission is achieved with low thresholds of a few hundred A/cm2 up to 45 K heat sink temperature and maximum output powers of more than 4mW. Under pulsed excitation, peak output powers of 4.5mW at low temperatures and still 1 mW at 65 K are measured. The amximum operating temperature is 67 K.

  1. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  2. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  3. Electromagnetically induced phase grating.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luís E E

    2010-04-01

    I propose an electromagnetically induced phase grating based on the giant Kerr nonlinearity of an atomic medium under electromagnetically induced transparency. The atomic phase grating behaves similarly to an ideal sinusoidal phase grating, and it is capable of producing a pi phase excursion across a weak probe beam along with high transmissivity. The grating is created with arbitrarily weak fields, and diffraction efficiencies as high as 30% are predicted.

  4. Cascades frog conservation assessment

    Treesearch

    Karen Pope; Catherine Brown; Marc Hayes; Gregory Green; Diane Macfarlane

    2014-01-01

    The Cascades frog (Rana cascadae) is a montane, lentic-breeding amphibian that has become rare in the southern Cascade Range and remains relatively widespread in the Klamath Mountains of northern California. In the southern Cascades, remaining populations occur primarily in meadow habitats where the fungal disease, chytridiomycosis, and habitat...

  5. Southern cascades bioregion

    Treesearch

    Carl N. Skinner; Alan H. Taylor

    2006-01-01

    The Cascade Range extends from British Columbia, Canada, south to northern California where it meets the Sierra Nevada. The Southern Cascades bioregion in California is bounded on the west by the Sacramento Valley and the Klamath Mountains, and on the east by the Modoc Plateau and Great Basin. The bioregion encompasses the Southern Cascades section of Miles and Goudey...

  6. Dynamics of cavitating cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C.; Kim, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Brief accounts of the theoretical research conducted on the unsteady cavitation characteristics of liquid rocket engine turbopumps are reported. The objective is to produce estimates of the cavitation compliance and other unsteady characteristics which could then be used in analysis of the pogo instability. Blade cavitation is the particular pheonomenon which is investigated and line arized free streamline methods were employed in both quasistatic and complete dynamic cascade analyses of the unsteady flow. The simpler quasistatic analysis was applied to particular turbopumps but yielded values of compliances significantly smaller than those indirectly obtained from experiments. Reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. The complete dynamic analysis presents a new problem in fundamental hydrodynamics and, though the basic solution is presented, numerical results have not as yet been obtained.

  7. Anomalous correlation between hadron and electromagnetic particles in hadron and gamma-ray families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Correlations between hadrons and electromagnetic particles were studied in the hadron-gamma families observed in the Chacaltaya emulsion chamber experiment. It is found that there exist a number of hadrons which associate electromagnetic showers in extraordinarily close vicinity. The probability to have such a large number of hadrons associating electromagnetic showers, expected from background calculation, is found to be negligibly small and it means there exists anomalous correlation between hadrons and electromagnetic particles in the characteristic spread of atmospheric electromagnetic cascade.

  8. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  9. Electromagnetic Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, James L.

    1990-01-01

    Three activities involving electromagnetism are presented. Discussed are investigations involving the construction of an electromagnet, the effect of the number of turns of wire in the magnet, and the effect of the number of batteries in the circuit. Extension activities are suggested. (CW)

  10. Electromagnetic Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, James L.

    1990-01-01

    Three activities involving electromagnetism are presented. Discussed are investigations involving the construction of an electromagnet, the effect of the number of turns of wire in the magnet, and the effect of the number of batteries in the circuit. Extension activities are suggested. (CW)

  11. South Cascade Glacier bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, A.G.; Fulk, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    South Cascade Glacier, in Washington State, resides in a well-defined basin with mainly unglacierized divides making it ideal for most glaciological and hydrological studies. This bibliography is divided into three cateogories: (1) studies done about South Cascade Glacier specifically; (2) studies that use data from South Cascade Glacier but do not focus on or give insight to the glacier itself; and (3) instrumentation studies and non-glacier projects including snow studies done in the basin. (ACR)

  12. Electromagnetics and Antenna Technology. Chapters 1, 2, 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-12

    transmit and receive electromagnetic fields. nonadaptively or adaptively [48–61] such that the combination of the array elements provides desired radiation ...provides various definitions for bandwidth. In Section 1.3, the generation of electromagnetic radiation and Maxwell’s equations are described. Since...computed, the S-parameters for the cascaded network can then be determined by Equations (1.66) to (1.69). 1.3 Electromagnetic Radiation : Maxwell’s

  13. Cascaded automatic target recognition (Cascaded ATR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Bradley

    2010-04-01

    The global war on terror has plunged US and coalition forces into a battle space requiring the continuous adaptation of tactics and technologies to cope with an elusive enemy. As a result, technologies that enhance the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) mission making the warfighter more effective are experiencing increased interest. In this paper we show how a new generation of smart cameras built around foveated sensing makes possible a powerful ISR technique termed Cascaded ATR. Foveated sensing is an innovative optical concept in which a single aperture captures two distinct fields of view. In Cascaded ATR, foveated sensing is used to provide a coarse resolution, persistent surveillance, wide field of view (WFOV) detector to accomplish detection level perception. At the same time, within the foveated sensor, these detection locations are passed as a cue to a steerable, high fidelity, narrow field of view (NFOV) detector to perform recognition level perception. Two new ISR mission scenarios, utilizing Cascaded ATR, are proposed.

  14. Numerical Investigation of a Cascaded Longitudinal Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-06-01

    In a cascaded longitudinal space-charge amplifier (LSCA), initial density noise in a relativistic e-beam is amplified via the interplay of longitudinal space charge forces and properly located dispersive sections. This type of amplification process was shown to potentially result in large final density modulations [1] compatible with the production of broadband electromagnetic radiation. The technique was recently demonstrated in the optical domain [2]. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performances of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). We especially explore the properties of the produced broadband radiation. Our studies have been conducted with a grid-less three-dimensional space-charge algorithm.

  15. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Randolph W.; Marts, Donna J.

    1994-01-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  16. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Randolph W.; Marts, Donna J.

    1994-11-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  17. Theory of cascade refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quack, Hans H.

    2012-06-01

    The maximum difference between the warm and cold temperature of a refrigeration cycle is limited by properties of the refrigerant and/or losses associated with the transport of the refrigerant. For larger temperature differences, one has to arrange several refrigeration cycles "above" each other, each cycle spanning a certain temperature difference. This approach is called cascade refrigeration and has played an important role in the history of cryogenics. For a theory of cascade refrigeration it is helpful to define a general one-stage non-reversible refrigeration step and to visualize it within the temperature-entropy diagram. Then one can combine several one-stage cycles to a cascade. There exist two types of cascades: "Full" cascades, where all entropy gains of a lower stage are transferred to the next higher temperature stage, and "partial" cascades, where each single cycle goes up to ambient temperature, where a part of the entropy gain is removed, and only the rest of the entropy gain is transferred to the next higher temperature stage. In cryogenic refrigeration "partial" cascades are generally more efficient than "full" cascades.

  18. Quantum cascade driving: Dissipatively mediated coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizabadi, Shahabedin C.; Naumann, Nicolas L.; Katzer, Manuel; Knorr, Andreas; Carmele, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Quantum cascaded systems offer the possibility to manipulate a target system with the quantum state of a source system. Here, we study in detail the differences between a direct quantum cascade and coherent or incoherent driving for the case of two coupled cavity-QED systems. We discuss qualitative differences between these excitations scenarios, which are particularly strong for higher-order photon-photon correlations: g(n )(0 ) with n >2 . Quantum cascaded systems show a behavior differing from the idealized cases of individual coherent or incoherent driving and allow one to produce qualitatively different quantum statistics. Furthermore, the quantum cascaded driving exhibits an interesting mixture of quantum coherent and incoherent excitation dynamics. We develop a measure where the two regimes intermix and quantify these differences via experimentally accessible higher-order photon correlations.

  19. [Electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Sobiczewska, Elzbieta; Szmigielski, Stanisław

    2009-01-01

    The development of industry, particularly of new technologies in communication systems, gives rise to the number and diversty of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources in the environment. These sources, including power-frequent, radiofrequent and microwaves, make human life richer, safer and easier. But at the same time, there is growing concern about possible health risks connected with EMF exposure. An increasing number of persons have recently reported on a variety of health problems induced, in their opinion, by exposure to EMF. It is important to note that EMF levels to which these individuals are exposed are generally well below the recommended exposure limits and are certainly far below those known to produce any adverse effects. These persons call themselves "electromagnetic hypersensitivity individuals" And complain about experiencing various types of non-specific symptoms, including dermatological, neurological and vegetative. In the present paper, the problem of electromagnetic hypersensitivity phenomenon is discussed based on the recently published literature.

  20. 5. VIEW OF UPPER AND LOWER CASCADE BRIDGES AND CASCADE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF UPPER AND LOWER CASCADE BRIDGES AND CASCADE CREEK FROM 100 YARDS WEST OF THE ROSTRUM (ROCK FORMATION ON SOUTH SIDE OF MERCED RIVER). HIGHWAY 140 IS AT BOTTOM OF FRAME. HIGHWAY 120, THE BIG OAK FLAT ROAD CROSSES FRAME JUST ABOVE CENTER. - Cascade Creek Bridge, Spanning Cascade Creek on New Big Oak Flat Road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  1. Using Artificially Generated VLF Electromagnetic Signals, Produced by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Full Transmitter Array, as Geophysical Probe Waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzykowski, M.; Solie, D.; Stevens, R.

    2008-12-01

    Field measurements were made to test the feasibility of using HAARP stimulated ionospheric emissions of Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic signals, as probe waves for geophysical studies. The test site chosen for the experiment was a mud volcano near Tolsona, Alaska on the Glenn Highway. Data acquisition was done with a Zonge GDP-32 Receiver. HAARP was run at full power and modulated at varying frequencies in the VLF range at frequencies of: 1, 4, 8, 16, 32, 96, 4096 and 6144 Hz. Both natural and induced VLF signals were recorded, with the intention of seeing a stronger signal at HAARP-generated frequencies upon examination of the data. Even though significant interference was caused by nearby power lines during the experiment, we measured correlated electric and magnetic field strengths significantly above the natural and artificial background for two frequencies (4096Hz and 6144Hz.). Our analysis indicates that given favorable ionospheric conditions, HAARP-generated VLF signals have the signal strength necessary for use as probe waves in geophysical field studies. This experiment was part of, and made possible by, the PARS 2007 Summer School.

  2. Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Yoshida, Shin

    2010-04-15

    In addition to producing loud gravitational waves, the dynamics of a binary black hole system could induce emission of electromagnetic radiation by affecting the behavior of plasmas and electromagnetic fields in their vicinity. We study how the electromagnetic fields are affected by a pair of orbiting black holes through the merger. In particular, we show how the binary's dynamics induce a variability in possible electromagnetically induced emissions as well as an enhancement of electromagnetic fields during the late-merge and merger epochs. These time dependent features will likely leave their imprint in processes generating detectable emissions and can be exploited in the detection of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves.

  3. Biocatalysis: Chiral cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Bo; Reetz, Manfred T.

    2015-12-01

    Racemic or enantiomerically pure alcohols can be converted with high yield into enantiopure chiral amines in a one-pot redox-neutral cascade process by the clever combination of an alcohol dehydrogenase and an appropriate amine dehydrogenase.

  4. DETAILED COMPARISON BETWEEN PARTON CASCADE AND HADRONIC CASCADE AT SPS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NARA,Y.

    1998-10-23

    The authors study the importance of the partonic phase produced in relativistic heavy ion collision by comparing the parton cascade model and the hadronic cascade model. Hadron yield, baryon stopping and transverse momentum distribution are calculated with JAM and discussions are given comparing with VNI. Both of these models give good description of experimental data. They also discuss the strangeness production mechanism and the directed transverse flow.

  5. The nitrogen cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway J.N.; Aber J.D.; Erisman J.W.; Seitzinger S.P.; Howarth R.W.; Cowling E.B.; Cosby B.J.

    2003-04-01

    Human production of food and energy is the dominant continental process that breaks the triple bond in molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and creates reactive nitrogen (Nr) species. Circulation of anthropogenic Nr in Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere has a wide variety of consequences, which are magnified with time as Nr moves along its biogeochemical pathway. The same atom of Nr can cause multiple effects in the atmosphere, in terrestrial ecosystems, in freshwater and marine systems, and on human health. We call this sequence of effects the nitrogen cascade. As the cascade progresses, the origin of Nr becomes unimportant. Reactive nitrogen does not cascade at the same rate through all environmental systems; some systems have the ability to accumulate Nr, which leads to lag times in the continuation of the cascade. These lags slow the cascade and result in Nr accumulation in certain reservoirs, which in turn can enhance the effects of Nr on that environment. The only way to eliminate Nr accumulation and stop the cascade is to convert Nr back to nonreactive N{sub 2}.

  6. Thin sheet casting with electromagnetic pressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Walk, Steven R.; Slepian, R. Michael; Nathenson, Richard D.; Williams, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus, method and system for the casting of thin strips or strips of metal upon a moving chill block that includes an electromagnet located so that molten metal poured from a reservoir onto the chill block passes into the magnetic field produced by the electromagnet. The electromagnet produces a force on the molten metal on said chill block in the direction toward said chill block in order to enhance thermal contact between the molten metal and the chill block.

  7. Production of defects in metals by collision cascades: TEM experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental TEM data on production of dislocation loops by low energy ion bombardment to low doses, as simulations of similar collision cascades produced by fast neutrons, in various metals and alloys. Dependence of vacancy dislocation loop formation on recoil energy, temperature and metal/alloy is examined. Emphasis is placed on effects on dilute alloy additions. A model for cascade melting is used to understand these effects; this will require an examination of the role of electron-phonon coupling in cascade cooling and recrystallization. Formation of interstitial dislocation loops as cascade defects and the effect of nearby surfaces are briefly discussed.

  8. Electromagnetic targeting of guns

    SciTech Connect

    Pogue, E.W.; Boat, R.M.; Holden, D.N.; Lopez, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) signals produced from explosives being fired have been reported in the literature for fifty years. When a gun is fired it produces an EMP muzzle blast signal. The strength and nature of these signals was first analyzed in the early 1970s, while the results were interesting, no follow-up studies were conducted. With modern detection and signal processing technology, we believe that these signals could be used to instantaneously locate guns of virtually all calibers as they fire. The objective of our one-year project was to establish the basic nature of these signals and their utility in the concept of electromagnetic targeting of guns.

  9. Electromagnetic Hammer for Metalworking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. A.; Brunet, F.; Dowd, A.; Durham, R.; Ezell, J.; Gorr, G.; Hartley, D.; Jackson, F.; Marchand, J.; Macfarlane, W.; Nameth, P.; Okelly, K.; Phillips, H.; Rollo, J.; Rupert, E.; Sykes, H.; Vitrano, E.; Woods, M.

    1986-01-01

    High eddy currents apply pressure for cold-forming. Coil housing constructed for mechanical strength to hold coil against magnetic force, to maintain electrical contact with coil ends, and to maintain insulation between coil turns. Drilled holes placed to facilitate release of bubbles during potting. In contrast with mechanical hammers, electromagnetic hammer requires no dynamic material contact with workpiece; consequently, produces almost no change in metal grain structure.

  10. Tracking Earthquake Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    In assessing their risk to society, earthquakes are best characterized as cascades that can propagate from the natural environment into the socio-economic (built) environment. Strong earthquakes rarely occur as isolated events; they usually cluster in foreshock-mainshock-aftershock sequences, seismic swarms, and extended sequences of large earthquakes that propagate along major fault systems. These cascades are regulated by stress-mediated interactions among faults driven by tectonic loading. Within these cascades, each large event can itself cause a chain reaction in which the primary effects of faulting and ground shaking induce secondary effects, including tsunami, landslides, liquefaction, and set off destructive processes within the built environment, such as fires and radiation leakage from nuclear plants. Recent earthquakes have demonstrated how the socio-economic effects of large earthquakes can reverberate for many years. To reduce earthquake risk and improve the resiliency of communities to earthquake damage, society depends on five geotechnologies for tracking earthquake cascades: long-term probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), short-term (operational) earthquake forecasting, earthquake early warning, tsunami warning, and the rapid production of post-event information for response and recovery (see figure). In this presentation, I describe how recent advances in earthquake system science are leading to improvements in this geotechnology pipeline. In particular, I will highlight the role of earthquake simulations in predicting strong ground motions and their secondary effects before and during earthquake cascades

  11. Resonant Cascaded Downconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Weedbrook, Christian; Parrett, Ben; Kheruntsyan, Karen; Drummond, Peter; Pooser, Raphael C; Pfister, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    We analyze an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in which cascaded down-conversion occurs inside a cavity resonant for all modes but the initial pump. Due to the resonant cascade design, the OPO presents two {chi}{sup (2)}-level oscillation thresholds that are therefore much lower than for a {chi}{sup (3)} OPO. This is promising for reaching the regime of an effective third-order nonlinearity well above both thresholds. Such a {chi}{sup (2)} cascaded device also has potential applications in frequency conversion to far-infrared regimes. But, most importantly, it can generate novel multipartite quantum correlations in the output radiation, which represent a step beyond squeezed or entangled light. The output can be highly non-Gaussian and therefore not describable by any semiclassical model. In this paper, we derive quantum stochastic equations in the positive-P representation and undertake an analysis of steady-state and dynamical properties of this system.

  12. Critical Mandelbrot Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, Julien; Kupiainen, Antti; Nikula, Miika; Saksman, Eero; Webb, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We study Mandelbrot's multiplicative cascade measures at the critical temperature. As has been recently shown by Barral et al. (C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 350:535-538, 2012), an appropriately normalized sequence of cascade measures converges weakly in probability to a nontrivial limit measure. We prove that these limit measures have no atoms and give bounds for the modulus of continuity of the cumulative distribution function of the measure. Using the earlier work of Barral and Seuret (Adv Math 214:437-468, 2007), we compute the multifractal spectrum of the measures. We also extend the result of Benjamini and Schramm (Commun Math Phys 289:653-662, 2009), in which the KPZ formula from quantum gravity is validated for the high temperature cascade measures, to the critical and low temperature cases.

  13. Collisional Cascades Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Hilke; Pan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Collisional cascades are believed to be the primary mechanism operating in circumstellar dusty debris disks, and are thought to be important in the Kuiper and Asteroid belt. Collisional cascades transfer mass via destructive collisions from larger bodies to smaller ones. Their widespread occurrence and potential importance in understanding planet formation and planet-disk interactions have motivated detailed studies of collisional cascades. The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. We relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan & Sari (2005) can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. These differences in the size distribution power law index are very important when estimating the total disk mass, including larger bodies, by extrapolating from the observed dust masses. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies in, for example, extrasolar debris disks may constrain the total mass in large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies

  14. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories and now a

  15. Triangular rogue wave cascades.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, David J; Ankiewicz, Adrian; Akhmediev, Nail

    2012-11-01

    By numerically applying the recursive Darboux transformation technique, we study high-order rational solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that appear spatiotemporally as triangular arrays of Peregrine solitons. These can be considered as rogue wave cascades and complement previously discovered circular cluster forms. In this analysis, we reveal a general parametric restriction for their existence and investigate the interplay between cascade and cluster forms. As a result, we demonstrate how to generate many more hybrid rogue wave solutions, including semicircular clusters that resemble claws.

  16. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  17. Optimized multibeam configuration for observation of QED cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfer, E. G.; Mironov, A. A.; Fedotov, A. M.; Bashmakov, V. F.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Narozhny, N. B.

    2015-08-01

    QED cascades in an intense electromagnetic field can occur if the dynamical quantum parameter χ of a seed electron, which in Compton units coincides with the electron proper acceleration, attains the order of unity. We derive a general expression for χ of an initially slow electron in an arbitrary electromagnetic field for a time range t ≪1 /ω , where ω is the field carrier frequency. Using this formula, we consider a special field configuration of multiple colliding focused laser beams and optimize it to provide cascade development at laser power below 10 PW and intensity of the order of 1023W /cm2 . Such parameters of the beams will be obtained with a new generation of laser facilities, particularly the ELI Beamlines, in the coming years.

  18. Cascade collapse in copper and nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrano, J.S.; Robertson, I.M.; Averback, R.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Kirk, M.A. )

    1990-04-01

    In-situ TEM studies of the development of the damage structure produced by heavy ion irradiations have been performed in copper and nickel to investigate the possibility that melting occurs in local regions within displacement cascades. These experiments reveal that as the ion dose increases additional loops form from isolated displacement cascades, but more surprisingly some fo the pre-existing loops are annihilated, change position, size and/or Burgers vector. It was also found that the probability for loop formation and the defect image size are greater in copper than in nickel even at temperatures well below stage 3. It will be demonstrated that these observations provide supporting evidence, albeit indirect, that local melting occurs within the cascade core. These results will be compared to the molecular dynamic computer simulations of the damage created by low energy self-ions in copper and nickel. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Harmonic cascade FEL designs for LUX

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, J.; Corlett, J.N.; Fawley, W.M.; Zholents, A.; Wan, W.

    2004-07-16

    LUX is a design concept for an ultrafast X-ray science facility, based on an electron beam accelerated to GeV energies in are circulating linac. Included in the design are short duration (200 fs or shorter FWHM) light sources using multiple stages of higher harmonic generation, seeded by a 200-250 nm laser of similar duration. This laser modulates the energy of a group of electrons within the electron bunch; this section of the electron bunch then produces radiation at a higher harmonic after entering a second, differently tuned undulator. Repeated stages in a cascade yield increasing photon energies up to 1 keV. Most of the undulators in the cascade operate in the low-gain FEL regime. Harmonic cascades have been designed for each pass of the recirculating linac up to a final electron beam energy of 3.1 GeV. For a given cascade, the photon energy can be selected over a wide range by varying the seed laser frequency and the field strength in the undulators. We present simulation results using the codes GENESIS and GINGER, as well as the results of analytical models which predict FEL performance. We discuss lattice considerations pertinent for harmonic cascade FELs, as well as sensitivity studies and requirements on the electron beam.

  20. Collapse of defect cascades to dislocation loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.; Robertson, I.M.; Jenkins, M.L.; English, C.A.; Black, T.J.; Vetrano, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    We review a number of experiments that we have recently performed to investigate the collapse of defect cascades to dislocation loops. This important ion and neutron irradiation phenomenon has been studied with in situ ion bombardment in the Argonne National Laboratory High Voltage Electron Microscope-Ion Accelerator Facility at temperatures of 30 and 300/sup 0/K in Cu/sub 3/Au, Cu, and Fe, and 30, 300 and 600/sup 0/K in Ni. These experiments have demonstrated that individual defect cascades collapse to dislocation loops athermally at 30/sup 0/K in some materials (Ni, Cu and Cu/sub 3/Au), while in another material (Fe) only overlapped cascades produced dislocation loops. A slight sensitivity to the irradiation temperature is demonstrated in Cu/sub 3/Au and Fe, and a strong dependence on the irradiation temperature is seen in Ni. This phenomenon of cascade collapse to dislocation loops in metals at 30/sup 0/K provides an understanding for previous neutron irradiation data. The more detailed dependencies of the collapse probability on material, temperature, bombarding ion dose, ion energy and ion mass contribute much information to a thermal spike model of the collision cascade which we will describe.

  1. Energy flow in a hadronic cascade: Application to hadroncalorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, Donald E.

    2006-05-17

    The hadronic cascade description developed in an earlierpaper is extended to the response of an idealized fine-sampling hadroncalorimeter. Calorimeter response is largely determined by the transferof energy E_e from the hadronic to the electromagnetic sector via \\pi0production. Fluctuations in this quantity produce the "constant term" inhadron calorimeter resolution. The increase of its fractional mean, f_\\rmem^0= \\vevE_e/E, with increasing incident energy E causes the energydependence of the \\pi/e ratio in a noncompensating calorimeter. The meanhadronic energy fraction, f_h0 = 1-f_\\rm em0, was shown to scaleverynearly as a power law in E: f_h0 = (E/E_0)m-1, where E_0\\approx1~;GeV forpions, and m\\approx0.83. It follows that \\pi/e=1-(1-h/e)(E/E_0)m-1, whereelectromagnetic and hadronic energy deposits are detected withefficiencies e and h, respectively. Fluctuations in these quantities,along with sampling fluctuations, are in corporated to give an overallunderstanding of resolution, which is different from the usual treatmentsin interesting ways. The conceptual framework is also extended to theresponse to jets and the difference between pi and presponse.

  2. Howling about Trophic Cascades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalewski, David

    2012-01-01

    Following evolutionary theory and an agriculture model, ecosystem research has stressed bottom-up dynamics, implying that top wild predators are epiphenomenal effects of more basic causes. As such, they are assumed expendable. A more modern co-evolutionary and wilderness approach--trophic cascades--instead suggests that top predators, whose…

  3. Quantum Cascade Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    predicted small linewidth enhancement factor of QC lasers was measured in outside collaboration ( Prof . Shun-Lien Chuang at UIUC) and confirmed to be...Gmachl, Michael C. Wanke, Federico Capasso, Albert L. Hutchinson, Deborah L. Sivco, Sung- Nee G. Chu, and Alfred Y. Cho “Surface plasmon quantum cascade

  4. 'Cascade Gold' raspberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cascade Gold’ is a new gold fruited, floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). It has been evaluated at Puyallup, Wash. in plantings from 1988 to 2008. ...

  5. Cascaded thermoacoustic devices

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.; Gardner, David L.

    2003-12-09

    A thermoacoustic device is formed with a resonator system defining at least one region of high specific acoustic impedance in an acoustic wave within the resonator system. A plurality of thermoacoustic units are cascaded together within the region of high specific acoustic impedance, where at least one of the thermoacoustic units is a regenerator unit.

  6. Howling about Trophic Cascades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalewski, David

    2012-01-01

    Following evolutionary theory and an agriculture model, ecosystem research has stressed bottom-up dynamics, implying that top wild predators are epiphenomenal effects of more basic causes. As such, they are assumed expendable. A more modern co-evolutionary and wilderness approach--trophic cascades--instead suggests that top predators, whose…

  7. One-Dimensional Hybrid Simulation of EAS Using Cascade Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, N. N.; Alekseeva, M. K.; Bergmann, T.; Chernatkin, V.; Engel, R.; Heck, D.; Moyon, J.; Ostapchenko, S. S.; Pierog, T.; Thouw, T.; Werner, K.

    2003-07-01

    A hybrid simulation code is developed that is suited for fast one-dimensional simulations of shower profiles, including fluctuations. It combines Monte Carlo simulation of high energy interactions with a fast numerical solution of cascade equations for the resulting distributions of secondary particles. First results obtained with this new code, called CONEX, are presented and compared to CORSIKA predictions, fo cusing on the treatment of the electromagnetic shower component.

  8. Anisotropic conducting films for electromagnetic radiation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G.; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Electronic devices for the generation of electromagnetic radiation are provided. Also provided are methods for using the devices to generate electromagnetic radiation. The radiation sources include an anisotropic electrically conducting thin film that is characterized by a periodically varying charge carrier mobility in the plane of the film. The periodic variation in carrier mobility gives rise to a spatially varying electric field, which produces electromagnetic radiation as charged particles pass through the film.

  9. Integrated Broadband Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, Kamjou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A broadband, integrated quantum cascade laser is disclosed, comprising ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers formed by applying standard semiconductor process techniques to a monolithic structure of alternating layers of claddings and active region layers. The resulting ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers may be individually controlled by independent voltage potentials, resulting in control of the overall spectrum of the integrated quantum cascade laser source. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  10. Search for acoustic signals from high energy cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R.; Bowen, T.

    1985-01-01

    High energy cosmic ray secondaries can be detected by means of the cascades they produce when they pass through matter. When the charged particles of these cascades ionize the matter they are traveling through, the heat produced and resulting thermal expansion causes a thermoacoustic wave. These sound waves travel at about one hundred-thousandth the speed of light, and should allow an array of acoustic transducers to resolve structure in the cascade to about 1 cm without high speed electronics or segmentation of the detector.

  11. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  12. Search for diffuse extraterrestrial contained neutrino-induced cascades using IceCube 79- and 86-string configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesiak-Bzdak, Mariola; Kiryluk, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    IceCube, a cubic kilometer detector at the South Pole, is the largest neutrino telescope currently taking data. Utilizing the transparent ice of Antarctica as a detection medium, IceCube digital optical sensors observe Cherenkov radiation from secondary particles produced in neutrino interactions inside or near the detector. Charged current νμ interactions create muon tracks, while charged current νe interactions, and neutral current interactions of all flavors initiate electromagnetic and hadronic showers (cascades). The goal of this study is to search for extraterrestrial neutrino-induced cascades, contained within the detector volume, with energies in the tens of TeV to a few PeV neutrino energy range and characterize the diffuse neutrino flux measured in IceCube. The analysis uses 662 days of livetime of the data taken from May 2010 to May 2012 with 79- and 86- string IceCube configurations. The analysis method and results of the likelihood fits to the cascade energy spectra from the fully unblinded datasets will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1205796.

  13. What Are Electromagnetic Fields?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sources of electromagnetic fields Besides natural sources the electromagnetic spectrum also includes fields generated by human-made sources: ... ability to break bonds between molecules. In the electromagnetic spectrum, gamma rays given off by radioactive materials, cosmic ...

  14. Electromagnetic microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttgenbach, S.; Al-Halhouli, A. T.; Feldmann, M.; Seidemann, V.; Waldschik, A.

    2013-05-01

    High precision microactuators have become key elements for many applications of MEMS, for example for positioning and handling systems as well as for microfluidic devices. Electromagnetic microactuators exhibit considerable benefits such as high forces, large deflections, low input impedances and thus, the involvement of only low voltages. Most of the magnetic microactuators developed so far are based on the variable reluctance principle and use soft magnetic materials. Since the driving force of such actuators is proportional to their volume, they require structures with rather great heights and aspect ratios. Therefore, the development of new photo resists, which allow UV exposure of thick layers of resist, has been essential for the advancement of variable reluctance microactuators. On the other hand, hard magnetic materials have the potential for larger forces and larger deflections. Accordingly, polymer magnets, in which micro particles of hard magnetic material are suspended in a polymer matrix, have been used to fabricate permanent magnet microactuators. In this paper we give an overview of sophisticated electromagnetic microactuators which have been developed in our laboratory in the framework of the Collaborative Research Center "Design and Manufacturing of Active Microsystems". In particular, concept, fabrication and test of variable reluctance micro stepper motors, of permanent magnet synchronous micromotors and of microactuators based on the Lorentz force principle will be described. Special emphasis will be given to applications in lab-on-chip systems.

  15. Superconducting cascade electron refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Camarasa-Gómez, M.; Giazotto, F.; Di Marco, A.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H.

    2014-05-12

    The design and operation of an electronic cooler based on a combination of superconducting tunnel junctions is described. The cascade extraction of hot-quasiparticles, which stems from the energy gaps of two different superconductors, allows for a normal metal to be cooled down to about 100 mK starting from a bath temperature of 0.5 K. We discuss the practical implementation, potential performance, and limitations of such a device.

  16. Information cascade on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisakado, Masato; Mori, Shintaro

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barabási-Albert (BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters-herders and independents-and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discuss the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade transition prevails when herder effects are stronger than the super-normal transition. In the BA and fitness models, the critical point of the information cascade transition is the same as that of the random network model. However, the critical point of the super-normal transition disappears when these two models are used. In conclusion, the influence of networks is shown to only affect the convergence speed and not the information cascade transition. We are therefore able to conclude that the influence of hubs on voters' perceptions is limited.

  17. Maxwellian cascade model

    SciTech Connect

    Macklin, R.L.

    1989-11-01

    A model for gamma-ray cascade de-excitation of a nucleus derived from the Maxwellian energy distribution function but imposing energy conservation was investigated. Energy distributions and multiplicities and their averages were found over a range of nuclear temperatures and excitation energies appropriate to neutron capture. The model was compared to existing measurements for tantalum, a case where the level density was high and thus a good approximation to the model. 7 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Cascade ICF power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.J.; Pitts, J.H.

    1986-05-20

    The double-cone-shaped Cascade reaction chamber rotates at 50 rpm to keep a blanket of ceramic granules in place against the wall as they slide from the poles to the exit slots at the equator. The 1 m-thick blanket consists of layers of carbon, beryllium oxide, and lithium aluminate granules about 1 mm in diameter. The x rays and debris are stopped in the carbon granules; the neutrons are multiplied and moderated in the BeO and breed tritium in the LiAlO/sub 2/. The chamber wall is made up of SiO tiles held in compression by a network of composite SiC/Al tendons. Cascade operates at a 5 Hz pulse rate with 300 MJ in each pulse. The temperature in the blanket reaches 1600 K on the inner surface and 1350 K at the outer edge. The granules are automatically thrown into three separate vacuum heat exchangers where they give up their energy to high pressure helium. The helium is used in a Brayton cycle to obtain a thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency of 55%. Studies have been done on neutron activation, debris recovery, vaporization and recondensation of blanket material, tritium control and recovery, fire safety, and cost. These studies indicate that Cascade appears to be a promising ICF reactor candidate from all standpoints. At the 1000 MWe size, electricity could be made for about the same cost as in a future fission reactor.

  19. Earth's Electromagnetic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The natural spectrum of electromagnetic variations surrounding Earth extends across an enormous frequency range and is controlled by diverse physical processes. Electromagnetic (EM) induction studies make use of external field variations with frequencies ranging from the solar cycle which has been used for geomagnetic depth sounding through the 10^{-4}-10^4 Hz frequency band widely used for magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric studies. Above 10^4 Hz, the EM spectrum is dominated by man-made signals. This review emphasizes electromagnetic sources at ˜1 Hz and higher, describing major differences in physical origin and structure of short- and long-period signals. The essential role of Earth's internal magnetic field in defining the magnetosphere through its interactions with the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field is briefly outlined. At its lower boundary, the magnetosphere is engaged in two-way interactions with the underlying ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. Extremely low-frequency (3 Hz-3 kHz) electromagnetic signals are generated in the form of sferics, lightning, and whistlers which can extend to frequencies as high as the VLF range (3-30 kHz).The roughly spherical dielectric cavity bounded by the ground and the ionosphere produces the Schumann resonance at around 8 Hz and its harmonics. A transverse resonance also occurs at 1.7-2.0 kHz arising from reflection off the variable height lower boundary of the ionosphere and exhibiting line splitting due to three-dimensional structure. Ground and satellite observations are discussed in the light of their contributions to understanding the global electric circuit and for EM induction studies.

  20. RECONFIGURING POWER SYSTEMS TO MINIMIZE CASCADING FAILURES: MODELS AND ALGORITHMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bienstock, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    the main goal of this project was to develop new scientific tools, based on optimization techniques, with the purpose of controlling and modeling cascading failures of electrical power transmission systems. We have developed a high-quality tool for simulating cascading failures. The problem of how to control a cascade was addressed, with the aim of stopping the cascade with a minimum of load lost. Yet another aspect of cascade is the investigation of which events would trigger a cascade, or more appropriately the computation of the most harmful initiating event given some constraint on the severity of the event. One common feature of the cascade models described (indeed, of several of the cascade models found in the literature) is that we study thermally-induced line tripping. We have produced a study that accounts for exogenous randomness (e.g. wind and ambient temperature) that could affect the thermal behavior of a line, with a focus on controlling the power flow of the line while maintaining safe probability of line overload. This was done by means of a rigorous analysis of a stochastic version of the heat equation. we incorporated a model of randomness in the behavior of wind power output; again modeling an OPF-like problem that uses chance-constraints to maintain low probability of line overloads; this work has been continued so as to account for generator dynamics as well.

  1. Electromagnetic Radiation System (EMRS) for Susceptibility Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY, *ELECTROMAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT, ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ANTENNAS, ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE, RADAR SIGNALS, RADIO SIGNALS, FIELD INTENSITY.

  2. Superconducting electromagnetic thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.

    1993-02-11

    An electromagnetic thruster for marine vehicles using a jet of water driven by the interaction of a mutually perpendicular intensified magnetic field and an intensified electric field is disclosed. The intensified magnetic field is produced by superconducting coils cooled by a coolant such as liquid helium. An intensified electric field is produced by passing high amperage current across the seawater jet. These interacting fields produce a Lorentz force perpendicular to mutually perpendicular electric and magnetic field vectors which is used to drive the seawater jet. In some embodiments, the force may also be used to draw water into the jet from the boundary layer flow around the vehicle thereby reducing boundary layer turbulence and associated radiated noise.

  3. Electromagnetic topology: Characterization of internal electromagnetic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmantier, J. P.; Aparicio, J. P.; Faure, F.

    1991-01-01

    The main principles are presented of a method dealing with the resolution of electromagnetic internal problems: Electromagnetic Topology. A very interesting way is to generalize the multiconductor transmission line network theory to the basic equation of the Electromagnetic Topology: the BLT equation. This generalization is illustrated by the treatment of an aperture as a four port junction. Analytical and experimental derivations of the scattering parameters are presented. These concepts are used to study the electromagnetic coupling in a scale model of an aircraft, and can be seen as a convenient means to test internal electromagnetic interference.

  4. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  5. Electromagnetic Levitation of a Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, R.; Neves, F.; de Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a teaching experiment that explores the levitation of a disc of ferromagnetic material in the presence of the magnetic field produced by a single electromagnet. In comparison to the classical experiment of the levitation of a sphere, the main advantage of the proposed laboratory bench is that the uniform magnetic field…

  6. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  7. Electromagnetic Biostimulation of Living Cultures for Biotechnology, Biofuel and Bioenergy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Ryan W.; Zavalin, Andrey; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C.

    2009-01-01

    The surge of interest in bioenergy has been marked with increasing efforts in research and development to identify new sources of biomass and to incorporate cutting-edge biotechnology to improve efficiency and increase yields. It is evident that various microorganisms will play an integral role in the development of this newly emerging industry, such as yeast for ethanol and Escherichia coli for fine chemical fermentation. However, it appears that microalgae have become the most promising prospect for biomass production due to their ability to grow fast, produce large quantities of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, thrive in poor quality waters, sequester and recycle carbon dioxide from industrial flue gases and remove pollutants from industrial, agricultural and municipal wastewaters. In an attempt to better understand and manipulate microorganisms for optimum production capacity, many researchers have investigated alternative methods for stimulating their growth and metabolic behavior. One such novel approach is the use of electromagnetic fields for the stimulation of growth and metabolic cascades and controlling biochemical pathways. An effort has been made in this review to consolidate the information on the current status of biostimulation research to enhance microbial growth and metabolism using electromagnetic fields. It summarizes information on the biostimulatory effects on growth and other biological processes to obtain insight regarding factors and dosages that lead to the stimulation and also what kind of processes have been reportedly affected. Diverse mechanistic theories and explanations for biological effects of electromagnetic fields on intra and extracellular environment have been discussed. The foundations of biophysical interactions such as bioelectromagnetic and biophotonic communication and organization within living systems are expounded with special consideration for spatiotemporal aspects of electromagnetic topology, leading to the

  8. Electromagnetic biostimulation of living cultures for biotechnology, biofuel and bioenergy applications.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Ryan W; Zavalin, Andrey; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C

    2009-11-20

    The surge of interest in bioenergy has been marked with increasing efforts in research and development to identify new sources of biomass and to incorporate cutting-edge biotechnology to improve efficiency and increase yields. It is evident that various microorganisms will play an integral role in the development of this newly emerging industry, such as yeast for ethanol and Escherichia coli for fine chemical fermentation. However, it appears that microalgae have become the most promising prospect for biomass production due to their ability to grow fast, produce large quantities of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, thrive in poor quality waters, sequester and recycle carbon dioxide from industrial flue gases and remove pollutants from industrial, agricultural and municipal wastewaters. In an attempt to better understand and manipulate microorganisms for optimum production capacity, many researchers have investigated alternative methods for stimulating their growth and metabolic behavior. One such novel approach is the use of electromagnetic fields for the stimulation of growth and metabolic cascades and controlling biochemical pathways. An effort has been made in this review to consolidate the information on the current status of biostimulation research to enhance microbial growth and metabolism using electromagnetic fields. It summarizes information on the biostimulatory effects on growth and other biological processes to obtain insight regarding factors and dosages that lead to the stimulation and also what kind of processes have been reportedly affected. Diverse mechanistic theories and explanations for biological effects of electromagnetic fields on intra and extracellular environment have been discussed. The foundations of biophysical interactions such as bioelectromagnetic and biophotonic communication and organization within living systems are expounded with special consideration for spatiotemporal aspects of electromagnetic topology, leading to the

  9. Serpentine Robot Arm Contains Electromagnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moya, Israel A.; Studer, Philip A.

    1994-01-01

    Identical modules assembled into flexible robot arm configured in serpentlike fashion to manipulate objects while avoiding obstacles. Each module includes integral electromagnetic actuators energized selectively to produce variety of motions, stationary configurations, and combinations thereof.

  10. COMPACT CASCADE IMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Lippmann, M.

    1964-04-01

    A cascade particle impactor capable of collecting particles and distributing them according to size is described. In addition the device is capable of collecting on a pair of slides a series of different samples so that less time is required for the changing of slides. Other features of the device are its compactness and its ruggedness making it useful under field conditions. Essentially the unit consists of a main body with a series of transverse jets discharging on a pair of parallel, spaced glass plates. The plates are capable of being moved incremental in steps to obtain the multiple samples. (AEC)

  11. The Ufm1 Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Jens; Liebau, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (Ufm1) is a posttranslational modifier that belongs to the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) family. Ufm1 is present in nearly all eukaryotic organisms, with the exception of fungi. It resembles ubiquitin in its ability to be ligated to other proteins, as well as in the mechanism of ligation. While the Ufm1 cascade has been implicated in endoplasmic reticulum functions and cell cycle control, its biological role still remains poorly understood. In this short review, we summarize the current state of Ufm1 research and its potential role in human diseases, like diabetes, ischemic heart disease and cancer. PMID:24921187

  12. Electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolm, H.; Mongeau, P.; Williams, F.

    1980-09-01

    Recent advances in energy storage, switching and magnet technology make electromagnetic acceleration a viable alternative to chemical propulsion for certain tasks, and a means to perform other tasks not previously feasible. Applications include the acceleration of gram-size particles for hypervelocity research and the initiation of fusion by impact, a replacement for chemically propelled artillery, the transportation of cargo and personnel over inaccessible terrain, and the launching of space vehicles to supply massive space operations, and for the disposal of nuclear waste. The simplest launcher of interest is the railgun, in which a short-circuit slide or an arc is driven along two rails by direct current. The most sophisticated studied thus far is the mass driver, in which a superconducting shuttle bucket is accelerated by a line of pulse coils energized by capacitors at energy conversion efficiencies better than 90%. Other accelerators of interest include helical, brush-commutated motors, discrete coil arc commutated drivers, flux compression momentum transformers, and various hybrid electrochemical devices.

  13. Electromagnetic launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Laskaris, E.T.; Chari, M.V.K.

    1990-11-20

    This paper describes an electromagnetic launcher. It comprises: a stationary superconductive coil situated coaxially in a cylindrical vacuum vessel for providing a magnetic field. The superconductive coil having a central aperture, the vacuum vessel having an axially extending bore passing through the central aperture of the superconducting coil; a resistive coil situated coaxially with the superconductive coil and movable axially relative to the stationary superconductive coil, the outer diameter of the resistive coil being smaller than the inner diameter of the bore permitting the resistive coil to pass therethrough; launch activating means coupled to the resistive coil. The launch activating means comprising a shaft joined at one end to the resistive coil, a tube open at both ends, a sliding piston situated in the tube and connected to the other end of the shaft; and power supply means coupled to the resistive coil for providing current of a desired direction and magnitude, so that energization of the resistive coil in the presence of the radial field component of the magnetic field of the superconductive coil creates an axial force on the movable coil, the direction and magnitude of which is dependent on the direction and magnitude of the current in the resistive coil.

  14. Electromagnetic Gun With Commutated Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic gun includes electromagnet coil, turns of which commutated in sequence along barrel. Electrical current fed to two armatures by brushes sliding on bus bars in barrel. Interaction between armature currents and magnetic field from coil produces force accelerating armature, which in turn, pushes on projectile. Commutation scheme chosen so magnetic field approximately coincides and moves with cylindrical region defined by armatures. Scheme has disadvantage of complexity, but in return, enables designer to increase driving magnetic field without increasing armature current. Attainable muzzle velocity increased substantially.

  15. Electromagnetic Gun With Commutated Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic gun includes electromagnet coil, turns of which commutated in sequence along barrel. Electrical current fed to two armatures by brushes sliding on bus bars in barrel. Interaction between armature currents and magnetic field from coil produces force accelerating armature, which in turn, pushes on projectile. Commutation scheme chosen so magnetic field approximately coincides and moves with cylindrical region defined by armatures. Scheme has disadvantage of complexity, but in return, enables designer to increase driving magnetic field without increasing armature current. Attainable muzzle velocity increased substantially.

  16. Electromagnetic computations for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.

    1989-09-01

    Among the difficulties in making nuclear fusion a useful energy source, two important ones are producing the magnetic fields needed to drive and confine the plasma, and controlling the eddy currents induced in electrically conducting components by changing fields. All over the world, researchers are developing electromagnetic codes and employing them to compute electromagnetic effects. Ferromagnetic components of a fusion reactor introduce field distortions. Eddy currents are induced in the vacuum vessel, blanket and other torus components of a tokamak when the plasma current disrupts. These eddy currents lead to large forces, and 3-D codes are being developed to study the currents and forces. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Crossover behavior in driven cascades.

    PubMed

    Burridge, James

    2013-09-01

    We propose a model which explains how power-law crossover behavior can arise in a system which is capable of experiencing cascading failure. In our model the susceptibility of the system to cascades is described by a single number, the propagation power, which measures the ease with which cascades propagate. Physically, such a number could represent the density of unstable material in a system, its internal connectivity, or the mean susceptibility of its component parts to failure. We assume that the propagation power follows an upward drifting Brownian motion between cascades, and drops discontinuously each time a cascade occurs. Cascades are described by a continuous state branching process with distributional properties determined by the value of the propagation power when they occur. In common with many cascading models, pure power-law behavior is exhibited at a critical level of propagation power, and the mean cascade size diverges. This divergence constrains large systems to the subcritical region. We show that as a result, crossover behavior appears in the cascade distribution when an average is performed over the distribution of propagation power. We are able to analytically determine the exponents before and after the crossover.

  18. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing. PMID:26314514

  19. Cascade Mtns. Oregon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-19

    The ground near one of the long-dormant Three Sisters volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains of west-central Oregon has risen approximately 10centimeters in a 10-by-20-km parcel since 1996, meaning that magma or underground lava is slowly flowing into the area, according to a research team from the U.S. Geological Survey. The Three Sisters area -- which contains five volcanoes -- is only about 170 miles from Mount St. Helens, which erupted in 1980. Both are part of the Cascades Range, a line of 27volcanoes stretching from British Columbia in Canada to northern California. This perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER image over digital topography from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset. This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03492

  20. Quantum dot cascade laser

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated an unambiguous quantum dot cascade laser based on InGaAs/GaAs/InAs/InAlAs heterostructure by making use of self-assembled quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode and two-step strain compensation active region design. The prototype generates stimulated emission at λ ~ 6.15 μm and a broad electroluminescence band with full width at half maximum over 3 μm. The characteristic temperature for the threshold current density within the temperature range of 82 to 162 K is up to 400 K. Moreover, our materials show the strong perpendicular mid-infrared response at about 1,900 cm-1. These results are very promising for extending the present laser concept to terahertz quantum cascade laser, which would lead to room temperature operation. PACS 42.55.Px; 78.55.Cr; 78.67.Hc PMID:24666965

  1. Rapid fitting of particle cascade development data from X-ray film densitometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E.; Benson, Carl M.; Fountain, Walter F.

    1989-01-01

    A semiautomatic method of fitting transition curves to X-ray film optical density measurements of electromagnetic particle cascades is described. Several hundred singly and multiple interacting cosmic ray events from the JACEE 8 balloon flights were analyzed using this procedure. In addition to greatly increased speed compared to the previous manual method, the semiautomatic method offers increased accuracy through maximum likelihood fitting.

  2. Cascade sample matrix inversion arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Timothy; Essman, Joseph

    It is shown that if a narrowband adaptive array is partitioned and processed as a cascade of adaptive arrays, computational complexity is reduced and performance is only slightly degraded. The sample matrix inversion (SMI) and covariance matrix estimation are discussed. Cascade SMI complexity is examined. Simulation results are presented.

  3. Tiny Electromagnetic Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    This paper considers electromagnetic transients of a modest total energy ({ E }≳ {10}40 erg) and small initial size ({ R }≳ {10}-1 cm). They could be produced during collisions between relativistic field structures (e.g., macroscopic magnetic dipoles) that formed around or before cosmic electroweak symmetry breaking. The outflowing energy has a dominant electromagnetic component; a subdominant thermal component (temperature > 1 GeV) supplies inertia in the form of residual {e}+/- . A thin shell forms, expanding subluminally and attaining a Lorentz factor ˜ {10}6{--7} before decelerating. Drag is supplied by the reflection of an ambient magnetic field and deflection of ambient free electrons. Emission of low-frequency (GHz-THz) superluminal waves takes place through three channels: (i) reflection of the ambient magnetic field; (ii) direct linear conversion of the embedded magnetic field into a superluminal mode; and (iii) excitation outside the shell by corrugation of its surface. The escaping electromagnetic pulse is very narrow (a few wavelengths), so the width of the detected transient is dominated by propagation effects. GHz radio transients are emitted from (i) the dark matter halos of galaxies and (ii) the near-horizon regions of supermassive black holes that formed via direct gas collapse and now accrete slowly. Brighter and much narrower 0.01-1 THz pulses are predicted at a rate at least comparable to fast radio bursts, experiencing weaker scattering and absorption. The same explosions also accelerate protons up to ˜ {10}19 eV, and heavier nuclei up to 1020-21 eV.

  4. Gamma ray pulsars. [electron-photon cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegelman, H.; Ayasli, S.; Hacinliyan, A.

    1977-01-01

    Data from the SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray experiment reveal the existence of four pulsars emitting photons above 35 MeV. An attempt is made to explain the gamma-ray emission from these pulsars in terms of an electron-photon cascade that develops in the magnetosphere of the pulsar. Although there is very little material above the surface of the pulsar, the very intense magnetic fields (10 to the 12th power gauss) correspond to many radiation lengths which cause electrons to emit photons by magnetic bremsstrahlung and which cause these photons to pair-produce. The cascade develops until the mean photon energy drops below the pair-production threshold which is in the gamma-ray range; at this stage, the photons break out from the source.

  5. Cascade Distillation System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargushingh, Miriam; Shull, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support System (LSS) Project is chartered with de-veloping advanced life support systems that will ena-ble NASA human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The goal of AES is to increase the affordabil-ity of long-duration life support missions, and to re-duce the risk associated with integrating and infusing new enabling technologies required to ensure mission success. Because of the robust nature of distillation systems, the AES LSS Project is pursuing develop-ment of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) as part of its technology portfolio. Currently, the system is being developed into a flight forward Generation 2.0 design.

  6. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  7. Unsteady turbulence cascades.

    PubMed

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J C

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5/3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935)1364-502110.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  8. Regenerated Uranium Separation in Matched Abundance Ratio Cascade with Additional Product Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslyukov, E. V.; Palkin, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses known methods used to purify regenerated uranium in single and double cascades. A new method for separating regenerated uranium has been developed that enables a significant reduction of the concentration of 232,234U in the additional product flow. Matched abundance ratio cascades (M*-cascades) with different key components and additional product flow are used in the new method. Main product flow of the M*-cascade contains low enriched regenerated uranium. It can be used for reactor fuel production. Purified product can be enriched in the ordinary cascade in compliance with the requirements of ASTM C 996-10 set for isotopes 232,234U in low enriched commercial uranium, which is usually produced from the natural one. Computer experiment based on the new method has been performed. The experiment shows that the best cascade with the maximum flow of the enriched purified product is M*-cascade with key components 232,236U.

  9. The effects of self-interstitial clusters on cascade defect evolution beyond the primary damage state

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1997-04-01

    The intracascade evolution of the defect distributions of cascades in copper is investigated using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated with molecular dynamics (MD). The temperature and energy dependencies of annihilation, clustering and free defect production are determined for individual cascades. The annealing simulation results illustrate the strong influence on intracascade evolution of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state. Another factor significantly affecting the evolution of the defect distribution is the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades. This phenomenon introduces a cascade energy dependence of defect evolution that is apparent only beyond the primary damage state, amplifying the need for further study of the annealing phase of cascade evolution and for performing many more MD cascade simulations at higher energies.

  10. Production of defects in metals by collision cascades: TEM experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper reviews experimental TEM data on production of dislocation loops by low energy ion bombardment to low doses, as simulations of similar collision cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation, in various metals and alloys. The dependence of vacancy dislocation loop formation on recoil energy, sample temperature, and specific metal or alloy will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on the effects of dilute alloy additions. A model for cascade melting will be employed to understand these effects, and will require an examination of the role of electron-phonon coupling in cascade cooling and recrystallization. The formation of interstitial dislocation loops as cascade defects, and the influence of the nearby surfaces in these experiments is briefly discussed.

  11. Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are in the ionizing radiation part of the electromagnetic spectrum and can damage DNA or cells directly. Low- ... in the non-ionizing radiation part of the electromagnetic spectrum and are not known to damage DNA or ...

  12. Electromagnetic induction methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electromagnetic induction geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use for agricultural purposes. Electromagnetic induction methods measure the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) for a bulk volume of soil directly beneath the surface. An instrument called a ground conductivity meter...

  13. Kinetics of density striations excited by powerful electromagnetic waves in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, Ya. N.; Leyser, T. B.

    2010-03-01

    One of the most important effects observed when pumping ionospheric plasma by powerful radio waves from the ground is the excitation of filamentary density striations that are stretched along the ambient geomagnetic field. The kinetics of the striations present in the pump electromagnetic field is studied theoretically. The density irregularities cause inhomogeneities in the pump field, which result in a ponderomotive force acting on the striations that makes the density depressions move perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. Striations moving with different velocities can collide, thereby merging to produce larger scale striations. The merging of striations constitutes a cascade process that distributes the energy over the spatial spectrum of the striations. The resulting inhomogeneity spectrum as well as the obtained outward radial drift of a few meters per second is consistent with experimental results.

  14. COHERENCE PROPERTIES OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , COHERENT SCATTERING), (*COHERENT SCATTERING, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), LIGHT, INTERFERENCE, INTENSITY, STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS, QUANTUM THEORY, BOSONS, INTERFEROMETERS, CHINA

  15. FcR epsilon+ lymphocytes and regulation of the IgE antibody system. III. Suppressive factor of allergy (SFA) is produced during the in vitro FcR epsilon expression cascade and displays corollary physiologic activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marcelletti, J F; Katz, D H

    1984-12-01

    Exposure of lymphoid cells to IgE induces the expression of Fc receptors for IgE (FcR epsilon) and the production of soluble mediators, termed IgE-induced regulants (EIR). Conventional suppressive factor of allergy (SFA) and enhancing factor of allergy (EFA), derived from mouse ascites fluids, both inhibit IgE-induced FcR epsilon expression in vitro in cultures of unfractionated and T cell-enriched, but not B cell-enriched, lymphoid cells. This indicates that the inhibitory activities of both entities are T cell dependent, and distinguishes them from the inhibitory EIRI, which inhibits FcR epsilon induction in the absence of T cells. Moreover, SFA and EFA can be distinguished from one another by differences in the T cell subsets required for the inhibitory activity of each respective mediator on in vitro IgE-induced FcR epsilon expression. Thus, SFA requires the presence of Lyt-1+ T cells, whereas EFA requires the presence of Lyt-2+ T cells. Supernatant fluids from IgE-stimulated unfractionated lymphoid cell cultures suppress in vivo IgE synthesis in mice, indicating that SFA is produced along with the other species of EIR. To define conditions required for SFA production in vitro, EIR-rich supernatant fluids were tested for the presence of SFA by using Lyt-2+ cell-blocked indicator cells in the in vitro FcR epsilon induction assay system (this eliminates the inhibitory activity of EFA). SFA production in vitro by IgE-stimulated lymphoid cells was shown to result from cooperative interactions between B cells and Lyt-1+ T cells. In addition, as observed with the induction of FcR epsilon in general, induction of SFA requires the initial interaction of B cells with IgE, and the release of the B cell-selective EIRB. Once produced, EIRB can directly stimulate Lyt-1+ cells, but not Lyt-2+ cells, to produce SFA. The physiologic significance of the in vitro induction of SFA by the action of EIRB on Lyt-1+ cells was confirmed by the demonstration that EIRB, devoid of

  16. Electromagnetic Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajpai, Shrish; Asif, Siddiqui Sajida; Akhtar, Syed Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Out of the four fundamental interactions in nature, electromagnetics is one of them along with gravitation, strong interaction and weak interaction. The field of electromagnetics has made much of the modern age possible. Electromagnets are common in day-to-day appliances and are becoming more conventional as the need for technology increases.…

  17. Electromagnetic Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajpai, Shrish; Asif, Siddiqui Sajida; Akhtar, Syed Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Out of the four fundamental interactions in nature, electromagnetics is one of them along with gravitation, strong interaction and weak interaction. The field of electromagnetics has made much of the modern age possible. Electromagnets are common in day-to-day appliances and are becoming more conventional as the need for technology increases.…

  18. Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrain, Paul; Corson, Dale R.; Lorrain, Francois

    Based on the classic Electromagnetic Fields and Waves by the same authors, Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena capitalizes on the older text's traditional strengths--solid physics, inventive problems, and an experimental approach--while offering a briefer, more accessible introduction to the basic principles of electromagnetism.

  19. Cascade Mtns. Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The ground near one of the long-dormant Three Sisters volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains of west-central Oregon has risen approximately 10centimeters in a 10-by-20-km parcel since 1996, meaning that magma or underground lava is slowly flowing into the area, according to a research team from the U.S. Geological Survey. The Three Sisters area -- which contains five volcanoes -- is only about 170 miles from Mount St. Helens, which erupted in 1980. Both are part of the Cascades Range, a line of 27volcanoes stretching from British Columbia in Canada to northern California. This perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER image over digital topography from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical

  20. Error bounds in cascading regressions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Cascading regressions is a technique for predicting a value of a dependent variable when no paired measurements exist to perform a standard regression analysis. Biases in coefficients of a cascaded-regression line as well as error variance of points about the line are functions of the correlation coefficient between dependent and independent variables. Although this correlation cannot be computed because of the lack of paired data, bounds can be placed on errors through the required properties of the correlation coefficient. The potential meansquared error of a cascaded-regression prediction can be large, as illustrated through an example using geomorphologic data. ?? 1985 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  1. Inferring network structure from cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghonge, Sushrut; Vural, Dervis Can

    2017-07-01

    Many physical, biological, and social phenomena can be described by cascades taking place on a network. Often, the activity can be empirically observed, but not the underlying network of interactions. In this paper we offer three topological methods to infer the structure of any directed network given a set of cascade arrival times. Our formulas hold for a very general class of models where the activation probability of a node is a generic function of its degree and the number of its active neighbors. We report high success rates for synthetic and real networks, for several different cascade models.

  2. High power, electrically tunable quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-02-01

    Mid-infrared laser sources (3-14 μm wavelengths) which have wide spectral coverage and high output power are attractive for many applications. This spectral range contains unique absorption fingerprints of most molecules, including toxins, explosives, and nerve agents. Infrared spectroscopy can also be used to detect important biomarkers, which can be used for medical diagnostics by means of breath analysis. The challenge is to produce a broadband midinfrared source which is small, lightweight, robust, and inexpensive. We are currently investigating monolithic solutions using quantum cascade lasers. A wide gain bandwidth is not sufficient to make an ideal spectroscopy source. Single mode output with rapid tuning is desirable. For dynamic wavelength selection, our group is developing multi-section laser geometries with wide electrical tuning (hundreds of cm-1). These devices are roughly the same size as a traditional quantum cascade lasers, but tuning is accomplished without any external optical components. When combined with suitable amplifiers, these lasers are capable of multi-Watt single mode output powers. This manuscript will describe our current research efforts and the potential for high performance, broadband electrical tuning with the quantum cascade laser.

  3. Trophic cascades across ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Knight, Tiffany M; McCoy, Michael W; Chase, Jonathan M; McCoy, Krista A; Holt, Robert D

    2005-10-06

    Predation can be intense, creating strong direct and indirect effects throughout food webs. In addition, ecologists increasingly recognize that fluxes of organisms across ecosystem boundaries can have major consequences for community dynamics. Species with complex life histories often shift habitats during their life cycles and provide potent conduits coupling ecosystems. Thus, local interactions that affect predator abundance in one ecosystem (for example a larval habitat) may have reverberating effects in another (for example an adult habitat). Here we show that fish indirectly facilitate terrestrial plant reproduction through cascading trophic interactions across ecosystem boundaries. Fish reduce larval dragonfly abundances in ponds, leading to fewer adult dragonflies nearby. Adult dragonflies consume insect pollinators and alter their foraging behaviour. As a result, plants near ponds with fish receive more pollinator visits and are less pollen limited than plants near fish-free ponds. Our results confirm that strong species interactions can reverberate across ecosystems, and emphasize the importance of landscape-level processes in driving local species interactions.

  4. Cascading Effects Following Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Gerald R.; Forgatch, Marion S.; DeGarmo, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Four different sources for cascade effects were examined using 9-year process and outcome data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a preventive intervention using Parent Management Training – Oregon Model (PMTO™). The social interaction learning (SIL) model of child antisocial behavior serves as one basis for predicting change. A second source addresses the issue of comorbid relationships among clinical diagnoses. The third source, collateral changes, describes events in which changes in one family member correlate with changes in another. The fourth component is based on the long-term effects of reducing coercion and increasing positive interpersonal processes within the family. New findings from the 9-year follow-up show that mothers experienced benefits as measured by standard of living (i.e., income, occupation, education, and financial stress) and frequency of police arrests. It is assumed that PMTO reduces the level of coercion, which sets the stage for a massive increase in positive social interaction. In effect, PMTO alters the family environment and thereby opens doors to healthy new social environments. PMID:20883592

  5. Principles of electromagnetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kovetz, A.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book emphasizes the fundamental understanding of the laws governing the behavior of charge and current carrying bodies. Electromagnetism is presented as a classical theory, based-like mechanics-on principles that are independent of the atomic constitution of matter. This book is unique among electromagnetic texts in its treatment of the precise manner in which electromagnetism is linked to mechanics and thermodynamics. Applications include electrostriction, piezoelectricity, ferromagnetism, superconductivity, thermoelectricity, magnetohydrodynamics, radiation from charged particles, electromagnetic wave propagation and guided waves. There are many worked examples of dynamical and thermal effects of electromagnetic fields, and of effects resulting from the motion of bodies.

  6. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  7. What is a Trophic Cascade?

    PubMed

    Ripple, William J; Estes, James A; Schmitz, Oswald J; Constant, Vanessa; Kaylor, Matthew J; Lenz, Adam; Motley, Jennifer L; Self, Katharine E; Taylor, David S; Wolf, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Few concepts in ecology have been so influential as that of the trophic cascade. Since the 1980s, the term has been a central or major theme of more than 2000 scientific articles. Despite this importance and widespread usage, basic questions remain about what constitutes a trophic cascade. Inconsistent usage of language impedes scientific progress and the utility of scientific concepts in management and conservation. Herein, we offer a definition of trophic cascade that is designed to be both widely applicable yet explicit enough to exclude extraneous interactions. We discuss our proposed definition and its implications, and define important related terms, thereby providing a common language for scientists, policy makers, conservationists, and other stakeholders with an interest in trophic cascades. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The cascade high productivity language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, David; Chamberlain, Branford L.; Zima, Hans P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design of Chapel, the Cascade High Productivity Language, which is being developed in the DARPA-funded HPCS project Cascade led by Cray Inc. Chapel pushes the state-of-the-art in languages for HEC system programming by focusing on productivity, in particular by combining the goal of highest possible object code performance with that of programmability offered by a high-level user interface.

  9. Aeroelasticity in Turbomachine-Cascades.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-10

    STABLE -180 UNSTABLE -360 ’ - ’ - -180 0. 󈧖O DIAGRAM 3 AERODYNAMIC LIFT (OENT)COEFFICIENTI AND PHASE LEADS IN DEPENDANCE OF FLOM GUANTATIES AND CASCADE...ABL -0.8 0.0 -5 0. -5 DIAGRAM ’. AERODYNAMIC NORK AND DAMPING COEFFICIENTS (FOR A RIGID NOTION) IN DEPENDANCE OF FLOW OURNTATIES AND CASCADE GEOMETRY...coefficients on blades + blade vibration + vizualization in the transonic flow domain (Schlieren) + instability dependance on flow conditions, blade

  10. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-01-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to Tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  11. The cascade high productivity language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, David; Chamberlain, Branford L.; Zima, Hans P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design of Chapel, the Cascade High Productivity Language, which is being developed in the DARPA-funded HPCS project Cascade led by Cray Inc. Chapel pushes the state-of-the-art in languages for HEC system programming by focusing on productivity, in particular by combining the goal of highest possible object code performance with that of programmability offered by a high-level user interface.

  12. Stochastic background of atmospheric cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, G. ); Wlodarczyk, Z. )

    1993-06-15

    Fluctuations in the atmospheric cascades developing during the propagation of very high energy cosmic rays through the atmosphere are investigated using stochastic branching model of pure birth process with immigration. In particular, we show that the multiplicity distributions of secondaries emerging from gamma families are much narrower than those resulting from hadronic families. We argue that the strong intermittent like behaviour found recently in atmospheric families results from the fluctuations in the cascades themselves and are insensitive to the details of elementary interactions.

  13. Cascading gravity is ghost free

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Khoury, Justin; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2010-06-15

    We perform a full perturbative stability analysis of the 6D cascading gravity model in the presence of 3-brane tension. We demonstrate that for sufficiently large tension on the (flat) 3-brane, there are no ghosts at the perturbative level, consistent with results that had previously only been obtained in a specific 5D decoupling limit. These results establish the cascading gravity framework as a consistent infrared modification of gravity.

  14. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  15. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Q.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  16. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating.

  17. Experiment Pamir-4: Analysis of superfamily with halo of electromagnetic nature detected in deep XEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsepin, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    The family Pb2-11 was detected in the multilayer lead XEC with total thickness of 100 c.u. exposed at the Pamirs. Each lead layer was 1 cm thick, the first registering layer being located under 2 cm of Pb(= 4 c.u.). The family comprised a narrow group of gamma-rays which near the maximum of cascade development (= 14 c.u.) produced a dark spot of optical density D approx. .4 over area S = 25 sq.mm. The narrow group of gamma-rays was traced up to 14th layer corresponding to 30 c.u. Deeper in the chamber, for the space of 70 c.u. no hadron cascade was observed. Thus, the pure electromagnetic halo could be assumed. Preliminary results of the analysis of the family Pb2-11 was presented. The methods of estimation of energy of primary particle and height of nuclear interaction responsible for the observed halo are considered in more detail.

  18. Electromagnetic Radiation Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-10

    A methodology is given for determining whether electromagnetic radiation of sufficient strength to cause performance degradation to the test item...exists at the test item location. The results of an electromagnetic radiation effects test are used to identify the radio frequencies and electromagnetic ... radiation levels to which the test item is susceptible. Further, using a test bed, comparisons are made with the representative signal levels to

  19. A new adaptive hybrid electromagnetic damper: modelling, optimization, and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Ehsan; Ribeiro, Roberto; Behrad Khamesee, Mir; Khajepour, Amir

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the development of a new electromagnetic hybrid damper which provides regenerative adaptive damping force for various applications. Recently, the introduction of electromagnetic technologies to the damping systems has provided researchers with new opportunities for the realization of adaptive semi-active damping systems with the added benefit of energy recovery. In this research, a hybrid electromagnetic damper is proposed. The hybrid damper is configured to operate with viscous and electromagnetic subsystems. The viscous medium provides a bias and fail-safe damping force while the electromagnetic component adds adaptability and the capacity for regeneration to the hybrid design. The electromagnetic component is modeled and analyzed using analytical (lumped equivalent magnetic circuit) and electromagnetic finite element method (FEM) (COMSOL® software package) approaches. By implementing both modeling approaches, an optimization for the geometric aspects of the electromagnetic subsystem is obtained. Based on the proposed electromagnetic hybrid damping concept and the preliminary optimization solution, a prototype is designed and fabricated. A good agreement is observed between the experimental and FEM results for the magnetic field distribution and electromagnetic damping forces. These results validate the accuracy of the modeling approach and the preliminary optimization solution. An analytical model is also presented for viscous damping force, and is compared with experimental results The results show that the damper is able to produce damping coefficients of 1300 and 0-238 N s m-1 through the viscous and electromagnetic components, respectively.

  20. Cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huawei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The conversion efficiency of double-clad Raman fiber laser is limited by the cladding-to-core area ratio. To get high conversion efficiency, the inner-cladding-to-core area ratio has to be less than about 8, which limits the brightness enhancement. To overcome the problem, a cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber laser with multiple-clad fiber as the Raman gain medium is proposed. A theoretical model of Raman fiber amplifier with multiple-clad fiber is developed, and numerical simulation proves that the proposed scheme can improve the conversion efficiency and brightness enhancement of cladding pumped Raman fiber laser.

  1. Autoregressive cascades on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Srikanth K.; Vaze, Rahul; Narasimha, Dheeraj

    2016-04-01

    A network cascade model that captures many real-life correlated node failures in large networks via load redistribution is studied. The considered model is well suited for networks where physical quantities are transmitted, e.g., studying large scale outages in electrical power grids, gridlocks in road networks, and connectivity breakdown in communication networks, etc. For this model, a phase transition is established, i.e., existence of critical thresholds above or below which a small number of node failures lead to a global cascade of network failures or not. Theoretical bounds are obtained for the phase transition on the critical capacity parameter that determines the threshold above and below which cascade appears or disappears, respectively, that are shown to closely follow numerical simulation results.

  2. Cascade Reservoirs Floodwater Resources Utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A reasonable floodwater resources utilization method is put forward by dynamic controlling of cascade reservoirs flood control limited level in this paper. According to the probability distribution of the beginning time of the first flood and the ending time of the final flood from July to September, the Fuzzy Statistic Analysis was used to divide the main flood season. By fitting the flood season membership functions of each period, the cascade reservoirs flood control limited water level for each period were computed according to the characteristic data of reservoirs. In terms of the benefit maximization and risk minimum principle, the reasonable combination of flood control limited water level of cascade reservoirs was put forward.

  3. THz quantum cascade lasers for standoff molecule detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wanke, Michael Clement; Lerttamrab, Maytee; Waldmueller, Ines

    2007-10-01

    Remote optical detection of molecules, agents, and energetic materials has many applications to national security interests. Currently there is significant interest in determining under what circumstances THz frequency coverage will aid in a complete sensing package. Sources of coherent THz frequency (i.e. 0.1 to 10 THz) electromagnetic radiation with requisite power levels, frequency agility, compactness and reliability represent the single greatest obstacle in establishing a THz technology base, but recent advances in semiconductor-based quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) offer huge improvements towards the ultimate THz source goals. This project advanced the development of narrow-linewidth THz quantum cascade lasers. We developed theoretical tools to guide the improvement of standard THz quantum cascade lasers, the investigation of nonlinear optics employing infrared QCLs, and the exploration of quantum coherence to improve QCL performance. The latter was aimed especially towards achieving high temperature operation. In addition we developed a computer algorithm capable of shifting the frequencies of an existing THz QCL to a different frequency and invented a new type of laser that may enable room temperature THz generation in a electrically driven solid-state source.

  4. General introduction to microstructural evolution under cascade damage conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedersich, H.

    1993-06-01

    A short overview of the processes that affect the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation is given. The processes include defect production with an emphasis on the effects of the dynamic cascade events, defect clustering, irradiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, phase decompositions and phase transformations. A simple model for the description of the development of the defect microstructure in a pure metal during cascade producing irradiation is also outlined which can provide, in principle, defect fluxes required for the description of the microstructural processes such as phase decomposition and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  5. Electroluminescence from Si/SiGe quantum cascade emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, D. J.; Lynch, S. A.; Bates, R.; Ikonic, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.; Harrison, P.; Norris, D. J.; Liew, S. L.; Cullis, A. G.; Murzyn, P.; Pidgeon, C.; Arnone, D. D.; Robbins, D. J.

    2003-03-01

    Intersubband electroluminescence results are presented from Si/SiGe quantum cascade emitters at 3.2 THz and at temperatures up to 150 K. The effect of adding doping into the active quantum wells was studied in addition to reduced barrier widths from previous measurements. While the current through the sample is increased by the addition of doping, the emitted power is reduced through additional free carrier absorption and Coulombic scattering. Free electron laser measurements confirm the intersubband transitions in the quantum wells of the cascade devices and produce non-radiative lifetimes of ∼20 ps between 4 and 150 K.

  6. Substrate channelling as an approach to cascade reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeldon, Ian; Minteer, Shelley D.; Banta, Scott; Barton, Scott Calabrese; Atanassov, Plamen; Sigman, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Millions of years of evolution have produced biological systems capable of efficient one-pot multi-step catalysis. The underlying mechanisms that facilitate these reaction processes are increasingly providing inspiration in synthetic chemistry. Substrate channelling, where intermediates between enzymatic steps are not in equilibrium with the bulk solution, enables increased efficiencies and yields in reaction and diffusion processes. Here, we review different mechanisms of substrate channelling found in nature and provide an overview of the analytical methods used to quantify these effects. The incorporation of substrate channelling into synthetic cascades is a rapidly developing concept, and recent examples of the fabrication of cascades with controlled diffusion and flux of intermediates are presented.

  7. Bosonic cascades of indirect excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalitov, A. V.; De Liberato, S.; Lagoudakis, P.; Savvidis, P. G.; Kavokin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the concept of the terahertz bosonic cascade laser (BCL) based on a parabolic quantum well (PQW) embedded in a microcavity was proposed. We refine this proposal by suggesting transitions between indirect exciton (IX) states as a source of terahertz emission. We explicitly propose a structure containing a narrow-square QW and a wide-parabolic QW for the realisation of a bosonic cascade. Advantages of this type of structures are in large dipole matrix elements for terahertz transitions and in long exciton radiative lifetimes which are crucial for realisation of threshold and quantum efficiency BCLs.

  8. Cascading dynamics in modular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we study a simple cascading process in a structured heterogeneous population, namely, a network composed of two loosely coupled communities. We demonstrate that under certain conditions the cascading dynamics in such a network has a two-tiered structure that characterizes activity spreading at different rates in the communities. We study the dynamics of the model using both simulations and an analytical approach based on annealed approximation and obtain good agreement between the two. Our results suggest that network modularity might have implications in various applications, such as epidemiology and viral marketing.

  9. Nanowire terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Thomas

    2014-10-06

    Quantum cascade lasers made of nanowire axial heterostructures are proposed. The dissipative quantum dynamics of their carriers is theoretically investigated using non-equilibrium Green functions. Their transport and gain properties are calculated for varying nanowire thickness, from the classical-wire regime to the quantum-wire regime. Our calculation shows that the lateral quantum confinement provided by the nanowires allows an increase of the maximum operation temperature and a strong reduction of the current density threshold compared to conventional terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  10. Electromagnetically Operated Counter

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, H D; Goldberg, M I

    1951-12-18

    An electromagnetically operated counter wherein signals to be counted are applied to cause stepwise rotation of a rotatable element which is connected to a suitable register. The mechanism involved consists of a rotatable armature having three spaced cores of magnetic material and a pair of diametrically opposed electromagnets with a suitable pulsing circuit to actuate the magnets.

  11. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  12. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, R.D.; Deis, G.A.

    1992-03-24

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles. 14 figs.

  13. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, Ross D.; Deis, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles.

  14. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  15. Statistical analysis of cascaded PLC-based PMD compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Lei; Wu, Xingkun

    2005-01-01

    The planar lightwave circuit (PLC) on silicon substrate offers a promising on-chip integrated solution to polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) compensation for long haul high speed communications. A novel cascaded PLC based PMD compensator is proposed in this paper and a detailed statistical analysis of PMD generated by cascaded PLC circuits is presented. Using Gisin and Pellaux's approach the distributions of first-order PMD produced by various multiple-stage PLC circuits were obtained by Monte Carlo simulation with respect to the phase shift introduced by heating elements in the circuits. The generated PMD was compared with a standard Maxwell distribution and that of a 12-stage nonlinear crystal based PMD compensator. It was found that a 3-stage cascaded PLC circuit yields a performance close to that of the crystal-based PMD compensator, while with a significant reduction in packaged size and enhancement in stability.

  16. Pair Cascades and Deathlines in Offset Magnetic Dipole Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice; Muslimov, Alex

    2010-01-01

    We investigate electron-positron pair cascades in a dipole magnetic field whose axis is offset from the neutron star center. In such a field geometry, the polar cap is displaced from the neutron star symmetry axis and the field line radius of curvature is modified. Using the modified parallel electric field near the polar cap of an offset dipole, we simulate pair cascades to determine the pair deathlines and pair multiplicities as a function of the offset parameter. We find that the pair multiplicity can change dramatically with a modest offset, with a significant increase on one side of the polar cap. Lower pair deathlines allow a larger fraction of the pulsar population, that include old and millisecond pulsars, to produce cascades with high multiplicity.

  17. Search for Magnetically Broadened Cascade Emission from Blazars with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Buchovecky, M.; Bugaev, V.; Cerruti, M.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Falcone, A.; Fernández Alonso, M.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Griffin, S.; Hütten, M.; Hervet, O.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lin, T. T. Y.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nieto, D.; O’Brien, S.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Sadeh, I.; Shahinyan, K.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tyler, J.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Wilcox, P.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2017-02-01

    We present a search for magnetically broadened gamma-ray emission around active galactic nuclei (AGNs), using VERITAS observations of seven hard-spectrum blazars. A cascade process occurs when multi-TeV gamma-rays from an AGN interact with extragalactic background light (EBL) photons to produce electron–positron pairs, which then interact with cosmic microwave background photons via inverse-Compton scattering to produce gamma-rays. Due to the deflection of the electron–positron pairs, a non-zero intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) would potentially produce detectable effects on the angular distribution of the cascade emission. In particular, an angular broadening compared to the unscattered emission could occur. Through non-detection of angularly broadened emission from 1ES 1218+304, the source with the largest predicted cascade fraction, we exclude a range of IGMF strengths around 10‑14 G at the 95% confidence level. The extent of the exclusion range varies with the assumptions made about the intrinsic spectrum of 1ES 1218+304 and the EBL model used in the simulation of the cascade process. All of the sources are used to set limits on the flux due to extended emission.

  18. Computer Code Validation in Electromagnetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    modeling code. This user perception of validity is based on documentation, peer review, user experience and computer resource management. Keywords: Electromagnetic environment effects; Electromagnetic interference; Reprints. (jhd)

  19. Cascaded linear shift-invariant processors in optical pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Reed, S; Coupland, J

    2001-08-10

    We study a cascade of linear shift-invariant processing modules (correlators), each augmented with a nonlinear threshold as a means to increase the performance of high-speed optical pattern recognition. This configuration is a special class of multilayer, feed-forward neural networks and has been proposed in the literature as a relatively fast best-guess classifier. However, it seems that, although cascaded correlation has been proposed in a number of specific pattern recognition problems, the importance of the configuration has been largely overlooked. We prove that the cascaded architecture is the exact structure that must be adopted if a multilayer feed-forward neural network is trained to produce a shift-invariant output. In contrast with more generalized multilayer networks, the approach is easily implemented in practice with optical techniques and is therefore ideally suited to the high-speed analysis of large images. We have trained a digital model of the system using a modified backpropagation algorithm with optimization using simulated annealing techniques. The resulting cascade has been applied to a defect recognition problem in the canning industry as a benchmark for comparison against a standard linear correlation filter, the minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter. We show that the nonlinear performance of the cascade is a significant improvement over that of the linear MACE filter in this case.

  20. Electromagnetic induction studies. [of earth lithosphere and asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Recent developments in electromagnetic induction studies of the lithosphere and the asthenosphere are reviewed. Attention is given to geoelectrical studies of active tectonic areas in terms of the major zones of crustal extension, the basin and range province along western regions of North America, and the Rio Grande rift. Studies have also been performed of tectonic activity around Iceland, the Salton Trough and Cerro Prieto, and the subduction zones of the Cascade Mountains volcanic belt, where magnetotelluric and geomagnetic variation studies have been done. Geomagnetic variations experiments have been reported in the Central Appalachians, and submarine electromagnetic studies along the Juan de Fuca ridge. Controlled source electromagnetic and dc resistivity investigations have been carried out in Nevada, Hawaii, and in the Adirondacks Mountains. Laboratory examinations on the conductivity of representative materials over a broad range of temperature, pressure, and chemistry are described.

  1. Electromagnetism, Second Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, I. S.; Phillips, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw the Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scientists R. J. Barlow and A. R. Barnett Electromagnetism, Second Edition is suitable for a first course in electromagnetism, whilst also covering many topics frequently encountered in later courses. The material has been carefully arranged and allows for flexi-bility in its use for courses of different length and structure. A knowledge of calculus and an elementary knowledge of vectors is assumed, but the mathematical properties of the differential vector operators are described in sufficient detail for an introductory course, and their physical significance in the context of electromagnetism is emphasised. In this Second Edition the authors give a fuller treatment of circuit analysis and include a discussion of the dispersion of electromagnetic waves. Electromagnetism, Second Edition features: The application of the laws of electromagnetism to practical problems such as the behaviour of antennas, transmission lines and transformers. Sets of problems at the end of each chapter to help student understanding, with hints and solutions to the problems given at the end of the book. Optional "starred" sections containing more specialised and advanced material for the more ambitious reader. An Appendix with a thorough discussion of electromagnetic standards and units. Recommended by many institutions. Electromagnetism. Second Edition has also been adopted by the Open University as the

  2. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema

    Claire Gmachl

    2016-07-12

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  3. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fang-zen; Qian, Zhao-ming

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own dc capacitor. The new inverter can: (1) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one time per fundamental cycle; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility interfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features, feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical, simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  4. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Claire Gmachl

    2010-03-17

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  5. CASCADE: Introducing AI into CBT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendley, R. J.; Jurascheck, N.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses changes in training requirements of commerce and industry in the United Kingdom and describes a project, CASCADE, that was developed to investigate and implement the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques into computer-based training (CBT). An overview of pilot projects in higher education settings is provided. (eight…

  6. Unsteady transonic flow in cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S. P.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    There is a need for methods to predict the unsteady air loads associated with flutter of turbomachinery blading at transonic speeds. The results of such an analysis in which the steady relative flow approaching a cascade of thin airfoils is assumed to be transonic, irrotational, and isentropic is presented. The blades in the cascade are allowed to undergo a small amplitude harmonic oscillation which generates a small unsteady flow superimposed on the existing steady flow. The blades are assumed to oscillate with a prescribed motion of constant amplitude and interblade phase angle. The equations of motion are obtained by linearizing about a uniform flow the inviscid nonheat conducting continuity and momentum equations. The resulting equations are solved by employing the Weiner Hopf technique. The solution yields the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on the cascade at Mach number equal to 1. Making use of an unsteady transonic similarity law, these results are compared with the results obtained from linear unsteady subsonic and supersonic cascade theories. A parametric study is conducted to find the effects of reduced frequency, solidity, stagger angle, and position of pitching axis on the flutter.

  7. Electromagnetic Heating Methods for Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, A.; Kumar, M.; Knapp, R.B.

    2000-05-01

    The most widely used method of thermal oil recovery is by injecting steam into the reservoir. A well-designed steam injection project is very efficient in recovering oil, however its applicability is limited in many situations. Simulation studies and field experience has shown that for low injectivity reservoirs, small thickness of the oil-bearing zone, and reservoir heterogeneity limits the performance of steam injection. This paper discusses alternative methods of transferring heat to heavy oil reservoirs, based on electromagnetic energy. They present a detailed analysis of low frequency electric resistive (ohmic) heating and higher frequency electromagnetic heating (radio and microwave frequency). They show the applicability of electromagnetic heating in two example reservoirs. The first reservoir model has thin sand zones separated by impermeable shale layers, and very viscous oil. They model preheating the reservoir with low frequency current using two horizontal electrodes, before injecting steam. The second reservoir model has very low permeability and moderately viscous oil. In this case they use a high frequency microwave antenna located near the producing well as the heat source. Simulation results presented in this paper show that in some cases, electromagnetic heating may be a good alternative to steam injection or maybe used in combination with steam to improve heavy oil production. They identify the parameters which are critical in electromagnetic heating. They also discuss past field applications of electromagnetic heating including technical challenges and limitations.

  8. Electromagnetically driven peristaltic pump

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2000-01-01

    An electromagnetic peristaltic pump apparatus may comprise a main body section having an inlet end and an outlet end and a flexible membrane which divides the main body section into a first cavity and a second cavity. The first cavity is in fluid communication with the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section. The second cavity is not in fluid communication with the first cavity and contains an electrically conductive fluid. The second cavity includes a plurality of electrodes which are positioned within the second cavity generally adjacent the flexible membrane. A magnetic field generator produces a magnetic field having a plurality of flux lines at least some of which are contained within the second cavity of the main body section and which are oriented generally parallel to a flow direction in which a material flows between the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section. A control system selectively places a voltage potential across selected ones of the plurality of electrodes to deflect the flexible membrane in a wave-like manner to move material contained in the first cavity between the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section.

  9. SOLAR NANTENNA ELECTROMAGNETIC COLLECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Steven D. Novack; Dale K. Kotter; Dennis Slafer; Patrick Pinhero

    2008-08-01

    This research explores a new efficient approach for producing electricity from the abundant energy of the sun. A nanoantenna electromagnetic collector (NEC) has been designed, prototyped, and tested. Proof of concept has been validated. The device targets mid-infrared wavelengths where conventional photovoltaic (PV) solar cells do not respond but is abundant in solar energy. The initial concept of designing NEC antennas was based on scaling of radio frequency antenna theory. This approach has proven unsuccessful by many due to not fully understanding and accounting for the optical behavior of materials in the THz region. Also until recent years the nanofabrication methods were not available to fabricate the optical antenna elements. We have addressed and overcome both technology barriers. Several factors were critical in successful implementation of NEC including: 1) frequency-dependent modeling of antenna elements, 2) selection of materials with proper THz properties and 3) novel manufacturing methods that enable economical large-scale manufacturing. The work represents an important step toward the ultimate realization of a low-cost device that will collect as well as convert this radiation into electricity, which will lead to a wide spectrum, high conversion efficiency, and low cost solution to complement conventional PVs.

  10. [Combined biological effect of electromagnetic fields and chemical substances (toxic)].

    PubMed

    Kamedula, M; Kamedula, T

    1996-01-01

    The authors present results of own measurements and examinations as well as the literature data on the occurrence and effect of direct, low and high frequency electromagnetic fields and chemicals. In real working conditions and in experimental conditions, the following relations can be observed: 1) concomitant occurrence of electromagnetic fields and chemicals, e.g. processes of electrolysis, inductive and dielectric heating; 2) experimental studies of combined effect of electromagnetic fields and chemicals on e.g. cancer development: 3) drug effect modified by electromagnetic fields; 4) effect of chemicals produced in materials under the influence of electromagnetic fields. There are only a few publications on medical examinations of workers exposed simultaneously to electromagnetic fields and chemicals. However, even in those reported studies, an attempt to distinguish changes in the health state due to electromagnetic fields, and due to chemicals has field. The studies of the effect of electromagnetic fields which modify the effect of carcinogenic substances have not yielded unequivocal results. Electromagnetic fields may modify significantly the effect of some psychotropic and hormonal drugs. Under the influence of pyrolisis, induced by thermal effect of electromagnetic fields, toxic substances or substances with harmful biological effect may occur in some materials.

  11. Dynamics robustness of cascading systems.

    PubMed

    Young, Jonathan T; Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro S; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-03-01

    A most important property of biochemical systems is robustness. Static robustness, e.g., homeostasis, is the insensitivity of a state against perturbations, whereas dynamics robustness, e.g., homeorhesis, is the insensitivity of a dynamic process. In contrast to the extensively studied static robustness, dynamics robustness, i.e., how a system creates an invariant temporal profile against perturbations, is little explored despite transient dynamics being crucial for cellular fates and are reported to be robust experimentally. For example, the duration of a stimulus elicits different phenotypic responses, and signaling networks process and encode temporal information. Hence, robustness in time courses will be necessary for functional biochemical networks. Based on dynamical systems theory, we uncovered a general mechanism to achieve dynamics robustness. Using a three-stage linear signaling cascade as an example, we found that the temporal profiles and response duration post-stimulus is robust to perturbations against certain parameters. Then analyzing the linearized model, we elucidated the criteria of when signaling cascades will display dynamics robustness. We found that changes in the upstream modules are masked in the cascade, and that the response duration is mainly controlled by the rate-limiting module and organization of the cascade's kinetics. Specifically, we found two necessary conditions for dynamics robustness in signaling cascades: 1) Constraint on the rate-limiting process: The phosphatase activity in the perturbed module is not the slowest. 2) Constraints on the initial conditions: The kinase activity needs to be fast enough such that each module is saturated even with fast phosphatase activity and upstream changes are attenuated. We discussed the relevance of such robustness to several biological examples and the validity of the above conditions therein. Given the applicability of dynamics robustness to a variety of systems, it will provide a

  12. PANEL CODE FOR PLANAR CASCADES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Code for Planar Cascades was developed as an aid for the designer of turbomachinery blade rows. The effective design of turbomachinery blade rows relies on the use of computer codes to model the flow on blade-to-blade surfaces. Most of the currently used codes model the flow as inviscid, irrotational, and compressible with solutions being obtained by finite difference or finite element numerical techniques. While these codes can yield very accurate solutions, they usually require an experienced user to manipulate input data and control parameters. Also, they often limit a designer in the types of blade geometries, cascade configurations, and flow conditions that can be considered. The Panel Code for Planar Cascades accelerates the design process and gives the designer more freedom in developing blade shapes by offering a simple blade-to-blade flow code. Panel, or integral equation, solution techniques have been used for several years by external aerodynamicists who have developed and refined them into a primary design tool of the aircraft industry. The Panel Code for Planar Cascades adapts these same techniques to provide a versatile, stable, and efficient calculation scheme for internal flow. The code calculates the compressible, inviscid, irrotational flow through a planar cascade of arbitrary blade shapes. Since the panel solution technique is for incompressible flow, a compressibility correction is introduced to account for compressible flow effects. The analysis is limited to flow conditions in the subsonic and shock-free transonic range. Input to the code consists of inlet flow conditions, blade geometry data, and simple control parameters. Output includes flow parameters at selected control points. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 590K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1982.

  13. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qalandar, K. R.; Strachan, B. S.; Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Shaw, S. W.; Turner, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2N. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2j at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  14. Particle energy cascade in the intergalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, M.; Evoli, C.; Ferrara, A.

    2010-05-01

    We study the development of high-energy (Ein <= 1 TeV) cascades produced by a primary electron of energy Ein injected into the intergalactic medium (IGM). To this aim we have developed the new code MEDEA (Monte Carlo Energy Deposition Analysis) which includes Bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton (IC) processes, along with H/He collisional ionizations and excitations, and electron-electron collisions. The cascade energy partition into heating, excitations and ionizations depends primarily not only on the IGM ionized fraction, xe, but also on redshift, z, due to IC on cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. While Bremsstrahlung is unimportant under most conditions, IC becomes largely dominant at energies Ein >= 1 MeV. The main effect of IC at injection energies Ein <= 100 MeV is a significant boost of the fraction of energy converted into low-energy photons (hν < 10.2 eV) which do not further interact with the IGM. For energies Ein >= 1 GeV CMB photons are preferentially upscattered within the X-ray spectrum (hν > 104 eV) and can free stream to the observer. Complete tables of the fractional energy depositions as a function of redshift, Ein and ionized fraction are given. Our results can be used in many astrophysical contexts, with an obvious application related to the study of decaying/annihilating dark matter (DM) candidates in the high-z Universe.

  15. Self-similar inverse cascade of magnetic helicity driven by the chiral anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, Yuji; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Yin, Yi

    2015-12-01

    For systems with charged chiral fermions, the imbalance of chirality in the presence of magnetic field generates an electric current—this is the chiral magnetic effect (CME). We study the dynamical real-time evolution of electromagnetic fields coupled by the anomaly to the chiral charge density and the CME current by solving the Maxwell-Chern-Simons equations. We find that the CME induces the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity toward the large distances, and that at late times this cascade becomes self-similar, with universal exponents. We also find that in terms of gauge field topology the inverse cascade represents the transition from linked electric and magnetic fields (Hopfions) to the knotted configuration of magnetic field (Chandrasekhar-Kendall states). The magnetic reconnections are accompanied by the pulses of the CME current directed along the magnetic field lines. We devise an experimental signature of these phenomena in heavy ion collisions, and speculate about implications for condensed matter systems.

  16. Cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We report on a theoretical and experimental study of cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics. We show that the usual energy-momentum conservation of Bragg scattering can be considerably relaxed via cascade-induced phase-matching. Experimentally we demonstrate frequency translation over six- and 11-fold cascades, in excellent agreement with derived phase-matching conditions.

  17. Electromagnetic Induction with Neodymium Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Deborah; Sebranek, John

    2013-09-01

    In April 1820, Hans Christian Ørsted noticed that the needle of a nearby compass deflected briefly from magnetic north each time the electric current of the battery he was using for an unrelated experiment was turned on or off. Upon further investigation, he showed that an electric current flowing through a wire produces a magnetic field. In 1831 Michael Faraday and Joseph Henry separately expanded on Ørsted's discovery by showing that a changing magnetic field produces an electric current. Heinrich Lenz found in 1833 that an induced current has the opposite direction from the electromagnetic force that produced it. This paper describes an experiment that can help students to develop an understanding of Faraday's law and Lenz's law by studying the emf generated as a magnet drops through a set of coils having increasing numbers of turns.

  18. Energy spectrum of cascade showers induced by cosmic ray muons in the range from 50 GeV to 5 TeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashitkov, V. D.; Kirina, T. M.; Klimakov, A. P.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Yumatov, V. I.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cascade showers induced by electromagnetic interactions of high energy muons of horizontal cosmic ray flux in iron absorber was measured. The total observation time exceeded 22,000 hours. Both the energy spectrum and angular distributions of cascade showers are fairly described in terms of the usual muon generation processes, with a single power index of the parent meson spectrum over the muon energy range from 150 GeV to 5 TeV.

  19. Descriptive Study of Electromagnetic Wave Distribution for Various Seating Positions: Using Digital Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seomun, GyeongAe; Kim, YoungHwan; Lee, Jung-Ah; Jeong, KwangHoon; Park, Seon-A; Kim, Miran; Noh, Wonjung

    2014-01-01

    To better understand environmental electromagnetic wave exposure during the use of digital textbooks by elementary school students, we measured numeric values of the electromagnetic fields produced by tablet personal computers (TPCs). Specifically, we examined the distribution of the electromagnetic waves for various students' seating positions in…

  20. Descriptive Study of Electromagnetic Wave Distribution for Various Seating Positions: Using Digital Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seomun, GyeongAe; Kim, YoungHwan; Lee, Jung-Ah; Jeong, KwangHoon; Park, Seon-A; Kim, Miran; Noh, Wonjung

    2014-01-01

    To better understand environmental electromagnetic wave exposure during the use of digital textbooks by elementary school students, we measured numeric values of the electromagnetic fields produced by tablet personal computers (TPCs). Specifically, we examined the distribution of the electromagnetic waves for various students' seating positions in…

  1. Consumer-mediated recycling and cascading trophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Shawn J; Loreau, Michel

    2010-07-01

    Cascading trophic interactions mediated by consumers are complex phenomena, which encompass many direct and indirect effects. Nonetheless, most experiments and theory on the topic focus uniquely on the indirect, positive effects of predators on producers via regulation of herbivores. Empirical research in aquatic ecosystems, however, demonstrate that the indirect, positive effects of consumer-mediated recycling on primary producer stocks may be larger than the effects of herbivore regulation, particularly when predators have access to alternative prey. We derive an ecosystem model with both recipient- and donor-controlled trophic relationships to test the conditions of four hypotheses generated from recent empirical work on the role of consumer-mediated recycling in cascading trophic interactions. Our model predicts that predator regulation of herbivores will have larger, positive effects on producers than consumer-mediated recycling in most cases but that consumer-mediated recycling does generally have a positive effect on producer stocks. We demonstrate that herbivore recycling will have larger effects on producer biomass than predator recycling when turnover rates and recycling efficiencies are high and predators prefer local prey. In addition, predictions suggest that consumer-mediated recycling has the largest effects on primary producers when predators prefer allochthonous prey and predator attack rates are high. Finally, our model predicts that consumer-mediated recycling effects may not be largest when external nutrient loading is low. Our model predictions highlight predator and prey feeding relationships, turnover rates, and external nutrient loading rates as key determinants of the strength of cascading trophic interactions. We show that existing hypotheses from specific empirical systems do not occur under all conditions, which further exacerbates the need to consider a broad suite of mechanisms when investigating trophic cascades.

  2. Cascade aeroacoustics including steady loading effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hsiao-Wei D.; Fleeter, Sanford

    A mathematical model is developed to analyze the effects of airfoil and cascade geometry, steady aerodynamic loading, and the characteristics of the unsteady flow field on the discrete frequency noise generation of a blade row in an incompressible flow. The unsteady lift which generates the noise is predicted with a complex first-order cascade convected gust analysis. This model was then applied to the Gostelow airfoil cascade and variations, demonstrating that steady loading, cascade solidity, and the gust direction are significant. Also, even at zero incidence, the classical flat plate cascade predictions are unacceptable.

  3. Cascade inertial-confinement-fusion power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Maya, I.

    1985-11-13

    The Cascade reactor is double-cone shaped with a maximum radius of 5 m. It rotates at 50 rpm. The average temperature of a three-material flowing granular blanket leaving the reactor is 1440 K. Heat from the blanket is transferred to helium gas in a shell- and ceramic-tube-type heat exchanger that has a separate region for each blanket material. Diffusion of tritium from the blanket granules through the heat exchanger is only 25 Ci/d, so no intermediate loop is needed for isolation. We selected a simple once-through, regenerative, 5-MPa helium gas-turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion because of its simplicity and high efficiency. Fusion power is 1500 MW; this is multiplied to 1670 MW/sub t/ in the blanket. Power conversion efficiency is 55%. Net electric power is 815 MW/sub e/, produced with a net plant efficiency of 49%.

  4. Atomistic Simulation of Collision Cascades in Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2006-09-01

    Defect production in energetic collision cascades in zircon has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation using a partial charge model combined with the Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential. Energy dissipation, defect accumulation, Si-O-Si polymerization, and Zr coordination number were examined for 10 keV and 30 keV U recoils simulated in the constant NVE ensemble. For both energies an amorphous core was produced with features similar to that of melt quenched zircon. Disordered Si ions in this core were polymerized with an average degree of polymerization of 1.5, while disordered Zr ions showed a coordination number of about 6 in agreement with EXAFS results. These results suggest that nano-scale phase separation into silica- and zirconia-rich regions occurs in the amorphous core.

  5. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Along its Oregon segment, the Cascade Range is almost entirely volcanic in origin. The volcanoes and their eroded remnants are the visible magmatic expression of the Cascadia subduction zone, where the offshore Juan de Fuca tectonic plate is subducted beneath North America. Subduction occurs as two lithospheric plates collide, and an underthrusted oceanic plate is commonly dragged into the mantle by the pull of gravity, carrying ocean-bottom rock and sediment down to where heat and pressure expel water. As this water rises, it lowers the melting temperature in the overlying hot mantle rocks, thereby promoting melting. The molten rock supplies the volcanic arcs with heat and magma. Cascade Range volcanoes are part of the Ring of Fire, a popular term for the numerous volcanic arcs that encircle the Pacific Ocean.

  6. Bankruptcy Cascades in Interbank Markets

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, Gabriele; Mazloumian, Amin; Gallegati, Mauro; Helbing, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank’s liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable. PMID:23300760

  7. Cascade Chaotic System With Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yicong; Hua, Zhongyun; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-09-01

    Chaotic maps are widely used in different applications. Motivated by the cascade structure in electronic circuits, this paper introduces a general chaotic framework called the cascade chaotic system (CCS). Using two 1-D chaotic maps as seed maps, CCS is able to generate a huge number of new chaotic maps. Examples and evaluations show the CCS's robustness. Compared with corresponding seed maps, newly generated chaotic maps are more unpredictable and have better chaotic performance, more parameters, and complex chaotic properties. To investigate applications of CCS, we introduce a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a data encryption system using a chaotic map generated by CCS. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that the proposed PRNG has high quality of randomness and that the data encryption system is able to protect different types of data with a high-security level.

  8. Cascade model of coronal heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanballegooijen, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is suggested that the quasi-static evolution of coronal magnetic structures is characterized by a cascade of magnetic energy to smaller length scales. This cascade process takes place on a time scale t sub b determined entirely by the photospheric motions. The Ohmic heating rate E sub H in the statistically stationary state was estimated using observational data on the diffusivity of photospheric motions; E sub H turned out to be too small by a factor of 40 when compared with observed coronal energy losses. However, given the fact that the theoretical estimate is based on a rather uncertain extrapolation to the diffusive regime, current heating cannot be ruled out as a viable mechanism of coronal heating.

  9. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Gabriele; Mazloumian, Amin; Gallegati, Mauro; Helbing, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  10. An opening electromagnetic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanhua; Kang, Yihua

    2013-12-01

    Tubular solenoids have been widely used without any change since an electrical wire was discovered to create magnetic fields by Hans Christian Oersted in 1820 and thereby the wire was first coiled as a helix into a solenoid coil by William Sturgeon in 1823 and was improved by Joseph Henry in 1829 [see http://www.myetymology.com/encyclopedia/History_of_the_electricity.html; J. M. D. Coey, Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2010); and F. Winterberg, Plasma Phys. 8, 541553 (1996)]. A magnetic control method of C-shaped carrying-current wire is proposed, and thereby a new opening electromagnetic transducer evidently differing from the traditional tubular solenoid is created, capable of directly encircling and centering the acted objects in it, bringing about convenient and innovative electromagnetic energy conversion for electromagnetic heating, electromagnetic excitation, physical information capture, and electro-mechanical motion used in science research, industry, and even biomedical activities.

  11. Electromagnetic and Weak Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, A.; Ward, J. C.

    One of the recurrent dreams in elementary particles physics is that of a possible fundamental synthesis between electro-magnetism and weak interactions [1]. The idea has its origin in the following shared characteristics…

  12. Electromagnetism in the Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everitt, Lori R.; Patterson, Evelyn T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the authors used portions of popular movies to help students review concepts related to electromagnetism. Movies used and concepts covered in the review are listed, and a sample activity is described. (WRM)

  13. Electromagnetism in the Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everitt, Lori R.; Patterson, Evelyn T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the authors used portions of popular movies to help students review concepts related to electromagnetism. Movies used and concepts covered in the review are listed, and a sample activity is described. (WRM)

  14. Can 'Cascades' make guidelines global?

    PubMed

    Fried, Michael; Krabshuis, Justus

    2008-10-01

    Why are guidelines in medicine so important today? What role do they have? Why and how did the World Gastroenterology Organization (WGO) choose a global focus? What does this mean for guidelines? These are the underlying questions addressed by our article. We argue that the addition of 'Cascades' to guidelines will increase their impact in large parts of the world. By so doing, we hope to add a new dimension to the 'knowledge into action' debate. A number of illustrations shows how raised expectations and resource restrictions pose - or should pose - an enormous challenge for guideline makers. Furthermore, the emphasis on evidence also creates problems for guideline making. If resources are limited it is unlikely gold-standard technologies are available. We believe Cascades can help. A Cascade is a selection of two or more hierarchical diagnostic or therapeutic options, based on proven medical procedures, methods, tools or products for the same disease, condition or diagnosis, aiming to achieve the same outcome and ranked by available resources. The construction of such a cascade is a hazardous intellectual journey that goes, to some extent, against established practice. But lives can be saved by matching options for diagnosis and treatment to available resources. While the optimal strategy, defined through an evidence-based approach, should always be the goal, one must be aware of the resource limitations that confront our colleagues in certain parts of the world and we should endeavour to work with them in the guideline development process to develop strategies that are clinically sound yet economically feasible and dacceptable to their populace.

  15. Lens Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade (QC) devices are disclosed that can operate, e.g., in a range of about 1 THz to about 10 THz. In some embodiments, QC lasers are disclosed in which an optical element (e.g., a lens) is coupled to an output facet of the laser's active region to enhance coupling of the lasing radiation from the active region to an external environment. In other embodiments, terahertz amplifier and tunable terahertz QC lasers are disclosed.

  16. Dynamics robustness of cascading systems

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    A most important property of biochemical systems is robustness. Static robustness, e.g., homeostasis, is the insensitivity of a state against perturbations, whereas dynamics robustness, e.g., homeorhesis, is the insensitivity of a dynamic process. In contrast to the extensively studied static robustness, dynamics robustness, i.e., how a system creates an invariant temporal profile against perturbations, is little explored despite transient dynamics being crucial for cellular fates and are reported to be robust experimentally. For example, the duration of a stimulus elicits different phenotypic responses, and signaling networks process and encode temporal information. Hence, robustness in time courses will be necessary for functional biochemical networks. Based on dynamical systems theory, we uncovered a general mechanism to achieve dynamics robustness. Using a three-stage linear signaling cascade as an example, we found that the temporal profiles and response duration post-stimulus is robust to perturbations against certain parameters. Then analyzing the linearized model, we elucidated the criteria of when signaling cascades will display dynamics robustness. We found that changes in the upstream modules are masked in the cascade, and that the response duration is mainly controlled by the rate-limiting module and organization of the cascade’s kinetics. Specifically, we found two necessary conditions for dynamics robustness in signaling cascades: 1) Constraint on the rate-limiting process: The phosphatase activity in the perturbed module is not the slowest. 2) Constraints on the initial conditions: The kinase activity needs to be fast enough such that each module is saturated even with fast phosphatase activity and upstream changes are attenuated. We discussed the relevance of such robustness to several biological examples and the validity of the above conditions therein. Given the applicability of dynamics robustness to a variety of systems, it will provide a

  17. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  18. Enantioselective organo-cascade catalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Walji, Abbas M; Larsen, Catharine H; MacMillan, David W C

    2005-11-02

    A new strategy for organocatalysis based on the biochemical blueprints of biosynthesis has enabled a new laboratory approach to cascade catalysis. Imidazolidinone-based catalytic cycles, involving iminium and enamine activation, have been successfully combined to allow a large diversity of nucleophiles (furans, thiophenes, indoles, butenolides, hydride sources, tertiary amino lactone equivalents) and electrophiles (fluorinating and chlorinating reagents) to undergo sequential addition with a wide array of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes. These new cascade catalysis protocols allow the invention of enantioselective transformations that were previously unknown, including the asymmetric catalytic addition of the elements of HF across a trisubstituted olefin. Importantly, these domino catalysis protocols can be mediated by a single imidazolidinone catalyst or using cycle-specific amine catalysts. In the latter case, cascade catalysis pathways can be readily modulated to provide a required diastereo- and enantioselective outcome via the judicious selection of the enantiomeric series of the amine catalysts. A central benefit of combining multiple asymmetric organocatalytic events into one sequence is the intrinsic requirement for enantioenrichment in the second induction cycle, as demonstrated by the enantioselectivities obtained throughout this study (>/=99% ee in all cases).

  19. Turbulence: Does Energy Cascade Exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josserand, Christophe; Le Berre, Martine; Lehner, Thierry; Pomeau, Yves

    2017-05-01

    To answer the question whether a cascade of energy exists or not in turbulence, we propose a set of correlation functions able to test if there is an irreversible transfert of energy, step by step, from large to small structures. These tests are applied to real Eulerian data of a turbulent velocity flow, taken in the wind grid tunnel of Modane, and also to a prototype model equation for wave turbulence. First we demonstrate the irreversible character of the flow by using multi-time correlation function at a given point of space. Moreover the unexpected behavior of the test function leads us to connect irreversibility and finite time singularities (intermittency). Secondly we show that turbulent cascade exists, and is a dynamical process, by using a test function depending on time and frequency. The cascade shows up only in the inertial domain where the kinetic energy is transferred more rapidly (on average) from the wavenumber k1 to k2 than from k1 to k'2 larger than k2.

  20. Demixing cascades in cluster crystals.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Nigel B; Sollich, Peter

    2014-09-07

    In a cluster crystal, each lattice site is occupied by multiple soft-core particles. As the number density is increased at zero temperature, a "cascade" of isostructural phase transitions can occur between states whose site occupancy differs by unity. For low but finite temperature, each of these transitions terminates in a critical point. Using tailored Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we have studied such demixing cascades in systems of soft particles interacting via potentials of the generalized exponential form u(r) = ε exp [-(r/σ)(n)]. We have estimated the critical parameters of the first few transitions in the cascade as a function of the softness parameter n. The critical temperature and pressure exhibit non-monotonic behavior as n is varied, although the critical chemical potential remains monotonic. The trends for the pressure and chemical potential are confirmed by cell model calculations at zero temperature. As n → 2(+), all the transitions that we have observed are preempted by melting although we cannot rule out that clustering transitions survive at high density.

  1. Covariant electromagnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Y.; Cohen, E.; Kaminer, I.; Elitzur, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    Faraday introduced electric field lines as a powerful tool for understanding the electric force, and these field lines are still used today in classrooms and textbooks teaching the basics of electromagnetism within the electrostatic limit. However, despite attempts at generalizing this concept beyond the electrostatic limit, such a fully relativistic field line theory still appears to be missing. In this work, we propose such a theory and define covariant electromagnetic field lines that naturally extend electric field lines to relativistic systems and general electromagnetic fields. We derive a closed-form formula for the field lines curvature in the vicinity of a charge, and show that it is related to the world line of the charge. This demonstrates how the kinematics of a charge can be derived from the geometry of the electromagnetic field lines. Such a theory may also provide new tools in modeling and analyzing electromagnetic phenomena, and may entail new insights regarding long-standing problems such as radiation-reaction and self-force. In particular, the electromagnetic field lines curvature has the attractive property of being non-singular everywhere, thus eliminating all self-field singularities without using renormalization techniques.

  2. Bioelectromagnetic effects of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, E.L.; Vault, W.L.

    1990-03-01

    The public has expressed concern about the biological effects and hazards of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields produced by the electro-magnetic pulse (EMP) simulators that simulate the EMP emanating from a high-altitude nuclear explosion. This paper provides a summary of the bioelectromagnetic effects literature up through the present, describes current occupational standards for workers exposed to the EMP environment, and discusses the use of medical surveillance as it relates to the potential human health hazards associated with exposure to the EMP environment.

  3. Electromagnetic or other directed energy pulse launcher

    DOEpatents

    Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    The physical realization of new solutions of wave propagation equations, such as Maxwell's equations and the scaler wave equation, produces localized pulses of wave energy such as electromagnetic or acoustic energy which propagate over long distances without divergence. The pulses are produced by driving each element of an array of radiating sources with a particular drive function so that the resultant localized packet of energy closely approximates the exact solutions and behaves the same.

  4. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  5. Electromagnetic therapy for treating pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Olyaee Manesh, A; Flemming, K; Cullum, N A; Ravaghi, H

    2006-04-19

    Pressure ulcers are defined as areas "of localized damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, shear, friction and/or the combination of these". In the UK, pressure ulcers occur in 5 to 32% of District General Hospitals people and in 4 to 7% of people in community settings. Electromagnetic therapy, in which electrodes produce an electromagnetic field across the wound, may improve healing of chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. To assess the effects of electromagnetic therapy on the healing of pressure ulcers. For this first update, we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (last searched October 2005); CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 4); MEDLINE (1966 to October 2005); EMBASE (1980 to October 2005); and CINAHL (1982 to October 2005). Randomised controlled trials comparing electromagnetic therapy with sham electromagnetic therapy, or other (standard) treatment. For this first update, two authors independently scrutinized the results of the search to identify relevant RCTs and obtained full reports of potentially eligible studies. For the original review, details of eligible studies were extracted and summarised using a data extraction sheet. Attempts were made to obtain missing data by contacting authors. Data extraction was checked by a second author. Meta-analysis was applied to combine the results of trials when the interventions and outcome measures were sufficiently similar. This update identified no new trials. Two RCTs were identified for inclusion in the original review (total of 60 participants). One was a three-armed study comparing electromagnetic therapy with electromagnetic therapy in combination with standard therapy, and with standard therapy alone, on 17 female and 13 male with grade II and III pressure ulcers. The other study compared electromagnetic therapy with sham therapy in 30 male participants with a spinal cord injury and a grade II or grade III pressure ulcer.Neither study found a statistically

  6. Photodetector with photothermal cascaded Fabry-Perot etalons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, George Y.; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Xiaokong; Lancaster, David G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Xu, Haolan

    2017-04-01

    A new type of photodetector with an optical sensor is presented, which enables it to operate even in the presence of strong electro-magnetic interference. The optical sensor head consists of cascaded Fabry-Perot etalons coated with a new type of photo-thermal coating comprising of hydrogel-embedded copper-oxide micro-particles. For white-light irradiation, the photodetector exhibits a power sensitivity of 760 pm/mW, a detection limit of 16.4 μW, and an optical damage threshold of 100 mW or 800 mW/cm2. The response and recovery times are 3.0 s ( 90% of change within 100 ms) and 16.0 s.

  7. Electromagnetic Counterparts of Gravitational Wave Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchesi, Marica

    2015-03-01

    In the near future the ground-based gravitational wave detectors will reach sensitivities that should make it possible for the first time to directly observe gravitational waves. The simultaneous availability of gravitational wave detectors observing together with space and ground-based electromagnetic telescopes will offer a great opportunity to explore the Universe in a new multi-messenger perspective. Promising sources of gravitational waves are the most energetic astrophysical events such as the merger of neutron stars and/or stellar-mass black holes and the core collapse of massive stars. These events are believed to produce electromagnetic transients in the sky, like gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. An overview of the expected electromagnetic counterparts of the gravitational wave sources is presented, focusing on the challenges, opportunities and strategies for starting transient gravitational wave astronomy.

  8. Apparatus for processing electromagnetic radiation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Measuring apparatus including a ruled member having alternate transparent and opaque zones. An optical coupler connecting the ruled member with electromagnetic radiation-conversion apparatus. The conversion apparatus may include a photomultiplier and a discriminator. Radiation impinging on the ruled member will, in part, be converted to electrical pulses which correspond to the intensity of the radiation. A method of processing electromagnetic radiation includes providing a member having alternating dark and light zones, establishing movement of the member through the beam of electromagnetic radiation with the dark zones interrupting passage of radiation through the rule, providing an optical coupler to connect a portion of the radiation with a conversion station where the radiation portion is converted into an electrical pulse which is related to the intensity of the radiation received at the conversion station. The electrical pulses may be counted and the digitized signals stored or permanently recorded to produce positional information.

  9. Geothermal resource potential of Cascade volcanic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.

    1987-08-01

    The central and southern cascade volcanic arc has the following features that suggest a high potential for geothermal resources: (1) extensive Quaternary volcanism with some silicic to intermediate volcanoes, (2) hundreds of square kilometers with regional background heat flow in excess of 100 mW/m/sup 2/, (3) shallow (4-9 km) calculated depth to Curie point in the same areas that have heat flow in excess of 100 mW/m/sup 2/, (4) a thick pile of volcanic rock with moderate to low thermal conductivity, (5) hot springs with minimum reservoir temperatures of 174/sup 0/-186/sup 0/C (from the anhydrite geothermometer of Mariner, 1985), and (6) fault zones for fracture permeability. These features are the result of interactions between the North American plate (NAP), the Pacific plate (PP), and the subducted Gorda, Juan de Fuca, and Explorer plates (GJEP). Interactions between the NAP and the PP produce north-south compression and east-west extension, causing extensive development of north-south normal faults and partial melting episodes in upper mantle. Northeast-southwest convergence between the NAP and the GJEP produce subduction-related magmas and crustal deformation from northeast-southwest compression. NAP-GJEP interactions dominate in the northern part of the arc, whereas NAP-PP and NAP-GJEP interactions have combined in the central and southern part of the arc to produce rates of magmatism and heat flow higher than in the north.

  10. Very high energy gamma rays from active galactic nuclei: Cascading on the cosmic background radiation fields and the formation of pair halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, F. A.; Coppi, P. S.; Voelk, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent high-energy gamma-ray observations (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 MeV) of blazar Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) show emission spectra with no clear upper energy cutoff. AGNs, considered to be possible sources for the observed flux of cosmic rays beyond 10(exp 19) eV, may well have emission extending into the very high energy (VHE), (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV) domain. Because VHE gamma-rays are absorbed by pair production on the intergalactic background radiation fields, much of this emission may not be directly visible. The electromagnetic cascades initiated by absorbed VHE gamma-rays, however, may be observable. Since, most probably, the velocities of (e(+), e(-)) pairs produced in a cascade are quickly isotropized by an ambient random magnetic field, extended 'halos' (R greater than 1 Mpc) of pairs will be formed around AGNs with VHE emission. The cascade radiation from these pair halos is emitted isotropically and should be observable at energies below a few TeV. The halo radiation can be distinguished by its characteristic variation in spectrum and intensity with angular distance from the central source. This variation depends weakly on the details of the central source model, e.g., the orientation and beaming/opening angle of an emitting jet. Limiting or determining the intensity of the pair halo can thus serve as a model-independent bound on or measure of the VHE power of AGNs. Next-generation Cherenkov telescopes may be able to image a pair halo.

  11. 2s photoionization and subsequent Auger cascade in atomic Si

    SciTech Connect

    Partanen, L.; Fritzsche, S.; Jaenkaelae, K.; Huttula, M.; Osmekhin, S.; Aksela, H.; Aksela, S.; Urpelainen, S.

    2010-06-15

    The 2s photoionization and subsequent Auger transition cascade in atomic Si were studied by means of synchrotron-radiation-induced electron spectroscopy. After the 2s photoionization, the core hole states decay predominantly by a two-step Auger transition cascade into the triply ionized [Ne]nl states. The ionization channels of the 2s core-ionized Si{sup +} atoms to Si{sup 3+} ions were observed by measuring the conventional Auger electron spectra of the L{sub 1}-L{sub 2,3}M Coster-Kronig transitions and the L{sub 2,3}M-MMM Auger transitions. The observed L{sub 1}-L{sub 2,3}M and L{sub 2,3}M-MMM Auger spectra were analyzed by means of extensive multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock computations. We found that the electron correlation plays a prominent role in the Auger cascade, especially for the final-step Auger L{sub 2,3}M-MMM spectrum. Additionally, it was seen that the L{sub 2,3}M-MMM Auger spectrum of Si includes more Auger groups than the isoelectronic L{sub 2,3}-MM Auger spectrum of Al. Thus, more information on the intermediate ionic states is obtained if they are produced by Auger cascade rather than by direct photoionization.

  12. Resonantly excited cascade x-ray emission from La

    SciTech Connect

    Moewes, A.; Wilks, R.G.; Kochur, A.G.; Kurmaev, E.Z.

    2005-08-15

    We are monitoring the intensity of the La 5p-4d emission for La metal while scanning across the deeper lying 3d-4f photoexcitation resonances of the same atom. A strong resonant enhancement in the integral intensity of the La 5p-4d fluorescence emission is observed, which is due to cascading decay of the resonantly excited 3d{sup 9}4f{sup +1} configuration. The corresponding emission spectrum features a complex satellite structure reflecting the multitude of transitions taking place in a variety of multi-vacancy configurations created by the cascade. We calculate the probability of 5p{yields}4d emission produced by the cascading decay and then take into account self-absorption of the emitted photons. This model provides good agreement with the experimental results. The number of 4d vacancies increases immensely due to electronic cascades. We also observe an enhanced integral intensity in the 5p-4d fluorescence compared to our calculations, which we attribute to intra-atomic resonance processes.

  13. Cascade excitation in the geocoronal hydrogen Balmer α line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S.; Roesler, F. L.; Coakley, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports high-accuracy measurements of geocoronal Balmer α line profiles and demonstrates that the profiles are well fit with a model which includes cascade excitation by solar Lyman series radiation from n>3 in addition to the direct excitation of n=3 by solar Lyman β. The increase in the signal-to-noise of our data is made possible by the use of the Fabry-Perot annular summing technique implemented at our Fabry-Perot facility at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory. The new sensitivity has allowed us to make a detailed examination of line profile asymmetries and to conclude that they are compatible with predictions that of the order of 10% of the geocoronal Balmer α emission is caused by the cascade process. Cascade excitation alters the observed profile because it produces Balmer α emission along fine structure paths yielding slightly shifted wavelengths not present in direct Lyman β excitation, which is the predominant excitation mechanism for geocoronal Balmer α. We discuss how fine structure excitation affects studies of non-Maxwellian exospheric hydrogen velocity distributions and effective temperatures through Balmer α line profile measurements. In a broader context, we consider how inclusion of the cascade excited emission in future radiation models can enhance their accuracy and their potential for assisting in the isolation in the data of shorter-term solar geophysical effects and longer timescale changes in exospheric hydrogen densities.

  14. Cascade: an RNA-seq visualization tool for cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Shifman, Aaron R; Johnson, Radia M; Wilhelm, Brian T

    2016-01-25

    Cancer genomics projects are producing ever-increasing amounts of rich and diverse data from patient samples. The ability to easily visualize this data in an integrated an intuitive way is currently limited by the current software available. As a result, users typically must use several different tools to view the different data types for their cohort, making it difficult to have a simple unified view of their data. Here we present Cascade, a novel web based tool for the intuitive 3D visualization of RNA-seq data from cancer genomics experiments. The Cascade viewer allows multiple data types (e.g. mutation, gene expression, alternative splicing frequency) to be simultaneously displayed, allowing a simplified view of the data in a way that is tuneable based on user specified parameters. The main webpage of Cascade provides a primary view of user data which is overlaid onto known biological pathways that are either predefined or added by users. A space-saving menu for data selection and parameter adjustment allows users to access an underlying MySQL database and customize the features presented in the main view. There is currently a pressing need for new software tools to allow researchers to easily explore large cancer genomics datasets and generate hypotheses. Cascade represents a simple yet intuitive interface for data visualization that is both scalable and customizable.

  15. Cascade frequency generation regime in an optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, D B; Dmitriev, Aleksandr K; Gorelik, P; Vong, Franko; Zondy, J J

    2009-05-31

    In a parametric oscillator of a special two-sectional design based on a lithium niobate periodic structure, a cascade frequency generation regime was observed in which a signal wave pumped a secondary parametric oscillator, producing secondary signal and idler waves. The secondary parametric oscillator can be tuned in a broad range of {approx}200 nm with respect to a fixed wavelength of the primary idler wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  16. A Terahertz VRT spectrometer employing quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, William T. S.; Hlavacek, Nik C.; Lee, Alan W. M.; Kao, Tsung-Yu; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-10-01

    The first application of a commercial Terahertz quantum cascade laser (QCL) system for high resolution spectroscopy of supersonic beams is presented. The QCLs exhibited continuous linear voltage tuning over a 2 GHz range about a center frequency of 3.762 THz with ∼1 ppm resolution. A sensitivity of ∼1 ppm fractional absorption was measured with a single pass optical system. Multipass operation at the quantum noise limit of the stressed photoconductor detector would produce a 100-fold improvement.

  17. Cascade upgrading of γ-valerolactone to biofuels.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Lafleur, Todd; Wu, Xu; Chai, Jiajue; Wu, Guosheng; Xie, Xianmei

    2015-04-25

    Cascade upgrading of γ-valerolactone (GVL), produced from renewable cellulosic biomass, with selective conversion to biofuels pentyl valerate (PV) and pentane in one pot using a bifunctional Pd/HY catalyst is described. Excellent catalytic performance (over 99% conversion of GVL, 60.6% yield of PV and 22.9% yield of pentane) was achieved in one step. These biofuels can be targeted for gasoline and jet fuel applications.

  18. Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the

  19. Effects of in-cascade defect clustering on near-term defect evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1997-08-01

    The effects of in-cascade defect clustering on the nature of the subsequent defect population are being studied using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the simulations illustrates the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent defect evolution. The large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades have been shown to be significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution. In recent work, the effects of initial cluster sizes appear to be extremely important.

  20. Cascade defense via routing in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Lan; Du, Wen-Bo; Hong, Chen

    2015-05-01

    As the cascading failures in networked traffic systems are becoming more and more serious, research on cascade defense in complex networks has become a hotspot in recent years. In this paper, we propose a traffic-based cascading failure model, in which each packet in the network has its own source and destination. When cascade is triggered, packets will be redistributed according to a given routing strategy. Here, a global hybrid (GH) routing strategy, which uses the dynamic information of the queue length and the static information of nodes' degree, is proposed to defense the network cascade. Comparing GH strategy with the shortest path (SP) routing, efficient routing (ER) and global dynamic (GD) routing strategies, we found that GH strategy is more effective than other routing strategies in improving the network robustness against cascading failures. Our work provides insight into the robustness of networked traffic systems.

  1. In-situ studies of cascade defect formation at T < 10/sup 0/K

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, K.; Baily, A.C.; King, W.E.; Merkle, K.L.; Meshii, M.

    1983-05-01

    Thin films of Ag and Au were ion-irradiated at temperature (T) < 10/sup 0/K and simultaneously observed using the Argonne National Laboratory high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) ion-beam interface system. Displacement cascades were produced by Kr/sup +/ ion bombardment in the energy range 20 to 140 keV. For Ag, 20% of the 20-keV cascades and 100% of the 100-keV cascades produced observable contrast. Analysis of the observed dynamical black-white (BW)-contrast indicates that the clusters are of vacancy type. Subcascades were observed in the high-energy irradiations. The present results demonstrate that, during the evolution of displacement cascades in Ag and Au, extensive athermal rearrangement of vacancies occurs which gives rise to clustering and collapse to dislocation loops.

  2. Cascade photo production at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, John; Hicks, Kenneth H.

    2014-09-01

    The famous discovery of the Omega in 1964 put the quark model on firm ground and since then a lot of effort has been spent on mapping out the baryonic and mesonic states. Over the following decades, many excited baryons with light quarks (up, down and strange) have been measured, but by most predictions, only a small percentage of those expected have been found. In this talk, I will discuss a newly developing technique using an (unflavored) photon beam to excite protons to doubly-strange "Cascade" (Xi) states. Advantages of such an experiment and associated difficulties will be presented, along with recent results from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab in Virginia.

  3. Orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, JP; Leonard, CS

    2014-01-01

    Orexin (hypocretin) peptides and their two known G-protein-coupled receptors play essential roles in sleep–wake control and powerfully influence other systems regulating appetite/metabolism, stress and reward. Consequently, drugs that influence signalling by these receptors may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treating sleep disorders, obesity and addiction. It is therefore critical to understand how these receptors operate, the nature of the signalling cascades they engage and their physiological targets. In this review, we evaluate what is currently known about orexin receptor signalling cascades, while a sister review (Leonard & Kukkonen, this issue) focuses on tissue-specific responses. The evidence suggests that orexin receptor signalling is multifaceted and is substantially more diverse than originally thought. Indeed, orexin receptors are able to couple to members of at least three G-protein families and possibly other proteins, through which they regulate non-selective cation channels, phospholipases, adenylyl cyclase, and protein and lipid kinases. In the central nervous system, orexin receptors produce neuroexcitation by postsynaptic depolarization via activation of non-selective cation channels, inhibition of K+ channels and activation of Na+/Ca2+ exchange, but they also can stimulate the release of neurotransmitters by presynaptic actions and modulate synaptic plasticity. Ca2+ signalling is also prominently influenced by these receptors, both via the classical phospholipase C−Ca2+ release pathway and via Ca2+ influx, mediated by several pathways. Upon longer-lasting stimulation, plastic effects are observed in some cell types, while others, especially cancer cells, are stimulated to die. Thus, orexin receptor signals appear highly tunable, depending on the milieu in which they are operating. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  4. Orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling cascades.

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, J P; Leonard, C S

    2014-01-01

    Orexin (hypocretin) peptides and their two known G-protein-coupled receptors play essential roles in sleep-wake control and powerfully influence other systems regulating appetite/metabolism, stress and reward. Consequently, drugs that influence signalling by these receptors may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treating sleep disorders, obesity and addiction. It is therefore critical to understand how these receptors operate, the nature of the signalling cascades they engage and their physiological targets. In this review, we evaluate what is currently known about orexin receptor signalling cascades, while a sister review (Leonard & Kukkonen, this issue) focuses on tissue-specific responses. The evidence suggests that orexin receptor signalling is multifaceted and is substantially more diverse than originally thought. Indeed, orexin receptors are able to couple to members of at least three G-protein families and possibly other proteins, through which they regulate non-selective cation channels, phospholipases, adenylyl cyclase, and protein and lipid kinases. In the central nervous system, orexin receptors produce neuroexcitation by postsynaptic depolarization via activation of non-selective cation channels, inhibition of K⁺ channels and activation of Na⁺/Ca²⁺ exchange, but they also can stimulate the release of neurotransmitters by presynaptic actions and modulate synaptic plasticity. Ca²⁺ signalling is also prominently influenced by these receptors, both via the classical phospholipase C-Ca²⁺ release pathway and via Ca²⁺ influx, mediated by several pathways. Upon longer-lasting stimulation, plastic effects are observed in some cell types, while others, especially cancer cells, are stimulated to die. Thus, orexin receptor signals appear highly tunable, depending on the milieu in which they are operating.

  5. Flat Plate Cascades at Supersonic Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El Badrawy, Rashad M

    1956-01-01

    A brief review of exact two-dimensional supersonic flow theory and Ackeret's linearized theory are first presented. The lift and drag coefficients of a cascade of flat plates are calculated exactly and compared to those obtained using the linearized theory. The forces on the cascade are determined for unsteady inlet flow. The flat plate cascade theory is extended to compute the efficiency of a supersonic propeller with friction and finite blade thickness.

  6. Cascades on clique-based graphs.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Adam; Gleeson, James P

    2013-06-01

    We present an analytical approach to determining the expected cascade size in a broad range of dynamical models on the class of highly clustered random graphs introduced by Gleeson [J. P. Gleeson, Phys. Rev. E 80, 036107 (2009)]. A condition for the existence of global cascades is also derived. Applications of this approach include analyses of percolation, and Watts's model. We show how our techniques can be used to study the effects of in-group bias in cascades on social networks.

  7. Hydraulic machine with non-uniform cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haluza, M.; Pochylý, F.; Habán, V.

    2012-11-01

    In this article is introduced the sentence of an extension of operational zone of hydraulic machines. The problems of its extending is based on the design of non-uniform cascade. The non-uniform cascade is connected with other factors. The change of own frequency of the runner of a hydraulic machine and pressure pulsations. The suitable construction of non-uniform cascade is introduced on the results of computational simulation and experiment.

  8. Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers.

    PubMed

    Watts, Claire M; Liu, Xianliang; Padilla, Willie J

    2012-06-19

    The advent of negative index materials has spawned extensive research into metamaterials over the past decade. Metamaterials are attractive not only for their exotic electromagnetic properties, but also their promise for applications. A particular branch-the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA)-has garnered interest due to the fact that it can achieve unity absorptivity of electromagnetic waves. Since its first experimental demonstration in 2008, the MPA has progressed significantly with designs shown across the electromagnetic spectrum, from microwave to optical. In this Progress Report we give an overview of the field and discuss a selection of examples and related applications. The ability of the MPA to exhibit extreme performance flexibility will be discussed and the theory underlying their operation and limitations will be established. Insight is given into what we can expect from this rapidly expanding field and future challenges will be addressed.

  9. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  10. Electromagnetic properties of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Ledwig, T.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Martin-Camalich, J.

    2011-10-21

    We discuss the chiral behavior of the nucleon and {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic properties within the framework of a SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. Our one-loop calculation is complete to the order p{sup 3} and p{sup 4}/{Delta} with {Delta} as the {Delta}(1232)-nucleon energy gap. We show that the magnetic moment of a resonance can be defined by the linear energy shift only when an additional relation between the involved masses and the applied magnetic field strength is fulfilled. Singularities and cusps in the pion mass dependence of the {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic moments reflect a non-fulfillment. We show results for the pion mass dependence of the nucleon iso-vector electromagnetic quantities and present preliminary results for finite volume effects on the iso-vector anomalous magnetic moment.

  11. Electromagnetic particle simulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Electromagnetic particle simulations solve the full set of Maxwell's equations. They thus include the effects of self-consistent electric and magnetic fields, magnetic induction, and electromagnetic radiation. The algorithms for an electromagnetic code which works directly with the electric and magnetic fields are described. The fields and current are separated into transverse and longitudinal components. The transverse E and B fields are integrated in time using a leapfrog scheme applied to the Fourier components. The particle pushing is performed via the relativistic Lorentz force equation for the particle momentum. As an example, simulation results are presented for the electron cyclotron maser instability which illustrate the importance of relativistic effects on the wave-particle resonance condition and on wave dispersion.

  12. Advanced Fast 3D Electromagnetic Solver for Microwave Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Nikolai; Kim, Bo-Ra; Lee, Kwang-Jae; Jeon, Soon-Ik; Son, Seong-Ho

    2017-06-07

    This paper describes a fast forward electromagnetic solver (FFS) for the image reconstruction algorithm of our microwave tomography (MT) system. Our apparatus is a preclinical prototype of a biomedical imaging system, designed for the purpose of early breast cancer detection. It operates in the 3-6 GHz frequency band using a circular array of probe antennas immersed in a matching liquid; it produces image reconstructions of the permittivity and conductivity profiles of the breast under examination. Our reconstruction algorithm solves the electromagnetic inverse problem and takes into account the real electromagnetic properties of the probe antenna array as well as the influence of the patient's body and that of the upper metal screen sheet. This FFS algorithm is much faster than conventional electromagnetic simulation solvers. In comparison, in the same PC, the CST solver takes ~45 min, while the FFS takes ~1 s of effective simulation time for the same electromagnetic model of a numerical breast phantom.

  13. Seismic electromagnetic study in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Seismo-electromagnetism is becoming a hot interdisciplinary study in both geosciences and electromagnetism. Numerous electromagnetic changes at a broad range of frequencies associated with earthquakes have been reported independently. There are some attempts of applying such electromagnetic data to short-term earthquake prediction. Although due to the complexity of seismogenic process and underground structure, the seismic electromagnetic phenomena cannot be fully understood, the seismic electromagnetic study plays a key role in the mitigation of seismic hazard. China is one of the countries which have the earliest reports on seismo-electromagnetic phenomena. The seismic electromagnetic study in China started in late 1960's. There are almost 50 years continuous observation data up to now, which provides a unique database for seismo-electromagnetic study not only in China, but also in the world. Therefore, seismo-electromagnetic study in China is interested broadly by international communities of geosciences and electromagnetism. I present here a brief review on seismic electromagnetic study in China, especially focusing on geo-electromagnetic observation and empirical prediction based on the observation data. After summarizing various electromagnetic observations such as apparent resistivity, geoelectric potential, geomagnetic field, electromagnetic disturbance, and so on, I show the cases of the empirical prediction based on the observed electromagnetic data associated with some earthquakes in China. Finally, based on the above review, I propose an integrated research scheme of earthquake-related electromagnetic phenomena, which includes the interaction between appropriate observations, robust methodology of data processing, and theoretical model analysis. This study is supported partially by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41274075) and the National Basic Research Program of China (2014CB845903).

  14. Study on the electromagnetic radiation characteristics of discharging excimer laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Duliang; Liang, Xu; Fang, Xiaodong; Wang, Qingsheng

    2016-10-01

    Excimer laser in condition of high voltage, large current and fast discharge will produce strong electromagnetic pulse radiation and electromagnetic interference on the around electrical equipment. The research on characteristics and distribution of excimer laser electromagnetic radiation could provide important basis for electromagnetic shielding and suppressing electromagnetic interference, and further improving the electromagnetic compatibility of system. Firstly, electromagnetic radiation source is analyzed according to the working principle of excimer laser. The key test points of the electromagnetic radiation, hydrogen thyratron, main discharge circuit and laser outlet, are determined by the mechanical structure and the theory of electromagnetic radiation. Secondly, characteristics of electromagnetic field were tested using a near field probe on the key positions of the vertical direction at 20, 50, and 80 cm, respectively. The main radiation frequencies and the radiation field characteristics in the near field are obtained. The experimental results show that the main radiation frequencies distribute in 47, 65, and 130 MHz for electric field and the main radiation frequencies distribute in 34, 100, and 165 MHz for magnetic field. The intensity of electromagnetic field decreases rapidly with the increase of test distance. The higher the frequency increases, the faster the amplitude attenuate. Finally, several electromagnetic interference suppression measurement methods are proposed from the perspective of electromagnetic compatibility according to the test results.

  15. WHISTLER TURBULENCE FORWARD CASCADE VERSUS INVERSE CASCADE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ouliang; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph E-mail: pgary@lanl.gov

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta β {sub e} = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  16. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  17. Tri-bimaximal Mixing from Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryo

    2008-11-23

    We investigate fermion mass matrices of the cascade form which lead to the tri-bimaximal mixing in the lepton sector. The cascade neutrino matrix predicts a parameter-independent relation among the observables, which are the neutrino mixing angles and mass squared differences. The relation predicts that the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle is close to maximal. We also study phenomenological aspect of the cascade form in supersymmetric theory, which are lepton flavor violation and thermal leptogenesis. A dynamical realivation of the cascade mass matrix are also presented in U(1) flavor theory.

  18. Dynamics of cavitating cascades and inducer pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Report chronicles advances in understanding and predicting unsteady dynamic characteristics of cavitating cascades and inducer pumps. It includes bibliography of 19 papers authored between 1972 and 1980.

  19. Method of independently operating a group of stages within a diffusion cascade

    DOEpatents

    Benedict, Manson; Fruit, Allen J.; Levey, Horace B.

    1976-06-08

    1. A method of operating a group of the diffusion stages of a productive diffusion cascade with countercurrent flow, said group comprising a top and a bottom stage, which comprises isolating said group from said cascade, circulating the diffused gas produced in said top stage to the feed of said bottom stage while at the same time circulating the undiffused gas from said bottom stage to the feed of said top stage whereby major changes in

  20. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations

  1. ASTROPHYSICAL GYROKINETICS: KINETIC AND FLUID TURBULENT CASCADES IN MAGNETIZED WEAKLY COLLISIONAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Tatsuno, T.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulent motions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the 'inertial range' above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-field-strength fluctuations. The former are governed by the reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations

  2. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.

  3. Improved Electromagnetic Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Toby B.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed design for an electromagnetic brake would increase the reliability while reducing the number of parts and the weight, relative to a prior commercially available electromagnetic brake. The reductions of weight and the number of parts could also lead to a reduction of cost. A description of the commercial brake is prerequisite to a description of the proposed electromagnetic brake. The commercial brake (see upper part of figure) includes (1) a permanent magnet and an electromagnet coil on a stator and (2) a rotor that includes a steel contact plate mounted, with tension spring loading, on an aluminum hub. The stator is mounted securely on a stationary object, which would ordinarily be the housing of a gear drive or a motor. The rotor is mounted on the shaft of the gear drive or motor. The commercial brake nominally operates in a fail-safe (in the sense of normally braking) mode: In the absence of current in the electromagnet coil, the permanent magnet pulls the contact plate, against the spring tension, into contact with the stator. To release the brake, one excites the electromagnet with a current of the magnitude and polarity chosen to cancel the magnetic flux of the permanent magnet, thereby enabling the spring tension to pull the contact plate out of contact with the stator. The fail-safe operation of the commercial brake depends on careful mounting of the rotor in relation to the stator. The rotor/stator gap must be set with a tolerance between 10 and 15 mils (between about 0.25 and about 0.38 mm). If the gap or the contact pad is thicker than the maximum allowable value, then the permanent magnetic field will not be strong enough to pull the steel plate across the gap. (For this reason, any contact pad between the contact plate and the stator must also be correspondingly thin.) If the gap exceeds the maximum allowable value because of shaft end play, it becomes impossible to set the brake by turning off the electromagnet current. Although it may

  4. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  5. Electromagnetic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

  6. Electromagnetic power absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R. S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A structure is presented with a surface portion of dielectric material which passes electromagnetic radiation and with a portion below the surface which includes material that absorbs the radiation, the face of the structure being formed with numerous steep ridges. The steepness of the dielectric material results in a high proportion of the electromagnetic energy passing through the surface for absorption by the absorbing material under the surface. A backing of aluminum or other highly heat-conductive and reflective material lies under the face and has very steep protuberances supporting the absorbing and dielectric materials.

  7. Quantum cascade lasers on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spott, Alexander; Peters, Jon; Davenport, Michael L.; Stanton, Eric J.; Zhang, Chong; Bewley, William W.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Kim, Chul Soo; Meyer, Jerry R.; Kirch, Jeremy; Mawst, Luke J.; Botez, Dan; Bowers, John E.

    2017-02-01

    Silicon integration of mid-infrared (MIR) photonic devices promises to enable low-cost, compact sensing and detection capabilities that are compatible with existing silicon photonic and silicon electronic technologies. Heterogeneous integration by bonding III-V wafers to silicon waveguides has been employed previously to build integrated diode lasers for wavelengths from 1310 to 2010 nm. Recently, Fabry-Perot Quantum Cascade Lasers integrated on silicon provided a 4800 nm light source for MIR silicon photonic applications. Distributed feedback (DFB) lasers are appealing for many high-sensitivity chemical spectroscopic sensing applications that require a single frequency, narrow-linewidth MIR source. While heterogeneously integrated 1550 nm DFB lasers have been demonstrated by introducing a shallow surface grating on a silicon waveguide within the active region, no mid-infrared DFB laser on silicon had previously been reported. Here we demonstrate quantum cascade DFB lasers heterogeneously integrated with silicon-on-nitride-oninsulator (SONOI) waveguides. These lasers emit over 200 mW of pulsed power at room temperature and operate up to 100 °C. Although the output is not single mode, the DFB grating nonetheless imposes wavelength selectivity with 22 nm of thermal tuning.

  8. Electromagnetic Transmission Through Resonant Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Steven M.

    Electromagnetic resonators store energy in the form of oscillatory electric and magnetic fields and gradually exchange that energy by coupling with their environment. This coupling process can have profound effects on the transmission and reflection properties of nearby interfaces, with rapid transitions from high transmittance to high reflectance over narrow frequency ranges, and has been exploited to design useful optical components such as spectral filters and dielectric mirrors. This dissertation includes analytic, numeric, and experimental investigations of three different electromagnetic resonators, each based on a different method of confining electromagnetic fields near the region of interest. First, we show that a structure with two parallel conducting plates, each containing a subwavelength slit, supports a localized resonant mode bound to the slits and therefore exhibits (in the absence of nonradiative losses), perfect resonant transmission over a narrow frequency range. In practice, the transmission is limited by conduction losses in the sidewalls; nevertheless, experimental results at 10 GHz show a narrowband transmission enhancement by a factor of 104 compared to the non-resonant transmission, with quality factor (ratio of frequency to peak width) Q ~ 3000. Second, we describe a narrowband transmission filter based on a single-layer dielectric grating. We use a group theory analysis to show that, due to their symmetry, several of the grating modes cannot couple to light at normal incidence, while several others have extremely large coupling. We then show how selectively breaking the system symmetry using off-normal light incidence can produce transmission peaks by enabling weak coupling to some of the previously protected modes. The narrowband filtering capabilities are validated by an experimental demonstration in the long wavelength infrared, showing transmission peaks of quality factor Q ~ 100 within a free-spectral range of 8-15 mum. Third, we

  9. Simulation Modeling of an Enhanced Low-Emission Swirl-Cascade Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2004-09-01

    ''Cascade-burners'' is a passive technique to control the stoichiometry of the flame through changing the flow dynamics and rates of mixing in the combustion zone with a set of venturis surrounding the flame. Cascade-burners have shown advantages over other techniques; its reliability, flexibility, safety, and cost makes it more attractive and desirable. On the other hand, the application of ''Swirl-burners'' has shown superiority in producing a stable flame under a variety of operating conditions and fuel types. The basic idea is to impart swirl to the air or fuel stream, or both. This not only helps to stabilize the flame but also enhances mixing in the combustion zone. As a result, nonpremixed (diffusion) swirl burners have been increasingly used in industrial combustion systems such as gas turbines, boilers, and furnaces, due to their advantages of safety and stability. Despite the advantages of cascade and swirl burners, both are passive control techniques, which resulted in a moderate pollutant emissions reduction compared to SCR, SNCR and FGR (active) methods. The present investigation will study the prospects of combining both techniques in what to be named as ''an enhanced swirl-cascade burner''. Natural gas jet diffusion flames in baseline, cascade, swirl, and swirl-cascade burners were numerically modeled using CFDRC package. The thermal, composition, and flow (velocity) fields were simulated. The numerical results showed that swirl and cascade burners have a more efficient fuel/air mixing, a shorter flame, and a lower NOx emission levels, compared to the baseline case. The results also revealed that the optimal configurations of the cascaded and swirling flames have not produced an improved performance when combined together in a ''swirl-cascade burner''. The non-linearity and complexity of the system accounts for such a result, and therefore, all possible combinations, i.e. swirl numbers (SN) versus venturi diameter ratios (D/d), need to be considered.

  10. Astrophysical probes of electromagnetic neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, Carlo; Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Li, Yu-Feng; Lokhov, Alexey V.; Studenikin, Alexander I.; Zhou, Shun

    2017-09-01

    Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos and current best astrophysical bounds on neutrino magnetic moment and millicharge are outlined. Future probes of electromagnetic neutrinos from a core-collapse supernova with JUNO are discussed.

  11. Generalized Modeling of Enrichment Cascades That Include Minor Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Charles F

    2012-01-01

    The monitoring of enrichment operations may require innovative analysis to allow for imperfect or missing data. The presence of minor isotopes may help or hurt - they can complicate a calculation or provide additional data to corroborate a calculation. However, they must be considered in a rigorous analysis, especially in cases involving reuse. This study considers matched-abundanceratio cascades that involve at least three isotopes and allows generalized input that does not require all feed assays or the enrichment factor to be specified. Calculations are based on the equations developed for the MSTAR code but are generalized to allow input of various combinations of assays, flows, and other cascade properties. Traditional cascade models have required specification of the enrichment factor, all feed assays, and the product and waste assays of the primary enriched component. The calculation would then produce the numbers of stages in the enriching and stripping sections and the remaining assays in waste and product streams. In cases where the enrichment factor or feed assays were not known, analysis was difficult or impossible. However, if other quantities are known (e.g., additional assays in waste or product streams), a reliable calculation is still possible with the new code, but such nonstandard input may introduce additional numerical difficulties into the calculation. Thus, the minimum input requirements for a stable solution are discussed, and a sample problem with a non-unique solution is described. Both heuristic and mathematically required guidelines are given to assist the application of cascade modeling to situations involving such non-standard input. As a result, this work provides both a calculational tool and specific guidance for evaluation of enrichment cascades in which traditional input data are either flawed or unknown. It is useful for cases involving minor isotopes, especially if the minor isotope assays are desired (or required) to be

  12. Dual wavelength Q-switched cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Hu, Tomonori; Jackson, Stuart D

    2012-06-15

    A diode-cladding-pumped dual wavelength Q-switched Ho3+-doped fluoride cascade fiber laser operating in the mid-infrared is demonstrated. Stable pulse trains from the (5)I6 → (5)I7 and (5)I7 → (5)I8 laser transitions were produced, and the μs-level time delay between the pulses from each transition was dependent on the pump power. At maximum pump power and at an acousto-optic modulator repetition rate of 25 kHz, the (5)I6 → (5)I7 transition pulse operated at 3.005 μm, a pulse energy of 29 μJ, and a pulse width of 380 ns; the (5)I7 → (5)I8 transition pulse correspondingly produced 7 μJ pulse energy and 260 ns pulse width at 2.074 μm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a Q-switched fiber laser operating beyond 3 μm.

  13. Electromagnetic structure of light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, Saori

    Here, the present understanding of nuclear electromagnetic properties including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in nuclei with A ≤ 10 is reviewed. Emphasis is on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electromagnetic currents derived from a chiral effective field theory with pions and nucleons.

  14. Electromagnetic structure of light nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Pastore, Saori

    2016-03-25

    Here, the present understanding of nuclear electromagnetic properties including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in nuclei with A ≤ 10 is reviewed. Emphasis is on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electromagnetic currents derived from a chiral effective field theory with pions and nucleons.

  15. Weak and electromagnetic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    One of the recurrent dreams in elementary particle physics is that of a possible fundamental synthesis between electromagnetism and weak interaction. The idea has its origin in the following shared characteristics: 1. Both forces affect equally all forms of matter -leptons as well as hadrons. 2. Both are vector in character. 3. Both (individually) possess universal coupling strengths.

  16. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  17. "Hearing" Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojo, Marta; Munoz, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an educational experience is described in which a microwave communication link is used to make students aware that all electromagnetic waves have the same physical nature and properties. Experimental demonstrations are linked to theoretical concepts to increase comprehension of the physical principles underlying electromagnetic…

  18. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  19. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  20. "Hearing" Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojo, Marta; Munoz, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an educational experience is described in which a microwave communication link is used to make students aware that all electromagnetic waves have the same physical nature and properties. Experimental demonstrations are linked to theoretical concepts to increase comprehension of the physical principles underlying electromagnetic…

  1. Optical electromagnetic radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, W. J.; Ludman, J. E.

    1985-08-01

    An optical electromagnetic radiation detector is invented having a probe for receiving nearby electromagnetic radiation. The probe includes a loop antenna connected to a pair of transparent electrodes deposited on the end surfaces of an electro-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer. When the loop antenna picks up the presence of electromagnetic radiation, a voltage will be developed across the crystal of the electro-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer thereby changing the optical length of the interferometer. A beam of light from a remote location is transmitted through an optical fiber onto the Fabry-Perot interferometer. The change in optical length of the Fabry-Perot interferometer alters the intensity of the beam of light as its is reflected from the Fabry-Perot interferometer back through the optical fiber to the remote location. A beamsplitter directs this reflected beam of light onto an intensity detector in order to provide an output indicative of the variations in intensity. The variations in intensity are directly related to the strength of the electromagnetic radiation received by the loop antenna.

  2. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  3. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  4. Electromagnetic pulse bombs' defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Yongbin; Li, Juan; Wang, Jianzhong

    2007-11-01

    With the high power microwave devices development, the high power microwave electromagnetic pulse bombs (E-bombs) have become practical abroad. The development of conventional E-bombs devices allows their use in nonnuclear confrontations. E-bombs are powerful enough to damage communication, radar, navigation and computer systems. This paper discusses effects of EMP on electrical system and how to defend the EMP.

  5. Methodology of Blade Unsteady Pressure Measurement in the NASA Transonic Flutter Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; McFarland, E. R.; Capece, V. R.; Jett, T. A.; Senyitko, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this report the methodology adopted to measure unsteady pressures on blade surfaces in the NASA Transonic Flutter Cascade under conditions of simulated blade flutter is described. The previous work done in this cascade reported that the oscillating cascade produced waves, which for some interblade phase angles reflected off the wind tunnel walls back into the cascade, interfered with the cascade unsteady aerodynamics, and contaminated the acquired data. To alleviate the problems with data contamination due to the back wall interference, a method of influence coefficients was selected for the future unsteady work in this cascade. In this approach only one blade in the cascade is oscillated at a time. The majority of the report is concerned with the experimental technique used and the experimental data generated in the facility. The report presents a list of all test conditions for the small amplitude of blade oscillations, and shows examples of some of the results achieved. The report does not discuss data analysis procedures like ensemble averaging, frequency analysis, and unsteady blade loading diagrams reconstructed using the influence coefficient method. Finally, the report presents the lessons learned from this phase of the experimental effort, and suggests the improvements and directions of the experimental work for tests to be carried out for large oscillation amplitudes.

  6. Electromagnetic Signatures of SMBH Coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    When two supermassive black holes (SMBHs) approach within 1-10 mpc, gravitational wave (GW) losses begin to dominate the evolution of the binary, pushing the system to merge in a relatively small time. During this final inspiral regime, the system will emit copious energy in GWs, which should be directly detectable by pulsar timing arrays and space-based interferometers. At the same time, any gas or stars in the immediate vicinity of the merging 5MBHs can get heated and produce bright electromagnetic (EM) counterparts to the GW signals. We present here a number of possible mechanisms by which simultaneous EM and GW signals will yield valuable new information about galaxy evolution, accretion disk dynamics, and fundamental physics in the most extreme gravitational fields.

  7. Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    DeFord, J.F.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area is a focal point for computer modeling activities in electronics and electromagnetics in the Electronics Engineering Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Traditionally, they have focused their efforts in technical areas of importance to existing and developing LLNL programs, and this continues to form the basis for much of their research. A relatively new and increasingly important emphasis for the thrust area is the formation of partnerships with industry and the application of their simulation technology and expertise to the solution of problems faced by industry. The activities of the thrust area fall into three broad categories: (1) the development of theoretical and computational models of electronic and electromagnetic phenomena, (2) the development of useful and robust software tools based on these models, and (3) the application of these tools to programmatic and industrial problems. In FY-92, they worked on projects in all of the areas outlined above. The object of their work on numerical electromagnetic algorithms continues to be the improvement of time-domain algorithms for electromagnetic simulation on unstructured conforming grids. The thrust area is also investigating various technologies for conforming-grid mesh generation to simplify the application of their advanced field solvers to design problems involving complicated geometries. They are developing a major code suite based on the three-dimensional (3-D), conforming-grid, time-domain code DSI3D. They continue to maintain and distribute the 3-D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code TSAR, which is installed at several dozen university, government, and industry sites.

  8. Geothermal Resources of the Cascades: USGS Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guffanti, Marianne; Muffler, Patrick

    Since 1979, the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has carried out a multidisciplinary research effort in the Cascade Range. The goal of this effort is to understand the tectonics, geology, and hydrology of the Cascades as a framework for characterizing and quantifying its geothermal resources. In May 1985, 5 years after an initial USGS-sponsored Cascades conference [Bacon, 1980], the Geothermal Research Program again sponsored a workshop on geothermal resources of the Cascade Range. Motivation for the workshop came primarily from the conviction within the Geothermal Research Program that the Cascade effort had advanced sufficiently that a forum with an explicitly geothermal focus was needed to promote the synthesis of ideas from diverse research projects. In addition, it was thought that research drilling plans in the Cascades that were being formulated by various other agencies also could benefit from the examination and evaluation that a workshop would foster. Accordingly, the workshop was designed to develop a common understanding of the status of various investigations among USGS and other scientists working in the Cascades, to stimulate renewed interest in understanding the geothermal regime of this volcanic chain, and to encourage the tectonic, geologic, and hydrologic synthesis necessary for a quantitative assessment of geothermal resources of the Cascades, a major objective of the USGS Geothermal Research Program.

  9. Cascading disaster models in postburn flash flood

    Treesearch

    Fred May

    2007-01-01

    A useful method of modeling threats from hazards and documenting their disaster causation sequences is called “cascading threat modeling.” This type of modeling enables emergency planners to address hazard and risk assessments systematically. This paper describes a cascading threat modeling and analysis process. Wildfire and an associated postburn flash flood disaster...

  10. Cascading costs: an economic nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Moomaw, William R; Birch, Melissa B L

    2005-09-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrified to N(2). We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single ton of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade. Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a ton of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that ton would cascade. The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a ton of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  11. Cascading costs: an economic nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Moomaw, William R; Birch, Melissa B L

    2005-12-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrified to N2. We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single tonne of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade. Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a tonne of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that tonne would cascade. The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a tonne of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  12. The electromagnetic environment for the Space Shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, B. L.; Blount, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The electromagnetic environment of the Shuttle orbiter is discussed with respect to the electromagnetic compatibility of the orbiter and its cargo. Effects on payloads of the orbiter's Ku-band antenna are considered, along with the effects of unintentional emissions in the cargo bay, the magnetic fields produced by the orbiter and various payloads, lightning-produced magnetic fields, and noise and transients in the AC and DC power buses. Special EMI testing is described that was carried out to substantiate the orbiter's electromagnetic compatibility. It is concluded that the orbiter presents a very benign electromagnetic environment for cargo except for payloads or experiments that use very sensitive receivers or instruments that can measure low magnetic or electric fields.

  13. Scale-invariant cascades in turbulence and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttenberg, Nicholas Ryan

    In this dissertation, I present work addressing three systems which are traditionally considered to be unrelated: turbulence, evolution, and social organization. The commonality between these systems is that in each case, microscopic interaction rules give rise to an emergent behavior that in some way makes contact with the macroscopic scale of the problem. The open-ended evolution of complexity in evolving systems is analogous to the scale-free structure established in turbulent flows through local transportation of energy. In both cases, an invariance is required for the cascading behavior to occur, and in both cases the scale-free structure is built up from some initial scale from which the behavior is fed. In turbulence, I examine the case of two-dimensional turbulence in order to support the hypothesis that the friction factor and velocity profile of turbulent pipe flows depend on the turbulent energy spectrum in a way unpredicted by the classic Prandtl theory. By simulating two-dimensional flows in controlled geometries, either an inverse energy cascade or forward enstrophy cascade can be produced. The friction factor scaling of the flow changes depending on which cascade is present, in a way consistent with momentum transfer theory and roughness-induced criticality. In the problem of evolution, I show that open-ended growth of complexity can be obtained by ensuring that the evolutionary dynamics are invariant with respect to changes in complexity. Finite system size, finite point mutation rate, and fixed points in the fitness landscape can all interrupt this cascade behavior, producing an analogue to the integral scale of turbulence. This complexity cascade can exist both for competing and for symbiotic sets of organisms. Extending this picture to the qualitatively-different levels of organization of real lifeforms (viruses, unicellular, biofilms, multicellular) requires an understanding of how the processes of evolution themselves evolve. I show that a

  14. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Haibin; Shi Chenbo; Zhang Xin'ai; Zhang Zun; Cheng Jiao

    2011-03-15

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 {mu}N s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 {mu}N s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 {mu}N s with 95% credibility.

  15. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is developed for the generation of electromagnetic radiation in an electron beam-plasma interaction. The plasma is treated as a two-dimensional finite system, and effects of a continuous nonrelativistic beam input are accounted for. Three momentum and three field components are included in the simulation, and an external magnetic field is excluded. EM radiation generation is possible through interaction among Langmuir oscillations, ion-acoustic waves, and the electromagnetic wave, producing radiation perpendicular to the beam. The radiation is located near the plasma frequency, and polarized with the E component parallel to the beam. The scattering of Langmuir waves caused by ion-acoustic fluctuations generates the radiation. Comparison with laboratory data for the three-wave interactions shows good agreement in terms of the radiation levels produced, which are small relative to the plasma thermal energy.

  16. Cascading trait-mediated interactions induced by ant pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Hsun-Yi; Liere, Heidi; Soto, Estelí J; Perfecto, Ivette

    2012-01-01

    Trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMII) can be as important as density-mediated indirect interactions. Here, we provide evidence for a novel trait-mediated cascade (where one TMII affects another TMII) and demonstrate that the mechanism consists of a predator eavesdropping on chemical signaling. Ants protect scale insects from predation by adult coccinellid beetles – the first TMII. However, parasitic phorid flies reduce ant foraging activity by 50% – the second TMII, providing a window of opportunity for female beetles to oviposit in high-quality microsites. Beetle larvae are protected from ant predation and benefit from living in patches with high scale densities. We demonstrate that female beetles can detect pheromones released by the ant when attacked by phorids, and that only females, and especially gravid females, are attracted to the ant pheromone. As ants reduce their movement when under attack by phorids, we conclude that phorids facilitate beetle oviposition, thus producing the TMII cascade. PMID:23139877

  17. Warming modifies trophic cascades and eutrophication in experimental freshwater communities.

    PubMed

    Kratina, Pavel; Greig, Hamish S; Thompson, Patrick L; Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana S A; Shurin, Jonathan B

    2012-06-01

    Climate warming is occurring in concert with other anthropogenic changes to ecosystems. However, it is unknown whether and how warming alters the importance of top-down vs. bottom-up control over community productivity and variability. We performed a 16-month factorial experimental manipulation of warming, nutrient enrichment, and predator presence in replicated freshwater pond mesocosms to test their independent and interactive impacts. Warming strengthened trophic cascades from fish to primary producers, and it decreased the impact of eutrophication on the mean and temporal variation of phytoplankton biomass. These impacts varied seasonally, with higher temperatures leading to stronger trophic cascades in winter and weaker algae blooms under eutrophication in summer. Our results suggest that higher temperatures may shift the control of primary production in freshwater ponds toward stronger top-down and weaker bottom-up effects. The dampened temporal variability of algal biomass under eutrophication at higher temperatures suggests that warming may stabilize some ecosystem processes.

  18. Cascading trait-mediated interactions induced by ant pheromones.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsun-Yi; Liere, Heidi; Soto, Estelí J; Perfecto, Ivette

    2012-09-01

    Trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMII) can be as important as density-mediated indirect interactions. Here, we provide evidence for a novel trait-mediated cascade (where one TMII affects another TMII) and demonstrate that the mechanism consists of a predator eavesdropping on chemical signaling. Ants protect scale insects from predation by adult coccinellid beetles - the first TMII. However, parasitic phorid flies reduce ant foraging activity by 50% - the second TMII, providing a window of opportunity for female beetles to oviposit in high-quality microsites. Beetle larvae are protected from ant predation and benefit from living in patches with high scale densities. We demonstrate that female beetles can detect pheromones released by the ant when attacked by phorids, and that only females, and especially gravid females, are attracted to the ant pheromone. As ants reduce their movement when under attack by phorids, we conclude that phorids facilitate beetle oviposition, thus producing the TMII cascade.

  19. A linear aerodynamic analysis for unsteady transonic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, J. M.; Caspar, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A potential flow analysis to predict unsteady airloads produced by the vibrations of turbomachinery blades operating at transonic Mach numbers is presented. The unsteady aerodynamic model includes the effects of blade geometry, finite mean pressure variation across the blade row, high frequency blade motion, and shock motion within the framework of a linearized, frequency domain formulation. The unsteady equations are solved implicit, least squares, finite difference approximation which is applicable on arbitrary grids. A numerical solution for the entire unsteady field is determined by matching a solution determined on a rectilinear type cascade mesh, which covers an extended blade passage region, to a solution determined on a detailed polar type local mesh, which covers and extends well beyond the supersonic region(s) adjacent to a blade surface. Cascades of double circular arc and flat plate blades demonstrate the unsteady analysis, and partially illustrate the effects of blade geometry, inlet Mach number, blade vibration frequency and shock motion on unsteady response.

  20. Cascades in interdependent flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Antonio; De Sanctis Lucentini, Pier Giorgio; Caldarelli, Guido; D'Agostino, Gregorio

    2016-06-01

    In this manuscript, we investigate the abrupt breakdown behavior of coupled distribution grids under load growth. This scenario mimics the ever-increasing customer demand and the foreseen introduction of energy hubs interconnecting the different energy vectors. We extend an analytical model of cascading behavior due to line overloads to the case of interdependent networks and find evidence of first order transitions due to the long-range nature of the flows. Our results indicate that the foreseen increase in the couplings between the grids has two competing effects: on the one hand, it increases the safety region where grids can operate without withstanding systemic failures; on the other hand, it increases the possibility of a joint systems' failure.

  1. Weak Interactions and Instability Cascades.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Taku; McCann, Kevin S

    2015-07-29

    Food web theory states that a weak interactor which is positioned in the food web such that it tends to deflect, or mute, energy away from a potentially oscillating consumer-resource interaction often enhances community persistence and stability. Here we examine how adding other weak interactions (predation/harvesting) on the stabilizing weak interactor alters the stability of food web using a set of well-established food web models/modules. We show that such "weak on weak" interaction chains drive an indirect dynamic cascade that can rapidly ignite a distant consumer-resource oscillator. Nonetheless, we also show that the "weak on weak" interactions are still more stable than the food web without them, and so weak interactions still generally act to stabilize food webs. Rather, these results are best interpreted to say that the degree of the stabilizing effect of a given important weak interaction can be severely compromised by other weak interactions (including weak harvesting).

  2. Cascade Joule-Thomson refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Steyert, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design criteria for cascade Joule-Thomson refrigerators for cooling in the temperature range from 300 K to 4.2 K were studied. The systems considered use three or four refrigeration stages with various working gases to achieve the low temperatures. Each stage results in cooling to a progressively lower temperature and provides cooling at intermediate temperatures to remove the substantial amount of parasitic heat load encountered in a typical dewar. With careful dewar design considerable cooling can be achieved with moderate gas flows. For many applications, e.g., in the cooling of sensitive sensors, the fact that the refrigerator contains no moving parts and may be remotely located from the gas source is of considerable advantage. A small compressor suitable for providing the gas flows required was constructed.

  3. The Geant4 Bertini Cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D. H.; Kelsey, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    One of the medium energy hadron–nucleus interaction models in the Geant4 simulation toolkit is based partly on the Bertini intranuclear cascade model. Since its initial appearance in the toolkit, this model has been largely re-written in order to extend its physics capabilities and to reduce its memory footprint. Physics improvements include extensions in applicable energy range and incident particle types, and improved hadron–nucleon cross-sections and angular distributions. Interfaces have also been developed which allow the model to be coupled with other Geant4 models at lower and higher energies. The inevitable speed reductions due to enhanced physics have been mitigated by memory and CPU efficiency improvements. Details of these improvements, along with selected comparisons of the model to data, are discussed.

  4. Cascade replication of dissipative solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, Bogdan A.; Tuz, Vladimir R.

    2017-07-01

    We report a new effect of a cascade replication of dissipative solitons from a single one. It is discussed in the framework of a common model based on the one-dimensional cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation in which an additional linear term is introduced to account the perturbation from a particular potential of externally applied force. The effect is demonstrated on the light beams propagating through a planar waveguide. The waveguide consists of a nonlinear layer able to guide dissipative solitons and a magneto-optic substrate. In the waveguide an externally applied force is considered to be an inhomogeneous magnetic field which is induced by modulated electric currents flowing along a set of conducting wires adjusted on the top of the waveguide.

  5. Stochastic annealing simulation of cascades in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1996-04-01

    The stochastic annealing simulation code ALSOME is used to investigate quantitatively the differential production of mobile vacancy and SIA defects as a function of temperature for isolated 25 KeV cascades in copper generated by MD simulations. The ALSOME code and cascade annealing simulations are described. The annealing simulations indicate that the above Stage V, where the cascade vacancy clusters are unstable,m nearly 80% of the post-quench vacancies escape the cascade volume, while about half of the post-quench SIAs remain in clusters. The results are sensitive to the relative fractions of SIAs that occur in small, highly mobile clusters and large stable clusters, respectively, which may be dependent on the cascade energy.

  6. The van Cittert-Zernike theorem for electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey S; Martínez-Niconoff, Gabriel; Martínez-Vara, Patricia; Olvera-Santamaría, Miguel A

    2009-02-02

    The van Cittert-Zernike theorem, well known for the scalar optical fields, is generalized for the case of vector electromagnetic fields. The deduced theorem shows that the degree of coherence of the electromagnetic field produced by the completely incoherent vector source increases on propagation whereas the degree of polarization remains unchanged. The possible application of the deduced theorem is illustrated by an example of optical simulation of partially coherent and partially polarized secondary source with the controlled statistical properties.

  7. Three phase transformer modelling for fast electromagnetic transient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Papadias, B.C.; Hatziargyriou, N.D.; Bakopoulos, J.A.; Prousalidis, J.M. . Electric Energy Systems Lab.)

    1994-04-01

    In this paper the overvoltages produced by switching the primary side of reactor loaded transformers are simulated using the Electromagnetic Transients Program (EMTP). Attention is focused on transformer modeling. Five general three-phase transformer models are used and from the results obtained, and comparisons with field tests positive conclusions concerning the reliability and the accuracy of these models in the study of switching fast electromagnetic transients are drawn.

  8. Electromagnetically induced transparency and quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. E.

    2016-11-01

    We describe how electromagnetically induced transparency may be used to construct a nontraditional near-ideal quantum heat engine as constrained by the second law. The engine is pumped by a thermal reservoir that may be either hotter or colder than that of an exhaust reservoir, and also by a monochromatic laser. As output, it produces a bright narrow emission at line center of an otherwise absorbing transition.

  9. Result of Monte-Carlo simulation of electron-photon cascades in lead and layers of lead-scintillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, A.; Krys, E.

    1985-01-01

    Results of Monte-Carlo simulation of electromagnetic cascade development in lead and lead-scintillator sandwiches are analyzed. It is demonstrated that the structure function for core approximation is not applicable in the case in which the primary energy is higher than 100 GeV. The simulation data has shown that introducing an inhomogeneous chamber structure results in subsequent reduction of secondary particles.

  10. Calculations of physical and chemical reactions with DNA in aqueous solution from Auger cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.; Howell, R.W.; Rao, D.V.; Sastry, K.S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations are performed of the physical and chemical interactions in liquid water by electrons produced during Auger cascades resulting from the decay of various radionuclides. Estimates are also made of the number of direct physical and indirect chemical interactions that would be produced on DNA located near the decay site. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Unify the electromagnetic force and gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Zheng Sheng

    2013-04-01

    In the process of mankind investigate natural rule: people know four kinds of force: electromagnetic force, gravitation, weak force, and strong force. Meanwhile people use these four kinds force to explain all phenomena in the Nature. Obviously people do not know their mechanism of origin until now. On the other hand, these four kinds force is the difference showing form of one force, is not it? For solve these questions and find their mechanism of origin, I do some experiments and discover that the moving photons produce gravitation. This discovery shows the origin of gravitation. Meanwhile I also do experiments show that light is a particle, but is not a wave-particle duality. My experiments show that the elementary particles moving produce gravitation and electromagnetic force, this effect also produce wave effect. That is to say my experiment and calculate not only reveal the origin of gravitation, but also reveal the origin of electric charge and magnetic force. Base on this I first unify the electromagnetic force and gravitation. The more detail see below website: https://www.lap-publishing.com/catalog/details/store/gb/book/978-3-8473-2658-8/mechanism-of-interaction-in-moving-matter

  12. Unify the electromagnetic force and gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng Ming, Zheng

    2013-04-01

    In the process of mankind investigate natural rule: people know four kinds of force: electromagnetic force, gravitation, weak force, and strong force. Meanwhile people use these four kinds force to explain all phenomena in the Nature. Obviously people do not know their mechanism of origin until now. On the other hand, these four kinds force is the difference showing form of one force, is not it? For solve these questions and find their mechanism of origin, I do some experiments and discover that the moving photons produce gravitation. This discovery shows the origin of gravitation. Meanwhile I also do experiments show that light is a particle, but is not a wave-particle duality. My experiments show that the elementary particles moving produce gravitation and electromagnetic force, this effect also produce wave effect. That is to say my experiment and calculate not only reveal the origin of gravitation, but also reveal the origin of electric charge and magnetic force. Base on this I first unify the electromagnetic force and gravitation. The more detail see below website: https://www.lap-publishing.com/catalog/details/store/gb/book/978-3-8473-2658-8/mechanism-of-interaction-in-moving-matter.

  13. Low frequency electromagnetic radiation and hearing.

    PubMed

    Morales, J; Garcia, M; Perez, C; Valverde, J V; Lopez-Sanchez, C; Garcia-Martinez, V; Quesada, J L

    2009-11-01

    To analyse the possible impact of low and extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on the outer hairs cells of the organ of Corti, in a guinea pig model. Electromagnetic fields of 50, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000 and 5000 Hz frequencies and 1.5 microT intensity were generated using a transverse electromagnetic wave guide. Guinea pigs of both sexes, weighing 100-150 g, were used, with no abnormalities on general and otic examination. Total exposure times were: 360 hours for 50, 500 and 1000 Hz; 3300 hours for 2000 Hz; 4820 hours for 4000 Hz; and 6420 hours for 5000 Hz. One control animal was used in each frequency group. The parameters measured by electric response audiometer included: hearing level; waves I-IV latencies; wave I-III interpeak latency; and percentage appearance of waves I-III at 90 and 50 dB sound pressure level intensity. Values for the above parameters did not differ significantly, comparing the control animal and the rest of each group. In addition, no significant differences were found between our findings and those of previous studies of normal guinea pigs. Prolonged exposure to electromagnetic fields of 50 Hz to 5 KHz frequencies and 1.5 microT intensity, produced no functional or morphological alteration in the outer hair cells of the guinea pig organ of Corti.

  14. Magnetic field sensor based on cascaded microfiber coupler with magnetic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Lianmin; Su, Delong; Wang, Zhaofang; Pu, Shengli; Zeng, Xianglong; Lahoubi, Mahieddine

    2016-09-07

    A kind of magnetic field sensor based on cascaded microfiber coupler with magnetic fluid is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The magnetic fluid is utilized as the cladding of the fused regions of the cascaded microfiber coupler. As the interference valley wavelength of the sensing structure is sensitive to the ambient variation, considering the magnetic-field-dependent refractive index of magnetic fluid, the proposed structure is employed for magnetic field sensing. The effective coupling length for each coupling region of the as-fabricated cascaded microfiber coupler is 6031 μm. The achieved sensitivity is 125 pm/Oe, which is about three times larger than that of the previously similar structure based on the single microfiber coupler. Experimental results indicate that the sensing sensitivity can be easily improved by increasing the effective coupling length or cascading more microfiber couplers. The proposed magnetic field sensor is attractive due to its low cost, immunity to electromagnetic interference, as well as high sensitivity, which also has the potentials in other tunable all-fiber photonic devices, such as filter.

  15. Psychophysiological mechanisms of interindividual differences in goal activation modes during action cascading.

    PubMed

    Mückschel, Moritz; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Our daily life is characterized by multiple response options that need to be cascaded in order to avoid overstrain of restricted response selection resources. While response selection and goal activation in action cascading are likely driven by a process varying from serial to parallel processing, little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms that may underlie interindividual differences in these modes of response selection. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a stop-change paradigm for the recording of event-related potentials and standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography source localizations in healthy subjects. Systematically varying the stimulus onset asynchrony (the temporal spacing of "stop" and "change" signals), we applied mathematical constraints to classify subjects in more parallel or more serial goal activators during action cascading. On that basis, the electrophysiological data show that processes linking stimulus processing and response execution, but not attentional processes, underlie interindividual differences in either serial or parallel response selection modes during action cascading. On a systems level, these processes were mediated via a distributed fronto-parietal network, including the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodman area 32, BA32) and the temporo-parietal junction (BA40). There was a linear relation between the individual degree of overlap in activated task goals and electrophysiological processes.

  16. Magnetic field sensor based on cascaded microfiber coupler with magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lianmin; Pu, Shengli; Su, Delong; Wang, Zhaofang; Zeng, Xianglong; Lahoubi, Mahieddine

    2016-09-01

    A kind of magnetic field sensor based on cascaded microfiber coupler with magnetic fluid is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The magnetic fluid is utilized as the cladding of the fused regions of the cascaded microfiber coupler. As the interference valley wavelength of the sensing structure is sensitive to the ambient variation, considering the magnetic-field-dependent refractive index of magnetic fluid, the proposed structure is employed for magnetic field sensing. The effective coupling length for each coupling region of the as-fabricated cascaded microfiber coupler is 6031 μm. The achieved sensitivity is 125 pm/Oe, which is about three times larger than that of the previously similar structure based on the single microfiber coupler. Experimental results indicate that the sensing sensitivity can be easily improved by increasing the effective coupling length or cascading more microfiber couplers. The proposed magnetic field sensor is attractive due to its low cost, immunity to electromagnetic interference, as well as high sensitivity, which also has the potentials in other tunable all-fiber photonic devices, such as filter.

  17. Performance of a 3d Imaging Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the AMS02 Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Coignet, G.; Girard, L.; Goy, C.; Kossakowski, R.; Lees-Rosier, S.; Pochon, J.; Vialle, J. P.; Cervelli, F.; di Falco, S.; Galeotti, S.; Incagli, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Spinella, F.; Venanzoni, G.; Falchini, E.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Paoletti, R.; Pilo, F.; Turini, N.; Valle, G.; Bolmont, J.; Jacholkowska, A.; Piron, F.; Sapinski, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Lu, Y.; Yang, C.

    2005-02-01

    A 3D imaging electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) based on a lead/scintillating-fiber sandwich has been developed for the AMS-02 experiment on the International Space Station. This calorimeter should fulfill the constraints due to the launch and to the operation conditions in space. The engineering model of the ECAL was put through space qualification tests. Results of the vibration and thermal-vacuum tests are presented. To satisfy the physics aims, precise energy measurement and high discrimination between hadronic and electromagnetic cascades are required on a large dynamic range. The ECAL performances were checked by exposing the engineering model to a test beam at CERN in July 2002.

  18. Application of a Modular Multilevel Cascade Converter (MMCC-SDBC) to a STATCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Makoto; Maeda, Ryo; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper presents the application of a modular multilevel cascade converter based on single-delta bridge-cells (MMCC-SDBC) to a STATic synchronous COMpensator (STATCOM), particularly for negative-sequence reactive-power control. The SDBC is characterized by cascade connection of multiple single-phase H-bridge (or full-bridge) converter cells per leg, which facilitates flexible circuit design, low voltage steps, and low electro-magnetic interference (EMI) emissions. However, there is no published report on such a STATCOM with experimental verification or a control strategy. This paper designs, constructs, and tests a 100-V 5-kVA PWM STATCOM based on the SDBC with focus on the operating principle and performance. Experimental results confirm that this converter can control not only the positive-sequence reactive power but also the negative-sequence reactive power and low-frequency active power intended for the flicker compensation of arc furnaces.

  19. Study of the cascading effect during the acceleration and heating of ions in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, P. S.; Muñoz, V.; Rogan, J.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a quasilinear theory to understand the energy cascade suggested by Gomberoff et al. (2004), in which there is a transfer of wave energy from long to short wave modes, with the subsequent acceleration and heating of ions, in the case of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves propagating along the magnetic field. For the case of background protons, and small concentration of α-particles, numerical results show that for an initial spectrum concentrated at low frequency, there is perpendicular and parallel heating of protons and α-particles. Due to energy conservation, this effect occurs at the expense of wave energy. Also, in an energy cascade effect, it is observed that the appearance of modes is at frequencies higher than in the initial spectrum.

  20. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  1. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  2. DIRECT CURRENT ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, A.H.

    1957-11-01

    An improved d-c electromagnetic pump is presented in which the poles, and consequently the magetic gap at the poles, are tapered to be wider at the upstream end. In addition, the cross section of the tube carryiQ the liquid metal is tapered so that the velocity of the pumped liquid increases in the downstream direction at a rate such that the counter-induced voltage in the liquid metal remains constant as it traverses the region between the poles. This configuration compensates for the distortion of the magnetic field caused by the induced voltage that would otherwise result in the lowering of the pumping capacity. This improved electromagnetic pump as practical application in the pumping of liquid metal coolants for nuclear reactors where conventional positive displacement pumps have proved unsatisfactory due to the high temperatures and the corrosive properties of the liquid metals involved.

  3. Electromagnetic acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Jane F; Chang, David B; McNaughton, Stuart; Jeong, Jong Seob; Shung, K K; Cerwin, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Electromagnetic acoustic imaging (EMAI) is a new imaging technique that uses long-wavelength RF electromagnetic (EM) waves to induce ultrasound emission. Signal intensity and image contrast have been found to depend on spatially varying electrical conductivity of the medium in addition to conventional acoustic properties. The resultant conductivity- weighted ultrasound data may enhance the diagnostic performance of medical ultrasound in cancer and cardiovascular applications because of the known changes in conductivity of malignancy and blood-filled spaces. EMAI has a potential advantage over other related imaging techniques because it combines the high resolution associated with ultrasound detection with the generation of the ultrasound signals directly related to physiologically important electrical properties of the tissues. Here, we report the theoretical development of EMAI, implementation of a dual-mode EMAI/ultrasound apparatus, and successful demonstrations of EMAI in various phantoms designed to establish feasibility of the approach for eventual medical applications.

  4. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  5. Ordinary electromagnetic mode instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C. Z.

    1974-01-01

    The instability of the ordinary electromagnetic mode propagating perpendicular to an external magnetic field is studied for a single-species plasma with ring velocity distribution. The marginal instability boundaries for both the purely growing mode and the propagating growing modes are calculated from the instability criteria. The dispersion characteristics for various sets of plasma parameters are also given. The typical growth rates are of the order of the cyclotron frequency.

  6. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  7. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  8. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  9. Proca and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hillion, P.; Quinnerz, S.

    1986-07-01

    In the framework of the proper orthochronous Lorentz group, the old connection is revived between the electromagnetic field characterized by a self-dual tensor and a traceless second-rank spinor obeying the Proca equation. The relationship between this spinor and the Hertz potential also considered as a self-dual tensor is emphasized. The extension of this formalism to meet the covariance under the full Lorentz group is also discussed.

  10. The body size dependence of trophic cascades.

    PubMed

    DeLong, John P; Gilbert, Benjamin; Shurin, Jonathan B; Savage, Van M; Barton, Brandon T; Clements, Christopher F; Dell, Anthony I; Greig, Hamish S; Harley, Christopher D G; Kratina, Pavel; McCann, Kevin S; Tunney, Tyler D; Vasseur, David A; O'Connor, Mary I

    2015-03-01

    Trophic cascades are indirect positive effects of predators on resources via control of intermediate consumers. Larger-bodied predators appear to induce stronger trophic cascades (a greater rebound of resource density toward carrying capacity), but how this happens is unknown because we lack a clear depiction of how the strength of trophic cascades is determined. Using consumer resource models, we first show that the strength of a trophic cascade has an upper limit set by the interaction strength between the basal trophic group and its consumer and that this limit is approached as the interaction strength between the consumer and its predator increases. We then express the strength of a trophic cascade explicitly in terms of predator body size and use two independent parameter sets to calculate how the strength of a trophic cascade depends on predator size. Both parameter sets predict a positive effect of predator size on the strength of a trophic cascade, driven mostly by the body size dependence of the interaction strength between the first two trophic levels. Our results support previous empirical findings and suggest that the loss of larger predators will have greater consequences on trophic control and biomass structure in food webs than the loss of smaller predators.

  11. Carter separable electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    2000-02-01

    The purely electromagnetic analogue in flat space of Kerr's metric in general relativity is only rarely considered. Here we carry out in flat space a programme similar to Carter's investigation of metrics in general relativity in which the motion of a charged particle is separable. We concentrate on the separability of the motion (be it classical, relativistic or quantum) of a charged particle in electromagnetic fields that lie in planes through an axis of symmetry. In cylindrical polar coordinates (t,R,φ,z) the four-vector potential takes the form [formmu2] is the unit toroidal vector. The forms of the functions Φ(R,z) and A(R,z) are sought that allow separable motion. This occurs for relativistic motion only when AR,Φ and A2-Φ2 are all of the separable form ζ(λ)-η(μ)]/(λ-μ), where ζ and η are arbitrary functions, and λ and μ are spheroidal coordinates or degenerations thereof. The special forms of A and Φ that allow this are deduced. They include the Kerr metric analogue, with E+iB=-∇{q[(r-ia).(r-ia)]-1/2}. Rather more general electromagnetic fields allow separation when the motion is non-relativistic. The investigation is extended to fields that lie in parallel planes. Connections to Larmor's theorem are remarked upon.

  12. Nuclear Electromagnetic Pulse Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinallo, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) from nuclear detonations have been observed for well over half a century. Beginning in the mid-to-late 1950s, the physics and modeling of EMP has been researched and will continue into the foreseeable future. The EMP environment propagates hundreds of miles from its origins and causes interference for all types of electronic instrumentation. This includes military, municipal and industry based electronic infrastructures such as power generation and distribution, command and control systems, systems used in financial and emergency services, electronic monitoring and communications networks, to mention some key infrastructure elements. Research into EMP has included originating physics, propagation and electromagnetic field coupling analyses and measurement-sensor development. Several methods for calculating EMP induced transient interference (voltage and current induction) will be briefly discussed and protection techniques reviewed. These methods can be mathematically simple or involve challenging boundary value solution techniques. A few illustrative calculations will demonstrate the concern for electronic system operability. Analyses such as the Wunsch-Bell model for electronic upset or damage, and the Singularity Expansion Method (SEM) put forth by Dr. Carl Baum, will facilitate the concern for EMP effects. The SEM determines the voltages and currents induced from transient electromagnetic fields in terms of natural modes of various types of electronic platforms (aerospace vehicles or land-based assets - fixed or mobile). Full-scale facility and laboratory simulation and response measurement approaches will be discussed. The talk will conclude with a discussion of some present research activities.

  13. Explosive spread F caused by lightning-induced electromagnetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, C. P.; Freidberg, J. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Lightning-produced electromagnetic effects may produce significant modifications in the ionospheric plasmas. An outstanding phenomenon investigated in this paper is the so-called explosive spread F, whose close link with lightning has been identified (Woodman and Kudeki, 1984). Parametric instability excited by the lightning-induced whistler waves is proposed as a potential source mechanism causing the explosive spread F.

  14. Explosive spread F caused by lightning-induced electromagnetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, C. P.; Freidberg, J. P.; Lee, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Lightning-produced electromagnetic effects may produce significant modifications in the ionospheric plasmas. An outstanding phenomenon investigated in this paper is the so-called explosive spread F, whose close link with lightning has been identified (Woodman and Kudeki, 1984). Parametric instability excited by the lightning-induced whistler waves is proposed as a potential source mechanism causing the explosive spread F.

  15. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Bradly J.; Guenther, David C.

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  16. Cascade Screening in Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Advancing Forward.

    PubMed

    Santos, Raul D; Frauches, Thiago S; Chacra, Ana P M

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is a genetic disorder associated with elevated LDL-cholesterol and high lifetime cardiovascular risk. Both clinical and molecular cascade screening programs have been implemented to increase early definition and treatment. In this systematic review, we discuss the main issues found in 65 different articles related to cascade screening and familial hypercholesterolemia, covering a range of topics including different types/strategies, considerations both positive and negative regarding cascade screening in general and associated with the different strategies, cost and coverage consideration, direct and indirect contact with patients, public policy around life insurance and doctor-patient confidentiality, the "right to know," and public health concerns regarding familial hypercholesterolemia.

  17. Living With Volcanic Risk in the Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W.

    1997-01-01

    The Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest has more than a dozen potentially active volcanoes. Cascade volcanoes tend to erupt explosively, and on average two eruptions occur per century?the most recent were at Mount St. Helens, Washington (1980?86 and 2004?8), and Lassen Peak, California (1914?17). To help protect the Pacific Northwest?s rapidly expanding population, USGS scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington, monitor and assess the hazards posed by the region?s volcanoes.

  18. Nonlocal effects and countermeasures in cascading failures.

    PubMed

    Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2015-09-01

    We study the propagation of cascading failures in complex supply networks with a focus on nonlocal effects occurring far away from the initial failure. It is shown that a high clustering and a small average path length of a network generally suppress nonlocal overloads. These properties are typical for many real-world networks, often called small-world networks, such that cascades propagate mostly locally in these networks. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial aspects of countermeasures based on the intentional removal of additional edges. Nonlocal actions are generally required in networks that have a low redundancy and are thus especially vulnerable to cascades.

  19. Gust Response Analysis of a Turbine Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, R. S. R.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Reddy, D. R.; Kurkov, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    A study was made of the gust response of an annular turbine cascade using a two-dimensional Navier Stokes code. The time-marching CFD code, NPARC, was used to calculate the unsteady forces due to the fluid flow. The computational results were compared with a previously published experimental data for the annular cascade reported in the literature. Reduced frequency, Mach number and angle of incidence were varied independently and the gust velocity was sinusoidal. For the high inlet velocity case, the cascade was nearly choked.

  20. Cascades on clique-based graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Adam; Gleeson, James P.

    2013-06-01

    We present an analytical approach to determining the expected cascade size in a broad range of dynamical models on the class of highly clustered random graphs introduced by Gleeson [J. P. Gleeson, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.036107 80, 036107 (2009)]. A condition for the existence of global cascades is also derived. Applications of this approach include analyses of percolation, and Watts's model. We show how our techniques can be used to study the effects of in-group bias in cascades on social networks.

  1. Bidirectional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfvenic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Che, H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    The observed steep kinetic scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quiet time suggest them as a possible source of free energy to drive kinetic turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how the free energy released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfvénic and whistler turbulence are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  2. Development of cascade reactions for the concise construction of diverse heterocyclic architectures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liang-Qiu; Chen, Jia-Rong; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2012-08-21

    , converted ω-indolyl alkenes into tetrahydrocarbazoles, tetrahydropyranoindoles, and tetrahydrocarbolines. In addition, we constructed tetrahydrocarbazoles and tetrahydroquinones using organocatalytic Friedel-Crafts alkylation/Michael addition cascades that used 2-vinyl indoles as common starting materials. Most green plants carry out photosynthesis to produce organic substances relying on readily available and renewable solar energy. In a related manner, we have also developed two cascade reactions that merge visible light-induced aerobic oxidation with either [3 + 2] cycloaddition/oxidative aromatization or intramolecular cyclization. These processes lead to the formation of pyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinolines and enantiopure tetrahydroimidazoles, respectively.

  3. Non-inertial electromagnetic effects in matter. Gyromagnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, M.

    2012-08-01

    Non-inertial electromagnetic effects in matter, i.e. electromagnetic fields created by a non-inertial motion of material bodies, are discussed within the Drude-Lorentz (plasma) model of matter polarization. It is shown that an oscillatory motion of a point-like body, or wavelike motion in an extended body gives rise to electromagnetic fields with the same frequency as the frequency of the original motion, while shock-like movements of a point-like body generate electromagnetic fields with the characteristic (atomic scale) frequency of the bodies. The polarization of a rigid body induced by rotations is discussed in various circumstances. A uniform rotation produces a static electric field in a dielectric and a stationary current (and a static magnetic field) in a conductor. The latter corresponds to the gyromagnetic effect (while the former may be called the gyroelectric effect). Both fields are computed for a sphere and the gyromagnetic coefficient is derived. A non-uniform rotation induces emission of electromagnetic fields. The equations of motion for the polarization are linearized for slight non-uniformities of the angular velocity and solved both for a dielectric and a conducting sphere. The electromagnetic field emitted by a dielectric spherically shaped body in (a slightly) non-uniform rotation has the characteristic (atomic scale) frequency of the body (slightly shifted by the uniform part of the angular frequency). In the same conditions, a conducting sphere emits an electromagnetic field whose frequency is double the uniform part of the angular frequency.

  4. Electromagnetic launcher: a new weapon

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; Hawke, R.S.

    1981-08-10

    Using electromagnetic (EM) forces to accelerate projectiles is not a new idea; it dates back to the first part of this century. The idea has been revitalized, however, by some recent work done in this area. There are two basic types of electromagnetic accelerators: those that rely on induced currents to provide the Lorentz force that accelerates the projectile (ac), and those that rely on direct current (dc). The ac accelerators are characterized by the potential for very high electrical to mechanical (kinetic energy) conversion efficiencies and relatively low accelerating forces. The dc accelerators produce much higher acceleration, but with lower efficiency. This is the type of interest for weapons applications. The higher accelerations will permit much shorter barrel lengths, minimizing pointing and tracking difficulties. There are several perceived advantages to using EM launching for weapons applications. Higher muzzle velocities than can be achieved with conventional ordnance will minimize the projectile time-of-flight to the target; this is of particular interest for air-defense applications against maneuvering targets and for penetrator launching. The potential for precise current (hence acceleration) control promises lower peak accelerations that the projectile must withstand, and much more precise muzzle velocity control, permitting the use of smart projectiles and continuous zoning for artillery applications. The principles behind EM accelerators, particularly dc accelerators (railguns), the recent history of their development, their advantages for weapons applications, the general requirements, potential problem areas that must be faced by designers, and the work that has been done by researchers at Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories in accelerating 3-g projectiles to 10 km/s, and larger masses to lower velocities are discussed.

  5. Integrated Circuit Electromagnetic Immunity Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sketoe, J. G.

    2000-08-01

    This handbook presents the results of the Boeing Company effort for NASA under contract NAS8-98217. Immunity level data for certain integrated circuit parts are discussed herein, along with analytical techniques for applying the data to electronics systems. This handbook is built heavily on the one produced in the seventies by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC, MDC Report E1929 of 1 August 1978, entitled Integrated Circuit Electromagnetic Susceptibility Handbook, known commonly as the ICES Handbook, which has served countless systems designers for over 20 years). Sections 2 and 3 supplement the device susceptibility data presented in section 4 by presenting information on related material required to use the IC susceptibility information. Section 2 concerns itself with electromagnetic susceptibility analysis and serves as a guide in using the information contained in the rest of the handbook. A suggested system hardening requirements is presented in this chapter. Section 3 briefly discusses coupling and shielding considerations. For conservatism and simplicity, a worst case approach is advocated to determine the maximum amount of RF power picked up from a given field. This handbook expands the scope of the immunity data in this Handbook is to of 10 MHz to 10 GHz. However, the analytical techniques provided are applicable to much higher frequencies as well. It is expected however, that the upper frequency limit of concern is near 10 GHz. This is due to two factors; the pickup of microwave energy on system cables and wiring falls off as the square of the wavelength, and component response falls off at a rapid rate due to the effects of parasitic shunt paths for the RF energy. It should be noted also that the pickup on wires and cables does not approach infinity as the frequency decreases (as would be expected by extrapolating the square law dependence of the high frequency roll-off to lower frequencies) but levels off due to mismatch effects.

  6. Quantum cascade lasers that emit more light than heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yanbo; Slivken, Steven; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Darvish, Shaban R.; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2010-02-01

    For any semiconductor lasers, the wall plug efficiency, that is, the portion of the injected electrical energy that can be converted into output optical energy, is one of the most important figures of merit. A device with a higher wall plug efficiency has a lower power demand and prolonged device lifetime due to its reduced self-heating. Since its invention, the power performance of the quantum cascade laser has improved tremendously. However, although the internal quantum efficiency can be engineered to be greater than 80% at low temperatures, the wall plug efficiency of a quantum cascade laser has never been demonstrated above 50% at any temperature. The best wall plug efficiency reported to date is 36% at 120 K (ref. 9). Here, we overcome the limiting factors using a single-well injector design and demonstrate 53% wall plug efficiency at 40 K with an emitting wavelength of 5 µm. In other words, we demonstrate a quantum cascade laser that produces more light than heat.

  7. The continuing challenge of electromagnetic launch

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M.; Cnare, E.C.; Duggin, B.W.; Kaye, R.J.; Marder, B.M.; Shokair, I.R.

    1993-07-01

    Interest in launching payloads through the atmosphere to ever higher velocity is robust. For hundreds of years, guns and rockets have been improved for this purpose until they are now considered to be near to their performance limits. While the potential of electromagnetic technology to increase launch velocity has been known since late in the nineteenth century, it was not until about 1980 that a sustained and large-scale effort was started to exploit it. Electromagnetic launcher technology is restricted here to mean only that technology which establishes both a current density, J, and a magnetic field, B, within a part of the launch package, called the armature, so that J {times} B integrated over the volume of the armature is the launching force. Research and development activity was triggered by the discovery that high velocity can be produced with a simple railgun which uses an arc for its armature. This so called ``plasma-armature railgun`` has been the launcher technology upon which nearly all of the work has focused. Still, a relatively small parallel effort has also been made to explore the potential of electromagnetic launchers which do not use sliding contacts on stationary rails to establish current in the armature. One electromagnetic launcher of this type is called an induction coilgun because armature current is established by electromagnetic induction. In this paper, we first establish terminology which we will use not only to specify requirements for successful endoatmospheric launch but also to compare different launcher types. Then, we summarize the statuses of the railgun and induction coilgun technologies and discuss the issues which must be resolved before either of these launchers can offer substantial advantage for endoatomospheric launch.

  8. Dressed-state electromagnetically induced transparency for light storage in uniform-phase spin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šibalić, N.; Kondo, J. M.; Adams, C. S.; Weatherill, K. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present, experimentally and theoretically, a scheme for dressed-state electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a three-step cascade system in which a four-level system is mapped into an effective three-level system. Theoretical analysis reveals that the scheme provides coherent-state control via adiabatic following and a generalized protocol for light storage in uniform phase spin-waves that are insensitive to motional dephasing. The three-step driving enables a number of other features, including spatial selectivity of the excitation region within the atomic medium, and kick-free and Doppler-free excitation that produces narrow resonances in thermal vapor. As a proof of concept, we present an experimental demonstration of the generalized EIT scheme using the 6 S1 /2→6 P3 /2→7 S1 /2→8 P1 /2 excitation path in thermal cesium vapor. This technique could be applied to cold and thermal ensembles to enable longer storage times for Rydberg polaritons.

  9. Cascading blockages in channel bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barré, C.; Talbot, J.

    2015-11-01

    Flow in channel networks may involve a redistribution of flux following the blockage or failure of an individual link. Here we consider a simplified model consisting of Nc parallel channels conveying a particulate flux. Particles enter these channels according to a homogeneous Poisson process and an individual channel blocks if more than N particles are simultaneously present. The behavior of the composite system depends strongly on how the flux of entering particles is redistributed following a blockage. We consider two cases. In the first, the intensity on each open channel remains constant while in the second the total intensity is evenly redistributed over the open channels. We obtain exact results for arbitrary Nc and N for a system of independent channels and for arbitrary Nc and N =1 for coupled channels. For N >1 we present approximate analytical as well as numerical results. Independent channels block at a decreasing rate due to a simple combinatorial effect, while for coupled channels the interval between successive blockages remains constant for N =1 but decreases for N >1 . This accelerating cascade is due to the nonlinear dependence of the mean blocking time of a single channel on the entering particle flux that more than compensates for the decrease in the number of active channels.

  10. Cascading blockages in channel bundles.

    PubMed

    Barré, C; Talbot, J

    2015-11-01

    Flow in channel networks may involve a redistribution of flux following the blockage or failure of an individual link. Here we consider a simplified model consisting of N(c) parallel channels conveying a particulate flux. Particles enter these channels according to a homogeneous Poisson process and an individual channel blocks if more than N particles are simultaneously present. The behavior of the composite system depends strongly on how the flux of entering particles is redistributed following a blockage. We consider two cases. In the first, the intensity on each open channel remains constant while in the second the total intensity is evenly redistributed over the open channels. We obtain exact results for arbitrary N(c) and N for a system of independent channels and for arbitrary N(c) and N=1 for coupled channels. For N>1 we present approximate analytical as well as numerical results. Independent channels block at a decreasing rate due to a simple combinatorial effect, while for coupled channels the interval between successive blockages remains constant for N=1 but decreases for N>1. This accelerating cascade is due to the nonlinear dependence of the mean blocking time of a single channel on the entering particle flux that more than compensates for the decrease in the number of active channels.

  11. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  12. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  13. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faist, Jérôme; Villares, Gustavo; Scalari, Giacomo; Rösch, Markus; Bonzon, Christopher; Hugi, Andreas; Beck, Mattias

    2016-06-01

    It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm-1 in the mid-infrared region. In the THz range, 10mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of the very short upper state lifetime of the gain medium, the mode proliferation in these sources arises from four-wave mixing rather than saturable absorption. As a result, their optical output is characterized by the tendency of small intensity modulation of the output power, and the relative phases of the modes to be similar to the ones of a frequency modulated laser. Recent results include the proof of comb operation down to a metrological level, the observation of a Schawlow-Townes broadened linewidth, as well as the first dual-comb spectroscopy measurements. The capability of the structure to integrate monothically nonlinear optical elements as well as to operate as a detector shows great promise for future chip integration of dual-comb systems.

  14. Rebalancing of internally generated carriers for mid-infrared interband cascade lasers with very low power consumption.

    PubMed

    Vurgaftman, I; Bewley, W W; Canedy, C L; Kim, C S; Kim, M; Merritt, C D; Abell, J; Lindle, J R; Meyer, J R

    2011-12-13

    The interband cascade laser differs from any other class of semiconductor laser, conventional or cascaded, in that most of the carriers producing population inversion are generated internally, at semimetallic interfaces within each stage of the active region. Here we present simulations demonstrating that all previous interband cascade laser performance has suffered from a significant imbalance of electron and hole densities in the active wells. We further confirm experimentally that correcting this imbalance with relatively heavy n-type doping in the electron injectors substantially reduces the threshold current and power densities relative to all earlier devices. At room temperature, the redesigned devices require nearly two orders of magnitude less input power to operate in continuous-wave mode than the quantum cascade laser. The interband cascade laser is consequently the most attractive option for gas sensing and other spectroscopic applications requiring low output power and minimum heat dissipation at wavelengths extending from 3 μm to beyond 6 μm.

  15. Cascade-able spin torque logic gates with input-output isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2015-06-01

    Spin torque majority gate (STMG) is one of the promising options for beyond-complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor non-volatile logic circuits for normally-off computing. Modeling of prior schemes demonstrated logic completeness using majority operation and nonlinear transfer characteristics. However significant problems arose with cascade-ability and input output isolation manifesting as domain walls (DWs) stopping, reflecting off ends of wires or propagating back to the inputs. We introduce a new scheme to enable cascade-ability and isolation based on (a) in-plane DW automotion in interconnects, (b) exchange coupling of magnetization between two FM layers, and (c) ‘round-about’ topology for the majority gate. We performed micro-magnetic simulations that demonstrate switching operation of this STMG scheme. These circuits were verified to enable isolation of inputs from output signals and to be cascade-able without limitations.

  16. A modeling comparison between a two-stage and three-stage cascaded thermoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanimba, Eurydice; Pearson, Matthew; Sharp, Jeff; Stokes, David; Priya, Shashank; Tian, Zhiting

    2017-10-01

    In this work, a comparison between the performance of two- and three-stage cascaded thermoelectric generator (TEG) devices is analyzed based on a prescribed maximum hot side temperature of 973 K, an imposed maximum heat input of 505 W, and a fixed cold side temperature of 473 K. Half-Heusler is used as a thermoelectric (TE) material in the top higher temperature stage and skutterudite as a TE in the bottom lower temperature stage for the two-stage structure. Lead telluride is added in the middle stage to form the three-stage structure. Based on the prescribed constraints, the two-stage cascaded TEG is found to produce a power output of 42 W with an efficiency of 8.3%. The three-stage cascaded TEG produces a power output of 51 W with an efficiency of 10.2%. The three-stage cascaded TEG produces 21% more power than the two-stage does; however, if the system complexity, mechanical robustness, manufacturability, and/or cost of three-stage cascaded TEG outweigh the 21% percent power production increase, the two-stage TEG could be preferable.

  17. Nuclear electromagnetic pulse and the electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Legro, J.R.; Reed, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A single, high-altitude nuclear detonation over the continental United States can expose large geographic areas to transient, electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The initial electromagnetic fields produced by this event have been defined as high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP). Later-time, low frequency fields have been defined as magnetohydrodynamic-electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). Nuclear detonations at, or near the surface of the earth can also produce transient EMP. These electromagnetic phenomena have been defined as source region electromagnetic pulse (SREMP). The Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has formulated and implemented a Program Plan to assess the possible effects of the above nuclear EMP on civilian electric power systems. This unclassified research effort is under the technical leadership of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper presents a brief perspective of EMP phenomenology and important interaction issues for power systems based on research performed by Westinghouse Advanced Systems Technology as a principal subcontractor in the research effort.

  18. Network effects, cascades and CCP interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaobing; Hu, Haibo; Pritsker, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    To control counterparty risk, financial regulations such as the Dodd Frank Act are increasingly requiring standardized derivatives trades to be cleared by central counterparties (CCPs). It is anticipated that in the near-term future, CCPs across the world will be linked through interoperability agreements that facilitate risk-sharing but also serve as a conduit for transmitting shocks. This paper theoretically studies a network with CCPs that are linked through interoperability arrangements, and studies the properties of the network that contribute to cascading failures. The magnitude of the cascading is theoretically related to the strength of network linkages, the size of the network, the logistic mapping coefficient, a stochastic effect and CCP's defense lines. Simulations indicate that larger network effects increase systemic risk from cascading failures. The size of the network N raises the threshold value of shock sizes that are required to generate cascades. Hence, the larger the network, the more robust it will be.

  19. Spatial filtering by using cascading plasmonic gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yia-Chung; Tsai, Din Ping

    2009-04-13

    In this study, the optical properties of a plasmonic multilayer structure, consisting of two longitudinally cascaded gratings with a half pitch off-set, are investigated. The proposed structure, which is a system mixing extended and localized surface plasmon, forms transversely cascaded metal/insulator/metal cavities. The angle dependent reflection spectrum of the proposed structure displays a resonance peak at a specific angle. The full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of the resonant peak is smaller than 3 degrees. The angular dispersion of the cascading plasmonic gratings is about d theta/d lambda =0.15 degrees/nm. The cascading plasmonic gratings can be used as a spatial filter to improve the spatial coherence of a light source.

  20. Determining the direction of a turbulent cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldburg, Walter; Cerbus, Rory

    2015-11-01

    In two-dimensional (2D) turbulence, one expects a cascade of energy to larger spatial scales, while the enstrophy cascade is to smaller ones. Here we present a new tool to study cascades using simple ideas borrowed from information theory. It is entirely unrelated to the Navier-Stoke's equations or any scaling arguments. We use the conditional entropy (conditioned uncertainty) of velocity fluctuations on one scale conditioned on another larger or smaller scale. If the entropy is larger after conditioning on larger scales rather than smaller ones, then the cascade is to smaller scales. By varying the scale of the velocity fluctuations used in the conditioning, we can test both direction and locality. We use these tools on experimental data taken from a flowing soap film, an approximately 2D turbulent flow. The Reynolds number is varied over a wide range to determine the entropy's scaling with Reynolds number OIST.

  1. Displacement Cascade Damage Production in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Malerba, Lorenzo; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in microstructure and mechanical properties in structural materials are the result of a complex set of physical processes initiated by the collision between an energetic particle (neutron or ion) and an atom in the lattice. This primary damage event is called an atomic displacement cascade. The simplest description of a displacement cascade is to view it as a series of many billiard-ball-like elastic collisions among the atoms in the material. This chapter describes the formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the relevant variables such as cascade energy and irradiation temperature is discussed, and defect formation in different materials is compared.

  2. Modeling and analysis of cascade solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F. D.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review is given of the present status of the development of cascade solar cells. It is known that photovoltaic efficiencies can be improved through this development. The designs and calculations of the multijunction cells, however, are quite complicated. The main goal is to find a method which is a compromise between accuracy and simplicity for modeling a cascade solar cell. Three approaches are presently under way, among them (1) equivalent circuit approach, (2) numerical approach, and (3) analytical approach. Here, the first and the second approaches are discussed. The equivalent circuit approach using SPICE (Simulation Program, Integrated Circuit Emphasis) to the cascade cells and the cascade-cell array is highlighted. The methods of extracting parameters for modeling are discussed.

  3. On Asymmetric Classifier Training for Detector Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Timothy Felix

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the Asymmetric AdaBoost algorithm introduced by Viola and Jones for cascaded face detection. The Viola and Jones face detector uses cascaded classifiers to successively filter, or reject, non-faces. In this approach most non-faces are easily rejected by the earlier classifiers in the cascade, thus reducing the overall number of computations. This requires earlier cascade classifiers to very seldomly reject true instances of faces. To reflect this training goal, Viola and Jones introduce a weighting parameter for AdaBoost iterations and show it enforces a desirable bound. During their implementation, a modification to the proposed weighting was introduced, while enforcing the same bound. The goal of this paper is to examine their asymmetric weighting by putting AdaBoost in the form of Additive Regression as was done by Friedman, Hastie, and Tibshirani. The author believes this helps to explain the approach and adds another connection between AdaBoost and Additive Regression.

  4. Cascaded coal dryer for a coking plant

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, V.; Heinz, R.; Jokisch, F.; Schmid, K.

    1984-02-07

    In a coking process, coal to be coked is preheated in a cascaded whirling bed dryer into which the coal is charged from above and exposed to an indirect heat transfer while whirling in a coal-steam mixture. Hot gas applied to the heating pipes in respective cascades of the dryer is branched off from the total amount of hot gases discharged from a dry cooler in which hot coke from the coke oven is cooled by recirculating cooler gas constituted by a partial gas stream discharged from the cascades of the dryer and reunited with the other partial stream subject to a heat exchange for generating steam. Steam from the whirling beds is discharged from the cascaded dryer, separated from the entrained dust particles, and then the excessive steam is drained in a branch conduit and the remaining steam is compressed and reintroduced into the lowermost whirling bed in the dryer.

  5. Electromagnetic Meissner-Effect Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic Meissner-effect launching apparatus differs from previous electromagnetic launchers; no need for electromagnet coil on projectile. Result, no need for brush contacts and high-voltage commutation equipment to supply current directly to projectile coil, or for pulse circuitry to induce current in projectile coil if brush contacts not used. Compresses magnetic field surrounding rear surface of projectile, creating gradient of magnetic pressure pushing projectile forward.

  6. Electromagnetic Meissner-Effect Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic Meissner-effect launching apparatus differs from previous electromagnetic launchers; no need for electromagnet coil on projectile. Result, no need for brush contacts and high-voltage commutation equipment to supply current directly to projectile coil, or for pulse circuitry to induce current in projectile coil if brush contacts not used. Compresses magnetic field surrounding rear surface of projectile, creating gradient of magnetic pressure pushing projectile forward.

  7. High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-09

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 01-2-620A High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP...planning and execution of testing Army/DOD equipment to determine the effects of Horizontal Component High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP... Electromagnetic Pulse Horizontal Electromagnetic Pulse Advanced Fast Electromagnetic Pulse Nuclear Weapons Effect Testing and Environments 16. SECURITY

  8. Electromagnetic Induction Aberration: The Possible Mechanism of Tic Douloureux

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A theory based on the principles of electromagnetic induction aberration is presented as the possible mechanism of classic trigeminal neuralgia, tic douloureux. The anatomy of the dorsal root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve at the pons in the proximity of the superior cerebellar artery presents a scenario conducive to the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction. When the action potentials traversing the axons in this zone of the compromised myelin come into juxtaposition with the vascular structure, the criteria for electromagnetic induction are satisfied. The laws of physics governing the phenomenon indicate that a new current, an aberration, would be produced. This could be responsible for the clinical symptoms of tic douloureux. Other clinical situations with similar features could share this mechanism. This proposed theory, a merger of anatomy, neurophysiology, and the physics of electromagnetic induction, extends the established concept of vascular compression as the etiology of tic douloureux. PMID:26180679

  9. Electromagnetic Induction Aberration: The Possible Mechanism of Tic Douloureux.

    PubMed

    Rish, Berkley

    2015-03-01

    A theory based on the principles of electromagnetic induction aberration is presented as the possible mechanism of classic trigeminal neuralgia, tic douloureux. The anatomy of the dorsal root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve at the pons in the proximity of the superior cerebellar artery presents a scenario conducive to the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction. When the action potentials traversing the axons in this zone of the compromised myelin come into juxtaposition with the vascular structure, the criteria for electromagnetic induction are satisfied. The laws of physics governing the phenomenon indicate that a new current, an aberration, would be produced. This could be responsible for the clinical symptoms of tic douloureux. Other clinical situations with similar features could share this mechanism. This proposed theory, a merger of anatomy, neurophysiology, and the physics of electromagnetic induction, extends the established concept of vascular compression as the etiology of tic douloureux.

  10. Through casing weak electromagnetic wave signal detection and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Xi-Fang; Cui, Cui-Mei

    2017-07-01

    Electromagnetic measurement technology is an important method for instrument parameters calibration, detection performance evaluation and complex system theory verification. In this paper, self-adaptive finite element method has been used to compute and analyze the weak electromagnetic wave signal, which is produced by changing electrode structure, transmitting frequency and antenna spacing of the through casing electromagnetic measurement tool. Numerical simulation results show that the detection depth of the tool can be influenced by the electrode structure can have the influence on, the resolution of high-resistivity and low-resistivity formation can be improved by transmitting frequency, the detection accuracy and detection depth of the through casing electromagnetic measurement tool can be influenced by the change of antenna spacing.

  11. Innovation cascades: artefacts, organization and attributions.

    PubMed

    Lane, David A

    2016-03-19

    Innovation cascades inextricably link the introduction of new artefacts, transformations in social organization, and the emergence of new functionalities and new needs. This paper describes a positive feedback dynamic, exaptive bootstrapping, through which these cascades proceed, and the characteristics of the relationships in which the new attributions that drive this dynamic are generated. It concludes by arguing that the exaptive bootstrapping dynamic is the principal driver of our current Innovation Society. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Supersonic Chordwise Bending Flutter in Cascades

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-31

    such a flutter boundary can be made by utilizing the trend lines predicted from a supersonic analysis based on supersonic cascade theory (Appendix I...bonding agent was injected via hypodermic needles after the blade tabs were properly inserted, The integrity and repeatability of the mounting of the indi...in conjunction with NASTRAN predictions and supersonic cascade aerodynamic computa- tions. Comparisons between theory and experiment are discussed. DD

  13. Cascaded Second-Order Nonlinearities in Waveguides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundheimer, Michael Lee

    The cascaded second-order nonlinearity arising from the second-harmonic generation process in noncentrosymmetric media is a novel approach to achieving the nonlinear phase shifts required for all-optical signal processing. The research presented in this dissertation demonstrated and measured the cascaded second-order nonlinearity for the first time in viable integrated optical waveguide formats. Cascaded self-phase modulation was measured in potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO_4 or KTP) segmented quasi-phasematched waveguides at wavelengths near 855 nm and in the optical fiber telecommunications window near 1.585 μm using picosecond and femtosecond pulses, respectively. Spectral modulation and broadening were observed on the output fundamental spectrum and compared to predictions from pulsed second -harmonic generation theory under conditions of group-velocity mismatch (temporal walk-off) and group-velocity dispersion. Peak cascaded phase shifts of the fundamental of approximately pi at 855 nm were inferred with 690 W of peak guided power. Peak cascaded phase shifts of approximately pi/2 were inferred at 1.585 μm with 760 W of peak power in the guide. Direct interferometric measurements of the magnitude and sign of the cascaded nonlinear phase shift of the fundamental were performed in temperature-tuned lithium niobate (LiNbO _3) channel waveguides at 1.32 mum. The cascaded phase shift was shown to change sign upon passing through the phasematching condition, as required by theory. Peak cascaded phase shifts of +0.53 pi and -0.13 pi were measured for 86 W peak power in these waveguides. A non-uniform temperature profile along the waveguide led to a non-uniform wavevector-mismatch along the guide, resulting in an enhanced positive phase shift and an increased temperature bandwidth for the phase shift. The phase shifts achieved in this research are large enough to be suitable for some all-optical signal processing functions.

  14. Recent biocatalytic oxidation–reduction cascades

    PubMed Central

    Schrittwieser, Joerg H; Sattler, Johann; Resch, Verena; Mutti, Francesco G; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The combination of an oxidation and a reduction in a cascade allows performing transformations in a very economic and efficient fashion. The challenge is how to combine an oxidation with a reduction in one pot, either by running the two reactions simultaneously or in a stepwise fashion without isolation of intermediates. The broader availability of various redox enzymes nowadays has triggered the recent investigation of various oxidation–reduction cascades. PMID:21130024

  15. Recent biocatalytic oxidation-reduction cascades.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Joerg H; Sattler, Johann; Resch, Verena; Mutti, Francesco G; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    The combination of an oxidation and a reduction in a cascade allows performing transformations in a very economic and efficient fashion. The challenge is how to combine an oxidation with a reduction in one pot, either by running the two reactions simultaneously or in a stepwise fashion without isolation of intermediates. The broader availability of various redox enzymes nowadays has triggered the recent investigation of various oxidation-reduction cascades. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Innovation cascades: artefacts, organization and attributions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Innovation cascades inextricably link the introduction of new artefacts, transformations in social organization, and the emergence of new functionalities and new needs. This paper describes a positive feedback dynamic, exaptive bootstrapping, through which these cascades proceed, and the characteristics of the relationships in which the new attributions that drive this dynamic are generated. It concludes by arguing that the exaptive bootstrapping dynamic is the principal driver of our current Innovation Society. PMID:26926284

  17. Electromagnetic force, jerk, and electric gun projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zowarka, R. C.; Kajs, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The electromagnetic forces that affect the mechanical loading of railgun projectiles are examined. Jerk is defined in terms of electromagnetic parameters, and examples of stress amplification with increasing acceleration rate are given. Maps of ideal performance are presented on the basis of idealized current waveforms modified to observe railgun and projectile structural limitations. In a railgun system driven with inductive stores, the opening switch function has to be modified to produce the desired acceleration profile. A modification to explosive opening switches which allows the control of the developed voltage of the switch and therefore the rate of rise of current in the railgun is described. Experimental data demonstrating this capability on the Balcones 60 MJ power supply are presented.

  18. Electromagnetic Signatures of Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    During the final moments of a binary black hole (BH) merger, the gravitational wave (GW) flux emitted from the system is greater than the combined electromagnetic luminosity of the entire observable universe. However, the extremely weak coupling between GWs and matter makes these waves very difficult to detect directly. Fortunately, the inspiraling BH system will interact strongly--on a purely Newtonian level--with any surrounding matter in the host galaxy, and this matter can in turn produce unique electromagnetic signals detectable at Earth. The nature of these signals varies widely, from the impressions left on stellar density distributions to the production of runaway quasars that escape from the galactic center at speeds of thousands of km/s. I will describe a number of these different signatures, and discuss their expected event rates and potentials for positive identification, long before direct GW detectors like LISA come online.

  19. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  20. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  1. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D.; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L.

    2016-01-01

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals. PMID:26853460

  2. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D.; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L.

    2016-02-01

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals.

  3. Dielectric Sensors Based on Electromagnetic Energy Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Omar; Kashanianfard, Mani; Ramahi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    We show that metallic wires embedded in narrow waveguide bends and channels demonstrate resonance behavior at specific frequencies. The electromagnetic energy at these resonances tunnels through the narrow waveguide channels with almost no propagation losses. Under the tunneling behavior, high-intensity electromagnetic fields are produced in the vicinity of the metallic wires. These intense field resonances can be exploited to build highly sensitive dielectric sensors. The sensor operation is explained with the help of full-wave simulations. A practical setup consisting of a 3D waveguide bend is presented to experimentally observe the tunneling phenomenon. The tunneling frequency is predicted by determining the input impedance minima through a variational formula based on the Green function of a probe-excited parallel plate waveguide. PMID:25835188

  4. Radiated fields from an electromagnetic pulse simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, M.; Delisle, G. Y.; Kashyap, S.

    Simulators of electromagnetic pulses allow generation within a limited time of very high-intensity fields such as those produced in a nuclear explosion. These fields can be radiated out of the test zone at a lower but nevertheless significant level; if the intensity of these fields is sufficiently high, damage to humans and electronic equipment can result. An evaluation of the potential danger of these simulator emissions requires knowledge of the amplitude, duration, and the energy of the radiated impulses. A technique is presented for calculating the fields radiated by a parallel-plane electromagnetic pulse simulator. The same method can also be applied to a rhombic type simulator. Sample numerical results are presented along with the calculations of the energy and power density and a discussion of the formation of the field in the frequency domain.

  5. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing.

    PubMed

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L

    2016-02-08

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals.

  6. Experimental determination of unsteady blade element aerodynamics in cascades. Volume 2: Translation mode cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, R. E.; Rothrock, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    A two dimensional cascade of harmonically oscillating airfoils was designed to model a near tip section from a rotor which was known to have experienced supersonic translational model flutter. This five bladed cascade had a solidity of 1.52 and a setting angle of 0.90 rad. Unique graphite epoxy airfoils were fabricated to achieve the realistic high reduced frequency level of 0.15. The cascade was tested over a range of static pressure ratios approximating the blade element operating conditions of the rotor along a constant speed line which penetrated the flutter boundary. The time steady and time unsteady flow field surrounding the center cascade airfoil were investigated.

  7. Study of the fragmentation of a displacement cascade in subcascades within the Binary Collision Approximation framework

    SciTech Connect

    Luneville, Laurence; Simone, David; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    When a material is subjected to irradiation, many primary defects are cre- ated at the atomic level by sequences of ballistic collision events to form highly disordered regions defined as displacement cascades. The long term evolution of materials under irradiation is dictated by the number and the spatial distribution of the surviving defects in the displacement cascade. The peculiar power law shape of collision cross sections is responsible for the frag- mentation of a displacement cascade into smaller subcascades. However, it remains difficult to define a subcascade. Within the fractal geometry frame- work, we demonstrate in this work that the set of atomic trajectories in a displacement cascade exhibit a fractal behavior. From this analysis, we present a new criterion to describe the fragmentation of a displacement cas- cade and to calculate the distribution and the number of defects from this fragmentation. Such an analysis provides the natural framework to estimate the number of defects created in a displacement cascade to integrate with results of MD simulations. From this defiintion of the fragmentation of a displacement cascade, this work gives some new insights to describe both the primary defects produced in a material under irradiation and then to compare different irradiations performed with different particles.

  8. Computer Simulation of Cascade Damage in α-Iron with Carbon in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Calder F; Bacon, David J; Barashev, Aleksandr; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation method is used to investigate defect production by displacement cascades in iron with carbon (C) in solution. This is the first study of cascade damage in a metal containing interstitial solute. Iron is of particular interest because of the use of ferritic steels in plant for nuclear power generation. Cascades are simulated with energy in the range 5 to 20keV in iron at either 100 or 600K containing carbon with concentration in the range 0 to 1at%. C in solution has no discernible effect on the number of defects produced in cascades under any of the conditions simulated, nor on the clustered fraction of either self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) or vacancies. However, significant fractions of single SIAs and vacancies are trapped by C in the cascade process, irrespective of cascade energy. The fraction is independent of temperature for vacancies, but increases strongly with temperature for SIAs: this is a consequence of the higher mobility of the SIA.

  9. Effect of collision cascades on dislocations in tungsten: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, B. Q.; Fitzgerald, S. P.; Hou, Q.; Wang, J.; Li, M.

    2017-02-01

    Tungsten (W) is the prime candidate material for the divertor and other plasma-facing components in DEMO. The point defects (i.e. vacancies and self-interstitials) produced in collision cascades caused by incident neutrons aggregate into dislocation loops (and voids), which strongly affect the mechanical properties. The point defects also interact with existing microstructural features, and understanding these processes is crucial for modelling the long term microstructural evolution of the material under fusion conditions. In this work, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of cascades interacting with initially straight edge dislocation dipoles. It was found that the residual vacancy number usually exceeds the residual interstitial number for cascades interacting with vacancy type dipoles, but for interstitial type dipoles these are close. We observed that a cascade near a dislocation promotes climb, i.e. it facilitates the movement of point defects along the climb direction. We also observed that the dislocations move easily along the glide direction, and that kinks are formed near the centre of the cascade, which then facilitate the movement of the dipoles. Some dipoles are sheared off by the cascade, and this is dependent on PKA energy, position, direction, and the width of dipole.

  10. Emergence of event cascades in inhomogeneous networks

    PubMed Central

    Onaga, Tomokatsu; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    There is a commonality among contagious diseases, tweets, and neuronal firings that past events facilitate the future occurrence of events. The spread of events has been extensively studied such that the systems exhibit catastrophic chain reactions if the interaction represented by the ratio of reproduction exceeds unity; however, their subthreshold states are not fully understood. Here, we report that these systems are possessed by nonstationary cascades of event-occurrences already in the subthreshold regime. Event cascades can be harmful in some contexts, when the peak-demand causes vaccine shortages, heavy traffic on communication lines, but may be beneficial in other contexts, such that spontaneous activity in neural networks may be used to generate motion or store memory. Thus it is important to comprehend the mechanism by which such cascades appear, and consider controlling a system to tame or facilitate fluctuations in the event-occurrences. The critical interaction for the emergence of cascades depends greatly on the network structure in which individuals are connected. We demonstrate that we can predict whether cascades may emerge, given information about the interactions between individuals. Furthermore, we develop a method of reallocating connections among individuals so that event cascades may be either impeded or impelled in a network. PMID:27625183

  11. Emergence of event cascades in inhomogeneous networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaga, Tomokatsu; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    There is a commonality among contagious diseases, tweets, and neuronal firings that past events facilitate the future occurrence of events. The spread of events has been extensively studied such that the systems exhibit catastrophic chain reactions if the interaction represented by the ratio of reproduction exceeds unity; however, their subthreshold states are not fully understood. Here, we report that these systems are possessed by nonstationary cascades of event-occurrences already in the subthreshold regime. Event cascades can be harmful in some contexts, when the peak-demand causes vaccine shortages, heavy traffic on communication lines, but may be beneficial in other contexts, such that spontaneous activity in neural networks may be used to generate motion or store memory. Thus it is important to comprehend the mechanism by which such cascades appear, and consider controlling a system to tame or facilitate fluctuations in the event-occurrences. The critical interaction for the emergence of cascades depends greatly on the network structure in which individuals are connected. We demonstrate that we can predict whether cascades may emerge, given information about the interactions between individuals. Furthermore, we develop a method of reallocating connections among individuals so that event cascades may be either impeded or impelled in a network.

  12. High Efficiency Cascade Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shuguang Deng, Seamus Curran, Igor Vasiliev

    2010-09-28

    This report summarizes the main work performed by New Mexico State University and University of Houston on a DOE sponsored project High Efficiency Cascade Solar Cells. The main tasks of this project include materials synthesis, characterization, theoretical calculations, organic solar cell device fabrication and test. The objective of this project is to develop organic nano-electronic-based photovoltaics. Carbon nanotubes and organic conjugated polymers were used to synthesize nanocomposites as the new active semiconductor materials that were used for fabricating two device architectures: thin film coating and cascade solar cell fiber. Chemical vapor deposition technique was employed to synthesized a variety of carbon nanotubes (single-walled CNT, doubled-walled CNT, multi-walled CNT, N-doped SWCNT, DWCNT and MWCNT, and B-doped SWCNT, DWCNT and MWCNT) and a few novel carbon structures (CNT-based nanolance, nanocross and supported graphene film) that have potential applications in organic solar cells. Purification procedures were developed for removing amorphous carbons from carbon nanotubes, and a controlled oxidation method was established for partial truncation of fullerene molecules. Carbon nanotubes (DWCNT and DWCNT) were functionalized with fullerenes and dyes covalently and used to form nanocomposites with conjugated polymers. Biologically synthesized Tellurium nanotubes were used to form composite with the conjugated polymers as well, which generated the highest reported optical limiting values from composites. Several materials characterization technique including SEM/TEM, Raman, AFM, UV-vis, adsorption and EDS were employed to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the carbon nanotubes, the functionalized carbon nanotubes and the nanocomposites synthesized in this project. These techniques allowed us to have a spectroscopic and morphological control of the composite formation and to understand the materials assembled. A parallel 136-CPU

  13. Comparative study of displacement cascades simulated with 'magnetic' potentials and Mendelev-type potential in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chan; Tian, Dongfeng; Li, Maosheng; Qian, Dazhi

    2017-04-01

    Different interatomic potentials produce displacement cascades with different features, and hence they significantly influence the results obtained from the displacement cascade simulations. The displacement cascade simulations in α-Fe have been carried out by molecular dynamics with three 'magnetic' potentials (MP) and Mendelev-type potential in this paper. Prior to the cascade simulations, the 'magnetic' potentials are hardened to suit for cascade simulations. We find that the peak time, maximum of defects, cascade volume and cascade density with 'magnetic' potentials are smaller than those with Mendelev-type potential. There is no significant difference within statistical uncertainty in the defect production efficiency with Mendelev-type potential and the second 'magnetic' potential at the same cascade energy, but remarkably smaller than those with the first and third 'magnetic' potential. Self interstitial atom (SIA) clustered fractions with 'magnetic' potentials are smaller than that with Mendelev-type potential, especially at the higher energy, due to the larger interstitial formation energies which result from the 'magnetic' potentials. The defect clustered fractions, which are input data for radiation damage accumulation models, may influence the prediction of microstructural evolution under radiation.

  14. Subsurface Microbial Ecosystems: A Photon Flux and a Metabolic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Alexander P.; Tejera, Frank; Libchaber, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Mud is a porous medium containing a high density of diverse microorganisms. It is out of equilibrium as the energy from a photon flux is dissipated by a cascade of biochemical reactions, mediated by the metabolisms of the constituent organisms. Despite its complexity, microbes in nature self-organize into simple reproducible patterns. We present two experiments in which the dynamics of natural mud coming to steady state are observed and modeled. In the first, the oxygen gradient produced by cyanobacteria in an imposed light gradient is measured. In the second, a thin front of oxygen-consuming microbes forms at the penetration depth of oxygen and moves with the changing oxygen gradient.

  15. Subsurface Microbial Ecosystems: A Photon Flux and a Metabolic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Alexander P.; Tejera, Frank; Libchaber, Albert

    2017-05-01

    Mud is a porous medium containing a high density of diverse microorganisms. It is out of equilibrium as the energy from a photon flux is dissipated by a cascade of biochemical reactions, mediated by the metabolisms of the constituent organisms. Despite its complexity, microbes in nature self-organize into simple reproducible patterns. We present two experiments in which the dynamics of natural mud coming to steady state are observed and modeled. In the first, the oxygen gradient produced by cyanobacteria in an imposed light gradient is measured. In the second, a thin front of oxygen-consuming microbes forms at the penetration depth of oxygen and moves with the changing oxygen gradient.

  16. The Dynamics of Cascaded Monod System Models Through Five Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Charles C.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A Monod system model is a set of ordinary differential equations where the terms resemble those which Monod described in his 1949 paper. We focus on the multiple trophic level case in which each trophic level uses only one of the trophic levels for its perpetuation, and no two trophic entities use the same trophic cascaded level. The treatment derives from a primary producer progressively through five trophic levels. Stability types are identified and are related to persistence, and the consequences of some intuitive scaling structures are developed. These considerations are useful to some theoretical questions in ecology and to applications such as bioreactor operation.

  17. Duality cascade in brane inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, Rachel; Chen Xingang; Hailu, Girma; Henry Tye, S-H; Xu Jiajun E-mail: xgchen@mit.edu E-mail: tye@lepp.cornell.edu

    2008-03-15

    We show that brane inflation is very sensitive to tiny sharp features in extra dimensions, including those in the potential and in the warp factor. This can show up as observational signatures in the power spectrum and/or non-Gaussianities of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). One general example of such sharp features is a succession of small steps in a warped throat, caused by Seiberg duality cascade using gauge/gravity duality. We study the cosmological observational consequences of these steps in brane inflation. Since the steps come in a series, the prediction of other steps and their properties can be tested by future data and analysis. It is also possible that the steps are too close to be resolved in the power spectrum, in which case they may show up only in the non-Gaussianity of the CMB temperature fluctuations and/or EE polarization. We study two cases. In the slow-roll scenario, where steps appear in the inflaton potential, the sensitivity of brane inflation to the height and width of the steps is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to that in previously studied large field models. In the IR DBI scenario, where steps appear in the warp factor, we find that the glitches in the power spectrum caused by these sharp features are generally small or even unobservable, but associated distinctive non-Gaussianity can be large. Together with its large negative running of the power spectrum index, this scenario clearly illustrates how rich and different a brane inflationary scenario can be when compared to generic slow-roll inflation. Such distinctive stringy features may provide a powerful probe of superstring theory.

  18. Electromagnetic levitation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bayazitoglu, Y.

    1996-11-01

    At high temperatures, most materials react with the walls of their containers. This inevitably leads to material contamination and property degradation. Therefore, it becomes difficult to process materials to the required degree of purity and/or measure their properties at high temperatures. Levitation melting has been used on earth and microgravity since to circumvent this problem. In this paper, first a broad survey of the work done in electromagnetic levitation since its invention is given. Then the heat generation due to an alternating magnetic field is studied. Finally, the application of levitation melting in the determination of thermal diffusivity, emissivity, surface tension and viscosity of liquid metals is presented.

  19. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Dahl, L.R.

    1996-06-25

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom. 9 figs.

  20. Electromagnetic Meissner effect launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electromagnetic projectile launcher provides acceleration of a superconducting projectile through the diamagnetic repulsion of the superconducting projectile. A superconducting layer is provided aft of the projectile, either directly on the projectile or on a platform upon which the projectile is carried, and a traveling magnetic field is caused to propagate along a magnetic field drive coil in which the projectile is disposed. The resulting diamagnetic repulsion between the superconducting projectile and the traveling magnetic field causes the projectile to be propelled along the coil. In one embodiment, a segmented drive coil is used to generate the traveling magnetic field.

  1. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1996-01-01

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom.

  2. Electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Jenet, F. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-02-15

    The first large-scale simulations of continuously driven, two-dimensional electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence are performed, for electron thermal speeds 0.01c{<=}v{<=}0.57c, by integrating the Zakharov equations for coupled Langmuir and transverse (T) waves near the plasma frequency. Turbulence scalings and wave number spectra are calculated, a transition is found from a mix of trapped and free T eigenstates for v{>=}0.1c to just free eigenstates for v{<=}0.1c, and wave energy densities are observed to undergo slow quasiperiodic oscillations.

  3. Advanced electromagnetic gun simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. L.; George, E. B.; Lippert, J. R.; Balius, A. R.

    1986-11-01

    The architecture, software and application of a simulation system for evaluating electromagnetic gun (EMG) operability, maintainability, test data and performance tradeoffs are described. The system features a generic preprocessor designed for handling the large data rates necessary for EMG simulations. The preprocessor and postprocessor operate independent of the EMG simulation, which is viewed through windows by the user, who can then select the areas of the simulation desired. The simulation considers a homopolar generator, busbars, pulse shaping coils, the barrel, switches, and prime movers. In particular, account is taken of barrel loading by the magnetic field, Lorentz force and plasma pressure.

  4. Measurement of ion cascade energies through resolution degradation of alpha particle microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Horansky, Robert D.; Stiehl, Gregory M.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Ullom, Joel N.; Plionis, Alexander A.; Rabin, Michael W.

    2010-02-15

    Atomic cascades caused by ions impinging on bulk materials have remained of interest to the scientific community since their discovery by Goldstein in 1902. While considerable effort has been spent describing and, more recently, simulating these cascades, tools that can study individual events are lacking and several aspects of cascade behavior remain poorly known. These aspects include the material energies that determine cascade magnitude and the variation between cascades produced by monoenergetic ions. We have recently developed an alpha particle detector with a thermodynamic resolution near 100 eV full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and an achieved resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM for 5.3 MeV particles. The detector relies on the absorption of particles by a bulk material and a thermal change in a superconducting thermometer. The achieved resolution of this detector provides the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive technique and a factor of 8 improvement over semiconductor detectors. The exquisite resolution can be directly applied to improved measurements of fundamental nuclear decays and nuclear forensics. In addition, we propose that the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and achieved resolution is due to fluctuations in lattice damage caused by ion-induced cascades in the absorber. Hence, this new detector is capable of measuring the kinetic energy converted to lattice damage in individual atomic cascades. This capability allows new measurements of cascade dynamics; for example, we find that the ubiquitous modeling program, SRIM, significantly underestimates the lattice damage caused in bulk tin by 5.3 MeV alpha particles.

  5. Measurement of ion cascade energies through resolution degradation of alpha particle microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horansky, Robert D.; Stiehl, Gregory M.; Beall, James A.; Irwin, Kent D.; Plionis, Alexander A.; Rabin, Michael W.; Ullom, Joel N.

    2010-02-01

    Atomic cascades caused by ions impinging on bulk materials have remained of interest to the scientific community since their discovery by Goldstein in 1902. While considerable effort has been spent describing and, more recently, simulating these cascades, tools that can study individual events are lacking and several aspects of cascade behavior remain poorly known. These aspects include the material energies that determine cascade magnitude and the variation between cascades produced by monoenergetic ions. We have recently developed an alpha particle detector with a thermodynamic resolution near 100 eV full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and an achieved resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM for 5.3 MeV particles. The detector relies on the absorption of particles by a bulk material and a thermal change in a superconducting thermometer. The achieved resolution of this detector provides the highest resolving power of any energy dispersive technique and a factor of 8 improvement over semiconductor detectors. The exquisite resolution can be directly applied to improved measurements of fundamental nuclear decays and nuclear forensics. In addition, we propose that the discrepancy between the thermodynamic and achieved resolution is due to fluctuations in lattice damage caused by ion-induced cascades in the absorber. Hence, this new detector is capable of measuring the kinetic energy converted to lattice damage in individual atomic cascades. This capability allows new measurements of cascade dynamics; for example, we find that the ubiquitous modeling program, SRIM, significantly underestimates the lattice damage caused in bulk tin by 5.3 MeV alpha particles.

  6. Mechanism of short-term ERK activation by electromagnetic fields at mobile phone frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joseph; Kraus, Sarah; Hauptman, Yirmi; Schiff, Yoni; Seger, Rony

    2007-01-01

    The exposure to non-thermal microwave electromagnetic fields generated by mobile phones affects the expression of many proteins. This effect on transcription and protein stability can be mediated by the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades, which serve as central signalling pathways and govern essentially all stimulated cellular processes. Indeed, long-term exposure of cells to mobile phone irradiation results in the activation of p38 as well as the ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) MAPKs. In the present study, we have studied the immediate effect of irradiation on the MAPK cascades, and found that ERKs, but not stress-related MAPKs, are rapidly activated in response to various frequencies and intensities. Using signalling inhibitors, we delineated the mechanism that is involved in this activation. We found that the first step is mediated in the plasma membrane by NADH oxidase, which rapidly generates ROS (reactive oxygen species). These ROS then directly stimulate MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases) and allow them to cleave and release Hb-EGF [heparin-binding EGF (epidermal growth factor)]. This secreted factor activates the EGF receptor, which in turn further activates the ERK cascade. Thus this study demonstrates for the first time a detailed molecular mechanism by which electromagnetic irradiation from mobile phones induces the activation of the ERK cascade and thereby induces transcription and other cellular processes. PMID:17456048

  7. Bears benefit plants via a cascade with both antagonistic and mutualistic interactions.

    PubMed

    Grinath, Joshua B; Inouye, Brian D; Underwood, Nora

    2015-02-01

    Predators can influence primary producers by generating cascades of effects in ecological webs. These effects are often non-intuitive, going undetected because they involve many links and different types of species interactions. Particularly, little is understood about how antagonistic (negative) and mutualistic (positive) interactions combine to create cascades. Here, we show that black bears can benefit plants by consuming ants. The ants are mutualists of herbivores and protect herbivores from other arthropod predators. We found that plants near bear-damaged ant nests had greater reproduction than those near undamaged nests, due to weaker ant protection for herbivores, which allowed herbivore suppression by arthropod predators. Our results highlight the need to integrate mutualisms into trophic cascade theory, which is based primarily on antagonistic relationships. Predators are often conservation targets, and our results suggest that bears and other predators should be managed with the understanding that they can influence primary producers through many paths. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  8. Plasmonic electromagnetic hot spots temporally addressed by photoinduced molecular displacement.

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, M. L.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Vial, A.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Montgomery, J. M.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Univ. de Technologie de Troyes

    2009-04-23

    We report the observation of temporally varying electromagnetic hot spots in plasmonic nanostructures. Changes in the field amplitude, position, and spatial features are induced by embedding plasmonic silver nanorods in the photoresponsive azo-polymer. This polymer undergoes cis?trans isomerization and wormlike transport within resonant optical fields, producing a time-varying local dielectric environment that alters the locations where electromagnetic hot spots are produced. Finite-difference time-domain and Monte Carlo simulations that model the induced field and corresponding material response are presented to aid in the interpretation of the experimental results. Evidence for propagating plasmons induced at the ends of the rods is also presented.

  9. STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO INTENSE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    EXPLODING WIRES, *GLASS, *DAMAGE, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ENERGY CONVERSION, ENERGY CONVERSION, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ELECTROMAGNETIC ... RADIATION , PLASTICS, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), STRESSES, THERMAL STRESSES, INSTRUMENTATION, ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, ELECTRIC DISCHARGES, THERMOCOUPLES, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS.

  10. Metamaterials beyond electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Metamaterials are rationally designed man-made structures composed of functional building blocks that are densely packed into an effective (crystalline) material. While metamaterials are mostly associated with negative refractive indices and invisibility cloaking in electromagnetism or optics, the deceptively simple metamaterial concept also applies to rather different areas such as thermodynamics, classical mechanics (including elastostatics, acoustics, fluid dynamics and elastodynamics), and, in principle, also to quantum mechanics. We review the basic concepts, analogies and differences to electromagnetism, and give an overview on the current state of the art regarding theory and experiment—all from the viewpoint of an experimentalist. This review includes homogeneous metamaterials as well as intentionally inhomogeneous metamaterial architectures designed by coordinate-transformation-based approaches analogous to transformation optics. Examples are laminates, transient thermal cloaks, thermal concentrators and inverters, ‘space-coiling’ metamaterials, anisotropic acoustic metamaterials, acoustic free-space and carpet cloaks, cloaks for gravitational surface waves, auxetic mechanical metamaterials, pentamode metamaterials (‘meta-liquids’), mechanical metamaterials with negative dynamic mass density, negative dynamic bulk modulus, or negative phase velocity, seismic metamaterials, cloaks for flexural waves in thin plates and three-dimensional elastostatic cloaks.

  11. The HPS electromagnetic calorimeter

    DOE PAGES

    Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N.; Battaglieri, M.; ...

    2017-02-22

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) is searching for a new gauge boson, the so-called "heavy photon". Through its kinetic mixing with the Standard Model photon, this particle could decay into an electron-positron pair. It would then be detectable as a narrow peak in the invariant mass spectrum of such pairs, or, depending on its lifetime, by a decay downstream of the production target. The HPS experiment is installed in Hall-B of Jefferson Lab. This article presents the design and performance of one of the two detectors of the experiment, the electromagnetic calorimeter, during the runs performed in 2015-2016. The calorimeter's main purpose is to provide a fast trigger and reduce the copious background from electromagnetic processes through matching with a tracking detector. Finally, the detector is a homogeneous calorimeter, made of 442 lead-tungsten (PbWOmore » $$_4$$) scintillating crystals, each read-out by an avalanche photodiode coupled to a custom trans-impedance amplifier.« less

  12. Interactions between electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwan, H. P.

    1985-02-01

    We applied for this grant to support a workshop at Erice, Italy. This workshop has been commonly called Erice School and the main subject of this workshop is the interaction of electromagnetic fields with biological cells and molecules. The grant from ONR enabled us to invite American scientists to participants in this workshop and deliver scientific papers. The duration of the Erice School was ten days. Therefore, we had sufficient time to discuss the problems of electromagnetic radiations. Vigorous discussions took place during official sessions and during private conversations. The participants of this workshop are mostly those who have been active in the research on bioelectromagnetics, but there are some numbers of speakers who discussed the basic electrical and magnetic properties of polyelectrolytes, biological membranes and tissue. The workshop was unique in that there were participants with a variety of training backgrounds. This enabled us to exchange the information between applied scientists and basic scientists. Also, active exchanges of opinions took place between biological scientists and physical scientists.

  13. Electromagnetically driven liquid iris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Deasung; Jeong, Jin Won; Lee, Dae Young; Kim, Dae Geun; Chung, Sang Kug

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a tunable liquid iris driven by electromagnetic actuation for miniature cameras. To examine the magnetic effect on a ferrofluid, the contact angle modification of a sessile ferrofluid droplet is tested using a neodymium magnet and an electric coil which 2.5 A current is applied to. The contact angle variations of the ferrofluid droplet for each test are 21.3 and 18.1 degrees, respectively. As a proof of concept, a pretest of a tunable iris actuated by electromagnetic effect is performed by using a hollow cylinder cell. As applying the current, the aperture diameter is adjusted from 4.06 mm at 0A to 3.21 mm at 2.0A. Finally, a tunable liquid iris (9 x 9 x 2 mm3) , consisting of two connected circular microchannels, is realized using MEMS technology. the aperture diameter of the tunable liquid iris is able to be modified from 1.72 mm at 0 A to 1.15 mm at 2.6 A. This tunable optical iris has potential applications not only for portable electronic devices but also in biomedical fields such as optical coherence tomography and microsurgery. This work was supported by 2016 Research Fund of Myongji University.

  14. Metamaterials beyond electromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Metamaterials are rationally designed man-made structures composed of functional building blocks that are densely packed into an effective (crystalline) material. While metamaterials are mostly associated with negative refractive indices and invisibility cloaking in electromagnetism or optics, the deceptively simple metamaterial concept also applies to rather different areas such as thermodynamics, classical mechanics (including elastostatics, acoustics, fluid dynamics and elastodynamics), and, in principle, also to quantum mechanics. We review the basic concepts, analogies and differences to electromagnetism, and give an overview on the current state of the art regarding theory and experiment-all from the viewpoint of an experimentalist. This review includes homogeneous metamaterials as well as intentionally inhomogeneous metamaterial architectures designed by coordinate-transformation-based approaches analogous to transformation optics. Examples are laminates, transient thermal cloaks, thermal concentrators and inverters, 'space-coiling' metamaterials, anisotropic acoustic metamaterials, acoustic free-space and carpet cloaks, cloaks for gravitational surface waves, auxetic mechanical metamaterials, pentamode metamaterials ('meta-liquids'), mechanical metamaterials with negative dynamic mass density, negative dynamic bulk modulus, or negative phase velocity, seismic metamaterials, cloaks for flexural waves in thin plates and three-dimensional elastostatic cloaks.

  15. Electro-magnetic compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, H.

    1980-05-01

    The historical background to the growth in problems of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in UK Military aircraft is reviewed and the present approach for minimizing these problems during development is discussed. The importance of using representative aircraft for final EMC assessments is stressed, and the methods of approach in planning and executing such tests are also outlined. The present equipment qualification procedures are based on assumptions regarding the electromagnetic fields present within the airframe, and the nature of the coupling mechanisms. These cannot be measured with any certainty in representative aircraft. Thus EMC assessments rely on practical tests. Avionics systems critical to flight safety, and systems vital to mission effectiveness require test methods that provide a measure of the safety and performance margins available to account for variations that occur in production and service use. Some proven methods are available, notably for detonator circuits, but in most other areas further work is required. Encouraging process has been made in the use of current probes for the measurement of interfering signals on critical signal lines, in conjunction with complementary test house procedures, as a means for obtaining the safety margins required in flight and engine control systems. Performance margins for mission systems using digital techniques are difficult to determine, and there is a need for improved test techniques. The present EMC qualification tests for equipment in the laboratory do not guarantee freedom from interference when installed, and the results are limited in value for correlating with aircraft tests.

  16. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  17. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT), were developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters were flown in space, though only PPT's were used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPT's is quite poor, providing only approximately 8 percent efficiency at approximately 1000 s specific impulse. However, laboratory PPT's yielding 34 percent efficiency at 2000 s specific impulse were extensively tested, and peak performance levels of 53 percent efficiency at 5170 s specific impulse were demonstrated. MPD thrusters were flown as experiments on the Japanese MS-T4 spacecraft and the Space Shuttle and were qualified for a flight in 1994. The flight MPD thrusters were pulsed, with a peak performance of 22 percent efficiency at 2500 s specific impulse using ammonia propellant. Laboratory MPD thrusters were demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 700 s specific impulse using lithium propellant. While the PIT thruster has never been flown, recent performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 to 8000 s. The fundamental operating principles, performance measurements, and system level design for the three types of electromagnetic thrusters are reviewed, and available data on flight tests are discussed for the PPT and MPD thrusters.

  18. The HPS electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N.; Battaglieri, M.; Bondì, M.; Buchanan, E.; Calvo, D.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; D'Angelo, A.; Napoli, M. De; Vita, R. De; Dupré, R.; Egiyan, H.; Ehrhart, M.; Filippi, A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Girod, F.-X.; Guidal, M.; Holtrop, M.; Iurasov, V.; Kubarovsky, V.; Livingston, K.; McCarty, K.; McCormick, J.; McKinnon, B.; Osipenko, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Randazzo, N.; Rauly, E.; Raydo, B.; Rindel, E.; Rizzo, A.; Rosier, P.; Sipala, V.; Stepanyan, S.; Szumila-Vance, H.; Weinstein, L. B.

    2017-05-01

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) is searching for a new gauge boson, the so-called ;heavy photon.; Through its kinetic mixing with the Standard Model photon, this particle could decay into an electron-positron pair. It would then be detectable as a narrow peak in the invariant mass spectrum of such pairs, or, depending on its lifetime, by a decay downstream of the production target. The HPS experiment is installed in Hall-B of Jefferson Lab. This article presents the design and performance of one of the two detectors of the experiment, the electromagnetic calorimeter, during the runs performed in 2015-2016. The calorimeter's main purpose is to provide a fast trigger and reduce the copious background from electromagnetic processes through matching with a tracking detector. The detector is a homogeneous calorimeter, made of 442 lead-tungstate (PbWO4) scintillating crystals, each read out by an avalanche photodiode coupled to a custom trans-impedance amplifier.

  19. Knots in electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrayás, M.; Bouwmeester, D.; Trueba, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Maxwell equations in vacuum allow for solutions with a non-trivial topology in the electric and magnetic field line configurations at any given moment in time. One example is a space filling congruence of electric and magnetic field lines forming circles lying on the surfaces of nested tori. In this example the electric, magnetic and Poynting vector fields are orthogonal everywhere. As time evolves the electric and magnetic fields expand and deform without changing the topology and energy, while the Poynting vector structure remains unchanged while propagating with the speed of light. The topology is characterized by the concept of helicity of the field configuration. Helicity is an important fundamental concept and for massless fields it is a conserved quantity under conformal transformations. We will review several methods by which linked and knotted electromagnetic (spin-1) fields can be derived. A first method, introduced by A. Rañada, uses the formulation of the Maxwell equations in terms of differential forms combined with the Hopf map from the three-sphere S3 to the two-sphere S2. A second method is based on spinor and twistor theory developed by R. Penrose in which elementary twistor functions correspond to the family of electromagnetic torus knots. A third method uses the Bateman construction of generating null solutions from complex Euler potentials. And a fourth method uses special conformal transformations, in particular conformal inversion, to generate new linked and knotted field configurations from existing ones. This fourth method is often accompanied by shifting singularities in the field to complex space-time points. Of course the various methods must be closely related to one another although they have been developed largely independently and they suggest different directions in which to expand the study of topologically non-trivial field configurations. It will be shown how the twistor formulation allows for a direct extension to massless

  20. Electromagnetic direct implicit PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, A.B.

    1983-03-29

    Interesting modelling of intense electron flow has been done with implicit particle-in-cell simulation codes. In this report, the direct implicit PIC simulation approach is applied to simulations that include full electromagnetic fields. The resulting algorithm offers advantages relative to moment implicit electromagnetic algorithms and may help in our quest for robust and simpler implicit codes.

  1. SOME SPECULATIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An attempt is made to derive Maxwell’s equation of an Electromagnetic field, in vacuo, from the relativistic Liouville’s equation for the photon gas...intensity, while half of the difference of the two functions, divided by square root of (-1) is the magnetic field intensity. Two vector wave functions satisfy Maxwell’s equation of Electromagnetic wave in vacuo. (Author)

  2. Electromagnetics laboratory annual report, 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindell, I. V.; Sihvola, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    Activities of the Electromagnetics Laboratory during 1994 are described in this report. As highlights of the output stand the monographs Electromagnetic Waves in Chiral and Bi-Isotropic Media (Artech House, Boston) and History of Electrical Engineering (Otatieto, Espoo, in Finnish). Also, the total number of papers published and accepted for publication in international refereed journals show a new record, 40 items.

  3. Exploration of the Electromagnetic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullekrug, M.

    2009-01-01

    The electromagnetic environment is composed of electric and magnetic fields which result from man-made and natural sources. An elementary experiment is described to explore the electromagnetic environment by measuring electric fields in the frequency range from approximately equal to 10 to 24 000 Hz. The equipment required to conduct the…

  4. Exploration of the Electromagnetic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullekrug, M.

    2009-01-01

    The electromagnetic environment is composed of electric and magnetic fields which result from man-made and natural sources. An elementary experiment is described to explore the electromagnetic environment by measuring electric fields in the frequency range from approximately equal to 10 to 24 000 Hz. The equipment required to conduct the…

  5. Molecular dynamics studies of displacement cascades in Fe-Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} system

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, Manan Chandra, Sharat; Jaya, S. Mathi

    2016-05-23

    The effect of displacement cascade on Fe-Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} bilayer is studied using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Different PKA species – Fe, Y, Ti and O – with the same PKA energy of 8 keV are used to produce displacement cascades that encompass the interface. It is shown that Ti atom has the highest movement in the ballistic regime of cascades which can lead to Ti atoms moving out of the oxide clusters into the Fe matrix in ODS alloys.

  6. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  7. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  8. Nonuniversal BBN bounds on electromagnetically decaying particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-05-01

    In Poulin and Serpico [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 091101 (2015)] we recently argued that when the energy of a photon injected in the primordial plasma falls below the pair-production threshold the universality of the nonthermal photon spectrum from the standard theory of electromagnetic cascades onto a photon background breaks down. We showed that this could reopen or widen the parameter space for an exotic solution to the "lithium problem." Here we discuss another application, namely the impact that this has on nonthermal big bang nucleosynthesis constraints from He 4 , He 3 , and H 2 , using the parametric example of monochromatic photon injection of different energies. Typically, we find tighter bounds than those existing in the literature, up to more than 1 order of magnitude. As a consequence of the nonuniversality of the spectrum, the energy dependence of the photodissociation cross sections is important. We also compare the constraints obtained with current level and future reach of cosmic microwave background spectral distortion bounds.

  9. Quantum diffusion of electromagnetic fields of ultrarelativistic spin-half particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Balthazar; Tuchin, Kirill

    2017-10-01

    We compute electromagnetic fields created by a relativistic charged spin-half particle in empty space at distances comparable to the particle Compton wavelength. The particle is described as a wave packet evolving according to the Dirac equation. It produces the electromagnetic field that is essentially different from the Coulomb field due to the quantum diffusion effect.

  10. Seismo-Electromagnetic Emissions Related to Seismic Waves can Trigger TLEs

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, Leonid V.

    2009-04-27

    This paper deals with the rare high intensity electromagnetic pulses associated with earthquakes, whose spectrum signature differs from that of atmospherics produced by lightning discharges. On the basis of actual data records, cases of the generation of anomalous seismo-electromagnetic emissions are described. These natural sub-millisecond electromagnetic pulses were associated with the passage of seismic waves from earthquakes to Moscow, the place where the electromagnetic field observations were made. Space-time coupling has been revealed between exact seismic waves from the earthquakes, lightning triggering and Transient Luminous Events triggering.

  11. Quantitative modeling of forces in electromagnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Bijamov, Alex; Shubitidze, Fridon; Oliver, Piercen M; Vezenov, Dmitri V

    2010-11-15

    This paper discusses numerical simulations of the magnetic field produced by an electromagnet for generation of forces on superparamagnetic microspheres used in manipulation of single molecules or cells. Single molecule force spectroscopy based on magnetic tweezers can be used in applications that require parallel readout of biopolymer stretching or biomolecular binding. The magnetic tweezers exert forces on the surface-immobilized macromolecule by pulling a magnetic bead attached to the free end of the molecule in the direction of the field gradient. In a typical force spectroscopy experiment, the pulling forces can range between subpiconewton to tens of piconewtons. In order to effectively provide such forces, an understanding of the source of the magnetic field is required as the first step in the design of force spectroscopy systems. In this study, we use a numerical technique, the method of auxiliary sources, to investigate the influence of electromagnet geometry and material parameters of the magnetic core on the magnetic forces pulling the target beads in the area of interest. The close proximity of the area of interest to the magnet body results in deviations from intuitive relations between magnet size and pulling force, as well as in the force decay with distance. We discuss the benefits and drawbacks of various geometric modifications affecting the magnitude and spatial distribution of forces achievable with an electromagnet.

  12. Terahertz metasurface quantum-cascade VECSELs: theory and performance

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher; Chen, Daguan; ...

    2017-04-12

    A longstanding challenge for terahertz quantum-cascade (QC) lasers is achieving both a high power and high-quality beam pattern, this is due in part due to their use of sub-wavelength metallic waveguides. Recently, the vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) concept was demonstrated for the first time in the terahertz range and for a QC-laser. This is enabled by the development of an amplifying metasurface reflector capable of coupling incident free-space THz radiation to the QC-laser material such that it is amplified and re-radiated. The THz metasurface QC-VECSEL initiates a new approach for making QC-lasers with high power and excellent beam pattern. Furthermore,more » the ability to engineer the electromagnetic phase, amplitude, and polarization response of the metasurface enables lasers with new functionality. Our article provides an overview of the fundamental theory, design considerations, and recent results for high-performance THz QC-VECSELs.« less

  13. Cascade reactions catalyzed by metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2014-09-01

    Cascade or tandem reactions where two or more individual reactions are carried out in one pot constitute a clear example of process intensification, targeting the maximization of spatial and temporal productivity with mobilization of minimum resources. In the case of catalytic reactions, cascade processes require bi-/multifunctional catalysts that contain different classes of active sites. Herein, we show that the features and properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) make these solids very appropriate materials for the development of catalysts for cascade reactions. Due to composition and structure, MOFs can incorporate different types of sites at the metal nodes, organic linkers, or at the empty internal pores, allowing the flexible design and synthesis of multifunctional catalysts. After some introductory sections on the relevance of cascade reactions from the point of view of competitiveness, sustainability, and environmental friendliness, the main part of the text provides a comprehensive review of the literature reporting the use of MOFs as heterogeneous catalysts for cascade reactions including those that combine in different ways acid/base, oxidation/reduction, and metal-organic centers. The final section summarizes the current state of the art, indicating that the development of a first commercial synthesis of a high-added-value fine chemical will be a crucial milestone in this area.

  14. The boundary layer on compressor cascade blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, S.; Zierke, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of NASA Research Grant NSG-3264 is to characterize the flowfield about an airfoil in a cascade at chord Reynolds number(R sub C)near 5 x 10 to the 5th power. The program is experimental and combines laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) measurements with flow visualization techniques in order to obtain detailed flow data, e.g., boundary layer profiles, points of separation and the transition zone, on a cascade of highly-loaded compressor blades. The information provided by this study is to serve as benchmark data for the evaluation of current and future compressor cascade predictive models, in this way aiding in the compressor design process. Summarized is the research activity for the period 1 December 1985 through 1 June 1986. Progress made from 1 June 1979 through 1 December 1985 is presented. Detailed measurements have been completed at the initial cascade angle of 53 deg. (incidence angle 5 degrees). A three part study, based on that data, has been accepted as part of the 1986 Gas Turbine Conference and will be submitted for subsequent journal publication. Also presented are data for a second cascade angle of 45 deg (an incidence angle of 3 degrees).

  15. Janus spectra: cascades without local isotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional turbulent flows host two disparate cascades: of enstrophy and of energy. The phenomenological theory of turbulence, which provides the theoretical underpinning of these cascades, assumes local isotropy. This assumption has been amply verified via computational, experimental and field data amassed to date. Local isotropy mandates that the streamwise (u) and transverse (v) velocity fluctuations partake in the same cascade; consequently, the attendant spectral exponents (αu and αv) of the turbulent energy spectra are the same, αu =αv . Here we report experiments in soap-film flows where αu corresponds to the energy cascade, but concurrently αv corresponds to the enstrophy cascade, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Remarkably, the tools of phenomenological theory can be invoked to elucidate this manifestly anisotropic flow. Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology.

  16. Anomalous electromagnetic coupling via entanglement at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepyan, Gregory; Boag, Amir; Mordachev, Vladimir; Sinkevich, Eugene; Maksimenko, Sergey; Kuzhir, Polina; Miano, Giovanni; Portnoi, Mikhail E.; Maffucci, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Understanding unwanted mutual interactions between devices at the nanoscale is crucial for the study of the electromagnetic compatibility in nanoelectronic and nanophotonic systems. Anomalous electromagnetic coupling (crosstalk) between nanodevices may arise from the combination of electromagnetic interaction and quantum entanglement. In this paper we study in detail the crosstalk between two identical nanodevices, each consisting of a quantum emitter (atom, quantum dot, etc), capacitively coupled to a pair of nanoelectrodes. Using the generalized susceptibility concept, the overall system is modeled as a two-port within the framework of the electrical circuit theory and it is characterized by the admittance matrix. We show that the entanglement changes dramatically the physical picture of the electromagnetic crosstalk. In particular, the excitation produced in one of the ports may be redistributed in equal parts between both the ports, in spite of the rather small electromagnetic interactions. Such an anomalous crosstalk is expected to appear at optical frequencies in lateral GaAs double quantum dots. A possible experimental set up is also discussed. The classical concepts of interference in the operation of electronic devices, which have been known since the early days of radio-communications and are associated with electromagnetic compatibility, should then be reconsidered at the nanoscale.

  17. Electromagnetic Differential Measuring Method: Application in Microstrip Sensors Developing

    PubMed Central

    García-Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Nieto-Hidalgo, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation is energy that interacts with matter. The interaction process is of great importance to the sensing applications that characterize material media. Parameters like constant dielectric represent matter characteristics and they are identified using emission, interaction and reception of electromagnetic radiation in adapted environmental conditions. How the electromagnetic wave responds when it interacts with the material media depends on the range of frequency used and the medium parameters. Different disciplines use this interaction and provides non-intrusive applications with clear benefits, remote sensing, earth sciences (geology, atmosphere, hydrosphere), biological or medical disciplines use this interaction and provides non-intrusive applications with clear benefits. Electromagnetic waves are transmitted and analyzed in the receiver to determine the interaction produced. In this work a method based in differential measurement technique is proposed as a novel way of detecting and characterizing electromagnetic matter characteristics using sensors based on a microstrip patch. The experimental results, based on simulations, show that it is possible to obtain benefits from the behavior of the wave-medium interaction using differential measurement on reception of electromagnetic waves at different frequencies or environmental conditions. Differential method introduce advantages in measure processes and promote new sensors development. A new microstrip sensor that uses differential time measures is proposed to show the possibilities of this method. PMID:28718804

  18. Electromagnetic Differential Measuring Method: Application in Microstrip Sensors Developing.

    PubMed

    Ferrández-Pastor, Francisco Javier; García-Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Nieto-Hidalgo, Mario

    2017-07-18

    Electromagnetic radiation is energy that interacts with matter. The interaction process is of great importance to the sensing applications that characterize material media. Parameters like constant dielectric represent matter characteristics and they are identified using emission, interaction and reception of electromagnetic radiation in adapted environmental conditions. How the electromagnetic wave responds when it interacts with the material media depends on the range of frequency used and the medium parameters. Different disciplines use this interaction and provides non-intrusive applications with clear benefits, remote sensing, earth sciences (geology, atmosphere, hydrosphere), biological or medical disciplines use this interaction and provides non-intrusive applications with clear benefits. Electromagnetic waves are transmitted and analyzed in the receiver to determine the interaction produced. In this work a method based in differential measurement technique is proposed as a novel way of detecting and characterizing electromagnetic matter characteristics using sensors based on a microstrip patch. The experimental results, based on simulations, show that it is possible to obtain benefits from the behavior of the wave-medium interaction using differential measurement on reception of electromagnetic waves at different frequencies or environmental conditions. Differential method introduce advantages in measure processes and promote new sensors development. A new microstrip sensor that uses differential time measures is proposed to show the possibilities of this method.

  19. Electromagnetic launch of lunar material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, William R.; Kolm, Henry H.

    1992-01-01

    Lunar soil can become a source of relatively inexpensive oxygen propellant for vehicles going from low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) and beyond. This lunar oxygen could replace the oxygen propellant that, in current plans for these missions, is launched from the Earth's surface and amounts to approximately 75 percent of the total mass. The reason for considering the use of oxygen produced on the Moon is that the cost for the energy needed to transport things from the lunar surface to LEO is approximately 5 percent the cost from the surface of the Earth to LEO. Electromagnetic launchers, in particular the superconducting quenchgun, provide a method of getting this lunar oxygen off the lunar surface at minimal cost. This cost savings comes from the fact that the superconducting quenchgun gets its launch energy from locally supplied, solar- or nuclear-generated electrical power. We present a preliminary design to show the main features and components of a lunar-based superconducting quenchgun for use in launching 1-ton containers of liquid oxygen, one every 2 hours. At this rate, nearly 4400 tons of liquid oxygen would be launched into low lunar orbit in a year.

  20. A New Adaptive Mother Wavelet for Electromagnetic Transient Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillén, Daniel; Idárraga-Ospina, Gina; Cortes, Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Wavelet Transform (WT) is a powerful technique of signal processing, its applications in power systems have been increasing to evaluate power system conditions, such as faults, switching transients, power quality issues, among others. Electromagnetic transients in power systems are due to changes in the network configuration, producing non-periodic signals, which have to be identified to avoid power outages in normal operation or transient conditions. In this paper a methodology to develop a new adaptive mother wavelet for electromagnetic transient analysis is proposed. Classification is carried out with an innovative technique based on adaptive wavelets, where filter bank coefficients will be adapted until a discriminant criterion is optimized. Then, its corresponding filter coefficients will be used to get the new mother wavelet, named wavelet ET, which allowed to identify and to distinguish the high frequency information produced by different electromagnetic transients.