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Sample records for electromagnetic induction phenomena

  1. University Students' Understanding of Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guisasola, Jenaro; Almudi, Jose M.; Zuza, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined engineering and physical science students' understanding of the electromagnetic induction (EMI) phenomena. It is assumed that significant knowledge of the EMI theory is a basic prerequisite when students have to think about electromagnetic phenomena. To analyse students' conceptions, we have taken into account the fact that…

  2. Earthquake prediction with electromagnetic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Masashi, E-mail: hayakawa@hi-seismo-em.jp; Advanced Wireless & Communications Research Center, UEC, Chofu Tokyo; Earthquake Analysis Laboratory, Information Systems Inc., 4-8-15, Minami-aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 107-0062

    Short-term earthquake (EQ) prediction is defined as prospective prediction with the time scale of about one week, which is considered to be one of the most important and urgent topics for the human beings. If this short-term prediction is realized, casualty will be drastically reduced. Unlike the conventional seismic measurement, we proposed the use of electromagnetic phenomena as precursors to EQs in the prediction, and an extensive amount of progress has been achieved in the field of seismo-electromagnetics during the last two decades. This paper deals with the review on this short-term EQ prediction, including the impossibility myth of EQsmore » prediction by seismometers, the reason why we are interested in electromagnetics, the history of seismo-electromagnetics, the ionospheric perturbation as the most promising candidate of EQ prediction, then the future of EQ predictology from two standpoints of a practical science and a pure science, and finally a brief summary.« less

  3. Self field electromagnetism and quantum phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1994-07-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) has been extremely successful inits predictive capability for atomic phenomena. Thus the greatest hope for any alternative view is solely to mimic the predictive capability of quantum mechanics (QM), and perhaps its usefulness will lie in gaining a better understanding of microscopic phenomena. Many ?paradoxes? and problematic situations emerge in QED. To combat the QED problems, the field of Stochastics Electrodynamics (SE) emerged, wherein a random ?zero point radiation? is assumed to fill all of space in an attmept to explain quantum phenomena, without some of the paradoxical concerns. SE, however, has greater failings. One is that the electromagnetic field energy must be infinit eto work. We have examined a deterministic side branch of SE, ?self field? electrodynamics, which may overcome the probelms of SE. Self field electrodynamics (SFE) utilizes the chaotic nature of electromagnetic emissions, as charges lose energy near atomic dimensions, to try to understand and mimic quantum phenomena. These fields and charges can ?interact with themselves? in a non-linear fashion, and may thereby explain many quantum phenomena from a semi-classical viewpoint. Referred to as self fields, they have gone by other names in the literature: ?evanesccent radiation?, ?virtual photons?, and ?vacuum fluctuations?. Using self fields, we discuss the uncertainty principles, the Casimir effects, and the black-body radiation spectrum, diffraction and interference effects, Schrodinger's equation, Planck's constant, and the nature of the electron and how they might be understood in the present framework. No new theory could ever replace QED. The self field view (if correct) would, at best, only serve to provide some understanding of the processes by which strange quantum phenomena occur at the atomic level. We discuss possible areas where experiments might be employed to test SFE, and areas where future work may lie.

  4. Electromagnetic Induction Rediscovered Using Original Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Describes a teaching unit on electromagnetic induction using historic texts. Uses some of Faraday's diary entries from 1831 to introduce the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction and teach about the properties of electricity, of taking conclusions from experiment, and scientific methodology. (ASK)

  5. Portable Electromagnetic Induction Sensor with Integrated Positioning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-20

    Subsurface electromagnetic induction imaging for unexploded ordnance detection. Journal of Applied Geophysics, 79:38 – 45, 2012. ISSN 09269851. URL http...Portable Electromagnetic Induction Sensor with Integrated Positioning MR-1712 Final Report Submitted to Strategic Environmental Research and...19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8–98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 06–25–2013

  6. Some Student Conceptions of Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, Wai Meng; Gunstone, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Introductory electromagnetism is a central part of undergraduate physics. Although there has been some research into student conceptions of electromagnetism, studies have been sparse and separated. This study sought to explore second year physics students’ conceptions of electromagnetism, to investigate to what extent the results from the present study are similar to these results from other studies, and to uncover any new forms of alternative conceptions. Data for this study came from 15 in-depth interviews. Three previously unreported alternative conceptions were identified in the study: 1) induced current varies proportionately with current in solenoid; 2) there must be contact between magnetic flux and the external coil in order for any emf to be induced in the coil; 3) coulombic or electrostatic potential difference is present in an induced electric field. These alternative conceptions were manifested in these students’ explanations of electromagnetic phenomena presented to them during the interviews.

  7. Electromagnetic Induction with Neodymium Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Deborah; Sebranek, John

    2013-09-01

    In April 1820, Hans Christian Ørsted noticed that the needle of a nearby compass deflected briefly from magnetic north each time the electric current of the battery he was using for an unrelated experiment was turned on or off. Upon further investigation, he showed that an electric current flowing through a wire produces a magnetic field. In 1831 Michael Faraday and Joseph Henry separately expanded on Ørsted's discovery by showing that a changing magnetic field produces an electric current. Heinrich Lenz found in 1833 that an induced current has the opposite direction from the electromagnetic force that produced it. This paper describes an experiment that can help students to develop an understanding of Faraday's law and Lenz's law by studying the emf generated as a magnet drops through a set of coils having increasing numbers of turns.

  8. Research in Antenna Technology, Radar Technology and Electromagnetic Scattering Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-06

    a group of six researchers in the fields of electromagnetics , radar and antenna technology. Research was conducted during this reporting period in...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Research in Antenna technology, Radar Technology and Electromagnetic Scattering Phenomena...Matrix Theory Based on Gaussian Beams………...65 4.5.3 Array realization of complex-source beam……………………………85 4.5.4 Electromagnetic Scattering-Matrix

  9. Analyzing high school students' reasoning about electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelicic, Katarina; Planinic, Maja; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2017-06-01

    Electromagnetic induction is an important, yet complex, physics topic that is a part of Croatian high school curriculum. Nine Croatian high school students of different abilities in physics were interviewed using six demonstration experiments from electromagnetism (three of them concerned the topic of electromagnetic induction). Students were asked to observe, describe, and explain the experiments. The analysis of students' explanations indicated the existence of many conceptual and reasoning difficulties with the basic concepts of electromagnetism, and especially with recognizing and explaining the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction. Three student mental models of electromagnetic induction, formed during the interviews, which reoccurred among students, are described and analyzed within the knowledge-in-pieces framework.

  10. Science 101: What Causes Electromagnetic Induction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction is the technical name for the fact that, when a wire is moved near a magnet or a magnet is moved near a wire, an electric current flows in the wire. Although Bill Robertson honestly admits to not knowing why this happens, he does say that it is possible to get a deeper understanding of what's going on in terms of…

  11. Analyzing High School Students' Reasoning about Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelicic, Katarina; Planinic, Maja; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction is an important, yet complex, physics topic that is a part of Croatian high school curriculum. Nine Croatian high school students of different abilities in physics were interviewed using six demonstration experiments from electromagnetism (three of them concerned the topic of electromagnetic induction). Students were…

  12. Nonlinear Phenomena in Electromagnetic and Acoustic Wave Propagation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    W~ . f. W. ~.. ~ . . W-71 40. R. Burridge Poroelasticity equations derived from J. B. Keller microstructure Pub: J. Acoust . Soc. Am., 70, 1140...Pub: Coin. Pure Appl. Math., 36, 547-569, 1983. 91. J. B. Keller Asymptotic analysis of a viscous Cochlear model 1. C. ou Sub: J. Acoust . Soc. Am. 92...34RD-R49 螜 NONLINEAR PHENOMENA IN ELECTROMAGNETIC AND ACOUSTIC /1 NAVE PROPAORTION(U) STANFORD UNIV CA DEPT OF MATHEMATICS J B KELLER APR 84 ARO

  13. Assessment of precursory information in seismo-electromagnetic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, P.; Hattori, K.; Zhuang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Previous statistical studies showed that there were correlations between seismo-electromagnetic phenomena and sizeable earthquakes in Japan. In this study, utilizing Molchan's error diagram, we evaluate whether these phenomena contain precursory information and discuss how they can be used in short-term forecasting of large earthquake events. In practice, for given series of precursory signals and related earthquake events, each prediction strategy is characterized by the leading time of alarms, the length of alarm window, the alarm radius (area) and magnitude. The leading time is the time length between a detected anomaly and its following alarm, and the alarm window is the duration that an alarm lasts. The alarm radius and magnitude are maximum predictable distance and minimum predictable magnitude of earthquake events, respectively. We introduce the modified probability gain (PG') and the probability difference (D') to quantify the forecasting performance and to explore the optimal prediction parameters for a given electromagnetic observation. The above methodology is firstly applied to ULF magnetic data and GPS-TEC data. The results show that the earthquake predictions based on electromagnetic anomalies are significantly better than random guesses, indicating the data contain potential useful precursory information. Meanwhile, we reveal the optimal prediction parameters for both observations. The methodology proposed in this study could be also applied to other pre-earthquake phenomena to find out whether there is precursory information, and then on this base explore the optimal alarm parameters in practical short-term forecast.

  14. On coincident loop transient electromagnetic induction logging

    SciTech Connect

    Swidinsky, Andrei; Weiss, Chester J.

    Coincident loop transient induction wireline logging is examined as the borehole analog of the well-known land and airborne time-domain electromagnetic (EM) method. The concept of whole-space late-time apparent resistivity is modified from the half-space version commonly used in land and airborne geophysics and applied to the coincident loop voltages produced from various formation, borehole, and invasion models. Given typical tool diameters, off-time measurements with such an instrument must be made on the order of nanoseconds to microseconds — much more rapidly than for surface methods. Departure curves of the apparent resistivity for thin beds, calculated using an algorithm developed tomore » model the transient response of a loop in a multilayered earth, indicate that the depth of investigation scales with the bed thickness. Modeled resistivity logs are comparable in accuracy and resolution with standard frequency-domain focused induction logs. However, if measurement times are longer than a few microseconds, the thicknesses of conductors can be overestimated, whereas resistors are underestimated. Thin-bed resolution characteristics are explained by visualizing snapshots of the EM fields in the formation, where a conductor traps the electric field while two current maxima are produced in the shoulder beds surrounding a resistor. Radial profiling is studied using a concentric cylinder earth model. Results found that true formation resistivity can be determined in the presence of either oil- or water-based mud, although in the latter case, measurements must be taken several orders of magnitude later in time. Lastly, the ability to determine true formation resistivity is governed by the degree that the EM field heals after being distorted by borehole fluid and invasion, a process visualized and particularly evident in the case of conductive water-based mud.« less

  15. On coincident loop transient electromagnetic induction logging

    DOE PAGES

    Swidinsky, Andrei; Weiss, Chester J.

    2017-05-31

    Coincident loop transient induction wireline logging is examined as the borehole analog of the well-known land and airborne time-domain electromagnetic (EM) method. The concept of whole-space late-time apparent resistivity is modified from the half-space version commonly used in land and airborne geophysics and applied to the coincident loop voltages produced from various formation, borehole, and invasion models. Given typical tool diameters, off-time measurements with such an instrument must be made on the order of nanoseconds to microseconds — much more rapidly than for surface methods. Departure curves of the apparent resistivity for thin beds, calculated using an algorithm developed tomore » model the transient response of a loop in a multilayered earth, indicate that the depth of investigation scales with the bed thickness. Modeled resistivity logs are comparable in accuracy and resolution with standard frequency-domain focused induction logs. However, if measurement times are longer than a few microseconds, the thicknesses of conductors can be overestimated, whereas resistors are underestimated. Thin-bed resolution characteristics are explained by visualizing snapshots of the EM fields in the formation, where a conductor traps the electric field while two current maxima are produced in the shoulder beds surrounding a resistor. Radial profiling is studied using a concentric cylinder earth model. Results found that true formation resistivity can be determined in the presence of either oil- or water-based mud, although in the latter case, measurements must be taken several orders of magnitude later in time. Lastly, the ability to determine true formation resistivity is governed by the degree that the EM field heals after being distorted by borehole fluid and invasion, a process visualized and particularly evident in the case of conductive water-based mud.« less

  16. Modelling high frequency phenomena in the rotor of induction motors under no-load test conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boglietti, Aldo; Bottauscio, Oriano; Chiampi, Mario; Lazzari, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The paper aims to deep the electromagnetic phenomena in the rotor of induction motors produced during the no-load test by the high-order harmonics of the spatial distribution of magnetic flux. The analysis is carried out by a flux driven finite element procedure, which can take into account the hysteresis of magnetic material, the induced currents in rotor cage and the eddy currents in the laminations. The computed results, including losses and local waveforms of electrical and magnetic quantities, are finally discussed.

  17. Some Student Conceptions of Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thong, Wai Meng; Gunstone, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Introductory electromagnetism is a central part of undergraduate physics. Although there has been some research into student conceptions of electromagnetism, studies have been sparse and separated. This study sought to explore second year physics students' conceptions of electromagnetism, to investigate to what extent the results from the present…

  18. Investigating Electromagnetic Induction through a Microcomputer-Based Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumper, Ricardo; Gelbman, Moshe

    2000-01-01

    Describes a microcomputer-based laboratory experiment designed for high school students that very accurately analyzes Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction, addressing each variable separately while the others are kept constant. (Author/CCM)

  19. Endocardial Energy Harvesting by Electromagnetic Induction.

    PubMed

    Zurbuchen, Adrian; Haeberlin, Andreas; Bereuter, Lukas; Pfenniger, Alois; Bosshard, Simon; Kernen, Micha; Philipp Heinisch, Paul; Fuhrer, Juerg; Vogel, Rolf

    2018-02-01

    cardiac pacemakers require regular medical follow-ups to ensure proper functioning. However, device replacements due to battery depletion are common and account for ∼25% of all implantation procedures. Furthermore, conventional pacemakers require pacemaker leads which are prone to fractures, dislocations or isolation defects. The ensuing surgical interventions increase risks for the patients and costs that need to be avoided. in this study, we present a method to harvest energy from endocardial heart motions. We developed a novel generator, which converts the heart's mechanical into electrical energy by electromagnetic induction. A mathematical model has been introduced to identify design parameters strongly related to the energy conversion efficiency of heart motions and fit the geometrical constraints for a miniaturized transcatheter deployable device. The implemented final design was tested on the bench and in vivo. the mathematical model proved an accurate method to estimate the harvested energy. For three previously recorded heart motions, the model predicted a mean output power of 14.5, 41.9, and 16.9 μW. During an animal experiment, the implanted device harvested a mean output power of 0.78 and 1.7 μW at a heart rate of 84 and 160 bpm, respectively. harvesting kinetic energy from endocardial motions seems feasible. Implanted at an energetically favorable location, such systems might become a welcome alternative to extend the lifetime of cardiac implantable electronic device. the presented endocardial energy harvesting concept has the potential to turn pacemakers into battery- and leadless systems and thereby eliminate two major drawbacks of contemporary systems.

  20. Electromagnetic Induction Rediscovered Using Original Texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth Tu, Michael

    Some of Faraday's diary-entries from 1831 have been used frequently as starting point to introduce the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction. This has been done on various levels of knowledge and to pupils of different ages during the last 5 years. I try to let my pupils witness, how Faraday made his discovery, but to show as well, that we cannot infer from his notes, how he arrived at his ideas proper. Reading the original notes (in English), my pupils were expected to take out of it, what Faraday did at his lab, what apparatus he used and what his observations were. Why he did what he did was point of discussion later on. Just here, I expected, that my pupils learn a lot about the properties of electricity, of taking conclusions from experiment, of scientific methodology etc. In addition, we repeated some of Faradays experiments with modern quipment, realizing always to common surprise that the effects observed are extremely faint ones. Depending on knowledge, age and motivation of the group, Lenz's Law was rediscovered in succession. Here I myself try to find out, why Faradays initial mistake as for the direction of the induced current is likely to be overlooked even by the informed modern reader (myself included!). This may become part of a story, why this mistake of Faraday has found serious attention by historians of science only very recently. My approach was connected with group work with English courses, with the reading of more papers by Faraday and two times even with a visit of the Royal Institution at London. In any case, I always tried to put my pupils into the state of knowledge Faraday had at the time of his discovery before this unit, to make the process of discovery as correct as possible. For this claim is somewhat artificial at first glance, it may be an interesting point of discussion.

  1. Research in Antenna Technology, Radar Technology and Electromagnetic Scattering Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    efforts of a group of six researchers in the fields of electromagnetics , radar and antenna technology. Research was conducted during this reporting...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Research in Antenna technology, Radar Technology and Electromagnetic Scattering...Scattering-Matrix Theory Based on Gaussian Beams………...65 4.5.3 Array realization of complex-source beam……………………………85 4.5.4 Electromagnetic Scattering

  2. Fuel saver based on electromagnetic induction for automotive engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siregar, Houtman P.; Sibarani, Maradu

    2007-12-01

    In the considered research is designed and analyzed the performance of the fuel saver which is based on electromagnetic induction for automotive diesel engine. The fuel saver which is based on permanent magnet has sold in market and its performance has tested. In comparison to the former fuel saver, in the proposed work is produced fuel saver which is based on electromagnetic induction. The considered research is the continuation of my former work. Performance of the produced fuel saver which is installed in the fuel line of internal combustion engine rig is compared to the performance of the standard internal combustion engine rig Speed of the engine, wire diameter of coil, and number of coil which is coiled in the winding of the the fuel saver are chosen as the testing variables. The considered research has succeeded to design the fuel saver which is based on electromagnetic induction for saving the automotive fuel consumption. Results of the research show that the addition of the fuel saver which is based on electromagnetic induction to the flow of the diesel fuel can significantly save the automative fuel consumption. In addition the designed fuel saver can reduce the opacity of the emission gas.

  3. The Teaching of Electromagnetic Induction at Sixth Form Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archenhold, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some ideas about teaching electromagnetic induction at sixth form level, including educational objectives, learning difficulties, syllabus requirements, selection of unit system, and sequence of material presentation. Suggests the Education Group of the Institute of Physics hold further discussions on these aspects before including the…

  4. Electromagnetic, heat and fluid flow phenomena in levitated metal droplets both under earthbound and microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1988-01-01

    The purpose is to develop an improved understanding of the electromagnetic, heat, and fluid flow phenomena in electromagnetically levitated metal droplets, both under earthbound and microgravity conditions. The main motivation for doing this work, together with the past accomplishments, and the plans for future research are discussed.

  5. The calculation of transport phenomena in electromagnetically levitated metal droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation has been developed for the electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field, and solute concentration field of levitation-melted metal specimens. The governing equations consist of the conventional transport equations combined with the appropriate expressions for the electromagnetic force field. The predictions obtained by solving the governing equations numerically on a digital computer are in good agreement with lifting force and average temperature measurements reported in the literature.

  6. Electromagnetic induction sensor for dynamic testing of coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Yu, Yuanhua; Yu, Zhanjiang; Chen, Qimeng

    2018-03-01

    With the increasing demand for coagulation POCT for patients in the surgery department or the ICU, rapid coagulation testing techniques and methods have drawn widespread attention from scholars and businessmen. This paper proposes the use of electromagnetic induction sensor probe for detection of dynamic process causing changes in the blood viscosity and density before and after coagulation based on the damped vibration principle, in order to evaluate the coagulation status. Utilizing the dynamic principle, the differential equation of vibration system comprising elastic support and electromagnetic induction device is established through sensor dynamic modeling. The structural parameters of elastic support are optimized, and the circular sheet spring is designed. Furthermore, harmonic response analysis and vibration fatigue coupling analysis are performed on the elastic support of the sensor by considering the natural frequency of the system, and the electromagnetic induction sensor testing device is set up. Using the device and coagulation reagent, the standard curve for coagulation POCT is plotted, and the blood sample application in clinical patients is established, which are methodologically compared with the imported POCT coagulation analyzer. The results show that the sensor designed in this paper has a first-order natural frequency of 11.368 Hz, which can withstand 5.295 × 10 2 million times of compressions and rebounds. Its correlation with the results of SONOCLOT analyzer reaches 0.996, and the reproducibility 0.002. The electromagnetic induction coagulation testing sensor designed has good elasticity and anti-fatigue, which can meet the accuracy requirement of clinical detection. This study provides the core technology for developing the electromagnetic induction POCT instrument for dynamic testing of coagulation process.

  7. Subsurface Electromagnetic Induction Imaging for Unexploded Ordnance Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Baum, 1999; Pasion and Oldenburg, 2001). The EMI- response problem has been solved analytically for spheroids (Ao et al., 2002; Barrowes et al., 2004...components. We also have made explicit the fact that the polarizabilities are always positive ( Pasion et al., 2008); we impose this constraint in the...Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, UK. Pasion , L.R., Oldenburg, D.W., 2001. A discrimination algorithm for UXO using time- domain electromagnetic induction

  8. Analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Lani, A.; Panesi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This work addresses the modeling of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma discharges. In the proposed computational model, the electromagnetic induction equation is solved together with the set of Navier-Stokes equations in order to compute the electromagnetic and flow fields, accounting for their mutual interaction. Semi-classical statistical thermodynamics is used to determine the plasma thermodynamic properties, while transport properties are obtained from kinetic principles, with the method of Chapman and Enskog. Particle ambipolar diffusive fluxes are found by solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations with a simple iterative method. Two physico-mathematical formulations are used to model the chemical reaction processes: (1) A Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) formulation and (2) a thermo-chemical non-equilibrium (TCNEQ) formulation. In the TCNEQ model, thermal non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules is accounted for. The electronic states of the chemical species are assumed in equilibrium with the vibrational temperature, whereas the rotational energy mode is assumed to be equilibrated with translation. Three different physical models are used to account for the coupling of chemistry and energy transfer processes. Numerical simulations obtained with the LTE and TCNEQ formulations are used to characterize the extent of non-equilibrium of the flow inside the Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute. Each model was tested using different kinetic mechanisms to assess the sensitivity of the results to variations in the reaction parameters. A comparison of temperatures and composition profiles at the outlet of the torch demonstrates that the flow is in non-equilibrium for operating conditions characterized by pressures below 30 000 Pa, frequency 0.37 MHz, input power 80 kW, and mass flow 8 g/s.

  9. Analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma generators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Panesi, M., E-mail: mpanesi@illinois.edu; Lani, A.

    This work addresses the modeling of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma discharges. In the proposed computational model, the electromagnetic induction equation is solved together with the set of Navier-Stokes equations in order to compute the electromagnetic and flow fields, accounting for their mutual interaction. Semi-classical statistical thermodynamics is used to determine the plasma thermodynamic properties, while transport properties are obtained from kinetic principles, with the method of Chapman and Enskog. Particle ambipolar diffusive fluxes are found by solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations with a simple iterative method. Two physico-mathematical formulations are used to model the chemical reaction processes: (1) Amore » Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) formulation and (2) a thermo-chemical non-equilibrium (TCNEQ) formulation. In the TCNEQ model, thermal non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules is accounted for. The electronic states of the chemical species are assumed in equilibrium with the vibrational temperature, whereas the rotational energy mode is assumed to be equilibrated with translation. Three different physical models are used to account for the coupling of chemistry and energy transfer processes. Numerical simulations obtained with the LTE and TCNEQ formulations are used to characterize the extent of non-equilibrium of the flow inside the Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute. Each model was tested using different kinetic mechanisms to assess the sensitivity of the results to variations in the reaction parameters. A comparison of temperatures and composition profiles at the outlet of the torch demonstrates that the flow is in non-equilibrium for operating conditions characterized by pressures below 30 000 Pa, frequency 0.37 MHz, input power 80 kW, and mass flow 8 g/s.« less

  10. FDTD modelling of induced polarization phenomena in transient electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commer, Michael; Petrov, Peter V.; Newman, Gregory A.

    2017-04-01

    The finite-difference time-domain scheme is augmented in order to treat the modelling of transient electromagnetic signals containing induced polarization effects from 3-D distributions of polarizable media. Compared to the non-dispersive problem, the discrete dispersive Maxwell system contains costly convolution operators. Key components to our solution for highly digitized model meshes are Debye decomposition and composite memory variables. We revert to the popular Cole-Cole model of dispersion to describe the frequency-dependent behaviour of electrical conductivity. Its inversely Laplace-transformed Debye decomposition results in a series of time convolutions between electric field and exponential decay functions, with the latter reflecting each Debye constituents' individual relaxation time. These function types in the discrete-time convolution allow for their substitution by memory variables, annihilating the otherwise prohibitive computing demands. Numerical examples demonstrate the efficiency and practicality of our algorithm.

  11. Electromagnetic phenomena analysis in brushless DC motor with speed control using PWM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurys, Marek Pawel

    2017-12-01

    Field-circuit model of a brushless DC motor with speed control using PWM method was developed. Waveforms of electrical and mechanical quantities of the designed motor with a high pressure vane pump built in a rotor of the motor were computed. Analysis of electromagnetic phenomena in the system: single phase AC network - converter - BLDC motor was carried out.

  12. Using a PC and external media to quantitatively investigate electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Bozzo, G.; Camarca, M.; Sapia, P.

    2011-07-01

    In this article we describe an experimental learning path about electromagnetic induction which uses an Atwood machine where one of the two hanging bodies is a cylindrical magnet falling through a plexiglass guide, surrounded either by a coil or by a copper pipe. The first configuration (magnet falling across a coil) allows students to quantitatively study the Faraday-Neumann-Lenz law, while the second configuration (falling through a copper pipe) permits learners to investigate the complex phenomena of induction by quantifying the amount of electric power dissipated through the pipe as a result of Foucault eddy currents, when the magnet travels through the pipe. The magnet's fall acceleration can be set by adjusting the counterweight of the Atwood machine so that both the kinematic quantities associated with it and the electromotive force induced within the coil are continuously and quantitatively monitored (respectively, by a common personal computer (PC) equipped with a webcam and by freely available software that makes it possible to use the audio card to convert the PC into an oscilloscope). Measurements carried out when the various experimental parameters are changed provide a useful framework for a thorough understanding and clarification of the conceptual nodes related to electromagnetic induction. The proposed learning path is under evaluation in various high schools participating in the project 'Lauree Scientifiche' promoted by the Italian Department of Education.

  13. Pedemis: a portable electromagnetic induction sensor with integrated positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrowes, Benjamin E.; Shubitidze, Fridon; Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M.; Fernández, Pablo; O'Neill, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Pedemis (PortablE Decoupled Electromagnetic Induction Sensor) is a time-domain handheld electromagnetic induction (EMI) instrument with the intended purpose of improving the detection and classification of UneXploded Ordnance (UXO). Pedemis sports nine coplanar transmitters (the Tx assembly) and nine triaxial receivers held in a fixed geometry with respect to each other (the Rx assembly) but with that Rx assembly physically decoupled from the Tx assembly allowing flexible data acquisition modes and deployment options. The data acquisition (DAQ) electronics consists of the National Instruments (NI) cRIO platform which is much lighter and more energy efficient that prior DAQ platforms. Pedemis has successfully acquired initial data, and inversion of the data acquired during these initial tests has yielded satisfactory polarizabilities of a spherical target. In addition, precise positioning of the Rx assembly has been achieved via position inversion algorithms based solely on the data acquired from the receivers during the "on-time" of the primary field. Pedemis has been designed to be a flexible yet user friendly EMI instrument that can survey, detect and classify targets in a one pass solution. In this paper, the Pedemis instrument is introduced along with its operation protocols, initial data results, and current status.

  14. A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Klenzing, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of coupling mechanisms between the troposphere and the ionosphere requires a multidisciplinary approach involving several branches of atmospheric sciences, from meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and fulminology to aeronomy, plasma physics, and space weather. In this work, we review low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity from a troposphere-ionosphere coupling perspective. We discuss electromagnetic wave generation, propagation, and resonance phenomena, considering atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric sources, from lightning and transient luminous events at low altitude to Alfven waves and particle precipitation related to solar and magnetospheric processes. We review in situ ionospheric processes as well as surface and space weather phenomena that drive troposphere-ionosphere dynamics. Effects of aerosols, water vapor distribution, thermodynamic parameters, and cloud charge separation and electrification processes on atmospheric electricity and electromagnetic waves are reviewed. We also briefly revisit ionospheric irregularities such as spread-F and explosive spread-F, sporadic-E, traveling ionospheric disturbances, Trimpi effect, and hiss and plasma turbulence. Regarding the role of the lower boundary of the cavity, we review transient surface phenomena, including seismic activity, earthquakes, volcanic processes and dust electrification. The role of surface and atmospheric gravity waves in ionospheric dynamics is also briefly addressed. We summarize analytical and numerical tools and techniques to model low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation and solving inverse problems and summarize in a final section a few challenging subjects that are important for a better understanding of tropospheric-ionospheric coupling mechanisms.

  15. Impact compressive and bending behaviour of rocks accompanied by electromagnetic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Horikawa, Keitaro; Ogawa, Kinya; Watanabe, Keiko

    2014-08-28

    It is well known that electromagnetic phenomena are often observed preceding earthquakes. However, the mechanism by which these electromagnetic waves are generated during the fracture and deformation of rocks has not been fully identified. Therefore, in order to examine the relationship between the electromagnetic phenomena and the mechanical properties of rocks, uniaxial compression and three-point bending tests for two kinds of rocks with different quartz content, granite and gabbro, have been carried out at quasi-static and dynamic rates. Especially, in the bending tests, pre-cracked specimens of granite were also tested. Using a split Hopkinson pressure bar and a ferrite-core antenna in close proximity to the specimens, both the stress-strain (load-displacement) curve and simultaneous electromagnetic wave magnitude were measured. It was found that the dynamic compressive and bending strengths and the stress increase slope of both rocks were higher than those observed in static tests; therefore, there is a strain-rate dependence in their strength and stress increase rate. It was found from the tests using the pre-cracked bending specimens that the intensity of electromagnetic waves measured during crack extension increased almost proportionally to the increase of the maximum stress intensity factor of specimens. This tendency was observed in both the dynamic and quasi-static three-point bending tests for granite. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of Arguments Constructed by First-Year Engineering Students Addressing Electromagnetic Induction Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almudi, Jose Manuel; Ceberio, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the quality of arguments used by first-year engineering university students enrolled in a traditional physics course dealing with electromagnetic induction and related problem solving where they had to assess whether the electromagnetic induction phenomenon would occur. Their conclusions were analyzed for the relevance of the…

  17. The Search for Electromagnetic Induction (1820-1831). Experiment No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devons, Samuel

    This paper focuses on the search for electromagnetic induction from 1820 to 1831 and the efforts by Augustin Fresnel's colleague, Andre Marie Ampere, in electric and magnetic induction. Faraday's work is discussed with excerpts from his diary on electromagnetism. A variety of different experiments by researchers including Francoise Jean Arago,…

  18. Ballistocardiogram of avian eggs determined by an electromagnetic induction coil.

    PubMed

    Ono, H; Akiyama, R; Sakamoto, Y; Pearson, J T; Tazawa, H

    1997-07-01

    As an avian embryo grows within an eggshell, the whole egg is moved by embryonic activity and also by the embryonic heartbeat. A technical interest in detecting minute biological movements has prompted the development of techniques and systems to measure the cardiogenic ballistic movement of the egg or ballistocardiogram (BCG). In this context, there is interest in using an electromagnetic induction coil (solenoid) as another simple sensor to measure the BCG and examining its possibility for BCG measurement. A small permanent magnet is attached tightly to the surface of an incubated egg, and then the egg with the magnet is placed in a solenoid. Preliminary model analysis is made to design a setup of the egg, magnet and solenoid coupling system. Then, simultaneous measurement with a laser displacement measuring system, developed previously, is made for chicken eggs, indicating that the solenoid detects the minute cardiogenic ballistic movements and that the BCG determined is a measure of the velocity of egg movements.

  19. An electromagnetic induction method for underground target detection and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, L.C.; Cress, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    An improved capability for subsurface structure detection is needed to support military and nonproliferation requirements for inspection and for surveillance of activities of threatening nations. As part of the DOE/NN-20 program to apply geophysical methods to detect and characterize underground facilities, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) initiated an electromagnetic induction (EMI) project to evaluate low frequency electromagnetic (EM) techniques for subsurface structure detection. Low frequency, in this case, extended from kilohertz to hundreds of kilohertz. An EMI survey procedure had already been developed for borehole imaging of coal seams and had successfully been applied in a surface mode to detect amore » drug smuggling tunnel. The SNL project has focused on building upon the success of that procedure and applying it to surface and low altitude airborne platforms. Part of SNL`s work has focused on improving that technology through improved hardware and data processing. The improved hardware development has been performed utilizing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) funding. In addition, SNL`s effort focused on: (1) improvements in modeling of the basic geophysics of the illuminating electromagnetic field and its coupling to the underground target (partially funded using LDRD funds) and (2) development of techniques for phase-based and multi-frequency processing and spatial processing to support subsurface target detection and characterization. The products of this project are: (1) an evaluation of an improved EM gradiometer, (2) an improved gradiometer concept for possible future development, (3) an improved modeling capability, (4) demonstration of an EM wave migration method for target recognition, and a demonstration that the technology is capable of detecting targets to depths exceeding 25 meters.« less

  20. Luminous phenomena and electromagnetic VHF wave emission originated from earthquake-related radon exhalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, A.; Tobo, I.; Omori, Y.; Muto, J.; Nagahama, H.

    2013-12-01

    Anomalous luminous phenomena and electromagnetic wave emission before or during earthquakes have been reported (e.g., the 1965 Matsushiro earthquake swarm). However, their mechanism is still unsolved, in spite of many models for these phenomena. Here, we propose a new model about luminous phenomena and electromagnetic wave emission during earthquake by focusing on atmospheric radon (Rn-222) and its daughter nuclides (Po-218 and Po-214). Rn-222, Po-218 and Po-214 are alpha emitters, and these alpha particles ionize atmospheric molecules. A light emission phenomenon, called 'the air luminescence', is caused by de-excitation of the ionized molecules of atmospheric nitrogen due to electron impact ionization from alpha particles. The de-excitation is from the second positive system of neutral nitrogen molecules and the first negative system of nitrogen molecule ion. Wavelengths of lights by these transitions include the visible light wavelength. So based on this mechanism, we proposed a new luminous phenomenon model before or during earthquake: 1. The concentration of atmospheric radon and its daughter nuclides increase anomalously before or during earthquakes, 2. Nitrogen molecules and their ions are excited by alpha particles emitted from Rn-222, Po-218 and Po-214, and air luminescence is generated by their de-excitation. Similarly, electromagnetic VHF wave emission can be explained by ionizing effect of radon and its daughter nuclides. Boyarchuk et al. (2005) proposed a model that electromagnetic VHF wave emission is originated when excited state of neutral clusters changes. Radon gas ionizes atmosphere and forms positively and negatively charged heavy particles. The process of ion hydration in ordinary air can be determined by the formation of complex chemically active structures of the various types of ion radicals. As a result of the association of such hydration radical ions, a neutral cluster, which is dipole quasi-molecules, is formed. A neutral cluster

  1. University Physics Students' Use of Models in Explanations of Phenomena Involving Interaction between Metals and Electromagnetic Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfors, Andreas; Ryder, Jim

    2001-01-01

    Examines third year university physics students' use of models when explaining familiar phenomena involving interaction between metals and electromagnetic radiation. Concludes that few students use a single model consistently. (Contains 27 references.) (DDR)

  2. Project MANTIS: A MANTle Induction Simulator for coupling geodynamic and electromagnetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    A key component to testing geodynamic hypotheses resulting from the 3D mantle convection simulations is the ability to easily translate the predicted physiochemical state to the model space relevant for an independent geophysical observation, such as earth's seismic, geodetic or electromagnetic response. In this contribution a new parallel code for simulating low-frequency, global-scale electromagnetic induction phenomena is introduced that has the same Earth discretization as the popular CitcomS mantle convection code. Hence, projection of the CitcomS model into the model space of electrical conductivity is greatly simplified, and focuses solely on the node-to-node, physics-based relationship between these Earth parameters without the need for "upscaling", "downscaling", averaging or harmonizing with some other model basis such as spherical harmonics. Preliminary performance tests of the MANTIS code on shared and distributed memory parallel compute platforms shows favorable scaling (>70% efficiency) for up to 500 processors. As with CitcomS, an OpenDX visualization widget (VISMAN) is also provided for 3D rendering and interactive interrogation of model results. Details of the MANTIS code will be briefly discussed here, focusing on compatibility with CitcomS modeling, as will be preliminary results in which the electromagnetic response of a CitcomS model is evaluated. VISMAN rendering of electrical tomography-derived electrical conductivity model overlain by an a 1x1 deg crustal conductivity map. Grey scale represents the log_10 magnitude of conductivity [S/m]. Arrows are horiztonal components of a hypothetical magnetospheric source field used to electromagnetically excite the conductivity model.

  3. Electromagnetic earthquake triggering phenomena: State-of-the-art research and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigarnik, Vladimir; Novikov, Victor

    2014-05-01

    of geoacoustic emission recorded in the wells at a distance of 7-12 km from the emitting dipole to the ERGU-600 pulses confirmed the effects of an influence of electromagnetic field on the deformation processes in the Earth crust and the real existence of electromagnetic triggering phenomena. For verification of results of field observations laboratory studies of behavior of rock samples under critical stress-strain state and external electric actions were carried out at the spring and lever presses, as well as at the stick-slip models simulated the seismic cycle (stress accumulation and discharge) in the seismogenic geological fault. Various possible mechanisms of weak electrical stimulation (electric current density 10-7-10-8 mA/cm2 at a depth of earthquake epicenters of 5 to10 km) of deformation processes in the Earth crust, including increased fluid pore pressure, electrokinetic phenomena, magnetostriction, electrical stimulation of fluid migration into the fault area are considered. However, the mechanism of electromagnetic earthquake triggering phenomena is still open. Based on the field observations of electromagnetic triggering of weak seismicity resulting in a partial safe release of stresses in the Earth crust a possibility of control of seismic process is considered for risk reduction of catastrophic earthquakes. The results obtained from field and laboratory experiments on electromagnetic initiation of seismic events allow to consider a problem of lithosphere-ionosphere relations from another point of view. Keeping in mind that the current density generated in the Earth crust by artificial electric source is comparable with the density of telluric currents induced during severe ionospheric disturbances (e.g., magnetic storms) it may be possible under certain favorable conditions in lithosphere to initiate earthquakes by electromagnetic disturbances in ionosphere. A possibility of application of these triggering phenomena for short-term earthquake

  4. Using computer simulations to facilitate conceptual understanding of electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu-Fen

    This study investigated the use of computer simulations to facilitate conceptual understanding in physics. The use of computer simulations in the present study was grounded in a conceptual framework drawn from findings related to the use of computer simulations in physics education. To achieve the goal of effective utilization of computers for physics education, I first reviewed studies pertaining to computer simulations in physics education categorized by three different learning frameworks and studies comparing the effects of different simulation environments. My intent was to identify the learning context and factors for successful use of computer simulations in past studies and to learn from the studies which did not obtain a significant result. Based on the analysis of reviewed literature, I proposed effective approaches to integrate computer simulations in physics education. These approaches are consistent with well established education principles such as those suggested by How People Learn (Bransford, Brown, Cocking, Donovan, & Pellegrino, 2000). The research based approaches to integrated computer simulations in physics education form a learning framework called Concept Learning with Computer Simulations (CLCS) in the current study. The second component of this study was to examine the CLCS learning framework empirically. The participants were recruited from a public high school in Beijing, China. All participating students were randomly assigned to two groups, the experimental (CLCS) group and the control (TRAD) group. Research based computer simulations developed by the physics education research group at University of Colorado at Boulder were used to tackle common conceptual difficulties in learning electromagnetic induction. While interacting with computer simulations, CLCS students were asked to answer reflective questions designed to stimulate qualitative reasoning and explanation. After receiving model reasoning online, students were asked to submit

  5. High speed displacement measurement based on electro-magnetic induction applied to electromagnetically driven ring expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaotao; Wu, Jiawei; Huang, Lantao; Qiu, Lei; Chen, Qi; Cao, Quanliang; Herlach, Fritz; Li, Liang

    2017-11-01

    Investigating the mechanism of electromagnetic forming (EMF) becomes a hot topic in the field of metal forming. The high speed up to 200 m/s in EMF makes it a real challenge to capture the forming process. To this end, a new method for measuring displacement at high speed based on electromagnetic induction has been developed. Specifically this is used to measure the displacement of an expanding metal ring driven by a pulsed magnetic field; this is one of the basic EMF processes. The new method is simple and practical, and it combines high-speed response with adequate precision. The new measurement system consists of a printed circuit board (PCB) and a Rogowski probe. Eleven coaxial annular detecting probes are arranged in the PCB plate to acquire induced voltage at different positions, and a Rogowski probe is used to measure the current in the driving coil. The displacement of the ring is deduced by analyzing the output voltages of the detecting probes and the Rogowski probe. The feasibility of the method is verified by comparing the results with pictures from a high speed camera taken simultaneously.

  6. The History of Electromagnetic Induction Techniques in Soil Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Doolittle, Jim

    2014-05-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) has been used to characterize the spatial variability of soil properties since the late 1970s. Initially used to assess soil salinity, the use of EMI in soil studies has expanded to include: mapping soil types; characterizing soil water content and flow patterns; assessing variations in soil texture, compaction, organic matter content, and pH; and determining the depth to subsurface horizons, stratigraphic layers or bedrock, among other uses. In all cases the soil property being investigated must influence soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) either directly or indirectly for EMI techniques to be effective. An increasing number and diversity of EMI sensors have been developed in response to users' needs and the availability of allied technologies, which have greatly improved the functionality of these tools. EMI investigations provide several benefits for soil studies. The large amount of georeferenced data that can be rapidly and inexpensively collected with EMI provides more complete characterization of the spatial variations in soil properties than traditional sampling techniques. In addition, compared to traditional soil survey methods, EMI can more effectively characterize diffuse soil boundaries and identify included areas of dissimilar soils within mapped soil units, giving soil scientists greater confidence when collecting spatial soil information. EMI techniques do have limitations; results are site-specific and can vary depending on the complex interactions among multiple and variable soil properties. Despite this, EMI techniques are increasingly being used to investigate the spatial variability of soil properties at field and landscape scales.

  7. The Use of Electromagnetic Induction Techniques for Soil Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Doolittle, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Soils have high natural spatial variability. This has been recognized for a long time, and many methods of mapping that spatial variability have been investigated. One technique that has received considerable attention over the last ~30 years is electromagnetic induction (EMI). Particularly when coupled with modern GPS and GIS systems, EMI techniques have allowed the rapid and relatively inexpensive collection of large spatially-related data sets that can be correlated to soil properties that either directly or indirectly influence electrical conductance in the soil. Soil electrical conductivity is directly controlled by soil water content, soluble salt content, clay content and mineralogy, and temperature. A wide range of indirect controls have been identified, such as soil organic matter content and bulk density; both influence water relationships in the soil. EMI techniques work best in areas where there are large changes in one soil property that influences soil electrical conductance, and don't work as well when soil properties that influence electrical conductance are largely homogenous. This presentation will present examples of situations where EMI techniques were successful as well as a couple of examples of situations where EMI was not so useful in mapping the spatial variability of soil properties. Reasons for both the successes and failures will be discussed.

  8. Electromagnetic phenomena in granular flows in the laboratory and dusty plasmas in geophysics and astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathrop, Daniel; Eiskowitz, Skylar; Rojas, Ruben

    2017-11-01

    In clouds of suspended particles, collisions electrify particles and the clouds produce electric potential differences over large scales. This is seen in the atmosphere as lightning in thunderstorms, thundersnow, dust storms, and volcanic ash plumes, but it is a general phenomena in granular systems. The electrification process is not well understood. To investigate the relative importance of particle material properties and collective phenomena in granular and atmospheric electrification, we used several tabletop experiments that excite particle-laden flows. Various electromagnetic phenomena ensue. Measured electric fields result from capacitive and direct charge transfer to electrodes. These results suggest that while particle properties do matter (as previous investigations have shown), macroscopic electrification of granular flows is somewhat material independent and large-scale collective phenomena play a major role. As well, our results on charge separation and Hall effects suggest a very different view of the dynamics of clouds, planetary rings, and cold accretion disks in proto-planetary systems. We gratefully acknowledge past funding from the Julian Schwinger Foundation as well as the Ph.D. work of Freja Nordsiek.

  9. Inductive phenomena at low frequencies in impedance spectra of proton exchange membrane fuel cells - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivac, Ivan; Barbir, Frano

    2016-09-01

    The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells may exhibit inductive phenomena at low frequencies. The occurrence of inductive features at high frequencies is explained by the cables and wires of the test system. However, explanation of inductive loop at low frequencies requires a more detailed study. This review paper discusses several possible causes of such inductive behavior in PEM fuel cells, such as side reactions with intermediate species, carbon monoxide poisoning, and water transport, also as their equivalent circuit representations. It may be concluded that interpretation of impedance spectra at low frequencies is still ambiguous, and that better equivalent circuit models are needed with clearly defined physical meaning of each of the circuit elements.

  10. Joseph Henry’s role in the discovery of electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Glenn S.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of electromagnetic induction in the early part of the 19th century is one of the greatest scientific achievements of all time, and it has had tremendous technological consequences. The credit for this discovery rightfully goes to the great English experimental physicist Michael Faraday. However, the American physicist Joseph Henry made some observations comparable to Faraday’s at nearly the same time, and for that reason, Faraday and Henry are often considered to be co-discoverers of some aspects of electromagnetic induction. We examine Henry’s early research on electromagnetism, starting from his efforts to improve the electromagnet, which led directly to his investigations of induction. We describe his earliest experiments on both mutual and self-induction, and pay particular attention to the relationship of Henry’s research to that of Faraday. The approach is one in which the experiments are described and then analysed using modern theory and terminology.

  11. Electromagnetic-induction logging to monitor changing chloride concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, Loren F.; Izbicki, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Water from the San Joaquin Delta, having chloride concentrations up to 3590 mg/L, has intruded fresh water aquifers underlying Stockton, California. Changes in chloride concentrations at depth within these aquifers were evaluated using sequential electromagnetic (EM) induction logs collected during 2004 through 2007 at seven multiple-well sites as deep as 268 m. Sequential EM logging is useful for identifying changes in groundwater quality through polyvinyl chloride-cased wells in intervals not screened by wells. These unscreened intervals represent more than 90% of the aquifer at the sites studied. Sequential EM logging suggested degrading groundwater quality in numerous thin intervals, typically between 1 and 7 m in thickness, especially in the northern part of the study area. Some of these intervals were unscreened by wells, and would not have been identified by traditional groundwater sample collection. Sequential logging also identified intervals with improving water quality—possibly due to groundwater management practices that have limited pumping and promoted artificial recharge. EM resistivity was correlated with chloride concentrations in sampled wells and in water from core material. Natural gamma log data were used to account for the effect of aquifer lithology on EM resistivity. Results of this study show that a sequential EM logging is useful for identifying and monitoring the movement of high-chloride water, having lower salinities and chloride concentrations than sea water, in aquifer intervals not screened by wells, and that increases in chloride in water from wells in the area are consistent with high-chloride water originating from the San Joaquin Delta rather than from the underlying saline aquifer.

  12. Calibrating electromagnetic induction conductivities with time-domain reflectometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragonetti, Giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Ajeel, Ali; Piero Deidda, Gian; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Rodriguez, Giuseppe; Vignoli, Giulio; Coppola, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    This paper deals with the issue of monitoring the spatial distribution of bulk electrical conductivity, σb, in the soil root zone by using electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors under different water and salinity conditions. To deduce the actual distribution of depth-specific σb from EMI apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) measurements, we inverted the data by using a regularized 1-D inversion procedure designed to manage nonlinear multiple EMI-depth responses. The inversion technique is based on the coupling of the damped Gauss-Newton method with truncated generalized singular value decomposition (TGSVD). The ill-posedness of the EMI data inversion is addressed by using a sharp stabilizer term in the objective function. This specific stabilizer promotes the reconstruction of blocky targets, thereby contributing to enhance the spatial resolution of the EMI results in the presence of sharp boundaries (otherwise smeared out after the application of more standard Occam-like regularization strategies searching for smooth solutions). Time-domain reflectometry (TDR) data are used as ground-truth data for calibration of the inversion results. An experimental field was divided into four transects 30 m long and 2.8 m wide, cultivated with green bean, and irrigated with water at two different salinity levels and using two different irrigation volumes. Clearly, this induces different salinity and water contents within the soil profiles. For each transect, 26 regularly spaced monitoring soundings (1 m apart) were selected for the collection of (i) Geonics EM-38 and (ii) Tektronix reflectometer data. Despite the original discrepancies in the EMI and TDR data, we found a significant correlation of the means and standard deviations of the two data series; in particular, after a low-pass spatial filtering of the TDR data. Based on these findings, this paper introduces a novel methodology to calibrate EMI-based electrical conductivities via TDR direct measurements. This

  13. Custom modular electromagnetic induction system for shallow electrical conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, Achim; Zimmermann, Egon; Tan, Xihe; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; van Waasen, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) is a contactless measurement method that offers fast and easy investigations of the shallow electrical conductivity, e.g. on the field-scale. Available frequency domain EMI systems offer multiple fixed transmitter-receiver (Tx-Rx) pairs with Tx-Rx separations between 0.3 and 4.0 m and investigation depths of up to six meters. Here, we present our custom EMI system that consists of modular sensor units that can either be transmitters or receivers, and a backpack containing the data acquisition system. The prototype system is optimized for frequencies between 5 and 30 kHz and Tx-Rx separations between 0.4 and 2.0 m. Each Tx and Rx signal is digitized separately and stored on a notebook computer. The soil conductivity information is determined after the measurements with advanced digital processing of the data using optimized correction and calibration procedures. The system stores the raw data throughout the entire procedure, which offers many advantages: (1) comprehensive accuracy and error analysis as well as the reproducibility of corrections and calibration procedures; (2) easy customizability of the number of Tx-/Rx-units and their arrangement and frequencies; (3) signals from simultaneously working transmitters can be separated within the received data using orthogonal signals, resulting in additional Tx-Rx pairs and maximized soil information; and (4) later improvements in the post-processing algorithms can be applied to old data sets. Exemplary, here we present an innovative setup with two transmitters and five receivers using orthogonal signals yielding ten Tx-Rx pairs. Note that orthogonal signals enable for redundant Tx-Rx pairs that are useful for verification of the transmitter signals and for data stacking. In contrast to commercial systems, only adjustments in the post-processing were necessary to realize such measurement configurations with flexibly combined Tx and Rx modules. The presented system reaches an accuracy of

  14. Reliability of electromagnetic induction data in near surface application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüsch, A.; Werban, U.; Sauer, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2012-12-01

    Use of the Electromagnetic Induction method for measuring electrical conductivities is widespread in applied geosciences, since the method is easy to perform and influenced by soil parameters. The vast amount of different applications of EMI measurements for different spatial resolutions as well as for the derivation of different soil parameters necessitates a unified handling of EMI data. So the requirements to the method have been changed from a qualitative overview to a quantitative use of data. A quantitative treatment of the data however is limited by the available instruments, which were made only for qualitative use. Nevertheless the limitations of the method can be expanded by considering a few conditions. In this study, we introduce possibilities for enhancing the quality of EMI data with regards to large scale investigations. In a set of systematic investigations, we show which aspects have to be taken into account when using a commercially available instrument, related to long term stability, comparability and repeatability. In-depth knowledge of the instruments used concerning aspects such as their calibration procedure, long term stability, battery life and thermal behaviour is an essential pre-requisite before starting the measurement process. A further aspect highlighted is quality control during measurements and if necessary a subsequent data correction which is pre-requisite for a quantitative analysis of the data. Quality control during the measurement process is crucial. Before a measurement starts, it is recommended that a short term test is carried out on-site to check environmental noise. Signal to noise ratio is a decisive influencing factor of whether or not the method is applicable at the chosen field site. A measurement needs to be monitored according to possible drifts. This can be achieved with different accuracies and starting from a quality check, with the help of reference lines up to a quantitative control with reference points

  15. An innovative experimental sequence on electromagnetic induction and eddy currents based on video analysis and cheap data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Bozzo, G.; Sapia, P.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we present a coherent sequence of experiments on electromagnetic (EM) induction and eddy currents, appropriate for university undergraduate students, based on a magnet falling through a drilled aluminum disk. The sequence, leveraging on the didactical interplay between the EM and mechanical aspects of the experiments, allows us to exploit the students’ awareness of mechanics to elicit their comprehension of EM phenomena. The proposed experiments feature two kinds of measurements: (i) kinematic measurements (performed by means of high-speed video analysis) give information on the system’s kinematics and, via appropriate numerical data processing, allow us to get dynamic information, in particular on energy dissipation; (ii) induced electromagnetic field (EMF) measurements (by using a homemade multi-coil sensor connected to a cheap data acquisition system) allow us to quantitatively determine the inductive effects of the moving magnet on its neighborhood. The comparison between experimental results and the predictions from an appropriate theoretical model (of the dissipative coupling between the moving magnet and the conducting disk) offers many educational hints on relevant topics related to EM induction, such as Maxwell’s displacement current, magnetic field flux variation, and the conceptual link between induced EMF and induced currents. Moreover, the didactical activity gives students the opportunity to be trained in video analysis, data acquisition and numerical data processing.

  16. Flow-field differences and electromagnetic-field properties of air and N2 inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minghao; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Tong

    2016-12-01

    A numerical model for simulating air and nitrogen inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) was developed considering thermochemical nonequilibrium and the third-order electron transport properties. A modified far-field electromagnetic model was introduced and tightly coupled with the flow field equations to describe the Joule heating and inductive discharge phenomena. In total, 11 species and 49 chemical reactions of air, which include 5 species and 8 chemical reactions of nitrogen, were employed to model the chemical reaction process. The internal energy transfers among translational, vibrational, rotational, and electronic energy modes of chemical species were taken into account to study thermal nonequilibrium effects. The low-Reynolds number Abe-Kondoh-Nagano k-ɛ turbulence model was employed to consider the turbulent heat transfer. In this study, the fundamental characteristics of an ICP flow, such as the weak ionization, high temperature but low velocity in the torch, and wide area of the plasma plume, were reproduced by the developed numerical model. The flow field differences between the air and nitrogen ICP flows inside the 10-kW ICP wind tunnel were made clear. The interactions between the electromagnetic and flow fields were also revealed for an inductive discharge.

  17. Electromagnetic induction and radiation-induced abnormality of wave propagation in excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Wu, Fuqiang; Hayat, Tasawar; Zhou, Ping; Tang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Continuous wave emitting from sinus node of the heart plays an important role in wave propagating among cardiac tissue, while the heart beating can be terminated when the target wave is broken into turbulent states by electromagnetic radiation. In this investigation, local periodical forcing is applied on the media to induce continuous target wave in the improved cardiac model, which the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux, then external electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the media. It is found that target wave propagation can be blocked to stand in a local area and the excitability of media is suppressed to approach quiescent but homogeneous state when electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the media. The sampled time series for membrane potentials decrease to quiescent state due to the electromagnetic radiation. It could accounts for the mechanism of abnormality in heart failure exposed to continuous electromagnetic field.

  18. ALLTEM Multi-Axis Electromagnetic Induction System Demonstration and Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    threshold T-high higher threshold TMGS Tensor Magnetic Gradiometer System TOI target of interest Tx ALLTEM transmitter USGS U.S. Geological...the Tensor Magnetic Gradiometer System ( TMGS ) and two prototype EMI instruments, the Very Early Time-domain ElectroMagnetic (VETEM) system and the...project one prototype magnetic system, the TMGS , and two prototype EMI instruments, VETEM and the High Frequency Sounder, were evaluated. Subsequent

  19. Electromagnetic induction imaging with a radio-frequency atomic magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca, E-mail: l.marmugi@ucl.ac.uk; Hussain, Sarah

    2016-03-07

    We report on a compact, tunable, and scalable to large arrays imaging device, based on a radio-frequency optically pumped atomic magnetometer operating in magnetic induction tomography modality. Imaging of conductive objects is performed at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and without background subtraction. Conductivity maps of target objects exhibit not only excellent performance in terms of shape reconstruction but also demonstrate detection of sub-millimetric cracks and penetration of conductive barriers. The results presented here demonstrate the potential of a future generation of imaging instruments, which combine magnetic induction tomography and the unmatched performance of atomic magnetometers.

  20. Seismo-electromagnetic phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Biagi, Pier; Namorado Rosa, Rui; Salgueiro da Silva, Manuel; Caldeira, Bento; Heitor Reis, Artur; Borges, José Fernando; Tlemçani, Mouhaydine; Manso, Marco

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a future research plan that aims to monitor Seismo-electromagnetic (SEM) phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary (WENP). This region has a significant tectonic activity [1] combined with relatively low electromagnetic noise levels and for that reason presents the possibility to perform high quality SEM measurements. Further, it is known that low-frequency [ultra (ULF), very (VLF), and low-frequencies (LF)] electromagnetic (EM) waves produce more convincing earthquake precursors (compared to higher frequencies) because of less contamination, large skin depth, and low attenuation [2]. Thus, two SEM effects will be considered: ULF electromagnetic field emissions [3], and VLF/LF radio broadcastings [4]. With respect to the ULF measurements, as a start, three ULF sensors are planned to be installed in the South of Iberian Peninsula supported by the existing networks of seismic research stations. Subsequent development of this initial plan could result in the implementation of a lager ULF monitoring network not only in the Iberian Peninsula, but also in the rest of Europe. Possible integration in the SEGMA array is now under consideration. Another perspective is to use a portable station to track seismic events. Regarding the VLF/LF radio broadcastings, a receiver is planned to be mounted in University of Évora. Radio signals from up to 10 transmitters (in these bands) of interest to study the seismic activity in the WENP region will be monitored. Actually, the radio path from the transmitter to the receiver should cross the epicentral area, therefore two possible transmitters are the ones installed in Monaco (France) and Sicily (Italy). Furthermore, the system will integrate the INFREP network and in this context it will not be restricted to WENP region. With the development of these research plans we aim to collect novel SEM data emerging from the seismic activity in the WENP region. We expect to address the time

  1. Introduction to the special section ‘Applications of electromagnetic induction to digital soil mapping’

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Use of electromagnetic induction (EMI) instruments has increased as a tool to map soils because it provides a means of locating suitable sampling sites that provide the basis for mapping the spatial variability of various soil properties either directly or indirectly measured with EMI, including sa...

  2. Effects of Physical Models and Simulations to Understand Daily Life Applications of Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tural, Güner; Tarakçi, Demet

    2017-01-01

    Background: One of the topics students have difficulties in understanding is electromagnetic induction. Active learning methods instead of traditional learning method may be able to help facilitate students' understanding such topics more effectively. Purpose: The study investigated the effectiveness of physical models and simulations on students'…

  3. Chapter 9.5: Electromagnetic induction to manage cattle feedlot waste

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter summarizes results of waste management research that utilized electromagnetic induction (EMI) tools for the purposes of: 1) collection of solid waste from feedlot surfaces to be utilized by crops 2) control and utilization of nutrient laden liquid runoff, and 3) feedlot surface man...

  4. A Datalogger Demonstration of Electromagnetic Induction with a Falling, Oscillating and Swinging Magnet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Darren; Lee, Paul; Foong, See Kit

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the electromagnetic induction phenomenon for a "falling," "oscillating" and "swinging" magnet and a coil, with the help of a datalogger. For each situation, we discuss the salient aspects of the phenomenon, with the aid of diagrams, and relate the motion of the magnet to its mathematical and graphical representations. Using various…

  5. Effects of Gender and Collaborative Learning Approach on Students' Conceptual Understanding of Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolphus, Telima; Omeodu, Doris

    2016-01-01

    The study investigates the effect of gender and collaborative learning approach on students' conceptual understanding of electromagnetic induction in Secondary Schools in Nigeria. Three research questions and 2 hypotheses were formulated to guide the research. The research design adopted for this study is the quasi-experimental design. In…

  6. Using a PC and External Media to Quantitatively Investigate Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonanno, A.; Bozzo, G.; Camarca, M.; Sapia, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe an experimental learning path about electromagnetic induction which uses an Atwood machine where one of the two hanging bodies is a cylindrical magnet falling through a plexiglass guide, surrounded either by a coil or by a copper pipe. The first configuration (magnet falling across a coil) allows students to…

  7. Global electromagnetic induction in the moon and planets. [poloidal eddy current transient response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments and analyses concerning electromagnetic induction in the moon and other extraterrestrial bodies are summarized. The theory of classical electromagnetic induction in a sphere is first considered, and this treatment is extended to the case of the moon, where poloidal eddy-current response has been found experimentally to dominate other induction modes. Analysis of lunar poloidal induction yields lunar internal electrical conductivity and temperature profiles. Two poloidal-induction analytical techniques are discussed: a transient-response method applied to time-series magnetometer data, and a harmonic-analysis method applied to data numerically Fourier-transformed to the frequency domain, with emphasis on the former technique. Attention is given to complicating effects of the solar wind interaction with both induced poloidal fields and remanent steady fields. The static magnetization field induction mode is described, from which are calculated bulk magnetic permeability profiles. Magnetic field measurements obtained from the moon and from fly-bys of Venus and Mars are studied to determine the feasibility of extending theoretical and experimental induction techniques to other bodies in the solar system.

  8. Paranormal phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    1996-08-01

    Critical analysis is given of some paranormal phenomena events (UFO, healers, psychokinesis (telekinesis))reported in Moldova. It is argued that correct analysis of paranormal phenomena should be made in the framework of electromagnetism.

  9. Snow Depth Calibrations for Electromagnetic Induction Investigations at a Former Munitions Waste Disposal Site in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, D. R., II; Wagner, A. M.; Gelvin, A.; Saari, S.; Staples, A.; Larsen, G.

    2017-12-01

    A US Army legacy munitions waste site was identified adjacent to a river near a small arms range in Alaska. As part of remediation efforts, geophysical studies were conducted to characterize the extent of buried metal debris at the site. Time-domain electromagnetic surveys were completed over the site to meet the regulatory guidance for site cleanup. Time-domain and frequency-domain electromagnetic induction, magnetic gradiometry, and ground penetrating radar subsurface geophysical studies were deployed over soil, water, and snow surface conditions throughout the impacted area. The time-domain electromagnetic induction results acquired during summer months, presented clear indications of trenches located directly perpendicular to and adjacent to the river. However, in the follow up investigation where the snow-pack was greater than one meter, the response amplitude of the metallic debris was dampened and possible targets were missed. This was confirmed by the subsequent magnetic gradiometry survey which identified a suspected extension of one of the trenches through the river on to the seasonal sand bar island. The region is subject to extremely cold temperatures as well as significant snow pack and permafrost soil conditions. The snow presented a negative impact to the accurate assessment of the site by changing the effective investigation depth. To address this we developed an approach using ground penetrating radar data calibrated with physical snow depth measurements to generate continuous estimates of snow depth and spatially correct the electromagnetic induction data to the corresponding regulatory amplitude limit as if the snow were not present. Limitations of the approach as related to the signal floor of the electromagnetic induction response were also assessed.

  10. Design and test of a simple fast electromagnetic inductive gas valve for planar pulsed inductive plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dawei; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2017-10-01

    In support of our planar pulsed inductive plasma thruster research, a fast electromagnetic inductive valve for a gas propellant injection system has been built and tested. A new and important design feature is the use of a conical diaphragm as the action part, which greatly contributes to the virtue of simplicity for adopting the resultant force of the diaphragm deformation as the closing force. An optical transmission technique is adopted to measure the opening and closing characters of the valve while the gas throughput is determined by measuring the pressure change per pulse in a test chamber with a capacitance manometer. The experimental results revealed that the delay time before the valve reaction is less than 40 μs, and the valve pulse width is no longer than 160 μs full width at half maximum. The valve delivers 0-2.5 mg of argon gas per pulse varied by adjusting the drive voltage and gas pressure.

  11. Design and test of a simple fast electromagnetic inductive gas valve for planar pulsed inductive plasma thruster.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dawei; Cheng, Mousen; Li, Xiaokang

    2017-10-01

    In support of our planar pulsed inductive plasma thruster research, a fast electromagnetic inductive valve for a gas propellant injection system has been built and tested. A new and important design feature is the use of a conical diaphragm as the action part, which greatly contributes to the virtue of simplicity for adopting the resultant force of the diaphragm deformation as the closing force. An optical transmission technique is adopted to measure the opening and closing characters of the valve while the gas throughput is determined by measuring the pressure change per pulse in a test chamber with a capacitance manometer. The experimental results revealed that the delay time before the valve reaction is less than 40 μs, and the valve pulse width is no longer than 160 μs full width at half maximum. The valve delivers 0-2.5 mg of argon gas per pulse varied by adjusting the drive voltage and gas pressure.

  12. Mechanical and electromagnetic induction of protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, A L; White, N C; Litovitz, T A

    2001-01-01

    Cells and tissues can be protected against a potentially lethal stress by first exposing them to a brief dose of the same or different stress. This "pre-conditioning" phenomenon has been documented in many models of protection against oxidative stress, including ischemia/reperfusion and ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. Stimuli which induce this protective response include heat, chemicals, brief ischemia, and electromagnetic (EM) field exposures. We report here that constant mechanical vibration pre-conditions chick embryos, protecting them during subsequent stress from hypoxia or UV light exposure. Continuously mechanically vibrated embryos (60 Hz, 1 g (32 ft/s2), 20 min) exhibited nearly double the survival (67.5%, P < 0.001) after subsequent hypoxia as compared to non-vibrated controls (37.6%). As a second set of experiments, embryos were vibrated and then exposed to UV light stress. Those embryos that were vibrated prior to UV had nearly double the survival 3 h after UV exposure (66%, P < 0.001) as compared to controls (35%). The degree of protection, however, was dependent on the constancy of the vibration amplitude. When vibration was turned on and off at 1-s intervals throughout exposure, no increase in hypoxia protection was noted. For 50 s on/off vibration intervals, however, hypoxia protection comparable to continuous vibration was obtained. In contrast, random, inconstant mechanical vibration did not induce protection against subsequent UV exposure. These data suggest that to be an effective pre-conditioning agent, mechanical vibration must have a degree of temporally constancy (on/off intervals of greater than 1 s). Further experiments in both models (hypoxia and UV) indicated an interaction between vibration and EM field-induced protection. Vibration-induced hypoxia protection was inhibited by superposition of a random EM noise field (previously shown to inhibit EM field-induced protection). In addition, EM field-induced UV protection was inhibited by

  13. Coil design considerations for a high-frequency electromagnetic induction sensing instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigman, John B.; Barrowes, Benjamin E.; Wang, Yinlin; Bennett, Hollis J.; Simms, Janet E.; Yule, Donald E.; O'Neill, Kevin; Shubitidze, Fridon

    2016-05-01

    Intermediate electrical conductivity (IEC) materials (101S/m < σ < 104S/m), such as carbon fiber (CF), have recently been used to make smart bombs. In addition, homemade improvised explosive devices (IED) can be produced with low conducting materials (10-4S/m < σ < 1S/m), such as Ammonium Nitrate (AN). To collect unexploded ordnance (UXO) from military training ranges and thwart deadly IEDs, the US military has urgent need for technology capable of detection and identification of subsurface IEC objects. Recent analytical and numerical studies have showed that these targets exhibit characteristic quadrature response peaks at high induction frequencies (100kHz - 15MHz, the High Frequency Electromagnetic Induction (HFEMI) band), and they are not detectable with traditional ultra wideband (UWB) electromagnetic induction (EMI) metal detectors operating between 100Hz - 100kHz. Using the HFEMI band for induction sensing is not so simple as driving existing instruments at higher frequencies, though. At low frequency, EMI systems use more wire turns in transmit and receive coils to boost signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), but at higher frequencies, the transmitter current has non-uniform distribution along the coil length. These non-uniform currents change the spatial distribution of the primary magnetic field and disturb axial symmetry and thwart established approaches for inferring subsurface metallic object properties. This paper discusses engineering tradeoffs for sensing with a broader band of frequencies ever used for EMI sensing, with particular focus on coil geometries.

  14. Electromagnetic compatibility and safety design of a patient compliance-free, inductive implant charger.

    PubMed

    Theodoridis, Michael P; Mollov, Stefan V

    2014-10-01

    This article presents the design of a domestic, radiofrequency induction charger for implants toward compliance with the Federal Communications Commission safety and electromagnetic compatibility regulations. The suggested arrangement does not impose any patient compliance requirements other than the use of a designated bed for night sleep, and therefore can find a domestic use. The method can be applied to a number of applications; a rechargeable pacemaker is considered as a case study. The presented work has proven that it is possible to realize a fully compliant inductive charging system with minimal patient interaction, and has generated important information for consideration by the designers of inductive charging systems. Experimental results have verified the validity of the theoretical findings.

  15. Student Understanding of Light as an Electromagnetic Wave: Relating the Formalism to Physical Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Bradley S.; Heron, Paula R. L.; Vokos, Stamatis; McDermott, Lillian C.

    1999-01-01

    Some serious difficulties that students have in understanding physical optics may be due in part to a lack of understanding of light as an electromagnetic wave. Describes the development and use of tutorials designed to address students' conceptual difficulties. (Contains over 15 references.) (Author/WRM)

  16. Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yochum, Hank; Vinion-Dubiel, Arlene; Granger, Jill; Lindsay, Lynne; Maass, Teresa; Mayhew, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Engaging children in authentic investigation opens the doors for them to gain deep conceptual understanding in science. As students engage in investigation, they experience the practices employed by scientists and engineers, as highlighted in the Next Generation Science Standards (Achieve Inc. 2013). They also begin to understand the nature of…

  17. Summary of sensor evaluation for the Fusion Electromagnetic Induction Experiment (FELIX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, M. J.

    1982-08-01

    As part of the First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program, a test bed called FELIX (fusion electromagnetic induction experiment) is under construction. Its purpose is to test, evaluate, and develop computer codes for the prediction of electromagnetically induced phenomenon in a magnetic environment modeling that of a fusion reaction. Crucial to this process is the sensing and recording of the various induced effects. Sensor evaluation for FELIX reached the point where most sensor types were evaluated and preliminary decisions are being made as to type and quantity for the initial FELIX experiments. These early experiments, the first, flat plate experiment in particular, will be aimed at testing the sensors as well as the pertinent theories involved. The reason for these evaluations, decisions, and proof tests is the harsh electrical and magnetic environment that FELIX presents.

  18. Subcritical Hopf Bifurcation and Stochastic Resonance of Electrical Activities in Neuron under Electromagnetic Induction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu-Xuan; Kang, Yan-Mei; Xie, Yong

    2018-01-01

    The FitzHugh–Nagumo model is improved to consider the effect of the electromagnetic induction on single neuron. On the basis of investigating the Hopf bifurcation behavior of the improved model, stochastic resonance in the stochastic version is captured near the bifurcation point. It is revealed that a weak harmonic oscillation in the electromagnetic disturbance can be amplified through stochastic resonance, and it is the cooperative effect of random transition between the resting state and the large amplitude oscillating state that results in the resonant phenomenon. Using the noise dependence of the mean of interburst intervals, we essentially suggest a biologically feasible clue for detecting weak signal by means of neuron model with subcritical Hopf bifurcation. These observations should be helpful in understanding the influence of the magnetic field to neural electrical activity. PMID:29467642

  19. Subcritical Hopf Bifurcation and Stochastic Resonance of Electrical Activities in Neuron under Electromagnetic Induction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu-Xuan; Kang, Yan-Mei; Xie, Yong

    2018-01-01

    The FitzHugh-Nagumo model is improved to consider the effect of the electromagnetic induction on single neuron. On the basis of investigating the Hopf bifurcation behavior of the improved model, stochastic resonance in the stochastic version is captured near the bifurcation point. It is revealed that a weak harmonic oscillation in the electromagnetic disturbance can be amplified through stochastic resonance, and it is the cooperative effect of random transition between the resting state and the large amplitude oscillating state that results in the resonant phenomenon. Using the noise dependence of the mean of interburst intervals, we essentially suggest a biologically feasible clue for detecting weak signal by means of neuron model with subcritical Hopf bifurcation. These observations should be helpful in understanding the influence of the magnetic field to neural electrical activity.

  20. Electromagnetic Performance Calculation of HTS Linear Induction Motor for Rail Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Fang, Jin; Cao, Junci; Chen, Jie; Shu, Hang; Sheng, Long

    2017-07-01

    According to a high temperature superconducting (HTS) linear induction motor (LIM) designed for rail systems, the influence of electromagnetic parameters and mechanical structure parameters on the electromagnetic horizontal thrust, vertical force of HTS LIM and the maximum vertical magnetic field of HTS windings are analyzed. Through the research on the vertical field of HTS windings, the development regularity of the HTS LIM maximum input current with different stator frequency and different thickness value of the secondary conductive plate is obtained. The theoretical results are of great significance to analyze the stability of HTS LIM. Finally, based on theory analysis, HTS LIM test platform was built and the experiment was carried out with load. The experimental results show that the theoretical analysis is correct and reasonable.

  1. Vertical spatial sensitivity and exploration depth of low-induction-number electromagnetic-induction instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Ferré, T.P.A.; Groom, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    Vertical spatial sensitivity and effective depth of exploration (d e) of low-induction-number (LIN) instruments over a layered soil were evaluated using a complete numerical solution to Maxwell's equations. Previous studies using approximate mathematical solutions predicted a vertical spatial sensitivity for instruments operating under LIN conditions that, for a given transmitter-receiver coil separation (s), coil orientation, and transmitter frequency, should depend solely on depth below the land surface. When not operating under LIN conditions, vertical spatial sensitivity and de also depend on apparent soil electrical conductivity (??a) and therefore the induction number (??). In this new evaluation, we determined the range of ??a and ?? values for which the LIN conditions hold and how de changes when they do not. Two-layer soil models were simulated with both horizontal (HCP) and vertical (VCP) coplanar coil orientations. Soil layers were given electrical conductivity values ranging from 0.1 to 200 mS m-1. As expected, de decreased as ??a increased. Only the least electrically conductive soil produced the de expected when operating under LIN conditions. For the VCP orientation, this was 1.6s, decreasing to 0.8s in the most electrically conductive soil. For the HCP orientation, de decreased from 0.76s to 0.51s. Differences between this and previous studies are attributed to inadequate representation of skin-depth effect and scattering at interfaces between layers. When using LIN instruments to identify depth to water tables, interfaces between soil layers, and variations in salt or moisture content, it is important to consider the dependence of de on ??a. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  2. Electromagnetic emission memory phenomena related to LiF ionic crystal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatou, C.; Tombras, G. S.; Ninos, D.; Hadjicontis, V.

    2008-04-01

    During the uniaxial compression of LiF ionic monocrystals, acoustic and electromagnetic emissions (EME) are detected. We observed that when the compression is performed in successive loading, unloading cycles and these emissions are being monitored, no new emissions will occur unless the maximum stress of the previous cycle is exceeded, meaning that the material presents memory characteristics. This is observed not only for the acoustic emission (AE), which is the well known Kaiser effect, but for the EME as well. In other words, the material appears to memorize and reveal the previously maximum stress it suffered while being deformed. The importance of an electromagnetic memory feature of a material can be related to various applications in material science, especially when the detection of AE is not feasible or gives false alert. Such cases may very well be earthquakes' predictive indications, monitoring of mines' stability, imminent landslides, etc.

  3. Electromagnetic induction pump for pumping liquid metals and other conductive liquids

    DOEpatents

    Smither, R.K.

    1993-05-11

    An electromagnetic induction pump is described in which an electrically conductive liquid is made to flow by means of a force created by interaction of a permanent magnetic field and a DC current. The pump achieves high efficiency through combination of: powerful permanent magnet materials which provide a high strength field that is uniform and constant; steel tubing formed into a coil which is constructed to carry conducting liquids with minimal electrical resistance and heat; and application of a voltage to induce a DC current which continuously produces a force in the direction of the desired flow.

  4. Electromagnetic induction pump for pumping liquid metals and other conductive liquids

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    An electromagnetic induction pump in which an electrically conductive liquid is made to flow by means of a force created by interaction of a permanent magnetic field and a DC current. The pump achieves high efficiency through combination of: powerful permanent magnet materials which provide a high strength field that is uniform and constant; steel tubing formed into a coil which is constructed to carry conducting liquids with minimal electrical resistance and heat; and application of a voltage to induce a DC current which continuously produces a force in the direction of the desired flow.

  5. Frequency domain electromagnetic induction survey in the intertidal zone: Limitations of low-induction-number and depth of exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delefortrie, Samuël; Saey, Timothy; Van De Vijver, Ellen; De Smedt, Philippe; Missiaen, Tine; Demerre, Ine; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Subsurface investigation in the Belgian intertidal zone is severely complicated due to high heterogeneity and tides. Near-surface geophysical techniques can offer assistance since they allow fast surveying and collection of high spatial density data and frequency domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) was chosen for archaeological prospection on the Belgian shore. However, in the intertidal zone the effects of extreme salinity compromise validity of low-induction-number (LIN) approximated EMI data. In this paper, the effects of incursion of seawater on multi-receiver EMI data are investigated by means of survey results, field observations, cone penetration tests and in-situ electrical conductivity measurements. The consequences of LIN approximation breakdown were researched. Reduced depth of investigation of the quadrature-phase (Qu) response and a complex interpretation of the in-phase response were confirmed. Nonetheless, a high signal-to-noise ratio of the Qu response and viable data with regard to shallow subsurface investigation were also evidenced, allowing subsurface investigation in the intertidal zone.

  6. Electromagnetic induction imaging of concealed metallic objects by means of resonating circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilizzoni, R.; Watson, J. C.; Bartlett, P. A.; Renzoni, F.

    2016-05-01

    An electromagnetic induction system, suitable for 2D imaging of metallic samples of different electrical conductivities, has been developed. The system is based on a parallel LCR circuit comprising a ferrite-cored coil (7.8 mm x 9.5 mm, L=680 μH at 1 KHz), a variable resistor and capacitor. The working principle of the system is based on eddy current induction inside a metallic sample when this is introduced into the AC magnetic field created by the coil. The inductance of the LCR circuit is modified due to the presence of the sample, to an extent that depends on its conductivity. Such modification is known to increase when the system is operated at its resonant frequency. Characterizing different metals based on their values of conductivity is therefore possible by utilizing a suitable system operated at resonance. Both imaging and material characterization were demonstrated by means of the proposed electromagnetic induction technique. Furthermore, the choice of using a system with an adjustable resonant frequency made it possible to select resonances that allow magnetic-field penetration through conductive screens. Investigations on the possibility of imaging concealed metals by penetrating such shields have been carried out. A penetration depth of δ~3 mm through aluminium (Al) was achieved. This allowed concealed metallic samples- having conductivities ranging from 0.54 to 59.77 MSm-1 and hidden behind 1.5-mm-thick Al shields- to be imaged. Our results demonstrate that the presence of the concealed metallic objects can be revealed. The technique was thus shown to be a promising detection tool for security applications.

  7. Electromagnetic receiver with capacitive electrodes and triaxial induction coil for tunnel exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Chen; Sheng, Jin; Wang, Shun

    2017-09-01

    A new type of electromagnetic (EM) receiver has been developed by integrating four capacitive electrodes and a triaxial induction coil with an advanced data logger for tunnel exploration. The new EM receiver can conduct EM observations in tunnels, which is one of the principal goals of surface-tunnel-borehole EM detection for deep ore deposit mapping. The use of capacitive electrodes enables us to record the electrical field (E-field) signals from hard rock surfaces, which are high-resistance terrains. A compact triaxial induction coil integrates three independent induction coils for narrow-tunnel exploration applications. A low-time-drift-error clock source is developed for tunnel applications where GPS signals are unavailable. The three main components of our tunnel EM receiver are: (1) four capacitive electrodes for measuring the E-field signal without digging in hard rock regions; (2) a triaxial induction coil sensor for audio-frequency magnetotelluric and controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric signal measurements; and (3) a data logger that allows us to record five-component MT signals with low noise levels, low time-drift-error for the clock source, and high dynamic range. The proposed tunnel EM receiver was successfully deployed in a mine that exhibited with typical noise characteristics. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: The new EM receiver can conduct EM observations in tunnels, which is one of the principal goals of the surface-tunnel-borehole EM (STBEM) detection for deep ore deposit mapping. The use of a capacitive electrode enables us to record the electrical field (E-field) signals from hard rock surfaces. A compact triaxial induction coil integrated three induction coils, for narrow-tunnel applications.

  8. The application of magnetic gradiometry and electromagnetic induction at a former radioactive waste disposal site.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Dale Franklin

    2010-04-01

    A former radioactive waste disposal site is surveyed with two non-intrusive geophysical techniques, including magnetic gradiometry and electromagnetic induction. Data were gathered over the site by towing the geophysical equipment mounted to a non-electrically conductive and non-magnetic fibre-glass cart. Magnetic gradiometry, which detects the location of ferromagnetic material, including iron and steel, was used to map the existence of a previously unknown buried pipeline formerly used in the delivery of liquid waste to a number of surface disposal trenches and concrete vaults. The existence of a possible pipeline is reinforced by historical engineering drawing and photographs. The electromagnetic induction (EMI) technique was used to map areas of high and low electrical conductivity, which coincide with the magnetic gradiometry data. The EMI also provided information on areas of high electrical conductivity unrelated to a pipeline network. Both data sets demonstrate the usefulness of surface geophysical surveillance techniques to minimize the risk of exposure in the event of future remediation efforts.

  9. Impact of Electromagnetic Field upon Temperature Measurement of Induction Heated Charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalcerz, A.; Przylucki, R.

    2013-04-01

    The use of thermoelements is a commonly applied method in industry and engineering. It provides a wide measurement range of temperature, a direct voltage signal from the transducer, low cost of the thermoelement, and its resistance to many unfavorable factors which occur in an industrial environment. Unfortunately, thermoelements may not be resistant to interferences of a strong electromagnetic field because of the nature and design of a transducer. Induction heating is the most commonly used type of heating, at present, for metals. In order to guarantee the correctness of the carried out heating process, it is essential to control the temperature of the heated element. The impact of a strong electromagnetic field upon the thermocouple temperature measurement of the inductively heated elements has been analyzed in this paper. The experiment includes dozens of measurements where the following parameters have been varied: frequency of the current which feeds the heating inductor, power supplied to the heating system, geometry of heat inductor, and the charge material and its geometrical dimensions. Interferences of the power-line frequency have been eliminated in part of the carried out measurements.

  10. Research on Stabilization Properties of Inductive-Capacitive Transducers Based on Hybrid Electromagnetic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesev, S. G.; Khazieva, R. T.; Kirllov, R. V.; Konev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Some electrical consumers (the charge system of storage capacitor, powerful pulse generators, electrothermal systems, gas-discharge lamps, electric ovens, plasma torches) require constant power consumption, while their resistance changes in the limited range. Current stabilization systems (CSS) with inductive-capacitive transducers (ICT) provide constant power, when the load resistance changes over a wide range and increaseы the efficiency of high-power loads’ power supplies. ICT elements are selected according to the maximum load, which leads to exceeding a predetermined value of capacity. The paper suggests carrying load power by the ICT based on multifunction integrated electromagnetic components (MIEC) to reduce the predetermined capacity of ICT elements and CSS weights and dimensions. The authors developed and patented ICT based on MIEC that reduces the CSS weights and dimensions by reducing components number with the possibility of device’s electric energy transformation and resonance frequency changing. An ICT mathematical model was produced. The model determines the width of the load stabilization range. Electromagnetic processes study model was built with the MIEC integral parameters (full inductance of the electrical lead, total capacity, current of electrical lead). It shows independence of the load current from the load resistance for different ways of MIEC connection.

  11. Three-dimensional sensitivity distribution and sample volume of low-induction-number electromagnetic-induction instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callegary, J.B.; Ferré, T.P.A.; Groom, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    There is an ongoing effort to improve the understanding of the correlation of soil properties with apparent soil electrical conductivity as measured by low-induction-number electromagnetic-induction (LIN FEM) instruments. At a minimum, the dimensions of LIN FEM instruments' sample volume, the spatial distribution of sensitivity within that volume, and implications for surveying and analyses must be clearly defined and discussed. Therefore, a series of numerical simulations was done in which a conductive perturbation was moved systematically through homogeneous soil to elucidate the three-dimensional sample volume of LIN FEM instruments. For a small perturbation with electrical conductivity similar to that of the soil, instrument response is a measure of local sensitivity (LS). Our results indicate that LS depends strongly on the orientation of the instrument's transmitter and receiver coils and includes regions of both positive and negative LS. Integration of the absolute value of LS from highest to lowest was used to contour cumulative sensitivity (CS). The 90% CS contour was used to define the sample volume. For both horizontal and vertical coplanar coil orientations, the longest dimension of the sample volume was at the surface along the main instrument axis with a length of about four times the intercoil spacing (s) with maximum thicknesses of about 1 and 0.3 s, respectively. The imaged distribution of spatial sensitivity within the sample volume is highly complex and should be considered in conjunction with the expected scale of heterogeneity before the use and interpretation of LIN FEM for mapping and profiling. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  12. Natural time analysis of critical phenomena: The case of pre-fracture electromagnetic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potirakis, S. M.; Karadimitrakis, A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2013-06-01

    Criticality of complex systems reveals itself in various ways. One way to monitor a system at critical state is to analyze its observable manifestations using the recently introduced method of natural time. Pre-fracture electromagnetic (EM) emissions, in agreement to laboratory experiments, have been consistently detected in the MHz band prior to significant earthquakes. It has been proposed that these emissions stem from the fracture of the heterogeneous materials surrounding the strong entities (asperities) distributed along the fault, preventing the relative slipping. It has also been proposed that the fracture of heterogeneous material could be described in analogy to the critical phase transitions in statistical physics. In this work, the natural time analysis is for the first time applied to the pre-fracture MHz EM signals revealing their critical nature. Seismicity and pre-fracture EM emissions should be two sides of the same coin concerning the earthquake generation process. Therefore, we also examine the corresponding foreshock seismic activity, as another manifestation of the same complex system at critical state. We conclude that the foreshock seismicity data present criticality features as well.

  13. Natural time analysis of critical phenomena: the case of pre-fracture electromagnetic emissions.

    PubMed

    Potirakis, S M; Karadimitrakis, A; Eftaxias, K

    2013-06-01

    Criticality of complex systems reveals itself in various ways. One way to monitor a system at critical state is to analyze its observable manifestations using the recently introduced method of natural time. Pre-fracture electromagnetic (EM) emissions, in agreement to laboratory experiments, have been consistently detected in the MHz band prior to significant earthquakes. It has been proposed that these emissions stem from the fracture of the heterogeneous materials surrounding the strong entities (asperities) distributed along the fault, preventing the relative slipping. It has also been proposed that the fracture of heterogeneous material could be described in analogy to the critical phase transitions in statistical physics. In this work, the natural time analysis is for the first time applied to the pre-fracture MHz EM signals revealing their critical nature. Seismicity and pre-fracture EM emissions should be two sides of the same coin concerning the earthquake generation process. Therefore, we also examine the corresponding foreshock seismic activity, as another manifestation of the same complex system at critical state. We conclude that the foreshock seismicity data present criticality features as well.

  14. Dry calibration of electromagnetic flowmeters based on numerical models combining multiple physical phenomena (multiphysics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Hu, L.; Lee, K. M.; Zou, J.; Ruan, X. D.; Yang, H. Y.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a method for dry calibration of an electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF). This method, which determines the voltage induced in the EMF as conductive liquid flows through a magnetic field, numerically solves a coupled set of multiphysical equations with measured boundary conditions for the magnetic, electric, and flow fields in the measuring pipe of the flowmeter. Specifically, this paper details the formulation of dry calibration and an efficient algorithm (that adaptively minimizes the number of measurements and requires only the normal component of the magnetic flux density as boundary conditions on the pipe surface to reconstruct the magnetic field involved) for computing the sensitivity of EMF. Along with an in-depth discussion on factors that could significantly affect the final precision of a dry calibrated EMF, the effects of flow disturbance on measuring errors have been experimentally studied by installing a baffle at the inflow port of the EMF. Results of the dry calibration on an actual EMF were compared against flow-rig calibration; excellent agreements (within 0.3%) between dry calibration and flow-rig tests verify the multiphysical computation of the fields and the robustness of the method. As requiring no actual flow, the dry calibration is particularly useful for calibrating large-diameter EMFs where conventional flow-rig methods are often costly and difficult to implement.

  15. Spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Glecio; Silva, Jucicléia; Bezerra, Joel; Silva, Enio; Montenegro, Abelardo

    2013-04-01

    The cultivation of sugar cane in Brazil occupies a prominent place in national production chain, because the country is the main world producer of sugar and ethanol. Accordingly, studies are needed that allow an integrated production and technified, and especially that estimates of crops are consistent with the actual production of each region. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction. The field experiment was conducted at an agricultural research site located in Goiana municipality, Pernambuco State, north-east of Brazil (Latitude 07 ° 34 '25 "S, Longitude 34 ° 55' 39" W). The surface of the studied field is 6.5 ha, and its mean height 8.5 m a.s.l. This site has been under sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum sp.) monoculture during the last 24 years and it was managed burning the straw each year after harvesting, renewal of plantation was performed every 7 years. Studied the field is located 10 km east from Atlantic Ocean and it is representative of the regional landscape lowlands, whose soils are affected by salinity seawater, sugarcane plantations with the main economical activity. Soil was classified an orthic the Podsol. The productivity of cane sugar and electrical conductivity were measured in 90 sampling points. The productivity of cane sugar was determined in each of the sampling points in plots of 9 m2. The Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa, mS m-1) was measured with an electromagnetic induction device EM38-DD (Geonics Limited). The equipment consists of two units of measurement, one in a horizontal dipole (ECa-H) to provide effective measurement distance of 1.5 m approximately and other one in vertical dipole (ECa-V) with an effective measurement depth of approximately 0.75 m. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and geostatistical tools. The results showed that productivity in the study area

  16. Modular Approaches to Earth Science Scientific Computing: 3D Electromagnetic Induction Modeling as an Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, K.; Egbert, G.; Siripunvaraporn, W.

    2003-12-01

    We are developing a modular system for three-dimensional inversion of electromagnetic (EM) induction data, using an object oriented programming approach. This approach allows us to modify the individual components of the inversion scheme proposed, and also reuse the components for variety of problems in earth science computing howsoever diverse they might be. In particular, the modularity allows us to (a) change modeling codes independently of inversion algorithm details; (b) experiment with new inversion algorithms; and (c) modify the way prior information is imposed in the inversion to test competing hypothesis and techniques required to solve an earth science problem. Our initial code development is for EM induction equations on a staggered grid, using iterative solution techniques in 3D. An example illustrated here is an experiment with the sensitivity of 3D magnetotelluric inversion to uncertainties in the boundary conditions required for regional induction problems. These boundary conditions should reflect the large-scale geoelectric structure of the study area, which is usually poorly constrained. In general for inversion of MT data, one fixes boundary conditions at the edge of the model domain, and adjusts the earth?s conductivity structure within the modeling domain. Allowing for errors in specification of the open boundary values is simple in principle, but no existing inversion codes that we are aware of have this feature. Adding a feature such as this is straightforward within the context of the modular approach. More generally, a modular approach provides an efficient methodology for setting up earth science computing problems to test various ideas. As a concrete illustration relevant to EM induction problems, we investigate the sensitivity of MT data near San Andreas Fault at Parkfield (California) to uncertainties in the regional geoelectric structure.

  17. Modelling of resonant MEMS magnetic field sensor with electromagnetic induction sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Song; Xu, Huaying; Xu, Dehui; Xiong, Bin

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical model of resonant MEMS magnetic field sensor with electromagnetic induction sensing. The resonant structure vibrates in square extensional (SE) mode. By analyzing the vibration amplitude and quality factor of the resonant structure, the magnetic field sensitivity as a function of device structure parameters and encapsulation pressure is established. The developed analytical model has been verified by comparing calculated results with experiment results and the deviation between them is only 10.25%, which shows the feasibility of the proposed device model. The model can provide theoretical guidance for further design optimization of the sensor. Moreover, a quantitative study of the magnetic field sensitivity is conducted with respect to the structure parameters and encapsulation pressure based on the proposed model.

  18. Urban soil exploration through multi-receiver electromagnetic induction and stepped-frequency ground penetrating radar.

    PubMed

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; Van Meirvenne, Marc; Vandenhaute, Laura; Delefortrie, Samuël; De Smedt, Philippe; Saey, Timothy; Seuntjens, Piet

    2015-07-01

    In environmental assessments, the characterization of urban soils relies heavily on invasive investigation, which is often insufficient to capture their full spatial heterogeneity. Non-invasive geophysical techniques enable rapid collection of high-resolution data and provide a cost-effective alternative to investigate soil in a spatially comprehensive way. This paper presents the results of combining multi-receiver electromagnetic induction and stepped-frequency ground penetrating radar to characterize a former garage site contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. The sensor combination showed the ability to identify and accurately locate building remains and a high-density soil layer, thus demonstrating the high potential to investigate anthropogenic disturbances of physical nature. In addition, a correspondence was found between an area of lower electrical conductivity and elevated concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons, suggesting the potential to detect specific chemical disturbances. We conclude that the sensor combination provides valuable information for preliminary assessment of urban soils.

  19. Hybridizing triboelectrification and electromagnetic induction effects for high-efficient mechanical energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youfan; Yang, Jin; Niu, Simiao; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-07-22

    The recently introduced triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) and the traditional electromagnetic induction generator (EMIG) are coherently integrated in one structure for energy harvesting and vibration sensing/isolation. The suspended structure is based on two oppositely oriented magnets that are enclosed by hollow cubes surrounded with coils, which oscillates in response to external disturbance and harvests mechanical energy simultaneously from triboelectrification and electromagnetic induction. It extends the previous definition of hybrid cell to harvest the same type of energy with multiple approaches. Both the sliding-mode TENG and contact-mode TENG can be achieved in the same structure. In order to make the TENG and EMIG work together, transformers are used to match the output impedance between these two power sources with very different characteristics. The maximum output power of 7.7 and 1.9 mW on the same load of 5 kΩ was obtained for the TENG and EMIG, respectively, after impedance matching. Benefiting from the rational design, the output signal from the TENG and the EMIG are in phase. They can be added up directly to get an output voltage of 4.6 V and an output current of 2.2 mA in parallel connection. A power management circuit was connected to the hybrid cell, and a regulated voltage of 3.3 V with constant current was achieved. For the first time, a logic operation was carried out on a half-adder circuit by using the hybrid cell working as both the power source and the input digit signals. We also demonstrated that the hybrid cell can serve as a vibration isolator. Further applications as vibration dampers, triggers, and sensors are all promising.

  20. Cone-shaped source characteristics and inductance effect of transient electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hai-Yan; Li, Feng-Ping; Yue, Jian-Hua; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Liu, Xu-Hua; Zhang, Hua

    2017-03-01

    Small multi-turn coil devices are used with the transient electromagnetic method (TEM) in areas with limited space, particularly in underground environments such as coal mines roadways and engineering tunnels, and for detecting shallow geological targets in environmental and engineering fields. However, the equipment involved has strong mutual inductance coupling, which causes a lengthy turn-offtime and a deep "blind zone". This study proposes a new transmitter device with a conical-shape source and derives the radius formula of each coil and the mutual inductance coefficient of the cone. According to primary field characteristics, results of the two fields created, calculation of the conical-shaped source in a uniform medium using theoretical analysis, and a comparison of the inductance of the new device with that of the multi-turn coil, show that inductance of the multi-turn coil is nine times greater than that of the conical source with the same equivalent magnetic moment of 926.1 A·m2. This indicates that the new source leads to a much shallower "blind zone." Furthermore, increasing the bottom radius and turn of the cone creates a larger mutual inductance but increasing the cone height results in a lower mutual inductance. Using the superposition principle, the primary and secondary magnetic fields for a conical source in a homogeneous medium are calculated; results indicate that the magnetic behavior of the cone is the same as that of the multi-turn coils, but the transient responses of the secondary field and the total field are more stronger than those of the multi-turn coils. To study the transient response characteristics using a cone-shaped source in a layered earth, a numerical filtering algorithm is then developed using the fast Hankel transform and the improved cosine transform, again using the superposition principle. During development, an average apparent resistivity inverted from the induced electromotive force using each coil is defined to

  1. Apparent resistivity for transient electromagnetic induction logging and its correction in radial layer identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingxin; Hu, Xiangyun; Pan, Heping; Xi, Yufei

    2018-04-01

    We propose an algorithm for calculating all-time apparent resistivity from transient electromagnetic induction logging. The algorithm is based on the whole-space transient electric field expression of the uniform model and Halley's optimisation. In trial calculations for uniform models, the all-time algorithm is shown to have high accuracy. We use the finite-difference time-domain method to simulate the transient electromagnetic field in radial two-layer models without wall rock and convert the simulation results to apparent resistivity using the all-time algorithm. The time-varying apparent resistivity reflects the radially layered geoelectrical structure of the models and the apparent resistivity of the earliest time channel follows the true resistivity of the inner layer; however, the apparent resistivity at larger times reflects the comprehensive electrical characteristics of the inner and outer layers. To accurately identify the outer layer resistivity based on the series relationship model of the layered resistance, the apparent resistivity and diffusion depth of the different time channels are approximately replaced by related model parameters; that is, we propose an apparent resistivity correction algorithm. By correcting the time-varying apparent resistivity of radial two-layer models, we show that the correction results reflect the radially layered electrical structure and the corrected resistivities of the larger time channels follow the outer layer resistivity. The transient electromagnetic fields of radially layered models with wall rock are simulated to obtain the 2D time-varying profiles of the apparent resistivity and corrections. The results suggest that the time-varying apparent resistivity and correction results reflect the vertical and radial geoelectrical structures. For models with small wall-rock effect, the correction removes the effect of the low-resistance inner layer on the apparent resistivity of the larger time channels.

  2. A Double Layer Model of the Electromagnetic and Thermal Processes in Induction Heating of Ferromagnetic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilev, B.; Kraev, G.; Venkov, G. I.

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents the modeling of electromagnetic and heating processes in an inductor, where cylindrical ferromagnetic material has been placed. In the first part the electromagnetic mathematical problem is solved, as a result the power density is obtained. The power density takes part in the heat conduction equation. In the second part the thermal mathematical problem is solved, as a result the alteration of the temperature of the ferromagnetic material during the heating process is obtained. The parameters in both mathematical problems depend on the temperature. Because of that the stitching method is used for their finding. In [3, 4] the same mathematical problems are solved by the finite elements method. Comparing our results to those from [3] shows that they are similar. In contrast to [3, 4] our method allows the continuation of the analysis with the finding of the load power during the heating process. Thus result permits the determination of the load power alteration in the supplying inverter [1]. It is well-known that during the induction hardening it is necessary to maintain constant current amplitude in the load circuit of the inverter. So the next aim of this research is to build up a controller, based on the developed model, which will procure the necessary mode.

  3. A Review of High-Performance Computational Strategies for Modeling and Imaging of Electromagnetic Induction Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Many geoscientific applications exploit electrostatic and electromagnetic fields to interrogate and map subsurface electrical resistivity—an important geophysical attribute for characterizing mineral, energy, and water resources. In complex three-dimensional geologies, where many of these resources remain to be found, resistivity mapping requires large-scale modeling and imaging capabilities, as well as the ability to treat significant data volumes, which can easily overwhelm single-core and modest multicore computing hardware. To treat such problems requires large-scale parallel computational resources, necessary for reducing the time to solution to a time frame acceptable to the exploration process. The recognition that significant parallel computing processes must be brought to bear on these problems gives rise to choices that must be made in parallel computing hardware and software. In this review, some of these choices are presented, along with the resulting trade-offs. We also discuss future trends in high-performance computing and the anticipated impact on electromagnetic (EM) geophysics. Topics discussed in this review article include a survey of parallel computing platforms, graphics processing units to multicore CPUs with a fast interconnect, along with effective parallel solvers and associated solver libraries effective for inductive EM modeling and imaging.

  4. Physics Almost Saved the President! Electromagnetic Induction and the Assassination of James Garfield: A Teaching Opportunity in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overduin, James; Molloy, Dana; Selway, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction is probably one of the most challenging subjects for students in the introductory physics sequence, especially in algebra-based courses. Yet it is at the heart of many of the devices we rely on today. To help students grasp and retain the concept, we have put together a simple and dramatic classroom demonstration that…

  5. A Missile-Borne Angular Velocity Sensor Based on Triaxial Electromagnetic Induction Coils

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Wu, Dan; Han, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Aiming to solve the problem of the limited measuring range for angular motion parameters of high-speed rotating projectiles in the field of guidance and control, a self-adaptive measurement method for angular motion parameters based on the electromagnetic induction principle is proposed. First, a framework with type bent “I-shape” is used to design triaxial coils in a mutually orthogonal way. Under the condition of high rotational speed of a projectile, the induction signal of the projectile moving across a geomagnetic field is acquired by using coils. Second, the frequency of the pulse signal is adjusted self-adaptively. Angular velocity and angular displacement are calculated in the form of periodic pulse counting and pulse accumulation, respectively. Finally, on the basis of that principle prototype of the sensor is researched and developed, performance of measuring angular motion parameters are tested on the sensor by semi-physical and physical simulation experiments, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the sensor has a wide measuring range of angular velocity from 1 rps to 100 rps with a measurement error of less than 0.3%, and the angular displacement measurement error is lower than 0.2°. The proposed method satisfies measurement requirements for high-speed rotating projectiles with an extremely high dynamic range of rotational speed and high precision, and has definite value to engineering applications in the fields of attitude determination and geomagnetic navigation. PMID:27706039

  6. The detection of brain oedema with frequency-dependent phase shift electromagnetic induction.

    PubMed

    González, César A; Rubinsky, Boris

    2006-06-01

    The spectroscopic distribution of inductive phase shift in the brain as a function of the relative volume of oedema was evaluated with theoretical and experimental methods in the frequency range 1 to 8 MHz. The theoretical study employed a simple mathematical model of electromagnetic induction in tissue and brain tissue data available from the literature to calculate the phase shift as a function of oedema in the bulk of the brain. Experimental data were generated from bulk measurements of ex vivo homogenized pig brain tissue mixed with various volumes of physiological saline in a volume sample typical of the human brain. There is good agreement between the analytical and the experimental results. Detectable changes in phase shift begin from a frequency of about 3 MHz to 4 MHz in the tested compositions and volume. The phase shift increases with frequency and fluid content. The results suggest that measuring phase shift in the bulk of the brain has the potential for becoming a robust means for non-contact detection of oedema in the brain.

  7. A Missile-Borne Angular Velocity Sensor Based on Triaxial Electromagnetic Induction Coils.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Wu, Dan; Han, Yan

    2016-09-30

    Aiming to solve the problem of the limited measuring range for angular motion parameters of high-speed rotating projectiles in the field of guidance and control, a self-adaptive measurement method for angular motion parameters based on the electromagnetic induction principle is proposed. First, a framework with type bent "I-shape" is used to design triaxial coils in a mutually orthogonal way. Under the condition of high rotational speed of a projectile, the induction signal of the projectile moving across a geomagnetic field is acquired by using coils. Second, the frequency of the pulse signal is adjusted self-adaptively. Angular velocity and angular displacement are calculated in the form of periodic pulse counting and pulse accumulation, respectively. Finally, on the basis of that principle prototype of the sensor is researched and developed, performance of measuring angular motion parameters are tested on the sensor by semi-physical and physical simulation experiments, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the sensor has a wide measuring range of angular velocity from 1 rps to 100 rps with a measurement error of less than 0.3%, and the angular displacement measurement error is lower than 0.2°. The proposed method satisfies measurement requirements for high-speed rotating projectiles with an extremely high dynamic range of rotational speed and high precision, and has definite value to engineering applications in the fields of attitude determination and geomagnetic navigation.

  8. Contiguous metallic rings: an inductive mesh with high transmissivity, strong electromagnetic shielding, and uniformly distributed stray light.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiubin; Lu, Zhengang

    2007-02-05

    This paper presents the experimental study on an inductive mesh composed of contiguous metallic rings fabricated using UV-lithography on quartz glass. Experimental results indicate that, at the same period and linewidth as square mesh, ring mesh has better transmissivity for its higher obscuration ratio, stronger electromagnetic shielding performance for its smaller maximum aperture, and less degradation of imaging quality for its lower ratio and uniform distribution of high order diffraction energy. It is therefore concluded that this kind of ring mesh can be used as high-pass filters to provide electromagnetic shielding of optical transparent elements.

  9. Non-standard electromagnetic induction sensor configurations: Evaluating sensitivities and applicability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemoteau, Julien; Tronicke, Jens

    2015-07-01

    For near surface geophysical surveys, small-fixed offset loop-loop electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors are usually placed parallel to the ground surface (i.e., both loops are at the same height above ground). In this study, we evaluate the potential of making measurements with a system that is not parallel to the ground; i.e., by positioning the system at different inclinations with respect to ground surface. First, we present the Maxwell theory for inclined magnetic dipoles over a homogeneous half space. By analyzing the sensitivities of such configurations, we show that varying the angle of the system would result in improved imaging capabilities. For example, we show that acquiring data with a vertical system allows detection of a conductive body with a better lateral resolution compared to data acquired using standard horizontal configurations. The synthetic responses are presented for a heterogeneous medium and compared to field data acquired in the historical Park Sanssouci in Potsdam, Germany. After presenting a detailed sensitivity analysis and synthetic examples of such ground conductivity measurements, we suggest a new strategy of acquisition that allows to better estimate the true distribution of electrical conductivity using instruments with a fixed, small offset between the loops. This strategy is evaluated using field data collected at a well-constrained test-site in Horstwalde (Germany). Here, the target buried utility pipes are best imaged using vertical system configurations demonstrating the potential of our approach for typical applications.

  10. Radiation and Electromagnetic Induction Data Fusion for Detection of Buried Radioactive Metal Waste - 12282

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Zhiling; Wei, Wei; Turlapaty, Anish

    2012-07-01

    At the United States Army's test sites, fired penetrators made of Depleted Uranium (DU) have been buried under ground and become hazardous waste. Previously, we developed techniques for detecting buried radioactive targets. We also developed approaches for locating buried paramagnetic metal objects by utilizing the electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor data. In this paper, we apply data fusion techniques to combine results from both the radiation detection and the EMI detection, so that we can further distinguish among DU penetrators, DU oxide, and non- DU metal debris. We develop a two-step fusion approach for the task, and test it with surveymore » data collected on simulation targets. In this work, we explored radiation and EMI data fusion for detecting DU, oxides, and non-DU metals. We developed a two-step fusion approach based on majority voting and a set of decision rules. With this approach, we fuse results from radiation detection based on the RX algorithm and EMI detection based on a 3-step analysis. Our fusion approach has been tested successfully with data collected on simulation targets. In the future, we will need to further verify the effectiveness of this fusion approach with field data. (authors)« less

  11. Electromagnetic induction heating for single crystal graphene growth: morphology control by rapid heating and quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaoxing; Li, Fushan; Chen, Wei; Veeramalai, Chandrasekar Perumal; Ooi, Poh Choon; Guo, Tailiang

    2015-03-01

    The direct observation of single crystal graphene growth and its shape evolution is of fundamental importance to the understanding of graphene growth physicochemical mechanisms and the achievement of wafer-scale single crystalline graphene. Here we demonstrate the controlled formation of single crystal graphene with varying shapes, and directly observe the shape evolution of single crystal graphene by developing a localized-heating and rapid-quenching chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system based on electromagnetic induction heating. Importantly, rational control of circular, hexagonal, and dendritic single crystalline graphene domains can be readily obtained for the first time by changing the growth condition. Systematic studies suggest that the graphene nucleation only occurs during the initial stage, while the domain density is independent of the growth temperatures due to the surface-limiting effect. In addition, the direct observation of graphene domain shape evolution is employed for the identification of competing growth mechanisms including diffusion-limited, attachment-limited, and detachment-limited processes. Our study not only provides a novel method for morphology-controlled graphene synthesis, but also offers fundamental insights into the kinetics of single crystal graphene growth.

  12. Using Electromagnetic Induction Technique to Detect Hydropedological Dynamics: Principles and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing; Liao, Kaihua; Doolittle, James; Lin, Henry

    2014-05-01

    Hydropedological dynamics including soil moisture variation, subsurface flow, and spatial distributions of different soil properties are important parameters in ecological, environmental, hydrological, and agricultural modeling and applications. However, technical gap exists in mapping these dynamics at intermediate spatial scale (e.g., farm and catchment scales). At intermediate scales, in-situ monitoring provides detailed data, but is restricted in number and spatial coverage; while remote sensing provides more acceptable spatial coverage, but has comparatively low spatial resolution, limited observation depths, and is greatly influenced by the surface condition and climate. As a non-invasive, fast, and convenient geophysical tool, electromagnetic induction (EMI) measures soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and has great potential to bridge this technical gap. In this presentation, principles of different EMI meters are briefly introduced. Then, case studies of using repeated EMI to detect spatial distributions of subsurface convergent flow, soil moisture dynamics, soil types and their transition zones, and different soil properties are presented. The suitability, effectiveness, and accuracy of EMI are evaluated for mapping different hydropedological dynamics. Lastly, contributions of different hydropedological and terrain properties on soil ECa are quantified under different wetness conditions, seasons, and land use types using Classification and Regression Tree model. Trend removal and residual analysis are then used for further mining of EMI survey data. Based on these analyses, proper EMI survey designs and data processing are proposed.

  13. A Novel Tactile Sensor with Electromagnetic Induction and Its Application on Stick-Slip Interaction Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Han, Haijun; Liu, Tao; Yi, Jingang; Li, Qingguo; Inoue, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Real-time detection of contact states, such as stick-slip interaction between a robot and an object on its end effector, is crucial for the robot to grasp and manipulate the object steadily. This paper presents a novel tactile sensor based on electromagnetic induction and its application on stick-slip interaction. An equivalent cantilever-beam model of the tactile sensor was built and capable of constructing the relationship between the sensor output and the friction applied on the sensor. With the tactile sensor, a new method to detect stick-slip interaction on the contact surface between the object and the sensor is proposed based on the characteristics of friction change. Furthermore, a prototype was developed for a typical application, stable wafer transferring on a wafer transfer robot, by considering the spatial magnetic field distribution and the sensor size according to the requirements of wafer transfer. The experimental results validate the sensing mechanism of the tactile sensor and verify its feasibility of detecting stick-slip on the contact surface between the wafer and the sensor. The sensing mechanism also provides a new approach to detect the contact state on the soft-rigid surface in other robot-environment interaction systems. PMID:27023545

  14. Physics Almost Saved the President! Electromagnetic Induction and the Assassination of James Garfield: A Teaching Opportunity in Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James; Molloy, Dana; Selway, Jim

    2014-03-01

    Electromagnetic induction is probably one of the most challenging subjects for students in the introductory physics sequence, especially in algebra-based courses. Yet it is at the heart of many of the devices we rely on today. To help students grasp and retain the concept, we have put together a simple and dramatic classroom demonstration that combines sight and sound with a compelling personal story from U.S. history. Other classroom activities dealing with induction have been discussed in this journal, but we believe that this one will be especially likely to attract and retain student interest, particularly in courses geared toward medical, biological, and other non-physics majors.

  15. An analysis of how electromagnetic induction and Faraday's law are presented in general physics textbooks, focusing on learning difficulties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisasola, Jenaro; Zuza, Kristina; Almudi, José-Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Textbooks are a very important tool in the teaching-learning process and influence important aspects of the process. This paper presents an analysis of the chapter on electromagnetic induction and Faraday's law in 19 textbooks on general physics for first-year university courses for scientists and engineers. This analysis was based on criteria formulated from the theoretical framework of electromagnetic induction in classical physics and students' learning difficulties concerning these concepts. The aim of the work presented here is not to compare a textbook against the ideal book, but rather to try and find a series of explanations, examples, questions, etc that provide evidence on how the topic is presented in relation to the criteria above. It concludes that despite many aspects being covered properly, there are others that deserve greater attention.

  16. Inversion of multi-frequency electromagnetic induction data for 3D characterization of hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, Troy R.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Schultz, Gregory M.; Curtis, Gary P.; Lane, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) instruments provide rapid, noninvasive, and spatially dense data for characterization of soil and groundwater properties. Data from multi-frequency EMI tools can be inverted to provide quantitative electrical conductivity estimates as a function of depth. In this study, multi-frequency EMI data collected across an abandoned uranium mill site near Naturita, Colorado, USA, are inverted to produce vertical distribution of electrical conductivity (EC) across the site. The relation between measured apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and hydraulic conductivity (K) is weak (correlation coefficient of 0.20), whereas the correlation between the depth dependent EC obtained from the inversions, and K is sufficiently strong to be used for hydrologic estimation (correlation coefficient of − 0.62). Depth-specific EC values were correlated with co-located K measurements to develop a site-specific ln(EC)–ln(K) relation. This petrophysical relation was applied to produce a spatially detailed map of K across the study area. A synthetic example based on ECa values at the site was used to assess model resolution and correlation loss given variations in depth and/or measurement error. Results from synthetic modeling indicate that optimum correlation with K occurs at ~ 0.5 m followed by a gradual correlation loss of 90% at 2.3 m. These results are consistent with an analysis of depth of investigation (DOI) given the range of frequencies, transmitter–receiver separation, and measurement errors for the field data. DOIs were estimated at 2.0 ± 0.5 m depending on the soil conductivities. A 4-layer model, with varying thicknesses, was used to invert the ECa to maximize available information within the aquifer region for improved correlations with K. Results show improved correlation between K and the corresponding inverted EC at similar depths, underscoring the importance of inversion in using multi-frequency EMI data for hydrologic

  17. Inversion of multi-frequency electromagnetic induction data for 3D characterization of hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Schultz, G.M.; Curtis, G.P.; Lane, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) instruments provide rapid, noninvasive, and spatially dense data for characterization of soil and groundwater properties. Data from multi-frequency EMI tools can be inverted to provide quantitative electrical conductivity estimates as a function of depth. In this study, multi-frequency EMI data collected across an abandoned uranium mill site near Naturita, Colorado, USA, are inverted to produce vertical distribution of electrical conductivity (EC) across the site. The relation between measured apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and hydraulic conductivity (K) is weak (correlation coefficient of 0.20), whereas the correlation between the depth dependent EC obtained from the inversions, and K is sufficiently strong to be used for hydrologic estimation (correlation coefficient of -0.62). Depth-specific EC values were correlated with co-located K measurements to develop a site-specific ln(EC)-ln(K) relation. This petrophysical relation was applied to produce a spatially detailed map of K across the study area. A synthetic example based on ECa values at the site was used to assess model resolution and correlation loss given variations in depth and/or measurement error. Results from synthetic modeling indicate that optimum correlation with K occurs at ~0.5m followed by a gradual correlation loss of 90% at 2.3m. These results are consistent with an analysis of depth of investigation (DOI) given the range of frequencies, transmitter-receiver separation, and measurement errors for the field data. DOIs were estimated at 2.0??0.5m depending on the soil conductivities. A 4-layer model, with varying thicknesses, was used to invert the ECa to maximize available information within the aquifer region for improved correlations with K. Results show improved correlation between K and the corresponding inverted EC at similar depths, underscoring the importance of inversion in using multi-frequency EMI data for hydrologic estimation. ?? 2011.

  18. Assessment of multi-frequency electromagnetic induction for determining soil moisture patterns at the hillslope scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp-van Meerveld, H. J.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    SummaryHillslopes are fundamental landscape units, yet represent a difficult scale for measurements as they are well-beyond our traditional point-scale techniques. Here we present an assessment of electromagnetic induction (EM) as a potential rapid and non-invasive method to map soil moisture patterns at the hillslope scale. We test the new multi-frequency GEM-300 for spatially distributed soil moisture measurements at the well-instrumented Panola hillslope. EM-based apparent conductivity measurements were linearly related to soil moisture measured with the Aqua-pro capacitance sensor below a threshold conductivity and represented the temporal patterns in soil moisture well. During spring rainfall events that wetted only the surface soil layers the apparent conductivity measurements explained the soil moisture dynamics at depth better than the surface soil moisture dynamics. All four EM frequencies (7.290, 9.090, 11.250, and 14.010 kHz) were highly correlated and linearly related to each other and could be used to predict soil moisture. This limited our ability to use the four different EM frequencies to obtain a soil moisture profile with depth. The apparent conductivity patterns represented the observed spatial soil moisture patterns well when the individually fitted relationships between measured soil moisture and apparent conductivity were used for each measurement point. However, when the same (master) relationship was used for all measurement locations, the soil moisture patterns were smoothed and did not resemble the observed soil moisture patterns very well. In addition the range in calculated soil moisture values was reduced compared to observed soil moisture. Part of the smoothing was likely due to the much larger measurement area of the GEM-300 compared to the soil moisture measurements.

  19. Assessment of Multi-frequency Electromagnetic Induction for Determining Soil Moisture Patterns at the Hillslope Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp-van Meerveld, I.; McDonnell, J.

    2009-05-01

    We present an assessment of electromagnetic induction (EM) as a potential rapid and non-invasive method to map soil moisture patterns at the Panola (GA, USA) hillslope. We address the following questions regarding the applicability of EM measurements for hillslope hydrological investigations: (1) Can EM be used for soil moisture measurements in areas with shallow soils?; (2) Can EM represent the temporal and spatial patterns of soil moisture throughout the year?; and (3) can multiple frequencies be used to extract additional information content from the EM approach and explain the depth profile of soil moisture? We found that the apparent conductivity measured with the multi-frequency GEM-300 was linearly related to soil moisture measured with an Aqua-pro capacitance sensor below a threshold conductivity and represented the temporal patterns in soil moisture well. During spring rainfall events that wetted only the surface soil layers the apparent conductivity measurements explained the soil moisture dynamics at depth better than the surface soil moisture dynamics. All four EM frequencies (7290, 9090, 11250, and 14010 Hz) were highly correlated and linearly related to each other and could be used to predict soil moisture. This limited our ability to use the four different EM frequencies to obtain a soil moisture profile with depth. The apparent conductivity patterns represented the observed spatial soil moisture patterns well when the individually fitted relationships between measured soil moisture and apparent conductivity were used for each measurement point. However, when the same (master) relationship was used for all measurement locations, the soil moisture patterns were smoothed and did not resemble the observed soil moisture patterns very well. In addition, the range in calculated soil moisture values was reduced compared to observed soil moisture. Part of the smoothing was likely due to the much larger measurement area of the GEM-300 compared to the Aqua

  20. A Brief History of the use of Electromagnetic Induction Techniques in Soil Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Doolittle, James

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) has been used to characterize the spatial variability of soil properties since the late 1970s. Initially used to assess soil salinity, the use of EMI in soil studies has expanded to include: mapping soil types; characterizing soil water content and flow patterns; assessing variations in soil texture, compaction, organic matter content, and pH; and determining the depth to subsurface horizons, stratigraphic layers or bedrock, among other uses. In all cases the soil property being investigated must influence soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) either directly or indirectly for EMI techniques to be effective. An increasing number and diversity of EMI sensors have been developed in response to users' needs and the availability of allied technologies, which have greatly improved the functionality of these tools and increased the amount and types of data that can be gathered with a single pass. EMI investigations provide several benefits for soil studies. The large amount of georeferenced data that can be rapidly and inexpensively collected with EMI provides more complete characterization of the spatial variations in soil properties than traditional sampling techniques. In addition, compared to traditional soil survey methods, EMI can more effectively characterize diffuse soil boundaries and identify included areas of dissimilar soils within mapped soil units, giving soil scientists greater confidence when collecting spatial soil information. EMI techniques do have limitations; results are site-specific and can vary depending on the complex interactions among multiple and variable soil properties. Despite this, EMI techniques are increasingly being used to investigate the spatial variability of soil properties at field and landscape scales. The future should witness a greater use of multiple-frequency and multiple-coil EMI sensors and integration with other sensors to assess the spatial variability of soil properties. Data analysis

  1. Application of Electromagnetic Induction Technique to Measure the Void Fraction in Oil/Gas Two Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahhab, H. A. Abdul; Aziz, A. R. A.; Al-Kayiem, H. H.; Nasif, M. S.; Reda, M. N.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, electromagnetic induction technique of measuring void fraction in liquid/gas fuel flow was utilized. In order to improve the electric properties of liquid fuel, an iron oxide Fe3O4 nanoparticles at 3% was blended to enhance the liquid fuel magnetization. Experiments have been conducted for a wide range of liquid and gas superficial velocities. From the experimental results, it was realized that there is an existing linear relationship between the void fraction and the measured electromotive force, when induction coils were connected in series for excitation coils, regardless of increase or decrease CNG bubbles distribution in liquid fuel flow. Therefore, it was revealed that the utilized method yielded quite reasonable account for measuring the void fraction, showing good agreement with the other available measurement techniques in the two-phase flow, and also with the published literature of the bubbly flow pattern. From the results of the present investigation, it has been proven that the electromagnetic induction is a feasible technique for the actual measurement of void fraction in a Diesel/CNG fuel flow.

  2. A Theoretical Model to Predict Both Horizontal Displacement and Vertical Displacement for Electromagnetic Induction-Based Deep Displacement Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Nanying; Zhang, Hongjian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Hongliang; Tong, Renyuan; Li, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Deep displacement observation is one basic means of landslide dynamic study and early warning monitoring and a key part of engineering geological investigation. In our previous work, we proposed a novel electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensor (I-type) to predict deep horizontal displacement and a theoretical model called equation-based equivalent loop approach (EELA) to describe its sensing characters. However in many landslide and related geological engineering cases, both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement vary apparently and dynamically so both may require monitoring. In this study, a II-type deep displacement sensor is designed by revising our I-type sensor to simultaneously monitor the deep horizontal displacement and vertical displacement variations at different depths within a sliding mass. Meanwhile, a new theoretical modeling called the numerical integration-based equivalent loop approach (NIELA) has been proposed to quantitatively depict II-type sensors’ mutual inductance properties with respect to predicted horizontal displacements and vertical displacements. After detailed examinations and comparative studies between measured mutual inductance voltage, NIELA-based mutual inductance and EELA-based mutual inductance, NIELA has verified to be an effective and quite accurate analytic model for characterization of II-type sensors. The NIELA model is widely applicable for II-type sensors’ monitoring on all kinds of landslides and other related geohazards with satisfactory estimation accuracy and calculation efficiency. PMID:22368467

  3. A theoretical model to predict both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement for electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensors.

    PubMed

    Shentu, Nanying; Zhang, Hongjian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Hongliang; Tong, Renyuan; Li, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Deep displacement observation is one basic means of landslide dynamic study and early warning monitoring and a key part of engineering geological investigation. In our previous work, we proposed a novel electromagnetic induction-based deep displacement sensor (I-type) to predict deep horizontal displacement and a theoretical model called equation-based equivalent loop approach (EELA) to describe its sensing characters. However in many landslide and related geological engineering cases, both horizontal displacement and vertical displacement vary apparently and dynamically so both may require monitoring. In this study, a II-type deep displacement sensor is designed by revising our I-type sensor to simultaneously monitor the deep horizontal displacement and vertical displacement variations at different depths within a sliding mass. Meanwhile, a new theoretical modeling called the numerical integration-based equivalent loop approach (NIELA) has been proposed to quantitatively depict II-type sensors' mutual inductance properties with respect to predicted horizontal displacements and vertical displacements. After detailed examinations and comparative studies between measured mutual inductance voltage, NIELA-based mutual inductance and EELA-based mutual inductance, NIELA has verified to be an effective and quite accurate analytic model for characterization of II-type sensors. The NIELA model is widely applicable for II-type sensors' monitoring on all kinds of landslides and other related geohazards with satisfactory estimation accuracy and calculation efficiency.

  4. Integration of electromagnetic induction sensor data in soil sampling scheme optimization using simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Barca, E; Castrignanò, A; Buttafuoco, G; De Benedetto, D; Passarella, G

    2015-07-01

    Soil survey is generally time-consuming, labor-intensive, and costly. Optimization of sampling scheme allows one to reduce the number of sampling points without decreasing or even increasing the accuracy of investigated attribute. Maps of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC a ) recorded with electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors could be effectively used to direct soil sampling design for assessing spatial variability of soil moisture. A protocol, using a field-scale bulk EC a survey, has been applied in an agricultural field in Apulia region (southeastern Italy). Spatial simulated annealing was used as a method to optimize spatial soil sampling scheme taking into account sampling constraints, field boundaries, and preliminary observations. Three optimization criteria were used. the first criterion (minimization of mean of the shortest distances, MMSD) optimizes the spreading of the point observations over the entire field by minimizing the expectation of the distance between an arbitrarily chosen point and its nearest observation; the second criterion (minimization of weighted mean of the shortest distances, MWMSD) is a weighted version of the MMSD, which uses the digital gradient of the grid EC a data as weighting function; and the third criterion (mean of average ordinary kriging variance, MAOKV) minimizes mean kriging estimation variance of the target variable. The last criterion utilizes the variogram model of soil water content estimated in a previous trial. The procedures, or a combination of them, were tested and compared in a real case. Simulated annealing was implemented by the software MSANOS able to define or redesign any sampling scheme by increasing or decreasing the original sampling locations. The output consists of the computed sampling scheme, the convergence time, and the cooling law, which can be an invaluable support to the process of sampling design. The proposed approach has found the optimal solution in a reasonable computation time. The

  5. Can we quantify the variability of soil moisture across scales using Electromagnetic Induction ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinet, Jérémy; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; Govers, Gerard; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in many natural processes. Therefore, technological and methodological advancements are of primary importance to provide accurate measurements of spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture. In that context, ElectroMagnetic Induction (EMI) instruments are often cited as a hydrogeophysical method with a large potential, through the measurement of the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the potential of EMI to characterize variability of soil moisture on both agricultural and forested land covers in a (sub-) tropical environment. These differences in land use could be critical as differences in temperature, transpiration and root water uptake can have significant effect, notably on the electrical conductivity of the pore water. In this study, we used an EMI instrument to carry out a first assessment of the impact of deforestation and agriculture on soil moisture in a subtropical region in the south of Brazil. We selected slopes of different topographies (gentle vs. steep) and contrasting land uses (natural forest vs. agriculture) within two nearby catchments. At selected locations on the slopes, we measured simultaneously ECa using EMI and a depth-weighted average of the soil moisture using TDR probes installed within soil pits. We found that the temporal variability of the soil moisture could not be measured accurately with EMI, probably because of important temporal variations of the pore water electrical conductivity and the relatively small temporal variations in soil moisture content. However, we found that its spatial variability could be effectively quantified using a non-linear relationship, for both intra- and inter-slopes variations. Within slopes, the ECa could explained between 67 and 90% of the variability of the soil moisture, while a single non-linear model for all the slopes could explain 55% of the soil moisture variability. We eventually showed that combining

  6. Comparing bulk electrical conductivities spatial series obtained by Time Domain Reflectometry and Electromagnetic Induction sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Ali; Ajeel, Ali; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The ability to determine and monitor the effects of salts on soils and plants, are of great importance to agriculture. To control its harmful effects, soil salinity needs to be monitored in space and time. This requires knowledge of its magnitude, temporal dynamics, and spatial variability. Conventional ground survey procedures by direct soil sampling are time consuming, costly and destructive. Alternatively, soil salinity can be evaluated by measuring the bulk electrical conductivity (σb) directly in the field. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensors allow simultaneous measurements of water content, θ, and σb. They may be calibrated for estimating the electrical conductivity of the soil solution (σw). However, they have a relatively small observation window and thus they are thought to only provide local-scale measurements. The spatial range of the sensors is limited to tens of centimeters and extension of the information to a large area can be problematic. Also, information on the vertical distribution of the σb soil profile may only be obtained by installing sensors at different depths. In this sense, the TDR may be considered as an invasive technique. Compared to the TDR, other geophysical methods based for example on Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) techniques are non-invasive methods and represent a viable alternative to traditional techniques for soil characterization. The problem is that all these techniques give depth-weighted apparent electrical conductivity (σa) measurements, depending on the specific depth distribution of the σb, as well as on the depth response function of the sensor used. In order to deduce the actual distribution of the bulk electrical conductivity, σb, in the soil profile, one needs to invert the signal coming from EMI. Because of their relatively lower observation window, TDR sensors provide quasi-point values and do not adequately integrate the spatial variability of the chemical concentration distribution in the soil

  7. Design of Circular, Square, Single, and Multi-layer Induction Coils for Electromagnetic Priming Using Inductance Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsch, Robert; Kennedy, Mark W.; Aune, Ragnhild E.

    2018-02-01

    Special induction coils used for electro magnetic priming of ceramic foam filters in liquid metal filtration have been designed using a combination of analytical and finite element modeling. Relatively simple empirical equations published by Wheeler in 1928 and 1982 have been used during the design process. The equations were found to accurately predict the z-component of the magnetic flux densities of both single- and multi-layer coils as verified both experimentally and by using COMSOL® 5.1 multiphysics simulations.

  8. Geophysical investigation of Red Devil mine using direct-current resistivity and electromagnetic induction, Red Devil, Alaska, August 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Bethany L.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2011-01-01

    Red Devil Mine, located in southwestern Alaska near the Village of Red Devil, was the state's largest producer of mercury and operated from 1933 to 1971. Throughout the lifespan of the mine, various generations of mills and retort buildings existed on both sides of Red Devil Creek, and the tailings and waste rock were deposited across the site. The mine was located on public Bureau of Land Management property, and the Bureau has begun site remediation by addressing mercury, arsenic, and antimony contamination caused by the minerals associated with the ore deposit (cinnabar, stibnite, realgar, and orpiment). In August 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey completed a geophysical survey at the site using direct-current resistivity and electromagnetic induction surface methods. Eight two-dimensional profiles and one three-dimensional grid of direct-current resistivity data as well as about 5.7 kilometers of electromagnetic induction profile data were acquired across the site. On the basis of the geophysical data and few available soil borings, there is not sufficient electrical or electromagnetic contrast to confidently distinguish between tailings, waste rock, and weathered bedrock. A water table is interpreted along the two-dimensional direct-current resistivity profiles based on correlation with monitoring well water levels and a relatively consistent decrease in resistivity typically at 2-6 meters depth. Three settling ponds used in the last few years of mine operation to capture silt and sand from a flotation ore processing technique possessed conductive values above the interpreted water level but more resistive values below the water level. The cause of the increased resistivity below the water table is unknown, but the increased resistivity may indicate that a secondary mechanism is affecting the resistivity structure under these ponds if the depth of the ponds is expected to extend below the water level. The electromagnetic induction data clearly identified the

  9. Combining ground penetrating radar and electromagnetic induction for industrial site characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; Van Meirvenne, Marc; Saey, Timothy; De Smedt, Philippe; Delefortrie, Samuël; Seuntjens, Piet

    2014-05-01

    Industrial sites pose specific challenges to the conventional way of characterizing soil and groundwater properties through borehole drilling and well monitoring. The subsurface of old industrial sites typically exhibits a large heterogeneity resulting from various anthropogenic interventions, such as the dumping of construction and demolition debris and industrial waste. Also larger buried structures such as foundations, utility infrastructure and underground storage tanks are frequently present. Spills and leaks from industrial activities and leaching of buried waste may have caused additional soil and groundwater contamination. Trying to characterize such a spatially heterogeneous medium with a limited number of localized observations is often problematic. The deployment of mobile proximal soil sensors may be a useful tool to fill up the gaps in between the conventional observations, as these enable measuring soil properties in a non-destructive way. However, because the output of most soil sensors is affected by more than one soil property, the application of only one sensor is generally insufficient to discriminate between all contributing factors. To test a multi-sensor approach, we selected a study area which was part of a former manufactured gas plant site located in one of the seaport areas of Belgium. It has a surface area of 3400 m² and was the location of a phosphate production unit that was demolished at the end of the 1980s. Considering the long and complex history of the site we expected to find a typical "industrial" soil. Furthermore, the studied area was located between buildings of the present industry, entailing additional practical challenges such as the presence of active utilities and aboveground obstacles. The area was surveyed using two proximal soil sensors based on two different geophysical methods: ground penetrating radar (GPR), to image contrasts in dielectric permittivity, and electromagnetic induction (EMI), to measure the apparent

  10. ELECTROMAGNETIC PHENOMENA WHICH RADIATE FROM THE HUMAN BRAIN DURING INTENSE PSYCHOSENSORIAL ACTIVITY FROM DREAMY, HALLUCINATORY AND TELEPSYCHIC STATES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    intense psychosensorial activity (oneirism, hallucinations, telepsychism). Oneirism is the peculiar psychic condition that is favorable to dreams ...normal hallucinatory phenomena during the sleep and dream -like stages of the beginning sleep and of the reverie. As hallucinations, are designated as the...whole gamut of subjective metapsychics (cryptesthesia, spontaneous or pragmatic; lucidity: clairvoyance: telepathy ; rhabdomancy; radiesthesia; graphonomy; cartomancy; chiromancy). (Author)

  11. Collection, processing, and quality assurance of time-series electromagnetic-induction log datasets, 1995–2016, south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prinos, Scott T.; Valderrama, Robert

    2016-12-13

    Time-series electromagnetic-induction log (TSEMIL) datasets are collected from polyvinyl-chloride cased or uncased monitoring wells to evaluate changes in water conductivity over time. TSEMIL datasets consist of a series of individual electromagnetic-induction logs, generally collected at a frequency of once per month or once per year that have been compiled into a dataset by eliminating small uniform offsets in bulk conductivity between logs probably caused by minor variations in calibration. These offsets are removed by selecting a depth at which no changes are apparent from year to year, and by adjusting individual logs to the median of all logs at the selected depth. Generally, the selected depths are within the freshwater saturated part of the aquifer, well below the water table. TSEMIL datasets can be used to monitor changes in water conductivity throughout the full thickness of an aquifer, without the need for long open-interval wells which have, in some instances, allowed vertical water flow within the well bore that has biased water conductivity profiles. The TSEMIL dataset compilation process enhances the ability to identify small differences between logs that were otherwise obscured by the offsets. As a result of TSEMIL dataset compilation, the root mean squared error of the linear regression between bulk conductivity of the electromagnetic-induction log measurements and the chloride concentration of water samples decreased from 17.4 to 1.7 millisiemens per meter in well G–3611 and from 3.7 to 2.2 millisiemens per meter in well G–3609. The primary use of the TSEMIL datasets in south Florida is to detect temporal changes in bulk conductivity associated with saltwater intrusion in the aquifer; however, other commonly observed changes include (1) variations in bulk conductivity near the water table where water saturation of pore spaces might vary and water temperature might be more variable, and (2) dissipation of conductive water in high-porosity rock

  12. The mutual inductance calculation between circular and quadrilateral coils at arbitrary attitudes using a rotation matrix for airborne transient electromagnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanju; Wang, Hongyuan; Lin, Jun; Guan, Shanshan; Feng, Xue; Li, Suyi

    2014-12-01

    Performance testing and calibration of airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) systems are conducted to obtain the electromagnetic response of ground loops. It is necessary to accurately calculate the mutual inductance between transmitting coils, receiving coils and ground loops to compute the electromagnetic responses. Therefore, based on Neumann's formula and the measured attitudes of the coils, this study deduces the formula for the mutual inductance calculation between circular and quadrilateral coils, circular and circular coils, and quadrilateral and quadrilateral coils using a rotation matrix, and then proposes a method to calculate the mutual inductance between two coils at arbitrary attitudes (roll, pitch, and yaw). Using coil attitude simulated data of an ATEM system, we calculate the mutual inductance of transmitting coils and ground loops at different attitudes, analyze the impact of coil attitudes on mutual inductance, and compare the computational accuracy and speed of the proposed method with those of other methods using the same data. The results show that the relative error of the calculation is smaller and that the speed-up is significant compared to other methods. Moreover, the proposed method is also applicable to the mutual inductance calculation of polygonal and circular coils at arbitrary attitudes and is highly expandable.

  13. Control of electromagnetic stirring by power focusing in large induction crucible furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frizen, V. E.; Sarapulov, F. N.

    2011-12-01

    An approach is proposed for the calculation of the operating conditions of an induction crucible furnace at the final stage of melting with the power focused in various regions of melted metal. The calculation is performed using a model based on the method of detailed magnetic equivalent circuits. The combination of the furnace and a thyristor frequency converter is taken into account in modeling.

  14. Design and operation of a fast electromagnetic inductive massive gas injection valve for NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Lay, W.-S.; Plunkett, G. J.

    2014-11-01

    Results from the operation of an electromagnetic valve, that does not incorporate ferromagnetic materials, are presented. Image currents induced on a conducting disc placed near a pancake solenoid cause it to move away from the solenoid and open the vacuum seal. A new and important design feature is the use of Lip Seals for the sliding piston. The pressure rise in the test chamber is measured directly using a fast time response Baratron gauge. The valve injects over 200 Torr l of nitrogen in less than 3 ms, which remains unchanged at moderate magnetic fields.

  15. Design and operation of a fast electromagnetic inductive massive gas injection valve for NSTX-U.

    PubMed

    Raman, R; Jarboe, T R; Nelson, B A; Gerhardt, S P; Lay, W-S; Plunkett, G J

    2014-11-01

    Results from the operation of an electromagnetic valve, that does not incorporate ferromagnetic materials, are presented. Image currents induced on a conducting disc placed near a pancake solenoid cause it to move away from the solenoid and open the vacuum seal. A new and important design feature is the use of Lip Seals for the sliding piston. The pressure rise in the test chamber is measured directly using a fast time response Baratron gauge. The valve injects over 200 Torr l of nitrogen in less than 3 ms, which remains unchanged at moderate magnetic fields.

  16. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, E.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ali-Ghanbari, A.; Sharifzadeh, S.; Ranjbaran, R.; Mostafavi-pour, Z.; Zal, F.; Haghani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old). Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results Our results showed significant increase in  ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated. PMID:26396966

  17. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, E; Mortazavi, S M J; Ali-Ghanbari, A; Sharifzadeh, S; Ranjbaran, R; Mostafavi-Pour, Z; Zal, F; Haghani, M

    2015-09-01

    Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old). Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Our results showed significant increase in  ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated.

  18. Ship-borne electromagnetic induction sounding of sea-ice thickness in the southern Sea of Okhotsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uto, Shotaro; Toyota, Takenobu; Shimoda, Haruhito; Tateyama, Kazutaka; Shirasawa, Kunio

    Recent observations have revealed that dynamical thickening is dominant in the growth process of sea ice in the southern Sea of Okhotsk. That indicates the importance of understanding the nature of thick deformed ice in this area. The objective of the present paper is to establish a ship-based method for observing the thickness of deformed ice with reasonable accuracy. Since February 2003, one of the authors has engaged in the core sampling using a small basket from the icebreaker Soya. Based on these results, we developed a new model which expressed the internal structure of pack ice in the southern Sea of Okhotsk, as a one-dimensional multilayered structure. Since 2004, the electromagnetic (EM) inductive sounding of sea-ice thickness has been conducted on board Soya. By combining the model and theoretical calculations, a new algorithm was developed for transforming the output of the EM inductive instrument to ice + snow thickness (total thickness). Comparison with total thickness by drillhole observations showed fair agreement. The probability density functions of total thickness in 2004 and 2005 showed some difference, which reflected the difference of fractions of thick deformed ice.

  19. Induction of Oxidation in Living Cells by Time-Varying Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    We are studying how biological systems can harness quantum effects of time varying electromagnetic (EM) waves as the time-setting basis for universal biochemical organization via the redox cycle. The effects of extremely weak EM field on the biochemical redox cycle can be monitored through real-time detection of oxidation-induced light emissions of reporter molecules in living cells. It has been shown that EM fields can also induce changes in fluid transport rates through capillaries (approximately 300 microns inner diameter) by generating annular proton gradients. This effect may be relevant to understanding cardiovascular dis-function in spaceflight, beyond the ionosphere. Importantly, we show that these EM effects can be attenuated using an active EM field cancellation device. Central for NASA's Human Research Program is the fact that the absence of ambient EM field in spaceflight can also have a detrimental influence, namely via increased oxidative damage, on DNA replication, which controls heredity.

  20. Sounding of Europa's interior using multi-frequency electromagnetic induction from a Europa orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.; Russell, C. T.

    2000-12-01

    Magnetic field observations from Galileo have shown that Europa induces a strong response to the varying field of Jupiter's magnetosphere. These observations are consistent with a global conductor located close to the surface. Khurana et al. [1998] and Kivelson et al. [1999] have shown that a moon-wide ocean with a conductivity similar to the Earth's ocean and having a thickness of at least 6 km could produce the observed induction signature. Many other geological and geophysical observations are consistent with this interpretation (See Pappalardo et al. [1999] for further details.). The magnetic induction signature at a single frequency can also be explained with a model in which the conducting layer is thinner (thicker) but has higher (lower) conductivity. The initial work relied on the variations of the time varying field at the synodic rotation period of Jupiter (as seen in the rest frame of the moon) to infer the interior structure of Europa. We have extended the initial analysis by showing that the spectrum of the primary field contains several other important frequencies. We single out one frequency-corresponding to the orbital period of Europa-for further examination. We show that by modeling the induction response at this frequency in addition to the previously used synodic frequency for a range of ocean shell thicknesses and conductivities, the ocean conductivity and the thickness of the ocean at Europa can be determined uniquely. We discuss how the measurements from an orbiting spacecraft can be decomposed into the internal (which is the secondary field) and external (the primary imposed field) components not only for the steady field but also for the varying field.

  1. Experimental diagnostics and modeling of inductive phenomena at low frequencies in impedance spectra of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivac, Ivan; Šimić, Boris; Barbir, Frano

    2017-10-01

    Representation of fuel cell processes by equivalent circuit models, involving resistance and capacitance elements representing activation losses on both anode and cathode in series with resistance representing ohmic losses, cannot capture and explain the inductive loop that may show up at low frequencies in Nyquist diagram representation of the electrochemical impedance spectra. In an attempt to explain the cause of the low-frequency inductive loop and correlate it with the processes within the fuel cell electrodes, a novel equivalent circuit model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been proposed and experimentally verified here in detail. The model takes into account both the anode and the cathode, and has an additional resonant loop on each side, comprising of a resistance, capacitance and inductance in parallel representing the processes within the catalyst layer. Using these additional circuit elements, more accurate and better fits to experimental impedance data in the wide frequency range at different current densities, cell temperatures, humidity of gases, air flow stoichiometries and backpressures were obtained.

  2. Use of electromagnetic induction methods to monitor remediation at the University of Connecticut landfill: 2004–2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; White, Eric A.; Joesten, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    Time‐lapse geophysical surveys using frequency‐domain electromagnetics (FDEM) can indirectly measure time‐varying hydrologic parameters such as fluid saturation or solute concentration. Monitoring of these processes provides insight into aquifer properties and the effectiveness of constructed controls (such as leachate interceptor trenches), as well as aquifer responses to natural or induced stresses. At the University of Connecticut landfill, noninvasive, electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods were used to monitor changes in subsurface electrical conductivity that were related to the landfill‐closure activities. After the landfill was closed, EMI methods were used to monitor changes in water saturation and water quality. As part of a long‐term monitoring plan to observe changes associated with closure, redevelopment, and remediation of the former landfill, EMI data were collected to supplement information from groundwater samples collected in wells to the south and north of the landfill. In comparison to single‐point measurements that could have been collected by conventional installation of additional monitoring wells, the EMI methods provided increased spatial coverage, and were less invasive and therefore less destructive to the wetland north of the landfill. To monitor effects of closure activities on the subsurface conductivity, EMI measurements were collected from 2004 to 2011 along discrete transects north and south of the landfill prior to, during, and after the landfill closure. In general, the results indicated an overall decline in subsurface electrical conductivity with time and with distance from the former landfill. This decline in electrical conductivity indicated that the closure and remediation efforts reduced the amount of leachate that originated from the landfill and that entered the drainages to the north and south of the landfill.

  3. A Novel Angular Acceleration Sensor Based on the Electromagnetic Induction Principle and Investigation of Its Calibration Tests

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2013-01-01

    An angular acceleration sensor can be used for the dynamic analysis of human and joint motions. In this paper, an angular acceleration sensor with novel structure based on the principle of electromagnetic induction is designed. The method involves the construction of a constant magnetic field by the excitation windings of sensor, and the cup-shaped rotor that cut the magnetic field. The output windings of the sensor generate an electromotive force, which is directly proportional to the angular acceleration through the electromagnetic coupling when the rotor has rotational angular acceleration. The mechanical structure and the magnetic working circuit of the sensor are described. The output properties and the mathematical model including the transfer function and state-space model of the sensor are established. The asymptotical stability of the sensor when it is working is verified by the Lyapunov Theorem. An angular acceleration calibration device based on the torsional pendulum principle is designed. The method involves the coaxial connection of the angular acceleration sensor, torsion pendulum and a high-precision angle sensor, and then an initial external force is applied to the torsion pendulum to produce a periodic damping angle oscillation. The angular acceleration sensor and the angle sensor will generate two corresponding electrical signals. The sensitivity coefficient of the angular acceleration sensor can be obtained after processing these two-channel signals. The experiment results show that the sensitivity coefficient of the sensor is about 17.29 mv/Krad·s2. Finally, the errors existing in the practical applications of the sensor are discussed and the corresponding improvement measures are proposed to provide effective technical support for the practical promotion of the novel sensor. PMID:23941911

  4. On recovering distributed IP information from inductive source time domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seogi; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2016-10-01

    We develop a procedure to invert time domain induced polarization (IP) data for inductive sources. Our approach is based upon the inversion methodology in conventional electrical IP (EIP), which uses a sensitivity function that is independent of time. However, significant modifications are required for inductive source IP (ISIP) because electric fields in the ground do not achieve a steady state. The time-history for these fields needs to be evaluated and then used to define approximate IP currents. The resultant data, either a magnetic field or its derivative, are evaluated through the Biot-Savart law. This forms the desired linear relationship between data and pseudo-chargeability. Our inversion procedure has three steps: (1) Obtain a 3-D background conductivity model. We advocate, where possible, that this be obtained by inverting early-time data that do not suffer significantly from IP effects. (2) Decouple IP responses embedded in the observations by forward modelling the TEM data due to a background conductivity and subtracting these from the observations. (3) Use the linearized sensitivity function to invert data at each time channel and recover pseudo-chargeability. Post-interpretation of the recovered pseudo-chargeabilities at multiple times allows recovery of intrinsic Cole-Cole parameters such as time constant and chargeability. The procedure is applicable to all inductive source survey geometries but we focus upon airborne time domain EM (ATEM) data with a coincident-loop configuration because of the distinctive negative IP signal that is observed over a chargeable body. Several assumptions are adopted to generate our linearized modelling but we systematically test the capability and accuracy of the linearization for ISIP responses arising from different conductivity structures. On test examples we show: (1) our decoupling procedure enhances the ability to extract information about existence and location of chargeable targets directly from the data maps

  5. Hydrogeological Characterization of the Upper Camp Bird III Rock Glacier in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado Using Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados-Aguilar, R.; Giardino, J. R.; Everett, M. E.; Pondthai, P.; Ramsey, C. E.; Mmasa, D.; Witek, M.; Rodriguez, R.

    2017-12-01

    Global change is the set of variations in environmental conditions that significantly impact the Earth systems. Climate, sea level, land-use/land-cover, and atmospheric composition changes are the most recognized environmental global changes. Impacts of climatic variability can include decreased rainfall, snowpack, shorter snow seasons, and changes in the timing, frequency, and intensity of precipitation events in some areas of the world, whereas other regions can suffer from the opposite effects leading to events such as landslides, flooding and extraordinary snowfall. The proposed research intends to provide a characterization of the internal structure, including water storages, pathways, and thresholds, as well as an estimation of the volume of ice stored within a rock glacier to evaluate its potential as a freshwater resources. The area of study corresponds to the third level of Camp Bird Mine in Ouray, Colorado. The tongue-shaped active rock glacier of interest, Upper Camp Bird III, has not been previously studied in detail. The predominant lithologies in the study area are Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Orogenic events caused alteration of sedimentary and intrusive igneous rock as mineral rich, hydrothermal fluids deposited economically valuable minerals in the region. Traditional geological and geomorphological mapping techniques will be complemented with the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). To obtain a detailed representation of the internal structure and determine the boundaries between resistive (rocks, sediment, and ice) and conductive materials (water and ore deposits) of the rock glacier, time-domain and frequency-domain methods will be implemented. The G-TEM by Geonics Ltd. is an innovative controlled-source time-domain electromagnetic induction system. Using the G-TEM, the distribution of electrical conductivity in the subsurface can be mapped in order to characterize the internal structure of the rock glacier from 5-10 m depth and below. The EM

  6. Nova Scotia: ``Feu Follet" At Cheticamp, and Also the Phenomena At L'Sitkuk of the Mi'Kmaw, May Be Electromagnetic In Nature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Michael Ann; McLeod, Roger D.

    2001-11-01

    There is a strong tradition that ``feu follet" exists at the cemetery associated with the Acadian French at Cheticamp. It is described as a blue light, and may actually be the equivalent of an ascending, positively charged stream of ions in the atmosphere, just like the blue-light column that is often a precursor of a storm's lightning-strike. Similar phenomena are at America's Stonehenge, at a stone serpent effigy site in Ohio, and just north of the Lakes Memphremagog and Magog of Vermont and Canada. At the Bear River L'sitkuk Reservation area, which seems to us to have been a most unsuitable site, was deliberately chosen by the Mi'kmaw for their living area. Was this because certain properties of the electromagnetic field (EMF) are evident to them there, which also seem to be reflected in their legends? We hope to establish that these disparate cultures and their separate worldviews can be confirmed by the presence of particular EMF signatures. *This paper does not represent the views of the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

  7. Numerical and Experimental Investigation on the Attenuation of Electromagnetic Waves in Unmagnetized Plasmas Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min; Xu, Haojun; Wei, Xiaolong; Liang, Hua; Song, Huimin; Sun, Quan; Zhang, Yanhua

    2015-10-01

    The attenuation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in unmagnetized plasma generated by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) actuator has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A numerical study is conducted to investigate the propagation of EM waves in multilayer plasma structures which cover a square flat plate. Experimentally, an ICP actuator with dimensions of 20 cm×20 cm×4 cm is designed to produce a steady plasma slab. The attenuation of EM waves in the plasma generated by the ICP actuator is measured by a reflectivity arch test method at incident waves of 2.3 GHz and 10.1 GHz, respectively. A contrastive analysis of calculated and measured results of these incident wave frequencies is presented, which suggests that the experiment accords well with our theory. As expected, the plasma slab generated by the ICP actuator can effectively attenuate the EM waves, which may have great potential application prospects in aircraft stealth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51276197, 11472306 and 11402301)

  8. Numerical investigation of the transport phenomena occurring in the growth of SiC by the induction heating TSSG method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Adkar, Nikhil; Okano, Yasunori; Ujihara, Toru; Dost, Sadik

    2017-09-01

    A numerical simulation study was carried out to examine the transport phenomena occurring during the Top-Seeded Solution Growth (TSSG) process of SiC. The simulation model includes the contributions of radiative and conductive heat transfer in the furnace, mass transfer and fluid flow in the melt, and the induced electric and magnetic fields. Results show that the induced Lorentz force is dominant in the melt compared with that of buoyancy. At the relatively low coil frequencies, the effect of the Lorentz force on the melt flow is significant, and the corresponding flow patterns loose their axisymmetry and become almost fully disturbed. However, at the relatively higher frequency values, the flow is steady and the flow patterns remain axisymmetric.

  9. A gauged finite-element potential formulation for accurate inductive and galvanic modelling of 3-D electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S. M.; Farquharson, C. G.; MacLachlan, S. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a new finite-element solution to the potential formulation of the geophysical electromagnetic (EM) problem that explicitly implements the Coulomb gauge, and that accurately computes the potentials and hence inductive and galvanic components, is proposed. The modelling scheme is based on using unstructured tetrahedral meshes for domain subdivision, which enables both realistic Earth models of complex geometries to be considered and efficient spatially variable refinement of the mesh to be done. For the finite-element discretization edge and nodal elements are used for approximating the vector and scalar potentials respectively. The issue of non-unique, incorrect potentials from the numerical solution of the usual incomplete-gauged potential system is demonstrated for a benchmark model from the literature that uses an electric-type EM source, through investigating the interface continuity conditions for both the normal and tangential components of the potential vectors, and by showing inconsistent results obtained from iterative and direct linear equation solvers. By explicitly introducing the Coulomb gauge condition as an extra equation, and by augmenting the Helmholtz equation with the gradient of a Lagrange multiplier, an explicitly gauged system for the potential formulation is formed. The solution to the discretized form of this system is validated for the above-mentioned example and for another classic example that uses a magnetic EM source. In order to stabilize the iterative solution of the gauged system, a block diagonal pre-conditioning scheme that is based upon the Schur complement of the potential system is used. For all examples, both the iterative and direct solvers produce the same responses for the potentials, demonstrating the uniqueness of the numerical solution for the potentials and fixing the problems with the interface conditions between cells observed for the incomplete-gauged system. These solutions of the gauged system also

  10. Multi-frequency Electromagnetic Induction Survey for Archaeological Prospection: Approach and Results in Han Hangu Pass and Xishan Yang in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Panpan; Chen, Fulong; Jiang, Aihui; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Hongchao; Leucci, Giovanni; de Giorgi, Lara; Sileo, Maria; Luo, Rupeng; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola

    2018-04-01

    This study presents the potential of multi-frequency electromagnetic induction (EMI) in archaeology. EMI is currently less employed for archaeological prospection with respect to other geophysical techniques. It is capable of identifying shallow subsurface relics by simultaneously measuring the apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and apparent magnetic susceptibility (MSa). Moreover, frequency sounding is able to quantify the depths and vertical shapes of buried structures. In this study, EMI surveys with five frequencies were performed at two heritage sites with different geological conditions: Han Hangu Pass characterized by cinnamon soil and Xishan Yang by sandy loams. In the first site, high ECa values were observed with variations in depth correlated to archaeological remains. Moreover, electromagnetic anomalies related to an ancient road and five kiln caves were identified. In the second site, an ancient tomb, indicating extremely low ECa and high MSa, was discovered. Its electromagnetic properties are attributed to the cavity and ferroferric oxides.

  11. Pulsed electromagnetic field affects intrinsic and endoplasmatic reticulum apoptosis induction pathways in MonoMac6 cell line culture.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba-Zwoinska, J; Chorobik, P; Juszczak, K; Zaraska, W; Thor, P J

    2012-10-01

    Current studies were aimed to elucidate influence of pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation on cell viability and apoptosis induction pathways. For the experimental model we have chosen monocytic cell line MonoMac6 and several apoptosis inducers with different mechanism of death induction like puromycin, colchicine, cyclophosphamide, minocycline and hydrogen peroxide. MonoMac6 cell line was grown at density 1x10(5) cells/well in 96-well culture plates. To induce cell death cell cultures were treated with different apoptosis inducers like puromycin, colchicine, cyclophosphamide, minocycline, hydrogen peroxide and at the same time with pulsed electromagnetic field 50 Hz, 45±5 mT (PEMF) for 4 hour per each stimulation, three times, in 24 hours intervals. Afterwards, cells were harvested for flow cytometry analysis of cell viability measured by annexin V-APC labeled and propidium iodide staining. Expression of apoptosis related genes was evaluated by semi quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay. NuPAGE Novex Western blot analysis was carried out for apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) abundance in cytosolic and nuclear extracts of MonoMac6 cells. Puromycin, colchicine and minocycline activated cells and simultaneously treated with PEMF have shown out diminished percentage of annexinV positive (AnV+) cells comparing to controls without PEMF stimulation. MonaMac6 cells puromycin/colchicyne and PEMF treated were to a higher extent double stained (AnV+,PI+), which means increased late apoptotic as well as necrotic (PI+) cells, than non-stimulated controls. On the other hand, minocycline activated cells prior to PEMF treatment showed diminished amount of apoptotic and necrotic (annexin V, annexin V and propidium iodide, propidium iodide positive staining) cells. The opposite effect of PEMF on the percentage of annexin V positively stained cells has been achieved after treatment of MonoMac6 culture with cyclophoshamide and hydrogen peroxide. PEMF enhanced early

  12. A physical model for low-frequency electromagnetic induction in the near field based on direct interaction between transmitter and receiver electrons

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ray T.; Jjunju, Fred P. M.; Young, Iain S.; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A physical model of electromagnetic induction is developed which relates directly the forces between electrons in the transmitter and receiver windings of concentric coaxial finite coils in the near-field region. By applying the principle of superposition, the contributions from accelerating electrons in successive current loops are summed, allowing the peak-induced voltage in the receiver to be accurately predicted. Results show good agreement between theory and experiment for various receivers of different radii up to five times that of the transmitter. The limitations of the linear theory of electromagnetic induction are discussed in terms of the non-uniform current distribution caused by the skin effect. In particular, the explanation in terms of electromagnetic energy and Poynting’s theorem is contrasted with a more direct explanation based on variable filament induction across the conductor cross section. As the direct physical model developed herein deals only with forces between discrete current elements, it can be readily adapted to suit different coil geometries and is widely applicable in various fields of research such as near-field communications, antenna design, wireless power transfer, sensor applications and beyond. PMID:27493580

  13. A physical model for low-frequency electromagnetic induction in the near field based on direct interaction between transmitter and receiver electrons.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ray T; Jjunju, Fred P M; Young, Iain S; Taylor, Stephen; Maher, Simon

    2016-07-01

    A physical model of electromagnetic induction is developed which relates directly the forces between electrons in the transmitter and receiver windings of concentric coaxial finite coils in the near-field region. By applying the principle of superposition, the contributions from accelerating electrons in successive current loops are summed, allowing the peak-induced voltage in the receiver to be accurately predicted. Results show good agreement between theory and experiment for various receivers of different radii up to five times that of the transmitter. The limitations of the linear theory of electromagnetic induction are discussed in terms of the non-uniform current distribution caused by the skin effect. In particular, the explanation in terms of electromagnetic energy and Poynting's theorem is contrasted with a more direct explanation based on variable filament induction across the conductor cross section. As the direct physical model developed herein deals only with forces between discrete current elements, it can be readily adapted to suit different coil geometries and is widely applicable in various fields of research such as near-field communications, antenna design, wireless power transfer, sensor applications and beyond.

  14. Studies on transport phenomena in electrothermal vaporization sample introduction applied to inductively coupled plasma for optical emission and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, T.; Maestre, S.; de Loos-Vollebregt, M. T. C.

    2005-10-01

    In the present work electrothermal vaporization (ETV) was used in both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and optical emission spectrometry (OES) for sample introduction of solution samples. The effect of (Pd + Mg)-nitrate modifier and CaCl 2 matrix/modifier of variable amounts were studied on ETV-ICP-MS signals of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb and on ETV-ICP-OES signals of Ag, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ga, Mn and Zn. With the use of matrix-free standard solutions the analytical curves were bent to the signal axes (as expected from earlier studies), which was observed in the 20-800 pg mass range by ICP-MS and in the 1-50 ng mass range by ICP-OES detection. The degree of curvature was, however, different with the use of single element and multi-element standards. When applying the noted chemical modifiers (aerosol carriers) in microgram amounts, linear analytical curves were found in the nearly two orders of magnitude mass ranges. Changes of the CaCl 2 matrix concentration (loaded amount of 2-10 μg Ca) resulted in less than 5% changes in MS signals of 5 elements (each below 1 ng) and OES signals of 22 analytes (each below 15 ng). Exceptions were Pb (ICP-MS) and Cd (ICP-OES), where the sensitivity increase by Pd + Mg modifier was much larger compared to other elements studied. The general conclusions suggest that quantitative analysis with the use of ETV sample introduction requires matrix matching or matrix replacement by appropriate chemical modifier to the specific concentration ranges of analytes. This is a similar requirement to that claimed also by the most commonly used pneumatic nebulization of solutions, if samples with high matrix concentration are concerned.

  15. Using the Electromagnetic Induction Method to Connect Spatial Vegetation Distributions with Soil Water and Salinity Dynamics on Steppe Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Li, X.; Wu, H.

    2014-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, plant growth and productivity are obviously affected by soil water and salinity. But it is not easy to acquire the spatial and temporal dynamics of soil water and salinity by traditional field methods because of the heterogeneity in their patterns. Electromagnetic induction (EMI), for its rapid character, can provide a useful way to solve this problem. Grassland dominated by Achnatherum splendens is an important ecosystem near the Qinghai-Lake watershed on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in northwestern China. EMI surveys were conducted for electrical conductivity (ECa) at an intermediate habitat scale (a 60×60 m experimental area) of A. splendens steppe for 18 times (one day only for one time) during the 2013 growing season. And twenty sampling points were established for the collection of soil samples for soil water and salinity, which were used for calibration of ECa. In addition, plant species, biomass and spatial patterns of vegetation were also sampled. The results showed that ECa maps exhibited distinctly spatial differences because of variations in soil moisture. And soil water was the main factor to drive salinity patterns, which in turn affected ECa values. Moreover, soil water and salinity could explain 82.8% of ECa changes due to there was a significant correlation (P<0.01) between ECa, soil water and salinity. Furthermore, with higher ECa values closer to A. splendens patches at the experimental site, patterns of ECa images showed clearly temporal stability, which were extremely corresponding with the spatial pattern of vegetation. A. splendens patches that accumulated infiltrating water and salinity and thus changed long-term soil properties, which were considered as "reservoirs" and were deemed responsible for the temporal stability of ECa images. Hence, EMI could be an indicator to locate areas of decreasing or increasing of water and to reveal soil water and salinity dynamics through repeated ECa surveys.

  16. Demonstration of Lenz's Law with an Induction Motor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of a conductor with a time-dependent magnetic field is an important topic of electromagnetic theory. A computerized classroom demonstration shows how the eddy currents induced in the rotor of an induction motor cause its rotation or braking. Both phenomena are directly related to Lenz's law.

  17. Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Management Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-20

    electromagnetic radiation to ordnance ( HERO ), hazards of electromagnetic radiation to fuels (HERF), and natural phenomena effects of lightning and...fuels HERO hazards of electromagnetic radiation to ordnance HERP hazards of electromagnetic radiation to personnel HF high frequency HN host... electromagnetic pulse (EMP); hazards of EM radiation to personnel, ordnance ,

  18. Multi-configuration electromagnetic induction measurements at long term agricultural test sites in Germany with different fertilizer and irrigation managements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Manuela Sarah; von Hebel, Christian; Brogi, Cosimo; Baumecker, Michael; Döring, Thomas; Amelung, Wulf; Vereecken, Harry; van der Kruk, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) data are often being used to investigate large scale soil properties including clay content, soil water content, and salinity changes for a wide range of applications. For agricultural sites, different management practices such as organic/mineral fertilization, tillage, and/or irrigation are important when interpreting the measured apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). Here, we present EMI data recorded at two long term field experiment (LTFE) agricultural test sites in Thyrow near Berlin (Germany), where different long term fertilizer and irrigation management practices were applied. We used two fixed-boom multi-coil EMI instruments that simultaneously measure over nine different depths of investigation (DOI), recording information ranging between the very shallow (0-0.25 m) ploughing zone including the organic matter and the surface soil (A-Horizon) down to the relatively deep (0-2.7 m) subsoil (B-Horizon) or even substratum (C-Horizon). At both test sites, the prevailing sandy to silty sand in the A- and B-Horizon is underlain by a glacial till C-Horizon resulting in generally low ECa values between 0.5 and 5 mS/m. At one test site, a "static nutrient deficiency experiment" is performed since 1937, where organic fertilizer (farm yard manure) and mineral fertilizers (nitrogen-phosphate-potassium (NPK) and liming) are applied at specific grids. Comparing the fertilizer application grid to the measured EMI data, the lowest ECa values coincide to unfertilized grids whereas the ECa values increase with liming, farm yard manure, and NPK. The visually observed correlation between ECa and the liming treatment was possibly due to the increased pH of the soil, because the fertilizer application increases ion contents that increase the soil electrical conductivity. At the second test site, a "Static Irrigation and Fertilizer Experiment" is conducted, where next to the fertilizer treatment (farm yard manure and nitrogen) part of the field

  19. Novel quantitative calibration approach for multi-configuration electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems using data acquired at multiple elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xihe; Mester, Achim; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; Zimmermann, Egon; Vereecken, Harry; van Waasen, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) systems offer a great potential to obtain highly resolved layered electrical conductivity models of the shallow subsurface. State-of-the-art inversion procedures require quantitative calibration of EMI data, especially for short-offset EMI systems where significant data shifts are often observed. These shifts are caused by external influences such as the presence of the operator, zero-leveling procedures, the field setup used to move the EMI system and/or cables close by. Calibrations can be performed by using collocated electrical resistivity measurements or taking soil samples, however, these two methods take a lot of time in the field. To improve the calibration in a fast and concise way, we introduce a novel on-site calibration method using a series of apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) values acquired at multiple elevations for a multi-configuration EMI system. No additional instrument or pre-knowledge of the subsurface is needed to acquire quantitative ECa data. By using this calibration method, we correct each coil configuration, i.e., transmitter and receiver coil separation and the horizontal or vertical coplanar (HCP or VCP) coil orientation with a unique set of calibration parameters. A multi-layer soil structure at the corresponding measurement location is inverted together with the calibration parameters using full-solution Maxwell equations for the forward modelling within the shuffled complex evolution (SCE) algorithm to find the optimum solution under a user-defined parameter space. Synthetic data verified the feasibility for calibrating HCP and VCP measurements of a custom made six-coil EMI system with coil offsets between 0.35 m and 1.8 m for quantitative data inversions. As a next step, we applied the calibration approach on acquired experimental data from a bare soil test field (Selhausen, Germany) for the considered EMI system. The obtained calibration parameters were applied to measurements over a 30 m

  20. Digital Mapping of Soil Salinity and Crop Yield across a Coastal Agricultural Landscape Using Repeated Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Rongjiang; Yang, Jingsong; Wu, Danhua; Xie, Wenping; Gao, Peng; Jin, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Reliable and real-time information on soil and crop properties is important for the development of management practices in accordance with the requirements of a specific soil and crop within individual field units. This is particularly the case in salt-affected agricultural landscape where managing the spatial variability of soil salinity is essential to minimize salinization and maximize crop output. The primary objectives were to use linear mixed-effects model for soil salinity and crop yield calibration with horizontal and vertical electromagnetic induction (EMI) measurements as ancillary data, to characterize the spatial distribution of soil salinity and crop yield and to verify the accuracy of spatial estimation. Horizontal and vertical EMI (type EM38) measurements at 252 locations were made during each survey, and root zone soil samples and crop samples at 64 sampling sites were collected. This work was periodically conducted on eight dates from June 2012 to May 2013 in a coastal salt-affected mud farmland. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and restricted maximum likelihood (REML) were applied to calibrate root zone soil salinity (ECe) and crop annual output (CAO) using ancillary data, and spatial distribution of soil ECe and CAO was generated using digital soil mapping (DSM) and the precision of spatial estimation was examined using the collected meteorological and groundwater data. Results indicated that a reduced model with EMh as a predictor was satisfactory for root zone ECe calibration, whereas a full model with both EMh and EMv as predictors met the requirement of CAO calibration. The obtained distribution maps of ECe showed consistency with those of EMI measurements at the corresponding time, and the spatial distribution of CAO generated from ancillary data showed agreement with that derived from raw crop data. Statistics of jackknifing procedure confirmed that the spatial estimation of ECe and CAO exhibited reliability and high accuracy. A general

  1. Digital Mapping of Soil Salinity and Crop Yield across a Coastal Agricultural Landscape Using Repeated Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) Surveys.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rongjiang; Yang, Jingsong; Wu, Danhua; Xie, Wenping; Gao, Peng; Jin, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    Reliable and real-time information on soil and crop properties is important for the development of management practices in accordance with the requirements of a specific soil and crop within individual field units. This is particularly the case in salt-affected agricultural landscape where managing the spatial variability of soil salinity is essential to minimize salinization and maximize crop output. The primary objectives were to use linear mixed-effects model for soil salinity and crop yield calibration with horizontal and vertical electromagnetic induction (EMI) measurements as ancillary data, to characterize the spatial distribution of soil salinity and crop yield and to verify the accuracy of spatial estimation. Horizontal and vertical EMI (type EM38) measurements at 252 locations were made during each survey, and root zone soil samples and crop samples at 64 sampling sites were collected. This work was periodically conducted on eight dates from June 2012 to May 2013 in a coastal salt-affected mud farmland. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and restricted maximum likelihood (REML) were applied to calibrate root zone soil salinity (ECe) and crop annual output (CAO) using ancillary data, and spatial distribution of soil ECe and CAO was generated using digital soil mapping (DSM) and the precision of spatial estimation was examined using the collected meteorological and groundwater data. Results indicated that a reduced model with EMh as a predictor was satisfactory for root zone ECe calibration, whereas a full model with both EMh and EMv as predictors met the requirement of CAO calibration. The obtained distribution maps of ECe showed consistency with those of EMI measurements at the corresponding time, and the spatial distribution of CAO generated from ancillary data showed agreement with that derived from raw crop data. Statistics of jackknifing procedure confirmed that the spatial estimation of ECe and CAO exhibited reliability and high accuracy. A general

  2. Electromagnetic Remote Sensing. Low Frequency Electromagnetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    biased superconducting point - contact quantum devices", J.Appl.Phys. 41, p.1572, 1970. [40] A.Yariv and H.Winsor, "Proposal for detection of magnetic ... magnetics , electromagnetic induc- tion, electrostatics) 2. Nondestructive testing (electromagnetic induction, neutron tomography, x-ray imaging) 3...Detection of submarines from aircraft or ships ( magnetics , electromagnetic induction) 4. Detection of land vehicles using buried sensors ( magnetics

  3. Electromagnetic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The design and development of an Electromagnetic Propulsion is discussed. Specific Electromagnetic Propulsion Topics discussed include: (1) Technology for Pulse Inductive Thruster (PIT), to design, develop, and test of a multirepetition rate pulsed inductive thruster, Solid-State Switch Technology, and Pulse Driver Network and Architecture; (2) Flight Weight Magnet Survey, to determine/develop light weight high performance magnetic materials for potential application Advanced Space Flight Systems as these systems develop; and (3) Magnetic Flux Compression, to enable rapid/robust/reliable omni-planetary space transportation within realistic development and operational costs constraints.

  4. Inductive reasoning.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan; Swendsen, Haruka

    2010-03-01

    Inductive reasoning entails using existing knowledge or observations to make predictions about novel cases. We review recent findings in research on category-based induction as well as theoretical models of these results, including similarity-based models, connectionist networks, an account based on relevance theory, Bayesian models, and other mathematical models. A number of touchstone empirical phenomena that involve taxonomic similarity are described. We also examine phenomena involving more complex background knowledge about premises and conclusions of inductive arguments and the properties referenced. Earlier models are shown to give a good account of similarity-based phenomena but not knowledge-based phenomena. Recent models that aim to account for both similarity-based and knowledge-based phenomena are reviewed and evaluated. Among the most important new directions in induction research are a focus on induction with uncertain premise categories, the modeling of the relationship between inductive and deductive reasoning, and examination of the neural substrates of induction. A common theme in both the well-established and emerging lines of induction research is the need to develop well-articulated and empirically testable formal models of induction. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Mapping SOC content and bulk density of a disturbed peatland relict with electromagnetic induction and DEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altdorff, Daniel; Bechtold, Michel; van der Kruk, Jan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; von Hebel, Christian; Huisman, Johan Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands represent a huge storage of soil organic carbon (SOC), and there is considerable interest to assess the total amount of carbon stored in these ecosystems. However, reliable field-scale information about peat properties, particularly SOC content and bulk density (BD) necessary to estimate C stocks, remains difficult to obtain. A potential way to acquire information on these properties and its spatial variation is the non-invasive mapping of easily recordable physical variables that correlate with peat properties, such as bulk electrical conductivity (ECa) measured with electromagnetic induction (EMI). However, ECa depends on a range of soil properties, including BD, soil and water chemistry, and water content, and thus results often show complex and site-specific relationships. Therefore, a reliable prediction of SOC and BD from ECa data is not necessarily given. In this study, we aim to explore the usefulness of Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict the peat soil properties SOC and BD from multi-offset EMI and high-resolution DEM data. The quality of the MLR models is assessed by cross-validation. We use data from a medium-scale disturbed peat relict (approximately 35ha) in Northern Germany. The potential explanatory variables considered in MLR were: EMI data of six different integral depths (approximately 0.25, 0.5, 0.6, 0.9, 1, and 1.80 m), their vertical heterogeneity, as well as several topographical variables extracted from the DEM. Ground truth information for SOC, BD content and peat layer thickness was obtained from 34 soil cores of 1 m depth. Each core was divided into several 5 to 20 cm thick layers so that integral information of the upper 0.25, 0.5, and 1 m as well as from the total peat layer was obtained. For cross-validation of results, we clustered the 34 soil cores into 4 classes using K-means clustering and selected 8 cores for validation from the clusters with a probability that depended on the size of the cluster. With the

  6. A new electromagnetic induction sensor using Vector Network Analyzer technology for accurate characterisation of soil electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, F.; Lambot, S.; Moghadas, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) has been widely used since the 70s to retrieve soil physico-chemical properties through the measurement of soil electrical conductivity. Soil electrical conductivity integrates several factors, mainly soil water content, salinity, clay content and temperature, and to a lesser extent, mineralogy, porosity, structure, cation exchange capacity, organic matter and bulk density. EMI has been shown to be useful for a wide range of environmental applications. EMI is non invasive and individual measurements are almost instantaneous, which permits to characterise large areas with fine spatial and/or temporal resolutions. Nevertheless, current EMI systems present some limitations. First, EMI usually operates at a single or at a limited number of fixed frequencies, which limits the information that can be retrieved from the subsurface. In addition, the calibration of existing commercial sensors is generally rather empirical and not accurate, which reduces the reliability of the data. Finally, the data processing techniques that are used to retrieve the soil electrical properties from EMI data often rely on strong simplifying assumptions with respect to wave propagation through the antenna-air-soil system. Performing EMI measurements with Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) technology would overcome a part of these limitations, allowing to work simultaneously at a wide range of frequencies and to readily perform robust calibrations, which are defined as an international standard. On that basis, we have developed a new algorithm for off-ground, zero-offset, frequency domain EMI based on full-waveform inverse modelling. The EMI forward model is based on a linear system of complex transfer functions for describing the loop antenna and its interactions with soil and an exact solution of Maxwell's equations for wave propagation in three-dimensional multilayered media. The approach has been validated in laboratory conditions for measurements at different

  7. Use of electromagnetic induction surveys to delimit zones of contrasting tree development in an irrigated olive orchard in Southern Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera, Aura; Vanderlinden, Karl; Jesús Espejo-Pérez, Antonio; Gómez, José Alfonso; Giráldez, Juan Vicente

    2014-05-01

    Olives are historically closely linked to Mediterranean culture and have nowadays important societal and economical implications. Improving yield and preventing infestation by soil-borne pathogens are crucial issues in maintaining olive cropping competitive. In order to assess both issues properly at the farm or field scale, accurate knowledge of the spatial distribution of soil physical properties and associated water dynamics is required. Conventional soil surveying is generally prohibitive at commercial farms, but electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors, measuring soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) provide a suitable alternative. ECa depends strongly on soil texture and water content and has been used exhaustively in precision agriculture to delimit management zones. The aim of this study was to delimit areas with unsatisfactory tree development in an olive orchard using EMI, and to identify the underlying relationships between ECa and the soil properties driving the spatial tree development pattern. An experimental catchment in S. Spain dedicated to irrigated olive cropping was surveyed for ECa under dry and wet soil conditions (0.06 vs. 0.22 g/g, respectively), using a Dualem 21-S EMI sensor. In addition, ECa and gravimetric soil water content (SWC) was measured at 45 locations throughout the catchment during each survey. At each of these locations, soil profile samples were collected to determine textural class including coarse particles content, organic matter (OM), and bulk density. Measurements for dry soil conditions with the perpendicular coil configuration with a separation of 2.1 m (P2.1) were chosen to make a first assessment of the orchard-growth variability. According to the shape of the histogram, the P2.1 ECa values were classified to delimit three areas in the field for which canopy coverage was estimated. Combining the 4 ECa signals for the wet and dry surveys, a principal component (PC) analysis showed that 91% of the total variance

  8. Non-contact electromagnetic induction heating for eradicating bacteria and yeasts on biomaterials and possible relevance to orthopaedic implant infections: In vitro findings.

    PubMed

    Pijls, B G; Sanders, I M J G; Kuijper, E J; Nelissen, R G H H

    2017-05-01

    Infection of implants is a major problem in elective and trauma surgery. Heating is an effective way to reduce the bacterial load in food preparation, and studies on hyperthermia treatment for cancer have shown that it is possible to heat metal objects with pulsed electromagnetic fields selectively (PEMF), also known as induction heating. We therefore set out to answer the following research question: is non-contact induction heating of metallic implants effective in reducing bacterial load in vitro ? Titanium alloy cylinders (Ti6Al4V) were exposed to PEMF from an induction heater with maximum 2000 watts at 27 kHz after being contaminated with five different types of micro-organisms: Staphylococcus epidermidis; Staphylococcus aureus; Pseudomonas aeruginosa ; spore-forming Bacillus cereus; and yeast Candida albicans . The cylinders were exposed to incremental target temperatures (35°C, 45°C, 50°C, 55°C, 60°C, 65°C, 70°C) for up to 3.5 minutes. There was an average linear heating rate of 0.39°C per second up to the target temperature, and thereafter the target temperature was maintained until the end of the experiment. At 60°C and higher (duration 3.5 minutes), there was a 6-log reduction or higher for every micro-organism tested. At 60°C, we found that the shortest duration of effective induction heating was 1.5 minutes. This resulted in a 5-log reduction or higher for every micro-organism tested. Non-contact induction heating of a titanium disk is effective in reducing bacterial load in vitro . These promising results can be further explored as a new treatment modality for infections of metal orthopaedic implants. Cite this article : B. G. Pijls, I. M. J. G. Sanders, E. J. Kuijper, R. G. H. H. Nelissen. Non-contact electromagnetic induction heating for eradicating bacteria and yeasts on biomaterials and possible relevance to orthopaedic implant infections: In vitro findings. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:323-330. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.65.BJR-2016-0308.R1.

  9. Effect of inductive and capacitive coupling on the current–voltage characteristic and electromagnetic radiation from a system of Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmonov, I. R., E-mail: rahmonov@theor.jinr.ru, E-mail: ilhom-tj@inbox.ru; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Atanasova, P. Kh.

    We have studied the current–voltage characteristic of a system of long Josephson junctions taking into account the inductive and capacitive coupling. The dependence of the average time derivative of the phase difference on the bias current and spatiotemporal dependences of the phase difference and magnetic field in each junction are considered. The possibility of branching of the current–voltage characteristic in the region of zero field step, which is associated with different numbers of fluxons in individual Josephson junctions, is demonstrated. The current–voltage characteristic of the system of Josephson junctions is compared with the case of a single junction, and itmore » is shown that the observed branching is due to coupling between the junctions. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation associated with motion of fluxons is calculated, and the effect of coupling between junctions on the radiation power is analyzed.« less

  10. Feasibility study of a swept frequency electromagnetic probe (SWEEP) using inductive coupling for the determination of subsurface conductivity of the earth and water prospecting in arid regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorraca, G. A.; Bannister, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques developed for electromagnetic probing of the lunar interior, and techniques developed for the generation of high power audio frequencies were combined to make practical a magnetic inductive coupling system for the rapid measurement of ground conductivity profiles which are helpful when prospecting for the presence and quality of subsurface water. A system which involves the measurement of the direction, intensity, and time phase of the magnetic field observed near the surface of the earth at a distance from a horizontal coil energized so as to create a field that penetrates the earth was designed and studied to deduce the conductivity and stratification of the subsurface. Theoretical studies and a rudimentary experiment in an arid region showed that the approach is conceptually valid and that this geophysical prospecting technique can be developed for the economical exploration of subterranean water resources.

  11. Demonstration of LenzÂ's law with an induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of a conductor with a time-dependent magnetic field is an important topic of electromagnetic theory. A computerized classroom demonstration shows how the eddy currents induced in the rotor of an induction motor cause its rotation or braking. Both phenomena are directly related to Lenz’s law.

  12. Operation Sun Beam, Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Project Officer's report - Project 7. 16. Airborne E-field radiation measurements of electromagnetic-pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, K.L.

    Airborne measurements of the absolute vertical electric field (E-field) of the radiated electromagnetic pulse were attempted for Shots Little Feller II and Small Boy. Instrumentation included calibrated vertical whip antennas, wideband magnetic tape recorders, and photographs of oscilloscope traces. One instrumented aircraft participated in Little Feller II (C-131F); two aircraft participated in Small Boy (a C-131F and an A-3A). No detectable signals were recorded for either event. It is concluded that the vertical E-field intensities encountered were below the calibrated levels of the instrumentation or the method of instrumentation and calibration was inadequate for nonrepetitive pulse signals.

  13. Electromagnetic Induction of Zerovalent Iron (ZVI) Powder and Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron (NZVI) Particles Enhances Dechlorination of Trichloroethylene in Contaminated Groundwater and Soil: Proof of Concept.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Thongboot, Thippawan; Lowry, Gregory V

    2016-01-19

    This study evaluates the concept of using zerovalent iron (ZVI) powder or nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles in combination with a low frequency (150 kHz) AC electromagnetic field (AC EMF) to effectively remove trichloroethylene (TCE) from groundwater and saturated soils. ZVI and NZVI are ferromagnetic, which can induce heat under applied AC EMF. The heat generated by ZVI and NZVI induction can increase the rate of dechlorination, according to Arrhenius' equation, and increase the rate of TCE desorption from TCE-sorbed soil. Both dechlorination and TCE desorption enhance the overall TCE removal rate. We evaluated this novel concept in laboratory batch reactors. We found that both ZVI and NZVI can induce heat under applied AC EMF up to 120 °C in 20 min. Using ZVI and NZVI with AC EMF enhanced dechlorination of dissolved TCE (no soil) up to 4.96-fold. In addition to increasing the temperature by ZVI and NZVI induction heating, AC EMF increased intrinsic ZVI and NZVI reactivity, ostensibly due to accelerated corrosion, as demonstrated by the increased ORP. In a soil-water-TCE system, NZVI together with AC EMF thermally enhanced desorption of TCE from soil and increased the degradation of TCE up to 5.36-fold compared to the absence of AC EMF. For the first time, this study indicates the potential for ZVI and NZVI coupled with AC EMF as a combined remediation technique for increasing the rate and completeness of in situ cleanup of adsorbed phase contaminants.

  14. Full-physics 3D heterogeneous simulations of electromagnetic induction fields on level and deformed sea ice

    DOE PAGES

    Samluk, Jesse P.; Geiger, Cathleen A.; Weiss, Chester J.; ...

    2015-10-01

    In this article we explore simulated responses of electromagnetic (EM) signals relative to in situ field surveys and quantify the effects that different values of conductivity in sea ice have on the EM fields. We compute EM responses of ice types with a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-volume discretization of Maxwell's equations and present 2-D sliced visualizations of their associated EM fields at discrete frequencies. Several interesting observations result: First, since the simulator computes the fields everywhere, each gridcell acts as a receiver within the model volume, and captures the complete, coupled interactions between air, snow, sea ice and sea water asmore » a function of their conductivity; second, visualizations demonstrate how 1-D approximations near deformed ice features are violated. But the most important new finding is that changes in conductivity affect EM field response by modifying the magnitude and spatial patterns (i.e. footprint size and shape) of current density and magnetic fields. These effects are demonstrated through a visual feature we define as 'null lines'. Null line shape is affected by changes in conductivity near material boundaries as well as transmitter location. Our results encourage the use of null lines as a planning tool for better ground-truth field measurements near deformed ice types.« less

  15. Full-physics 3D heterogeneous simulations of electromagnetic induction fields on level and deformed sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Samluk, Jesse P.; Geiger, Cathleen A.; Weiss, Chester J.

    In this article we explore simulated responses of electromagnetic (EM) signals relative to in situ field surveys and quantify the effects that different values of conductivity in sea ice have on the EM fields. We compute EM responses of ice types with a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-volume discretization of Maxwell's equations and present 2-D sliced visualizations of their associated EM fields at discrete frequencies. Several interesting observations result: First, since the simulator computes the fields everywhere, each gridcell acts as a receiver within the model volume, and captures the complete, coupled interactions between air, snow, sea ice and sea water asmore » a function of their conductivity; second, visualizations demonstrate how 1-D approximations near deformed ice features are violated. But the most important new finding is that changes in conductivity affect EM field response by modifying the magnitude and spatial patterns (i.e. footprint size and shape) of current density and magnetic fields. These effects are demonstrated through a visual feature we define as 'null lines'. Null line shape is affected by changes in conductivity near material boundaries as well as transmitter location. Our results encourage the use of null lines as a planning tool for better ground-truth field measurements near deformed ice types.« less

  16. Conductivity gradients as inferred by electromagnetic-induction meter (EM38) readings within a salt-affected wetland in Saskatchewan, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirck, Jaconette; Schroeder, William

    2018-01-01

    The change from deep-rooted grass and shrub vegetation to annual-cropping dryland farming has contributed to serious soil salinization challenges on the semi-arid North American Great Plains. In some cases, cultivation of the Great Plains has increased the availability of water, causing dominant sulfate salts to travel from the uphill areas to depressions where it will surface when water evaporates at the soil surface. A potential solution could include the replanting of the native deep-rooted vegetation, which requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of soil salinity. This study tested the soil factors influencing electromagnetic-induction meter (EM38) readings of soil salinity distribution around wetlands. The objectives were to: (1) predict growth and survival of Salix dasyclados Wimm. (cv. `India') along a salinity gradient in a small wetland, and (2) investigate whether newly established willows affected water-table fluctuations, which would indicate their phreatophytic nature or their ability to obtain their water supply from the zone of saturation. Results indicated significantly lower salinity values for sampling points with EM38 readings above 175 and 250 mS m-1 for height and survival, respectively. In addition, diurnal fluxes of the water table in areas of good willow growth and lower salinity indicated that cultivar `India' was phreatophytic in these areas and therefore has great potential for being used to combat saline seeps.

  17. Delineation of salt water intrusion through use of electromagnetic-induction logging: A case study in Southern Manhattan Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stumm, Frederick; Como, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater with chloride concentrations up to 15,000 mg/L has intruded the freshwater aquifer underlying southern Manhattan Island, New York. Historical (1940–1950) chloride concentration data of glacial aquifer wells in the study area indicate the presence of four wedges of saltwater intrusion that may have been caused by industrial pumpage. The limited recharge capability of the aquifer, due to impervious surfaces and the 22.7 million liters per day (mld) of reported industrial pumpage early in the 20th Century was probably the cause for the saltwater intrusion and the persistence of the historical saltwater intrusion wedges over time. Recent drilling of wells provided new information on the hydrogeology and extent of saltwater intrusion of the glacial aquifer overlying bedrock. The new observation wells provided ground-water level, chloride concentration, hydraulic conductivity, and borehole geophysical data of the glacial aquifer. The glacial sediments range in thickness from less than 0.3 m to more than 76.2 m within the study area. A linear relation between Electromagnetic-induction (EM) conductivity log response and measured chloride concentration was determined. Using this relation, chloride concentration was estimated in parts of the glacial aquifer where sampling was not possible. EM logging is an effective tool to monitor changes in saltwater intrusion wedges.

  18. Mapping patterns of soil properties and soil moisture using electromagnetic induction to investigate the impact of land use changes on soil processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinet, Jérémy; von Hebel, Christian; van der Kruk, Jan; Govers, Gerard; Vanderborght, Jan

    2016-04-01

    As highlighted by many authors, classical or geophysical techniques for measuring soil moisture such as destructive soil sampling, neutron probes or Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) have some major drawbacks. Among other things, they provide point scale information, are often intrusive and time-consuming. ElectroMagnetic Induction (EMI) instruments are often cited as a promising alternative hydrogeophysical methods providing more efficiently soil moisture measurements ranging from hillslope to catchment scale. The overall objective of our research project is to investigate whether a combination of geophysical techniques at various scales can be used to study the impact of land use change on temporal and spatial variations of soil moisture and soil properties. In our work, apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) patterns are obtained with an EM multiconfiguration system. Depth profiles of ECa were subsequently inferred through a calibration-inversion procedure based on TDR data. The obtained spatial patterns of these profiles were linked to soil profile and soil water content distributions. Two catchments with contrasting land use (agriculture vs. natural forest) were selected in a subtropical region in the south of Brazil. On selected slopes within the catchments, combined EMI and TDR measurements were carried out simultaneously, under different atmospheric and soil moisture conditions. Ground-truth data for soil properties were obtained through soil sampling and auger profiles. The comparison of these data provided information about the potential of the EMI technique to deliver qualitative and quantitative information about the variability of soil moisture and soil properties.

  19. Conductivity gradients as inferred by electromagnetic-induction meter (EM38) readings within a salt-affected wetland in Saskatchewan, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirck, Jaconette; Schroeder, William

    2018-06-01

    The change from deep-rooted grass and shrub vegetation to annual-cropping dryland farming has contributed to serious soil salinization challenges on the semi-arid North American Great Plains. In some cases, cultivation of the Great Plains has increased the availability of water, causing dominant sulfate salts to travel from the uphill areas to depressions where it will surface when water evaporates at the soil surface. A potential solution could include the replanting of the native deep-rooted vegetation, which requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of soil salinity. This study tested the soil factors influencing electromagnetic-induction meter (EM38) readings of soil salinity distribution around wetlands. The objectives were to: (1) predict growth and survival of Salix dasyclados Wimm. (cv. `India') along a salinity gradient in a small wetland, and (2) investigate whether newly established willows affected water-table fluctuations, which would indicate their phreatophytic nature or their ability to obtain their water supply from the zone of saturation. Results indicated significantly lower salinity values for sampling points with EM38 readings above 175 and 250 mS m-1 for height and survival, respectively. In addition, diurnal fluxes of the water table in areas of good willow growth and lower salinity indicated that cultivar `India' was phreatophytic in these areas and therefore has great potential for being used to combat saline seeps.

  20. Multiconfiguration electromagnetic induction survey for paleochannel internal structure imaging: a case study in the alluvial plain of the River Seine, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejiba, Fayçal; Schamper, Cyril; Chevalier, Antoine; Deleplancque, Benoit; Hovhannissian, Gaghik; Thiesson, Julien; Weill, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    The La Bassée floodplain area is a large groundwater reservoir controlling most of the water exchanged between local aquifers and hydrographic networks within the Seine River basin (France). Preferential flows depend essentially on the heterogeneity of alluvial plain infilling, whose characteristics are strongly influenced by the presence of mud plugs (paleomeander clayey infilling). These mud plugs strongly contrast with the coarse sand material that composes most of the alluvial plain, and can create permeability barriers to groundwater flows. A detailed knowledge of the global and internal geometry of such paleomeanders can thus lead to a comprehensive understanding of the long-term hydrogeological processes of the alluvial plain. A geophysical survey based on the use of electromagnetic induction was performed on a wide paleomeander, situated close to the city of Nogent-sur-Seine in France. In the present study we assess the advantages of combining several spatial offsets, together with both vertical and horizontal dipole orientations (six apparent conductivities), thereby mapping not only the spatial distribution of the paleomeander derived from lidar data but also its vertical extent and internal variability.

  1. Electromagnetic induction of nanoscale zerovalent iron particles accelerates the degradation of chlorinated dense non-aqueous phase liquid: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Kumloet, Itsaraphong

    2016-12-15

    In this study, a novel electromagnetically enhanced treatment concept is proposed for in situ remediation of a source zone of chlorinated dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that is slowly dissolved, causing contaminated groundwater for centuries. Here, we used polystyrene sulfonate (PSS)-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles (ferromagnetic) in combination with a low frequency (LF) (150 kHz) AC electromagnetic field (EMF) to accelerate the degradation of the DNAPLs via enhanced dissolution and reductive dechlorination. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were used in a bench-scaled evaluation. The PSS-modified NZVI successfully targeted the DNAPL/water interface, as evidenced by the Pickering emulsion formation. Dechlorination of TCE- and PCE-DNAPL was measured by quantifying the by-product formation (acetylene, ethene, and ethane). Without magnetic induction heating (MIH) by LF EMF, PSS-modified NZVI transformed TCE- and PCE-DNAPL to ethene and ethane at the rate constants of 12.19 × 10 -3 and 1.00 × 10 -3  μmol/h/m 2 , respectively, following pseudo zero-order reactions. However, four MIH cycles of PSS-NZVI increased the temperature up to 87 °C and increased the rate constants of TCE-DNAPL and PCE-DNAPL up to 14.58 and 58.01 times, respectively, in comparison to the dechlorination rate without MIH. Theoretical analysis suggested that the MIH of the PSS-modified NZVI enhanced the dechlorination of TCE- and PCE-DNAPL via the combination of the enhanced thermal dissolution of DNAPL, the effect of increasing the temperature on the rate constant (the Arrhenius equation), and the accelerated NZVI corrosion. Nevertheless, the effect of the Arrhenius equation was dominant. For the first time, this proof-of-concept study reveals the potential for using polyelectrolyte-modified NZVI coupled with LF EMF as a combined remediation technique for increasing the rate and completeness of in situ chlorinated DNAPL source remediation

  2. Repeated electromagnetic induction measurements for mapping soil moisture at the field scale: validation with data from a wireless soil moisture monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, Edoardo; Werban, Ulrike; Zacharias, Steffen; Pohle, Marco; Dietrich, Peter; Wollschläger, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) measurements are widely used for soil mapping, as they allow fast and relatively low-cost surveys of soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). Although the use of non-invasive EMI for imaging spatial soil properties is very attractive, the dependence of ECa on several factors challenges any interpretation with respect to individual soil properties or states such as soil moisture (θ). The major aim of this study was to further investigate the potential of repeated EMI measurements to map θ, with particular focus on the temporal variability of the spatial patterns of ECa and θ. To this end, we compared repeated EMI measurements with high-resolution θ data from a wireless soil moisture and soil temperature monitoring network for an extensively managed hillslope area for which soil properties and θ dynamics are known. For the investigated site, (i) ECa showed small temporal variations whereas θ varied from very dry to almost saturation, (ii) temporal changes of the spatial pattern of ECa differed from those of the spatial pattern of θ, and (iii) the ECa-θ relationship varied with time. Results suggest that (i) depending upon site characteristics, stable soil properties can be the major control of ECa measured with EMI, and (ii) for soils with low clay content, the influence of θ on ECa may be confounded by changes of the electrical conductivity of the soil solution. Further, this study discusses the complex interplay between factors controlling ECa and θ, and the use of EMI-based ECa data with respect to hydrological applications.

  3. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  4. Electromagnetic Induction with Neodymium Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Deborah; Sebranek, John

    2013-01-01

    In April 1820, Hans Christian Ørsted noticed that the needle of a nearby compass deflected briefly from magnetic north each time the electric current of the battery he was using for an unrelated experiment was turned on or off. Upon further investigation, he showed that an electric current flowing through a wire produces a magnetic field. In 1831…

  5. An Electromagnetic Induction Flashlight Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Emily; Kennedy, Mark; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Smith, Warren

    2007-01-01

    In the last several years, the electronics industry has released hand generator-powered flashlights, which are advertised as the end of battery-powered flashlights. This has become possible because of recent advances in capacitor, magnet, and LED technology. Nevertheless, the physics behind these flashlights is fairly simple.

  6. Switching Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Mazza, M. G.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.; Stokely, K.; Xu, L.

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines can suddenly "switch" from one behavior to another, even though they possess no perfect metronome in time. As if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many temporal patterns in physics, economics, and medicine and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enable a system to pass from one state to another. We discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understanding switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water's anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the "tipping point" immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not "outliers" (another Gladwell immortalization).

  7. Cokriging of Electromagnetic Induction Soil Electrical Conductivity Measurements and Soil Textural Properties to Demarcate Sub-field Management Zones for Precision Irrigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, R.; Cruz, L.; Whitney, J.; Telenko, D.; Oware, E. K.

    2017-12-01

    There is the growing need for the development of efficient irrigation management practices due to increasing irrigation water scarcity as a result of growing population and changing climate. Soil texture primarily controls the water-holding capacity of soils, which determines the amount of irrigation water that will be available to the plant. However, while there are significant variabilities in the textural properties of the soil across a field, conventional irrigation practices ignore the underlying variability in the soil properties, resulting in over- or under-irrigation. Over-irrigation leaches plant nutrients beyond the root-zone leading to fertilizer, energy, and water wastages with dire environmental consequences. Under-irrigation, in contrast, causes water stress of the plant, thereby reducing plant quality and yield. The goal of this project is to leverage soil textural map of a field to create water management zones (MZs) to guide site-specific precision irrigation. There is increasing application of electromagnetic induction methods to rapidly and inexpensively map spatially continuous soil properties in terms of the apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) of the soil. ECa is a measure of the bulk soil properties, including soil texture, moisture, salinity, and cation exchange capacity, making an ECa map a pseudo-soil map. Data for the project were collected from a farm site at Eden, NY. The objective is to leverage high-resolution ECa map to predict spatially dense soil textural properties from limited measurements of soil texture. Thus, after performing ECa mapping, we conducted particle-size analysis of soil samples to determine the textural properties of soils at selected locations across the field. We cokriged the high-resolution ECa measurements with the sparse soil textural data to estimate a soil texture map for the field. We conducted irrigation experiments at selected locations to calibrate representative water-holding capacities of each

  8. Generation of electromagnetic energy in a magnetic cumulation generator with the use of inductively coupled circuits with a variable coupling coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilev, S. D.; Prokopiev, V. S.

    2017-07-01

    A method of generation of electromagnetic energy and magnetic flux in a magnetic cumulation generator is proposed. The method is based on dynamic variation of the circuit coupling coefficient. This circuit is compared with other available circuits of magnetic energy generation with the help of magnetic cumulation (classical magnetic cumulation generator, generator with transformer coupling, and generator with a dynamic transformer). It is demonstrated that the proposed method allows obtaining high values of magnetic energy. The proposed circuit is found to be more effective than the known transformer circuit. Experiments on electromagnetic energy generation are performed, which demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  9. Maxwell's inductions from Faraday's induction law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redžić, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    In article 598 of his Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism (Maxwell 1891 A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism (Oxford: Clarendon)), Maxwell gives a seminal analysis of Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. We present a detailed account of the analysis, attempting to reconstruct the missing steps, and discuss some related matters.

  10. Response of Electrical Activity in an Improved Neuron Model under Electromagnetic Radiation and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Feibiao; Liu, Shenquan

    2017-01-01

    Electrical activities are ubiquitous neuronal bioelectric phenomena, which have many different modes to encode the expression of biological information, and constitute the whole process of signal propagation between neurons. Therefore, we focus on the electrical activities of neurons, which is also causing widespread concern among neuroscientists. In this paper, we mainly investigate the electrical activities of the Morris-Lecar (M-L) model with electromagnetic radiation or Gaussian white noise, which can restore the authenticity of neurons in realistic neural network. First, we explore dynamical response of the whole system with electromagnetic induction (EMI) and Gaussian white noise. We find that there are slight differences in the discharge behaviors via comparing the response of original system with that of improved system, and electromagnetic induction can transform bursting or spiking state to quiescent state and vice versa. Furthermore, we research bursting transition mode and the corresponding periodic solution mechanism for the isolated neuron model with electromagnetic induction by using one-parameter and bi-parameters bifurcation analysis. Finally, we analyze the effects of Gaussian white noise on the original system and coupled system, which is conducive to understand the actual discharge properties of realistic neurons. PMID:29209192

  11. Response of Electrical Activity in an Improved Neuron Model under Electromagnetic Radiation and Noise.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Feibiao; Liu, Shenquan

    2017-01-01

    Electrical activities are ubiquitous neuronal bioelectric phenomena, which have many different modes to encode the expression of biological information, and constitute the whole process of signal propagation between neurons. Therefore, we focus on the electrical activities of neurons, which is also causing widespread concern among neuroscientists. In this paper, we mainly investigate the electrical activities of the Morris-Lecar (M-L) model with electromagnetic radiation or Gaussian white noise, which can restore the authenticity of neurons in realistic neural network. First, we explore dynamical response of the whole system with electromagnetic induction (EMI) and Gaussian white noise. We find that there are slight differences in the discharge behaviors via comparing the response of original system with that of improved system, and electromagnetic induction can transform bursting or spiking state to quiescent state and vice versa. Furthermore, we research bursting transition mode and the corresponding periodic solution mechanism for the isolated neuron model with electromagnetic induction by using one-parameter and bi-parameters bifurcation analysis. Finally, we analyze the effects of Gaussian white noise on the original system and coupled system, which is conducive to understand the actual discharge properties of realistic neurons.

  12. Covariant electromagnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Y.; Cohen, E.; Kaminer, I.; Elitzur, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    Faraday introduced electric field lines as a powerful tool for understanding the electric force, and these field lines are still used today in classrooms and textbooks teaching the basics of electromagnetism within the electrostatic limit. However, despite attempts at generalizing this concept beyond the electrostatic limit, such a fully relativistic field line theory still appears to be missing. In this work, we propose such a theory and define covariant electromagnetic field lines that naturally extend electric field lines to relativistic systems and general electromagnetic fields. We derive a closed-form formula for the field lines curvature in the vicinity of a charge, and show that it is related to the world line of the charge. This demonstrates how the kinematics of a charge can be derived from the geometry of the electromagnetic field lines. Such a theory may also provide new tools in modeling and analyzing electromagnetic phenomena, and may entail new insights regarding long-standing problems such as radiation-reaction and self-force. In particular, the electromagnetic field lines curvature has the attractive property of being non-singular everywhere, thus eliminating all self-field singularities without using renormalization techniques.

  13. Module Eight: Induction; Basic Electricity and Electronics Individualized Learning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    The module covers in greater depth electromagnetic induction, its effects, and how it is used to advantage in electrical circuits; and the physical components, called inductors, designed to take advantage of the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction. This module is divided into four lessons: electromagnetism; inductors and flux density, inducing…

  14. Project APhiD: A Lorenz-gauged A-Φ decomposition for parallelized computation of ultra-broadband electromagnetic induction in a fully heterogeneous Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Chester J.

    2013-08-01

    An essential element for computational hypothesis testing, data inversion and experiment design for electromagnetic geophysics is a robust forward solver, capable of easily and quickly evaluating the electromagnetic response of arbitrary geologic structure. The usefulness of such a solver hinges on the balance among competing desires like ease of use, speed of forward calculation, scalability to large problems or compute clusters, parsimonious use of memory access, accuracy and by necessity, the ability to faithfully accommodate a broad range of geologic scenarios over extremes in length scale and frequency content. This is indeed a tall order. The present study addresses recent progress toward the development of a forward solver with these properties. Based on the Lorenz-gauged Helmholtz decomposition, a new finite volume solution over Cartesian model domains endowed with complex-valued electrical properties is shown to be stable over the frequency range 10-2-1010 Hz and range 10-3-105 m in length scale. Benchmark examples are drawn from magnetotellurics, exploration geophysics, geotechnical mapping and laboratory-scale analysis, showing excellent agreement with reference analytic solutions. Computational efficiency is achieved through use of a matrix-free implementation of the quasi-minimum-residual (QMR) iterative solver, which eliminates explicit storage of finite volume matrix elements in favor of "on the fly" computation as needed by the iterative Krylov sequence. Further efficiency is achieved through sparse coupling matrices between the vector and scalar potentials whose non-zero elements arise only in those parts of the model domain where the conductivity gradient is non-zero. Multi-thread parallelization in the QMR solver through OpenMP pragmas is used to reduce the computational cost of its most expensive step: the single matrix-vector product at each iteration. High-level MPI communicators farm independent processes to available compute nodes for

  15. Investigation of Non-Linear Dynamics of the Rock Massive,Using Seismological Catalogue data and Induction Electromagnetic Monitoring Data in a Rock Burst Mine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, O. A.; Khachay, O. Y.; Klimko, V. K.; Shipeev, O. V.

    2012-04-01

    Geological medium is an open dynamical system, which is influenced on different scales by natural and man-made impacts, which change the medium state and lead as a result to a complicated many ranked hierarchic evolution. That is the subject of geo synergetics. Paradigm of physical mesomechanics, which was advanced by academician Panin V.E. and his scientific school, which includes the synergetic approach is a constructive method for research and changing the state of heterogenic materials [1]. That result had been obtained on specimens of different materials. In our results of research of no stationary geological medium in a frame of natural experiments in real rock massifs, which are under high man-made influence it was shown, that the state dynamics can be revealed with use synergetics in hierarchic medium. Active and passive geophysical monitoring plays a very important role for research of the state of dynamical geological systems. It can be achieved by use electromagnetic and seismic fields. Our experience of that research showed the changing of the system state reveals on the space scales and times in the parameters, which are linked with the peculiarities of the medium of the second or higher ranks [2-5]. Results of seismological and electromagnetic information showed the mutual additional information on different space-time levels of rock massive state, which are energetic influenced by explosions, used in mining technology. It is revealed a change of nonlinearity degree in time of the massive state by active influence on it. The description of massive movement in a frame of linear dynamical system does not satisfy the practical situation. The received results are of great significance because for the first time we could find the coincidences with the mathematical theory of open systems and experimental natural results with very complicated structure. On that base we developed a new processing method for the seismological information which can be used in

  16. The dissipation of electromagnetic waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basov, N. G.

    The present anthology includes articles concerning the experimental study of the interaction of high power electromagnetic waves with collisionless plasmas and with electrons. Among the topics covered are the nonlinear dissipation of electromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous collisionless plasmas, the collisionless absorption of electromagnetic waves in plasmas and 'slow' nonlinear phenomena, the nonlinear effects of electron plasma waves propagating in an inhomogeneous plasma layer, and secondary-emission microwave discharges having large electron transit angles.

  17. Electromagnetic induction of foam-based nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles to thermally enhance non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) volatilization in unsaturated porous media: Proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Srirattana, Supawan; Piaowan, Kitsanateen; Lowry, Gregory V; Phenrat, Tanapon

    2017-09-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) is a promising remediation agent for volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in saturated sub-surfaces, but is rarely applied to the vadose zone as there are not enough water molecules in the unsaturated zone to participate in reductive dechlorination. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of using foam as a carrying vehicle to emplace NZVI in unsaturated porous media followed by the application of low frequency-electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) to enhance VOC volatilization in laboratory batch reactors. We found that the optimal condition for generating foam-based NZVI (F-NZVI) was using sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) at a concentration of 3% (w/w) and a N 2 flow rate of 500 mL/min. Also, F-NZVI could carry as much as 41.31 g/L of NZVI in the liquid phase of the foam and generate heat to raise ΔT to 77 °C in 15 min under an applied LF-EMF (150 kHz and 13 A). Under these conditions, F-NZVI together with LF-EMF enhanced trichloroethylene (TCE) volatilization from TCE-dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in unsaturated sand by 39.51 ± 6.59-fold compared to reactors without LF-EMF application. This suggested that using F-NZVI together with LF-EMF could theoretically be an alternative to radio frequency heating (RFH) as it requires a much lower irradiation frequency (336-fold lower), which should result in significantly lower capital and operational costs compared to RFH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Advanced high-temperature electromagnetic pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahan, J. W.; Powell, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Three phase helical, electromagnetic induction pump for use as boiler feed pump in potassium Rankine-cycle power system is described. Techniques for fabricating components of pump are discussed. Specifications of pump are analyzed.

  19. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  20. Properties of inductive reasoning.

    PubMed

    Heit, E

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the main psychological phenomena of inductive reasoning, covering 25 years of experimental and model-based research, in particular addressing four questions. First, what makes a case or event generalizable to other cases? Second, what makes a set of cases generalizable? Third, what makes a property or predicate projectable? Fourth, how do psychological models of induction address these results? The key results in inductive reasoning are outlined, and several recent models, including a new Bayesian account, are evaluated with respect to these results. In addition, future directions for experimental and model-based work are proposed.

  1. Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Masashi; Takahashi, Kenji A.; Arai, Yuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2008-01-01

    Establishing a means to prevent osteonecrosis after corticosteroid administration is an important theme. We asked whether pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation, a noninvasive treatment, could prevent osteonecrosis. Ninety rabbits were divided into four treatment groups: (1) exposure of 10 hours per day to electromagnetic stimulation for 1 week, followed by injection of methylprednisolone (20 mg/kg), and exposure of 10 hours per day to electromagnetism for a further 4 weeks (n = 40); (2) methylprednisolone injection only (n = 40); (3) no treatment (n = 5); and (4) exposure of 10 hours per day to electromagnetism for 5 weeks (n = 5). After 5 weeks, we harvested and histologically examined femurs bilaterally. The frequency of osteonecrosis was lower in the steroid-electromagnetism group (15/40) than in the steroid-only group (26/40). No necrotic lesions were found in the two control groups. We observed no clear effects of electromagnetism on the number, location, extent, and repair of necrotic lesions and intramedullary fat cell size in affected rabbits. Pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation reportedly augments angiogenesis factors and dilates blood vessels; these effects may lower the frequency of osteonecrosis. Exposure to pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation before corticosteroid administration could be an effective means to reduce the risk of osteonecrosis. PMID:18350347

  2. Electromagnetic Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, James L.

    1990-01-01

    Three activities involving electromagnetism are presented. Discussed are investigations involving the construction of an electromagnet, the effect of the number of turns of wire in the magnet, and the effect of the number of batteries in the circuit. Extension activities are suggested. (CW)

  3. Inductive shearing of drilling pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Wilgen, John; Kisner, Roger

    Induction shearing may be used to cut a drillpipe at an undersea well. Electromagnetic rings may be built into a blow-out preventer (BOP) at the seafloor. The electromagnetic rings create a magnetic field through the drillpipe and may transfer sufficient energy to change the state of the metal drillpipe to shear the drillpipe. After shearing the drillpipe, the drillpipe may be sealed to prevent further leakage of well contents.

  4. Inductive dielectric analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranovich, Daniel; Polygalov, Eugene; Popov, Ivan; Ben Ishai, Paul; Feldman, Yuri

    2017-03-01

    One of the approaches to bypass the problem of electrode polarization in dielectric measurements is the free electrode method. The advantage of this technique is that, the probing electric field in the material is not supplied by contact electrodes, but rather by electromagnetic induction. We have designed an inductive dielectric analyzer based on a sensor comprising two concentric toroidal coils. In this work, we present an analytic derivation of the relationship between the impedance measured by the sensor and the complex dielectric permittivity of the sample. The obtained relationship was successfully employed to measure the dielectric permittivity and conductivity of various alcohols and aqueous salt solutions.

  5. Luminous Phenomena - A Scientific Investigation of Anomalous Luminous Atmospheric Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.

    2003-12-01

    Anomalous atmospheric luminous phenomena reoccur in several locations of Earth, in the form of multi-color light balls characterized by large dimensions, erratic motion, long duration and a correlated electromagnetic field. The author (an astrophysicist) of this book, which is organized as a selection of some of his technical and popularizing papers and seminars, describes and discusses all the efforts that have been done in 10 years, through several missions and a massive data analysis, in order to obtain some scientific explanation of this kind of anomalies, in particular the Hessdalen anomaly in Norway. The following topics are treated in the book: a) geographic archive of the areas of Earth where such phenomena are known to reoccur most often; b) observational techniques of astrophysical kind that have been used to acquire the data; c) main scientific results obtained so far; d) physical interpretation and natural hypothesis vs. ETV hypothesis; e) historical and chronological issues; f) the importance to brindle new energy sources; g) the importance to keep distance from any kind of "ufology". An unpublished chapter is entirely devoted to a detailed scientific investigation project of light phenomena reoccurring on the Ontario lake; the chosen new-generation multi-wavelength sensing instrumentation that is planned to be used in future missions in that specific area, is described together with scientific rationale and planned procedures. The main results, which were obtained in other areas of the world, such as the Arizona desert, USA and the Sibillini Mountains, Italy, are also briefly mentioned. One chapter is entirely dedicated to the presentation of extensive abstracts of technical papers by the author concerning this specific subject. The book is accompanied with a rich source of bibliographic references.

  6. VHF electromagnetic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gole, P.

    Theoretical and experimental study of large-scale VHF propagation characteristics is presented. Certain phenomena that are difficult to model, such as the effects of ground near the antenna, are examined from a purely experimental point of view. The characteristics of electromagnetic waves over a spherical surface and through a medium having a certain refractive index, such as is the case for waves propagated over the earth's surface, are analytically described. Two mathematical models are used, one for the case of the receiver being within the radioelectric horizon of the transmitter and the other for when it is not. Propagation phenomena likely to increase the false alarm probability of an air surveillance radar are briefly considered.

  7. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Randolph W.; Marts, Donna J.

    1994-11-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  8. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Randolph W.; Marts, Donna J.

    1994-01-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  9. Light Phenomena from the Nothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.

    2004-11-01

    The most recent results of scientific investigations on anomalous light phenomena, which were carried out in Hessdalen, Norway, are described and discussed. The data acquired so far show that the phenomenon is a plasma form triggered by piezoelectricity and maintained by electrochemical effects that become effective when a plasma concentration interacts with an atmosphere rich of water vapor and aerosols. It is also shown that the electrochemical mechanism able to permit an efficient confinement of the plasma can explain some peculiar kinematic and structural characteristics too, being the light phenomenon formed by clusters of small light balls, which are occasionally ejected from the core. The mechanism, with which amplitude time-variations of pulsating light phenomena occur, is also described. It is finally shown how, however, some peculiar aspects of the phenomenon, in particular the occurrence of some transiently geometric shapes, cannot be explained using a geophysical standard model. One hypothesis concerning quantum fluctuations of the zero point energy, including a possible interaction with a form of "electromagnetic intelligence", is discussed as a possible speculation, which is ventured in order to suggest to all physical scientists working in this field to carry out a more in-depth study of the light phenomenon in its entirety.

  10. Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    DeFord, J.F.

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area is a focal point for computer modeling activities in electronics and electromagnetics in the Electronics Engineering Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Traditionally, they have focused their efforts in technical areas of importance to existing and developing LLNL programs, and this continues to form the basis for much of their research. A relatively new and increasingly important emphasis for the thrust area is the formation of partnerships with industry and the application of their simulation technology and expertise to the solution of problems faced by industry. The activities of the thrust areamore » fall into three broad categories: (1) the development of theoretical and computational models of electronic and electromagnetic phenomena, (2) the development of useful and robust software tools based on these models, and (3) the application of these tools to programmatic and industrial problems. In FY-92, they worked on projects in all of the areas outlined above. The object of their work on numerical electromagnetic algorithms continues to be the improvement of time-domain algorithms for electromagnetic simulation on unstructured conforming grids. The thrust area is also investigating various technologies for conforming-grid mesh generation to simplify the application of their advanced field solvers to design problems involving complicated geometries. They are developing a major code suite based on the three-dimensional (3-D), conforming-grid, time-domain code DSI3D. They continue to maintain and distribute the 3-D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code TSAR, which is installed at several dozen university, government, and industry sites.« less

  11. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-09-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators.

  12. Inductive reasoning 2.0.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Brett K; Heit, Evan

    2018-05-01

    Inductive reasoning entails using existing knowledge to make predictions about novel cases. The first part of this review summarizes key inductive phenomena and critically evaluates theories of induction. We highlight recent theoretical advances, with a special emphasis on the structured statistical approach, the importance of sampling assumptions in Bayesian models, and connectionist modeling. A number of new research directions in this field are identified including comparisons of inductive and deductive reasoning, the identification of common core processes in induction and memory tasks and induction involving category uncertainty. The implications of induction research for areas as diverse as complex decision-making and fear generalization are discussed. This article is categorized under: Psychology > Reasoning and Decision Making Psychology > Learning. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mapping Pesticide Partition Coefficients By Electromagnetic Induction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A potential method for reducing pesticide leaching is to base application rates on the leaching potential of a specific chemical and soil combination. However, leaching is determined in part by the partitioning of the chemical between the soil and soil solution, which varies across a field. Standard...

  14. Investigation of an Electromagnetic Induction Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    c) (f) Figure 5. Respose plotted on an Argand diagram over the center of a) TS-50 anti-personnel landmines buried 0 to...5 cm deep, b) MAI-75 anti- personnel landmines buried 0 to 5 cm deep, and c) patio stones buried 2.5 to 11 cm deep. Magnitude of the respose at the 21...Figure 6. Respose plotted on an Argand diagram over the center of empty grid locations. II - 377 a) b) c) d) Figure 5. Response of four mines

  15. Vector Potential, Electromagnetic Induction and "Physical Meaning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giuliani, G.

    2010-01-01

    A forgotten experiment by Andre Blondel (1914) proves, as held on the basis of theoretical arguments in a previous paper, that the time variation of the magnetic flux is not the cause of the induced emf; the physical agent is instead the vector potential through the term [equation omitted] (when the induced circuit is at rest). The "good…

  16. Electromagnetic Induction: A Computer-Assisted Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrickson, J. E.; Moreland, L.

    1972-01-01

    By using minimal equipment it is possible to demonstrate Faraday's Law. An electronic desk calculator enables sophomore students to solve a difficult mathematical expression for the induced EMF. Polaroid pictures of the plot of induced EMF, together with the computer facility, enables students to make comparisons. (PS)

  17. Ultrafast Phenomena XIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Okada, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A.; de Silvestri, Sandro

    Ultrafast Phenomena XIV presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including ultrafast laser and measurement technology as well as studies of ultrafast phenomena. Pico-, femto-, and atosecond processes relevant in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering are presented. Ultrafast technology is now having a profound impact within a wide range of applications, among them imaging, material diagnostics, and transformation and high-speed optoelectronics . This book summarizes results presented at the 14th Ultrafast Phenomena Conference and reviews the state of the art in this important and rapidly advancing field.

  18. Nuclear Electromagnetic Pulse Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinallo, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) from nuclear detonations have been observed for well over half a century. Beginning in the mid-to-late 1950s, the physics and modeling of EMP has been researched and will continue into the foreseeable future. The EMP environment propagates hundreds of miles from its origins and causes interference for all types of electronic instrumentation. This includes military, municipal and industry based electronic infrastructures such as power generation and distribution, command and control systems, systems used in financial and emergency services, electronic monitoring and communications networks, to mention some key infrastructure elements. Research into EMP has included originating physics, propagation and electromagnetic field coupling analyses and measurement-sensor development. Several methods for calculating EMP induced transient interference (voltage and current induction) will be briefly discussed and protection techniques reviewed. These methods can be mathematically simple or involve challenging boundary value solution techniques. A few illustrative calculations will demonstrate the concern for electronic system operability. Analyses such as the Wunsch-Bell model for electronic upset or damage, and the Singularity Expansion Method (SEM) put forth by Dr. Carl Baum, will facilitate the concern for EMP effects. The SEM determines the voltages and currents induced from transient electromagnetic fields in terms of natural modes of various types of electronic platforms (aerospace vehicles or land-based assets - fixed or mobile). Full-scale facility and laboratory simulation and response measurement approaches will be discussed. The talk will conclude with a discussion of some present research activities.

  19. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-02-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF).

  20. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-01-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF). PMID:28169361

  1. Low-inductance bus lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kernick, A.

    1977-01-01

    Laminated bus strips and bifilar litz cable connectors for high-power rectifiers, thrisistors, and transistors provide low inductance and eliminate electromagnetic interference in high-power circuits. These techniques offer significant cost advantages because of ease of assembly and consistent high quality of product. Effectiveness makes general usage in static power conversion likely.

  2. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, A; Baum, P

    2016-07-22

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample's oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    spin operator changes sign with T-operation. (iii) Gauge symmetry (G), which is associated with a change in the phase of the wave-function as {Psi} {yields} e{sup i{theta}}{Psi}. Gauge symmetry is connected to the law of charge conservation, and broken G-symmetry corresponds to superconductivity/superfluidity. To summarize, the interplay among these electronic degrees of freedom produces various forms of symmetry breaking patterns of I, T, and G, leading to novel emergent phenomena, which can appear only by the collective behavior of electrons and cannot be expected from individual electrons. Figure 1 shows this schematically by means of several representative phenomena. From this viewpoint, the interfaces of TMOs offer a unique and important laboratory because I is already broken by the structure itself, and the detailed form of broken I-symmetry can often be designed. Also, two-dimensionality usually enhances the effects of electron correlations by reducing their kinetic energy. These two features of oxide interfaces produce many novel effects and functions that cannot be attained in bulk form. Given that the electromagnetic responses are a major source of the physical properties of solids, and new gauge structures often appear in correlated electronic systems, we put 'emergent electromagnetism' at the center of Fig. 1.« less

  4. Electromagnetic Compatibility of Devices on Hybrid Electromagnetic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konesev, S. G.; Khazieva, R. T.; Kirillov, R. V.; Gainutdinov, I. Z.; Kondratyev, E. Y.

    2018-01-01

    There is a general tendency to reduce the weight and dimensions, the consumption of conductive and electrical insulating materials, increase the reliability and energy efficiency of electrical devices. In recent years, designers have been actively developing devices based on hybrid electromagnetic components (HEMC) such as inductive-capacitive converters (ICC), voltages pulse generators (VPG), secondary power supplies (SPS), capacitive storage devices (CSD), induction heating systems (IHS). Sources of power supplies of similar electrical devices contain, as a rule, links of increased frequency and function in key (pulse) modes, which leads to an increase in electromagnetic interference (EMI). Nonlinear and periodic (impulse) loads, non-sinusoidal (pulsation) of the electromotive force and nonlinearity of the internal parameters of the source and input circuits of consumers distort the shape of the input voltage lead to an increase in thermal losses from the higher harmonic currents, aging of the insulation, increase in the weight of the power supply filter units, resonance at higher harmonics. The most important task is to analyze the operation of electrotechnical devices based on HEMC from the point of view of creating EMIs and assessing their electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) with power supply systems (PSS). The article presents the results of research on the operation of an IHS, the operation principle of a secondary power supply source of which is based on the operation of a half-bridge autonomous inverter, the switching circuit of which is made in the form of a HEMC, called the «multifunctional integrated electromagnetic component»" (MIEC).

  5. Scattering theory of stochastic electromagnetic light waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhao, Daomu

    2010-07-15

    We generalize scattering theory to stochastic electromagnetic light waves. It is shown that when a stochastic electromagnetic light wave is scattered from a medium, the properties of the scattered field can be characterized by a 3 x 3 cross-spectral density matrix. An example of scattering of a spatially coherent electromagnetic light wave from a deterministic medium is discussed. Some interesting phenomena emerge, including the changes of the spectral degree of coherence and of the spectral degree of polarization of the scattered field.

  6. Inductive Interference in Rapid Transit Signaling Systems. Volume 3. Data and Test Results.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-11-01

    This report presents comparative inductive interference data obtained from four U.S. rapid transit systems employing chopper propulsion control, as part of the Rail Transit Electromagnetic Interference/Electromagnetic Compatibility program conducted ...

  7. Aura phenomena during syncope.

    PubMed

    Benke, T; Hochleitner, M; Bauer, G

    1997-01-01

    We studied the frequency and clinical characteristics of aura phenomena in 60 patients with cardiac and 40 subjects with vasovagal syncopes. The majority (93%) of all syncope patients recalled having experienced an aura. Aura phenomena were similar in both groups and were mostly compound auras comprising epigastric, vertiginous, visual, or somatosensory experiences, but were more detailed in the noncardiac group. The localizing significance of auras preceding a syncope was generally poor. Although hard to distinguish from epileptic auras from their structure and shape, syncope-related auras lacked symptoms that are commonly reported after epileptic seizures such as tastes, smells, déjà vu phenomena, scenic visual perceptions, and speech impairments. A detailed anamnestic exploration of auras seems worthwhile in unexplained disorders of consciousness.

  8. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculationmore » (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).« less

  9. Effective electromagnetic properties of microheterogeneous materials with surface phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Valery; Markov, Mikhail; Mousatov, Aleksandr; Kazatchenko, Elena; Pervago, Evgeny

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present an approach to calculate the complex dielectric permittivity of a micro-heterogeneous medium composed of non-conductive solid inclusions embedded into the conductive liquid continuous host. To take into account the surface effects, we approximate the inclusion by a layered ellipsoid consisting of a dielectric core and an infinitesimally thin outer shell corresponding to an electrical double layer (EDL). To predict the effective complex dielectric permittivity of materials with a high concentration of inclusions, we have modified the Effective Field Method (EFM) for the layered ellipsoidal particles with complex electrical properties. We present the results of complex permittivity calculations for the composites with randomly and parallel oriented ellipsoidal inclusions. To analyze the influence of surface polarization, we have accomplished modeling in a wide frequency range for different existing physic-chemical models of double electrical layer. The results obtained show that the tensor of effective complex permittivity of a micro-heterogeneous medium with surface effects has complicate dependences on the component electrical properties, spatial material texture, and the inclusion shape (ellipsoid aspect ratio) and size. The dispersion of dielectric permittivity corresponds to the frequency dependence for individual inclusion of given size, and does not depend on the inclusion concentration.

  10. Overview on the standardization in the field of electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Georges

    1989-04-01

    Standardization in the domain of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is discussed, with specific reference to the standards of the International Electrotechnical Commission, the Comite International Special des Perturbations Radioelectriques, and the Comite Europeen de Normalisation Electrotechnique. EMC fields considered include radiocommunications, telecommunications, biological effects, and data transmission. Standards are presented for such electromagnetic disturbances as low-frequency, high-frequency, conduction, and radiation phenomena.

  11. Assessing the value of multi-receiver low-frequency electromagnetic-induction (EMI) measurement for assessing variation in soil moisture content in field experiments with winter wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Peter; Binley, Andrew; Dodd, Ian; Whalley, Richard; Watts, Chris; Ashton, Rhys; Ober, Eric

    2014-05-01

    In large plant breeding field trials with multiple genotypes, measuring soil water status (an indicator of crop water uptake) by conventional techniques (e.g. core extraction and penetration resistance) is limited by the cost and effort needed to achieve sufficient replication to apply robust statistical analysis. Geophysical methods may provide a more cost-effective means of more assessing valuable information about soil water status for such studies. We present here results from a field experiment using geophysical techniques for remote mapping of soil water content on sandy loam and silt loam soils in spring/summer 2013 in the UK. The aim of the study was to assess electromagnetic-induction (EMI) conductivity measurements for sensitivity to variations in shallow soil electrical properties and the spatial and temporal mapping of soil water. The CMD Mini-Explorer (GF Instruments) operates with three receiver coils at fixed distances from a transmitter coil (0.32 m, 0.71 m, 1.2 m). Measurement of magnetic field quadrature in horizontal coplanar (HC) and vertical coplanar (VC) of the three receiver coils provides six depths of investigation for the given coil spacing cumulative sensitivities. At the two field sites the instrument was applied to measuring apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) below 7.0 x 1.8 m plots consisting of 23 rain fed winter wheat cultivars and bare soil fallow control plots. These plots were sown in March 2013 and organised into a randomised block design. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys along 15 m transects were also conducted at the two sites in order to compare EMI measured ECa. Our results show that progressive soil drying at both sites due to crop uptake significantly decreased (p<0.05) soil ECa. The difference in soil ECa as a result of water uptake between cultivars was found to be significant (p<0.05) from one of the coil configurations (coil spacing 1.8m in HC mode), and only at the silty loam site (no significant

  12. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  13. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  14. Electromagnetic connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    Connector pair consists of two iron cores brought together a short distance from each other. Each core is wound with insulated wire. Ac signal is connected through the pair across the gap by magnetic induction. Device can be used underwater or in flammable atmosphere.

  15. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT) have been developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters have been flown in space, though only PPTs have been used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPTs is quite poor, providing only about 8 percent efficiency at about 1000 sec specific impulse. Laboratory PPTs yielding 34 percent efficiency at 5170 sec specific impulse have been demonstrated. Laboratory MPD thrusters have been demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 7000 sec specific impulse. Recent PIT performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 and 8000 sec.

  16. Demonstration of ROV-based Underwater Electromagnetic Array Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-25

    Volume Magnetic Source Model that Was Modified to Address EM Propagation through a Conductive Seawater Medium...16  Figure 7. Still Shots of the Integrated ROV- EM System (left) and the EM Sensor (right) Performing Bottom Following...of Defense DVL Doppler Velocity Log E Easting EOD Explosive Ordnance Disposal EM Electromagnetic EMI Electromagnetic Induction EMF

  17. Electromagnetic potential vectors and the Lagrangian of a charged particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    Maxwell's equations can be shown to imply the existence of two independent three-dimensional potential vectors. A comparison between the potential vectors and the electric and magnetic field vectors, using a spatial Fourier transformation, reveals six independent potential components but only four independent electromagnetic field components for each mode. Although the electromagnetic fields determined by Maxwell's equations give a complete description of all possible classical electromagnetic phenomena, potential vectors contains more information and allow for a description of such quantum mechanical phenomena as the Aharonov-Bohm effect. A new result is that a charged particle Lagrangian written in terms of potential vectors automatically contains a 'spontaneous symmetry breaking' potential.

  18. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT), were developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters were flown in space, though only PPT's were used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPT's is quite poor, providing only approximately 8 percent efficiency at approximately 1000 s specific impulse. However, laboratory PPT's yielding 34 percent efficiency at 2000 s specific impulse were extensively tested, and peak performance levels of 53 percent efficiency at 5170 s specific impulse were demonstrated. MPD thrusters were flown as experiments on the Japanese MS-T4 spacecraft and the Space Shuttle and were qualified for a flight in 1994. The flight MPD thrusters were pulsed, with a peak performance of 22 percent efficiency at 2500 s specific impulse using ammonia propellant. Laboratory MPD thrusters were demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 700 s specific impulse using lithium propellant. While the PIT thruster has never been flown, recent performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 to 8000 s. The fundamental operating principles, performance measurements, and system level design for the three types of electromagnetic thrusters are reviewed, and available data on flight tests are discussed for the PPT and MPD thrusters.

  19. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  20. Paramutation phenomena in plants.

    PubMed

    Pilu, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Paramutation is a particular epigenetic phenomenon discovered in Zea mays by Alexander Brink in the 1950s, and then also found in other plants and animals. Brink coined the term paramutation (from the Greek syllable "para" meaning beside, near, beyond, aside) in 1958, with the aim to differentiate paramutation from mutation. The peculiarity of paramutation with respect to other gene silencing phenomena consists in the ability of the silenced allele (named paramutagenic) to silence the other allele (paramutable) present in trans. The newly silenced (paramutated) allele remains stable in the next generations even after segregation from the paramutagenic allele and acquires paramutagenic ability itself. The inheritance behaviour of these epialleles permits a fast diffusion of a particular gene expression level/phenotype in a population even in the absence of other evolutionary influences, thus breaking the Hardy-Weinberg law. As with other gene silencing phenomena such as quelling in the fungus Neurospora crassa, transvection in Drosophila, co-suppression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) described in transgenic plants and RNA interference (RNAi) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, paramutation occurs without changes in the DNA sequence. So far the molecular basis of paramutation remains not fully understood, although many studies point to the involvement of RNA causing changes in DNA methylation and chromatin structure of the silenced genes. In this review I summarize all paramutation phenomena described in plants, focusing on the similarities and differences between them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gravitational induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Cherubini, Christian; Chicone, Carmen; Mashhoon, Bahram

    2008-11-01

    We study the linear post-Newtonian approximation to general relativity known as gravitoelectromagnetism (GEM); in particular, we examine the similarities and differences between GEM and electrodynamics. Notwithstanding some significant differences between them, we find that a special nonstationary metric in GEM can be employed to show explicitly that it is possible to introduce gravitational induction within GEM in close analogy with Faraday's law of induction and Lenz's law in electrodynamics. Some of the physical implications of gravitational induction are briefly discussed.

  2. What Are Electromagnetic Fields?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alt+0 Navigation Alt+1 Content Alt+2 Electromagnetic fields (EMF) Menu EMF Home About electromagnetic fields ... Standards EMF publications & information resources Meetings What are electromagnetic fields? Definitions and sources Electric fields are created ...

  3. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  4. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

    1990-11-06

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

  5. Working principle of an electromagnetic wiping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, R.; Fautrelle, Y.; Bianchi, A.-M.; Iliescu, M.

    2009-03-01

    In galvanizing lines, the gas knife wiping device works well for controlling the zinc coating thickness up to 2 to 3 m/s strip velocities. But for higher velocities, a strong liquid zinc splash risk forbids the gas pressure increase, which would be necessary to keep the same thickness control efficiency of the knives. That is why a complementary electromagnetic wiping system, whose purpose is to pre-wipe the liquid zinc before the gas knives take over, is presented here. After mentioning different kinds of AC and DC possible electromagnetic solutions, a DC field electromagnetic brake (EMB) system based on the use of permanent magnets is selected for a future experimental implementation. In order to better understand the electromagnetic and fluid mechanics phenomena, an analytical model and then different numerical models are presented here. These models show an interesting wiping effect on the liquid zinc, which seems promising for a future experimental pilot design. Figs 8, Refs 9.

  6. Ocean Magnetics: 1. Fundamental Survey and Estimates of Induction Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    sensitivities of /i0-• /Hz only in the far infra - sonic regime. We may note that, for a noise souce at great distances (R) such that its radiation...Various Ocean Depths (D), Pycnocline Depths (d), and Density Changes (6p/p), Sonic Mode (0), with IW Truncated at Brunt-Vaisala Frequency for aJ 25-m...Changes (6p/p), Sonic Mode MQ, with 1WI ~Truncated at Brunt Vaisala Frequency for a 25-rn-Thick Pycnocline.I Dashed line separates quasi-static (left

  7. A Computer Simulation to Help in Teaching Induction Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihas, Pavlos

    2003-01-01

    The motion of a magnet through a coil is analysed through a model of magnetic monopoles. The magnetic flux of a monopole passing through a loop is explained and also its rate of change. By a superposition of voltages produced by the monopoles on the coils the shape of the voltage versus time graph is explained. Also examined is the interaction of…

  8. Calculation of electromagnetic force in electromagnetic forming process of metal sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Da; Liu, Xuesong; Fang, Kun; Fang, Hongyuan

    2010-06-01

    Electromagnetic forming (EMF) is a forming process that relies on the inductive electromagnetic force to deform metallic workpiece at high speed. Calculation of the electromagnetic force is essential to understand the EMF process. However, accurate calculation requires complex numerical solution, in which the coupling between the electromagnetic process and the deformation of workpiece needs be considered. In this paper, an appropriate formula has been developed to calculate the electromagnetic force in metal work-piece in the sheet EMF process. The effects of the geometric size of coil, the material properties, and the parameters of discharge circuit on electromagnetic force are taken into consideration. Through the formula, the electromagnetic force at different time and in different positions of the workpiece can be predicted. The calculated electromagnetic force and magnetic field are in good agreement with the numerical and experimental results. The accurate prediction of the electromagnetic force provides an insight into the physical process of the EMF and a powerful tool to design optimum EMF systems.

  9. Wolf-Rayet phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of stars showing Wolf-Rayet phenomena are outlined along with the direction of future work. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of W-R spectra. Specifically the following topics are covered: the absolute visual magnitudes; the heterogeneity of WN spectra; the existence of transition type spectra and compositions the mass loss rates; and the existence of very luminous and possibly very massive W-R stars. Also, a brief overview of current understanding of the theoretical aspects of stellar evolution and stellar winds and the various scenarios that have been proposed to understand W-R spectra are included.

  10. Electromagnetic pulses bone healing booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintea, S. R.; Pomazan, V. M.; Bica, D.; Grebenisan, D.; Bordea, N.

    2015-11-01

    Posttraumatic bone restoration triggered by the need to assist and stimulate compensatory bone growth in periodontal condition. Recent studies state that specific electromagnetic stimulation can boost the bone restoration, reaching up to 30% decrease in recovery time. Based on the existing data on the electromagnetic parameters, a digital electronic device is proposed for intra oral mounting and bone restoration stimulation in periodontal condition. The electrical signal is applied to an inductive mark that will create and impregnate magnetic field in diseased tissue. The device also monitors the status of the electromagnetic field. Controlled wave forms and pulse frequency signal at programmable intervals are obtained with optimized number of components and miniaturized using surface mounting devices (SMD) circuits and surface mounting technology (SMT), with enhanced protection against abnormal current growth, given the intra-oral environment. The system is powered by an autonomous power supply (battery), to limit the problems caused by powering medical equipment from the main power supply. Currently the device is used in clinical testing, in cycles of six up to twelve months. Basic principles for the electrical scheme and algorithms for pulse generation, pulse control, electromagnetic field control and automation of current monitoring are presented, together with the friendly user interface, suitable for medical data and patient monitoring.

  11. Phenomena Associated with EIT Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We discuss phenomena associated with 'EIT Wave' transients. These phenomena include coronal mass ejections, flares, EUV/SXR dimmings, chromospheric waves, Moreton waves, solar energetic particle events, energetic electron events, and radio signatures. Although the occurrence of many phenomena correlate with the appearance of EIT waves, it is difficult to infer which associations are causal. The presentation will include a discussion of correlation surveys of these phenomena.

  12. Phenomena Associated With EIT Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Biesecker, D. A.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss phenomena associated with "EIT Wave" transients. These phenomena include coronal mass ejections, flares, EUV/SXR dimmings, chromospheric waves, Moreton waves, solar energetic particle events, energetic electron events, and radio signatures. Although the occurrence of many phenomena correlate with the appearance of EIT waves, it is difficult to mfer which associations are causal. The presentation will include a discussion of correlation surveys of these phenomena.

  13. Electromagnetic topology: Characterization of internal electromagnetic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmantier, J. P.; Aparicio, J. P.; Faure, F.

    1991-01-01

    The main principles are presented of a method dealing with the resolution of electromagnetic internal problems: Electromagnetic Topology. A very interesting way is to generalize the multiconductor transmission line network theory to the basic equation of the Electromagnetic Topology: the BLT equation. This generalization is illustrated by the treatment of an aperture as a four port junction. Analytical and experimental derivations of the scattering parameters are presented. These concepts are used to study the electromagnetic coupling in a scale model of an aircraft, and can be seen as a convenient means to test internal electromagnetic interference.

  14. Study on magnetic force of electromagnetic levitation circular knitting machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. G.; Zhang, C.; Xu, X. S.; Zhang, J. G.; Yan, N.; Zhang, G. Z.

    2018-06-01

    The structure of the driving coil and the electromagnetic force of the test prototype of electromagnetic-levitation (EL) circular knitting machine are studied. In this paper, the driving coil’s structure and working principle of the EL circular knitting machine are firstly introduced, then the mathematical modelling analysis of the driving electromagnetic force is carried out, and through the Ansoft Maxwell finite element simulation software the coil’s magnetic induction intensity and the needle’s electromagnetic force is simulated, finally an experimental platform is built to measure the coil’s magnetic induction intensity and the needle’s electromagnetic force. The results show that the theoretical analysis, the simulation analysis and the results of the test are very close, which proves the correctness of the proposed model.

  15. Crystallization phenomena in slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrling, Carl Folke

    2000-09-01

    The crystallization of the mold slag affects both the heat transfer and the lubrication between the mold and the strand in continuous casting of steel. In order for mold slag design to become an engineering science rather than an empirical exercise, a fundamental understanding of the melting and solidification behavior of a slag must be developed. Thus it is necessary to be able to quantify the phenomena that occur under the thermal conditions that are found in the mold of a continuous caster. The double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT) and the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope used in this study are two novel techniques for investigating melting and solidification phenomena of transparent slags. Results from these techniques are useful in defining the phenomena that occur when the slag film infiltrates between the mold and the shell of the casting. TTT diagrams were obtained for various slags and indicated that the onset of crystallization is a function of cooling rate and slag chemistry. Crystal morphology was found to be dependent upon the experimental temperature and four different morphologies were classified based upon the degree of melt undercooling. Continuous cooling experiments were carried out to develop CCT diagrams and it was found that the amount and appearance of the crystalline fraction greatly depends on the cooling conditions. The DHTT can also be used to mimic the cooling profile encountered by the slag in the mold of a continuous caster. In this differential cooling mode (DCT), it was found that the details of the cooling rate determine the actual response of the slag to a thermal gradient and small changes can lead to significantly different results. Crystal growth rates were measured and found to be in the range between 0.11 mum/s to 11.73 mum/s depending on temperature and slag chemistry. Alumina particles were found to be effective innoculants in oxide melts reducing the incubation time for the onset of crystallization and also extending

  16. Induction voidmeter

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Brewer, John

    1986-01-01

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge circuit, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  17. Induction voidmeter

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Brewer, J.

    1983-12-21

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; means for applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and means for detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  18. Similarity, Induction, Naming, and Categorization (SINC): Generalization or Inductive Reasoning? Reply to Heit and Hayes (2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloutsky, Vladimir M.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a response to E. Heit and B. K. Hayes's comment on the target article "Induction and Categorization in Young Children: A Similarity-Based Model" (V. M. Sloutsky & A. V. Fisher, 2004a). The response discusses points of agreement and disagreement with Heit and Hayes; phenomena predicted by similarity, induction, naming, and…

  19. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  20. Foot morphometric phenomena.

    PubMed

    Agić, Ante

    2007-06-01

    Knowledge of the foot morphometry is important for proper foot structure and function. Foot structure as a vital part of human body is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric and morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical descriptors in order to fully characterize foot functionality. For Croatian student population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot morphometric descriptors are influenced by many factors, such as life style, climate, and things of great importance in human society. Dominant descriptors related to fit and comfort are determined by the use 3D foot shape and advanced foot biomechanics. Some practical recommendations and conclusions for medical, sportswear and footwear practice are highlighted.

  1. Autoimmune phenomena following prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Tweezer-Zaks, Nurit; Marai, Ibrahim; Livneh, Avi; Bank, Ilan; Langevitz, Pnina

    2005-09-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy is the most common benign tumor in males, resulting in prostatectomy in 20-30% of men who live to the age of 80. There are no data on the association of prostatectomy with autoimmune phenomena in the English-language medical literature. To report our experience with three patients who developed autoimmune disease following prostatectomy. Three patients presented awith autoimmune phenomenon soon after a prostectomy for BPH or prostatic carcinoma: one had clinically diagnosed temporal arteritis, one had leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and the third patient developed sensory Guillian-Barré syndrome following prostatectomy. In view of the temporal association between the removal of the prostate gland andthe autoimmune process, combined with previously known immunohistologic features of BPH, a cause-effect relationship probably exists.

  2. Electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolm, H.; Mongeau, P.; Williams, F.

    1980-09-01

    Recent advances in energy storage, switching and magnet technology make electromagnetic acceleration a viable alternative to chemical propulsion for certain tasks, and a means to perform other tasks not previously feasible. Applications include the acceleration of gram-size particles for hypervelocity research and the initiation of fusion by impact, a replacement for chemically propelled artillery, the transportation of cargo and personnel over inaccessible terrain, and the launching of space vehicles to supply massive space operations, and for the disposal of nuclear waste. The simplest launcher of interest is the railgun, in which a short-circuit slide or an arc is driven along two rails by direct current. The most sophisticated studied thus far is the mass driver, in which a superconducting shuttle bucket is accelerated by a line of pulse coils energized by capacitors at energy conversion efficiencies better than 90%. Other accelerators of interest include helical, brush-commutated motors, discrete coil arc commutated drivers, flux compression momentum transformers, and various hybrid electrochemical devices.

  3. Teaching wave phenomena via biophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel; Robbins, Mark; Leheny, Robert; Wonnell, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Over the past several years we have developed a two-semester second-year physics course sequence for students in the biosciences, tailored in part to the needs of undergraduate biophysics majors. One semester, ``Biological Physics,'' is based on the book of that name by P. Nelson. This talk will focus largely on the other semester, ``Wave Phenomena with Biophysical Applications,'' where we provide a novel introduction to the physics of waves, primarily through the study of experimental probes used in the biosciences that depend on the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. Topic covered include: Fourier analysis, sound and hearing, diffraction - culminating in an analysis of x-ray fiber diffraction and its use in the determination of the structure of DNA - geometrical and physical optics, the physics of modern light microscopy, NMR and MRI. Laboratory exercises tailored to this course will also be described.

  4. Visualization of bioelectric phenomena.

    PubMed

    Palmer, T C; Simpson, E V; Kavanagh, K M; Smith, W M

    1992-01-01

    Biomedical investigators are currently able to acquire and analyze physiological and anatomical data from three-dimensional structures in the body. Often, multiple kinds of data can be recorded simultaneously. The usefulness of this information, either for exploratory viewing or for presentation to others, is limited by the lack of techniques to display it in intuitive, accessible formats. Unfortunately, the complexity of scientific visualization techniques and the inflexibility of commercial packages deter investigators from using sophisticated visualization methods that could provide them added insight into the mechanisms of the phenomena under study. Also, the sheer volume of such data is a problem. High-performance computing resources are often required for storage and processing, in addition to visualization. This chapter describes a novel, language-based interface that allows scientists with basic programming skills to classify and render multivariate volumetric data with a modest investment in software training. The interface facilitates data exploration by enabling experimentation with various algorithms to compute opacity and color from volumetric data. The value of the system is demonstrated using data from cardiac mapping studies, in which multiple electrodes are placed in an on the heart to measure the cardiac electrical activity intrinsic to the heart and its response to external stimulation.

  5. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  6. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  7. ELECTRICAL PHENOMENA IN NERVE

    PubMed Central

    Shanes, Abraham M.

    1949-01-01

    The action of a number of agents, which may be classified as "stabilizers" and "unstabilizers" on the electrical oscillations and after-potentials in the squid giant axon has been examined. The effects on the spike, "positive overshoot," and "potassium potential" were also observed, but where possible concentrations were employed which left these phenomena unaltered. Veratrine augmented the oscillations and the negative after-potential, particularly with repetitive stimulation. Yohimbine caused a small long lasting positive after-potential and depressed the oscillations, effects also enhanced with repetitive activity. Cocaine and procaine suppressed the oscillations and the negative after-potential but DDT was completely inert. An elevation in the medium calcium depressed the oscillations and the naturally occurring negative after-potential; negative after-potentials induced with veratrine were increased by calcium. A decrease in the potassium augmented the oscillations and the negative after-potential. A hypothesis is presented in which these effects are interpreted in terms of potassium concentration at the fiber surface as regulated by a labile permeability and metabolism. This is discussed in relation to the available evidence for these factors. It is a pleasure to acknowledge the author's indebtedness to Dr. D. E. S. Brown, Director, and to his staff at the Bermuda Biological Station for Research for the cooperation and special facilities provided during the initiation of this work. Dr. T. Baylor of Princeton University very kindly provided the camera and film used in Bermuda. PMID:18139008

  8. Megawatt Electromagnetic Plasma Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Lapointe, Michael; Mikellides, Pavlos

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center program in megawatt level electric propulsion is centered on electromagnetic acceleration of quasi-neutral plasmas. Specific concepts currently being examined are the Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT). In the case of the MPD thruster, a multifaceted approach of experiments, computational modeling, and systems-level models of self field MPD thrusters is underway. The MPD thruster experimental research consists of a 1-10 MWe, 2 ms pulse-forming-network, a vacuum chamber with two 32 diffusion pumps, and voltage, current, mass flow rate, and thrust stand diagnostics. Current focus is on obtaining repeatable thrust measurements of a Princeton Benchmark type self field thruster operating at 0.5-1 gls of argon. Operation with hydrogen is the ultimate goal to realize the increased efficiency anticipated using the lighter gas. Computational modeling is done using the MACH2 MHD code, which can include real gas effects for propellants of interest to MPD operation. The MACH2 code has been benchmarked against other MPD thruster data, and has been used to create a point design for a 3000 second specific impulse (Isp) MPD thruster. This design is awaiting testing in the experimental facility. For the PIT, a computational investigation using MACH2 has been initiated, with experiments awaiting further funding. Although the calculated results have been found to be sensitive to the initial ionization assumptions, recent results have agreed well with experimental data. Finally, a systems level self-field MPD thruster model has been developed that allows for a mission planner or system designer to input Isp and power level into the model equations and obtain values for efficiency, mass flow rate, and input current and voltage. This model emphasizes algebraic simplicity to allow its incorporation into larger trajectory or system optimization codes. The systems level approach will be extended to the pulsed inductive

  9. EDITORIAL: Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loss, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Twenty years ago the Institute of Physics launched the journal Nanotechnology from its publishing house based in the home town of Paul Dirac, a legendary figure in the development of quantum mechanics at the turn of the last century. At the beginning of the 20th century, the adoption of quantum mechanical descriptions of events transformed the existing deterministic world view. But in many ways it also revolutionised the progress of research itself. For the first time since the 17th century when Francis Bacon established inductive reasoning as the means of advancing science from fact to axiom to law, theory was progressing ahead of experiments instead of providing explanations for observations that had already been made. Dirac's postulation of antimatter through purely theoretical investigation before its observation is the archetypal example of theory leading the way for experiment. The progress of nanotechnology and the development of tools and techniques that enabled the investigation of systems at the nanoscale brought with them many fascinating observations of phenomena that could only be explained through quantum mechanics, first theoretically deduced decades previously. At the nanoscale, quantum confinement effects dominate the electrical and optical properties of systems. They also render new opportunities for manipulating the response of systems. For example, a better understanding of these systems has enabled the rapid development of quantum dots with precisely determined properties, which can be exploited in a range of applications from medical imaging and photovoltaic solar cells to quantum computation, a radically new information technology being currently developed in many labs worldwide. As the first ever academic journal in nanotechnology, {\\it Nanotechnology} has been the forum for papers detailing progress of the science through extremely exciting times. In the early years of the journal, the investigation of electron spin led to the formulation

  10. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  11. Transport phenomena in environmental engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Aleksandra; Kardum, Jasna Prlić; Matijašić, Gordana; Žižek, Krunoslav

    2018-01-01

    A term transport phenomena arises as a second paradigm at the end of 1950s with high awareness that there was a strong need to improve the scoping of chemical engineering science. At that point, engineers became highly aware that it is extremely important to take step forward from pure empirical description and the concept of unit operations only to understand the specific process using phenomenological equations that rely on three elementary physical processes: momentum, energy and mass transport. This conceptual evolution of chemical engineering was first presented with a well-known book of R. Byron Bird, Warren E. Stewart and Edwin N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, published in 1960 [1]. What transport phenomena are included in environmental engineering? It is hard to divide those phenomena through different engineering disciplines. The core is the same but the focus changes. Intention of the authors here is to present the transport phenomena that are omnipresent in treatment of various process streams. The focus in this chapter is made on the transport phenomena that permanently occur in mechanical macroprocesses of sedimentation and filtration for separation in solid-liquid particulate systems and on the phenomena of the flow through a fixed and a fluidized bed of particles that are immanent in separation processes in packed columns and in environmental catalysis. The fundamental phenomena for each thermal and equilibrium separation process technology are presented as well. Understanding and mathematical description of underlying transport phenomena result in scoping the separation processes in a way that ChEs should act worldwide.

  12. How Do Pre-Service Teachers Picture Various Electromagnetic Phenomenon? A Qualitative Study of Pre-Service Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Fundamental Electromagnetic Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes the nature of pre-service teachers' conceptual models of various electromagnetic phenomena, specifically electrical current, electrical resistance, and light/matter interactions. This is achieved through the students answering the three questions on electromagnetism using a free response approach including both verbal and…

  13. Multiphysics analysis of liquid metal annular linear induction pumps: A project overview

    SciTech Connect

    Maidana, Carlos Omar; Nieminen, Juha E.

    Liquid metal-cooled fission reactors are both moderated and cooled by a liquid metal solution. These reactors are typically very compact and they can be used in regular electric power production, for naval and space propulsion systems or in fission surface power systems for planetary exploration. The coupling between the electromagnetics and thermo-fluid mechanical phenomena observed in liquid metal thermo-magnetic systems for nuclear and space applications gives rise to complex engineering magnetohydrodynamics and numerical problems. It is known that electromagnetic pumps have a number of advantages over rotating mechanisms: absence of moving parts, low noise and vibration level, simplicity of flowmore » rate regulation, easy maintenance and so on. However, while developing annular linear induction pumps, we are faced with a significant problem of magnetohydrodynamic instability arising in the device. The complex flow behavior in this type of devices includes a time-varying Lorentz force and pressure pulsation due to the time-varying electromagnetic fields and the induced convective currents that originates from the liquid metal flow, leading to instability problems along the device geometry. The determinations of the geometry and electrical configuration of liquid metal thermo-magnetic devices give rise to a complex inverse magnetohydrodynamic field problem were techniques for global optimization should be used, magnetohydrodynamics instabilities understood –or quantified- and multiphysics models developed and analyzed. Lastly, we present a project overview as well as a few computational models developed to study liquid metal annular linear induction pumps using first principles and the a few results of our multi-physics analysis.« less

  14. Multiphysics analysis of liquid metal annular linear induction pumps: A project overview

    DOE PAGES

    Maidana, Carlos Omar; Nieminen, Juha E.

    2016-03-14

    Liquid metal-cooled fission reactors are both moderated and cooled by a liquid metal solution. These reactors are typically very compact and they can be used in regular electric power production, for naval and space propulsion systems or in fission surface power systems for planetary exploration. The coupling between the electromagnetics and thermo-fluid mechanical phenomena observed in liquid metal thermo-magnetic systems for nuclear and space applications gives rise to complex engineering magnetohydrodynamics and numerical problems. It is known that electromagnetic pumps have a number of advantages over rotating mechanisms: absence of moving parts, low noise and vibration level, simplicity of flowmore » rate regulation, easy maintenance and so on. However, while developing annular linear induction pumps, we are faced with a significant problem of magnetohydrodynamic instability arising in the device. The complex flow behavior in this type of devices includes a time-varying Lorentz force and pressure pulsation due to the time-varying electromagnetic fields and the induced convective currents that originates from the liquid metal flow, leading to instability problems along the device geometry. The determinations of the geometry and electrical configuration of liquid metal thermo-magnetic devices give rise to a complex inverse magnetohydrodynamic field problem were techniques for global optimization should be used, magnetohydrodynamics instabilities understood –or quantified- and multiphysics models developed and analyzed. Lastly, we present a project overview as well as a few computational models developed to study liquid metal annular linear induction pumps using first principles and the a few results of our multi-physics analysis.« less

  15. Simulations of Biomechanical Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Jose Cruz

    Recent studies have published breakthroughs in the application of finite element (FEA) studies in the design and analysis of advanced orthodontics. However, FEA has not captured bone remodeling responses to advanced orthodontics. The results of these simulations report unrealistic displacement around the nasal bridge, which impeded correlation with clinical data. Bone remodeling has been previously documented in FEA and has shown bone response to mechanical stimulus in femur bone models. However, the relationship between mechanical stimulus and bone remodeling has not been reported in orthodontic studies due to the complexity of the skull. In the current study, strain energy is used as the mechanical stimulus to control remodeling, from which density and modulus evolve. Due to the localization of forces in orthodontics, current remodeling algorithms have limited application. In turn, we developed an algorithm that dynamically collects, sorts, and bins stresses in all elements for regional remodeling based on the proximity of the element to the load. The results demonstrate that bone response to orthodontic appliances is different than that of an FEA without bone remodeling, due to load path changes based upon evolution of the bone properties. It was also found that density and moduli proximal to the load application site exhibit faster remodeling than those located remotely. Modeling another biomechanical phenomena, a 3D simulation was created to simulate recent experimental results that discovered a difference in impact mitigation properties of dense-polymer/foam bilayer structure based on the orientation of the dense-polymer with respect to the impact site. The impact energy transmitted varied in time of arrival and amplitude depending on the orientation of the structure (thin layer up or down). By creating a 3D explicit dynamic FEA simulation, it is expected to reduce costly experiments and time consumed in set up, and offer opportunities for optimization for

  16. Labor Induction

    MedlinePlus

    ... many contractions may lead to changes in the fetal heart rate, umbilical cord problems, and other problems. Other risks of cervical ripening and labor induction include the following: • Infection in the mother or fetus • Uterine rupture • Increased risk of cesarean birth • Fetal ...

  17. Aircraft Electromagnetic Compatibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields , 300 KiloHertz to 100 GigaHertz." 6. ARINC 429-8, "Digital Information Transfer System (DITS...142 V EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Aircraft Electromagnetic Compatibility guidelines document deals with electromagnetic compatibility in a... electromagnetic interference paths (figure EI. TYPE PATH 400 Hz Electrostatic MagneticCharge Electric Field Transients 5 R d t Coupling 150/i 300o Wire

  18. Nursing phenomena in inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, F; Müller-Staub, M; Needham, I; Van Achterberg, T

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about the question if the nursing diagnosis classification of North American Nursing Association-International (NANDA-I) describes the adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. The present study aimed to identify nursing phenomena mentioned in journal articles about the psychiatric inpatient nursing care and to compare these phenomena with the labels and the definitions of the nursing diagnoses to elucidate how well this classification covers these phenomena. A search of journal articles took place in the databases MedLine, PsychInfo, Cochrane and CINAHL. A qualitative content analysis approach was used to identify nursing phenomena in the articles. Various phenomena were found in the articles. The study demonstrated that NANDA-I describes essential phenomena for the adult inpatient psychiatry on the level of labels and definitions. However, some apparently important nursing phenomena are not covered by the labels or definitions of NANDA-I. Other phenomena are assigned as defining characteristics or as related factors to construct nursing diagnoses. The further development of the classification NANDA-I will strengthen the application in the daily work of psychiatric nurses and enhance the quality of nursing care in the inpatient setting. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  19. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  20. Electromagnetic Education in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajpai, Shrish; Asif, Siddiqui Sajida; Akhtar, Syed Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Out of the four fundamental interactions in nature, electromagnetics is one of them along with gravitation, strong interaction and weak interaction. The field of electromagnetics has made much of the modern age possible. Electromagnets are common in day-to-day appliances and are becoming more conventional as the need for technology increases.…

  1. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  2. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 - 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along the

  3. Multimode electromagnetic target discriminator: preliminary data results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Christopher J.; McMichael, Ian T.; Nelson, Carl V.

    2004-09-01

    This paper describes the Multi-mode Electromagnetic Target Discriminator (METD) sensor and presents preliminary results from recent field experiments. The METD sensor was developed for the US Army RDECOM NVESD by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The METD, based on the technology of the previously developed Electromagnetic Target Discriminator (ETD), is a spatial scanning electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor that uses both the time-domain (TD) and the frequency-domain (FD) for target detection and classification. Data is collected with a custom data acquisition system and wirelessly transmitted to a base computer. We show that the METD has a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the ability to detect voids created by plastic anti-tank (AT) mines, and is practical for near real-time data processing.

  4. Electromagnetic Levitation: A Useful Tool in Microgravity Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szekely, Julian; Schwartz, Elliot; Hyers, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic levitation is one area of the electromagnetic processing of materials that has uses for both fundamental research and practical applications. This technique was successfully used on the Space Shuttle Columbia during the Spacelab IML-2 mission in July 1994 as a platform for accurately measuring the surface tensions of liquid metals and alloys. In this article, we discuss the key transport phenomena associated with electromagnetic levitation, the fundamental relationships associated with thermophysical property measurement that can be made using this technique, reasons for working in microgravity, and some of the results obtained from the microgravity experiments.

  5. Toward Understanding Astrophysical Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Jing

    2015-06-01

    algorithm also has the flexibility to trigger electromagnetic (EM) observation before the merger. The key to the efficiency of our algorithm arises from the use of chains of so-called Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filters, which filter time-series data recursively. Computational cost is further reduced by a template interpolation technique that requires filtering to be done only for a much coarser template bank than otherwise required to sufficiently recover optimal signal-to-noise ratio. Towards future detectors with sensitivity extending to lower frequencies, our algorithm's computational cost is shown to increase rather insignificantly compared to the conventional time-domain correlation method. Moreover, at latencies of less than hundreds to thousands of seconds, this method is expected to be computationally more efficient than the straightforward frequency-domain method. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  6. Transient interaction model of electromagnetic field generated by lightning current pulses and human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iváncsy, T.; Kiss, I.; Szücs, L.; Tamus, Z. Á.

    2015-10-01

    The lightning current generates time-varying magnetic field near the down- conductor and the down-conductors are mounted on the wall of the buildings where residential places might be situated. It is well known that the rapidly changing magnetic fields can generate dangerous eddy currents in the human body.The higher duration and gradient of the magnetic field can cause potentially life threatening cardiac stimulation. The coupling mechanism between the electromagnetic field and the human body is based on a well-known physical phenomena (e.g. Faradays law of induction). However, the calculation of the induced current is very complicated because the shape of the organs is complex and the determination of the material properties of living tissues is difficult, as well. Our previous study revealed that the cardiac stimulation is independent of the rising time of the lightning current and only the peak of the current counts. In this study, the authors introduce an improved model of the interaction of electromagnetic fields of lighting current near down-conductor and human body. Our previous models are based on the quasi stationer field calculations, the new improved model is a transient model. This is because the magnetic field around the down-conductor and in the human body can be determined more precisely, therefore the dangerous currents in the body can be estimated.

  7. A multiphysics and multiscale model for low frequency electromagnetic direct-chill casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košnik, N.; Guštin, A. Z.; Mavrič, B.; Šarler, B.

    2016-03-01

    Simulation and control of macrosegregation, deformation and grain size in low frequency electromagnetic (EM) direct-chill casting (LFEMC) is important for downstream processing. Respectively, a multiphysics and multiscale model is developed for solution of Lorentz force, temperature, velocity, concentration, deformation and grain structure of LFEMC processed aluminum alloys, with focus on axisymmetric billets. The mixture equations with lever rule, linearized phase diagram, and stationary thermoelastic solid phase are assumed, together with EM induction equation for the field imposed by the coil. Explicit diffuse approximate meshless solution procedure [1] is used for solving the EM field, and the explicit local radial basis function collocation method [2] is used for solving the coupled transport phenomena and thermomechanics fields. Pressure-velocity coupling is performed by the fractional step method [3]. The point automata method with modified KGT model is used to estimate the grain structure [4] in a post-processing mode. Thermal, mechanical, EM and grain structure outcomes of the model are demonstrated. A systematic study of the complicated influences of the process parameters can be investigated by the model, including intensity and frequency of the electromagnetic field. The meshless solution framework, with the implemented simplest physical models, will be further extended by including more sophisticated microsegregation and grain structure models, as well as a more realistic solid and solid-liquid phase rheology.

  8. Velocity damper for electromagnetically levitated materials

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.

    1994-06-07

    A system for damping oscillatory and spinning motions induced in an electromagnetically levitated material is disclosed. Two opposed field magnets are located orthogonally to the existing levitation coils for providing a DC quadrupole field (cusp field) around the material. The material used for generating the DC quadrupole field must be nonconducting to avoid eddy-current heating and of low magnetic permeability to avoid distorting the induction fields providing the levitation. 1 fig.

  9. Velocity damper for electromagnetically levitated materials

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    A system for damping oscillatory and spinning motions induced in an electromagnetically levitated material. Two opposed field magnets are located orthogonally to the existing levitation coils for providing a DC quadrupole field (cusp field) around the material. The material used for generating the DC quadrupole field must be nonconducting to avoid eddy-current heating and of low magnetic permeability to avoid distorting the induction fields providing the levitation.

  10. Spectral perspective on the electromagnetic activity of cells.

    PubMed

    Kučera, Ondrej; Červinková, Kateřina; Nerudová, Michaela; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    In this mini-review, we summarize the current hypotheses, theories and experimental evidence concerning the electromagnetic activity of living cells. We systematically classify the bio-electromagnetic phenomena in terms of frequency and we assess their general acceptance in scientific community. We show that the electromagnetic activity of cells is well established in the low frequency range below 1 kHz and on optical wavelengths, while there is only limited evidence for bio-electromagnetic processes in radio- frequency and millimeter-wave ranges. This lack of generally accepted theory or trustful experimental results is the cause for controversy which accompanies this topic. We conclude our review with the discussion of the relevance of the electromagnetic activity of cells to human medicine.

  11. Sensing network for electromagnetic fields generated by seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Bambakidis, Gust; Ternovskiy, Igor V.

    2014-06-01

    The sensors network is becoming prolific and play now increasingly more important role in acquiring and processing information. Cyber-Physical Systems are focusing on investigation of integrated systems that includes sensing, networking, and computations. The physics of the seismic measurement and electromagnetic field measurement requires special consideration how to design electromagnetic field measurement networks for both research and detection earthquakes and explosions along with the seismic measurement networks. In addition, the electromagnetic sensor network itself could be designed and deployed, as a research tool with great deal of flexibility, the placement of the measuring nodes must be design based on systematic analysis of the seismic-electromagnetic interaction. In this article, we review the observations of the co-seismic electromagnetic field generated by earthquakes and man-made sources such as vibrations and explosions. The theoretical investigation allows the distribution of sensor nodes to be optimized and could be used to support existing geological networks. The placement of sensor nodes have to be determined based on physics of electromagnetic field distribution above the ground level. The results of theoretical investigations of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena are considered in Section I. First, we compare the relative contribution of various types of mechano-electromagnetic mechanisms and then analyze in detail the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by piezomagnetic and electrokinetic effects.

  12. Induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Whitney H.

    1980-01-01

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizing a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  13. Compact, Low-Noise Magnetic Sensor with Fluxgate (DC) and Induction (AC) Modes of Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    induction sensor and the fluxgate magnetometer . ......................................... 2 Figure 3.1 - Impulse response of a 4” long coil (#6...Block diagram of the Year 2, Task 2 fluxgate magnetometer . ................................... 6 Figure 3.3 - FIS-prototype magnetic-field...and demonstrated an innovative dual-mode, fluxgate -induction sensor (FIS) that combines a fluxgate magnetometer and an electromagnetic (EM) induction

  14. Building health: The need for electromagnetic hygiene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, Isaac A.; Holdstock, Paul; ApSimon, Helen M.; Bell, J. Nigel B.

    2010-04-01

    Whilst the electromagnetic nature of the built environment has changed considerably over the past century, little thought is at present given to the possible advantages of creating electromagnetic microenvironments that more closely resemble those found in nature and/or developing biologically-friendly technology aligned more closely to its operating principles. This review paper examines how more natural exposures to a variety of electromagnetic phenomena could be re-introduced into the built environment, possible benefits that might arise, and discusses the extent to which there may be tangible benefits obtainable from introducing more rigorous properly considered electromagnetic hygiene measures. Amongst the matters discussed are: the effects of different materials, finishes and electrical items on charge generation (and the effects of excess charge on contaminant deposition); the possible benefits of suitably grounding conductive objects (including humans) in order to reduce excess charge and contaminant deposition; how the presence of vertical electric field regimes, similar to those found in nature, may enhance biological performance; and possible pitfalls to avoid when seeking to introduce appropriate electromagnetic hygiene regimes.

  15. Integrating Effective Pedagogies in Science Education with a Design of Alternative Experiments on Electromagnetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Shaona; Yeung, Yau-Yuen; Wang, Yanlin; Wang, Xiaojun; Xiao, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Learning electromagnetics often involves dealing with problems with strong mathematical skills or thinking about problems in abstract and multiple spaces. Moreover, many students are often unable to explain some related physical phenomena using the appropriate electromagnetic principles. In this paper, we report on integrating two effective…

  16. Measurement and control systems for an imaging electromagnetic flow metre.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y Y; Lucas, G; Leeungculsatien, T

    2014-03-01

    Electromagnetic flow metres based on the principles of Faraday's laws of induction have been used successfully in many industries. The conventional electromagnetic flow metre can measure the mean liquid velocity in axisymmetric single phase flows. However, in order to achieve velocity profile measurements in single phase flows with non-uniform velocity profiles, a novel imaging electromagnetic flow metre (IEF) has been developed which is described in this paper. The novel electromagnetic flow metre which is based on the 'weight value' theory to reconstruct velocity profiles is interfaced with a 'Microrobotics VM1' microcontroller as a stand-alone unit. The work undertaken in the paper demonstrates that an imaging electromagnetic flow metre for liquid velocity profile measurement is an instrument that is highly suited for control via a microcontroller. © 2013 ISA Published by ISA All rights reserved.

  17. A Hamiltonian electromagnetic gyrofluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waelbroeck, F. L.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Morrison, P. J.

    2009-11-01

    An isothermal truncation of the electromagnetic gyrofluid model of Snyder and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 8, 3199 (2001)] is shown to be Hamiltonian. The corresponding noncanonical Lie-Poisson bracket and its Casimir invariants are presented. The model describes the evolution of the density, the electrostatic potential, and the component of the vector potential along a strong background field. This makes it suitable for describing such phenomena as the propagation of kinetic-Alfv'en modons, the nonlinear saturation of drift-tearing modes, and the diamagnetic stabilization of the internal kink. The invariants are used to obtain a set of coupled Grad-Shafranov equations describing equilibria and propagating coherent structures. They also lead to a Lagrangian formulation of the equations of motion that is well suited to solution with the PIC method.

  18. Information Architecture without Internal Theory: An Inductive Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverty, Marsha

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that information architecture design is primarily an inductive process, partly because it lacks internal theory and partly because it is an activity that supports emergent phenomena (user experiences) from basic design components. Suggests a resemblance to Constructive Induction, a design process that locates the best representational…

  19. Electromagnetic braking for Mars spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Aerobraking concepts are being studied to improve performance and cost effectiveness of propulsion systems for Mars landers and Mars interplanetary spacecraft. Access to megawatt power levels (nuclear power coupled to high-storage inductive or capacitive devices) on a manned Mars interplanetary spacecraft may make feasible electromagnetic braking and lift modulation techniques which were previously impractical. Using pulsed microwave and magnetic field technology, potential plasmadynamic braking and hydromagnetic lift modulation techniques have been identified. Entry corridor modulation to reduce loads and heating, to reduce vertical descent rates, and to expand horizontal and lateral landing ranges are possible benefits. In-depth studies are needed to identify specific design concepts for feasibility assessments. Standing wave/plasma sheath interaction techniques appear to be promising. The techniques may require some tailoring of spacecraft external structures and materials. In addition, rapid response guidance and control systems may require the use of structurally embedded sensors coupled to expert systems or to artificial intelligence systems.

  20. Electromagnetic Interference Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (300 kHz - 100 GHz), American National Standards Institute...Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (300 kHz - 100 GHz), American National Standards Institute, C95.1-1982, 30 July 1980...II il~l I!I 11 lll i 13. ABSTkACT (Waxlrnun 200woruh) This TOP is a general guideline for electromagnetic interference testing of electronic

  1. Teaching optical phenomena with Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a relatively complex setup. Fortunately, nowadays it is possible to analyse optical phenomena in a simple and quantitative way using the freeware video analysis software ‘Tracker’. In this paper, we show the advantages of video-based experimental activities for teaching concepts in optics. We intend to show: (a) how easy the study of such phenomena can be, even at home, because only simple materials are needed, and Tracker provides the necessary measuring instruments; and (b) how we can use Tracker to improve students’ understanding of some optical concepts. We give examples using video modelling to study the laws of reflection, Snell’s laws, focal distances in lenses and mirrors, and diffraction phenomena, which we hope will motivate teachers to implement it in their own classes and schools.

  2. Mathematical methods of studying physical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, substantial theoretical and experimental progress was achieved in understanding the quantum nature of physical phenomena that serves as the foundation of present and future quantum technologies. Quantum correlations like the entanglement of the states of composite systems, the phenomenon of quantum discord, which captures other aspects of quantum correlations, quantum contextuality and, connected with these phenomena, uncertainty relations for conjugate variables and entropies, like Shannon and Rényi entropies, and the inequalities for spin states, like Bell inequalities, reflect the recently understood quantum properties of micro and macro systems. The mathematical methods needed to describe all quantum phenomena mentioned above were also the subject of intense studies in the end of the last, and beginning of the new, century. In this section of CAMOP 'Mathematical Methods of Studying Physical Phenomena' new results and new trends in the rapidly developing domain of quantum (and classical) physics are presented. Among the particular topics under discussion there are some reviews on the problems of dynamical invariants and their relations with symmetries of the physical systems. In fact, this is a very old problem of both classical and quantum systems, e.g. the systems of parametric oscillators with time-dependent parameters, like Ermakov systems, which have specific constants of motion depending linearly or quadratically on the oscillator positions and momenta. Such dynamical invariants play an important role in studying the dynamical Casimir effect, the essence of the effect being the creation of photons from the vacuum in a cavity with moving boundaries due to the presence of purely quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field in the vacuum. It is remarkable that this effect was recently observed experimentally. The other new direction in developing the mathematical approach in physics is quantum tomography that provides a new vision of

  3. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  4. Electromagnetically Operated Counter

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, H D; Goldberg, M I

    1951-12-18

    An electromagnetically operated counter wherein signals to be counted are applied to cause stepwise rotation of a rotatable element which is connected to a suitable register. The mechanism involved consists of a rotatable armature having three spaced cores of magnetic material and a pair of diametrically opposed electromagnets with a suitable pulsing circuit to actuate the magnets.

  5. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, R.D.; Deis, G.A.

    1992-03-24

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles. 14 figs.

  6. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  7. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, Ross D.; Deis, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles.

  8. Linear induction pump

    DOEpatents

    Meisner, John W.; Moore, Robert M.; Bienvenue, Louis L.

    1985-03-19

    Electromagnetic linear induction pump for liquid metal which includes a unitary pump duct. The duct comprises two substantially flat parallel spaced-apart wall members, one being located above the other and two parallel opposing side members interconnecting the wall members. Located within the duct are a plurality of web members interconnecting the wall members and extending parallel to the side members whereby the wall members, side members and web members define a plurality of fluid passageways, each of the fluid passageways having substantially the same cross-sectional flow area. Attached to an outer surface of each side member is an electrically conductive end bar for the passage of an induced current therethrough. A multi-phase, electrical stator is located adjacent each of the wall members. The duct, stators, and end bars are enclosed in a housing which is provided with an inlet and outlet in fluid communication with opposite ends of the fluid passageways in the pump duct. In accordance with a preferred embodiment, the inlet and outlet includes a transition means which provides for a transition from a round cross-sectional flow path to a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow path defined by the pump duct.

  9. Visualizing Chemical Phenomena in Microdroplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Wiener, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Phenomena that occur in microdroplets are described to the undergraduate chemistry community. Droplets having a diameter in the micrometer range can have unique and interesting properties, which arise because of their small size and, especially, their high surface area-to-volume ratio. Students are generally unfamiliar with the characteristics of…

  10. A Course on Surface Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Donald R.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a graduate or senior elective course combining fundamentals of surface phenomena with practical problem-solving structured around a series of case problems. Discusses topics covered and their development through acquiring new knowledge applied to the case problem, practical calculations of solutions, and applications to additional…

  11. Electromagnetic homeostasis and the role of low-amplitude electromagnetic fields on life organization.

    PubMed

    De Ninno, Antonella; Pregnolato, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The appearance of endogenous electromagnetic fields in biological systems is a widely debated issue in modern science. The electrophysiological fields have very tiny intensities and it can be inferred that they are rapidly decreasing with the distance from the generating structure, vanishing at very short distances. This makes very hard their detection using standard experimental methods. However, the existence of fast-moving charged particles in the macromolecules inside both intracellular and extracellular fluids may envisage the generation of localized electric currents as well as the presence of closed loops, which implies the existence of magnetic fields. Moreover, the whole set of oscillatory frequencies of various substances, enzymes, cell membranes, nucleic acids, bioelectrical phenomena generated by the electrical rhythm of coherent groups of cells, cell-to-cell communication among population of host bacteria, forms the increasingly complex hierarchies of electromagnetic signals of different frequencies which cover the living being and represent a fundamental information network controlling the cell metabolism. From this approach emerges the concept of electromagnetic homeostasis: that is, the capability of the human body to maintain the balance of highly complex electromagnetic interactions within, in spite of the external electromagnetic noisy environment. This concept may have an important impact on the actual definitions of heal and disease.

  12. Influence of the aging process on the dealloying activity of an induction salt bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonenko, A. N.

    1992-12-01

    The process of dealloying of the surface of high-alloy steels in heating in induction salt baths with a graphite crucible is neutralized by the process of carburizing and electrochemical interaction in a high-frequency electromagnetic field.

  13. Using analog instruments in Tracker video-based experiments to understand the phenomena of electricity and magnetism in physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Marín, Pablo; Chavez-Bacilio, Mario; Jáuregui-Rosas, Segundo

    2018-05-01

    Tracker is a piece of freeware software, designed to use video recorded images of the motion of objects as input data, and has been mostly applied in physics education to analyse and simulate physical phenomena in mechanics. In this work we report the application of Tracker to the study of experiments in electricity and magnetism using analog instruments for electrical signal measurements. As we are unable to directly video-track the motion of electrons in electric circuits, the angular deflections of the instruments’ pointers were video captured instead. The kinematic variables (angular position as a function of time) had to be related to the electrical ones (voltages and currents as a function of time). Two well-known experiments in physics teaching, the RC circuit for charging and discharging a capacitor and Faraday electromagnetic induction, were chosen to illustrate the procedures. The third experiment analysed and modeled with Tracker was the rather well-known electromagnetic retardation of disk- or cylinder-shaped magnets falling inside non-magnetic metallic pipes. Instead of metallic pipes we used an aluminum plate with an arrangement of a couple of parallelepiped-shaped magnets falling parallel to the plate. In the three cases studied, the experimental and the Tracker simulation results were in very good agreement. These outcomes show that it is possible to exploit the potential of Tracker software in areas other than mechanics, in areas where electrical signals are involved. The experiments are inexpensive and simple to perform, and are suitable for high school and introductory undergraduate courses in electricity, magnetism and electronics. We propose the use of Tracker combined with analog measuring devices to explore further its applications in electricity, magnetism, electronics and in other experimental sciences where electrical signals are involved.

  14. Electromagnetically induced transparency with noisy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yanhong; Wang, Tun; Baryakhtar, Maria; van Camp, Mackenzie; Crescimanno, Michael; Hohensee, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Phillips, David F.; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Yelin, Susanne F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2009-10-01

    We demonstrate and characterize two coherent phenomena that can mitigate the effects of laser phase noise for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT): a laser-power-broadening-resistant resonance in the transmitted intensity cross correlation between EIT optical fields, and a resonant suppression of the conversion of laser phase noise to intensity noise when one-photon noise dominates over two-photon-detuning noise. Our experimental observations are in good agreement with both an intuitive physical picture and numerical calculations. The results have wide-ranging applications to spectroscopy, atomic clocks, and magnetometers.

  15. Vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, R.J.

    1984-08-01

    Vertical seismic profiling (VSP) is based upon reception measurements performed in a borehole with a source near the ground surface. This technology has seen a surge in application and development in the last decade. The analogous concept of vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEMP) consists of reception measurements performed in a borehole with a source near the ground surface. Although the electromagnetic concept has seen some application, this technology has not been as systematically developed and applied as VSP. Vertical electromagnetic profiling provides distinct and complementary data due to sensing different physical parameters than seismic profiling. Certain of the advantages of VEMPmore » are presented. 28 references, 7 figures.« less

  16. Numerical calculation of primary slot leakage inductance of a Single-sided HTS linear induction motor used for linear metro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Wen, Yinghong; Li, Weili; Fang, Jin; Cao, Junci; Zhang, Xiaochen; Lv, Gang

    2017-03-01

    In the paper, the numerical method calculating asymmetric primary slot leakage inductances of Single-sided High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) Linear Induction Motor (HTS LIM) is presented. The mathematical and geometric models of three-dimensional nonlinear transient electromagnetic field are established and the boundary conditions are also given. The established model is solved by time-stepping Finite Element Method (FEM). Then, the three-phase asymmetric primary slot leakage inductances under different operation conditions are calculated by using the obtained electromagnetic field distribution. The influences of the special effects such as longitudinal end effects, transversal edge effects, etc. on the primary slot leakage inductance are investigated. The presented numerical method is validated by experiments carried out on a 3.5 kW prototype with copper wires which has the same structures with the HTS LIM.

  17. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  18. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena.

    PubMed

    Maroney, O J E

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  19. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Diverse Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Tensor calculus is applied to the formulation of mathematical models of diverse phenomena. Aeronautics, fluid dynamics, and cosmology are among the areas of application. The feasibility of combining tensor methods and computer capability to formulate problems is demonstrated. The techniques described are an attempt to simplify the formulation of mathematical models by reducing the modeling process to a series of routine operations, which can be performed either manually or by computer.

  1. Experimenting with wires, batteries, bulbs and the induction coil: Narratives of teaching and learning physics in the electrical investigations of Laura, David, Jamie, myself and the nineteenth century experimenters. Our developments and instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth Mary

    Physics is conventionally taught as a fixed curriculum which students must master. This thesis changes that: curriculum emerges from what learners try and question in experiments they invent. The thesis narrates: three adult students exploring wires, batteries and bulbs with me as teacher; nineteenth century investigations of electromagnetism; my laboratory work replicating historic instruments. In each case, learning arose through activity with materials. Evidences of this are analyzed within narratives and reflections. I used teaching-research, a method developed by Duckworth from Piaget's clinical interviewing, to research and simultaneously extend students' evolving understandings. What I learned through questioning students informed my next interactions; what they learned extended their experimenting. Similarly, I researched historical accounts interactively: improvising experiments to develop my understandings. Studying my own learning deepened my interpretations of students' learning. My students Laura, David and Jamie experimented by: soldering bulbs to wires, making series and parallel circuits, inserting resistive wire that dimmed bulbs, conducting electricity through salt water They noticed bulb brightness and battery heat, compared electricity's paths, questioned how voltage and current relate. They inferred electricity's effects manifest magnitudes of material properties. They found their experiences while learning were inseparable from what they learned. I researched investigations connected with Cavendish's leather fish, Galvani's frogs, Schweigger's wire spiraled around a compass needle, Henry's electromagnets, Faraday's induction ring, induction devices of Page, Callan, Hearder. Experimentally, I made galvanometers, electromagnets, induction rings, induction coil. I observed effects of electromagnetism, internal resistance, induced sparking. Across these investigations, learning developed with instrumental innovations; confusions were productive

  2. Antagonistic Phenomena in Network Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Timme, Marc

    2018-03-01

    Recent research on the network modeling of complex systems has led to a convenient representation of numerous natural, social, and engineered systems that are now recognized as networks of interacting parts. Such systems can exhibit a wealth of phenomena that not only cannot be anticipated from merely examining their parts, as per the textbook definition of complexity, but also challenge intuition even when considered in the context of what is now known in network science. Here, we review the recent literature on two major classes of such phenomena that have far-reaching implications: (a) antagonistic responses to changes of states or parameters and (b) coexistence of seemingly incongruous behaviors or properties - both deriving from the collective and inherently decentralized nature of the dynamics. They include effects as diverse as negative compressibility in engineered materials, rescue interactions in biological networks, negative resistance in fluid networks, and the Braess paradox occurring across transport and supply networks. They also include remote synchronization, chimera states, and the converse of symmetry breaking in brain, power-grid, and oscillator networks as well as remote control in biological and bioinspired systems. By offering a unified view of these various scenarios, we suggest that they are representative of a yet broader class of unprecedented network phenomena that ought to be revealed and explained by future research.

  3. Electromagnetically Tunable Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    constitutive material properties (electrical permittivity, magnetic permeability, and electrical conductivity) of electromagnetically tunable fluids ( ETFs ... trade -offs and operational perspectives of a dielectric coated spherical inverted-F antenna," accepted for IEEE/URSI Int. Symp. Antennas and Propag

  4. Broadband Electromagnetic Technology

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-06-23

    The objectives of this project are to continue the enhancements to the combined Broadband Electromagnetic and Full Encirclement Unit (BEM-FEU) technologies and to evaluate the systems capability in the laboratory and the field. The BEM instrument ...

  5. Electromagnetism in the Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everitt, Lori R.; Patterson, Evelyn T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the authors used portions of popular movies to help students review concepts related to electromagnetism. Movies used and concepts covered in the review are listed, and a sample activity is described. (WRM)

  6. Concurrent electromagnetic scattering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jean E.; Cwik, Tom; Ferraro, Robert D.; Jacobi, Nathan; Liewer, Paulett C.; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Parker, Jay

    1989-01-01

    The computational power of the hypercube parallel computing architecture is applied to the solution of large-scale electromagnetic scattering and radiation problems. Three analysis codes have been implemented. A Hypercube Electromagnetic Interactive Analysis Workstation was developed to aid in the design and analysis of metallic structures such as antennas and to facilitate the use of these analysis codes. The workstation provides a general user environment for specification of the structure to be analyzed and graphical representations of the results.

  7. Purely electromagnetic spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, B. V.

    The Rainich's program of describing metrics induced by pure electromagnetic fields is implemented in a simpler way by using the Ernst formalism and increasing the symmetry of spacetime. Stationary metrics possessing one, two or three Killing vectors are studied and classified. Three branches of solutions exist. Electromagnetically induced mass terms appear in two of them, including a class of solutions in harmonic functions. The static subcase is discussed too. Relations to other well-known electrovacuum metrics are elucidated.

  8. Identifying Electromagnetic Attacks against Airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, A.; Genender, E.; Doering, O.; Garbe, H.

    2012-05-01

    This work presents a new and sophisticated approach to detect and locate the origin of electromagnetic attacks. At the example of an airport, a normal electromagnetic environment is defined, in which electromagnetic attacks shall be identified. After a brief consideration of the capabilities of high power electromagnetic sources to produce high field strength values, this contribution finally presents the approach of a sensor network, realizing the identification of electromagnetic attacks.

  9. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcranial stimulability of phosphenes by long lightning electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, J.; Kendl, A.

    2010-06-01

    The electromagnetic pulses of rare long (order of seconds) repetitive lightning discharges near strike point (order of 100 m) are analyzed and compared to magnetic fields applied in standard clinical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice. It is shown that the time-varying lightning magnetic fields and locally induced electric fields are in the same order of magnitude and frequency as those established in TMS experiments to study stimulated perception phenomena, like magnetophosphenes. Lightning electromagnetic pulse induced transcranial magnetic stimulation of phosphenes in the visual cortex is concluded to be a plausible interpretation of a large class of reports on luminous perceptions during thunderstorms.

  11. [Experimental research on the electromagnetic radiation immunity of a kind of portable monitor].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Xiao, Dongping; Jian, Xin

    2010-11-01

    The paper is focused on a kind of portable monitor that is widely used in military hospitals. In order to study the electromagnetic radiation immunity of the monitor, the experiments of electromagnetic radiation caused by radio frequency continuous wave in reverberation chamber and by ultra wide band (UWB) electromagnetic pulse have been done. The study results show that UWB electromagnetic pulse interferes observably the operating state of the monitor. It should be paid high attention to take protective measures. The monitor tested has some electromagnetic immunity ability for radio frequency continuous wave radiation. The frequent abnormal phenomena are baseline drift and waveform distortion. The electromagnetic sensitivity of the monitor is related to the frequency of interference source. The monitor tested is most sensitive to the frequency of 390 MHz.

  12. Electromagnetic Induction E-Sensor for Underwater UXO Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    EMF Electromotive force FET Field Effect Transitor Hz Hertz ms millisecond nV nanoVolt QFS QUASAR Federal...processing. Statistical discrimination techniques based on model analysis, such as the Time-Domain Three Dipole (TD3D) model, can separate UXO-like objects

  13. Simplified spatiotemporal electromagnetic induction - salinity multi-field calibration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salinity-affected farmlands are common in arid and semi-arid regions. To assure long-term sustainability of farming practices in these areas, soil salinity (ECe) should be routinely mapped and monitored. Salinity can be measured through soil sampling directed by geospatial measurements of apparent s...

  14. Pedemis: A Portable Electromagnetic Induction Sensor with Integrated Positioning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-27

    International Society for Optical Engineering 5794(Part I), 346 – 357 (2005). [18] Pasion , L. R., “A unified approach to uxo discrimination using the...B., and O’Neill, K., “Camp butner uxo data inversion and classification using advanced emi models,” (2010). SERDP-MR-1572. [27] Pasion , L., “Uxo

  15. Electromagnetic Induction Sensing of UneXploded Ordnance with Pedemis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-22

    Pasion , L. R., “A unified approach to uxo discrimination using the method of auxiliary sources,” tech. rep. (2006). [19] Barrowes, B. E., O’Neill, K...inversion and classification using advanced emi models,” (2010). SERDP-MR-1572. [27] Pasion , L., “Uxo discrimination using full coverage and cued

  16. Ultra-Wideband Electromagnetic Induction for UXO Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-30

    prolate to oblate shapes do not present problematical considerations, we will just proceed below in terms of the prolate case. The coefficients bpmn in...these equations are known in the sense that they are calculated from the primary field, while the unknown Bpmn must be solved for. Obtaining the... Bpmn constitutes solving the problem, given that the associated Legendre functions m mn nandP Q are readily evaluated. A set of bpmn can be obtained

  17. ALLTEM Multi-Axis Electromagnetic Induction System Demonstration and Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-17

    fencing that test the capabilities of the platform systems Recently the Open Field area was reconfigured to emulate typical impact area conditions. The...surveyed. • Open field (indirect fire) The indirect fire subarea contains only three munition types that could be typically found at an impact area...direct fire subarea contains only three munition types that could be typically found at an impact area of a direct fire weapons range. These are 25 mm

  18. Electromagnetic Induction Spectroscopy for the Detection of Subsurface Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    curves of the proposed method and that of Fails et al.. For the kNN ROC curve, k = 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81...et al. [6] and Ramachandran et al. [7] both demonstrated success in detecting mines using the k-nearest-neighbor ( kNN ) algorithm based on the EMI...error is also included in the feature vector. The kNN labels an unknown target based on the closest targets in a training set. Collins et al. [2] and

  19. Faraday's Investigation of Electromagnetic Induction. Experiment No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devons, Samuel

    This paper focuses on Michael Faraday's experimental research in electricity in the 1830's. Historical notes related to his work are included as well as experiments, his objectives, and illustrations of equipment for the experiments. Examples from his diary are given so that students can attempt to emulate his honest and systematic manner of…

  20. A Linear Electromagnetic Piston Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Paul H.

    Advancements in mobile hydraulics for human-scale applications have increased demand for a compact hydraulic power supply. Conventional designs couple a rotating electric motor to a hydraulic pump, which increases the package volume and requires several energy conversions. This thesis investigates the use of a free piston as the moving element in a linear motor to eliminate multiple energy conversions and decrease the overall package volume. A coupled model used a quasi-static magnetic equivalent circuit to calculate the motor inductance and the electromagnetic force acting on the piston. The force was an input to a time domain model to evaluate the mechanical and pressure dynamics. The magnetic circuit model was validated with finite element analysis and an experimental prototype linear motor. The coupled model was optimized using a multi-objective genetic algorithm to explore the parameter space and maximize power density and efficiency. An experimental prototype linear pump coupled pistons to an off-the-shelf linear motor to validate the mechanical and pressure dynamics models. The magnetic circuit force calculation agreed within 3% of finite element analysis, and within 8% of experimental data from the unoptimized prototype linear motor. The optimized motor geometry also had good agreement with FEA; at zero piston displacement, the magnetic circuit calculates optimized motor force within 10% of FEA in less than 1/1000 the computational time. This makes it well suited to genetic optimization algorithms. The mechanical model agrees very well with the experimental piston pump position data when tuned for additional unmodeled mechanical friction. Optimized results suggest that an improvement of 400% of the state of the art power density is attainable with as high as 85% net efficiency. This demonstrates that a linear electromagnetic piston pump has potential to serve as a more compact and efficient supply of fluid power for the human scale.

  1. Complex (dusty) plasmas-kinetic studies of strong coupling phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Thomas, Hubertus M.

    2012-05-15

    'Dusty plasmas' can be found almost everywhere-in the interstellar medium, in star and planet formation, in the solar system in the Earth's atmosphere, and in the laboratory. In astrophysical plasmas, the dust component accounts for only about 1% of the mass, nevertheless this component has a profound influence on the thermodynamics, the chemistry, and the dynamics. Important physical processes are charging, sputtering, cooling, light absorption, and radiation pressure, connecting electromagnetic forces to gravity. Surface chemistry is another important aspect. In the laboratory, there is great interest in industrial processes (e.g., etching, vapor deposition) and-at the fundamental level-in the physics ofmore » strong coupling phenomena. Here, the dust (or microparticles) are the dominant component of the multi-species plasma. The particles can be observed in real time and space, individually resolved at all relevant length and time scales. This provides an unprecedented means for studying self-organisation processes in many-particle systems, including the onset of cooperative phenomena. Due to the comparatively large mass of the microparticles (10{sup -12}to10{sup -9}g), precision experiments are performed on the ISS. The following topics will be discussed: Phase transitions, phase separation, electrorheology, flow phenomena including the onset of turbulence at the kinetic level.« less

  2. Discrimination between preseismic electromagnetic anomalies and solar activity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouras, Gr; Balasis, G.; Kontakos, K.; Ruzhin, Y.; Avgoustis, G.; Kavouras, D.; Nomicos, C.

    2009-04-01

    Laboratory studies suggest that electromagnetic emissions in a wide frequency spectrum ranging from kHz to very high MHz frequencies are produced by the opening of microcracks, with the MHz radiation appearing earlier than the kHz radiation. Earthquakes are large-scale fracture phenomena in the Earth's heterogeneous crust. Thus, the radiated kHz-MHz electromagnetic emissions are detectable not only at laboratory but also at geological scale. Clear MHz-to-kHz electromagnetic anomalies have been systematically detected over periods ranging from a few days to a few hours prior to recent destructive earthquakes in Greece. We bear in mind that whether electromagnetic precursors to earthquakes exist is an important question not only for earthquake prediction but mainly for understanding the physical processes of earthquake generation. An open question in this field of research is the classification of a detected electromagnetic anomaly as a pre-seismic signal associated to earthquake occurrence. Indeed, electromagnetic fluctuations in the frequency range of MHz are known to related to a few sources, i.e., they might be atmospheric noise (due to lightning), man-made composite noise, solar-terrestrial noise (resulting from the Sun-solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere-Earth's surface chain) or cosmic noise, and finally, lithospheric effect, namely pre-seismic activity. We focus on this point. We suggest that if a combination of detected kHz and MHz electromagnetic anomalies satisfies the herein presented set of criteria these anomalies could be considered as candidate precursory phenomena of an impending earthquake.

  3. Reference Frames and the Physical Gravito-Electromagnetic Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Luis Filipe P. O.; Herdeiro, C. A. R.

    2009-05-01

    The interest on the physical analogies between General Relativity and Electromagnetism has been revived by the recent Gravity Probe-B and the upcoming Lares missions, aiming to measure the so-called gravito-magnetic effects. These effects are presently believed to be at the origin of observed jets in quasars, galactic nuclei, neutron stars and black holes, as well as the precession of black holes' accretion disks. Gravitomagnetism has been studied mainly in a first order approximation ( e.g. [arXiv:gr-qc/0207065]) which, making use of certain similarities between linearized gravity and electromagnetism, applies intuition and well known results from electromagnetic phenomena to the description of the less familiar gravitational ones. However, there is no consensus at present on the limit of validity of such approach. Using a new exact approach based on tidal tensors [Phys. Rev. D 78, 024021 (2008)], we show that the existence of the aforementioned similarities depends crucially on the reference frame. Whereas a stationary observer will find remarkable similarities between the gravitational and electromagnetic interactions, if the fields are not stationary in the observer's rest frame, however, the two interactions differ significantly, so that the gravito-electromagnetic equations commonly found in literature are no longer valid. The tidal tensor formalism allows for a comparison between gravity and electromagnetism in terms of quantities common to both theories (tidal forces), making transparent both the similarities and key differences between the two interactions. It also unveils a new analogy based on exact, covariant, and fully general equations, which allows to extend the intuition from electromagnetism to the understanding of non-linear gravitational phenomena, such as the spin interaction between two celestial bodies, and Hawking's [Phys Rev. Lett. 26, 1344 (1971)] spin-dependent upper bound for the energy released by gravitational radiation when two black

  4. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  5. Transport phenomena in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Jacob; Corapcioglu, M. Yavuz

    The Advanced Study Institute on Fundamentals of Transport Phenomena in Porous Media, held July 14-23, 1985 in Newark, Del. and directed by Jacob Bear (Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa) and M. Yavuz Corapcioglu (City College of New York), under the auspices of NATO, was a sequel to the NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) held in 1982 (proceedings published as Fundamentals of Transport Phenomena in Porous Media, J. Bear, and M.Y. Corapcioglu (Ed.), Martinus Nijhoff, Dordrecht, the Netherlands, 1984). The meeting was attended by 106 participants and lecturers from 21 countries.As in the first NATO/ASI, the objective of this meeting—which was a combination of a conference of experts and a teaching institute— was to present and discuss selected topics of transport in porous media. In selecting topics and lecturers, an attempt was made to bridge the gap that sometimes exists between research and practice. An effort was also made to demonstrate the unified approach to the transport of mass of a fluid phase, components of a fluid phase, momentum, and heat in a porous medium domain. The void space may be occupied by a single fluid phase or by a number of such phases; each fluid may constitute a multicomponent system; the solid matrix may be deformable; and the whole process of transport in the system may take place under nonisothermal conditions, with or without phase changes. Such phenomena are encountered in a variety of disciplines, e.g., petroleum engineering, civil engineering (in connection with groundwater flow and contamination), soil mechanics, and chemical engineering. One of the goals of the 1985 NATO/ASI, as in the 1982 institute, was to bring together experts from all these disciplines and enhance communication among them.

  6. Nonlinear phenomena in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyari, Alireza; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Mansouri, Reza

    2018-04-01

    The perturbation theory plays an important role in studying structure formation in cosmology and post-Newtonian physics, but not all phenomena can be described by the linear perturbation theory. Thus, it is necessary to study exact solutions or higher-order perturbations. Specifically, we study black hole (apparent) horizons and the cosmological event horizon formation in the perturbation theory. We emphasize that in the perturbative regime of the gravitational potential these horizons cannot form in the lower order. Studying the infinite plane metric, we show that, to capture the cosmological constant effect, we need at least a second-order expansion.

  7. Phenomena and Diosignes of Aratous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgoloupis, S. I.

    2013-01-01

    Aratous (305-240B.C.) was a singular intellectual, writer and poet which engage himself to compose a very interesting astronomical poet, using the "Dactylous sixstage' style, the formal style of the ancient Greek Epic poetry. This astronomic poem of Aratous "Phenomena and Diosignes" became very favorite reading during the Alexandrine, the Romman and the Byzandin eras as well and had received many praises from significant poets and particularly from Hipparchous and from Theonas from Alexandria, an astronomer of 4rth century A.C.(in Greeks)

  8. Foot anthropometry and morphology phenomena.

    PubMed

    Agić, Ante; Nikolić, Vasilije; Mijović, Budimir

    2006-12-01

    Foot structure description is important for many reasons. The foot anthropometric morphology phenomena are analyzed together with hidden biomechanical functionality in order to fully characterize foot structure and function. For younger Croatian population the scatter data of the individual foot variables were interpolated by multivariate statistics. Foot structure descriptors are influenced by many factors, as a style of life, race, climate, and things of the great importance in human society. Dominant descriptors are determined by principal component analysis. Some practical recommendation and conclusion for medical, sportswear and footwear practice are highlighted.

  9. Quantum phenomena in gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdel, Th.; Doser, M.; Ernest, A. D.; Voronin, A. Yu.; Voronin, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The subjects presented here are very different. Their common feature is that they all involve quantum phenomena in a gravitational field: gravitational quantum states of ultracold antihydrogen above a material surface and measuring a gravitational interaction of antihydrogen in AEGIS, a quantum trampoline for ultracold atoms, and a hypothesis on naturally occurring gravitational quantum states, an Eötvös-type experiment with cold neutrons and others. Considering them together, however, we could learn that they have many common points both in physics and in methodology.

  10. Design, fabrication and characterization of LTCC-based electromagnetic microgenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierczak, M.; Markowski, P.; Dziedzic, A.

    2016-02-01

    Design, manufacturing process and properties of electromagnetic microgenerators fabricated in LTCC (Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics) technology are presented in this paper. Electromagnetic microgenerators consist of planar coils spatially arranged on several layers of LTCC and of a multipole permanent magnet. Two different patterns of coils with 2-, 8-,10- and 12-layers and outer diameter of 50 mm were designed and fabricated. Silver-based pastes ESL 903-A or DuPont 6145 were used. In order to estimate the inductance of a single spatial coil the Greenhouse (self-inductance) and Hoer (mutual inductance) calculation methods were used. To verify the calculation results a single-layer coil was fabricated for each pattern and its inductance was measured using the precision RLC Meter. Fabricated LTCC microgenerators with embedded coils allow to generate voltage higher than ten volts and the electrical output power of approximately 600 mW at the rotor rotation speed of 12 thousands rpm. The self-made system was used for characterization of LTCC-based electromagnetic microgenerators.

  11. Critical phenomena on k -booklets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We define a "k -booklet" to be a set of k semi-infinite planes with -∞ phenomena: self-avoiding random walks, the Ising model, and percolation. For k =2 , a booklet is equivalent to a single infinite lattice, and for k =1 to a semi-infinite lattice. In both these cases the systems show standard critical phenomena. This is not so for k ≥3 . Self-avoiding walks starting at y =0 show a first-order transition at a shifted critical point, with no power-behaved scaling laws. The Ising model and percolation show hybrid transitions, i.e., the scaling laws of the standard models coexist with discontinuities of the order parameter at y ≈0 , and the critical points are not shifted. In the case of the Ising model, ergodicity is already broken at T =Tc , and not only for T

  12. Aircraft Lightning Electromagnetic Environment Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Szatkowski, George N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a NASA project plan for demonstrating a prototype lightning strike measurement system that is suitable for installation onto research aircraft that already operate in thunderstorms. This work builds upon past data from the NASA F106, FAA CV-580, and Transall C-180 flight projects, SAE ARP5412, and the European ILDAS Program. The primary focus is to capture airframe current waveforms during attachment, but may also consider pre and post-attachment current, electric field, and radiated field phenomena. New sensor technologies are being developed for this system, including a fiber-optic Faraday polarization sensor that measures lightning current waveforms from DC to over several Megahertz, and has dynamic range covering hundreds-of-volts to tens-of-thousands-of-volts. A study of the electromagnetic emission spectrum of lightning (including radio wave, microwave, optical, X-Rays and Gamma-Rays), and a compilation of aircraft transfer-function data (including composite aircraft) are included, to aid in the development of other new lightning environment sensors, their placement on-board research aircraft, and triggering of the onboard instrumentation system. The instrumentation system will leverage recent advances in high-speed, high dynamic range, deep memory data acquisition equipment, and fiber-optic interconnect.

  13. Electromagnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic attachment mechanism is disclosed for use as an end effector of a remote manipulator system. A pair of electromagnets, each with a U-shaped magnetic core with a pull-in coil and two holding coils, are mounted by a spring suspension system on a base plate of the mechanism housing with end pole pieces adapted to move through openings in the base plate when the attractive force of the electromagnets is exerted on a strike plate of a grapple fixture affixed to a target object. The pole pieces are spaced by an air gap from the strike plate when the mechanism first contacts the grapple fixture. An individual control circuit and power source is provided for the pull-in coil and one holding coil of each electromagnet. A back-up control circuit connected to the two power sources and a third power source is provided for the remaining holding coils. When energized, the pull-in coils overcome the suspension system and air gap and are automatically de-energized when the pole pieces move to grapple and impose a preload force across the grapple interface. A battery backup is a redundant power source for each electromagnet in each individual control circuit and is automatically connected upon failure of the primary source. A centerline mounted camera and video monitor are used in cooperation with a target pattern on the reflective surface of the strike plate to effect targeting and alignment.

  14. Electromagnetic fields and their impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prša, M. A.; Kasaš-Lažetić, K. K.

    2018-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to briefly recall some different electromagnetic field definitions, some macroscopic sources of electromagnetic fields, electromagnetic fields classification regarding time dependences, and the ways of field determination in concrete cases. After that, all the mechanisms of interaction between electromagnetic field and substance, on atomic level, are described in details. Interaction between substance and electric field is investigated separately from the substance and magnetic field interaction. It is demonstrated that, in all cases of the unique electromagnetic field, total interaction can be treated as a superposition of two separated interactions. Finally, the main electromagnetic fields surrounding us is cited and discussed.

  15. Elective induction of labor.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lisa E; Rayburn, William F

    2006-09-01

    Induction of labor rates have more than doubled nationwide in the past 15 years. The increase in medically induced inductions was slower than the overall increase, suggesting that inductions for marginal or elective reasons rose more rapidly. Elective inductions seem to account for at least half of all inductions and 10% of all deliveries. Whether the experience of an elective induction is satisfactory to the patient, obstetrician, and intrapartum crew warrants more widespread attention. Cesarean rates are high for nulliparas undergoing an induction with an unfavorable cervix. Prospective studies are limited or nonexistent to recommend induction of labor for elective or marginal indications. Until more prospective work is performed, it will be difficult to evaluate the true impact of the elective induction of labor on population-wide cesarean delivery rates. Strategies for increased obstetrician awareness are proposed through practice guidelines and through clinical research trials.

  16. Induction Based on Circumscription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Haruka; Inoue, Katsumi

    We investigate induction from the viewpoint of nonmonotonic reasoning. Induction we consider in this paper is descriptive induction. Hypotheses from descriptive induction have the weak property that they only describe rules with respect to the observations and do not realize an inductive leap. In this paper, we define a new form of descriptive induction with circumscription and the idea of explanation and show two procedures for computing it. The new descriptive induction is called circumscriptive induction. By deciding the roles of predicates in circumscription, we can intentionally minimize models of a given inductive problem. By adopting the idea of explanation, we can distinguish between background knowledge and observations. Additionally, we consider the relationship between the way of choosing the roles of predicates in computing circumscription and the property of hypotheses obtained by circumscriptive induction. It is shown that hypotheses from circumscriptive induction reflect a difference between background knowledge and observations and do not realize an inductive leap. We also investigate revision of hypotheses which is as important as generation of hypotheses. In a process of hypothesis revision, a difference between previous induction and circumscriptive induction is clearly characterised.

  17. Electromagnetic Basis of Metabolism and Heredity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Stolc, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms control their cellular biological clocks to maintain functional oscillation of the redox cycle, also called the "metabolic cycle" or "respiratory cycle". Organization of cellular processes requires parallel processing on a synchronized time-base. These clocks coordinate the timing of all biochemical processes in the cell, including energy production, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. When this universal time keeping function is perturbed by exogenous induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the rate of metabolism changes. This causes oxidative stress, aging and mutations. Therefore, good temporal coordination of the redox cycle not only actively prevents chemical conflict between the reductive and oxidative partial reactions; it also maintains genome integrity and lifespan. Moreover, this universal biochemical rhythm can be disrupted by ROS induction in vivo. This in turn can be achieved by blocking the electron transport chain either endogenously or exogenously by various metabolites, e.g. hydrogen sulfide (H2S), highly diffusible drugs, and carbon monoxide (CO). Alternatively, the electron transport in vivo can be attenuated via a coherent or interfering transfer of energy from exogenous ultralow frequency (ULF) and extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic (EM) fields, suggesting that-on Earth-such ambient fields are an omnipresent (and probably crucially important) factor for the time-setting basis of universal biochemical reactions in living cells. Our work demonstrated previously un-described evidence for quantum effects in biology by electromagnetic coupling below thermal noise at the universal electron transport chain (ETC) in vivo.

  18. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  19. Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers.

    PubMed

    Watts, Claire M; Liu, Xianliang; Padilla, Willie J

    2012-06-19

    The advent of negative index materials has spawned extensive research into metamaterials over the past decade. Metamaterials are attractive not only for their exotic electromagnetic properties, but also their promise for applications. A particular branch-the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA)-has garnered interest due to the fact that it can achieve unity absorptivity of electromagnetic waves. Since its first experimental demonstration in 2008, the MPA has progressed significantly with designs shown across the electromagnetic spectrum, from microwave to optical. In this Progress Report we give an overview of the field and discuss a selection of examples and related applications. The ability of the MPA to exhibit extreme performance flexibility will be discussed and the theory underlying their operation and limitations will be established. Insight is given into what we can expect from this rapidly expanding field and future challenges will be addressed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A general theory of DC electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Thomas G.; Timpson, Erik J.

    2015-08-01

    The non-linear, transient operation of DC electromagnetic launchers (EMLs) complicates their theoretical understanding and prevents scaling studies and performance comparisons without the aid of detailed numerical models. This paper presents a general theory for DC electromagnetic launchers that has simplified these tasks by identifying critical EML parameters and relationships affecting the EML's voltage, current, and power scaling, as well as its performance and energy conversion efficiency. EML parameters and relationships discussed in this paper include the specific force, the operating mode, the launcher constant, the launcher characteristic velocity, the contact characteristic velocity, the energy conversion efficiency, and the kinetic power and voltage-current scaling relationship. The concepts of the ideal EML, same-scale comparisons, and EML impedance are discussed. This paper defines conditions needed for the EML to operate in the steady-state. A comparison of the general theory with experimental results of several different types of DC (i.e., non-induction) electromagnetic launchers ranging from medium velocity (100's m/s) to high velocity (1000's m/s) is performed. There is good agreement between the general theory and the experimental results.

  1. Electrostatic Phenomena on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle, Carlos I.

    2017-02-01

    The diverse planetary environments in the solar system react in somewhat different ways to the encompassing influence of the Sun. These different interactions define the electrostatic phenomena that take place on and near planetary surfaces. The desire to understand the electrostatic environments of planetary surfaces goes beyond scientific inquiry. These environments have enormous implications for both human and robotic exploration of the solar system. This book describes in some detail what is known about the electrostatic environment of the solar system from early and current experiments on Earth as well as what is being learned from the instrumentation on the space exploration missions (NASA, European Space Agency, and the Japanese Space Agency) of the last few decades. It begins with a brief review of the basic principles of electrostatics.

  2. Phenomena of Pneumatic Tire Hydroplaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.; Horne, W. B.

    1963-01-01

    Recent research on pneumatic tire hydroplaning has been collected and summarized with the aim of describing what is presently known about the phenomena of tire hydroplaning. A physical description of tire hydroplaning is given along with formulae for estimating the ground speed at which it occurs. Eight manifestations of tire hydroplaning which have been experimentally observed are presented and discussed. These manifestations are: detachment of tire footprint, hydrodynamic ground pressure, spin-down of wheel, suppression of tire bow wave, scouring action of escaping fluid in tire-ground footprint region, peaking of fluid displacement drag, loss in braking traction, and loss of tire directional stability. The vehicle, pavement, tire, and fluid parameters of importance to tire hydroplaning are listed and described. Finally, the hazards of tire hydroplaning to ground and air-vehicle-ground performance are listed, and procedures are given to minimize these effects.

  3. Electromagnetic braking revisited with a magnetic point dipole model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Sara; McGuire, Patrick; Bumb, Nikhil; Mann, Brian P.; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the trajectory of magnetized spheres falling through a copper pipe. The derive magnetic point dipole model agrees well with the experimental trajectories for NdFeB spherical magnets of varying diameter, which are embedded inside 3D printed shells with fixed outer dimensions. This demonstration of electrodynamic phenomena and Lenz's law serves as a good laboratory exercise for physics, electromagnetics, and dynamics classes at the undergraduate level.

  4. Improved Electromagnetic Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Toby B.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed design for an electromagnetic brake would increase the reliability while reducing the number of parts and the weight, relative to a prior commercially available electromagnetic brake. The reductions of weight and the number of parts could also lead to a reduction of cost. A description of the commercial brake is prerequisite to a description of the proposed electromagnetic brake. The commercial brake (see upper part of figure) includes (1) a permanent magnet and an electromagnet coil on a stator and (2) a rotor that includes a steel contact plate mounted, with tension spring loading, on an aluminum hub. The stator is mounted securely on a stationary object, which would ordinarily be the housing of a gear drive or a motor. The rotor is mounted on the shaft of the gear drive or motor. The commercial brake nominally operates in a fail-safe (in the sense of normally braking) mode: In the absence of current in the electromagnet coil, the permanent magnet pulls the contact plate, against the spring tension, into contact with the stator. To release the brake, one excites the electromagnet with a current of the magnitude and polarity chosen to cancel the magnetic flux of the permanent magnet, thereby enabling the spring tension to pull the contact plate out of contact with the stator. The fail-safe operation of the commercial brake depends on careful mounting of the rotor in relation to the stator. The rotor/stator gap must be set with a tolerance between 10 and 15 mils (between about 0.25 and about 0.38 mm). If the gap or the contact pad is thicker than the maximum allowable value, then the permanent magnetic field will not be strong enough to pull the steel plate across the gap. (For this reason, any contact pad between the contact plate and the stator must also be correspondingly thin.) If the gap exceeds the maximum allowable value because of shaft end play, it becomes impossible to set the brake by turning off the electromagnet current. Although it may

  5. Electromagnetic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

  6. EML - an electromagnetic levitator for the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, A.; Soellner, W.; Stenzel, C.

    2011-12-01

    Based on a long and successful evolution of electromagnetic levitators for microgravity applications, including facilities for parabolic flights, sounding rocket missions and Spacelab missions, the Electromagnetic Levitator EML provides unique experiment opportunities onboard ISS. With the application of the electromagnetic levitation principle under microgravity conditions the undercooled regime of electrically conductive materials becomes accessible for an extended time which allows the performance of unique studies of nucleation phenomena or phase formation as well as the measurement of a range of thermophysical properties both above the melting temperature and in the undercooled regime. The EML payload is presently being developed by Astrium Space Transportation under contracts to ESA and DLR. The design of the payload allows flexible experiment scenarios individually targeted towards specific experimental needs and samples including live video control of the running experiments and automatic or interactive process control.

  7. Rethinking Reinforcement: Allocation, Induction, and Contingency

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M

    2012-01-01

    The concept of reinforcement is at least incomplete and almost certainly incorrect. An alternative way of organizing our understanding of behavior may be built around three concepts: allocation, induction, and correlation. Allocation is the measure of behavior and captures the centrality of choice: All behavior entails choice and consists of choice. Allocation changes as a result of induction and correlation. The term induction covers phenomena such as adjunctive, interim, and terminal behavior—behavior induced in a situation by occurrence of food or another Phylogenetically Important Event (PIE) in that situation. Induction resembles stimulus control in that no one-to-one relation exists between induced behavior and the inducing event. If one allowed that some stimulus control were the result of phylogeny, then induction and stimulus control would be identical, and a PIE would resemble a discriminative stimulus. Much evidence supports the idea that a PIE induces all PIE-related activities. Research also supports the idea that stimuli correlated with PIEs become PIE-related conditional inducers. Contingencies create correlations between “operant” activity (e.g., lever pressing) and PIEs (e.g., food). Once an activity has become PIE-related, the PIE induces it along with other PIE-related activities. Contingencies also constrain possible performances. These constraints specify feedback functions, which explain phenomena such as the higher response rates on ratio schedules in comparison with interval schedules. Allocations that include a lot of operant activity are “selected” only in the sense that they generate more frequent occurrence of the PIE within the constraints of the situation; contingency and induction do the “selecting.” PMID:22287807

  8. Electromagnetic structure of light nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Pastore, Saori

    2016-03-25

    Here, the present understanding of nuclear electromagnetic properties including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in nuclei with A ≤ 10 is reviewed. Emphasis is on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electromagnetic currents derived from a chiral effective field theory with pions and nucleons.

  9. Electromagnetic structure of light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pastore, Saori

    Here, the present understanding of nuclear electromagnetic properties including electromagnetic moments, form factors and transitions in nuclei with A ≤ 10 is reviewed. Emphasis is on calculations based on nuclear Hamiltonians that include two- and three-nucleon realistic potentials, along with one- and two-body electromagnetic currents derived from a chiral effective field theory with pions and nucleons.

  10. Equivalence principles and electromagnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1977-01-01

    The implications of the weak equivalence principles are investigated in detail for electromagnetic systems in a general framework. In particular, it is shown that the universality of free-fall trajectories (Galileo weak equivalence principle) does not imply the validity of the Einstein equivalence principle. However, the Galileo principle plus the universality of free-fall rotation states does imply the Einstein principle.

  11. "Hearing" Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojo, Marta; Munoz, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an educational experience is described in which a microwave communication link is used to make students aware that all electromagnetic waves have the same physical nature and properties. Experimental demonstrations are linked to theoretical concepts to increase comprehension of the physical principles underlying electromagnetic…

  12. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  13. Noncontact Electromagnetic Vibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz A.

    1994-01-01

    Metal aircraft skins scanned rapidly in vibration tests. Relatively simple combination of permanent magnets and electromagnet serves as noncontact vibration source for nondestructive testing of metal aircraft skins. In test, source excites vibrations, and vibration waveforms measured, then analyzed for changes in resonances signifying cracks and other flaws.

  14. Assisted of electromagnetic fields in glucose production from cassava stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lismeri, Lia; Haryati, Sri; Djoni Bustan, M.; Darni, Yuli

    2018-03-01

    Decrease in fossil fuel reserves that led to high price has become major problem in many countries around the world. To acquire the sustainability of energy reserves, the renewable energies obtained from plant biomass will therefore have to play an increasing role in fulfilling energy demand throughout the century. Renewable energy source must be explored by innovative techniques which is safe to the environment and low in energy consumptions. This research conducted to produce glucose from cassava stems assisted by electromagnetic field inductions process. The parameters used in this research were pretreatment solvent, concentration, temperature and electrical currents. The electromagnetic field inductions could be applied to increase glucose productivity with the maximum yield of glucose was 47.43%.

  15. Electromechanical phenomena in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Willatzen, M.

    2011-02-01

    Electromechanical phenomena in semiconductors are still poorly studied from a fundamental and an applied science perspective, even though significant strides have been made in the last decade or so. Indeed, most current electromechanical devices are based on ferroelectric oxides. Yet, the importance of the effect in certain semiconductors is being increasingly recognized. For instance, the magnitude of the electric field in an AlN/GaN nanostructure can reach 1-10 MV/cm. In fact, the basic functioning of an (0001) AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor is due to the two-dimensional electron gas formed at the material interface by the polarization fields. The goal of this review is to inform the reader of some of the recent developments in the field for nanostructures and to point out still open questions. Examples of recent work that involves the piezoelectric and pyroelectric effects in semiconductors include: the study of the optoelectronic properties of III-nitrides quantum wells and dots, the current controversy regarding the importance of the nonlinear piezoelectric effect, energy harvesting using ZnO nanowires as a piezoelectric nanogenerator, the use of piezoelectric materials in surface acoustic wave devices, and the appropriateness of various models for analyzing electromechanical effects. Piezoelectric materials such as GaN and ZnO are gaining more and more importance for energy-related applications; examples include high-brightness light-emitting diodes for white lighting, high-electron mobility transistors, and nanogenerators. Indeed, it remains to be demonstrated whether these materials could be the ideal multifunctional materials. The solutions to these and other related problems will not only lead to a better understanding of the basic physics of these materials, but will validate new characterization tools, and advance the development of new and better devices. We will restrict ourselves to nanostructures in the current article even though the

  16. Inductive Reasoning and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooks, Clay; Boyd, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Induction, properly understood, is not merely a game, nor is it a gimmick, nor is it an artificial way of explaining an element of reasoning. Proper understanding of inductive reasoning--and the various types of reasoning that the authors term inductive--enables the student to evaluate critically other people's writing and enhances the composition…

  17. Electromagnetic Navigation Diagnostic Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, Thomas R.; Mazzone, Peter J.; Karnak, Demet; Meziane, Moulay; Mehta, Atul C.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy using superDimension/Bronchus System is a novel method to increase diagnostic yield of peripheral and mediastinal lung lesions. Objectives: A prospective, open label, single-center, pilot study was conducted to determine the ability of electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy to sample peripheral lung lesions and mediastinal lymph nodes with standard bronchoscopic instruments and demonstrate safety. Methods: Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy was performed using the superDimension/Bronchus system consisting of electromagnetic board, position sensor encapsulated in the tip of a steerable probe, extended working channel, and real-time reconstruction of previously acquired multiplanar computed tomography images. The final distance of the steerable probe to lesion, expected error based on the actual and virtual markers, and procedure yield was gathered. Measurements: 60 subjects were enrolled between December 2004 and September 2005. Mean navigation times were 7 ± 6 min and 2 ± 2 min for peripheral lesions and lymph nodes, respectively. The steerable probe tip was navigated to the target lung area in all cases. The mean peripheral lesions and lymph nodes size was 22.8 ± 12.6 mm and 28.1 ± 12.8 mm. Yield was determined by results obtained during the bronchoscopy per patient. Results: The yield/procedure was 74% and 100% for peripheral lesions and lymph nodes, respectively. A diagnosis was obtained in 80.3% of bronchoscopic procedures. A definitive diagnosis of lung malignancy was made in 74.4% of subjects. Pneumothorax occurred in two subjects. Conclusion: Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy is a safe method for sampling peripheral and mediastinal lesions with high diagnostic yield independent of lesion size and location. PMID:16873767

  18. Applicator modeling for electromagnetic thermotherapy of cervix cancer.

    PubMed

    Rezaeealam, Behrooz

    2015-03-01

    This report proposes an induction heating coil design that can be used for producing strong magnetic fields around ferromagnetic implants located in the cervix of uterus. The effect of coil design on the uniformity and extent of heat generation ability is inspected. Also, a numerical model of the applicator is developed that includes the ferromagnetic implants, and is coupled to the bioheat transfer model of the body tissue. Then, the ability of the proposed applicator for electromagnetic thermotherapy is investigated.

  19. An overview of landmine detection with emphasis on electromagnetic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Yogadhish

    2003-04-01

    Human suffering caused by antipersonnel landmines left over from previous conflicts has only recently received significant public exposure. However, considerable amount of research on how to detect and deal with buried landmines has been carried out at least since the second world war. The research has encompassed a wide range of technologies and large sums of money have been spent. Despite these efforts there is still no operationally satisfactory solution, especially to the detection problem. This lack of success is attributable to the difficulty of the problem and the high degree of effectiveness demanded of any proposed solution. The many landmine detection approaches can be divided into two broad categories: (1)approaches primarily aimed at detecting the casing of the landmine (physical properties of its explosive content may also have some influence) and (2)approaches aimed at directly detecting the explosive contents. Examples of techniques belonging to the first group are electromagnetic induction, ground probing radar and other high frequency electromagnetic techniques, acoustics and other mechanical techniques, and infrared. Trace explosive vapour detection, thermalneutron activation and nuclear quadrupole resonance are examples of the second group. Following a brief introduction to nature of the landmine problem and the many technologies that have been explored to solve it, the presentation will focus on some of the detection approaches based on electromagnetic techniques. In particular, the state of the art in electromagnetic induction detection will be reviewed and required future research and development in this area will be presented.

  20. Dissociation and serenity induction.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, Lori A; Sacks, Matthew B; Foa, Edna B

    2007-09-01

    Dissociation is a common experience during or immediately after a traumatic event; yet, most of the current knowledge regarding dissociation is retrospective in nature. The aim of the present study investigated a non-pharmacological method of dissociative induction with a clinical sample. Participants with PTSD and non-trauma exposed participants were randomly assigned to receive either a dissociative induction, or a serenity induction, based on modified Velten mood induction procedures. Participants receiving the dissociative induction reported higher state-dissociation than those receiving the serenity induction. The PTSD group reported greater state dissociation than the non-trauma exposed group, regardless of induction. State dissociation was related to trait dissociation, PTSD severity, and depression. The present results provide an initial demonstration of the viability for inducing state dissociation in the laboratory with a PTSD sample.

  1. Observation of Celestial Phenomena in Ancient China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Because of the need for calendar-making and portent astrology, the Chinese were diligent and meticulous observers of celestial phenomena. China has maintained the longest continuous historical records of celestial phenomena in the world. Extraordinary or abnormal celestial events were particularly noted because of their astrological significance. The historical records cover various types of celestial phenomena, which include solar and lunar eclipses, sunspots, "guest stars" (novae or supernovae as we understand today), comets and meteors, and all kinds of planetary phenomena. These records provide valuable historical data for astronomical studies today.

  2. Synthetic electromagnetic knot in a three-dimensional skyrmion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonjae; Gheorghe, Andrei H.; Tiurev, Konstantin; Ollikainen, Tuomas; Möttönen, Mikko; Hall, David S.

    2018-01-01

    Classical electromagnetism and quantum mechanics are both central to the modern understanding of the physical world and its ongoing technological development. Quantum simulations of electromagnetic forces have the potential to provide information about materials and systems that do not have conveniently solvable theoretical descriptions, such as those related to quantum Hall physics, or that have not been physically observed, such as magnetic monopoles. However, quantum simulations that simultaneously implement all of the principal features of classical electromagnetism have thus far proved elusive. We experimentally realize a simulation in which a charged quantum particle interacts with the knotted electromagnetic fields peculiar to a topological model of ball lightning. These phenomena are induced by precise spatiotemporal control of the spin field of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, simultaneously creating a Shankar skyrmion—a topological excitation that was theoretically predicted four decades ago but never before observed experimentally. Our results reveal the versatile capabilities of synthetic electromagnetism and provide the first experimental images of topological three-dimensional skyrmions in a quantum system. PMID:29511735

  3. Electromagnetic interference with cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators from low-frequency electromagnetic fields in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tiikkaja, Maria; Aro, Aapo L; Alanko, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Sistonen, Heli; Hartikainen, Juha E K; Toivonen, Lauri; Juutilainen, Jukka; Hietanen, Maila

    2013-03-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) can pose a danger to workers with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). At some workplaces electromagnetic fields are high enough to potentially inflict EMI. The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate the susceptibility of pacemakers and ICDs to external electromagnetic fields. Eleven volunteers with a pacemaker and 13 with an ICD were exposed to sine, pulse, ramp, and square waveform magnetic fields with frequencies of 2-200 Hz using Helmholtz coil. The magnetic field flux densities varied to 300 µT. We also tested the occurrence of EMI from an electronic article surveillance (EAS) gate, an induction cooktop, and a metal inert gas (MIG) welding machine. All pacemakers were tested with bipolar settings and three of them also with unipolar sensing configurations. None of the bipolar pacemakers or ICDs tested experienced interference in any of the exposure situations. The three pacemakers with unipolar settings were affected by the highest fields of the Helmholtz coil, and one of them also by the EAS gate and the welding cable. The induction cooktop did not interfere with any of the unipolarly programmed pacemakers. Magnetic fields with intensities as high as those used in this study are rare even in industrial working environments. In most cases, employees can return to work after implantation of a bipolar pacemaker or an ICD, after an appropriate risk assessment. Pacemakers programmed to unipolar configurations can cause danger to their users in environments with high electromagnetic fields, and should be avoided, if possible.

  4. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, Francesco

    2015-01-22

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. Inmore » the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating.« less

  5. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. In the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating.

  6. Computational electronics and electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C C

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area serves as the focal point for Engineering R and D activities for developing computer-based design and analysis tools. Representative applications include design of particle accelerator cells and beamline components; design of transmission line components; engineering analysis and design of high-power (optical and microwave) components; photonics and optoelectronics circuit design; electromagnetic susceptibility analysis; and antenna synthesis. The FY-97 effort focuses on development and validation of (1) accelerator design codes; (2) 3-D massively parallel, time-dependent EM codes; (3) material models; (4) coupling and application of engineering tools for analysis and design of high-power components; andmore » (5) development of beam control algorithms coupled to beam transport physics codes. These efforts are in association with technology development in the power conversion, nondestructive evaluation, and microtechnology areas. The efforts complement technology development in Lawrence Livermore National programs.« less

  7. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  8. DIRECT CURRENT ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, A.H.

    1957-11-01

    An improved d-c electromagnetic pump is presented in which the poles, and consequently the magetic gap at the poles, are tapered to be wider at the upstream end. In addition, the cross section of the tube carryiQ the liquid metal is tapered so that the velocity of the pumped liquid increases in the downstream direction at a rate such that the counter-induced voltage in the liquid metal remains constant as it traverses the region between the poles. This configuration compensates for the distortion of the magnetic field caused by the induced voltage that would otherwise result in the lowering of the pumping capacity. This improved electromagnetic pump as practical application in the pumping of liquid metal coolants for nuclear reactors where conventional positive displacement pumps have proved unsatisfactory due to the high temperatures and the corrosive properties of the liquid metals involved.

  9. Electromagnetic wave energy converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave energy is converted into electric power with an array of mutually insulated electromagnetic wave absorber elements each responsive to an electric field component of the wave as it impinges thereon. Each element includes a portion tapered in the direction of wave propagation to provide a relatively wideband response spectrum. Each element includes an output for deriving a voltage replica of the electric field variations intercepted by it. Adjacent elements are positioned relative to each other so that an electric field subsists between adjacent elements in response to the impinging wave. The electric field results in a voltage difference between adjacent elements that is fed to a rectifier to derive dc output power.

  10. Emergent spin electromagnetism induced by magnetization textures in the presence of spin-orbit interaction (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Tatara, Gen, E-mail: gen.tatara@riken.jp; Nakabayashi, Noriyuki; Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 Japan

    2014-05-07

    Emergent electromagnetic field which couples to electron's spin in ferromagnetic metals is theoretically studied. Rashba spin-orbit interaction induces spin electromagnetic field which is in the linear order in gradient of magnetization texture. The Rashba-induced effective electric and magnetic fields satisfy in the absence of spin relaxation the Maxwell's equations as in the charge-based electromagnetism. When spin relaxation is taken into account besides spin dynamics, a monopole current emerges generating spin motive force via the Faraday's induction law. The monopole is expected to play an important role in spin-charge conversion and in the integration of spintronics into electronics.

  11. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  12. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  13. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  14. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  15. Electromagnetic tornadoes in space

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.; Crew, G.B.; Retterer, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The exotic phenomenon of energetic-ion conic formation by plasma waves in the magnetosphere is considered. Two particular transverse heating mechanisms are reviewed in detail; lower-hybrid energization of ions in the boundary layer of the plasma sheet and electromagnetic ion cyclotron resonance heating in the central region of the plasma sheet. Mean particle calculations, plasma simulations and analytical treatments of the heating processes are described.

  16. Electromagnetism; Problems and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina C.; Schrecengost, Zachariah S.

    2016-11-01

    Electromagnetism: Problems and solutions is an ideal companion book for the undergraduate student-sophomore, junior, or senior-who may want to work on more problems and receive immediate feedback while studying. Each chapter contains brief theoretical notes followed by the problem text with the solution and ends with a brief bibliography. Also presented are problems more general in nature, which may be a bit more challenging.

  17. A tightly coupled non-equilibrium model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A., E-mail: munafo@illinois.edu; Alfuhaid, S. A., E-mail: alfuhai2@illinois.edu; Panesi, M., E-mail: mpanesi@illinois.edu

    2015-10-07

    The objective of the present work is the development of a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium between translation of heavy-particles and vibration of molecules. Excited electronic states of atoms are instead treated as separate pseudo-species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. Free-electrons are assumed Maxwellian at their own temperature. The governing equations for the electro-magnetic field and the gas properties (e.g., chemical composition and temperatures) are written as a coupled systemmore » of time-dependent conservation laws. Steady-state solutions are obtained by means of an implicit Finite Volume method. The results obtained in both LTE and NLTE conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed coupled numerical method. The analysis of chemical composition and temperature distributions along the torch radius shows that: (i) the use of the LTE assumption may lead to an inaccurate prediction of the thermo-chemical state of the gas, and (ii) non-equilibrium phenomena play a significant role close the walls, due to the combined effects of Ohmic heating and macroscopic gradients.« less

  18. Carter separable electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    2000-02-01

    The purely electromagnetic analogue in flat space of Kerr's metric in general relativity is only rarely considered. Here we carry out in flat space a programme similar to Carter's investigation of metrics in general relativity in which the motion of a charged particle is separable. We concentrate on the separability of the motion (be it classical, relativistic or quantum) of a charged particle in electromagnetic fields that lie in planes through an axis of symmetry. In cylindrical polar coordinates (t,R,φ,z) the four-vector potential takes the form [formmu2] is the unit toroidal vector. The forms of the functions Φ(R,z) and A(R,z) are sought that allow separable motion. This occurs for relativistic motion only when AR,Φ and A2-Φ2 are all of the separable form ζ(λ)-η(μ)]/(λ-μ), where ζ and η are arbitrary functions, and λ and μ are spheroidal coordinates or degenerations thereof. The special forms of A and Φ that allow this are deduced. They include the Kerr metric analogue, with E+iB=-∇{q[(r-ia).(r-ia)]-1/2}. Rather more general electromagnetic fields allow separation when the motion is non-relativistic. The investigation is extended to fields that lie in parallel planes. Connections to Larmor's theorem are remarked upon.

  19. Plasminogen activator: analysis of enzyme induction by ultraviolet irradiation mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Miskin, R.; Reich, E.; Dixon, K.

    1981-10-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation mapping techniques have previously been used to study the organization of eucaryotic gene classes and transcription units. We used the same method to probe some regulatory phenomena observed in the induction of plasminogen activator (PA) biosynthesis: PA synthesis in chicken embryo fibroblasts is induced by tumor-promoting phorbol esters and by retinoic acid; furthermore, PA induction by phorbol esters is synergistic with transformation, being 10- to 20-fold greater in virus-transformed cells than in normal cells. We found that the ultraviolet irradiation inactivation cross sections for PA induction by phorbol esters and by retinoate differed significantly, suggesting that these agentsmore » induce PA biosynthesis by different mechanisms. On the other hand, the ultraviolet irradiation sensitivity of phorbol ester induction in normal chicken embryo fibroblasts was the same as in transformed cells, indicating that the synergism of transformation and phorbol esters is probably not due to different pathways of PA induction.« less

  20. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Bradly J [Jemez Springs, NM; Guenther, David C [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  1. Modulated wave formation in myocardial cells under electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takembo, Clovis N.; Mvogo, A.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Kofané, T. C.

    2018-06-01

    We exclusively analyze the onset and condition of formation of modulated waves in a diffusive FitzHugh-Nagumo model for myocardial cell excitations. The cells are connected through gap junction coupling. An additive magnetic flux variable is used to describe the effect of electromagnetic induction, while electromagnetic radiation is imposed on the magnetic flux variable as a periodic forcing. We used the discrete multiple scale expansion and obtained, from the model equations, a single differential-difference amplitude nonlinear equation. We performed the linear stability analysis of this equation and found that instability features are importantly influenced by the induced electromagnetic gain. We present the unstable and stable regions of modulational instability (MI). The resulting analytic predictions are confirmed by numerical experiments of the generic equations. The results reveal that due to MI, an initial steady state that consisted of a plane wave with low amplitude evolves into a modulated localized wave patterns, soliton-like in shape, with features of synchronization. Furthermore, the formation of periodic pulse train with breathing motion presents a disappearing pattern in the presence of electromagnetic radiation. This could provide guidance and better understanding of sudden heart failure exposed to heavily electromagnetic radiation.

  2. Electromagnetic flat sheet forming by spiral type actuator coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, S.; Aleem, M. A.; Sarwar, M. N.; Zillohu, A. U.; Awan, M. S.; Haider, A.; Ahmad, Z.; Akhtar, S.; Farooque, M.

    2016-08-01

    Focus of present work is to develop a setup for high strain rate electromagnetic forming of thin aluminum sheets (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) and optimization of forming parameters. Flat spiral coil of 99.9% pure Cu strip (2.5x8.0 mm) with self-inductance 11 μH, 13 no. of turns and resultant outer diameter of 130mm has been fabricated and was coupled to a capacitor bank of energy, voltage and capacitance of 9 kJ, 900 V and 22.8 mF, respectively. To optimize the coil design, a commercially available software FEMM-4.2 was used to simulate the electromagnetic field profile generated by the coils of different pitch but same number of turns. Results of electromagnetic field intensity proposed by simulation agree in close proximity with those of theoretical as well as experimental data. The calculation of electromagnetic force and magnetic couplings between the coil and metal sheet are made. Forming parameters were optimized for different sheet thicknesses. Electromagnetic field intensity's profile plays a principal role in forming of typical shapes and patterns in sheets.

  3. PREFACE Integrability and nonlinear phenomena Integrability and nonlinear phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ullate, David; Lombardo, Sara; Mañas, Manuel; Mazzocco, Marta; Nijhoff, Frank; Sommacal, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Back in 1967, Clifford Gardner, John Greene, Martin Kruskal and Robert Miura published a seminal paper in Physical Review Letters which was to become a cornerstone in the theory of integrable systems. In 2006, the authors of this paper received the AMS Steele Prize. In this award the AMS pointed out that `In applications of mathematics, solitons and their descendants (kinks, anti-kinks, instantons, and breathers) have entered and changed such diverse fields as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, and ocean, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. Nonlinearity has undergone a revolution: from a nuisance to be eliminated, to a new tool to be exploited.' From this discovery the modern theory of integrability bloomed, leading scientists to a deep understanding of many nonlinear phenomena which is by no means reachable by perturbation methods or other previous tools from linear theories. Nonlinear phenomena appear everywhere in nature, their description and understanding is therefore of great interest both from the theoretical and applicative point of view. If a nonlinear phenomenon can be represented by an integrable system then we have at our disposal a variety of tools to achieve a better mathematical description of the phenomenon. This special issue is largely dedicated to investigations of nonlinear phenomena which are related to the concept of integrability, either involving integrable systems themselves or because they use techniques from the theory of integrability. The idea of this special issue originated during the 18th edition of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations and Dynamical Systems (NEEDS) workshop, held at Isola Rossa, Sardinia, Italy, 16-23 May 2009 (http://needs-conferences.net/2009/). The issue benefits from the occasion offered by the meeting, in particular by its mini-workshops programme, and contains invited review papers and contributed papers. It is worth pointing out that there was an open call for papers and all contributions were peer reviewed

  4. A Connection between Transport Phenomena and Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaney, Ross; Bird, R. Byron

    2017-01-01

    Although students take courses in transport phenomena and thermodynamics, they probably do not ask whether these two subjects are related. Here we give an answer to that question. Specifically we give relationships between the equations of change for total energy, internal energy, and entropy of transport phenomena and key equations of equilibrium…

  5. A seafloor electromagnetic receiver for marine magnetotellurics and marine controlled-source electromagnetic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Wei, Wen-Bo; Deng, Ming; Wu, Zhong-Liang; Yu, Gang

    2015-09-01

    In planning and executing marine controlled-source electromagnetic methods, seafloor electromagnetic receivers must overcome the problems of noise, clock drift, and power consumption. To design a receiver that performs well and overcomes the abovementioned problems, we performed forward modeling of the E-field abnormal response and established the receiver's characteristics. We describe the design optimization and the properties of each component, that is, low-noise induction coil sensor, low-noise Ag/AgCl electrode, low-noise chopper amplifier, digital temperature-compensated crystal oscillator module, acoustic telemetry modem, and burn wire system. Finally, we discuss the results of onshore and offshore field tests to show the effectiveness of the developed seafloor electromagnetic receiver and its performance: typical E-field noise of 0.12 nV/m/rt(Hz) at 0.5 Hz, dynamic range higher than 120 dB, clock drift lower than 1 ms/day, and continuous operation of at least 21 days.

  6. An electromagnetic modulator based on electrically controllable metamaterial analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuancheng; Qiao, Tong; Zhang, Fuli; Fu, Quanhong; Dong, Jiajia; Kong, Botao; Li, Hongqiang

    2017-01-16

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is a promising technology for the enhancement of light-matter interactions, and recent demonstrations of the EIT analogue realized in artificial micro-structured medium have remarkably reduced the extreme requirement for experimental observation of EIT spectrum. In this paper, we propose to electrically control the EIT-like spectrum in a metamaterial as an electromagnetic modulator. A diode acting as a tunable resistor is loaded in the gap of paired wires to inductively tune the magnetic resonance, which induces remarkable modulation on the EIT-like spectrum through the metamaterial sample. The experimental measurements confirmed that the prediction of electromagnetic modulation in three narrow bands on the EIT-like spectrum, and a modulation contrast of up to 31 dB was achieved on the transmission through the metamaterial. Our results may facilitate the study on active/dynamical technology in translational metamaterials, which connect extraordinary manipulations on the flow of light in metamaterials, e.g., the exotic EIT, and practical applications in industry.

  7. Electromagnetic Meissner-Effect Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic Meissner-effect launching apparatus differs from previous electromagnetic launchers; no need for electromagnet coil on projectile. Result, no need for brush contacts and high-voltage commutation equipment to supply current directly to projectile coil, or for pulse circuitry to induce current in projectile coil if brush contacts not used. Compresses magnetic field surrounding rear surface of projectile, creating gradient of magnetic pressure pushing projectile forward.

  8. Electromagnetic Environmental Effects System Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-02

    Procedure (TOP) 1-2-511 Electromagnetic Environmental Effects System Testing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...airborne, sea, space, and ground systems , including associated ordnance, as stated in military standard (MIL-STD)-464A “Electromagnetic Environmental...Effects Requirement for Systems ”, as well as ADS-37A-PRF “Aeronautical Design Standard for the Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Performance and

  9. High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-09

    Electromagnetic Pulse Horizontal Electromagnetic Pulse Advanced Fast Electromagnetic Pulse Nuclear Weapons Effect Testing and Environments 16. SECURITY... Weapons of Mass Destruction Agency (USANCA). In order to effectively determine criteria compliance, the TO/PE must thoroughly understand the...ELECTROMAGNETIC ENVIRONMENT AND EFFECTS. A.1 The electromagnetic environment produced by a nuclear weapon consists of the ionization of the atmosphere and

  10. Electromagnetic Spectrum Test and Evaluation Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    HERO , hazards of electromagnetic radiation to ordnance ; HERP, hazards of electromagnetic radiation to personnel; HERF, hazards of electromagnetic ... electromagnetic pulse (EMP); electronic protection; electrostatic dis- charge (ESD); hazards of electromagnetic radi- ation to personnel (HERP), ordnance ...including ordnance containing electrically initiated devices, to be mutually compatible in their intended

  11. Theory of electromagnetic wave propagation in ferromagnetic Rashba conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Junya; Takeuchi, Akihito; Kohno, Hiroshi; Tatara, Gen

    2018-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of various electromagnetic wave propagation phenomena in a ferromagnetic bulk Rashba conductor from the perspective of quantum mechanical transport. In this system, both the space inversion and time reversal symmetries are broken, as characterized by the Rashba field α and magnetization M, respectively. First, we present a general phenomenological analysis of electromagnetic wave propagation in media with broken space inversion and time reversal symmetries based on the dielectric tensor. The dependence of the dielectric tensor on the wave vector q and M is retained to first order. Then, we calculate the microscopic electromagnetic response of the current and spin of conduction electrons subjected to α and M, based on linear response theory and the Green's function method; the results are used to study the system optical properties. First, it is found that a large α enhances the anisotropic properties of the system and enlarges the frequency range in which the electromagnetic waves have hyperbolic dispersion surfaces and exhibit unusual propagations known as negative refraction and backward waves. Second, we consider the electromagnetic cross-correlation effects (direct and inverse Edelstein effects) on the wave propagation. These effects stem from the lack of space inversion symmetry and yield q-linear off-diagonal components in the dielectric tensor. This induces a Rashba-induced birefringence, in which the polarization vector rotates around the vector (α ×q ) . In the presence of M, which breaks time reversal symmetry, there arises an anomalous Hall effect and the dielectric tensor acquires off-diagonal components linear in M. For α ∥M , these components yield the Faraday effect for the Faraday configuration q ∥M and the Cotton-Mouton effect for the Voigt configuration ( q ⊥M ). When α and M are noncollinear, M- and q-induced optical phenomena are possible, which include nonreciprocal directional dichroism in the

  12. The gravitational analog of Faraday's induction law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zile, Daniel; Overduin, James

    2015-04-01

    Michael Faraday, the discoverer of electromagnetic induction, was convinced that there must also be a gravitational analog of this law, and he carried out drop-tower experiments in 1849 to look for the electric current induced in a coil by changes in gravitational flux through the coil. This work, now little remembered, was in some ways the first investigation of what we would now call a unified-field theory. We revisit Faraday's experiments in the light of current knowledge and ask what might be learned if they were to be performed today. We then review the gravitational analog for Faraday's law that arises within the vector (or gravito-electromagnetic) approximation to Einstein's theory of general relativity in the weak-field, low-velocity limit. This law relates spinning masses and induced ``mass currents'' rather than spinning charges and electric currents, but is otherwise remarkably similar to its electromagnetic counterpart. The predicted effects are completely unobservable in everyday settings like those envisioned by Faraday, but are thought to be relevant in astrophysical contexts like the accretion disks around collapsed stars, thus bearing out Faraday's remarkable intuition. Undergraduate student.

  13. Approximate analytical solution for induction heating of solid cylinders

    DOE PAGES

    Jankowski, Todd Andrew; Pawley, Norma Helen; Gonzales, Lindsey Michal; ...

    2015-10-20

    An approximate solution to the mathematical model for induction heating of a solid cylinder in a cylindrical induction coil is presented here. The coupled multiphysics model includes equations describing the electromagnetic field in the heated object, a heat transfer simulation to determine temperature of the heated object, and an AC circuit simulation of the induction heating power supply. A multiple-scale perturbation method is used to solve the multiphysics model. The approximate analytical solution yields simple closed-form expressions for the electromagnetic field and heat generation rate in the solid cylinder, for the equivalent impedance of the associated tank circuit, and formore » the frequency response of a variable frequency power supply driving the tank circuit. The solution developed here is validated by comparing predicted power supply frequency to both experimental measurements and calculated values from finite element analysis for heating of graphite cylinders in an induction furnace. The simple expressions from the analytical solution clearly show the functional dependence of the power supply frequency on the material properties of the load and the geometrical characteristics of the furnace installation. In conclusion, the expressions developed here provide physical insight into observations made during load signature analysis of induction heating.« less

  14. Tiny Electromagnetic Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    This paper considers electromagnetic transients of a modest total energy ({ E }≳ {10}40 erg) and small initial size ({ R }≳ {10}-1 cm). They could be produced during collisions between relativistic field structures (e.g., macroscopic magnetic dipoles) that formed around or before cosmic electroweak symmetry breaking. The outflowing energy has a dominant electromagnetic component; a subdominant thermal component (temperature > 1 GeV) supplies inertia in the form of residual {e}+/- . A thin shell forms, expanding subluminally and attaining a Lorentz factor ˜ {10}6{--7} before decelerating. Drag is supplied by the reflection of an ambient magnetic field and deflection of ambient free electrons. Emission of low-frequency (GHz-THz) superluminal waves takes place through three channels: (I) reflection of the ambient magnetic field; (II) direct linear conversion of the embedded magnetic field into a superluminal mode; and (III) excitation outside the shell by corrugation of its surface. The escaping electromagnetic pulse is very narrow (a few wavelengths), so the width of the detected transient is dominated by propagation effects. GHz radio transients are emitted from (I) the dark matter halos of galaxies and (II) the near-horizon regions of supermassive black holes that formed via direct gas collapse and now accrete slowly. Brighter and much narrower 0.01-1 THz pulses are predicted at a rate at least comparable to fast radio bursts, experiencing weaker scattering and absorption. The same explosions also accelerate protons up to ˜ {10}19 eV, and heavier nuclei up to 1020-21 eV.

  15. Mass sensitivity studies for an inductively driven railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, J. J., III; Young, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    Those areas which result in substantial system mass reductions for an HPG (homopolar generator) driven EML (electromagnetic launcher) are identified. Sensitivity studies are performed by varying launch mass, peak acceleration, launcher efficiency, inductance gradient, injection velocity, barrel mass per unit length, fuel tankage and pump estimates, and component energy and power densities. Two major contributors to the system mass are the allowed number of shots per barrel versus the number required for the mission, and the barrel length. The effects of component performance parameters, such as friction coefficient, injection velocity, ablation coefficient, rail resistivity, armature voltage, peak acceleration, and inductance gradient on these two areas, are addressed.

  16. MEMS electromagnetic energy harvesters with multiple resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelatury, Sudarshan R.; Gray, Robert

    2014-06-01

    There is going on a flurry of research activity in the development of effcient energy harvesters from all branches of energy conversion. The need for developing self-powered wireless sensors and actuators to be employed in unmanned combat vehicles also seems to grow steadily. These vehicles are inducted into perilous war zones for silent watch missions. Energy management is sometimes carried out using misson-aware energy expenditure strategies. Also, when there is a requirement for constant monitoring of events, the sensors and the subsystems of combat vehicles require energy harvesters that can operate over a discrete set of spot frequencies. This paper attempts to review some of the recent techniques and the energy harvesting devices based on electromagnetic and electromechanical principles. In particular, we shall discuss the design and performance of a MEMS-harvester that exhibits multiple resonances. Frequency response of a simulated electromagnetic harvester is plotted. It has three dominant peaks at three different resonant frequencies. Variation in the load power in the normalized units as a function of load is found, which determines the matched load resistance.

  17. Electromagnetic studies of global geodynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarits, Pascal

    1994-03-01

    The deep electromagnetic sounding (DES) technique is one of the few geophysical methods, along with seismology, gravity, heat flow, which may be use to probe the structure of the Earth's mantle directly. The interpretation of the DESs may provide electrical conductivity profiles down to the upper part of the lower mantle. The electrical conductivity is extremely sensitive to most of the thermodynamic processes we believe are acting in the Earth's mantle (temperature increases, partial melting, phase transition and to a lesser extent pressure). Therefore, in principle, results from DES along with laboratory measurements could be used to constrain models of these processes. The DES technique is reviewed in the light of recent results obtained in a variety of domains: data acquisition and analysis, global induction modeling and data inversion and interpretation. The mechanisms and the importance of surface distortions of the DES data are reviewed and techniques to model them are discussed. The recent results in terms of the conductivity distribution in the mantle from local and global DES are presented and a tentative synthesis is proposed. The geodynamic interpretations of the deep conductivity structures are reviewed. The existence of mantle lateral heterogeneities in conductivity at all scales and depths for which electromagnetic data are available is now well documented. A comparison with global results from seismology is presented.

  18. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Dahl, L.R.

    1996-06-25

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom. 9 figs.

  19. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1996-01-01

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom.

  20. Electromagnetic Meissner effect launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electromagnetic projectile launcher provides acceleration of a superconducting projectile through the diamagnetic repulsion of the superconducting projectile. A superconducting layer is provided aft of the projectile, either directly on the projectile or on a platform upon which the projectile is carried, and a traveling magnetic field is caused to propagate along a magnetic field drive coil in which the projectile is disposed. The resulting diamagnetic repulsion between the superconducting projectile and the traveling magnetic field causes the projectile to be propelled along the coil. In one embodiment, a segmented drive coil is used to generate the traveling magnetic field.

  1. Interactive electromagnetic launcher simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, F. J.; Howland, H. R.; Hughes, W. F.; Fikse, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mathematical model, usage, and documentation of an interactive computer simulation for an electromagnetic launcher is presented. The launcher is modeled as an electrical circuit. Three slight variations of the program permit studies of a launcher with (1) rail skin effects, (2) rail skin effects and approximated storage coil skin effects, or (3) neither of these effects. Usage of the program as currently implemented on the Westinghouse R&D Univac 1106 is described, with a sample session shown. The implementation of the program permits rapid scoping of the effects of parameter changes.

  2. Induction heating apparatus and methods of operation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, John G.

    2006-08-01

    Methods of operation of an induction melter include providing material within a cooled crucible proximate an inductor. A desired electromagnetic flux skin depth for heating the material within the crucible may be selected, and a frequency of an alternating current for energizing the inductor and for producing the desired skin depth may be selected. The alternating current frequency may be adjusted after energizing the inductor to maintain the desired electromagnetic flux skin depth. The desired skin depth may be substantially maintained as the temperature of the material varies. An induction heating apparatus includes a sensor configured to detect changes in at least one physical characteristic of a material to be heated in a crucible, and a controller configured for selectively varying a frequency of an alternating current for energizing an inductor at least partially in response to changes in the physical characteristic to be detected by the sensor.

  3. Induction: Making the Leap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ling, Lorraine M.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a critical examination of a variety of approaches to induction focusing especially upon Australia and other Pacific Rim countries. The question of the purposes induction serves for graduate teachers, experienced teachers and education systems is addressed in terms of whether it is a technical exercise which preserves the…

  4. Investigation of the structure of the electromagnetic field and related phenomena, generated by the Active Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, Yakov L.

    1991-01-01

    The altitude dependencies of the moduli of the electric field E in the VLF and LF frequency bands (f sub B much less than F less than f sub B) and in the altitude range of the ionosphere Z equals (400 to 2500) km up to Z equals 6000 km (the bottom of the magnetosphere) were calculated by the linear theory. The amplitudes of the field have large maxima in four regions: the axis field (E sub o) close to the direction of the Earth's magnetic field line B sub o, beta approximately 0 degrees, the fields (E sub St), (E sub RevSt) and (E sub Res) in the Storey, Reversed Story and Resonance cones, beta approximately (0 approaches 20) degrees. Their maxima are very pronounced close to the low hybrid frequency F sub L. The nonlinear heating of the magnetoplasma under the action of an electric field Ee (sup iwt) was recently expanded by the macroscopic theory by the author. The velocities, collision frequencies and temperatures of all the constituents of a magnetoplasma - electrons, ions, and neutral particles - are taken into account. Formulae and numerical results are presented for the ionosphere in the frequency band F equals (1 to 10 exp 4) kHz and altitude range Z approximately (100 - 1000) km. Some results of calculations by the self consistent solution of the basis system of equations are also discussed.

  5. Complex monitoring and alert network for electromagnetic, infrasound, acoustic seismotectonic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    -Emilian Toader, Victorin; Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Constantin, Ionescu

    2014-05-01

    The Romanian seismicity recorded in 2013 three important events: the largest seismic "silence", the shortest sequence of two earthquakes greater than 4.8R in less than 14 days after the "Romanian National Institute for Earth Physics" (NIEP) developed a digital network, and a very high crustal activity in Galati area. We analyze the variations of the telluric currents and local magnetic field, variations of the atmospheric electrostatic field, infrasound, temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, variations in the earth crust with inclinometers and animal behavior. The general effect is the first high seismic energy discontinuity that could be a precursor factor. Since 1977 Romania did not register any important earthquake that would generate a sense of fear among the population. In parallel with the seismic network NIEP developed a magneto-telluric, bioseismic, VLF and acoustic network. A large frequency spectrum is covered for mechanical vibration, magnetic and electric field with ground and air sensors. Special software was designed for acquisition, analysis and real time alert using internet direct connection, web page, email and SMS. Many examples show the sensitivity of telluric current, infrasound, acoustic records (from air-ground), and the effect of tectonic stress on the magnetic field or ground deformation. The next update of the multidisciplinary monitoring network will include measurement of ionization, radon emission, sky color, solar radiation and extension of infrasound and VL/LF equipment. NOAA Space Weather satellites transmit solar activity magnetic field data, X ray flux, electron, and proton flux information useful for complex analysis.

  6. A Priori Error-Controlled Simulation of Electromagnetic Phenomena for HPC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-12

    our project manager from the Army in July, coinciding with Prof. Hagstrom’s visit to HyPerComp. We are presently aiming to integrate the CRBC module...2P (P +1)+P 2 = 3P 2+2P equations in 3(P +1)2 = 3P 2+6P +3 variables. Thus 4P +3 additional equations are required. We first incorporate incoming data...P + 1) = 4P + 4 equations, one more than we can use. We remove an equation by only imposing the sum of (30) and (33) for j = k = 0. 4 Meep Meep-1.2

  7. Anovulation and ovulation induction

    PubMed Central

    Katsikis, I; Kita, M; Karkanaki, A; Prapas, N; Panidis, D

    2006-01-01

    Conventional treatment of normogonadotropic anovulatory infertility is ovulation induction using the antiestrogen clomiphene citrate, followed by follicle-stimulating hormone. Multiple follicle development, associated with ovarian hyperstimulation, and multiple pregnancy remain the major complications. Cumulative singleton and multiple pregnancy rate data after different induction treatments are needed. Newer ovulation induction interventions, such as insulin-sensitizing drugs, aromatase inhibitors and laparoscopic ovarian electrocoagulation, should be compared with conventional treatments. Ovulation induction efficiency might improve if patient subgroups with altered chances for success or complications with new or conventional techniques could be identified, using multivariate prediction models based on initial screening characteristics. This would make ovulation induction more cost-effective, safe and convenient, enabling doctors to advise patients on the most effective and patient-tailored treatment strategy. PMID:20351807

  8. Principles of Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs*, Richard J.

    The basic concepts involved in induction accelerators are introduced in this chapter. The objective is to provide a foundation for the more detailed coverage of key technology elements and specific applications in the following chapters. A wide variety of induction accelerators are discussed in the following chapters, from the high current linear electron accelerator configurations that have been the main focus of the original developments, to circular configurations like the ion synchrotrons that are the subject of more recent research. The main focus in the present chapter is on the induction module containing the magnetic core that plays the role of a transformer in coupling the pulsed power from the modulator to the charged particle beam. This is the essential common element in all these induction accelerators, and an understanding of the basic processes involved in its operation is the main objective of this chapter. (See [1] for a useful and complementary presentation of the basic principles in induction linacs.)

  9. EM Induction Experiment to Determine the Moment of a Magnet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najiya Maryam, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    If we drop a magnet through a coil, an emf is induced in the coil according to Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. Here, such an experiment is done using expEYES kit. The plot of emf versus time has a specific shape with two peaks. A theoretical analysis of this graph is discussed here for both short and long cylindrical magnets.…

  10. Electromagnetic δ -function sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Prachi; Milton, Kimball A.; Shajesh, K. V.; Brevik, Iver

    2017-10-01

    We develop a formalism to extend our previous work on the electromagnetic δ -function plates to a spherical surface. The electric (λe) and magnetic (λg) couplings to the surface are through δ -function potentials defining the dielectric permittivity and the diamagnetic permeability, with two anisotropic coupling tensors. The formalism incorporates dispersion. The electromagnetic Green's dyadic breaks up into transverse electric and transverse magnetic parts. We derive the Casimir interaction energy between two concentric δ -function spheres in this formalism and show that it has the correct asymptotic flat-plate limit. We systematically derive expressions for the Casimir self-energy and the total stress on a spherical shell using a δ -function potential, properly regulated by temporal and spatial point splitting, which are different from the conventional temporal point splitting. In the strong-coupling limit, we recover the usual result for the perfectly conducting spherical shell but in addition there is an integrated curvature-squared divergent contribution. For finite coupling, there are additional divergent contributions; in particular, there is a familiar logarithmic divergence occurring in the third order of the uniform asymptotic expansion that renders it impossible to extract a unique finite energy except in the case of an isorefractive sphere, which translates into λg=-λe.

  11. The HPS electromagnetic calorimeter

    DOE PAGES

    Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N.; Battaglieri, M.; ...

    2017-02-22

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) is searching for a new gauge boson, the so-called "heavy photon". Through its kinetic mixing with the Standard Model photon, this particle could decay into an electron-positron pair. It would then be detectable as a narrow peak in the invariant mass spectrum of such pairs, or, depending on its lifetime, by a decay downstream of the production target. The HPS experiment is installed in Hall-B of Jefferson Lab. This article presents the design and performance of one of the two detectors of the experiment, the electromagnetic calorimeter, during the runs performed in 2015-2016. The calorimeter's main purpose is to provide a fast trigger and reduce the copious background from electromagnetic processes through matching with a tracking detector. Finally, the detector is a homogeneous calorimeter, made of 442 lead-tungsten (PbWOmore » $$_4$$) scintillating crystals, each read-out by an avalanche photodiode coupled to a custom trans-impedance amplifier.« less

  12. The HPS electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N.; Battaglieri, M.

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) is searching for a new gauge boson, the so-called "heavy photon". Through its kinetic mixing with the Standard Model photon, this particle could decay into an electron-positron pair. It would then be detectable as a narrow peak in the invariant mass spectrum of such pairs, or, depending on its lifetime, by a decay downstream of the production target. The HPS experiment is installed in Hall-B of Jefferson Lab. This article presents the design and performance of one of the two detectors of the experiment, the electromagnetic calorimeter, during the runs performed in 2015-2016. The calorimeter's main purpose is to provide a fast trigger and reduce the copious background from electromagnetic processes through matching with a tracking detector. Finally, the detector is a homogeneous calorimeter, made of 442 lead-tungsten (PbWOmore » $$_4$$) scintillating crystals, each read-out by an avalanche photodiode coupled to a custom trans-impedance amplifier.« less

  13. The HPS electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N.; Battaglieri, M.; Bondì, M.; Buchanan, E.; Calvo, D.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; D'Angelo, A.; Napoli, M. De; Vita, R. De; Dupré, R.; Egiyan, H.; Ehrhart, M.; Filippi, A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Girod, F.-X.; Guidal, M.; Holtrop, M.; Iurasov, V.; Kubarovsky, V.; Livingston, K.; McCarty, K.; McCormick, J.; McKinnon, B.; Osipenko, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Randazzo, N.; Rauly, E.; Raydo, B.; Rindel, E.; Rizzo, A.; Rosier, P.; Sipala, V.; Stepanyan, S.; Szumila-Vance, H.; Weinstein, L. B.

    2017-05-01

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) is searching for a new gauge boson, the so-called "heavy photon." Through its kinetic mixing with the Standard Model photon, this particle could decay into an electron-positron pair. It would then be detectable as a narrow peak in the invariant mass spectrum of such pairs, or, depending on its lifetime, by a decay downstream of the production target. The HPS experiment is installed in Hall-B of Jefferson Lab. This article presents the design and performance of one of the two detectors of the experiment, the electromagnetic calorimeter, during the runs performed in 2015-2016. The calorimeter's main purpose is to provide a fast trigger and reduce the copious background from electromagnetic processes through matching with a tracking detector. The detector is a homogeneous calorimeter, made of 442 lead-tungstate (PbWO4) scintillating crystals, each read out by an avalanche photodiode coupled to a custom trans-impedance amplifier.

  14. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  15. Metamaterials beyond electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadic, Muamer; Bückmann, Tiemo; Schittny, Robert; Wegener, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Metamaterials are rationally designed man-made structures composed of functional building blocks that are densely packed into an effective (crystalline) material. While metamaterials are mostly associated with negative refractive indices and invisibility cloaking in electromagnetism or optics, the deceptively simple metamaterial concept also applies to rather different areas such as thermodynamics, classical mechanics (including elastostatics, acoustics, fluid dynamics and elastodynamics), and, in principle, also to quantum mechanics. We review the basic concepts, analogies and differences to electromagnetism, and give an overview on the current state of the art regarding theory and experiment—all from the viewpoint of an experimentalist. This review includes homogeneous metamaterials as well as intentionally inhomogeneous metamaterial architectures designed by coordinate-transformation-based approaches analogous to transformation optics. Examples are laminates, transient thermal cloaks, thermal concentrators and inverters, ‘space-coiling’ metamaterials, anisotropic acoustic metamaterials, acoustic free-space and carpet cloaks, cloaks for gravitational surface waves, auxetic mechanical metamaterials, pentamode metamaterials (‘meta-liquids’), mechanical metamaterials with negative dynamic mass density, negative dynamic bulk modulus, or negative phase velocity, seismic metamaterials, cloaks for flexural waves in thin plates and three-dimensional elastostatic cloaks.

  16. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation induces oxidative DNA base damage in a mouse spermatocyte-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2013-03-27

    Whether exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR) emitted from mobile phones can induce DNA damage in male germ cells remains unclear. In this study, we conducted a 24h intermittent exposure (5 min on and 10 min off) of a mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line to 1800 MHz Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) signals in GSM-Talk mode at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1 W/kg, 2 W/kg or 4 W/kg. Subsequently, through the use of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) in a modified comet assay, we determined that the extent of DNA migration was significantly increased at a SAR of 4 W/kg. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that levels of the DNA adduct 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) were also increased at a SAR of 4 W/kg. These increases were concomitant with similar increases in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); these phenomena were mitigated by co-treatment with the antioxidant α-tocopherol. However, no detectable DNA strand breakage was observed by the alkaline comet assay. Taking together, these findings may imply the novel possibility that RF-EMR with insufficient energy for the direct induction of DNA strand breaks may produce genotoxicity through oxidative DNA base damage in male germ cells. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Knots in electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrayás, M.; Bouwmeester, D.; Trueba, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Maxwell equations in vacuum allow for solutions with a non-trivial topology in the electric and magnetic field line configurations at any given moment in time. One example is a space filling congruence of electric and magnetic field lines forming circles lying on the surfaces of nested tori. In this example the electric, magnetic and Poynting vector fields are orthogonal everywhere. As time evolves the electric and magnetic fields expand and deform without changing the topology and energy, while the Poynting vector structure remains unchanged while propagating with the speed of light. The topology is characterized by the concept of helicity of the field configuration. Helicity is an important fundamental concept and for massless fields it is a conserved quantity under conformal transformations. We will review several methods by which linked and knotted electromagnetic (spin-1) fields can be derived. A first method, introduced by A. Rañada, uses the formulation of the Maxwell equations in terms of differential forms combined with the Hopf map from the three-sphere S3 to the two-sphere S2. A second method is based on spinor and twistor theory developed by R. Penrose in which elementary twistor functions correspond to the family of electromagnetic torus knots. A third method uses the Bateman construction of generating null solutions from complex Euler potentials. And a fourth method uses special conformal transformations, in particular conformal inversion, to generate new linked and knotted field configurations from existing ones. This fourth method is often accompanied by shifting singularities in the field to complex space-time points. Of course the various methods must be closely related to one another although they have been developed largely independently and they suggest different directions in which to expand the study of topologically non-trivial field configurations. It will be shown how the twistor formulation allows for a direct extension to massless

  18. Superconductivity for Electromagnetic Guns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    greater than that for a pulsed homopolar machine when the time constant is less than 0.1 sec (ref 32) (See fig. 18). Since the energy density in a...transferred from the capacitor to the induct- or. If the capacitor is replaced by a homopolar machine, then, as is well-known, the kinetic energy of the...rotor plays the role of an "electrical" capacitance and the two arrangements (capacitance and homopolar ) are functionally equivalent. Group 3. In

  19. Classifying prion and prion-like phenomena.

    PubMed

    Harbi, Djamel; Harrison, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The universe of prion and prion-like phenomena has expanded significantly in the past several years. Here, we overview the challenges in classifying this data informatically, given that terms such as "prion-like", "prion-related" or "prion-forming" do not have a stable meaning in the scientific literature. We examine the spectrum of proteins that have been described in the literature as forming prions, and discuss how "prion" can have a range of meaning, with a strict definition being for demonstration of infection with in vitro-derived recombinant prions. We suggest that although prion/prion-like phenomena can largely be apportioned into a small number of broad groups dependent on the type of transmissibility evidence for them, as new phenomena are discovered in the coming years, a detailed ontological approach might be necessary that allows for subtle definition of different "flavors" of prion / prion-like phenomena.

  20. Exploration of the Electromagnetic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullekrug, M.

    2009-01-01

    The electromagnetic environment is composed of electric and magnetic fields which result from man-made and natural sources. An elementary experiment is described to explore the electromagnetic environment by measuring electric fields in the frequency range from approximately equal to 10 to 24 000 Hz. The equipment required to conduct the…

  1. Time-lapse monitoring of soil water content using electromagnetic conductivity imaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The volumetric soil water content (VWC) is fundamental to agriculture. Unfortunately, the universally accepted thermogravimetric method is labour intensive and time-consuming to use for field-scale monitoring. Electromagnetic (EM) induction instruments have proven to be useful in mapping the spatio-...

  2. Monitoring scale-specific and temporal variation in electromagnetic conductivity images

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the semi-arid and arid landscapes of southwest USA, irrigation sustains agricultural activity; however, there are increasing demands on water resources. As such spatial temporal variation of soil moisture needs to be monitored. One way to do this is to use electromagnetic (EM) induction instrumen...

  3. How do pre-service teachers picture various electromagnetic phenomenon? A qualitative study of pre-service teachers' conceptual understanding of fundamental electromagnetic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Christopher P.

    This study analyzes the nature of pre-service teachers' conceptual models of various electromagnetic phenomena, specifically electrical current, electrical resistance, and light/matter interactions. This is achieved through the students answering the three questions on electromagnetism using a free response approach including both verbal and pictorial representation. The student responses are then analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively utilizing a multi-tiered approach. These analyses include epistemological representation, misconceptions, correct conceptions, and the impact of high school physics exposure on student conceptions. This study is unique in three primary respects; the free response questionnaire approach, a subject group that consists of pre-service teachers, and a primarily female demographic.

  4. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  5. Electromagnetic containerless processing requirements and recommended facility concept and capabilities for space lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, R. T.; Bloom, H. L.; Napaluch, L. J.; Stockhoff, E. H.; Wouch, G.

    1974-01-01

    Containerless melting, reaction, and solidification experiments and processes which potentially can lead to new understanding of material science and production of new or improved materials in the weightless space environment are reviewed in terms of planning for spacelab. Most of the experiments and processes discussed are amenable to the employment of electromagnetic position control and electromagnetic induction or electron beam heating and melting. The spectrum of relevant properties of materials, which determine requirements for a space laboratory electromagnetic containerless processing facility are reviewed. Appropriate distributions and associated coil structures are analyzed and compared on the basis of efficiency, for providing the functions of position sensing, control, and induction heating. Several coil systems are found capable of providing these functions. Exchangeable modular coils in appropriate sizes are recommended to achieve the maximum power efficiencies, for a wide range of specimen sizes and resistivities, in order to conserve total facility power.

  6. Advancement of Analysis Method for Electromagnetic Screening Effect of Mountain Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutani, Tamio; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Terada, Natsuki; Fukuda, Mitsuyoshi; Tate, Yutaka; Inada, Satoshi; Itoh, Hidenori; Wakao, Shinji

    In this paper we report advancement of an analysis method for electromagnetic screening effect of mountain tunnel with a multiple conductor circuit model. On A.C. electrified railways it is a great issue to manage the influence of electromagnetic induction caused by feeding circuits. Tunnels are said to have a screening effect to reduce the electromagnetic induction because a large amount of steel is used in the tunnels. But recently the screening effect is less expected because New Austrian Tunneling Method (NATM), in which the amount of steel used is less than in conventional methods, is adopted as the standard tunneling method for constructing mountain tunnels. So we measured and analyzed the actual screening effect of mountain tunnels constructed with NATM. In the process of the analysis we have advanced a method to analyze the screening effect more precisely. In this method we can adequately model tunnel structure as a part of multiple conductor circuit.

  7. Control of electronic transport in graphene by electromagnetic dressing

    PubMed Central

    Kristinsson, K.; Kibis, O. V.; Morina, S.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated theoretically that the renormalization of the electron energy spectrum near the Dirac point of graphene by a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field) drastically depends on polarization of the field. Namely, linear polarization results in an anisotropic gapless energy spectrum, whereas circular polarization leads to an isotropic gapped one. As a consequence, the stationary (dc) electronic transport in graphene strongly depends on parameters of the dressing field: A circularly polarized field monotonically decreases the isotropic conductivity of graphene, whereas a linearly polarized one results in both giant anisotropy of conductivity (which can reach thousands of percents) and the oscillating behavior of the conductivity as a function of the field intensity. Since the predicted phenomena can be observed in a graphene layer irradiated by a monochromatic electromagnetic wave, the elaborated theory opens a substantially new way to control electronic properties of graphene with light. PMID:26838371

  8. Control of electronic transport in graphene by electromagnetic dressing.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, K; Kibis, O V; Morina, S; Shelykh, I A

    2016-02-03

    We demonstrated theoretically that the renormalization of the electron energy spectrum near the Dirac point of graphene by a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field) drastically depends on polarization of the field. Namely, linear polarization results in an anisotropic gapless energy spectrum, whereas circular polarization leads to an isotropic gapped one. As a consequence, the stationary (dc) electronic transport in graphene strongly depends on parameters of the dressing field: A circularly polarized field monotonically decreases the isotropic conductivity of graphene, whereas a linearly polarized one results in both giant anisotropy of conductivity (which can reach thousands of percents) and the oscillating behavior of the conductivity as a function of the field intensity. Since the predicted phenomena can be observed in a graphene layer irradiated by a monochromatic electromagnetic wave, the elaborated theory opens a substantially new way to control electronic properties of graphene with light.

  9. Direct reading inductance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolby, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A direct reading inductance meter comprised of a crystal oscillator and an LC tuned oscillator is presented. The oscillators function respectively to generate a reference frequency, f(r), and to generate an initial frequency, f(0), which when mixed produce a difference equal to zero. Upon connecting an inductor of small unknown value in the LC circuit to change its resonant frequency to f(x), a difference frequency (f(r)-f(x)) is produced that is very nearly a linear function of the inductance of the inductor. The difference frequency is measured and displayed on a linear scale in units of inductance.

  10. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  11. Electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojarski, N. N.

    1972-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic inverse scattering identity, based on the physical optics approximation, is developed for the monostatic scattered far field cross section of perfect conductors. Uniqueness of this inverse identity is proven. This identity requires complete scattering information for all frequencies and aspect angles. A nonsingular integral equation is developed for the arbitrary case of incomplete frequence and/or aspect angle scattering information. A general closed-form solution to this integral equation is developed, which yields the shape of the scatterer from such incomplete information. A specific practical radar solution is presented. The resolution of this solution is developed, yielding short-pulse target resolution radar system parameter equations. The special cases of two- and one-dimensional inverse scattering and the special case of a priori knowledge of scatterer symmetry are treated in some detail. The merits of this solution over the conventional radar imaging technique are discussed.

  12. Electromagnetic Waves and Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Wayne D.

    2017-11-01

    This book reviews basic electromagnetic (EM) wave theory and applies it specifically to lasers to give the reader not only tangible examples of how the theory is manifested in real life, but also practical knowledge about lasers, and their operation and usage. The latter can be useful for those involved with using lasers. As a short treatise on this subject matter, this book is not intended to delve deeply into the details of EM waves nor lasers. A bibliography is provided for those who wish to explore in more depth the topics covered in this book. Rather, the aim of this book is to offer a quick overview, which will allow the reader to gain a competent general understanding of EM waves and lasers.

  13. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental data were combined with one-dimensional conservation relations to yield information on the energy deposition ratio in a parallel-plate accelerator, where the downstream flow was confined to a constant area channel. Approximately 70% of the total input power was detected in the exhaust flow, of which only about 20% appeared as directed kinetic energy, thus implying that a downstream expansion to convert chamber enthalpy into kinetic energy must be an important aspect of conventional high power MPD arcs. Spectroscopic experiments on a quasi-steady MPD argon accelerator verified the presence of A(III) and the absence of A(I), and indicated an azimuthal structure in the jet related to the mass injection locations. Measurements of pressure in the arc chamber and impact pressure in the exhaust jet using a piezocrystal backed by a Plexiglas rod were in good agreement with the electromagnetic thrust model.

  14. Observation of unidirectional backscattering-immune topological electromagnetic states.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Chong, Yidong; Joannopoulos, J D; Soljacić, Marin

    2009-10-08

    One of the most striking phenomena in condensed-matter physics is the quantum Hall effect, which arises in two-dimensional electron systems subject to a large magnetic field applied perpendicular to the plane in which the electrons reside. In such circumstances, current is carried by electrons along the edges of the system, in so-called chiral edge states (CESs). These are states that, as a consequence of nontrivial topological properties of the bulk electronic band structure, have a unique directionality and are robust against scattering from disorder. Recently, it was theoretically predicted that electromagnetic analogues of such electronic edge states could be observed in photonic crystals, which are materials having refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through them. Here we report the experimental realization and observation of such electromagnetic CESs in a magneto-optical photonic crystal fabricated in the microwave regime. We demonstrate that, like their electronic counterparts, electromagnetic CESs can travel in only one direction and are very robust against scattering from disorder; we find that even large metallic scatterers placed in the path of the propagating edge modes do not induce reflections. These modes may enable the production of new classes of electromagnetic device and experiments that would be impossible using conventional reciprocal photonic states alone. Furthermore, our experimental demonstration and study of photonic CESs provides strong support for the generalization and application of topological band theories to classical and bosonic systems, and may lead to the realization and observation of topological phenomena in a generally much more controlled and customizable fashion than is typically possible with electronic systems.

  15. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry and Current Sheet Trajectory of a Conical Theta Pinch Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Bonds, Kevin W.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented demonstrating the e ect of inductive coil geometry and current sheet trajectory on the exhaust velocity of propellant in conical theta pinch pulsed induc- tive plasma accelerators. The electromagnetic coupling between the inductive coil of the accelerator and a plasma current sheet is simulated, substituting a conical copper frustum for the plasma. The variation of system inductance as a function of plasma position is obtained by displacing the simulated current sheet from the coil while measuring the total inductance of the coil. Four coils of differing geometries were employed, and the total inductance of each coil was measured as a function of the axial displacement of two sep- arate copper frusta both having the same cone angle and length as the coil but with one compressed to a smaller size relative to the coil. The measured relationship between total coil inductance and current sheet position closes a dynamical circuit model that is used to calculate the resulting current sheet velocity for various coil and current sheet con gura- tions. The results of this model, which neglects the pinching contribution to thrust, radial propellant con nement, and plume divergence, indicate that in a conical theta pinch ge- ometry current sheet pinching is detrimental to thruster performance, reducing the kinetic energy of the exhausting propellant by up to 50% (at the upper bound for the parameter range of the study). The decrease in exhaust velocity was larger for coils and simulated current sheets of smaller half cone angles. An upper bound for the pinching contribution to thrust is estimated for typical operating parameters. Measurements of coil inductance for three di erent current sheet pinching conditions are used to estimate the magnetic pressure as a function of current sheet radial compression. The gas-dynamic contribution to axial acceleration is also estimated and shown to not compensate for the decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration

  16. Split Octonion Reformulation for Electromagnetic Chiral Media of Massive Dyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanyal, B. C.

    2017-12-01

    In an explicit, unified, and covariant formulation of an octonion algebra, we study and generalize the electromagnetic chiral fields equations of massive dyons with the split octonionic representation. Starting with 2×2 Zorn’s vector matrix realization of split-octonion and its dual Euclidean spaces, we represent the unified structure of split octonionic electric and magnetic induction vectors for chiral media. As such, in present paper, we describe the chiral parameter and pairing constants in terms of split octonionic matrix representation of Drude-Born-Fedorov constitutive relations. We have expressed a split octonionic electromagnetic field vector for chiral media, which exhibits the unified field structure of electric and magnetic chiral fields of dyons. The beauty of split octonionic representation of Zorn vector matrix realization is that, the every scalar and vector components have its own meaning in the generalized chiral electromagnetism of dyons. Correspondingly, we obtained the alternative form of generalized Proca-Maxwell’s equations of massive dyons in chiral media. Furthermore, the continuity equations, Poynting theorem and wave propagation for generalized electromagnetic fields of chiral media of massive dyons are established by split octonionic form of Zorn vector matrix algebra.

  17. Highly-dispersive electromagnetic induced transparency in planar symmetric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiqun; Shi, Jinhui; Liu, Ran; Guan, Chunying

    2012-07-30

    We propose, design and experimentally demonstrate highly-dispersive electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in planar symmetric metamaterials actively switched and controlled by angles of incidence. Full-wave simulation and measurement results show EIT phenomena, trapped-mode excitations and the associated local field enhancement of two symmetric metamaterials consisting of symmetrically split rings (SSR) and a fishscale (FS) metamaterial pattern, respectively, strongly depend on angles of incidence. The FS metamaterial shows much broader spectral splitting than the SSR metamaterial due to the surface current distribution variation.

  18. Induction heating coupler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Copeland, Carl E. (Inventor); Swaim, Robert J. (Inventor); Coultrip, Robert H. (Inventor); Johnston, David F. (Inventor); Phillips, W. Morris (Inventor); Johnson, Samuel D. (Inventor); Dinkins, James R. (Inventor); Buckley, John D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An induction heating device includes a handle having a hollow interior and two opposite ends, a wrist connected to one end of the handle, a U-shaped pole piece having two spaced apart ends, a tank circuit including an induction coil wrapped around the pole piece and a capacitor connected to the induction coil, a head connected to the wrist and including a housing for receiving the U-shaped pole piece, the two spaced apart ends of the pole piece extending outwardely beyond the housing, and a power source connected to the tank circuit. When the tank circuit is energized and a susceptor is placed in juxtaposition to the ends of the U-shaped pole piece, the susceptor is heated by induction heating due to magnetic flux passing between the two ends of the pole piece.

  19. Enhancing Induction Coil Reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreter, K.; Goldstein, R.; Yakey, C.; Nemkov, V.

    2014-12-01

    In induction hardening, thermal fatigue is one of the main copper failure modes of induction heat treating coils. There have been papers published that describe this failure mode and others that describe some good design practices. The variables previously identified as the sources of thermal fatigue include radiation from the part surface, frequency, current, concentrator losses, water pressure and coil wall thickness. However, there is very little quantitative data on the factors that influence thermal fatigue in induction coils is available in the public domain. By using finite element analysis software this study analyzes the effect of common design variables of inductor cooling, and quantifies the relative importance of these variables. A comprehensive case study for a single shot induction coil with Fluxtrol A concentrator applied is used for the analysis.

  20. Induction melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Jay A [Idaho Falls, ID; Richardson, John G [Idaho Falls, ID; Raivo, Brian D [Idaho Falls, ID; Soelberg, Nicholas R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-06-17

    Apparatus and methods of operation are provided for a cold-crucible-induction melter for vitrifying waste wherein a single induction power supply may be used to effect a selected thermal distribution by independently energizing at least two inductors. Also, a bottom drain assembly may be heated by an inductor and may include an electrically resistive heater. The bottom drain assembly may be cooled to solidify molten material passing therethrough to prevent discharge of molten material therefrom. Configurations are provided wherein the induction flux skin depth substantially corresponds with the central longitudinal axis of the crucible. Further, the drain tube may be positioned within the induction flux skin depth in relation to material within the crucible or may be substantially aligned with a direction of flow of molten material within the crucible. An improved head design including four shells forming thermal radiation shields and at least two gas-cooled plenums is also disclosed.

  1. Induction launcher design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driga, M. D.; Weldon, W. F.

    1989-01-01

    New concepts in the design of induction accelerators and their power supplies for space and military applications are discussed. Particular attention is given to a piecewise-rising-frequency power supply in which each elementary generator (normal compulsator or rising frequency generator) has a different base frequency. A preliminary design of a coaxial induction accelerator for a hypersonic real gas facility is discussed to illustrate the concepts described.

  2. Induction Heating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Induction heating technology, a magnetic non-deforming process, was developed by Langley researchers to join plastic and composite components in space. Under NASA license, Inductron Corporation uses the process to produce induction heating systems and equipment for numerous applications. The Torobonder, a portable system, comes with a number of interchangeable heads for aircraft repair. Other developments are the E Heating Head, the Toroid Joining Gun, and the Torobrazer. These products perform bonding applications more quickly, safely and efficiently than previous methods.

  3. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  4. Doubly fed induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2005-10-11

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load including an energy converter device having a doubly fed induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer coupled to the energy converter device to control the flow of power or energy through the doubly fed induction machine.

  5. Spatial transformation-enabled electromagnetic devices: from radio frequencies to optical wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Turpin, Jeremy P.; Morgan, Kennith; Lu, Bingqian; Werner, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    Transformation optics provides scientists and engineers with a new powerful design paradigm to manipulate the flow of electromagnetic waves in a user-defined manner and with unprecedented flexibility, by controlling the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic properties of a medium. Using this approach, over the past decade, various previously undiscovered physical wave phenomena have been revealed and novel electromagnetic devices have been demonstrated throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we present versatile theoretical and experimental investigations on designing transformation optics-enabled devices for shaping electromagnetic wave radiation and guidance, at both radio frequencies and optical wavelengths. Different from conventional coordinate transformations, more advanced and versatile coordinate transformations are exploited here to benefit diverse applications, thereby providing expanded design flexibility, enhanced device performance, as well as reduced implementation complexity. These design examples demonstrate the comprehensive capability of transformation optics in controlling electromagnetic waves, while the associated novel devices will open up new paths towards future integrated electromagnetic component synthesis and design, from microwave to optical spectral regimes. PMID:26217054

  6. Spatial transformation-enabled electromagnetic devices: from radio frequencies to optical wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Turpin, Jeremy P; Morgan, Kennith; Lu, Bingqian; Werner, Douglas H

    2015-08-28

    Transformation optics provides scientists and engineers with a new powerful design paradigm to manipulate the flow of electromagnetic waves in a user-defined manner and with unprecedented flexibility, by controlling the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic properties of a medium. Using this approach, over the past decade, various previously undiscovered physical wave phenomena have been revealed and novel electromagnetic devices have been demonstrated throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we present versatile theoretical and experimental investigations on designing transformation optics-enabled devices for shaping electromagnetic wave radiation and guidance, at both radio frequencies and optical wavelengths. Different from conventional coordinate transformations, more advanced and versatile coordinate transformations are exploited here to benefit diverse applications, thereby providing expanded design flexibility, enhanced device performance, as well as reduced implementation complexity. These design examples demonstrate the comprehensive capability of transformation optics in controlling electromagnetic waves, while the associated novel devices will open up new paths towards future integrated electromagnetic component synthesis and design, from microwave to optical spectral regimes. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Anomalous Light Phenomena vs. Bioelectric Brain Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    We present a research proposal concerning the instrumented investigation of anomalous light phenomena that are apparently correlated with particular mind states, such as prayer, meditation or psi. Previous research by these authors demonstrate that such light phenomena can be monitored and measured quite efficiently in areas of the world where they are reported in a recurrent way. Instruments such as optical equipment for photography and spectroscopy, VLF spectrometers, magnetometers, radar and IR viewers were deployed and used massively in several areas of the world. Results allowed us to develop physical models concerning the structural and time-variable behaviour of light phenomena, and their kinematics. Recent insights and witnesses have suggested to us that a sort of "synchronous connection" seems to exist between plasma-like phenomena and particular mind states of experiencers who seem to trigger a light manifestation which is very similar to the one previously investigated. The main goal of these authors is now aimed at the search for a concrete "entanglement-like effect" between the experiencer's mind and the light phenomena, in such a way that both aspects are intended to be monitored and measured simultaneously using appropriate instrumentation. The goal of this research project is twofold: a) to verify quantitatively the existence of one very particular kind of mind-matter interaction and to study in real time its physical and biophysical manifestations; b) to repeat the same kind of experiment using the same test-subject in different locations and under various conditions of geomagnetic activity.

  8. Overview of Advanced Electromagnetic Propulsion Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Kamhawi, Hani; Gilland, James H.; Arrington, Lynn A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Very High Power Electric Propulsion task is sponsored by the Energetics Heritage Project. Electric propulsion technologies currently being investigated under this program include pulsed electromagnetic plasma thrusters, magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, helicon plasma sources as well as the systems models for high power electromagnetic propulsion devices. An investigation and evaluation of pulsed electromagnetic plasma thruster performance at energy levels up to 700 Joules is underway. On-going magnetoplasmadynamic thruster experiments will investigate applied-field performance characteristics of gas-fed MPDs. Plasma characterization of helicon plasma sources will provide additional insights into the operation of this novel propulsion concept. Systems models have been developed for high power electromagnetic propulsion concepts, such as pulsed inductive thrusters and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters to enable an evaluation of mission-optimized designs.

  9. Induction as Knowledge Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Benjamin D.; Rosenbloom, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    Two key issues for induction algorithms are the accuracy of the learned hypothesis and the computational resources consumed in inducing that hypothesis. One of the most promising ways to improve performance along both dimensions is to make use of additional knowledge. Multi-strategy learning algorithms tackle this problem by employing several strategies for handling different kinds of knowledge in different ways. However, integrating knowledge into an induction algorithm can be difficult when the new knowledge differs significantly from the knowledge the algorithm already uses. In many cases the algorithm must be rewritten. This paper presents Knowledge Integration framework for Induction (KII), a KII, that provides a uniform mechanism for integrating knowledge into induction. In theory, arbitrary knowledge can be integrated with this mechanism, but in practice the knowledge representation language determines both the knowledge that can be integrated, and the costs of integration and induction. By instantiating KII with various set representations, algorithms can be generated at different trade-off points along these dimensions. One instantiation of KII, called RS-KII, is presented that can implement hybrid induction algorithms, depending on which knowledge it utilizes. RS-KII is demonstrated to implement AQ-11, as well as a hybrid algorithm that utilizes a domain theory and noisy examples. Other algorithms are also possible.

  10. When degenerate stars collide: Understanding A New Explosion Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Joshua

    2007-07-01

    Explosive events seen at extragalactic distances mark the end-state of violent and catastrophic physical processes. Most supernovae and gamma-ray bursts {GRBs}, in particular, are thought to herald the death of massive stars and the birth of solar-mass black holes. A minority fraction of GRBs, however, have been circumstantially associated with the merger of degenerate systems {such as black holes and neutron stars}. These short-duration bursts are rare and difficult to localize, with only about 2 dozen studied to any degree of detail to date. We believe that we have finally discovered, in the last few days, one of the tell-tale signatures of degenerate merger products -- a "mini-supernova" from the non-relativistic ejecta left over after merger. If true, this long-theorized phenomenon would be an entirely new sort of explosion in the universe. In several rapidly executed visits, HST, coupled with a recently approved Chandra DD proposal to search for underlying afterglow, could make a substantial contribution to our understanding of this phenomena by honing the physical parameters of the event and helping to rule out alternatives. If we are correct in our hypothesis, we have found the first clear cut observational signature in the electromagnetic spectrum of what are expected to the be the dominant sources of gravitational waves for advanced LIGO.

  11. Searching for Electrical Properties, Phenomena and Mechanisms in the Construction and Function of Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kanev, Ivan; Mei, Wai-Ning; Mizuno, Akira; DeHaai, Kristi; Sanmann, Jennifer; Hess, Michelle; Starr, Lois; Grove, Jennifer; Dave, Bhavana; Sanger, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Our studies reveal previously unidentified electrical properties of chromosomes: (1) chromosomes are amazingly similar in construction and function to electrical transformers; (2) chromosomes possess in their construction and function, components similar to those of electric generators, conductors, condensers, switches, and other components of electrical circuits; (3) chromosomes demonstrate in nano-scale level electromagnetic interactions, resonance, fusion and other phenomena similar to those described by equations in classical physics. These electrical properties and phenomena provide a possible explanation for unclear and poorly understood mechanisms in clinical genetics including: (a) electrically based mechanisms responsible for breaks, translocations, fusions, and other chromosomal abnormalities associated with cancer, intellectual disability, infertility, pregnancy loss, Down syndrome, and other genetic disorders; (b) electrically based mechanisms involved in crossing over, non-disjunction and other events during meiosis and mitosis; (c) mechanisms demonstrating heterochromatin to be electrically active and genetically important. PMID:24688715

  12. Equivalent Electromagnetic Constants for Microwave Application to Composite Materials for the Multi-Scale Problem

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Keisuke; Ikeda, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    To connect different scale models in the multi-scale problem of microwave use, equivalent material constants were researched numerically by a three-dimensional electromagnetic field, taking into account eddy current and displacement current. A volume averaged method and a standing wave method were used to introduce the equivalent material constants; water particles and aluminum particles are used as composite materials. Consumed electrical power is used for the evaluation. Water particles have the same equivalent material constants for both methods; the same electrical power is obtained for both the precise model (micro-model) and the homogeneous model (macro-model). However, aluminum particles have dissimilar equivalent material constants for both methods; different electric power is obtained for both models. The varying electromagnetic phenomena are derived from the expression of eddy current. For small electrical conductivity such as water, the macro-current which flows in the macro-model and the micro-current which flows in the micro-model express the same electromagnetic phenomena. However, for large electrical conductivity such as aluminum, the macro-current and micro-current express different electromagnetic phenomena. The eddy current which is observed in the micro-model is not expressed by the macro-model. Therefore, the equivalent material constant derived from the volume averaged method and the standing wave method is applicable to water with a small electrical conductivity, although not applicable to aluminum with a large electrical conductivity. PMID:28788395

  13. Theories of dynamical phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Attempts that have been made to understand and explain observed dynamical phenomena in sunspots within the framework of magnetohydrodynamic theory are surveyed. The qualitative aspects of the theory and physical arguments are emphasized, with mathematical details generally avoided. The dynamical phenomena in sunspots are divided into two categories: aperiodic (quasi-steady) and oscillatory. For each phenomenon discussed, the salient observational features that any theory should explain are summarized. The two contending theoretical models that can account for the fine structure of the Evershed motion, namely the convective roll model and the siphon flow model, are described. With regard to oscillatory phenomena, attention is given to overstability and oscillatory convection, umbral oscillations and flashes. penumbral waves, five-minute oscillations in sunspots, and the wave cooling of sunspots.

  14. The making of extraordinary psychological phenomena.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the extraordinary phenomena that have been central to unorthodox areas of psychological knowledge. It shows how even the agreed facts relating to mesmerism, spiritualism, psychical research, and parapsychology have been framed as evidence both for and against the reality of the phenomena. It argues that these disputes can be seen as a means through which beliefs have been formulated and maintained in the face of potentially challenging evidence. It also shows how these disputes appealed to different forms of expertise, and that both sides appealed to belief in various ways as part of the ongoing dispute about both the facts and expertise. Finally, it shows how, when a formal Psychology of paranormal belief emerged in the twentieth century, it took two different forms, each reflecting one side of the ongoing dispute about the reality of the phenomena. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Electromagnetic pollution (electrosmog)--potential hazards of our electromagnetic future].

    PubMed

    Nowak, D; Radon, K

    2004-02-26

    The term electromagnetic environment encompasses the totality of all electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields generated by natural and technical sources. A differentiation is made between low- and high-frequency electromagnetic fields. Typical sources of the former are domestic electricity Exposure to the latter is, for example, associated with the sue of mobile telephones. Studies on the health-related effects of electromagnetic fields are available in particular for the low-frequency range, based on an appropriate estimation of exposure. A number of these studies reveal an association between exposure to this type of electromagnetic fields and the occurrence of infantile leukemia in the highest exposure category. For high-frequency electromagnetic fields the number of epidemiological studies is limited. An increased risk of an accident occurring through the use of a cellular phone while driving has consistently been shown. Against the background of our limited knowledge about possible adverse effects of exposure to mobile phone transmitters, and the inability of the public to influence such exposure, transparency in the communication of the risks involved is of great importance.

  16. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  17. A new asymptotic method for jump phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Physical phenomena involving rapid and sudden transitions, such as snap buckling of elastic shells, explosions, and earthquakes, are characterized mathematically as a small disturbance causing a large-amplitude response. Because of this, standard asymptotic and perturbation methods are ill-suited to these problems. In the present paper, a new method of analyzing jump phenomena is proposed. The principal feature of the method is the representation of the response in terms of rational functions. For illustration, the method is applied to the snap buckling of an elastic arch and to a simple combustion problem.

  18. Computational hydrodynamics and optical performance of inductively-coupled plasma adaptive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Mortazavi, M.; Urzay, J., E-mail: jurzay@stanford.edu; Mani, A.

    2015-06-15

    This study addresses the optical performance of a plasma adaptive lens for aero-optical applications by using both axisymmetric and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Plasma adaptive lenses are based on the effects of free electrons on the phase velocity of incident light, which, in theory, can be used as a phase-conjugation mechanism. A closed cylindrical chamber filled with Argon plasma is used as a model lens into which a beam of light is launched. The plasma is sustained by applying a radio-frequency electric current through a coil that envelops the chamber. Four different operating conditions, ranging from low to high powers andmore » induction frequencies, are employed in the simulations. The numerical simulations reveal complex hydrodynamic phenomena related to buoyant and electromagnetic laminar transport, which generate, respectively, large recirculating cells and wall-normal compression stresses in the form of local stagnation-point flows. In the axisymmetric simulations, the plasma motion is coupled with near-wall axial striations in the electron-density field, some of which propagate in the form of low-frequency traveling disturbances adjacent to vortical quadrupoles that are reminiscent of Taylor-Görtler flow structures in centrifugally unstable flows. Although the refractive-index fields obtained from axisymmetric simulations lead to smooth beam wavefronts, they are found to be unstable to azimuthal disturbances in three of the four three-dimensional cases considered. The azimuthal striations are optically detrimental, since they produce high-order angular aberrations that account for most of the beam wavefront error. A fourth case is computed at high input power and high induction frequency, which displays the best optical properties among all the three-dimensional simulations considered. In particular, the increase in induction frequency prevents local thermalization and leads to an axisymmetric distribution of electrons even after

  19. Electromagnetic Showers at High Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loos, J. S.; Dawson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Some of the properties of electromagnetic showers observed in an experimental study are illustrated. Experimental data and results from quantum electrodynamics are discussed. Data and theory are compared using computer simulation. (BB)

  20. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  1. The electromagnetic bio-field: clinical experiments and interferences

    PubMed Central

    Burnei, G; Hodorogea, D; Georgescu, I; Gavriliu, Ş; Drăghici, I; Dan, D; Vlad, C; Drăghici, L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important factors is the technical and scientifically rapid development that is continually modifying the world we live in and polluting it with electromagnetic radiations. A functional and structural influence of magnetic and electromagnetic field on living organisms is presented in the literature by many performed experiments. Material and methods: The notion of bio-field represents the electromagnetic field generated by the bio-structures, not only in their normal physiological activities but also in their pathological states. There is a tight interdependency between the bio-field and the bio-structure, which respects the primary notion of an electromagnetic field given by the Maxwell-Faraday laws, in which, the electromagnetic phenomena are simplified to the field variations. These variations can be expressed in a coherent differential equation system that bounds the field vectors to different space points at different time moments. Results: The living organisms cannot contain electrostatic and magneto-static fields due to the intense activity of the bio-structures. The biochemical reactions that have high rhythms and speeds always impose the electrodynamics character of the biologic field that also corresponds to the stability of the protein molecule that can be explained only through a dynamic way. The existent energy is not considered an exciting agent, and it does not lead to any effects. Conclusions: The parameters of these elementary bio-fields cannot yet be fully known due to technical reasons. The biological structures are very complex ones and undergo continuous dynamical activity. That is why the calculus model should be related to the constant dynamics, nowadays being very difficult to express. PMID:22802878

  2. The electromagnetic bio-field: clinical experiments and interferences.

    PubMed

    Burnei, G; Hodorogea, D; Georgescu, I; Gavriliu, Ş; Drăghici, I; Dan, D; Vlad, C; Drăghici, L

    2012-06-12

    One of the most important factors is the technical and scientifically rapid development that is continually modifying the world we live in and polluting it with electromagnetic radiations. A functional and structural influence of magnetic and electromagnetic field on living organisms is presented in the literature by many performed experiments. The notion of bio-field represents the electromagnetic field generated by the bio-structures, not only in their normal physiological activities but also in their pathological states. There is a tight interdependency between the bio-field and the bio-structure, which respects the primary notion of an electromagnetic field given by the Maxwell-Faraday laws, in which, the electromagnetic phenomena are simplified to the field variations. These variations can be expressed in a coherent differential equation system that bounds the field vectors to different space points at different time moments. The living organisms cannot contain electrostatic and magneto-static fields due to the intense activity of the bio-structures. The biochemical reactions that have high rhythms and speeds always impose the electrodynamics character of the biologic field that also corresponds to the stability of the protein molecule that can be explained only through a dynamic way. The existent energy is not considered an exciting agent, and it does not lead to any effects. The parameters of these elementary bio-fields cannot yet be fully known due to technical reasons. The biological structures are very complex ones and undergo continuous dynamical activity. That is why the calculus model should be related to the constant dynamics, nowadays being very difficult to express.

  3. Weak low-frequency electromagnetic oscillations in water.

    PubMed

    Liboff, A R; Poggi, Claudio; Pratesi, Piero

    2017-01-01

    Recent observations of low-frequency electromagnetic oscillations in water suggest an inductive structural component. Accordingly, we assume a helical basis enabling us to model water as an LC tuned oscillator. A proposed tetrahedral structure consisting of three water molecules and one hydronium ion is incorporated into the Boerdijk-Coxeter tetrahelix to form long water chains that are shown to have resonance frequencies consistent with observation. This model also serves to explain separately reported claims of ion cyclotron resonance of hydronium ions, in that the tetrahelix provides a built-in path for helical proton-hopping.

  4. Vertical Electromagnetic Pulse (VEMP) Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-11

    3) MIL-STD-2169B: High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse ( HEMP ) Environment. The final survivability analysis of the baseline system...Electromagnetic Pulse ( HEMP ). The first EMP situation, SREMP, occurs within the atmosphere at an altitude of less than 40 km above sea level, and possesses an...The second EMP situation, HEMP , occurs at an altitude greater than 40 km above sea level, and possesses a large electric and magnetic field over a

  5. Computational electronics and electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C. C.

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serves as the focal point for engineering R&D activities for developing computer-based design, analysis, and tools for theory. Key representative applications include design of particle accelerator cells and beamline components; engineering analysis and design of high-power components, photonics, and optoelectronics circuit design; EMI susceptibility analysis; and antenna synthesis. The FY-96 technology-base effort focused code development on (1) accelerator design codes; (2) 3-D massively parallel, object-oriented time-domain EM codes; (3) material models; (4) coupling and application of engineering tools for analysis and design of high-power components; (5) 3-D spectral-domainmore » CEM tools; and (6) enhancement of laser drilling codes. Joint efforts with the Power Conversion Technologies thrust area include development of antenna systems for compact, high-performance radar, in addition to novel, compact Marx generators. 18 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.« less

  6. Mapping Earth's electromagnetic dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. J.; Kelbert, A.; Bedrosian, P.

    2017-12-01

    The form of a magnetotelluric impedance tensor, obtained for a given geographic site through simultaneous measurement of geomagnetic and geoelectric field variation, is affected by electrical conductivity structure beneath the measurement site. Building on existing methods for characterizing the symmetry of magnetotelluric impedance tensors, a simple scalar measure is developed for measuring the (frequency dependent) proportion of the impedance tensor that is not just a one-dimensional (1D) function of depth ("non-1D-ness"). These measures are applied to nearly 1000 impedance tensors obtained during magnetotelluric surveys, those for the continental United States and obtained principally through the National Science Foundation's EarthScope project. Across geomagnetic/geoelectric variational periods ranging from 30 s to 3,000 s, corresponding to crustal and upper mantle depths, it is shown that local Earth structure is very often not simply 1D-depth-dependent - often less than 50% of magnetotelluric impedance is 1D. For selected variational frequencies, non-1D-ness is mapped and the relationship between electromagnetic dimensionality and known geological and tectonic structures is discussed. The importance of using realistic surface impedances to accurately evaluate magnetic-storm geoelectric hazards is emphasized.

  7. Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Port, Jeffrey; Harrison, Sebron

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in technology and treatment options, lung cancer remains a deadly disease. National screening programs are being instituted in an attempt to discover lung cancer in high-risk individuals at an earlier stage. Such screening programs invariably discover small peripheral nodules that previously would not have been clinically apparent; the management of such lesions can be challenging. Current diagnostic options such as percutaneous biopsy are effective; however, they are hindered by their risk of morbidity such as pneumothorax. Electromagnetic bronchoscopy (ENB) is an emerging technology that allows the practitioner the ability to both sample and treat small peripheral pulmonary lesions. In experienced centers, ENB provides high rates of diagnostic yield for small lesions and a complication rate significantly lower than that of more conventional diagnostic modalities. Although there are current barriers to its widespread utilization (cost, specialized imaging, technical training), these obstacles will handled similarly to any other emerging technology and will likely not be long-term impediments to its use. PMID:24436528

  8. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  9. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the axial velocity profile and electromagnetic structure of a high power, quasi-steady MPD discharge are used to formulate a gasdynamic model of the acceleration process. Conceptually dividing the accelerated plasma into an inner flow and an outer flow, it is found that more than two-thirds of the total power in the plasma is deposited in the inner flow, accelerating it to an exhaust velocity of 12.5 km/sec. The outer flow, which is accelerated to a velocity of only 6.2 km/sec, appears to provide a current conduction path between the inner flow and the anode. Related cathode studies have shown that the critical current for the onset of terminal voltage fluctuations, which was recently shown to be a function of the cathode area, appears to reach an asymptote for cathodes of very large surface area. Detailed floating potential measurements show that the fluctuations are confined to the vicinity of the cathode and hence reflect a cathode emission process rather than a fundamental limit on MPD performance.

  10. Electromagnetically driven peristaltic pump

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2000-01-01

    An electromagnetic peristaltic pump apparatus may comprise a main body section having an inlet end and an outlet end and a flexible membrane which divides the main body section into a first cavity and a second cavity. The first cavity is in fluid communication with the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section. The second cavity is not in fluid communication with the first cavity and contains an electrically conductive fluid. The second cavity includes a plurality of electrodes which are positioned within the second cavity generally adjacent the flexible membrane. A magnetic field generator produces a magnetic field having a plurality of flux lines at least some of which are contained within the second cavity of the main body section and which are oriented generally parallel to a flow direction in which a material flows between the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section. A control system selectively places a voltage potential across selected ones of the plurality of electrodes to deflect the flexible membrane in a wave-like manner to move material contained in the first cavity between the inlet and outlet ends of the main body section.

  11. [The influence of Naturphilosophie in nineteenth-century science: electromagnetism and energy].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Paula Bispo; Silva, Jamily Alves da

    2017-01-01

    Phenomena involving electromagnetism and conservation of energy during the nineteenth century did not fit the reigning Newtonian paradigm. Among scholars, there was the need to explain such facts considering "something more" that had not yet been expressed. Through this explanation, Naturphilosophie, the philosophical branch associated with the German romantic movement of the nineteenth century, seems to offer new ways of understanding the sciences. In this article, we present main aspects of the work of Schelling, the main exponent of Naturphilosophie, and how his assumptions were inserted into the physical sciences to explain electromagnetism and conservation of energy.

  12. Butterfly-valve inductive orientation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Steven

    1980-04-01

    Relative changes of inductance ΔL/L of a single layer coil surrounding a thin electrically conducting disk which can rotate about an axis perpendicular to the coil axis are studied experimentally as a means of measuring angular displacements. ΔL/L is found to be a strong function of disk diameter and is weakly dependent on the ratio of disk thickness to electromagnetic skin depth when this ratio is of the order unity. Values of ΔL/L as a function of disk diameter are given for lead, brass and copper. Detection sensitivities using a resonant tank circuit or an astatic transformer are given in terms of ΔL/L and it is shown that sensitivities of the order of 10-3 to 10-4 deg are practical. Application of this system to the Rayleigh disk and cryogenic environments are emphasized and an expression for the magnetic torque due to detection currents is given.

  13. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Thrust Efficiency of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley; Polzin, Kurt; Emsellem, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) [4, 5] is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and permanent magnets that are arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the inductive coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil is under investigation. The conical geometry serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [2, 3], however a conical coil imparts a direct radial acceleration of the current sheet that serves to rapidly decouple the propellant from the coil, limiting the direct axial electromagnetic acceleration in favor of an indirect acceleration mechanism that requires significant heating of the propellant within the volume bounded by the current sheet. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance

  14. Integrating surface and borehole geophysics in ground water studies - an example using electromagnetic soundings in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick; Hite, Laura; Carlson, Matthew

    1999-01-01

    Time domain surface electromagnetic soundings, borehole induction logs, and other borehole logging techniques are used to construct a realistic model for the shallow subsurface hydraulic properties of unconsolidated sediments in south Florida. Induction logs are used to calibrate surface induction soundings in units of pore water salinity by correlating water sample specific electrical conductivity with the electrical conductivity of the formation over the sampled interval for a two‐layered aquifer model. Geophysical logs are also used to show that a constant conductivity layer model is appropriate for the south Florida study. Several physically independent log measurements are used to quantify the dependence of formation electrical conductivity on such parameters as salinity, permeability, and clay mineral fraction. The combined interpretation of electromagnetic soundings and induction logs was verified by logging three validation boreholes, confirming quantitative estimates of formation conductivity and thickness in the upper model layer, and qualitative estimates of conductivity in the lower model layer.

  15. Application of induction heating in food processing and cooking: A Review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Induction heating is an electromagnetic heating technology that has several advantages such as high safety, scalability, and high energy efficiency. It has been applied for a long time in metal processing, medical applications, and cooking. However, the application of this technology in the food pro...

  16. Sundance Fire: an analysis of fire phenomena

    Treesearch

    Hal E. Anderson

    1968-01-01

    The Sundance Fire on September 1, 1967, made a spectacular run of 16 miles in 9 hours and destroyed more than 50,000 acres. This run became the subject of a detailed research analysis of the environmental, topographic, and vegetation variables aimed at reconstructing and describing fire phenomena. This report details the fire's progress; discusses the fire's...

  17. Temporal Phenomena in the Korean Conjunctive Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the temporal phenomena in the Korean conjunctive constructions. These constructions consist of three components: a verbal stem, a clause medial temporal suffix, and a clause terminal suffix. This study focuses on both the temporality of the terminal connective suffixes and the grammatical meanings of the…

  18. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  19. Solar Phenomena Associated with "EIT Waves"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Myers, D. C.; Thompson, B. J.; Hammer, D. M.; Vourlidas, A.

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to understand what an 'EIT wave' is and what its causes are, we have looked for correlations between the initiation of EIT waves and the occurrence of other solar phenomena. An EIT wave is a coronal disturbance, typically appearing as a diffuse brightening propagating across the Sun. A catalog of EIT waves, covering the period from 1997 March through 1998 June, was used in this study. For each EIT wave, the catalog gives the heliographic location and a rating for each wave, where the rating is determined by the reliability of the observations. Since EIT waves are transient, coronal phenomena, we have looked for correlations with other transient, coronal phenomena: X-ray flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and metric type II radio bursts. An unambiguous correlation between EIT waves and CMEs has been found. The correlation of EIT waves with flares is significantly weaker, and EIT waves frequently are not accompanied by radio bursts. To search for trends in the data, proxies for each of these transient phenomena are examined. We also use the accumulated data to show the robustness of the catalog and to reveal biases that must be accounted for in this study.

  20. Natural phenomena exhibited by forest fires

    Treesearch

    J. S. Barrows

    1961-01-01

    Forest fire phenomena are presented through a series of motion pictures and 35 mm slides. These films have been taken by the staffs of the Southeastern, Pacific Southwest, and Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Stations of the U. S. Forest Service and by Dr. Vincent J. Schaefer during the course of fire research activities. Both regular speed and time-lapse...