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Sample records for electron acceptor sulfate

  1. Artificial electron acceptors decouple archaeal methane oxidation from sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Silvan; Yu, Hang; Chadwick, Grayson L; McGlynn, Shawn E; Orphan, Victoria J

    2016-02-12

    The oxidation of methane with sulfate is an important microbial metabolism in the global carbon cycle. In marine methane seeps, this process is mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) that live in syntrophy with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The underlying interdependencies within this uncultured symbiotic partnership are poorly understood. We used a combination of rate measurements and single-cell stable isotope probing to demonstrate that ANME in deep-sea sediments can be catabolically and anabolically decoupled from their syntrophic SRB partners using soluble artificial oxidants. The ANME still sustain high rates of methane oxidation in the absence of sulfate as the terminal oxidant, lending support to the hypothesis that interspecies extracellular electron transfer is the syntrophic mechanism for the anaerobic oxidation of methane.

  2. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  3. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  4. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  5. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: Implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreiber, M.E.; Carey, G.R.; Feinstein, D.T.; Bahr, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum- contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  6. Enhanced biodegradation of cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX) under mixed electron-acceptor condition.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, R

    2001-02-01

    The biodegradation of cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine, commonly known as 'high melting explosive' (HMX), under various electron-acceptor conditions was investigated using enrichment cultures developed from the anaerobic digester sludge of Thibodaux sewage treatment plant. The results indicated that the HMX was biodegraded under sulfate reducing, nitrate reducing, fermenting, methanogenic, and mixed electron accepting conditions. However, the rates of degradation varied among the various conditions studied. The fastest removal of HMX (from 22 ppm on day 0 to < 0.05 ppm on day 11) was observed under mixed electron-acceptor conditions, followed in order by sulfate reducing, fermenting, methanogenic, and nitrate reducing conditions. Under aerobic conditions, HMX was not biodegraded, which indicated that HMX degradation takes place under anaerobic conditions via reduction. HMX was converted to methanol and chloroform under mixed electron-acceptor conditions. This study showed evidence for HMX degradation under anaerobic conditions in a mixed microbial population system similar to any contaminated field sites, where a heterogeneous population exists.

  7. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-01-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme. PMID:1218095

  8. The reaction of choline dehydrogenase with some electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M C; Dawson, A P

    1975-12-01

    1. The choline dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.99.1) WAS SOLUBILIZED FROM ACETONE-DRIED POWDERS OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA BY TREATMENT WITH Naja naja venom. 2. The kinetics of the reaction of enzyme with phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as electron acceptors were investigated. 3. With both electron acceptors the reaction mechanism appears to involve a free, modified-enzyme intermediate. 4. With some electron acceptors the maximum velocity of the reaction is independent of the nature of the acceptor. With phenazine methosulphate and ubiquinone-2 as acceptors the Km value for choline is also independent of the nature of the acceptor molecule. 5. The mechanism of the Triton X-100-solubilized enzyme is apparently the smae as that for the snake venom solubilized enzyme.

  9. Electronic structure of acceptor-donor complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoro, E.; Ohama, Y.; Hayafuji, Y.

    2003-10-01

    The electronic structure of trimer acceptor-donor complexes in silicon Si clusters is studied using the ab initio discrete variational-Xα molecular-orbital (MO) method. The trimer complexes In2D (D=phosphorus P, arsenic As, antimony Sb, or bismuth Bi) consist of two indium In acceptor elements and a centered donor element D from the group V elements. Calculations are performed under the assumption that the three atoms are arranged in the nearest neighbor substitutional trimer configuration. Results indicate that the trimer complexes act as shallower acceptors having smaller ionization activation energies than In acceptor. The potential of In2D as an acceptor in Si is then discussed and In2D is proposed as a promising acceptor for the formation of channels and source/drains in ultralarge scaled integration.

  10. Electron Transfer Rate Maxima at Large Donor-Acceptor Distances.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-02-01

    Because of their low mass, electrons can transfer rapidly over long (>15 Å) distances, but usually reaction rates decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance. We report here on electron transfer rate maxima at donor-acceptor separations of 30.6 Å, observed for thermal electron transfer between an anthraquinone radical anion and a triarylamine radical cation in three homologous series of rigid-rod-like donor-photosensitizer-acceptor triads with p-xylene bridges. Our experimental observations can be explained by a weak distance dependence of electronic donor-acceptor coupling combined with a strong increase of the (outer-sphere) reorganization energy with increasing distance, as predicted by electron transfer theory more than 30 years ago. The observed effect has important consequences for light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:26800279

  11. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs. PMID:26901739

  12. Biogenic hydroxysulfate green rust, a potential electron acceptor for SRB activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegeye, Asfaw; Huguet, Lucie; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Carteret, Cédric; Mullet, Martine; Jorand, Frédéric

    2007-11-01

    Microbiological reduction of a biogenic sulfated green rust (GR2(SO42-)), was examined using a sulfate reducing bacterium ( Desulfovibrio alaskensis). Experiments investigated whether GR2(SO42-) could serve as a sulfate source for D. alaskensis anaerobic respiration by analyzing mineral transformation. Batch experiments were conducted using lactate as the electron donor and biogenic GR2(SO42-) as the electron acceptor, at circumneutral pH in unbuffered medium. GR2(SO42-) transformation was monitored with time by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy (TMS), Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The reduction of sulfate anions and the formation of iron sulfur mineral were clearly identified by XPS analyses. TMS showed the formation of additional mineral as green rust (GR) and vivianite. XRD analyses discriminated the type of the newly formed GR as GR1. The formed GR1 was GR1(CO32-) as indicated by DRIFTS analysis. Thus, the results presented in this study indicate that D. alaskensis cells were able to use GR2(SO42-) as an electron acceptor. GR1(CO32-), vivianite and an iron sulfur compound were formed as a result of GR2(SO42-) reduction by D. alaskensis. Hence, in environments where geochemical conditions promote biogenic GR2(SO42-) formation, this mineral could stimulate the anaerobic respiration of sulfate reducing bacteria.

  13. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate were used as electron acceptors to examine the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated aromatic compounds in estuarine and freshwater sediments. The respective denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic enrichment cultures were established on each of the monochlorinated phenol and monochlorinated benzoic acid isomers, using sediment from the upper (freshwater) and lower (estuarine) Hudson River and the East River (estuarine) as source materials. (Copyright (c) 1993 American Society for Microbiology.)

  14. Electron acceptor-dependent respiratory and physiological stratifications in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Sun, Guoping; Wu, Wei-Min; Xu, Meiying

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial respiration is an essential driving force in biogeochemical cycling and bioremediation processes. Electron acceptors respired by bacteria often have solid and soluble forms that typically coexist in the environment. It is important to understand how sessile bacteria attached to solid electron acceptors respond to ambient soluble alternative electron acceptors. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) provide a useful tool to investigate this interaction. In MFCs with Shewanella decolorationis, azo dye was used as an alternative electron acceptor in the anode chamber. Different respiration patterns were observed for biofilm and planktonic cells, with planktonic cells preferred to respire with azo dye while biofilm cells respired with both the anode and azo dye. The additional azo respiration dissipated the proton accumulation within the anode biofilm. There was a large redox potential gap between the biofilms and anode surface. Changing cathodic conditions caused immediate effects on the anode potential but not on the biofilm potential. Biofilm viability showed an inverse and respiration-dependent profile when respiring with only the anode or azo dye and was enhanced when respiring with both simultaneously. These results provide new insights into the bacterial respiration strategies in environments containing multiple electron acceptors and support an electron-hopping mechanism within Shewanella electrode-respiring biofilms.

  15. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention.

  16. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention. PMID:23558182

  17. Influence of petroleum deposit geometry on local gradient of electron acceptors and microbial catabolic potential.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gargi; Pruden, Amy; Widdowson, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    A field survey was conducted following the Deepwater Horizon blowout and it was noted that resulting coastal petroleum deposits possessed distinct geometries, ranging from small tar balls to expansive horizontal oil sheets. A subsequent laboratory study evaluated the effect of oil deposit geometry on localized gradients of electron acceptors and microbial community composition, factors that are critical to accurately estimating biodegradation rates. One-dimensional top-flow sand columns with 12-h simulated tidal cycles compared two contrasting geometries (isolated tar "balls" versus horizontal "sheets") relative to an oil-free control. Significant differences in the effluent dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentrations were noted among the columns, indicating presence of anaerobic zones in the oiled columns, particularly in the sheet condition. Furthermore, quantification of genetic markers of terminal electron acceptor and catabolic processes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction of dsrA (sulfate-reduction), mcrA (methanogenesis), and cat23 (oxygenation of aromatics) genes in column cores suggested more extensive anaerobic conditions induced by the sheet relative to the ball geometry. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis similarly revealed that distinct gradients of bacterial communities established in response to the different geometries. Thus, petroleum deposit geometry impacts local dominant electron acceptor conditions and may be a key factor for advancing attenuation models and prioritizing cleanup. PMID:22574781

  18. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y. )

    1993-04-01

    Methanogeneic conditions can promote the biodegradation of a number of halogenated aromatic compounds. This study, using sediments from freshwater and estuarine sites, is an evaluation of the anaerobic biodegradability of monochlorinated phenols and benzoic acids coupled to denitrification, sulfidogenesis, and methanogenesis. The results indicate that chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids are biodegradable under at least one set of anaerobic conditions. Metabolism depends both on the electron acceptor available and on the position of the chlorine substituent. Presence of alternative electron acceptors, nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate, can affect degradation rates and substrate specificities. Since contaminated sites usually have mixtures of wastes, bioremediation efforts may need to consider the activities of diverse anaerobic communities to carry out effective treatment of all components. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Influence of alternative electron acceptors on the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated phenols and benzoic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate were used as electron acceptors to examine the anaerobic biodegradability of chlorinated aromatic compounds in estuarine and freshwater sediments. The respective denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic enrichment cultures were established on each of the monochlorinated phenol and monochlorinated benzoic acid isomers, using sediment from the upper (freshwater) and lower (estuarine) Hudson River and the East River (estuarine) as source materials. Utilization of each chlorophenol and chlorobenzoate isomer was observed under at least one reducing condition; however, no single reducing condition permitted the metabolism of all six compounds tested. The anaerobic biodegradation of the chlorophenols and chlorobenzoates depended on the electron acceptor available and on the position of the chlorine substituent. In general, similar activities were observed under the different reducing conditions in both the freshwater and estuarine sediments.

  20. Fate of microbial metabolites of hydrocarbons in a coastal plain aquifer: The role of electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Herman, J.S.; Baedecker, M. Jo

    1995-01-01

    A combined field and laboratory study was undertaken to understand the distribution and geochemical conditions that influence the prevalence of low molecular weight organic acids in groundwater of a shallow aquifer contaminated with gasoline. Aromatic hydrocarbons from gasoline were degraded by microbially mediated oxidation-reduction reactions, including reduction of nitrate, sulfate, and Fe(III). The biogeochemical reactions changed overtime in response to changes in the hydrogeochemical conditions in the aquifer. Aliphatic and aromatic organic acids were associated with hydrocarbon degradation in anoxic zones of the aquifer. Laboratory microcosms demonstrated that the biogeochemical fate of specific organic acids observed in groundwater varied with the structure of the acid and the availability of electron acceptors. Benzoic and phenylacetic acid were degraded by indigenous aquifer microorganisms when nitrate was supplied as an electron acceptor. Aromatic acids with two or more methyl substituants on the benzene ring persisted under nitrate-reducing conditions. Although iron reduction and sulfate reduction were important processes in situ and occurred in the microcosms, these reactions were not coupled to the biological oxidation of aromatic organic acids that were added to the microcosms as electron donors. ?? 1995 American Chemical Society.

  1. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  2. Virtual screening of electron acceptor materials for organic photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Djurovich, Peter J.; Giesen, David J.; Goldberg, Alexander; Sommer, Jonathan; McAnally, Eric; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-10-01

    Virtual screening involves the generation of structure libraries, automated analysis to predict properties related to application performance and subsequent screening to identify lead systems and estimate critical structure-property limits across a targeted chemical design space. This approach holds great promise for informing experimental discovery and development efforts for next-generation materials, such as organic semiconductors. In this work, the virtual screening approach is illustrated for nitrogen-substituted pentacene molecules to identify systems for development as electron acceptor materials for use in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. A structure library of tetra-azapentacenes (TAPs) was generated by substituting four nitrogens for CH at 12 sites on the pentacene molecular framework. Molecular properties (e.g. ELUMO, Eg and μ) were computed for each candidate structure using hybrid DFT at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of theory. The resulting TAPs library was then analyzed with respect to intrinsic properties associated with OPV acceptor performance. Marcus reorganization energies for charge transport for the most favorable TAP candidates were then calculated to further determine suitability as OPV electron acceptors. The synthesis, characterization and OPV device testing of TAP materials is underway, guided by these results.

  3. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells.

  4. Dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors in anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions.

  5. Dissimilatory Reduction of Extracellular Electron Acceptors in Anaerobic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions. PMID:22179232

  6. Electromigration of microbial electron acceptors and nutrients: (I) transport in synthetic media.

    PubMed

    Lohner, Svenja T; Katzoreck, Daniel; Tiehm, Andreas

    2008-07-01

    Microbiological cleanup is a widely used in situ remediation strategy for organic soil and groundwater contaminations. However, often the availability of electron acceptors and nutrients are limiting factors for microbial pollutant degradation in the field. Electromigration represents a new approach for the transport of microbiological agents in soil. In this study, the electrokinetic transport of the microbial electron acceptors nitrate and sulfate and of the nutrients ammonium and phosphate was compared. All experiments were performed under standardized conditions, i.e. with constant voltage in demineralized water and a model sandy soil. Average transport rates for nitrate, sulfate, poly-phosphate, and ammonium were 1.34 cm/h, 1.91 cm/h, 0.48 cm/h, and 0.40 cm/h, respectively, in single compound studies. Transport velocities were dependent on applied voltage gradient but not on the initial ion concentration. Additionally, electrokinetic transport was studied with ion mixtures. The ion distribution in the soil was significantly influenced by the pH profile and the associated voltage gradient.

  7. Ultrafast photoinduced charge transport in Pt(II) donor-acceptor assembly bearing naphthalimide electron acceptor and phenothiazine electron donor.

    PubMed

    Sazanovich, Igor V; Best, Jonathan; Scattergood, Paul A; Towrie, Michael; Tikhomirov, Sergei A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Weinstein, Julia A

    2014-12-21

    Visible light-induced charge transfer dynamics were investigated in a novel transition metal triad acceptor-chromophore-donor, (NDI-phen)Pt(II)(-C≡C-Ph-CH2-PTZ)2 (1), designed for photoinduced charge separation using a combination of time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and femtosecond electronic transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. In 1, the electron acceptor is 1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide (NDI), and the electron donor is phenothiazine (PTZ), and [(phen)Pt(-C≡C-Ph-)], where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline, represents the chromophoric core. The first excited state observed in 1 is a (3)MLCT/LL'CT, with {Pt(II)-acetylide}-to-phen character. Following that, charge transfer from the phen-anion onto the NDI subunit to form NDI(-)-phen-[Pt-(C≡C)2](+)-PTZ2 occurs with a time constant of 2.3 ps. This transition is characterised by appearance of the prominent NDI-anion features in both TRIR and TA spectra. The final step of the charge separation in 1 proceeds with a time constant of ∼15 ps during which the hole migrates from the [Pt-(C≡C)2] subunit to one of the PTZ groups. Charge recombination in 1 then occurs with two distinct time constants of 36 ns and 107 ns, corresponding to the back electron transfer to each of the two donor groups; a rather rare occurrence which manifests that the hole in the final charge-separated state is localised on one of the two donor PTZ groups. The assignment of the nature of the excited states and dynamics in 1 was assisted by TRIR investigations of the analogous previously reported ((COOEt)2bpy)Pt(C≡C-Ph-CH2-PTZ)2 (2), (J. E. McGarrah and R. Eisenberg, Inorg. Chem., 2003, 42, 4355; J. E. McGarrah, J. T. Hupp and S. N. Smirnov, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2009, 113, 6430) as well as (bpy)Pt(C≡C-Ph-C7H15)2, which represent the acceptor-free dyad, and the chromophoric core, respectively. Thus, the step-wise formation of the full charge-separated state on the picosecond time scale and charge recombination via tunnelling have been established; and

  8. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations.

  9. Development of imide- and imidazole-containing electron acceptors for use in donor-acceptor conjugated compounds and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo

    Conjugated organic compounds and polymers have attracted significant attention due to their potential application in electronic devices as semiconducting materials, such as organic solar cells (OSCs). In order to tune band gaps, donor-acceptor (D-A) structure is widely used, which has been proved to be one of the most effective strategies. This thesis consists of three parts: 1) design, syntheses and characterization of new weak acceptors based on imides and the systematic study of the structure-property relationship; (2) introduction of weak and strong acceptors in one polymer to achieve a broad coverage of light absorption and improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE); (3) modification of benzothiadiazole (BT) acceptor in order to increase the electron withdrawing ability. Imide-based electron acceptors, 4-(5-bromothiophen-2-y1)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-9- phenyl- 1H-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (BIDO-1) and 4,9-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3-dione (BIDO-2), were designed and synthesized. In this design, naphthalene is selected as its main core to maintain a planar structure, and thienyl groups are able to facilitate the bromination reaction and lower the band gap. BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 were successfully coupled with different donors by both Suzuki cross-coupling and Stille cross-coupling reactions. Based on the energy levels and band gaps of the BIDO-containing compounds and polymers, BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 are proved to be weak electron acceptors. Pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) was also studied and found to be a stronger electron acceptor than BIDO . In order to obtain broad absorption coverage, both weak acceptor ( BIDO-2) and strong acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) were introduced in the same polymer. The resulting polymers show two absorption bands at 400 and 600 nm and two emission peaks at 500 and 680 nm. The band gaps of the polymers are around 1.6 eV, which is ideal for OSC application. The PCE of 1.17% was achieved. Finally

  10. Effects of multiple electron acceptors on microbial interactions in a hydrogen-based biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He-Ping; Ilhan, Zehra Esra; Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Tang, Youneng; Rittmann, Bruce E; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2013-07-01

    To investigate interactions among multiple electron acceptors in a H2-fed biofilm, we operated a membrane biofilm reactor with H2-delivery capacity sufficient to reduce all acceptors. ClO4(-) and O2 were input electron acceptors in all stages at surface loadings of 0.08 ± 0.006 g/m(2)-d (1.0 ± 0.7 e(-) meq/m(2)-d) for ClO4(-) and 0.51 g/m(2)-d (76 e(-) meq/m(2)-d) for O2. SO4(2-) was added in Stage 2 at 3.77 ± 0.39 g/m(2)-d (331 ± 34 e(-) meq/m(2)-d), and NO3(-) was further added in Stage 3 at 0.72 ± 0.03 g N/m(2)-d (312 ± 13 e(-) meq/m(2)-d). At steady state for each stage, ClO4(-), O2, and NO3(-) (when present in the influent) were completely reduced; measured SO4(2-) reduction decreased from 78 ± 4% in Stage 2 to 59 ± 4% in Stage 3, when NO3(-) was present. While perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), assayed by qPCR targeting the pcrA gene, remained stable throughout, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), assayed by the dsrA gene, increased almost 3 orders of magnitude when significant SO4(2-) reduction occurred in stage 2. The abundance of denitrifying bacteria (DB), assayed by the nirK and nirS genes, increased in Stage 3, while SRB remained at high numbers, but did not increase. Based on pyrosequencing analyses, β-Proteobacteria dominated in Stage 1, but ε-Proteobacteria became more important in Stages 2 and 3, when the input of multiple electron acceptors favored genera with broader electron-accepting capabilities. Sulfuricurvum (a sulfur oxidizer and NO3(-) reducer) and Desulfovibrio (a SO4(2-) reducer) become dominant in Stage 3, suggesting redox cycling of sulfur in the biofilm.

  11. Physiological and electrochemical effects of different electron acceptors on bacterial anode respiration in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang; Xiang, Yinbo; Xia, Chunyu; Wu, Wei-Min; Sun, Guoping; Xu, Meiying

    2014-07-01

    To understand the interactions between bacterial electrode respiration and the other ambient bacterial electron acceptor reductions, alternative electron acceptors (nitrate, Fe2O3, fumarate, azo dye MB17) were added singly or multiply into Shewanella decolorationis microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All the added electron acceptors were reduced simultaneously with current generation. Adding nitrate or MB17 resulted in more rapid cell growth, higher flavin concentration and higher biofilm metabolic viability, but lower columbic efficiency (CE) and normalized energy recovery (NER) while the CE and NER were enhanced by Fe2O3 or fumarate. The added electron acceptors also significantly influenced the cyclic voltammetry profile of anode biofilm probably via altering the cytochrome c expression. The highest power density was observed in MFCs added with MB17 due to the electron shuttle role of the naphthols from MB17 reduction. The results provided important information for MFCs applied in practical environments where contains various electron acceptors.

  12. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  13. Phthalimides as exceptionally efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reductive coupling reactions promoted by samarium diiodide.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Tatiana; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Chiara, Jose Luis

    2007-12-20

    Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that phthalimides are highly efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reactions promoted by samarium diiodide, affording ketyl radical anion intermediates, which participate in high-yielding inter- and intramolecular reductive coupling processes with different radicophiles including imides, oxime ethers, nitrones, and Michael acceptors.

  14. Donor-Acceptor-Type Semiconducting Polymers Consisting of Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Electron-Acceptor Units for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Park, Jong Baek; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    We synthesized two fused pentacyclic donor-acceptor structures, where the two different outer electron rich thiophene (DTPBT) and electron poor benzene (ICTh) moieties are covalently bonded to the central electron-deficient benzothiadiazole core by two nitrogen bridges. These new electron-acceptor DTPBT and ICTh building blocks were copolymerized with fluorene, as the electron donor group, via Suzuki coupling polymerization, to produce two new alternating copolymers, PFDTPBT and PFICTh, respectively. The average molecular weights of the synthesized polymers were determined by GPC. The number-average molecular weights of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were 19,000 (PDI = 2.5) and 20,000 (PDI = 4.0), respectively. The optical bandgap energies of the polymers were measured from their absorption onsets to be 2.15 and 2.55 eV, depending on the polymer structure. The HOMO energy levels of the polymers were determined, by measuring the oxidation onsets of the polymer films by cyclic voltammetry. The measured HOMO energy levels of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were -5.10 and -5.57 eV, respectively. When the polymers were blended with PC71BM, as the active layer for bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic devices, power conversion efficiencies were 2.08% and 0.34%, respectively, under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) conditions.

  15. Microbial Diversity in Coastal Subsurface Sediments: a Cultivation Approach Using Various Electron Acceptors and Substrate Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Beate; Wilms, Reinhard; Engelen, Bert; Cypionka, Heribert; Sass, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Microbial communities in coastal subsurface sediments are scarcely investigated and have escaped attention so far. But since they are likely to play an important role in biogeochemical cycles, knowledge of their composition and ecological adaptations is important. Microbial communities in tidal sediments were investigated along the geochemical gradients from the surface down to a depth of 5.5 m. Most-probable-number (MPN) series were prepared with a variety of different carbon substrates, each at a low concentration, in combination with different electron acceptors such as iron and manganese oxides. These achieved remarkably high cultivation efficiencies (up to 23% of the total cell counts) along the upper 200 cm. In the deeper sediment layers, MPN counts dropped significantly. Parallel to the liquid enrichment cultures in the MPN series, gradient cultures with embedded sediment subcores were prepared as an additional enrichment approach. In total, 112 pure cultures were isolated; they could be grouped into 53 different operational taxonomic units (OTU). The isolates belonged to the Proteobacteria, “Bacteroidetes,” “Fusobacteria,” Actinobacteria, and “Firmicutes.” Each cultivation approach yielded a specific set of isolates that in general were restricted to this single isolation procedure. Analysis of the enrichment cultures by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed an even higher diversity in the primary enrichments that was only partially reflected by the culture collection. The majority of the isolates grew well under anoxic conditions, by fermentation, or by anaerobic respiration with nitrate, sulfate, ferrihydrite, or manganese oxides as electron acceptors. PMID:16332756

  16. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  17. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  18. Sulfur oxidation to sulfate coupled with electron transfer to electrodes by Desulfuromonas strain TZ1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T; Bain, TS; Barlett, MA; Dar, SA; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-01-02

    Microbial oxidation of elemental sulfur with an electrode serving as the electron acceptor is of interest because this may play an important role in the recovery of electrons from sulfidic wastes and for current production in marine benthic microbial fuel cells. Enrichments initiated with a marine sediment inoculum, with elemental sulfur as the electron donor and a positively poised (+300 mV versus Ag/AgCl) anode as the electron acceptor, yielded an anode biofilm with a diversity of micro-organisms, including Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas, Pseudomonas, Clostridium and Desulfuromonas species. Further enrichment of the anode biofilm inoculum in medium with elemental sulfur as the electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, followed by isolation in solidified sulfur/Fe(III) medium yielded a strain of Desulfuromonas, designated strain TZ1. Strain TZ1 effectively oxidized elemental sulfur to sulfate with an anode serving as the sole electron acceptor, at rates faster than Desulfobulbus propionicus, the only other organism in pure culture previously shown to oxidize S with current production. The abundance of Desulfuromonas species enriched on the anodes of marine benthic fuel cells has previously been interpreted as acetate oxidation driving current production, but the results presented here suggest that sulfur-driven current production is a likely alternative.

  19. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis clades enriched under cyclic anaerobic and microaerobic conditions simultaneously use different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Pamela Y; Owen, Brian R; Martirano, Joseph; Ma, Juan; Kapoor, Vikram; Santo Domingo, Jorge; McMahon, Katherine D; Noguera, Daniel R

    2016-10-01

    Lab- and pilot-scale simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal-sequencing batch reactors were operated under cyclic anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions. The use of oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate as electron acceptors by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis during the micro-aerobic stage was investigated. A complete clade-level characterization of Accumulibacter in both reactors was performed using newly designed qPCR primers targeting the polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk1). In the lab-scale reactor, limited-oxygen conditions led to an alternated dominance of Clade IID and IC over the other clades. Results from batch tests when Clade IC was dominant (i.e., >92% of Accumulibacter) showed that this clade was capable of using oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for P uptake. A more heterogeneous distribution of clades was found in the pilot-scale system (Clades IIA, IIB, IIC, IID, IA, and IC), and in this reactor, oxygen, nitrite and nitrate were also used as electron acceptors coupled to phosphorus uptake. However, nitrite was not an efficient electron acceptor in either reactor, and nitrate allowed only partial P removal. The results from the Clade IC dominated reactor indicated that either organisms in this clade can simultaneously use multiple electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions, or that the use of multiple electron acceptors by Clade IC is due to significant microdiversity within the Accumulibacter clades defined using the ppk1 gene. PMID:27340814

  20. Enhanced natural attenuation of BTEX in the nitrate-reducing environment by different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongsheng; Qu, Dan; Hou, Zhimin; Zhou, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing natural attenuation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) in groundwater is a potential remediation technology. This study focused on selecting appropriate electron acceptors to promote BTEX degradation in a nitrate-reducing environment. Nitrate-reducing soil was obtained from simulated BTEX-contaminated column. Enhancing experiments were conducted in the microcosm with nitrate-reducing material and simulated BTEX-polluted groundwater to investigate the promoting feasibility of adding dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate, chelated Fe(III), and sulphate as electron acceptors. The concentrations of BTEX, electron acceptors, and their reducing products were measured. The order of promoting BTEX degradation with four electron acceptors was nitrate>sulphate>chelated Fe(III)>DO, and the first-order decay coefficients were 0.0432, 0.0333, 0.0240, and 0.0155, respectively. Nitrate, sulphate, and chelated Fe(III) enhanced attenuation. Nitrate was the most effective electron acceptor under nitrate-reducing conditions. Selecting proper electron acceptor is significant in promoting BTEX degradation according to the biogeochemical characteristics of local underground environment.

  1. Effects of auxiliary carbon sources and electron acceptors on methanogenic degradation of chlorinated phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Haeggblom, M.M.; Rivera, M.D.; Young, L.Y. )

    1993-08-01

    The authors studied the degradation of chlorinated phenols under methanogenic conditions by establishing enrichment cultures on 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol with or without a supplementary substrate. p-Cresol was chosen as a nonchlorinated aromatic compound structurally similar to the chlorophenols, and propionate was chosen as a readily utilizable carbon source. 2,4-Dichlorophenol was dechlorinated to 4-chlorophenol, which was degraded without further detection of metabolites. The rates of chlorophenols and supplementary substrates. The addition of p-cresol or propionate as an auxiliary carbon source enhanced the rate of 4-chlorophenol degradation. Methanogenic cultures capable of ortho dechlorination were repeatedly subcultured by dilution into fresh media and refeeding of 2,6-dichlorophenol and either p-cresol or propionate as auxiliary substrates. 2,6-Dichlorophenol was sequentially dechlorinated to 2-chlorophenol and phenol and ultimately mineralized to methane and carbon dioxide. Cultures adapted to 2,4- or 2,6-dichlorophenol also readily dechlorinated other dichlorophenols containing an ortho chlorine. The alternative electron acceptors nitrate, sulfite, and thiosulfate completely inhibited dechlorination of 2,6-dichlorophenol, whereas sulfate slowed the dechlorination rate.

  2. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of 2-hydroxypyridine with electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.

    2013-07-01

    The CT-interactions of electron acceptors such as iodine (I2), chloranilic acid (H2CA) and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) with 2-hydroxypyridine (HPyO) have been investigated in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(HPyO)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (HPyO)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptors. Factors affecting the CT-processes are discussed.

  3. Preparation and spectroscopic studies on charge-transfer complexes of famciclovir drug with different electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.; Teleb, Said M.; Nour, El-Metwally

    2012-09-01

    The CT-interaction of electron acceptors such as chloranilic acid (H2CA), 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) and and 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) with the antiviral drug famciclovir (FCV) have been investigated spectrophotometrically in the defined solvent. The data indicate the formation of CT-complexes with the general formula [(FCV)(acceptor)]. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the (FCV)-acceptors were based on elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration measurements for the reactions. The formation constants (KCT) for the CT-complexes are shown to be strongly dependent on the type and structure of the electron acceptor. Factors affecting the CT-processes such as redox potentials and steric hinderance of reactants are discussed.

  4. Effect of Electronic Acceptor Segments on Photophysical Properties of Low-Band-Gap Ambipolar Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanzuo; Cui, Jingang; Zhao, Jianing; Liu, Jinglin; Song, Peng; Ma, Fengcai

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by a recent experimental report, charge transfer and photophysical properties of donor-acceptor ambipolar polymer were studied with the quantum chemistry calculation and the developed 3D charge difference density method. The effects of electronic acceptor strength on the structure, energy levels, electron density distribution, ionization potentials, and electron affinities were also obtained to estimate the transporting ability of hole and electron. With the developed 3D charge difference density, one visualizes the charge transfer process, distinguishes the role of molecular units, and finds the relationship between the role of DPP and excitation energy for the three polymers during photo-excitation. PMID:23365549

  5. Conduction electrons in acceptor-doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Wlodek; Raymond, Andre; Kubisa, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    We review magneto-optical and magneto-transport effects in GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures doped in GaAlAs barriers with donors, providing two-dimensional (2D) electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs quantum wells (QWS), and additionally doped with smaller amounts of acceptors (mostly Be atoms) in the vicinity of 2DEG. One may also deal with residual acceptors (mostly C atoms). The behavior of such systems in the presence of a magnetic field differs appreciably from those doped in the vicinity of 2DEG with donors. Three subjects related to the acceptor-doped heterostructures are considered. First is the problem of bound states of conduction electrons confined to the vicinity of negatively charged acceptors by the joint effect of a QW and an external magnetic field parallel to the growth direction. A variational theory of such states is presented, demonstrating that an electron turning around a repulsive center has discrete energies above the corresponding Landau levels. Experimental evidence for the discrete electron energies comes from the work on interband photo-magneto-luminescence, intraband cyclotron resonance and quantum magneto-transport (the Quantum Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas effects). An electron rain-down effect at weak electric fields and a boil-off effect at strong electric fields are introduced. It is demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, that a negatively charged acceptor can localize more than one electron. The second subject describes experiment and theory of asymmetric quantized Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas plateaus in acceptor-doped GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructures. It is shown that the main features of the plateau asymmetry can be attributed to asymmetric density of Landau states in the presence of acceptors. However, at high magnetic fields, the rain-down effect is also at work. The third subject deals with the so-called disorder modes (DMs) in the cyclotron resonance of conduction electrons. The DMs originate from random distributions of negatively

  6. Insights on the design and electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The development of conjugated organic materials has become a rapidly evolving field of research, particularly with a view toward practical applications in so-called organic electronics that encompass a variety of device types, such as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. Almost all of these devices minimally require the presence of electron-donor and -acceptor components that act as p- and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Research over the past two decades has shown that while there is an abundant resource of organic p-type materials, suitable n-type species are few and far between. To overcome this severe bottleneck for the further development of organic electronics, researchers have identified organo-main-group avenues as valuable alternatives toward organic electron-acceptor materials that may ultimately be used as n-type components in practical devices. One particular element of interest in this context is phosphorus, which at first glance may not necessarily suggest such properties. In this Account, I provide detailed insights on the origin of the electron-acceptor properties of organophosphorus-based conjugated materials and include an overview of important molecular species that have been developed by my group and others. To this end, I explain that the electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials originate from an interaction known as negative hyperconjugation. While this particular interaction creates a simply inductively withdrawing phosphoryl substituent for π-conjugated scaffolds, incorporation of a phosphorus atom as an integral part of a cyclic substructure within a π-conjugated system provides a much more complex, versatile, and consequently highly valuable tool for the tuning of the electron-acceptor properties of the materials. Notably, the degree of negative hyperconjugation can effectively be tailored in various ways via simple substitution at the phosphorus center. This is now well established for phosphole-based molecular

  7. Insights on the design and electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The development of conjugated organic materials has become a rapidly evolving field of research, particularly with a view toward practical applications in so-called organic electronics that encompass a variety of device types, such as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. Almost all of these devices minimally require the presence of electron-donor and -acceptor components that act as p- and n-type semiconductors, respectively. Research over the past two decades has shown that while there is an abundant resource of organic p-type materials, suitable n-type species are few and far between. To overcome this severe bottleneck for the further development of organic electronics, researchers have identified organo-main-group avenues as valuable alternatives toward organic electron-acceptor materials that may ultimately be used as n-type components in practical devices. One particular element of interest in this context is phosphorus, which at first glance may not necessarily suggest such properties. In this Account, I provide detailed insights on the origin of the electron-acceptor properties of organophosphorus-based conjugated materials and include an overview of important molecular species that have been developed by my group and others. To this end, I explain that the electron-acceptor properties of conjugated organophosphorus materials originate from an interaction known as negative hyperconjugation. While this particular interaction creates a simply inductively withdrawing phosphoryl substituent for π-conjugated scaffolds, incorporation of a phosphorus atom as an integral part of a cyclic substructure within a π-conjugated system provides a much more complex, versatile, and consequently highly valuable tool for the tuning of the electron-acceptor properties of the materials. Notably, the degree of negative hyperconjugation can effectively be tailored in various ways via simple substitution at the phosphorus center. This is now well established for phosphole-based molecular

  8. Microbial Community Succession during Lactate Amendment and Electron Acceptor Limitation Reveals a Predominance of Metal-Reducing Pelosinus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Jennifer J.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Podar, Mircea; Hurt, Richard A.; Campbell, James H.; Drake, Meghan M.; Moberly, James G.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of the success of in situ bioremediation strategies is complex. By using controlled laboratory conditions, the influence of individual variables, such as U(VI), Cr(VI), and electron donors and acceptors on community structure, dynamics, and the metal-reducing potential can be studied. Triplicate anaerobic, continuous-flow reactors were inoculated with Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater from the Hanford, WA, 100-H area, amended with lactate, and incubated for 95 days to obtain stable, enriched communities. The reactors were kept anaerobic with N2 gas (9 ml/min) flushing the headspace and were fed a defined medium amended with 30 mM lactate and 0.05 mM sulfate with a 48-h generation time. The resultant diversity decreased from 63 genera within 12 phyla to 11 bacterial genera (from 3 phyla) and 2 archaeal genera (from 1 phylum). Final communities were dominated by Pelosinus spp. and to a lesser degree, Acetobacterium spp., with low levels of other organisms, including methanogens. Four new strains of Pelosinus were isolated, with 3 strains being capable of Cr(VI) reduction while one also reduced U(VI). Under limited sulfate, it appeared that the sulfate reducers, including Desulfovibrio spp., were outcompeted. These results suggest that during times of electron acceptor limitation in situ, organisms such as Pelosinus spp. may outcompete the more-well-studied organisms while maintaining overall metal reduction rates and extents. Finally, lab-scale simulations can test new strategies on a smaller scale while facilitating community member isolation, so that a deeper understanding of community metabolism can be revealed. PMID:22267668

  9. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X.-Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor−acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. PMID:26382113

  10. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; et al

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealedmore » both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.« less

  11. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu M. Zhong; Nam, Chang -Yong; Trinh, M. Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E.; Khlyabich, Petr P.; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Loo, Yueh -Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X. -Y.; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor–acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. As a result, this study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  12. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  13. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. PMID:26382113

  14. A New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kimberly L; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J; Semkiw, Elizabeth M.; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D; Wall, Judy D.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the encoding gene, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycAor the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase, QrcABCD transmembrane complex. In contrast to the wild type, neither CycA and QrcA mutants do not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are essential D. alaskensis components for transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  15. New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp-Giles, Barbara J; Keller, Kimberly L; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D; Semkiw, Elizabeth M.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the gene encoding TpIc3, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycA or the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase transmembrane complex, QrcABCD. In contrast to the wild type, the CycA and QrcA mutants did not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as the electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of the growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are D. alaskensis components essential for the transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  16. New Model for Electron Flow for Sulfate Reduction in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Rapp-Giles, Barbara J.; Semkiw, Elizabeth S.; Porat, Iris; Brown, Steven D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-02-01

    To understand the energy conversion activities of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, it is necessary to identify the components involved in electron flow. The importance of the abundant type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (TpIc3) as an electron carrier during sulfate respiration was questioned by the previous isolation of a null mutation in the gene encoding TpIc3, cycA, in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Whereas respiratory growth of the CycA mutant with lactate and sulfate was little affected, growth with pyruvate and sulfate was significantly impaired. We have explored the phenotype of the CycA mutant through physiological tests and transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data reported here show that electrons from pyruvate oxidation do not reach adenylyl sulfate reductase, the enzyme catalyzing the first redox reaction during sulfate reduction, in the absence of either CycA or the type I cytochrome c3:menaquinone oxidoreductase transmembrane complex, QrcABCD. In contrast to the wild type, the CycA and QrcA mutants did not grow with H2 or formate and sulfate as the electron acceptor. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the CycA mutant showed that transcripts and enzymes for the pathway from pyruvate to succinate were strongly decreased in the CycA mutant regardless of the growth mode. Neither the CycA nor the QrcA mutant grew on fumarate alone, consistent with the omics results and a redox regulation of gene expression. We conclude that TpIc3 and the Qrc complex are D. alaskensis components essential for the transfer of electrons released in the periplasm to reach the cytoplasmic adenylyl sulfate reductase and present a model that may explain the CycA phenotype through confurcation of electrons.

  17. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for use in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian B; Holliday, Sarah; Chen, Hung-Yang; Cryer, Samuel J; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-11-17

    The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure-property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together, forming dimers with

  18. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for use in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian B; Holliday, Sarah; Chen, Hung-Yang; Cryer, Samuel J; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-11-17

    The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure-property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together, forming dimers with

  19. Non-Fullerene Electron Acceptors for Use in Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted to optimize the absorbing, energetic, and transport properties of the donor material, fullerenes remain as the exclusive electron acceptor in all high performance devices. Very recently, some new non-fullerene acceptors have been demonstrated to outperform fullerenes in comparative devices. This Account describes this progress, discussing molecular design considerations and the structure–property relationships that are emerging. The motivation to replace fullerene acceptors stems from their synthetic inflexibility, leading to constraints in manipulating frontier energy levels, as well as poor absorption in the solar spectrum range, and an inherent tendency to undergo postfabrication crystallization, resulting in device instability. New acceptors have to address these limitations, providing tunable absorption with high extinction coefficients, thus contributing to device photocurrent. The ability to vary and optimize the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy level for a specific donor polymer is also an important requirement, ensuring minimal energy loss on electron transfer and as high an internal voltage as possible. Initially perylene diimide acceptors were evaluated as promising acceptor materials. These electron deficient aromatic molecules can exhibit good electron transport, facilitated by close packed herringbone crystal motifs, and their energy levels can be synthetically tuned. The principal drawback of this class of materials, their tendency to crystallize on too large a length scale for an optimal heterojunction nanostructure, has been shown to be overcome through introduction of conformation twisting through steric effects. This has been primarily achieved by coupling two units together

  20. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase: preference for quinones as electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W; Galuszka, Petr; Sebela, Marek; Pec, Pavel; Hrbác, Jan; Novák, Ondrej; Bilyeu, Kristin D; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that can be used by the enzyme. Using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone or 1,4-naphthoquinone as electron acceptor, turnover rates with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine of approx. 150 s(-1) could be obtained. This suggests that the natural electron acceptor of the enzyme is quite probably a p-quinone or similar compound. By using the stopped-flow technique, it was found that the enzyme is rapidly reduced by N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (k(red)=950 s(-1)). Re-oxidation of the reduced enzyme by molecular oxygen is too slow to be of physiological relevance, confirming its classification as a dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was established for the first time that the enzyme is capable of degrading aromatic cytokinins, although at low reaction rates. As a result, the enzyme displays a dual catalytic mode for oxidative degradation of cytokinins: a low-rate and low-substrate specificity reaction with oxygen as the electron acceptor, and high activity and strict specificity for isopentenyladenine and analogous cytokinins with some specific electron acceptors. PMID:14965342

  1. Experimental investigation of donor-acceptor electron transfer and back transfer in solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, R.C.; Lin, Y.; Fayer, M.D. )

    1989-08-24

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor (rubrene) to randomly distributed acceptors (duroquinone) followed by electron back transfer in a rigid solution (sucrose octaacetate) has been studied experimentally. The forward electron-transfer process was observed by time-dependent fluorescence quenching measurements, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation was monitored by use of the picosecond transient grating technique. A statistical mechanics theory is used to describe the time-dependent dynamics of the system and to extract the forward- and back-transfer parameters from the data. The theory includes donor-acceptor and acceptor-acceptor excluded volume. It is found that the inclusion of excluded volume is necessary to obtain accurate transfer parameters. These parameters enable a detailed description of the electron transfer and recombination dynamics to be given. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent. A variety of time-dependent properties of the system are calculated. These include the time-dependent ion populations and the probability that the ith acceptor is an ion as a function of time and distance. In addition, (R(t)) and ({tau}(t)), which are the average ion separation as a function of time and the average ion existence time as a function of ion separation, respectively, are calculated.

  2. Hexachloroiridate IV as an Electron Acceptor for a Plasmalemma Redox System in Maize Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Lüthen, Hartwig; Böttger, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Hexachloroiridate IV, a new artificial electron acceptor for the constitutive plant plasma membrane redox system has been investigated. It appeared not to permeate through biological membranes. Due to its higher redox potential, it is a more powerful electron acceptor than hexacyanoferrate III (ferricyanide) and even micromolar concentrations are rapidly reduced. Hexachloroiridate IV increased H+ efflux over a concentration range of 0.05 to 0.1 millimolar. Lower concentrations slightly inhibited proton extrusion. Calcium stimulated both proton and electron transfer rates. Like hexacyanoferrate III-reduction, irridate reduction was inhibited by auxin. PMID:16666029

  3. Beyond Fullerenes: Designing Alternative Molecular Electron Acceptors for Solution-Processable Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Geneviève; Fernando, Roshan

    2015-09-17

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are promising candidates for providing a low cost, widespread energy source by converting sunlight into electricity. Solution-processable active layers have predominantly consisted of a conjugated polymer donor blended with a fullerene derivative as the acceptor. Although fullerene derivatives have been the acceptor of choice, they have drawbacks such as weak visible light absorption and poor energy tuning that limit overall efficiencies. This has recently fueled new research to explore alternative acceptors that would overcome those limitations. During this exploration, one question arises: what are the important design principles for developing nonfullerene acceptors? It is generally accepted that acceptors should have high electron affinity, electron mobility, and absorption coefficient in the visible and near-IR region of the spectra. In this Perspective, we argue that alternative molecular acceptors, when blended with a conjugated polymer donor, should also have large nonplanar structures to promote nanoscale phase separation, charge separation and charge transport in blend films. Additionally, new material design should address the low dielectric constant of organic semiconductors that have so far limited their widespread application.

  4. TERMINAL ELECTRON ACCEPTOR MASS BALANCE: LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in subsurface systems contain a relatively large amount of biodegradable organic material. During the biochemical oxidation of the organic compounds in the NAPL, electrons are transferred to terminal electron acceptors (TEA) (i.e., O2, NO3-, Mn(I...

  5. Growth of strain SES-3 with arsenate and other diverse electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laverman, A.M.; Blum, J.S.; Schaefer, J.K.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The selenate-respiring bacterial strain SES-3 was able to use a variety of inorganic electron acceptors to sustain growth. SES-3 grew with the reduction of arsenate to arsenite, Fe(III) to Fe(II), or thiosulfate to sulfide. It also grew in medium in which elemental sulfur, Mn(IV), nitrite, trimethylamine N-oxide, or fumarate was provided as an electron acceptor. Growth on oxygen was microaerophilic. There was no growth with arsenite or chromate. Washed suspensions of cells grown on selenate or nitrate had a constitutive ability to reduce arsenate but were unable to reduce arsenite. These results suggest that strain SES-3 may occupy a niche as an environmental opportunist by being able to take advantage of a diversity of electron acceptors.

  6. Organic photovoltaic cells based on unconventional electron donor fullerene and electron acceptor copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. L.; Sullivan, P.; Schumann, S.; Hancox, I.; Jones, T. S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate organic discrete heterojunction photovoltaic cells based on fullerene (C60) and copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc), in which the C60 and F16CuPc act as the electron donor and the electron acceptor, respectively. The C60/F16CuPc cells fabricated with conventional and inverted architectures both exhibit comparable power conversion efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that the photocurrent in both cells is generated by a conventional exciton dissociation mechanism rather than the exciton recombination mechanism recently proposed for a similar C60/F16ZnPc system [Song et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 4554 (2010)]. These results demonstrate that new unconventional material systems are a potential way to fabricate organic photovoltaic cells with inverted as well as conventional architectures.

  7. Photocurrent generation through electron-exciton interaction at the organic semiconductor donor/acceptor interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Zhang, Qiaoming; Lei, Yanlian; Zhu, Furong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Guoxi; Xiong, Zuhong; Song, Qunliang

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we report our effort to understand the photocurrent generation that is contributed via electron-exciton interaction at the donor/acceptor interface in organic solar cells (OSCs). Donor/acceptor bi-layer heterojunction OSCs, of the indium tin oxide/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60)/molybdenum oxide/Al type, were employed to study the mechanism of photocurrent generation due to the electron-exciton interaction, where CuPc and C60 are the donor and the acceptor, respectively. It is shown that the electron-exciton interaction and the exciton dissociation processes co-exist at the CuPc/C60 interface in OSCs. Compared to conventional donor/acceptor bi-layer OSCs, the cells with the above configuration enable holes to be extracted at the C60 side while electrons can be collected at the CuPc side, resulting in a photocurrent in the reverse direction. The photocurrent thus observed is contributed to primarily by the charge carriers that are generated by the electron-exciton interaction at the CuPc/C60 interface, while charges derived from the exciton dissociation process also exist at the same interface. The mechanism of photocurrent generation due to electron-exciton interaction in the OSCs is further investigated, and it is manifested by the transient photovoltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency measurements. PMID:24002235

  8. Time dependence of donor-acceptor electron transfer and back transfer in solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Dorfman, R. C.; Fayer, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor to randomly distributed acceptors followed by electron back transfer is treated theoretically for donors and acceptors in a rigid solution. The forward electron transfer process is described in terms of the excited state population probabilityPex(t) of the donor molecules, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation is characterized by Pct(t), the donor cation state population probability. Exact expressions for the ensemble averages and are derived. Numerical calulations are presented for the cation probabilities, the average cation-anion separation distance , and the average cation existence time <τ(R)>, using parameters which characterize the forward and back transfer distance dependent rates. Relationships among , and the intermolecular interaction parameters provide detailed insights into the distance and time dependence of the flow of electron probability in an ensemble of donors and acceptors. The theoretical expressions can be used to calculate experimental observables. In particular, picosecond transient grating experiments are analyzed, and it is shown that by combining grating experiments (or other ground state recovery experiments) with fluorescence experiments it is possible to obtain the intermolecular interaction parameters for both forward and back transfer and a detailed description of the dynamics. The calculations presented here for rigid solutions are the precursor to the inclusion of diffusive motion of donors and acceptors to describe the dynamics of coupled electron transfer and back transfer in liquid solutions.

  9. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-10-15

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  10. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-10-01

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH(4)) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH(4) production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt(-1)), while observed CO(2) production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH(4) emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha(-1)) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha(-1) application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH(4) emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH(4) production rates as well as total seasonal CH(4) flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH(4) emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  11. Removal of multiple electron acceptors by pilot-scale, two-stage membrane biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He-Ping; Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Tang, Youneng; Kim, Bi-O; Vanginkel, Steven; Friese, David; Overstreet, Ryan; Smith, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce

    2014-05-01

    We studied the performance of a pilot-scale membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) treating groundwater containing four electron acceptors: nitrate (NO3(-)), perchlorate (ClO4(-)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), and oxygen (O2). The treatment goal was to remove ClO4(-) from ∼200 μg/L to less than 6 μg/L. The pilot system was operated as two MBfRs in series, and the positions of the lead and lag MBfRs were switched regularly. The lead MBfR removed at least 99% of the O2 and 63-88% of NO3(-), depending on loading conditions. The lag MBfR was where most of the ClO4(-) reduction occurred, and the effluent ClO4(-) concentration was driven to as low as 4 μg/L, with most concentrations ≤10 μg/L. However, SO4(2-) reduction occurred in the lag MBfR when its NO3(-) + O2 flux was smaller than ∼0.18 g H2/m(2)-d, and this was accompanied by a lower ClO4(-) flux. We were able to suppress SO4(2-) reduction by lowering the H2 pressure and increasing the NO3(-) + O2 flux. We also monitored the microbial community using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting characteristic reductase genes. Due to regular position switching, the lead and lag MBfRs had similar microbial communities. Denitrifying bacteria dominated the biofilm when the NO3(-) + O2 fluxes were highest, but sulfate-reducing bacteria became more important when SO4(2-) reduction was enhanced in the lag MBfR due to low NO3(-) + O2 flux. The practical two-stage strategy to achieve complete ClO4(-) and NO3(-) reduction while suppressing SO4(2-) reduction involved controlling the NO3(-) + O2 surface loading between 0.18 and 0.34 g H2/m(2)-d and using a low H2 pressure in the lag MBfR.

  12. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer between donors and acceptors on micelle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidemaier, Kristin; Tavernier, H. L.; Chu, K. T.; Fayer, M. D.

    1997-09-01

    Fluorescence time-dependence and fluorescence yield data are used to examine photoinduced electron transfer between N,N-dimethylaniline and octadecylrhodamine B on the surfaces of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and Triton X-100 micelles. The data are analyzed with a detailed theory that includes diffusion of the chromophores over the micelle surface and models the reaction rate by a distance-dependent Marcus form. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained for reasonable choices of the transfer parameters for DTAB. However, for Triton X-100, there is reasonable agreement between theory and experiment only for values of the parameters that verge on unphysical. Possible explanations are discussed.

  14. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation. PMID:21499600

  15. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation.

  16. New conjugated molecular scaffolds based on [2,2]paracyclophane as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Guanxin; Yu, Chenmin; He, Chang; Wang, Jianguo; Chen, Xin; Yao, Jingjing; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Deqing

    2014-09-01

    Two conjugated molecules with a [2,2]paracyclophane core were designed as non-fullerene electron acceptors for photovoltaic cells. Using as the donor, a high power conversion efficiency (2.69%) is achieved for the blending thin film of with , which is relatively high for solution-processed OPVs based on small molecular non-fullerene acceptors and as the electron donor.

  17. Effect of biogenic photochromic electron acceptors on chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. V.; Klimenko, I. V.; Nevrova, O. V.; Zhuravleva, T. S.

    2014-05-01

    It is shown that the photophysical properties of chlorophyll a (Chl) depend on the nature and relative amounts of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (MNQ) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Photoinduced charge separation occurs in aqueous ethanol solutions of Chl (1 × 10-5 M) and NADP (5 × 10-6-5 × 10-4 M), resulting in the dynamic quenching of Chl fluorescence. Coordination interaction between Chl and NADP is established at an NADP concentration of ≥5 × 10-4 M. The nonlinear Stern-Volmer dependence in this range is due to the input from static quenching. It is shown that the quenching of Chl fluorescence in an MNQ solution at Chl and MNQ concentrations of 1 × 10-5 M and 6.7 × 10-5-1 × 10-4 M, respectively, is described by a linear dependence in the Stern-Volmer coordinates; no complex formation is observed for Chl and MNQ under these conditions, and electron transfer is of the dynamic type. Static or mixed-type energy transfer from MNQ to Chl dominates at elevated MNQ concentrations.

  18. Evolution of the electron mobility in polymer solar cells with different fullerene acceptors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong; Djukic, Brandon; Shi, Weiqing; Bridges, Colin R; Kozycz, Lisa M; Seferos, Dwight S

    2013-08-28

    We investigate the evolution of the electron mobility of two different acceptors, [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) and indene-C60 bisadduct (ICBA), in a poly(3-hexylthiophene) blend solar cell during a prolonged thermal aging process. High electron mobility does not correlate with the best device performance in our study of the P3HT:PC71BM and P3HT:ICBA systems. Very little changes are observed in the polymer crystallinity as a function of time. The evolution of the acceptor appears to be the dominant factor that leads to long-term changes in the device performance. The electron mobility evolves differently in PC71BM and ICBA systems, which highlights the importance of the fullerene molecular structure. PMID:23845022

  19. C-H-Activated Direct Arylation of Strong Benzothiadiazole and Quinoxaline-Based Electron Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junxiang; Parker, Timothy C; Chen, Wayne; Williams, LaRita; Khrustalev, Victor N; Jucov, Evgheni V; Barlow, Stephen; Timofeeva, Tatiana V; Marder, Seth R

    2016-01-15

    Electron acceptors are important components of π-conjugated materials, but the strong electron-withdrawing properties of the required synthetic intermediates often make them poor substrates in synthetic schemes designed around conventional organometallic cross-coupling. Here, strong benzodiimine-based acceptors, including 5,6-difluoro[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole, 5,6-dicyano[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole, 5,6-dicyanobenzo[d][1,2,3]triazole, 6,7-dicyanoquinoxaline, and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline, are shown to undergo facile palladium-catalyzed C-H direct arylation with a variety of bromoarenes in moderate to high yields. The electrochemical characteristics of di-2-thienyl derivatives synthesized using this methodology are compared and suggest that, in an electron-transfer sense, 5,6-dicyano[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole is a comparably strong acceptor to benzo[1,2-c:4,5-c']bis[1,2,5]thiadiazole. The synthetic results suggest that high electron-withdrawing ability, which has traditionally limited reaction yields and structural variety in organic electronic materials, may be advantageous when employing C-H activated direct arylation in certain circumstances.

  20. Donor acceptor electronic couplings in π-stacks: How many states must be accounted for?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-04-01

    Two-state model is commonly used to estimate the donor-acceptor electronic coupling Vda for electron transfer. However, in some important cases, e.g. for DNA π-stacks, this scheme fails to provide accurate values of Vda because of multistate effects. The Generalized Mulliken-Hush method enables a multistate treatment of Vda. In this Letter, we analyze the dependence of calculated electronic couplings on the number of the adiabatic states included in the model. We suggest a simple scheme to determine this number. The superexchange correction of the two-state approximation is shown to provide good estimates of the electronic coupling.

  1. Influence of different electron donors and acceptors on dehalorespiration of tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritse, J.; Drzyzga, O.; Kloetstra, G.; Keijmel, M.; Wiersum, L.P.; Hutson, R.; Collins, M.D.; Gottschal, J.C.

    1999-12-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethane (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 {micro}m and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35 C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H{sub 2}, format, L-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except format and H{sub 2}) are oxidized to acetate and CO{sub 2}. when L-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher. Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumate or nitrate.

  2. Influence of Different Electron Donors and Acceptors on Dehalorespiration of Tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    PubMed Central

    Gerritse, Jan; Drzyzga, Oliver; Kloetstra, Geert; Keijmel, Mischa; Wiersum, Luit P.; Hutson, Roger; Collins, Matthew D.; Gottschal, Jan C.

    1999-01-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 μm and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35°C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H2, formate, l-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except formate and H2) are oxidized to acetate and CO2. When l-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher (up to 1.4 μmol of chloride released · min−1 · mg of protein−1). Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumarate or nitrate. PMID:10583967

  3. Isotope effect on electron paramagnetic resonance of boron acceptors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegner, A. R.; Tezuka, H.; Andlauer, T.; Stutzmann, M.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Brandt, M. S.; Itoh, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    The fourfold degeneracy of the boron acceptor ground state in silicon, which is easily lifted by any symmetry-breaking perturbation, allows for a strong inhomogeneous broadening of the boron-related electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lines, e.g., by a random distribution of local strains. However, since EPR of boron acceptors in externally unstrained silicon was reported initially, neither the line shape nor the magnitude of the residual broadening observed in samples with high-crystalline purity were compatible with the low concentrations of carbon and oxygen point defects, being the predominant source of random local strain. Adapting a theoretical model which has been applied to understand the acceptor ground-state splitting in the absence of a magnetic field as an effect due to the presence of different silicon isotopes, we show that local fluctuations of the valence-band edge due to different isotopic configurations in the vicinity of the boron acceptors can quantitatively account for all inhomogeneous broadening effects in high-purity Si with a natural isotope composition. Our calculations show that such an isotopic perturbation also leads to a shift in the g value of different boron-related resonances, which we could verify in our experiments. Further, our results provide an independent test and verification of the valence-band offsets between the different Si isotopes determined in previous works.

  4. Femtosecond transient grating studies of electron transfer in porphyrin and chlorophyll donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Svec, W.A.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1994-04-01

    Transient grating studies of electron transfer in artificial photosynthetic systems are described. These systems include simple donor-acceptor molecules where the donor, a chlorophyll or porphyrin, is rigidly attached to an easily reduced species such as napthoquinone or benzoquinone. We have previously synthesized acceptor molecules which have well defined absorption bands upon reduction and are well removed from the excited and cationic states of porphyrins and chlorophylls. They also possess large molar extinction coefficients that dominate the spectra and have well defined polarization characteristics. These traits are ideal for polarization sensitive transient grating experiments which enable accurate determination of the angle of the transition dipole between the initial excitation and the acceptor probe, dynamic solvation effects on the charge separated species, and any time dependent rotation of the chromophores relative to each other. An example of the type of molecule utilized for these experiments is a free base porphyrin (HP) donor and a pyromellitic diimide (PI) acceptor directly bonded to the porphyrin ring.

  5. Electron acceptors for energy generation in microbial fuel cells fed with wastewaters: A mini-review.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan-Shu; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained tremendous global interest over the last decades as a device that uses bacteria to oxidize organic and inorganic matters in the anode with bioelectricity generation and even for purpose of bioremediation. However, this prospective technology has not yet been carried out in field in particular because of its low power yields and target compounds removal which can be largely influenced by electron acceptors contributing to overcome the potential losses existing on the cathode. This mini review summarizes various electron acceptors used in recent years in the categories of inorganic and organic compounds, identifies their merits and drawbacks, and compares their influences on performance of MFCs, as well as briefly discusses possible future research directions particularly from cathode aspect.

  6. Competition between Methane and Alkylbenzenes for Electron Acceptors during Natural Attenuation of Crude Oil in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Amos, R. T.; Cozzarelli, I.; Voytek, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    At a crude-oil spill site near the town of Bemidji, MN, entrapped oil is present at residual saturations exceeding 10% in the vadose zone and floating at the water table at saturations of 30-60%. The degradable fraction of the light crude oil includes n-alkanes, aromatics, and alkyl-cyclohexanes. Together these compounds constitute a reduced carbon concentration at least 500 times greater than is present in the dissolved hydrocarbon groundwater plume comprised mainly of aromatics. Methanogenic degradation of the stationary oil body has been occurring for at least 20 years providing a continuous supply of methane emanating from the oil. Transport of methane away from the oil body occurs in both the vapor phase through the vadose zone and in the dissolved phase with the groundwater flow. Within the vadose zone the supply of oxygen and other electron acceptors from the surface is completely consumed by the process of methane oxidation in a zone 2-3 meters above the water table. In the groundwater, the 1 ppm contour of the methane plume extends beyond the 0.5 ppb contour for benzene, which is located at the aerobic/anaerobic boundary in the plume approximately 120 m downgradient of the oil body. Between 75 m and 120 m downgradient, methane concentrations decrease steadily from >0.6 mmol/L to <0.06 mmol/L, accompanied by increases in the δ13C-CH4 indicating that methane attenuation occurs through microbially-mediated oxidation. Anaerobic methane oxidation under iron-reducing conditions has recently been demonstrated by Beal et al. (Science, 325, 184, 2009) and is indicated at this site by several lines of evidence. In the methane oxidation zone, values of bioavailable Fe(III) extracted from the sediments averaged 8 mmol/kg (n=16), or >8 times the amount required to degrade 0.5 mmol methane, while all other electron acceptors together can account for complete oxidation of only 0.07 mmol (sulfate <0.06 mmol/L, dissolved oxygen <3 µmol/L, and nitrate <0.02 mmol

  7. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride and [1,2- 14C]dichloroethene to 14CO2 under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  8. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer between an incarcerated donor and a free acceptor in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Porel, Mintu; Chuang, Chi-Hung; Burda, Clemens; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2012-09-12

    Supramolecular photoinduced electron transfer dynamics between coumarin 153 (C153) and 4,4'-dimethyl viologen dichloride (MV(2+)) across the molecular barrier of a host molecule, octa acid (OA), has been investigated with femtosecond time resolution. The ultrafast electron transfer from C153 to MV(2+) followed excitation with 150 fs laser pulses at a wavelength of 390 nm despite the fact that C153 was incarcerated within an OA(2) capsule. As a result, the photoexcited coumarin did not show any of the typical relaxation dynamics that is usually observed in free solution. Instead, the excited electron was transferred across the molecular wall of the capsuleplex within 20 ps. Likewise, the lifetime of the charge transfer state was short (724 ps), and electron back-transfer reestablished the ground state of the system within 1 ns, showing strong electronic coupling among the excited electron donor, host, and acceptor. When the donor was encapsulated into the host molecule, the electron transfer process showed significantly accelerated dynamics and essentially no solvent relaxation compared with that in free solution. The study was also extended to N-methylpyridinium iodide as the acceptor with similar results. PMID:22931120

  9. High-Performance Electron Acceptor with Thienyl Side Chains for Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuze; Zhao, Fuwen; He, Qiao; Huo, Lijun; Wu, Yang; Parker, Timothy C; Ma, Wei; Sun, Yanming; Wang, Chunru; Zhu, Daoben; Heeger, Alan J; Marder, Seth R; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-04-13

    We develop an efficient fused-ring electron acceptor (ITIC-Th) based on indacenodithieno[3,2-b]thiophene core and thienyl side-chains for organic solar cells (OSCs). Relative to its counterpart with phenyl side-chains (ITIC), ITIC-Th shows lower energy levels (ITIC-Th: HOMO = -5.66 eV, LUMO = -3.93 eV; ITIC: HOMO = -5.48 eV, LUMO = -3.83 eV) due to the σ-inductive effect of thienyl side-chains, which can match with high-performance narrow-band-gap polymer donors and wide-band-gap polymer donors. ITIC-Th has higher electron mobility (6.1 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) than ITIC (2.6 × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) due to enhanced intermolecular interaction induced by sulfur-sulfur interaction. We fabricate OSCs by blending ITIC-Th acceptor with two different low-band-gap and wide-band-gap polymer donors. In one case, a power conversion efficiency of 9.6% was observed, which rivals some of the highest efficiencies for single junction OSCs based on fullerene acceptors.

  10. XeF(2) /fluoride acceptors as versatile one-electron oxidants.

    PubMed

    Poleschner, Helmut; Seppelt, Konrad

    2013-12-01

    No phlogiston but xenon is released when XeF2 /F(-) acceptors act as new one-electron oxidants. F(-) acceptors are Lewis acids BF3 , B(C6 F5 )3 , and Al{OC(CF3 )3 }3 , and silyl derivatives TfOSiMe3 , Tf2 NSiMe3 , Me3 Si(+)  B(C6 F5 )4 (-) , and Me3 Si(+)  CHB11 Cl11 (-) . The anions BF4 (-) , TfO(-) , Tf2 N(-) , FB(C6 F5 )3 (-) , FAl{OC(CF3 )3 }3 (-) , B(C6 F5 )4 (-) , or CHB11 Cl11 (-) can be introduced into oxidation products of R2 E2 (E=S, Se, Te), [FeCp2 ], [(FeCpS)4 ], tetrathiafulvalene, thianthrene, and (2,4-Br2 C6 H3 )3 N. PMID:24127390

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer in rigidly linked dimethoxynapthalene-N-methylpyridinium donor-acceptor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.; Wilson, Gerard J.; Keyte, Peter J.; Paddon-Row, Michael N.

    1992-07-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) is studied in a series of novel molecules containing a dimethoxynaphthalene (DMN) donor and either a pyridine (P) or N-methylpyridinium (P-Me +) acceptor covalently linked via a rigid nonbornalogous bridge ( n sigma bonds in length). ET rates of the order of 10 10 s -1 were measured for the DMN- n-P-Me + series ( n = 4, 6), while no appreciable ET was observed for the DMN- n-P compounds. Electronic and nuclear factors are discussed and the results rationalized in terms of Marcus—Hush and non-adiabatic ET theories.

  12. Short-lived electron transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psiachos, D.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate time-dependent electron transfer (ET) in benchmark donor-bridge-acceptor systems. For the small bridge sizes studied, we obtain results far different from the perturbation theory which underlies scattering-based approaches, notably a lack of destructive interference in the ET for certain arrangements of bridge molecules. We also calculate wavepacket transmission in the non-steady-state regime, finding a featureless spectrum, while for the current we find two types of transmission: sequential and direct, where in the latter, the current transmission increases as a function of the energy of the transferred electron, a regime inaccessible by conventional scattering theory.

  13. Evidence on Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (AOM) in a boreal cultivated peatland with natural and added electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorodnikov, Maxim; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Martikainen, Pertti; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a process of methane (CH4) consumption under anoxic conditions driven by microorganisms, which oxidize CH4 with various alternate electron acceptors (AEA): sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, metals-(Fe, Mn, Cu), organic compounds. AOM is common in marine ecosystems, where microbial sulfate reduction (SR) consumes most of the CH4 produced in sediments. Despite the global significance of AOM, the exact mechanisms and relevance of the process in terrestrial ecosystems are almost unknown. In the current study the occurrence of AOM was tested for two organic soil horizons (30 and 40 cm depth) and one mineral sub-soil (sand, 50 cm depth) of a cultivated boreal peatland (Linnansuo, Eastern Finland, energy crop Phalaris arundinacea - reed canarygrass) under controlled conditions with the addition of 13C-labeled CH4 and two common AEAs - SO4-2 and Fe+3. Concentrations of CH4, CO2 and O2 were continuously measured during 10 days of incubation and CO2 was sampled periodically under anaerobic conditions for stable 13C analysis. Oxygen dynamics revealed negligible O2 contamination during incubation and its trace amounts (0.05-0.8% from the atmospheric) were accounted in the net CH4 uptake. Application of 13C-enriched CH4 (4.9 atom%) allowed to track the label in CO2 as the end-product of AOM. The highest 13CO2 enrichment (up to 60‰) was observed in mineral sub-soil, however AOM was quantitatively more pronounced in the upper 30 cm horizon (2.1 vs. 0.2 μg CO2 g soil DW-1 in the 50 cm sub-soil). The highest AOM rate of 8.9 ng CO2 g soil DW-1 h-1 was estimated for the control treatment where no AEAs were added indicating sufficient amount of naturally available AEAs, likely organic compounds. This rate was 50 times more intensive (on the C basis) than the CH4 production potential of the same soil. In contrast, external AEAs decreased AOM rates but added Fe+3 stimulated decomposition of native SOM (as seen from the most depleted 13CO2 signatures

  14. An inner membrane cytochrome required only for reduction of high redox potential extracellular electron acceptors

    DOE PAGES

    Levar, Caleb E.; Chan, Chi Ho; Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, transfer electrons beyond their outer membranes to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, heavy metals, and electrodes in electrochemical devices. In the environment, metal acceptors exist in multiple chelated and insoluble forms that span a range of redox potentials and offer different amounts of available energy. Despite this, metal-reducing bacteria have not been shown to alter their electron transfer strategies to take advantage of these energy differences. Disruption of imcH, encoding an inner membrane c-type cytochrome, eliminated the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, and insoluble Mn(IV) oxides, electron acceptors with potentialsmore » greater than 0.1 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), but the imcH mutant retained the ability to reduce Fe(III) oxides with potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE. The imcH mutant failed to grow on electrodes poised at +0.24 V versus SHE, but switching electrodes to –0.1 V versus SHE triggered exponential growth. At potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE, both the wild type and the imcH mutant doubled 60% slower than at higher potentials. Electrodes poised even 100 mV higher (0.0 V versus SHE) could not trigger imcH mutant growth. These results demonstrate that G. sulfurreducens possesses multiple respiratory pathways, that some of these pathways are in operation only after exposure to low redox potentials, and that electron flow can be coupled to generation of different amounts of energy for growth. Redox potentials that trigger these behaviors mirror those of metal acceptors common in subsurface environments where Geobacter is found.« less

  15. An inner membrane cytochrome required only for reduction of high redox potential extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Levar, Caleb E.; Chan, Chi Ho; Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2014-10-28

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, transfer electrons beyond their outer membranes to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides, heavy metals, and electrodes in electrochemical devices. In the environment, metal acceptors exist in multiple chelated and insoluble forms that span a range of redox potentials and offer different amounts of available energy. Despite this, metal-reducing bacteria have not been shown to alter their electron transfer strategies to take advantage of these energy differences. Disruption of imcH, encoding an inner membrane c-type cytochrome, eliminated the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, and insoluble Mn(IV) oxides, electron acceptors with potentials greater than 0.1 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), but the imcH mutant retained the ability to reduce Fe(III) oxides with potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE. The imcH mutant failed to grow on electrodes poised at +0.24 V versus SHE, but switching electrodes to –0.1 V versus SHE triggered exponential growth. At potentials of ≤–0.1 V versus SHE, both the wild type and the imcH mutant doubled 60% slower than at higher potentials. Electrodes poised even 100 mV higher (0.0 V versus SHE) could not trigger imcH mutant growth. These results demonstrate that G. sulfurreducens possesses multiple respiratory pathways, that some of these pathways are in operation only after exposure to low redox potentials, and that electron flow can be coupled to generation of different amounts of energy for growth. Redox potentials that trigger these behaviors mirror those of metal acceptors common in subsurface environments where Geobacter is found.

  16. Donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrid materials facilitating photo-induced electron-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Anastasios; Pagona, Georgia; Tagmatarchis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Graphene research and in particular the topic of chemical functionalization of graphene has exploded in the last decade. The main aim is to increase the solubility and thereby enhance the processability of the material, which is otherwise insoluble and inapplicable for technological applications when stacked in the form of graphite. To this end, initially, graphite was oxidized under harsh conditions to yield exfoliated graphene oxide sheets that are soluble in aqueous media and amenable to chemical modifications due to the presence of carboxylic acid groups at the edges of the lattice. However, it was obvious that the high-defect framework of graphene oxide cannot be readily utilized in applications that are governed by charge-transfer processes, for example, in solar cells. Alternatively, exfoliated graphene has been applied toward the realization of some donor-acceptor hybrid materials with photo- and/or electro-active components. The main body of research regarding obtaining donor-acceptor hybrid materials based on graphene to facilitate charge-transfer phenomena, which is reviewed here, concerns the incorporation of porphyrins and phthalocyanines onto graphene sheets. Through illustrative schemes, the preparation and most importantly the photophysical properties of such graphene-based ensembles will be described. Important parameters, such as the generation of the charge-separated state upon photoexcitation of the organic electron donor, the lifetimes of the charge-separation and charge-recombination as well as the incident-photon-to-current efficiency value for some donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrids, will be discussed.

  17. Denitrification and patterns of electron donors and acceptors in 8 riparian zones with contrasting hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidon, P.; Hill, A.

    2004-12-01

    A better understanding of nitrate removal mechanisms is important for managing the water quality function of stream riparian zones. We examined the linkages between hydrologic flow paths, patterns of electron donors and acceptors and the importance of denitrification as a nitrate removal mechanism in 8 riparian zones on glacial till and outwash landscapes in southern Ontario, Canada. Nitrate-N concentrations in shallow groundwater from adjacent cropland declined from levels that were often 10-30 mg L-1 near the field-riparian edge to <1 mg L-1 in the riparian zones throughout the year. Chloride data suggest that dilution cannot account for most of this nitrate decline. Despite contrasting hydrogeologic settings, these riparian zones displayed a well-organized pattern of electron donors and acceptors that resulted from the transport of oxic nitrate-rich groundwater to portions of the riparian zones where low DO concentrations and an increase in DOC concentrations were encountered. The natural abundances of d15N and in situ acetylene injection to piezometers indicate that denitrification is the primary mechanism of nitrate removal in all of the riparian zones. Our data indicate that effective nitrate removal by denitrification occurs in riparian zones with hydric soils as well as in non-hydric riparian zones and that a shallow water table is not always necessary for efficient nitrate removal by denitrification. The location of "hot spots" of denitrification within riparian areas can be explained by the influence of key landscape variables such as slope, sediment texture and depth of confining layers on hydrologic pathways that link supplies of electron donors and acceptors.

  18. TiO2 advanced photo-oxidation technology: Effect of electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ekabi, H.; Butters, B.; Delany, D.; Powell, T.; Ireland, J.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of electron acceptors (additives) such as hydrogen peroxide, ammonium persulphate, potassium bromate and potassium peroxymonosulphate (oxone) on the TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of various organic pollutants were examined at various conditions. The individual and the collective effects of these additives on the degradation rates of two different concentrations (40 and 200 ppm) of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) were investigated in single-pass and multi-pass operational modes at 3 L/min flow. (Copyright (c) 1993 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

  19. Epitaxial composite layers of electron donors and acceptors from very large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Samorí, Paolo; Severin, Nikolai; Simpson, Christopher D; Müllen, Klaus; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2002-08-14

    Large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be considered as nanographenes, whose electron donating or accepting properties are controlled by their size and shape as well as functionalities in their periphery. Epitaxial thin films of them are targets for optoelectronic applications; however, large PAHs are increasingly difficult to process. Here we show that epitaxial layers of very large unsubstituted PAHs (C(42)H(18) and C(132)H(34)), as well as a mixed layer of C(42)H(18) with an electron acceptor, can be obtained by self-assembly from solution. The C(132)H(34) is by far the largest nanographene that up to now has been processed into ordered thin films; due to its size it cannot be sublimed in a vacuum. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies reveal that the interaction with the substrate induces a strong perturbation of the electronic structure of the pure donor in the first epitaxial monolayer. In a second epitaxial layer with a donor acceptor stoichiometry of 2:1 the molecules are unperturbed.

  20. Redox potential of the terminal quinone electron acceptor QB in photosystem II reveals the mechanism of electron transfer regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yuki; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) extracts electrons from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster using light energy and then transfers them to two plastoquinones, the primary quinone electron acceptor QA and the secondary quinone electron acceptor QB. This forward electron transfer is an essential process in light energy conversion. Meanwhile, backward electron transfer is also significant in photoprotection of PSII proteins. Modulation of the redox potential (Em) gap of QA and QB mainly regulates the forward and backward electron transfers in PSII. However, the full scheme of electron transfer regulation remains unresolved due to the unknown Em value of QB. Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), the Em value of QB reduction was measured directly using spectroelectrochemistry in combination with light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The Em(QB−/QB) was determined to be approximately +90 mV and was virtually unaffected by depletion of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This insensitivity of Em(QB−/QB), in combination with the known large upshift of Em(QA−/QA), explains the mechanism of PSII photoprotection with an impaired Mn4CaO5 cluster, in which a large decrease in the Em gap between QA and QB promotes rapid charge recombination via QA−. PMID:26715751

  1. Redox potential of the terminal quinone electron acceptor QB in photosystem II reveals the mechanism of electron transfer regulation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuki; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-19

    Photosystem II (PSII) extracts electrons from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster using light energy and then transfers them to two plastoquinones, the primary quinone electron acceptor QA and the secondary quinone electron acceptor QB. This forward electron transfer is an essential process in light energy conversion. Meanwhile, backward electron transfer is also significant in photoprotection of PSII proteins. Modulation of the redox potential (Em) gap of QA and QB mainly regulates the forward and backward electron transfers in PSII. However, the full scheme of electron transfer regulation remains unresolved due to the unknown Em value of QB. Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), the Em value of QB reduction was measured directly using spectroelectrochemistry in combination with light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The Em(QB (-)/QB) was determined to be approximately +90 mV and was virtually unaffected by depletion of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This insensitivity of Em(QB (-)/QB), in combination with the known large upshift of Em(QA (-)/QA), explains the mechanism of PSII photoprotection with an impaired Mn4CaO5 cluster, in which a large decrease in the Em gap between QA and QB promotes rapid charge recombination via QA (-).

  2. [Chromate reduction by Pseudomonas sp. str. 10 in the presence of some heavy metals and alternative electron acceptors].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, G F; Podgorskiĭ, V S

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. str. 10 reduces chromate with a rate of 0.54 mg / L.h. The availability of Cd2+ and Zn2+ in the medium has no noticeable effect on the rate or slightly increases it. The presence of nickel and copper in the ionic form in the medium resulted in a decrease of chromate reduction rate 2.4 and 4.2 times, respectively. Change of these metals into hydroxide form significantly lowers their negative influence. Iron (III) both in ionic and hydroxide form inhibits the reduction of chromate by Pseudomonas sp. 10. Joint presence of all studied metals decreases their negative impact on chromate reduction, therefore these metals may be neutralized together without a significant lowering of the process efficacy on condition that copper-containing drain will be cleaned separately. The presence of alternative acceptors of electrons inhibited the reduction of chromate. Sulfate and oxyanions of chlorine - chlorate and perchlorate have the highest inhibitory effect on chromate reduction. PMID:24006778

  3. Formate Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis Generates Proton Motive Force and Prevents Growth without an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Aunica L.; Brutinel, Evan D.; Joo, Heena; Maysonet, Rebecca; VanDrisse, Chelsey M.; Kotloski, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that thrives in redox-stratified environments due to its ability to utilize a wide array of terminal electron acceptors. Conversely, the electron donors utilized by S. oneidensis are more limited and include products of primary fermentation such as lactate, pyruvate, formate, and hydrogen. Lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen metabolisms in S. oneidensis have been described previously, but little is known about the role of formate oxidation in the ecophysiology of these bacteria. Formate is produced by S. oneidensis through pyruvate formate lyase during anaerobic growth on carbon sources that enter metabolism at or above the level of pyruvate, and the genome contains three gene clusters predicted to encode three complete formate dehydrogenase complexes. To determine the contribution of each complex to formate metabolism, strains lacking one, two, or all three annotated formate dehydrogenase gene clusters were generated and examined for growth rates and yields on a variety of carbon sources. Here, we report that formate oxidation contributes to both the growth rate and yield of S. oneidensis through the generation of proton motive force. Exogenous formate also greatly accelerated growth on N-acetylglucosamine, a carbon source normally utilized very slowly by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. Surprisingly, deletion of all three formate dehydrogenase gene clusters enabled growth of S. oneidensis using pyruvate in the absence of a terminal electron acceptor, a mode of growth never before observed in these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that formate oxidation is a fundamental strategy under anaerobic conditions for energy conservation in S. oneidensis. IMPORTANCE Shewanella species have garnered interest in biotechnology applications for their ability to respire extracellular terminal electron acceptors, such as insoluble iron oxides and electrodes. While much effort has gone into studying the

  4. Triazole bridges as versatile linkers in electron donor-acceptor conjugates

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Schuster, David I.; Fazio, Michael A; Lee, Olivia P.; Haley, Christopher K.; Ortiz, Angy L.; Echegoyen, Luis; Clark, Timothy; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic triazoles have been frequently used as π-conjugated linkers in intramolecular electron transfer processes. To gain a deeper understanding of the electron mediating function of triazoles, we have synthesized a family of new triazole-based electron donor-acceptor conjugates. We have connected porphyrins and fullerenes through a central triazole moiety – (ZnP-Tri-C60) – each with a single change in their connection through the linker. An extensive photophysical and computational investigation reveals that the electron transfer dynamics – charge separation and charge recombination – in the different ZnP-Tri-C60 conjugates reflect a significant influence of the connectivity at the triazole linker. Except for m4m-ZnP-Tri-C60 17, the conjugates exhibit through-bond electron transfer with varying rate constants. Since the through-bond distance is nearly equal in the ZnP-Tri-C60 conjugates, the variation in charge separation and charge recombination dynamics is mainly associated with the electronic properties of the conjugates, including orbital energies, electron affinity, and the energies of the excited states. The changes of the electronic couplings are, in turn, a consequence of the different connectivity patterns at the triazole moieties. PMID:21702513

  5. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-08-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and ‑0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration.

  6. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and −0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration. PMID:27503002

  7. Molecular and biokinetic characterization of methylotrophic denitrification using nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Kim, Sungpyo; Yu, Ran; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2008-01-01

    Although methanol is a widely employed carbon source for denitrification, relatively little is known on the abundance and diversity of methylotrophic bacteria in activated sludge. The primary aim of this study was to specifically identify bacteria that metabolized methanol in a sequencing batch denitrifying reactor (SBDR), using a novel technique, stable isotope probing (SIP) of 13C labeled DNA. A secondary aim was to quantitatively track dominant methylotrophic bacteria in the SBDR exposed to different terminal electron acceptors. SIP enabled 13C 16S rDNA clone libraries revealed that SBDR methylotrophic populations were related to Methyloversatilis spp. and Hyphomicrobium spp. Based on newly developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays, Hyphomicrobium spp. were more abundant than Methyloversatilis spp. throughout the period of SBDR operation. The relative population abundance was stable despite a shift in electron acceptor from nitrate to nitrite (keeping the same methanol dose). However, the shift to nitrite resulted in a significant decrease in denitrification biokinetics on both nitrate and nitrite. PMID:18701786

  8. Biosynthetic Pathways of Vibrio succinogenes growing with fumarate as terminal electron acceptor and sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Bronder, M; Mell, H; Stupperich, E; Kröger, A

    1982-05-01

    1. With fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor and either H2 or formate as donor, Vibrio succinogenes could grow anaerobically in a mineral medium using fumarate as the sole carbon source. Both the growth rate and the cell yield were increased when glutamate was also present in the medium. 2. Glutamate was incorporated only into the amino acids of the glutamate family (glutamate, glutamine, proline and arginine) of the protein. The residual cell constituents were synthesized from fumarate. 3. Pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate, as the central intermediates of most of the cell constituents, were formed through the action of malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate synthetase. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase was present in the bacterium suggesting that this enzyme is involved in carbohydrate synthesis. 4. In the absence of added glutamate the amino acids of the glutamate family were synthesized from fumarate via citrate. The enzymes involved in glutamate synthesis were present. 5. During growth in the presence of glutamate, net reducing equivalents were needed for cell synthesis. Glutamate and not H2 or formate was used as the source of these reducing equivalents. For this purpose part of the glutamate was oxidized to yield succinate and CO2. 6. The alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase involved in this reaction was found to use ferredoxin as the electron acceptor. The ferredoxin of the bacterium was reoxidized by means of a NADP-ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Enzymes catalyzing the reduction of NAD, NADP or ferredoxin by H2 or formate were not detected in the bacterium. PMID:7103660

  9. [Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on biological phosphorus removal].

    PubMed

    Han, Yun; Xu, Song; Dong, Tao; Wang, Bin-Fan; Wang, Xian-Yao; Peng, Dang-Cong

    2015-02-01

    Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on phosphorus uptake and release were investigated in a pilot-scale oxidation ditch. Phosphorus uptake and release rates were measured with different carbon sources (domestic sewage, sodium acetate, glucose) at 25 degrees C. The results showed that the minimum phosphorus uptake and release rates of glucose were 5.12 mg x (g x h)(-1) and 6.43 mg x (g x h)(-1), respectively, and those of domestic sewage are similar to those of sodium acetate. Phosphorus uptake and release rates increased with the increase of temperature (12, 16, 20 and 25 degrees C) using sodium acetate as carbon sources. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate decreased with added COD. Electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite) had significant effects on phosphorus uptake rate and their order was in accordance with oxygen > nitrate > nitrite. The mass ratio of anoxic P uptake and N consumption (P(uptake)/N (consumption)) of nitrate and nitrite were 0.96 and 0.65, respectively.

  10. Electron acceptor redox potential globally regulates transcriptomic profiling in Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yingli; Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Li, Xiaojing; Fang, Yun; Gan, Lixia; Xu, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    Electron acceptor redox potential (EARP) was presumed to be a determining factor for microbial metabolism in many natural and engineered processes. However, little is known about the potentially global effects of EARP on bacteria. In this study, we compared the physiological and transcriptomic properties of Shewanella decolorationis S12 respiring with different EARPs in microbial electrochemical systems to avoid the effects caused by the other physicochemical properties of real electron acceptor. Results showed that the metabolic activities of strain S12 were nonlinear responses to EARP. The tricarboxylic acid cycle for central carbon metabolism was down-regulated while glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated at 0.8 V compared to 0.2 and -0.2 V, which suggested that EARP is an important but not the only determinant for metabolic pathways of strain S12. Moreover, few cytochrome c genes were differentially expressed at different EARPs. The energy intensive flagella assembly and assimilatory sulfur metabolism pathways were significantly enriched at 0.8 V, which suggested strain S12 had stronger electrokinesis behavior and oxidative stress-response at high EARP. This study provides the first global information of EARP regulations on microbial metabolism, which will be helpful for understanding microorganism respiration. PMID:27503002

  11. [Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on biological phosphorus removal].

    PubMed

    Han, Yun; Xu, Song; Dong, Tao; Wang, Bin-Fan; Wang, Xian-Yao; Peng, Dang-Cong

    2015-02-01

    Effects of carbon sources, temperature and electron acceptors on phosphorus uptake and release were investigated in a pilot-scale oxidation ditch. Phosphorus uptake and release rates were measured with different carbon sources (domestic sewage, sodium acetate, glucose) at 25 degrees C. The results showed that the minimum phosphorus uptake and release rates of glucose were 5.12 mg x (g x h)(-1) and 6.43 mg x (g x h)(-1), respectively, and those of domestic sewage are similar to those of sodium acetate. Phosphorus uptake and release rates increased with the increase of temperature (12, 16, 20 and 25 degrees C) using sodium acetate as carbon sources. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate decreased with added COD. Electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite) had significant effects on phosphorus uptake rate and their order was in accordance with oxygen > nitrate > nitrite. The mass ratio of anoxic P uptake and N consumption (P(uptake)/N (consumption)) of nitrate and nitrite were 0.96 and 0.65, respectively. PMID:26031087

  12. In situ generation of electron acceptor for photoelectrochemical biosensing via hemin-mediated catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yang; Lei, Jianping; Zhang, Lei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-12-16

    A novel photoelectrochemical sensing strategy is designed for DNA detection on the basis of in situ generation of an electron acceptor via the catalytic reaction of hemin toward H2O2. The photoelectrochemical platform was established by sequential assembly of near-infrared CdTe quantum dots, capture DNA, and a hemin-labeled DNA probe to form a triple-helix molecular beacon (THMB) structure on an indium tin oxide electrode. According to the highly catalytic capacity of hemin toward H2O2, a photoelectrochemical mechanism was then proposed, in which the electron acceptor of O2 was in situ-generated on the electrode surface, leading to the enhancement of the photocurrent response. The utilization of CdTe QDs can extend the absorption edge to the near-infrared band, resulting in an increase in the light-to-electricity efficiency. After introducing target DNA, the THMB structure is disassembled and releases hemin and, thus, quenches the photocurrent. Under optimized conditions, this biosensor shows high sensitivity with a linear range from 1 to 1000 pM and detection limit of 0.8 pM. Moreover, it exhibits good performance of excellent selectivity, high stability, and acceptable fabrication reproducibility. This present strategy opens an alternative avenue for photoelectrochemical signal transduction and expands the applications of hemin-based materials in photoelectrochemical biosensing and clinical diagnosis.

  13. Spectral fine tuning of cyanine dyes: electron donor-acceptor substituted analogues of thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Rastede, Elizabeth E; Tanha, Matteus; Yaron, David; Watkins, Simon C; Waggoner, Alan S; Armitage, Bruce A

    2015-09-26

    The introduction of electron donor and acceptor groups at strategic locations on a fluorogenic cyanine dye allows fine-tuning of the absorption and emission spectra while preserving the ability of the dye to bind to biomolecular hosts such as double-stranded DNA and a single-chain antibody fragment originally selected for binding to the parent unsubstituted dye, thiazole orange (TO). The observed spectral shifts are consistent with calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and reflect electron density localization on the quinoline half of TO in the LUMO. A dye bearing donating methoxy and withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups on the benzothiazole and quinoline rings, respectively, shifts the absorption spectrum to sufficiently longer wavelengths to allow excitation at green wavelengths as opposed to the parent dye, which is optimally excited in the blue.

  14. Spectral Fine Tuning of Cyanine Dyes: Electron Donor-Acceptor Substituted Analogues of Thiazole Orange†

    PubMed Central

    Rastede, Elizabeth E.; Tanha, Matteus; Yaron, David; Watkins, Simon C.; Waggoner, Alan S.; Armitage, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of electron donor and acceptor groups at strategic locations on a fluorogenic cyanine dye allows fine-tuning of the absorption and emission spectra while preserving the ability of the dye to bind to biomolecular hosts such as double-stranded DNA and a single-chain antibody fragment originally selected for binding to the parent unsubstituted dye, thiazole orange (TO). The observed spectral shifts are consistent with calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and reflect electron density localization on the quinoline half of TO in the LUMO. A dye bearing donating methoxy and withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups on the benzothiazole and quinoline rings, respectively, shifts the absorption spectrum to sufficiently longer wavelengths to allow excitation at green wavelengths as opposed to the parent dye, which is optimally excited in the blue. PMID:26171668

  15. Dibenzothiophene-Substituted Fullerene Derivative as Electron Acceptor for Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Un; Park, Jong Baek; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A new fullerene derivative, [6,6]-dibenzo[b,d]thiophene-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (DBTC61BM) was synthesized from C60 using tosylhydrazone, and used as an electron-acceptor material for poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)-based organic photovoltaic cells. The synthesized DBTC61BM was used to modify the basic structure of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) by replacing the aromatic part with dibenzo[b,d]thiophene. The solubilities of DBTC61BM and PC61BM are similar; they have good solubilities in common organic solvents such as dichloromethane, chloroform, toluene, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K(sv)) of DBTC61BM was 7.14 x 10(3) M(-1), and was correlated with the binding affinity between the fluorophore and a quencher. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy level of DBTC61BM was -3.71 eV. The charge-carrier mobility of a P3HT:DBTC61BM blend film was determined using the space-charge-limited current method; the electron mobility value obtained for the P3HT:DBTC61BM blend film was 2.13 x 10(-4) cm2 V(-1) s(-1). Photovoltaic devices were fabricated using P3HT as the electron donor and DBTC61BM as the electron acceptor. Among the fabricated devices, photovoltaic cells with the structure ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:DBTC61BM/LiF/Al showed the highest power conversion efficiency, namely 3.23%, with an open-circuit voltage of 0.64 V, short-circuit-current density of 8.14 mA cm(-2), and fill factor of 0.59, under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) illumination.

  16. Dibenzothiophene-Substituted Fullerene Derivative as Electron Acceptor for Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Un; Park, Jong Baek; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A new fullerene derivative, [6,6]-dibenzo[b,d]thiophene-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (DBTC61BM) was synthesized from C60 using tosylhydrazone, and used as an electron-acceptor material for poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)-based organic photovoltaic cells. The synthesized DBTC61BM was used to modify the basic structure of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) by replacing the aromatic part with dibenzo[b,d]thiophene. The solubilities of DBTC61BM and PC61BM are similar; they have good solubilities in common organic solvents such as dichloromethane, chloroform, toluene, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (K(sv)) of DBTC61BM was 7.14 x 10(3) M(-1), and was correlated with the binding affinity between the fluorophore and a quencher. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy level of DBTC61BM was -3.71 eV. The charge-carrier mobility of a P3HT:DBTC61BM blend film was determined using the space-charge-limited current method; the electron mobility value obtained for the P3HT:DBTC61BM blend film was 2.13 x 10(-4) cm2 V(-1) s(-1). Photovoltaic devices were fabricated using P3HT as the electron donor and DBTC61BM as the electron acceptor. Among the fabricated devices, photovoltaic cells with the structure ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:DBTC61BM/LiF/Al showed the highest power conversion efficiency, namely 3.23%, with an open-circuit voltage of 0.64 V, short-circuit-current density of 8.14 mA cm(-2), and fill factor of 0.59, under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) illumination. PMID:27483863

  17. Polymer Acceptor Based on B←N Units with Enhanced Electron Mobility for Efficient All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruyan; Dou, Chuandong; Xie, Zhiyuan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lixiang

    2016-04-18

    We demonstrate that polymer electron acceptors with excellent all-polymer solar-cell (all-PSC) device performance can be developed from polymer electron donors by using B←N units. By alleviating the steric hindrance effect of the bulky pendant moieties on the conjugated polymers that contain B←N units, the π-π stacking distance of polymer backbones is decreased and the electron mobility is consequently enhanced by nearly two orders of magnitude. As a result, the power conversion efficiency of all-PSCs with the polymer acting as the electron acceptor is greatly improved from 0.12 % to 5.04 %. This PCE value is comparable to that of the best all-PSCs with state-of-the-art polymer acceptors.

  18. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and other electron acceptors by a Thermus isolate.

    PubMed

    Kieft, T L; Fredrickson, J K; Onstott, T C; Gorby, Y A; Kostandarithes, H M; Bailey, T J; Kennedy, D W; Li, S W; Plymale, A E; Spadoni, C M; Gray, M S

    1999-03-01

    A thermophilic bacterium that can use O2, NO3-, Fe(III), and S0 as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities (0.5 mM) of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduced in the presence of either lactate or H2. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO2 and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 degrees C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S.

  19. Dissimilatory Reduction of Fe(III) and Other Electron Acceptors by a Thermus Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, T. L.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Onstott, T. C.; Gorby, Y. A.; Kostandarithes, H. M.; Bailey, T. J.; Kennedy, D. W.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; Spadoni, C. M.; Gray, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterium that can use O2, NO3−, Fe(III), and S0 as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at a 3.2-km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rRNA gene (rDNA) sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors. Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus strain SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could reduce only relatively small quantities (0.5 mM) of hydrous ferric oxide except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II); reduction of Fe(III)-NTA was coupled to the oxidation of lactate and supported growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus strain SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and U(VI). Mn(IV)-oxide was reduced in the presence of either lactate or H2. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO2 and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus strains SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65°C; their optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn, or S. PMID:10049886

  20. Dissimilatory Reduction of Fe(III) and Other Electron Acceptors by a Thermus Isolate

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, T. L.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Onstott, T. C.; Gorby, Y. A.; Kostandarithes, H. M.; Bailey, T. J.; Kennedy, D. W.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; Spadoni, C. M.; Gray, M. S.

    1995-10-25

    A thermophilic bacterium that could use O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Fe(III), or S{sup o} as terminal electron acceptors for growth was isolated from groundwater sampled at 3.2 km depth in a South African gold mine. This organism, designated SA-01, clustered most closely with members of the genus Thermus, as determined by 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The 16S rDNA sequence of SA-01 was >98% similar to that of Thermus strain NMX2 A.1, which was previously isolated by other investigators from a thermal spring in New Mexico. Strain NMX2 A.1 was also able to reduce Fe(III) and other electron acceptors, whereas Thermus aquaticus (ATCC 25104) and Thermus filiformis (ATCC 43280) did not reduce NO{sub 3}{sup -} or Fe(III). Neither SA-01 nor NMX2 A.1 grew fermentatively, i.e., addition of an external electron acceptor was required for anaerobic growth. Thermus SA-01 reduced soluble Fe(III) complexed with citrate or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA); however, it could only reduce relatively small quantities (0.5 mM) of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) except when the humic acid analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS) was added as an electron shuttle, in which case 10 mM Fe(III) was reduced. Fe(III)-NTA was reduced quantitatively to Fe(II), was coupled to the oxidation of lactate, and could support growth through three consecutive transfers. Suspensions of Thermus SA-01 cells also reduced Mn(IV), Co(III)-EDTA, Cr(VI), and AQDS. Mn(IV)-oxide was reduced in the presence of either lactate or H{sub 2}. Both strains were also able to mineralize NTA to CO{sub 2} and to couple its oxidation to Fe(III) reduction and growth. The optimum temperature for growth and Fe(III) reduction by Thermus SA-01 and NMX2 A.1 is approximately 65 C; optimum pH is 6.5 to 7.0. This is the first report of a Thermus sp. being able to couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe, Mn or S.

  1. Cation Effects on the Electron-Acceptor Side of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sahr; Sun, Jennifer S; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-06-18

    The normal pathway of electron transfer on the electron-acceptor side of photosystem II (PSII) involves electron transfer from quinone A, QA, to quinone B, QB. It is possible to redirect electrons from QA(-) to water-soluble Co(III) complexes, which opens a new avenue for harvesting electrons from water oxidation by immobilization of PSII on electrode surfaces. Herein, the kinetics of electron transfer from QA(-) to [Co(III)(terpy)2](3+) (terpy = 2,2';6',2″-terpyridine) are investigated with a spectrophotometric assay revealing that the reaction follows Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics, is inhibited by cations, and is not affected by variation of the QA reduction potential. A negatively charged site on the stromal surface of the PSII protein complex, composed of glutamic acid residues near QA, is hypothesized to bind cations, especially divalent cations. The cations are proposed to tune the redox properties of QA through electrostatic interactions. These observations may thus explain the molecular basis of the effect of divalent cations like Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+) on the redox properties of the quinones in PSII, which has previously been attributed to long-range conformational changes propagated from divalent cations binding to the Ca(II)-binding site in the oxygen-evolving complex on the lumenal side of the PSII complex.

  2. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently.

  3. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-04-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Reduction of low potential electron acceptors requires the CbcL inner membrane cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Zacharoff, Lori; Chan, Chi Ho; Bond, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The respiration of metals by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires electrons generated by metabolism to pass from the interior of the cell to electron acceptors beyond the cell membranes. The G. sulfurreducens inner membrane multiheme c-type cytochrome ImcH is required for respiration to extracellular electron acceptors with redox potentials greater than -0.1 V vs. SHE, but ImcH is not essential for electron transfer to lower potential acceptors. In contrast, deletion of cbcL, encoding an inner membrane protein consisting of b-type and multiheme c-type cytochrome domains, severely affected reduction of low potential electron acceptors such as Fe(III)-oxides and electrodes poised at -0.1 V vs. SHE. Catalytic cyclic voltammetry of a ΔcbcL strain growing on poised electrodes revealed a 50 mV positive shift in driving force required for electron transfer out of the cell. In non-catalytic conditions, low-potential peaks present in wild type biofilms were absent in ∆cbcL mutants. Expression of cbcL in trans increased growth at low redox potential and restored features to cyclic voltammetry. This evidence supports a model where CbcL is a component of a second electron transfer pathway out of the G. sulfurreducens inner membrane that dominates when redox potential is at or below -0.1 V vs. SHE.

  5. Reduction of low potential electron acceptors requires the CbcL inner membrane cytochrome of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Zacharoff, Lori; Chan, Chi Ho; Bond, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    The respiration of metals by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires electrons generated by metabolism to pass from the interior of the cell to electron acceptors beyond the cell membranes. The G. sulfurreducens inner membrane multiheme c-type cytochrome ImcH is required for respiration to extracellular electron acceptors with redox potentials greater than -0.1 V vs. SHE, but ImcH is not essential for electron transfer to lower potential acceptors. In contrast, deletion of cbcL, encoding an inner membrane protein consisting of b-type and multiheme c-type cytochrome domains, severely affected reduction of low potential electron acceptors such as Fe(III)-oxides and electrodes poised at -0.1 V vs. SHE. Catalytic cyclic voltammetry of a ΔcbcL strain growing on poised electrodes revealed a 50 mV positive shift in driving force required for electron transfer out of the cell. In non-catalytic conditions, low-potential peaks present in wild type biofilms were absent in ∆cbcL mutants. Expression of cbcL in trans increased growth at low redox potential and restored features to cyclic voltammetry. This evidence supports a model where CbcL is a component of a second electron transfer pathway out of the G. sulfurreducens inner membrane that dominates when redox potential is at or below -0.1 V vs. SHE. PMID:26407054

  6. Modelling transport and degradation of de-icing chemicals in soil, assuming Monod kinetics with multiple electron-acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotanus, D.; Meeussen, J. C. L.; van der Ploeg, M. J.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.

    2012-04-01

    De-icing chemicals that contain propylene glycol are used at Oslo airport during winter time. A fraction of these chemicals is spilled on the runway and can be transported rapidly in the sandy soil in spring during snowmelt. Better insight into the chemical and physical processes that govern the fate of these chemicals in soil will help to estimate potential effects on the large unconfined aquifer in this area, and makes it possible to evaluate potential remedial actions. Micro-organisms in the soil can degrade propylene glycol, for which they need electron-acceptors. Under aerobic conditions, oxygen will be used as an electron-acceptor. From experiments, it is known that also anaerobic degradation occurs in this soil. During snowmelt, high infiltration rates can lead to locally saturated soil. In these parts, oxygen diffusion is limited and thus anaerobic conditions will occur. In these anaerobic regions, other electron-acceptors, such as manganese-oxides that are present in this soil, are used. However, frequent propylene glycol application may lead to a depletion of manganese-oxides and so to increased persistence and migration of propylene glycol in soil. To prevent this depletion and to enhance biodegradation, other electron-acceptors can be applied at the soil surface. Examples are the application of nitrate to the soil surface, and air injection. Model calculations could help to estimate required concentrations. The objectives of this study are 1) to create the reactive model, 2) to use this model to evaluate which parameters are determining leaching fluxes of propylene glycol from the soil, and 3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the different remediation strategies. Therefore, transient water flow, kinetic degradation, and redox chemistry were combined in one model. Degradation is modelled with Monod kinetics using multiple electron-acceptors. Oxygen diffusion in the gas phase, biomass growth, and oxidation and reduction of the important electron-acceptors

  7. Pilot scale application of nanosized iron oxides as electron acceptors for bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Julian; Fritzsche, Andreas; Frank-Fahle, Beatrice; Lüders, Tilmann; Höss, Sebastian; Eisenmann, Heinrich; Held, Thomas; Totsche, Kai U.; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial reduction of ferric iron is a major biogeochemical process in groundwater aquifer ecosystems and often associated with the degradation of organic contaminants, as bacteria couple iron reduction to the oxidation reduced carbon like e.g. BTEX. Yet in general the low bioavailability of natural iron oxides limits microbial reduction rates. However, nanosized iron oxides have an unequally enhanced bioavailability and reactivity compared to their respective bulk, macro-sized, and more crystalline materials. At the same time, nanosized iron oxides can be produced in stable colloidal suspensions, permitting efficient injections into contaminated aquifers. We examined the reactivity of nanosized synthetic colloidal iron oxides in microbial iron reduction. Application of colloidal nanoparticles led to a strong and sustainable enhancement of microbial reaction rates in batch experiments and sediment columns. Toluene oxidation was increased five-fold as compared to bulk, non-colloidal ferrihydrite as electron acceptor. Furthermore, we developed a unique approach for custom-tailoring the subsurface mobility of these particles after being injected into a contaminant plume. In a field pilot application, we injected 18 m3 of an iron oxide nanoparticle solution into a BTEX contaminated aquifer with a maximum excess pressure as low as 0.2 bar. The applied suspension showed a superior subsurface mobility, creating a reactive zone of 4 m height (corresponding to the height of the confined aquifer) and 6 m in diameter. Subsequent monitoring of BTEX, microbial BTEX degradation metabolites, ferrous iron generation, stable isotopes fractionation, microbial populations, and methanogenesis demonstrated the strong impact of our approach. Mathematic processed X-ray diffractograms and FTIR spectra provided a semi-quantitatively estimate of the long-term fate of the iron oxide colloids in the aquifer. Potential environmental risks of the injection itself were monitored with

  8. Activated carbon as an electron acceptor and redox mediator during the anaerobic biotransformation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Frank P; Bisschops, Iemke A E; Lettinga, Gatze; Field, Jim A

    2003-01-15

    Activated carbon (AC) has a long history of applications in environmental technology as an adsorbent of pollutants for the purification of drinking waters and wastewaters. Here we describe novel role of AC as redox mediator in accelerating the reductive transformation of pollutants as well as a terminal electron acceptor in the biological oxidation of an organic substrate. This study explores the use of AC as an immobilized redox mediator for the reduction of a recalcitrant azo dye (hydrolyzed Reactive Red 2) in laboratory-scale anaerobic bioreactors, using volatile fatty acids as electron donor. The incorporation of AC in the sludge bed greatly improved dye removal and formation of aniline, a dye reduction product. These results indicate that AC acts as a redox mediator. In supporting batch experiments, bacteria were shown to oxidize acetate at the expense of reducing AC. Furthermore, AC greatly accelerated the chemical reduction of an azo dye by sulfide. The results taken as a whole clearly suggest that AC accepts electrons from the microbial oxidation of organic acids and transfers the electrons to azo dyes, accelerating their reduction. A possible role of quinone surface groups in the catalysis is discussed. PMID:12564915

  9. Humic substances as fully regenerable electron acceptors in recurrently anoxic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klüpfel, Laura; Piepenbrock, Annette; Kappler, Andreas; Sander, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Humic substances form through the degradation of microbial and plant precursors, and make up a significant fraction of natural organic matter in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Humic substances are redox-active and can act as terminal electron acceptors in anaerobic microbial respiration. Reduced humic substances may become re-oxidized during aeration of temporarily anoxic systems, such as wetlands, sediments and many soils. If the transfer of electrons from anaerobic respiration through humic substances to oxygen is sustained over many redox cycles, it may competitively suppress electron transfer to carbon dioxide, and thereby lower the formation of methane in temporarily anoxic systems. Here, we monitor changes in the redox states of four chemically distinct dissolved humic substances over successive cycles of reduction by the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and oxidation by oxygen, in a series of laboratory experiments. We show that electron transfer to and from these substances is fully reversible and sustainable over successive redox cycles. We suggest that redox cycling of humic substances may largely suppress methane production in temporarily anoxic systems.

  10. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Boyanov, Maxim I; Brulc, Jennifer M; Johnston, Eric R; Kemner, Kenneth M; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  11. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Man Jae; O’Loughlin, Edward J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Brulc, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Eric R.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  12. An Electron-Deficient Building Block Based on the B←N Unit: An Electron Acceptor for All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Chuandong; Long, Xiaojing; Ding, Zicheng; Xie, Zhiyuan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lixiang

    2016-01-22

    A double B←N bridged bipyridyl (BNBP) is a novel electron-deficient building block for polymer electron acceptors in all-polymer solar cells. The B←N bridging units endow BNBP with fixed planar configuration and low-lying LUMO/HOMO energy levels. As a result, the polymer based on BNBP units (P-BNBP-T) exhibits high electron mobility, low-lying LUMO/HOMO energy levels, and strong absorbance in the visible region, which is desirable for polymer electron acceptors. Preliminary all-polymer solar cell (all-PSC) devices with P-BNBP-T as the electron acceptor and PTB7 as the electron donor exhibit a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.38%, which is among the highest values of all-PSCs with PTB7 as the electron donor.

  13. An Electron-Deficient Building Block Based on the B←N Unit: An Electron Acceptor for All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Chuandong; Long, Xiaojing; Ding, Zicheng; Xie, Zhiyuan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lixiang

    2016-01-22

    A double B←N bridged bipyridyl (BNBP) is a novel electron-deficient building block for polymer electron acceptors in all-polymer solar cells. The B←N bridging units endow BNBP with fixed planar configuration and low-lying LUMO/HOMO energy levels. As a result, the polymer based on BNBP units (P-BNBP-T) exhibits high electron mobility, low-lying LUMO/HOMO energy levels, and strong absorbance in the visible region, which is desirable for polymer electron acceptors. Preliminary all-polymer solar cell (all-PSC) devices with P-BNBP-T as the electron acceptor and PTB7 as the electron donor exhibit a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.38%, which is among the highest values of all-PSCs with PTB7 as the electron donor. PMID:26663513

  14. 2010 Electron Donor-Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference, August 8 - 13, 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Meyer

    2010-08-18

    The Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions (GRC EDAI) presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer Processes and Energy Conversion. The fundamental concepts underpinning the field of electron transfer and charge transport phenomena are understood, but fascinating experimental discoveries and novel applications based on charge transfer processes are expanding the discipline. Simultaneously, global challenges for development of viable and economical alternative energy resources, on which many researchers in the field focus their efforts, are now the subject of daily news headlines. Enduring themes of this conference relate to photosynthesis, both natural and artificial, and solar energy conversion. More recent developments include molecular electronics, optical switches, and nanoscale charge transport structures of both natural (biological) and man-made origin. The GRC EDAI is one of the major international meetings advancing this field, and is one of the few scientific meetings where fundamental research in solar energy conversion has a leading voice. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices. In addition to disseminating the latest advances in the field of electron transfer processes, the conference is an excellent forum for scientists from different disciplines to meet and initiate new directions; for scientists from different countries to make contacts; for young scientists to network and establish personal contacts with other young scientists and with established scientists who, otherwise, might not have the time to meet young people. The EDAI GRC also features an interactive atmosphere with lively poster sessions, a few of which are selected for oral presentations.

  15. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Loess Sediments: An Important Source of Electron Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Michael E.; Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Ji, Junfeng

    2010-08-01

    A quantitative study was conducted to understand if Fe (III) in loess sediments is available for microbial respiration by using a common metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, CN32. The loess samples were collected from three different sites: St. Louis (Peoria), Missouri, USA; Huanxia (HX) and Yanchang (YCH), Shanxi Province of China. Wet chemical analyses indicated that the total Fe concentration for the three samples was 1.69%, 2.76%, and 3.29%, respectively, of which 0.48%, 0.67%, and 1.27% was Fe(III). All unreduced loess sediments contained iron oxides and phyllosilicates (smectite, illite, chlorite, vermiculite), in addition to common minerals such as quartz, feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, and dolomite. Bioreduction experiments were performed at a loess concentration of 20 mg/mL using lactate as the sole electron donor, Fe(III) in loess as the sole electron acceptor in the presence and absence of anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) as an electron shuttle. Experiments were performed in non-growth (bicarbonate buffer) and growth (M1) media with a cell concentration of ~2.8 x 107 and 2.1 x 107 cells/mL, respectively. The unreduced and bioreduced solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) methods. Despite many similarities among the three loess samples, the extent and rate of Fe (III) reduction varied significantly. For example, in presence of AQDS the extent of reduction in the non-growth experiment was 25% in HX, 34% in Peoria, and 38% in YCH. The extent of reduction in the growth experiment was 72% in HX, 94% in Peoria, and 56% in YCH. The extent of bioreduction was lower in absence of AQDS. Overall, AQDS and the M1 growth medium significantly enhanced the rate and extent of bioreduction. Fe(III) in iron oxides and Fe(III)-containing phyllosilicates was bioreduced. Biogenic illite, siderite, and

  16. Electronic coupling for charge transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor systems. Performance of the two-state FCD model.

    PubMed

    Voityuk, Alexander A

    2012-10-28

    Electronic coupling is a key parameter that determines the rate of electron transfer reactions and electrical conductivity of molecular wires. To examine the performance of a two-state approach based on the orthogonal transformation of adiabatic states to diabatic states, we compare the effective donor-acceptor coupling V(DA) computed with three different approaches in model donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) systems. It is found that V(DA) derived with the two-state method accounts properly for both the direct and superexchange interactions. The approach becomes, however, less accurate with the increasing energy difference of the donor and acceptor states. We suggest a simple diagnostic to identify the situation when the estimated coupling might be inaccurate and consider how to improve the performance of the two-state scheme in such a case.

  17. Theoretical investigations of metal-free dyes for solar cells: Effects of electron donor and acceptor groups on sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanamoorthi, Nachimuthu; Lai, Kuan-Hwa; Taufany, Fadlilatul; Jiang, Jyh-Chiang

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption of different model dyes on the anatase (101) TiO2 surface has been investigated using density functional theory calculations. The main aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different strength of donor and acceptor groups which are substituted in the present organic dyes on the ability of electron injection to the surface. Analysis of the density of states (DOS) demonstrated that the increased strength of the donor and acceptor dyes shifts the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) values and decreases the band gap. The strength of the donor and acceptor parts is shown to be effective for the electron injection process. Our present results provide the possibility of the design strategy of dyes to achieve the best dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs).

  18. Theory and computational modeling: Medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling in electron transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.D.; Feldberg, S.W.; Smalley, J.F.

    1998-03-01

    The continuing goal is to convert the rapidly accumulating mechanistic information about electron transfer (et) kinetics (often representable in terms of simple rate constants) into precise tools for fine-tuned control of the kinetics and for design of molecular-based systems which meet specified et characteristics. The present treatment will be limited to the kinetic framework defined by the assumption of transition state theory (TST). The primary objective of this paper is to report recent advances in the theoretical formulation, calculation, and analysis of energetics and electronic coupling pertinent to et in complex molecular aggregates. The control of et kinetics (i.e., enhancing desired processes, while inhibiting others) involves, of course, both system energetics (especially reorganization energies (E{sub r}) and free energy changes ({Delta}G{sup 0})) and electronic coupling of local D and A sites, which for thermal processes is most directly relevant only after the system has reached the appropriate point (or region) along the reaction coordinate (i.e., the transition state). The authors first discuss TST rate constant models, emphasizing genetic features, but also noting some special features arising when metal electrodes are involved. They then turn to a consideration of detailed aspects of medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling. With these theoretical tools in hand, they examine the results of recent applications to complex molecular systems using the techniques of computational quantum chemistry and electrostatics, together with detailed analysis of the numerical results and comparison with recent electrochemical kinetic data.

  19. Phenothiazine-anthraquinone donor-acceptor molecules: synthesis, electronic properties and DFT-TDDFT computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Wei; Mao, Wei-Li; Hu, Yun-Xia; Tian, Zi-Qi; Wang, Zhi-Lin; Meng, Qing-Jin

    2009-09-17

    Two donor-acceptor molecules with different pi-electron conjugative units, 1-((10-methyl-10H-phenothiazin-3-yl)ethynyl)anthracene-9,10-dione (AqMp) and 1,1'-(10-methyl-10H-phenothiazine-3,7-diyl)bis(ethyne-2,1-diyl)dianthracene-9,10-dione (Aq2Mp), have been synthesized and investigated for their photochemical and electrochemical properties. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide insights into their molecular geometry, electronic structures, and properties. These studies satisfactorily explain the electrochemistry of the two compounds and indicate that larger conjugative effect leads to smaller HOMO-LUMO gap (Eg) in Aq2Mp. Both compounds show ICT and pi --> pi* transitions in the UV-visible range in solution, and Aq2Mp has a bathochromic shift and shows higher oscillator strength of the absorption, which has been verified by time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations. The differences between AqMp and Aq2Mp indicate that the structural and conjugative effects have great influence on the electronic properties of the molecules. PMID:19705823

  20. Acceptor side effects on the electron transfer at cryogenic temperatures in intact photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Bao, Han; Zhang, Chunxi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Ren, Yanan; Shen, Jian-Ren; Zhao, Jingquan

    2008-09-01

    In intact PSII, both the secondary electron donor (Tyr(Z)) and side-path electron donors (Car/Chl(Z)/Cyt(b)(559)) can be oxidized by P(680)(+)* at cryogenic temperatures. In this paper, the effects of acceptor side, especially the redox state of the non-heme iron, on the donor side electron transfer induced by visible light at cryogenic temperatures were studied by EPR spectroscopy. We found that the formation and decay of the S(1)Tyr(Z) EPR signal were independent of the treatment of K(3)Fe(CN)(6), whereas formation and decay of the Car(+)/Chl(Z)(+) EPR signal correlated with the reduction and recovery of the Fe(3+) EPR signal of the non-heme iron in K(3)Fe(CN)(6) pre-treated PSII, respectively. Based on the observed correlation between Car/Chl(Z) oxidation and Fe(3+) reduction, the oxidation of non-heme iron by K(3)Fe(CN)(6) at 0 degrees C was quantified, which showed that around 50-60% fractions of the reaction centers gave rise to the Fe(3+) EPR signal. In addition, we found that the presence of phenyl-p-benzoquinone significantly enhanced the yield of Tyr(Z) oxidation. These results indicate that the electron transfer at the donor side can be significantly modified by changes at the acceptor side, and indicate that two types of reaction centers are present in intact PSII, namely, one contains unoxidizable non-heme iron and another one contains oxidizable non-heme iron. Tyr(Z) oxidation and side-path reaction occur separately in these two types of reaction centers, instead of competition with each other in the same reaction centers. In addition, our results show that the non-heme iron has different properties in active and inactive PSII. The oxidation of non-heme iron by K(3)Fe(CN)(6) takes place only in inactive PSII, which implies that the Fe(3+) state is probably not the intermediate species for the turnover of quinone reduction.

  1. Use of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor to recover previously uncultured hyperthermophiles: isolation and characterization of Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kashefi, Kazem; Holmes, Dawn E; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Lovley, Derek R

    2002-04-01

    It has recently been recognized that the ability to use Fe(III) as a terminal electron acceptor is a highly conserved characteristic in hyperthermophilic microorganisms. This suggests that it may be possible to recover as-yet-uncultured hyperthermophiles in pure culture if Fe(III) is used as an electron acceptor. As part of a study of the microbial diversity of the Obsidian Pool area in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., hot sediment samples were used as the inoculum for enrichment cultures in media containing hydrogen as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. A pure culture was recovered on solidified, Fe(III) oxide medium. The isolate, designated FW-1a, is a hyperthermophilic anaerobe that grows exclusively by coupling hydrogen oxidation to the reduction of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide. Organic carbon is not required for growth. Magnetite is the end product of Fe(III) oxide reduction under the culture conditions evaluated. The cells are rod shaped, about 0.5 microm by 1.0 to 1.2 microm, and motile and have a single flagellum. Strain FW-1a grows at circumneutral pH, at freshwater salinities, and at temperatures of between 65 and 100 degrees C with an optimum of 85 to 90 degrees C. To our knowledge this is the highest temperature optimum of any organism in the Bacteria. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence of strain FW-1a places it within the Bacteria, most closely related to abundant but uncultured microorganisms whose 16S rDNA sequences have been previously recovered from Obsidian Pool and a terrestrial hot spring in Iceland. While previous studies inferred that the uncultured microorganisms with these 16S rDNA sequences were sulfate-reducing organisms, the physiology of the strain FW-1a, which does not reduce sulfate, indicates that these organisms are just as likely to be Fe(III) reducers. These results further demonstrate that Fe(III) may be helpful for recovering as-yet-uncultured microorganisms

  2. Use of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor to recover previously uncultured hyperthermophiles: isolation and characterization of Geothermobacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kashefi, Kazem; Holmes, Dawn E; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Lovley, Derek R

    2002-04-01

    It has recently been recognized that the ability to use Fe(III) as a terminal electron acceptor is a highly conserved characteristic in hyperthermophilic microorganisms. This suggests that it may be possible to recover as-yet-uncultured hyperthermophiles in pure culture if Fe(III) is used as an electron acceptor. As part of a study of the microbial diversity of the Obsidian Pool area in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., hot sediment samples were used as the inoculum for enrichment cultures in media containing hydrogen as the sole electron donor and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. A pure culture was recovered on solidified, Fe(III) oxide medium. The isolate, designated FW-1a, is a hyperthermophilic anaerobe that grows exclusively by coupling hydrogen oxidation to the reduction of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide. Organic carbon is not required for growth. Magnetite is the end product of Fe(III) oxide reduction under the culture conditions evaluated. The cells are rod shaped, about 0.5 microm by 1.0 to 1.2 microm, and motile and have a single flagellum. Strain FW-1a grows at circumneutral pH, at freshwater salinities, and at temperatures of between 65 and 100 degrees C with an optimum of 85 to 90 degrees C. To our knowledge this is the highest temperature optimum of any organism in the Bacteria. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence of strain FW-1a places it within the Bacteria, most closely related to abundant but uncultured microorganisms whose 16S rDNA sequences have been previously recovered from Obsidian Pool and a terrestrial hot spring in Iceland. While previous studies inferred that the uncultured microorganisms with these 16S rDNA sequences were sulfate-reducing organisms, the physiology of the strain FW-1a, which does not reduce sulfate, indicates that these organisms are just as likely to be Fe(III) reducers. These results further demonstrate that Fe(III) may be helpful for recovering as-yet-uncultured microorganisms

  3. Electron-acceptor-dependent light absorption, excited-state relaxation, and charge generation in triphenylamine dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Renzhi; Zhang, Min; Yan, Cancan; Yao, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    By choosing a simple triphenylamine electron donor, we herein compare the influence of electron acceptors benzothiadiazole benzoic acid (BTBA) and cyanoacrylic acid (CA), on energy levels, light absorption, and dynamics of excited-state evolution and electron injection. DFT and time-dependent DFT calculations disclosed remarkable intramolecular conformational changes for the excited states of these two donor-acceptor dyes. Photoinduced dihedral angle variation occurs to the triphenylamine unit in the CA dye and backbone planarization happens to conjugated aromatic blocks in the BTBA dye. Femtosecond spectroscopic measurements suggested the crucial role of having a long excited-state lifetime in maintaining a high electron-injection yield because a reduced driving force for a low energy-gap dye can result in slower electron-injection dynamics.

  4. Tuning the electronic coupling in a low-bandgap donor-acceptor copolymer via the placement of side-chains

    SciTech Connect

    Oberhumer, Philipp M.; Huang, Ya-Shih; Massip, Sylvain; Albert-Seifried, Sebastian; Greenham, Neil C.; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Friend, Richard H.; James, David T.; Kim, Ji-Seon; Tu Guoli; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.; Beljonne, David; Cornil, Jerome

    2011-03-21

    We present a spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of the effect of the presence and position of hexyl side-chains in the novel low-bandgap alternating donor-acceptor copolymer poly[bis-N,N-(4-octylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1, 4-phenylenediamine-alt-5,5'-4',7',-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole] (T8TBT). We use electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopic measurements supported by calculations of chain conformation, electronic transitions, and Raman modes. Using these tools, we find that sterically demanding side-chain configurations induce twisting in the electronic acceptor unit and reduce the electronic interaction with the donor. This leads to a blue-shifted and weakened (partial) charge-transfer absorption band together with a higher photoluminescence efficiency. On the other hand, sterically relaxed side-chain configurations promote coupling between donor and acceptor units and exhibit enhanced absorption at the expense of luminescence efficiency. The possibility of tuning the donor-acceptor character of conjugated polymers by varying the placement of side-chains has very important ramifications for light emitting diode, Laser, display, and photovoltaic device optimization.

  5. Electronic spectrum of non-tetrahedral acceptors in CdTe:Cl and CdTe:Bi,Cl single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivobok, V. S.; Nikolaev, S. N.; Bagaev, V. S.; Pruchkina, A. A.; Onishchenko, E. E.; Kolosov, S. A.; Klevkov, Yu. V.; Skorikov, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    The electronic spectra of complex acceptors in compensated CdTe:Cl, CdTe:Ag,Cl, and CdTe:Bi,Cl single crystals are studied using low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements under both nonresonant and resonant excitation of distant donor-acceptor pairs (DAP). The wavelength modulation of the excitation source combined with the analysis of the differential PL signal is used to enhance narrow spectral features obscured because of inhomogeneous line broadening and/or excitation transfer for selectively excited DAPs. For the well-known tetrahedral (TD) AgCd acceptor, the energies of four excited states are measured, and the values obtained are shown to be in perfect agreement with the previous data. Moreover, splitting between the 2P3/2 (D8) and 2S3/2 (D8) states is clearly observed for AgCd centers located at a short distance (5-7 nm) from a hydrogen-like donor (ClTe). This splitting results from the reduction of the TD symmetry taking place when the acceptor is a member of a donor-acceptor pair. For the Cl-related complex acceptor with an activation energy of ˜121 meV (A-center), the energies of eight excited states are measured. It is shown that this defect produces low-symmetry central-cell correction responsible for the strong splitting of S-like TD shells. The energy spectrum of the Bi-related shallow acceptor with an activation energy of ˜36 meV is measured as well. The spectrum obtained differs drastically from the hydrogen-like set of levels, which indicates the existence of repulsive low-symmetry perturbation of the hydrogen-like Coulomb potential. It is also shown that the spectra of selectively excited PL recorded for a macroscopic ensemble of distant donor-acceptor pairs allow one to detect the low symmetry of acceptors of a given type caused by their complex nature or by the Jahn-Teller distortion. This method does not require any additional (external) field and is applicable to acceptors in diverse zinc-blende compound semiconductors.

  6. Novel processes for anaerobic sulfate production from elemental sulfur by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfate reducers and related organisms which had previously been found to reduce Fe(III) with H2 or organic electron donors oxidized S0 to sulfate when Mn(IV) was provided as an electron acceptor. Organisms catalyzing this reaction in washed cell suspensions included Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfomicrobium baculatum. Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and Geobacter metallireducens. These organisms produced little or no sulfate from S0 with Fe(III) as a potential electron acceptor or in the absence of an electron acceptor. In detailed studies with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, the stoichiometry of sulfate and Mn(II) production was consistent with the reaction S0 + 3 MnO2 + 4H+ ???SO42- + 3Mn(II) + 2H2O. None of the organisms evaluated could be grown with S0 as the sole electron donor and Mn(IV) as the electron acceptor. In contrast to the other sulfate reducers evaluated, Desulfobulbus propionicus produced sulfate from S0 in the absence of an electron acceptor and Fe(III) oxide stimulated sulfate production. Sulfide also accumulated in the absence of Mn(IV) or Fe(III). The stoichiometry of sulfate and sulfide production indicated that Desulfobulbus propionicus disproportionates S0 as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O???SO42- + 3HS- + 5 H+. Growth of Desulfobulbus propionicus with S0 as the electron donor and Fe(III) as a sulfide sink and/or electron acceptor was very slow. The S0 oxidation coupled to Mn(IV) reduction described here provides a potential explanation for the Mn(IV)-dependent sulfate production that previous studies have observed in anoxic marine sediments. Desulfobulbus propionicus is the first example of a pure culture known to disproportionate S0.

  7. Synthesis of Naphthalene-Based Push-Pull Molecules with a Heteroaromatic Electron Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Šarlah, David; Juranovič, Amadej; Kožar, Boris; Rejc, Luka; Golobič, Amalija; Petrič, Andrej

    2016-03-02

    Naphthalene derivatives bearing electron-accepting and electron-donating groups at the 2,6-positions belong to the family of D-π-A push-pull dyes. It has been found that these compounds, e.g., 2-(1-(6-((2-(fluoro)ethyl)(methyl)amino)naphthalen-2-yl)ethylidene)malononitrile (FDDNP), show not only interesting optical properties, such as solvatochromism, but they have the potential to label protein aggregates of different compositions formed in the brain of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's (AD). In continuation of our research we set our goal to find new FDDNP analogs, which would inherit optical and binding properties but hopefully show better specificity for tau protein aggregates, which are characteristic for neurodegeneration caused by repetitive mild trauma. In this work we report on the synthesis of new FDDNP analogs in which the acceptor group has been formally replaced with an aromatic five- or six-membered heterocycle. The heterocyclic moiety was annealed to the central naphthalene ring either by classical ring closure reactions or by modern transition metal-catalyzed coupling reactions. The chemical characterization, NMR spectra, and UV/vis properties of all new compounds are reported.

  8. Utilization of toxic and vapors as alternate electron acceptors in biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.D.; Apel, W.A.; Walton, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    Conceptually, biofilters are vapor phase bioreactors that rely on microorganisms in the bed medium to oxidize contaminants in off-gases flowing through the bed to less hazardous compounds. In the most studied and utilized systems reduced compounds such as fuel hydrocarbons are enzymatically oxidized to compounds such as carbon dioxide and water. In these types of reactions the microorganisms in the bed oxidize the contaminant and transfer the electrons to oxygen which is the terminal electron acceptor in the process. In essence the contaminant is the carbon and energy source for the microorganisms in the bed medium and through this catabolic process oxygen is reduced to water. An example of this oxidation process can be seen during the degradation of benzene and similar aromatic compounds. Aromatics are initially attacked by a dioxygenase enzyme which oxidizes the compounds to a labile dihydrodiole which is spontaneously converted to a catechol. The dihydroxylated aromatic rings is then opened by oxidative {open_quotes}ortho{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}meta{close_quotes} cleavage yielding cis, cis-muconic acid or 2-hydroxy-cis, cis-muconic semialdehyde, respectively. These organic compounds are further oxidized to carbon dioxide or are assimilated for cellular material. This paper describes the conversion of carbon tetrachloride using methanol as the primary carbon and energy source.

  9. Remarkable Dependence of the Final Charge Separation Efficiency on the Donor-Acceptor Interaction in Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Yamada, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Masanori; Furube, Akihiro; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Miura, Taku; Kobori, Yasuhiro; Jono, Ryota; Yamashita, Koichi; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2016-01-11

    The unprecedented dependence of final charge separation efficiency as a function of donor-acceptor interaction in covalently-linked molecules with a rectilinear rigid oligo-p-xylene bridge has been observed. Optimization of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling remarkably inhibits the undesirable rapid decay of the singlet charge-separated state to the ground state, yielding the final long-lived, triplet charge-separated state with circa 100% efficiency. This finding is extremely useful for the rational design of artificial photosynthesis and organic photovoltaic cells toward efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:26610285

  10. Fragment charge difference method for estimating donor-acceptor electronic coupling: Application to DNA π-stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.; Rösch, Notker

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this communication is two-fold. We introduce the fragment charge difference (FCD) method to estimate the electron transfer matrix element HDA between a donor D and an acceptor A, and we apply this method to several aspects of hole transfer electronic couplings in π-stacks of DNA, including systems with several donor-acceptor sites. Within the two-state model, our scheme can be simplified to recover a convenient estimate of the electron transfer matrix element HDA=(1-Δq2)1/2(E2-E1)/2 based on the vertical excitation energy E2-E1 and the charge difference Δq between donor and acceptor. For systems with strong charge separation, Δq≳0.95, one should resort to the FCD method. As favorable feature, we demonstrate the stability of the FCD approach for systems which require an approach beyond the two-state model. On the basis of ab initio calculations of various DNA related systems, we compared three approaches for estimating the electronic coupling: the minimum splitting method, the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) scheme, and the FCD approach. We studied the sensitivity of FCD and GMH couplings to the donor-acceptor energy gap and found both schemes to be quite robust; they are applicable also in cases where donor and acceptor states are off resonance. In the application to π-stacks of DNA, we demonstrated for the Watson-Crick pair dimer [(GC),(GC)] how structural changes considerably affect the coupling strength of electron hole transfer. For models of three Watson-Crick pairs, we showed that the two-state model significantly overestimates the hole transfer coupling whereas simultaneous treatment of several states leads to satisfactory results.

  11. Electrical Instability Induced by Electron Trapping in Low-Bandgap Donor-Acceptor Polymer Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hung; Wang, Ming; Bazan, Guillermo C; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen

    2015-11-18

    The mechanism of electrical instability and the double slope of p-type organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) fabricated from low-bandgap donor-acceptor copolymers are resolved. Those polymers enable electron conduction in the device, which leads to electron trapping and consequent formation of -SiO(-). This causes a turn-on voltage shift, hole-mobility increase, and double-slope occurrence. These findings tremendously impact the molecular design and device engineering of OFETs. PMID:26441385

  12. Fresh look at electron-transfer mechanisms via the donor/acceptor bindings in the critical encounter complex.

    PubMed

    Rosokha, Sergiy V; Kochi, Jay K

    2008-05-01

    Seminal insights provided by the iconic R. S. Mulliken and his "charge-transfer" theory, H. Taube and his "outer/inner-sphere" mechanisms, R. A. Marcus and his "two-state non-adiabatic" theory, and N. S. Hush and his "intervalence" theory are each separately woven into the rich panoramic tapestry constituting chemical research into electron-transfer dynamics, and its mechanistic dominance for the past half century and more. In this Account, we illustrate how the simultaneous melding of all four key concepts allows sharp focus on the charge-transfer character of the critical encounter complex to evoke the latent facet of traditional electron-transfer mechanisms. To this end, we exploit the intervalence (electronic) transition that invariably accompanies the diffusive encounter of electron-rich organic donors (D) with electron-poor acceptors (A) as the experimental harbinger of the collision complex, which is then actually isolated and X-ray crystallographically established as loosely bound pi-stacked pairs of various aromatic and olefinic donor/acceptor dyads with uniform interplanar separations of r(DA) = 3.1 +/- 0.2 A. These X-ray structures, together with the spectral measurements of their intervalence transitions, lead to the pair of important electron-transfer parameters, H(DA) (electronic coupling element) versus lambdaT (reorganization energy), the ratio of which generally defines the odd-electron mobility within such an encounter complex in terms of the resonance stabilization of the donor/acceptor assembly [D, A] as opposed to the reorganization-energy penalty required for its interconversion to the electron-transfer state [D(+*), A(-*)]. We recognize the resonance-stabilization energy relative to the intrinsic activation barrier as the mechanistic binding factor, Q = 2H(DA)/lambdaT, to represent the quantitative measure of the highly variable continuum of inner-sphere/outer-sphere interactions that are possible within various types of precursor complexes

  13. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis. PMID:26559132

  14. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-11-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis.

  15. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis. PMID:26559132

  16. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process. PMID:17438808

  17. NOx in the Atmosphere of Early Earth as Electron Acceptors for Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. L.; Charnay, B.; Gao, P.; Yung, Y. L.; Russell, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We quantify the amount of NOx produced in the Hadean atmosphere and available in the Hadean ocean for the emergence of life. Atmospherically generated nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) are the most attractive high-potential electron acceptors for driving the highly endergonic reactions at the entry points to autotrophic metabolic pathways at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents (Ducluzeau, 2008; Russell, 2014). The Hadean atmosphere, dominated by CO2 and N2, will produce nitric oxide (NO) when shocked by lightning and impacts (Ducluzeau, 2008; Nna Mvondo, 2001). Photochemical reactions involving NO and H2O vapor will then produce acids such as HNO3 and HNO2 that rain into the ocean and dissociate into NO3- and NO2-. Previous work suggests that 1018 g of NOx can be produced in a million years or so, satisfying the need for micromolar concentrations of NO3- and NO2- in the ocean (Ducluzeau, 2008). But because this number is controversial, we present new calculations based on a novel combination of early-Earth GCM and photochemical modeling, calculating the sources and sinks for fixed nitrogen. Finally, it is notable that lightning has been detected on Venus and Mars along with evidence of atmospheric NO; in the distant past, could NOx have been created and available for the emergence of life on numerous wet, rocky worlds?

  18. NOx in the atmospheres of aquaplanets as electron acceptors for life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. L.; Yung, Y. L.; Russell, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    A high potential electron acceptor is required to drive the highly endergonic reactions at the entry points to the autotrophic metabolic pathways that would lead to life on any wet rocky world. Nitrate and nitrite in the earliest oceans are the most attractive candidates (Ducluzeau et al., 2009, 2014). It has been estimated that, given a CO2 and N2 atmosphere, lightning (a proportion of it volcanic), meteorite impacts and volcanic gases would have produced enough NOx in a million years or so (>1018 g) to generate micromolar amounts of NO3- and NO2- in the ocean (Yung and McElroy, 1979; Kasting, 1990; Navarro-González et al., 1998; Martin et al., 2007). It is notable that lightning has been detected on Venus and Mars along with evidence of atmospheric NO. Because a figure 1018 g of nitrate/nitrite is controversial, we will present new calculations based on 10 atmospheres of CO2, two atmospheres of N2 and stepped concentrations of water vapor dependent on surface temperatures.

  19. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process.

  20. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-11-12

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis.

  1. Microbial Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions, Alternative Electron Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Urigüen, M.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Autotrophic Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium named A6 (A6), part of the Actinobacteria phylum have been linked to anaerobic ammonium (NH4+) oxidation under iron reducing conditions. These organisms obtain their energy by oxidizing NH4+ and transferring the electrons to a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Under environmental conditions, the TEAs are iron oxides [Fe(III)], which are reduced to Fe(II), this process is known as Feammox. Our studies indicate that alternative forms of TEAs can be used by A6, e.g. iron rich clays (i.e. nontronite) and electrodes in bioelectrochemical systems such as Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs), which can sustain NH4+removal and A6 biomass production. Our results show that nontronite can support Feammox and promote bacterial cell production. A6 biomass increased from 4.7 x 104 to 3.9 x 105 cells/ml in 10 days. Incubations of A6 in nontronite resulted in up to 10 times more NH4+ removal and 3 times more biomass production than when ferrihydrite is used as the Fe(III) source. Additionally, Fe in nontronite can be reoxidized by aeration and A6 can reutilize it; however, Fe is still finite in the clay. In contrast, in MECs, A6 harvest electrons from NH4+ and use an anode as an unlimited TEA, as a result current is produced. We operated multiple MECs in parallel using a single external power source, as described by Call & Logan (2011). MECs were run with an applied voltage of 0.7V and different growing mediums always containing initial 5mM NH4+. Results show that current production is favored when anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttled, is present in the medium as it facilitates the transfer of electrons from the bacterial cell to the anode. Additionally, A6 biomass increased from 1 x 104 to 9.77 x 105cells/ml in 14 days of operation. Due to Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium A6's ability to use various TEAs, MECs represent an alternative, iron-free form, for optimized biomass production of A6 and its application in NH4

  2. Estimation of electronic coupling in π-stacked donor-bridge-acceptor systems: Correction of the two-state model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-02-01

    Comparison of donor-acceptor electronic couplings calculated within two-state and three-state models suggests that the two-state treatment can provide unreliable estimates of Vda because of neglecting the multistate effects. We show that in most cases accurate values of the electronic coupling in a π stack, where donor and acceptor are separated by a bridging unit, can be obtained as Ṽda=(E2-E1)μ12/Rda+(2E3-E1-E2)2μ13μ23/Rda2, where E1, E2, and E3 are adiabatic energies of the ground, charge-transfer, and bridge states, respectively, μij is the transition dipole moments between the states i and j, and Rda is the distance between the planes of donor and acceptor. In this expression based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush approach, the first term corresponds to the coupling derived within a two-state model, whereas the second term is the superexchange correction accounting for the bridge effect. The formula is extended to bridges consisting of several subunits. The influence of the donor-acceptor energy mismatch on the excess charge distribution, adiabatic dipole and transition moments, and electronic couplings is examined. A diagnostic is developed to determine whether the two-state approach can be applied. Based on numerical results, we showed that the superexchange correction considerably improves estimates of the donor-acceptor coupling derived within a two-state approach. In most cases when the two-state scheme fails, the formula gives reliable results which are in good agreement (within 5%) with the data of the three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush model.

  3. A Systematic Study on the Influence of Electron-Acceptors in Phenanthrocarbazole Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Yao, Zhaoyang; Liu, Jiao; Wang, Junting; Wang, Peng

    2016-04-20

    In this work, by conjugating 2-cyanoacrylic acid (CA), 4-(benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-7-yl)benzoic acid (BTBA), 4-(7-ethynylbenzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl)benzoic acid (EBTBA), and 4-((7-ethynylbenzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)benzoic acid (EBTEBA) to a binary electron-donor diphenylamine-phenanthrocarbazole (DPA-PC), we systematically investigate the impacts of electron-acceptors upon energy level, energy gap, light-harvesting ability, photovoltaic parameter, and cell stability of donor-acceptor dyes in photoelectrochemical cells. In conjunction with an ionic liquid composite electrolyte, the DPA-PC dye with EBTEBA as electron-acceptor yields a high power conversion efficiency of 8% and an outstanding stability after a 1000 h aging test under the soaking of full sunlight at 60 °C in a dye-sensitized solar cell. Femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion measurements have suggested that energy relaxation and electron injection both occur to dye molecules in the nonequilibrium excited states. Moreover, the time constants of injecting electrons from dye molecules in the excited states to titania are very dispersive for over 1 order of magnitude, mainly owing to the broad energy distribution of excited states.

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer and back transfer in systems of randomly distributed donors and acceptors: picosecond transient grating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, R.C.; Lin, Y.; Zimmt, M.B.; Baumann, J.; Domingue, R.P.; Fayer, M.D.

    1988-07-28

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor (rubrene) to randomly distributed acceptors (duroquinone) followed by electron back transfer in a rigid solution (sucrose octaacetate) has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The forward electron transfer process was observed by time-dependent fluorescence quenching measurements, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation was monitored by using the picosecond transient grating (TG) technique. A statistical mechanics theory is used to describe the highly exponential TG signals and to extract the forward and back transfer parameters from the data. The agreement between the theory and experiments is excellent. The values of the forward and back transfer parameters are reported.

  5. Decacyclene Trianhydride at Functional Interfaces: An Ideal Electron Acceptor Material for Organic Electronics.

    PubMed

    de Oteyza, Dimas G; Garcia-Lastra, Juan M; Toma, Francesca M; Borghetti, Patrizia; Floreano, Luca; Verdini, Alberto; Cossaro, Albano; Pho, Toan V; Wudl, Fred; Ortega, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We report the interface energetics of decacyclene trianhydride (DTA) monolayers on top of two distinct model surfaces, namely, Au(111) and Ag(111). On the latter, combined valence band photoemission and X-ray absorption measurements that access the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals, respectively, reveal that electron transfer from substrate to surface sets in. Density functional theory calculations confirm our experimental findings and provide an understanding not only of the photoemission and X-ray absorption spectral features of this promising organic semiconductor but also of the fingerprints associated with the interface charge transfer.

  6. Decacyclene Trianhydride at Functional Interfaces: An Ideal Electron Acceptor Material for Organic Electronics.

    PubMed

    de Oteyza, Dimas G; Garcia-Lastra, Juan M; Toma, Francesca M; Borghetti, Patrizia; Floreano, Luca; Verdini, Alberto; Cossaro, Albano; Pho, Toan V; Wudl, Fred; Ortega, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We report the interface energetics of decacyclene trianhydride (DTA) monolayers on top of two distinct model surfaces, namely, Au(111) and Ag(111). On the latter, combined valence band photoemission and X-ray absorption measurements that access the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals, respectively, reveal that electron transfer from substrate to surface sets in. Density functional theory calculations confirm our experimental findings and provide an understanding not only of the photoemission and X-ray absorption spectral features of this promising organic semiconductor but also of the fingerprints associated with the interface charge transfer. PMID:26651535

  7. Charge Transfer Fluorescence and 34 nm Exciton Diffusion Length in Polymers with Electron Acceptor End Traps.

    PubMed

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R; Miller, John R

    2015-06-18

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17-127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence, and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps, the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF), and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization, and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ∼50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length is LD = 34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. The efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length but not on trap depth, solvent polarity, or which trap group is present.

  8. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    SciTech Connect

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  9. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE PAGES

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore » large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  10. Effects of electron acceptors on soluble reactive phosphorus in the overlying water during algal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinzhi; Jiang, Xia; Zheng, Binghui; Niu, Yuan; Wang, Kun; Wang, Wenwen; Kardol, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Endogenous phosphorus (P) release from sediments is an important factor to cause eutrophication and, hence, algal bloom in lakes in China. Algal decomposition depletes dissolved oxygen (DO) and causes anaerobic conditions and therefore increases P release from sediments. As sediment P release is dependent on the iron (Fe) cycle, electron acceptors (e.g., NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), and Mn(4+)) can be utilized to suppress the reduction of Fe(3+) under anaerobic conditions and, as such, have the potential to impair the release of sediment P. Here, we used a laboratory experiment to test the effects of FeCl3, MnO2, and KNO3 on soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration and related chemical variables in the overlying water column during algal decomposition at different algal densities. Results showed that algal decomposition significantly depleted DO and thereby increased sediment Fe-bound P release. Compared with the control, addition of FeCl3 significantly decreased water SRP concentration through inhibiting sediment P release. Compared with FeCl3, addition of MnO2 has less potential to suppress sediment P release during algal decomposition. Algal decomposition has the potential for NO3 (-) removal from aquatic ecosystem through denitrification and by that alleviates the suppressing role of NO3 (-) on sediment P release. Our results indicated that FeCl3 and MnO2 could be efficient in reducing sediment P release during algal decomposition, with the strongest effect found for FeCl3; large amounts of NO3 (-) were removed from the aquatic ecosystem through denitrification during algal decomposition. Moreover, the amounts of NO3 (-) removal increased with increasing algal density.

  11. Modeling microbial degradation of propylene glycol: electron acceptors and their related redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dathe, Annette; Fernandez, Perrine M.; Bloem, Esther; Meeussen, Johannes C. L.; French, Helen K.

    2014-05-01

    De-icing chemicals are applied in large amounts at airports during winter conditions to keep the runways and aircrafts ice-free. The commonly used propylene glycol (PG) is easily degradable by local microbial communities, but anoxic zones develop and soluble Fe+2 and Mn+2 ions can reach the groundwater. To enhance microbial induced remediation and reduce the release of iron and manganese, it was proposed to add NO3- together with PG. However, experiments conducted in the unsaturated zone at Gardermoen airport, Norway, revealed that manganese and iron were preferred over NO3- as electron acceptor [1]. The objectives of this study are to quantify mechanisms which control the order of reduction processes in an unsaturated sandy soil, and to test whether measured redox potentials can help to determine underlying biogeochemical reactions. We are modelling the microbial degradation of PG using Monod kinetics described for the chemical equilibrium tool ORCHESTRA [2], following an approach of [1]. The model is calibrated against gas measurements of CO2, NO2 and N2 released from batch experiments performed under controlled conditions. Fe+2 and Mn+2 were measured for the start and end of the experiment, as well as bulk resistivity, pH and electrical conductivity. With the calibrated model we are working towards a tool to quantify microbial induced redox reactions under different soil water saturations to account for seasonal water fluxes especially during snowmelt. [1] Schotanus, D., Meeussen, J.C.L., Lissner, H., van der Ploeg, M.J., Wehrer, M., Totsche, K.U., van der Zee, S.E.A.T.M., 2013. Transport and degradation of propylene glycol in the vadose zone: model development and sensitivity analysis. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. [2] Meeussen, J.C.L., 2003. ORCHESTRA: An Object-Oriented Framework for Implementing Chemical Equilibrium Models. Environ. Sci. Technol. 37, 1175-1182.

  12. Selection of denitrifying phosphorous accumulating organisms in IFAS systems: comparison of nitrite with nitrate as an electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Jabari, Pouria; Munz, Giulio; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2014-08-01

    Nitrite and nitrate were compared as electron acceptors to select for denitrifying phosphorous accumulating organisms (DPAO) in two integrated fixed film activated sludge (IFAS 1 and IFAS 2) systems operated as sequencing batch reactors. The bench-scale experiment lasted one year and synthetic wastewater was used as feed. During anoxic conditions 20mgNO3(-)-NL(-1) were dosed into IFAS-1 and 20mgNO2(-)-NL(-1) were dosed into IFAS-2. Long term phosphorous and ammonia removal via nitritation were achieved in both systems and both attached and suspended biomass contributed to phosphorous and ammonia removal. DPAO showed no specific adaptation to the electron acceptor as evidenced by short term switch of feeding with nitrate or nitrite. Anoxic phosphorus uptake rate was significantly higher with nitrite than with nitrate. Results showed that DPAO activity with nitrite could be integrated into attached and suspended biomass of IFAS systems in long term operation.

  13. Nitrate reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marietou, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) gain their energy by coupling the oxidation of organic substrate to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Several SRBs are able to use alternative terminal electron acceptors to sulfate such as nitrate. Nitrate-reducing SRBs have been isolated from a diverse range of environments. In order to be able to understand the significance of nitrate reduction in SRBs, we need to examine the ecology and physiology of the nitrate-reducing SRB isolates.

  14. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source. PMID:26783836

  15. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source.

  16. Effects of the acceptor unit in dyes with acceptor-bridge-donor architecture on the electron photo-injection mechanism and aggregation in DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Ximena; Claveria-Cadiz, Francisca; Arias-Olivares, David; Rodriguez-Serrano, Angela; Inostroza, Natalia; Schott, Eduardo

    2016-09-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are devices that convert light to electrical energy. Nowadays, researchers have focused on the understanding of the performance of dyes in solar cells. In this way, new efficient dyes have been obtained which can act as efficient light-harvesting compounds where the combination and the balance of acceptor(A)-bridge-donor(D) architectures confer suitable attributes and properties to the dye. Herein, we have carried out a DFT study on the optical and electronic properties of eight different A motifs and their influence on the electron photo-injection (PI) mechanisms through type I (indirect) or type II (direct) pathways in A-bridge-D dyes in DSSCs. The models consisted of thiophene as a bridge and triphenylamine as a D anchored to a TiO2 anatase cluster. All geometry optimizations were calculated using the B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and BHandHLYP functionals combined with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O and S and the LANL2DZ pseudopotential for Ti atoms. Most of the A dyes display optoelectronic properties consistent with a type-I (indirect) mechanism except for the A5 dye where the results suggest a type-II (direct) PI pathway. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out in order to describe the formation of dye dimers and analyze the stability of the aggregates due to intermolecular interactions. The observed trends indicate that dyes with A2 and A5 anchoring groups have less tendency to dimerize due to weaker intermolecular interactions resulting in less stable dimer complexes. Specifically, we found that the A motif influences the PI by a dye and the dimerization profiles. PMID:27530076

  17. 2004 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Conference - August 8-13, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    GUILFORD JONES BOSTON UNIVERSITY PHOTONICS CENTER 8 ST. MARY'S ST BOSTON, MA 02215

    2005-09-14

    The 2004 Gordon Conference on Donor/Acceptor Interactions will take place at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island on August 8-13, 2004. The conference will be devoted to the consequences of charge interaction and charge motion in molecular and materials systems.

  18. ELECTRON DONOR ACCEPTOR DESCRIPTORS OF THE SINGLE AND DOUBLE BONDED SUBSTITUENT AND HETEROATOM INCORPORATION EFFECTS. A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the series of Electron Donor-Acceptor (EDA) descriptors of classical substituent effect (sEDA(I), pEDA(I)), double bonded substituent effect (sEDA(=), pEDA(=)), heteroatom incorporation effect in monocyclic systems (sEDA(II), pEDA(II)), and in ring-junction position (sEDA(III), pEDA(III)), are reviewed. The descriptors show the amount of electrons donated to or withdrawn from the σ-(sEDA) or π(pEDA) valence orbitals by the substituent or incorporant. The new descriptors are expected to enrich the potency of QSAR analyses in drug design and materials chemistry.

  19. Transcriptional analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with an electrode compared to Fe(III)citrate or oxygen as terminal electron acceptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Shewanella oneidensis is a target of extensive research efforts in the fields of bioelectrochemical systems and bioremediation because of its versatile metabolic capabilities, especially in regards to the respiration with extracellular electron acceptors. Here, we took a global approach ...

  20. Highly Soluble Benzo[ghi]perylenetriimide Derivatives: Stable and Air-Insensitive Electron Acceptors for Artificial Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Reek, Joost N H; Williams, René M; Brouwer, Albert M

    2015-01-01

    A series of new benzo[ghi]perylenetriimide (BPTI) derivatives has been synthesized and characterized. These remarkably soluble BPTI derivatives show strong optical absorption in the range of λ=300–500 nm and have a high triplet-state energy of 1.67 eV. A cyanophenyl substituent renders BPTI such a strong electron acceptor (Ered=−0.11 V vs. the normal hydrogen electrode) that electron-trapping reactions with O2 and H2O do not occur. The BPTI radical anion on a fluorine-doped tin oxide|TiO2 electrode is persistent up to tens of seconds (t1/2=39 s) in air-saturated buffer solution. As a result of favorable packing, theoretical electron mobilities (10−2∼10−1 cm2 V−1 s−1) are high and similar to the experimental values observed for perylene diimide and C60 derivatives. Our studies show the potential of the cyanophenyl-modified BPTI compounds as electron acceptors in devices for artificial photosynthesis in water splitting that are also very promising nonfullerene electron-transport materials for organic solar cells. PMID:26395847

  1. Highly Soluble Benzo[ghi]perylenetriimide Derivatives: Stable and Air-Insensitive Electron Acceptors for Artificial Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Reek, Joost N H; Williams, René M; Brouwer, Albert M

    2015-11-01

    A series of new benzo[ghi]perylenetriimide (BPTI) derivatives has been synthesized and characterized. These remarkably soluble BPTI derivatives show strong optical absorption in the range of λ=300-500 nm and have a high triplet-state energy of 1.67 eV. A cyanophenyl substituent renders BPTI such a strong electron acceptor (Ered =-0.11 V vs. the normal hydrogen electrode) that electron-trapping reactions with O2 and H2 O do not occur. The BPTI radical anion on a fluorine-doped tin oxide|TiO2 electrode is persistent up to tens of seconds (t1/2 =39 s) in air-saturated buffer solution. As a result of favorable packing, theoretical electron mobilities (10(-2) ∼10(-1) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) are high and similar to the experimental values observed for perylene diimide and C60 derivatives. Our studies show the potential of the cyanophenyl-modified BPTI compounds as electron acceptors in devices for artificial photosynthesis in water splitting that are also very promising nonfullerene electron-transport materials for organic solar cells.

  2. Interplay between barrier width and height in electron tunneling: photoinduced electron transfer in porphyrin-based donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Karin; Wiberg, Joanna; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Mårtensson, Jerker; Albinsson, Bo

    2006-01-12

    The rate of electron tunneling in molecular donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) systems is determined both by the tunneling barrier width and height, that is, both by the distance between the donor and acceptor as well as by the energy gap between the donor and bridge moieties. These factors are therefore important to control when designing functional electron transfer systems, such as constructs for photovoltaics, artificial photosynthesis, and molecular scale electronics. In this paper we have investigated a set of D-B-A systems in which the distance and the energy difference between the donor and bridge states (DeltaEDB) are systematically varied. Zinc(II) and gold(III) porphyrins were chosen as electron donor and acceptor because of their suitable driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (-0.9 eV in butyronitrile) and well-characterized photophysics. We have previously shown, in accordance with the superexchange mechanism for electron transfer, that the electron transfer rate is proportional to the inverse of DeltaEDB in a series of zinc/gold porphyrin D-B-A systems with bridges of constant edge to edge distance (19.6 A) and varying DeltaEDB (3900-17 600 cm(-1)). Here, we use the same donor and acceptor but the bridge is shortened or extended giving a set of oligo-p-phenyleneethynylene bridges (OPE) with four different edge to edge distances ranging from 12.7 to 33.4 A. These two sets of D-B-A systems-ZnP-RB-AuP+ and ZnP-nB-AuP+-have one bridge in common, and hence, for the first time both the distance and DeltaEDB dependence of electron transfer can be studied simultaneously in a systematic way.

  3. Electronic spectra and hyperpolarizabilities of structurally similar donor-acceptor dyes. A density functional theory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amrita; Das, Mousumi; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2015-12-01

    Studies with density functional theory (DFT) have been done to reinforce our previous experimental findings involving the solvatochromism and the effect of protonation and for three structurally similar donor-acceptor dyes exhibiting intramolecular charge transfer transition. These dyes have similar donor (indole N/amino N) site and similar carbonyl O as the acceptor centre. The dye with an amino N donor site and indanone O as the acceptor centre has the lowest value of the energy gap between HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) and highest percentage of charge transfer from the N to the O centre. Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been used to calculate the excitation energy to the lowest singlet excited dipole-allowed states of the dyes. Effect of solvation on excitation energy has been studied by the use of polarisable continuum model (PCM). Computational results indicate that the excitation energy of these dyes is sensitive to solvent polarity and exhibits a red shift as polarity increases. The calculated excitation energies are in good agreement with the values of absorption maximum of these dyes in different solvents obtained in experiment. Studies on protonation of the dyes show that the carbonyl O to be the most favourable site of protonation for all the three dyes. Calculations of linear and first hyperpolarizabilities indicate these dyes to be suitable candidates for possible non-linear optical application.

  4. Respiration and growth of Shewanella decolorationis S12 with an Azo compound as the sole electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Xu, Meiying; Guo, Jun; Xu, Zhicheng; Chen, Xingjuan; Sun, Guoping

    2007-01-01

    The ability of Shewanella decolorationis S12 to obtain energy for growth by coupling the oxidation of various electron donors to dissimilatory azoreduction was investigated. This microorganism can reduce a variety of azo dyes by use of formate, lactate, pyruvate, or H(2) as the electron donor. Furthermore, strain S12 grew to a maximal density of 3.0 x 10(7) cells per ml after compete reduction of 2.0 mM amaranth in a defined medium. This was accompanied by a stoichiometric consumption of 4.0 mM formate over time when amaranth and formate were supplied as the sole electron acceptor and donor, respectively, suggesting that microbial azoreduction is an electron transport process and that this electron transport can yield energy to support growth. Purified membranous, periplasmic, and cytoplasmic fractions from S12 were analyzed, but only the membranous fraction was capable of reducing azo dyes with formate, lactate, pyruvate, or H(2) as the electron donor. The presence of 5 microM Cu(2+) ions, 200 microM dicumarol, 100 microM stigmatellin, and 100 microM metyrapone inhibited anaerobic azoreduction activity by both whole cells and the purified membrane fraction, showing that dehydrogenases, cytochromes, and menaquinone are essential electron transfer components for azoreduction. These results provide evidence that the microbial anaerobic azoreduction is linked to the electron transport chain and suggest that the dissimilatory azoreduction is a form of microbial anaerobic respiration. These findings not only expand the number of potential electron acceptors known for microbial energy conservation but also elucidate the mechanisms of microbial anaerobic azoreduction.

  5. Strong electronic coupling and electron transfer in a Ce2@Ih-C80-H2P electron donor acceptor conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Marc; Feng, Lai; Slanina, Zdenek; Wang, Weiwei; Nagase, Shigeru; Akasaka, Takeshi; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2016-07-01

    A newly designed electron donor-acceptor conjugate, namely Ce2@Ih-C80-H2P consisting of an endohedral dimetallofullerene Ce2@Ih-C80 and a free-base prophyrin (H2P), has been synthesized and systematically investigated. Basic characterization by means of NMR spectroscopy, steady-state absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemistry points to a folded configuration with sizeable interactions between Ce2@Ih-C80 and H2P. Complementary DFT optimization also results in the same conclusions. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopic investigations corroborate the formation of the (Ce2)&z.rad;-@Ih-C80-(H2P)&z.rad;+ radical ion pair state in non-polar as well as polar media. Overall, the modus operandi is an ultrafast through-space electron transfer enabled by the folded configuration in the ground and excited state.A newly designed electron donor-acceptor conjugate, namely Ce2@Ih-C80-H2P consisting of an endohedral dimetallofullerene Ce2@Ih-C80 and a free-base prophyrin (H2P), has been synthesized and systematically investigated. Basic characterization by means of NMR spectroscopy, steady-state absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemistry points to a folded configuration with sizeable interactions between Ce2@Ih-C80 and H2P. Complementary DFT optimization also results in the same conclusions. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopic investigations corroborate the formation of the (Ce2)&z.rad;-@Ih-C80-(H2P)&z.rad;+ radical ion pair state in non-polar as well as polar media. Overall, the modus operandi is an ultrafast through-space electron transfer enabled by the folded configuration in the ground and excited state. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03324e

  6. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers.

    PubMed

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J; Fierro, José Luis G; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-21

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.

  7. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers.

    PubMed

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J; Fierro, José Luis G; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-21

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices. PMID:27305145

  8. SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA IN THE SEAGRASS RHIZOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are rooted in anoxic sediments that support high levels of microbial activity including utilization of sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor which is reduced to sulfide. Sulfate reduction in seagrass bed sediments is stimulated by input of organic carbon through the ...

  9. Photoinitiated Charge Transport through π-Stacked Electron Conduits in Supramolecular Ordered Assemblies of Donor−Acceptor Triads

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, Joseph E.; Carmieli, Raanan; Mickley, Sarah M.; Vura-Weis, Josh; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2009-09-25

    Photochemical electron donor-acceptor triads having an aminopyrene primary donor (APy) and a p-diaminobenzene secondary donor (DAB) attached to either one or both imide nitrogen atoms of a perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PDI) electron acceptor were prepared to give DAB-APy-PDI and DAB-APy-PDI-APy-DAB. In toluene, both triads are monomeric, but in methylcyclohexane, they self-assemble into ordered helical heptamers and hexamers, respectively, in which the PDI molecules are {pi}-stacked in a columnar fashion, as evidenced by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Photoexcitation of these supramolecular assemblies results in rapid formation of DAB{sup +}-PDI{sup -} spin-polarized radical ion pairs having spin-spin dipolar interactions, which show that the average distance between the two radical ions is much larger in the assemblies (31 {angstrom}) than it is in their monomeric building blocks (23 {angstrom}). This work demonstrates that electron hopping through the {pi}-stacked PDI molecules is fast enough to compete effectively with charge recombination (40 ns) in these systems, making these materials of interest as photoactive assemblies for artificial photosynthesis and organic photovoltaics.

  10. Geothrix fermentans Secretes Two Different Redox-Active Compounds To Utilize Electron Acceptors across a Wide Range of Redox Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.

    2012-01-01

    The current understanding of dissimilatory metal reduction is based primarily on isolates from the proteobacterial genera Geobacter and Shewanella. However, environments undergoing active Fe(III) reduction often harbor less-well-studied phyla that are equally abundant. In this work, electrochemical techniques were used to analyze respiratory electron transfer by the only known Fe(III)-reducing representative of the Acidobacteria, Geothrix fermentans. In contrast to previously characterized metal-reducing bacteria, which typically reach maximal rates of respiration at electron acceptor potentials of 0 V versus standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), G. fermentans required potentials as high as 0.55 V to respire at its maximum rate. In addition, G. fermentans secreted two different soluble redox-active electron shuttles with separate redox potentials (−0.2 V and 0.3 V). The compound with the lower midpoint potential, responsible for 20 to 30% of electron transfer activity, was riboflavin. The behavior of the higher-potential compound was consistent with hydrophilic UV-fluorescent molecules previously found in G. fermentans supernatants. Both electron shuttles were also produced when cultures were grown with Fe(III), but not when fumarate was the electron acceptor. This study reveals that Geothrix is able to take advantage of higher-redox-potential environments, demonstrates that secretion of flavin-based shuttles is not confined to Shewanella, and points to the existence of high-potential-redox-active compounds involved in extracellular electron transfer. Based on differences between the respiratory strategies of Geothrix and Geobacter, these two groups of bacteria could exist in distinctive environmental niches defined by redox potential. PMID:22843516

  11. Electron-transfer and acid-base properties of a two-electron oxidized form of quaterpyrrole that acts as both an electron donor and an acceptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; E, Wenbo; Ohkubo, Kei; Sanchez-Garcia, David; Yoon, Dae-Wi; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kadish, Karl M

    2008-02-21

    Electron-transfer interconversion between the four-electron oxidized form of a quaterpyrrole (abbreviated as P4 for four pyrroles) and the two-electron oxidized form (P4H2) as well as between P4H2 and its fully reduced form (P4H4) bearing analogous substituents in the alpha- and beta-pyrrolic positions was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible spectroelectrochemistry combined with ESR and laser flash photolysis measurements. The two-electron oxidized form, P4H2, acts as both an electron donor and an electron acceptor. The radical cation (P4H2*+) and radical anion (P4H2*-) are both produced by photoinduced electron transfer from dimeric 1-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide to P4H2, whereas the cation radical form of the compound is also produced by electron-transfer oxidation of P4H2 with [Ru(bpy)3]3+. The ESR spectra of P4H2*+ and P4H2*- were recorded at low temperature and exhibit spin delocalization over all four pyrrole units. Thus, the two-electron oxidized form of the quaterpyrrole (P4H2) displays redox and electronic features analogous to those seen in the case of porphyrins and may be considered as a simple, open-chain model of this well-studied tetrapyrrolic macrocycle. The dynamics of deprotonation from P4H2*+ and disproportionation of P4H2 were examined by laser flash photolysis measurements of photoinduced electron-transfer oxidation and reduction of P4H2, respectively.

  12. Electron Transfer within Self-Assembling Cyclic Tetramers Using Chlorophyll-Based Donor-Acceptor Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Victoria L; Smeigh, Amanda L; Kim, Chul Hoon; Co, Dick T; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2012-05-09

    The synthesis and photoinduced charge transfer properties of a series of Chl-based donor-acceptor triad building blocks that self-assemble into cyclic tetramers are reported. Chlorophyll a was converted into zinc methyl 3-ethylpyrochlorophyllide a (Chl) and then further modified at its 20-position to covalently attach a pyromellitimide (PI) acceptor bearing a pyridine ligand and one or two naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide) (NDI) secondary electron acceptors to give Chl-PI-NDI and Chl-PI-NDI2. The pyridine ligand within each ambident triad enables intermolecular Chl metal-ligand coordination in dry toluene, which results in the formation of cyclic tetramers in solution, as determined using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering at a synchrotron source. Femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of the monomers in toluene-1% pyridine and the cyclic tetramers in toluene shows that the selective photoexcitation of Chl results in intramolecular electron transfer from 1*Chl to PI to form Chl+.-PI-.-NDI and Chl+.-PI-.-NDI2. This initial charge separation is followed by a rapid charge shift from PI-. to NDI and subsequent charge recombination of Chl+.-PI-NDI-. and Chl+.-PI-(NDI)NDI-. on a 5-30 ns time scale. Charge recombination in the Chl-PI-NDI2 cyclic tetramer (τCR = 30 ± 1 ns in toluene) is slower by a factor of 3 relative to the monomeric building blocks (τCR = 10 ± 1 ns in toluene-1% pyridine). This indicates that the self-assembly of these building blocks into the cyclic tetramers alters their structures in a way that lengthens their charge separation lifetimes, which is an advantageous strategy for artificial photosynthetic systems.

  13. Influence of donor-acceptor distance variation on photoinduced electron and proton transfer in rhenium(I)-phenol dyads.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wolf, Hilke; Stalke, Dietmar; Wenger, Oliver S

    2012-08-01

    A homologous series of four molecules in which a phenol unit is linked covalently to a rhenium(I) tricarbonyl diimine photooxidant via a variable number of p-xylene spacers (n = 0-3) was synthesized and investigated. The species with a single p-xylene spacer was structurally characterized to get some benchmark distances. Photoexcitation of the metal complex in the shortest dyad (n = 0) triggers release of the phenolic proton to the acetonitrile/water solvent mixture; a H/D kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 2.0 ± 0.4 is associated with this process. Thus, the shortest dyad basically acts like a photoacid. The next two longer dyads (n = 1, 2) exhibit intramolecular photoinduced phenol-to-rhenium electron transfer in the rate-determining excited-state deactivation step, and there is no significant KIE in this case. For the dyad with n = 1, transient absorption spectroscopy provided evidence for release of the phenolic proton to the solvent upon oxidation of the phenol by intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer. Subsequent thermal charge recombination is associated with a H/D KIE of 3.6 ± 0.4 and therefore is likely to involve proton motion in the rate-determining reaction step. Thus, some of the longer dyads (n = 1, 2) exhibit photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), albeit in a stepwise (electron transfer followed by proton transfer) rather than concerted manner. Our study demonstrates that electronically strongly coupled donor-acceptor systems may exhibit significantly different photoinduced PCET chemistry than electronically weakly coupled donor-bridge-acceptor molecules.

  14. Intramolecular electron transfer in fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads

    SciTech Connect

    Guldi, D.M.; Maggini, M.; Scorrano, G.; Prato, M.

    1997-02-05

    A systematic steady-state fluorescence and time-resolved flash photolytic investigation of a series of covalently linked fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads is reported as a function of the nature of the spacer between the donor site (ferrocene) and acceptor site (fullerene) and the dielectric constant of the medium. The fluorescence of the investigated dyads 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 in methylcyclohexane at 77 K were substantially quenched, relative to N-methylfulleropyrrolidine 1, indicating intramolecular quenching of the fullerene excited singlet state. Excitation of N-methylfulleropyrrolidine revealed the immediate formation of the excited singlet state, with {lambda}{sub max} around 886 nm. A rapid intersystem crossing ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 1.2 ps ) to the excited triplet state was observed with characteristic absorption around 705 nm. Picosecond resolved photolysis of dyads 2-6 in toluene showed light-induced formation of the excited singlet state which undergoes rapid intramolecular quenching. Nanosecond-resolved photolysis of dyads 3 and 4 in degassed benzonitrile revealed long-lived charge separated states with characteristic fullerene radical-anion bands at {lambda}{sub max} = 1055 nm. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The separation distance distribution in electron-donor-acceptor systems and the wavelength dependence of free ion yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinwei; Findley, Bret R.; Braun, Charles L.; Sutin, Norman

    2001-06-01

    We recently reported that free radical ion quantum yields for electron-donor-acceptor (EDA) systems of alkylbenzenes-tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) exhibit a remarkable wavelength dependence in dichloromethane, a medium polarity solvent. We proposed that weak absorption by long-distance, unassociated or "random" D⋯A pairs is mainly responsible for the free radical ion yield. Here a model for the wavelength dependence of the free ion yield is developed for four systems in which differing degrees of EDA complex formation are present: 1,3,5-tri-tert-butylbenzene-TCNE in which only random pairs exist due to the bulky groups on the electron donor, and toluene—TCNE, 1,3,5-triethylbenzene-TCNE and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene-TCNE. Mulliken-Hush theory is used to determine the excitation distance distribution of unassociated, random pairs at different wavelengths. For each absorption distribution, free radical ion yields at different wavelengths are then calculated using Onsager's result for the ion separation probability. Encouraging agreement between the calculated yields and our experimental results is obtained. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that photoexcitation of unassociated donor/acceptor pairs has been invoked as the source of separated radical ion pairs.

  16. Electron ionization mass spectral fragmentation study of sulfation derivatives of polychlorinated biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueshu; Robertson, Larry W; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls are persistent organic pollutants that can be metabolized via hydroxylated PCBs to PCB sulfate metabolites. The sensitive and selective analysis of PCB sulfate monoesters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) requires their derivatization, for example, as PCB 2,2,2-trichloroethyl (TCE) sulfate monoesters. To aid in the identification of unknown PCB sulfate metabolites isolated from biological samples, the electron impact MS fragmentation pathways of selected PCB TCE sulfate diesters were analyzed and compared to the fragmentation pathways of the corresponding methoxylated PCBs. Results The most abundant and characteristic fragment ions of PCB TCE sulfate diesters were formed by releasing CHCCl3, SO3, HCl2 and/or CCl3 from the TCE sulfate moiety and Cl2, HCl, ethyne and chloroethyne from an intermediate phenylcyclopentadienyl cation. The fragmentation pattern depended on the degree of chlorination and the position of the TCE sulfate moiety (i.e., ortho vs. meta/para to the second phenyl ring), but were independent of the chlorine substitution pattern. These fragmentation pathways are similar to the fragmentation pathways of structurally related methoxylated PCBs. Conclusion Knowledge of the fragmentation patterns of PCB TCE sulfate diesters will greatly aid in determining the position of sulfate moiety (ortho vs. meta/para) of unknown PCB sulfate metabolites isolated from environmental or laboratory samples. PMID:19272150

  17. Synthesis of an A-D-A type of molecule used as electron acceptor for improving charge transfer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-Zhi; Gu, Shu-Duo; Shen, Dan; Yuan, Yang; Zhang, Mingdao

    2016-08-01

    Electron-accepting molecules play an important role in developing organic solar cells. A new type of A-D-A molecule, 3,6-di([7-(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-1,5,2,4,6,8-dithiotetrazocin-3-yl]thiophen-2-yl)-9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole, was synthesized. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy levels are -3.55 and -5.85 eV, respectively. Therefore, the A-D-A type of compound could be used as electron acceptor for fabricating organic solar cell with a high open circuit voltage. Gibbs free energy (-49.2 kJ/mol) reveals that the process of A-D-A acceptor accepting an electron from poly(3-hexylthiophene) at excited state is spontaneous. The value of entropy (118 J/mol) in the process of an electron transferring from P3HT to the A-D-A acceptor at organic interface suggests that electrons generated from separation of electron-hole pairs at donor/acceptor interface would be delocalized efficiently. Therefore, the A-D-A molecule would be a potential acceptor for efficient organic BHJ solar cells.

  18. Benzene oxidation coupled to sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Coates, J.D.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Highly reduced sediments from San Diego Bay, Calif., that were incubated under strictly anaerobic conditions metabolized benzene within 55 days when they were exposed initially to I ??M benzene. The rate of benzene metabolism increased as benzene was added back to the benzene-adapted sediments. When a [14C]benzene tracer was included with the benzene added to benzene-adapted sediments, 92% of the added radioactivity was recovered as 14CO2. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, inhibited benzene uptake and production of 14CO2 from [14C]benzene. Benzene metabolism stopped when the sediments became sulfate depleted, and benzene uptake resumed when sulfate was added again. The stoichiometry of benzene uptake and sulfate reduction was consistent with the hypothesis that sulfate was the principal electron acceptor for benzene oxidation. Isotope trapping experiments performed with [14C]benzene revealed that there was no production of such potential extracellular intermediates of benzene oxidation as phenol, benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, cyclohexane, catechol, and acetate. The results demonstrate that benzene can be oxidized in the absence of O2, with sulfate serving as the electron acceptor, and suggest that some sulfate reducers are capable of completely oxidizing benzene to carbon dioxide without the production of extracellular intermediates. Although anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to chelated Fe(III) has been documented previously, the study reported here provides the first example of a natural sediment compound that can serve as an electron acceptor for anaerobic benzene oxidation.

  19. Effects of electron acceptors on removal of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, resistance genes and class 1 integrons under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heyang; Miller, Jennifer H; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M; Pruden, Amy; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic biotechnologies can effectively remove antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but there is a need to better understand the mechanisms. Here we employ bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as a platform to investigate the fate of a native tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant Escherichia coli strain and its ARGs. The E. coli strain carrying intI1, sulI and tet(E) was isolated from domestic wastewater and dosed into a tubular BES. The BES was first operated as a microbial fuel cell (MFC), with aeration in the cathode, which resulted in enhanced removal of E. coli and ARGs by ~2 log (i.e., order of magnitude) when switched from high current to open circuit operation mode. The BES was then operated as a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to exclude the effects of oxygen diffusion, and the removal of E. coli and ARGs during the open circuit configuration was again 1-2 log higher than that at high current mode. Significant correlations of E. coli vs. current (R(2)=0.73) and ARGs vs. E. coli (R(2) ranged from 0.54 to 0.87), and the fact that the BES substrate contained no electron acceptors, implied that the persistence of the E. coli and its ARGs was determined by the availability of indigenous electron acceptors in the BES, i.e., the anode electrode or the electron shuttles generated by the exoelectrogens. Subsequent experiments with pure-culture tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant E. coli being incubated in a two-chamber MEC and serum bottles demonstrated that the E. coli could survive by respiring anode electrode and/or electron shuttles released by exoelectrogens, and ARGs persisted with their host E. coli.

  20. Computational characterization of competing energy and electron transfer states in bimetallic donor-acceptor systems for photocatalytic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredin, Lisa A.; Persson, Petter

    2016-09-01

    The rapidly growing interest in photocatalytic systems for direct solar fuel production such as hydrogen generation from water splitting is grounded in the unique opportunity to achieve charge separation in molecular systems provided by electron transfer processes. In general, both photoinduced and catalytic processes involve complicated dynamics that depend on both structural and electronic effects. Here the excited state landscape of metal centered light harvester-catalyst pairs is explored using density functional theory calculations. In weakly bound systems, the interplay between structural and electronic factors involved can be constructed from the various mononuclear relaxed excited states. For this study, supramolecular states of electron transfer and excitation energy transfer character have been constructed from constituent full optimizations of multiple charge/spin states for a set of three Ru-based light harvesters and nine transition metal catalysts (based on Ru, Rh, Re, Pd, and Co) in terms of energy, structure, and electronic properties. The complete set of combined charge-spin states for each donor-acceptor system provides information about the competition of excited state energy transfer states with the catalytically active electron transfer states, enabling the identification of the most promising candidates for photocatalytic applications from this perspective.

  1. Computational characterization of competing energy and electron transfer states in bimetallic donor-acceptor systems for photocatalytic conversion.

    PubMed

    Fredin, Lisa A; Persson, Petter

    2016-09-14

    The rapidly growing interest in photocatalytic systems for direct solar fuel production such as hydrogen generation from water splitting is grounded in the unique opportunity to achieve charge separation in molecular systems provided by electron transfer processes. In general, both photoinduced and catalytic processes involve complicated dynamics that depend on both structural and electronic effects. Here the excited state landscape of metal centered light harvester-catalyst pairs is explored using density functional theory calculations. In weakly bound systems, the interplay between structural and electronic factors involved can be constructed from the various mononuclear relaxed excited states. For this study, supramolecular states of electron transfer and excitation energy transfer character have been constructed from constituent full optimizations of multiple charge/spin states for a set of three Ru-based light harvesters and nine transition metal catalysts (based on Ru, Rh, Re, Pd, and Co) in terms of energy, structure, and electronic properties. The complete set of combined charge-spin states for each donor-acceptor system provides information about the competition of excited state energy transfer states with the catalytically active electron transfer states, enabling the identification of the most promising candidates for photocatalytic applications from this perspective.

  2. Computational characterization of competing energy and electron transfer states in bimetallic donor-acceptor systems for photocatalytic conversion.

    PubMed

    Fredin, Lisa A; Persson, Petter

    2016-09-14

    The rapidly growing interest in photocatalytic systems for direct solar fuel production such as hydrogen generation from water splitting is grounded in the unique opportunity to achieve charge separation in molecular systems provided by electron transfer processes. In general, both photoinduced and catalytic processes involve complicated dynamics that depend on both structural and electronic effects. Here the excited state landscape of metal centered light harvester-catalyst pairs is explored using density functional theory calculations. In weakly bound systems, the interplay between structural and electronic factors involved can be constructed from the various mononuclear relaxed excited states. For this study, supramolecular states of electron transfer and excitation energy transfer character have been constructed from constituent full optimizations of multiple charge/spin states for a set of three Ru-based light harvesters and nine transition metal catalysts (based on Ru, Rh, Re, Pd, and Co) in terms of energy, structure, and electronic properties. The complete set of combined charge-spin states for each donor-acceptor system provides information about the competition of excited state energy transfer states with the catalytically active electron transfer states, enabling the identification of the most promising candidates for photocatalytic applications from this perspective. PMID:27634263

  3. Growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms on a ferruginous smectite as the sole electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Kashefi, Kazem; Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Elliott, W Crawford; Lovley, Derek R

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the structural Fe(III) within phyllosilicate minerals, including smectite and illite, is an important electron acceptor for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in sedimentary environments at moderate temperatures. The reduction of structural Fe(III) by thermophiles, however, has not previously been described. A wide range of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Archaea and Bacteria from marine and freshwater environments that are known to reduce poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides were tested for their ability to reduce structural (octahedrally coordinated) Fe(III) in smectite (SWa-1) as the sole electron acceptor. Two out of the 10 organisms tested, Geoglobus ahangari and Geothermobacterium ferrireducens, were not able to conserve energy to support growth by reduction of Fe(III) in SWa-1 despite the fact that both organisms were originally isolated with solid-phase Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. The other organisms tested were able to grow on SWa-1 and reduced 6.3 to 15.1% of the Fe(III). This is 20 to 50% less than the reported amounts of Fe(III) reduced in the same smectite (SWa-1) by mesophilic Fe(III) reducers. Two organisms, Geothermobacter ehrlichii and archaeal strain 140, produced copious amounts of an exopolysaccharide material, which may have played an active role in the dissolution of the structural iron in SWa-1 smectite. The reduction of structural Fe(III) in SWa-1 by archaeal strain 140 was studied in detail. Microbial Fe(III) reduction was accompanied by an increase in interlayer and octahedral charges and some incorporation of potassium and magnesium into the smectite structure. However, these changes in the major element chemistry of SWa-1 smectite did not result in the formation of an illite-like structure, as reported for a mesophilic Fe(III) reducer. These results suggest that thermophilic Fe(III)-reducing organisms differ in their ability to reduce and solubilize structural Fe(III) in SWa-1 smectite and that SWa-1

  4. Decomposition of plant materials in marine sediment exposed to different electron acceptors (O 2, NO 3-, and SO 42-), with emphasis on substrate origin, degradation kinetics, and the role of bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Erik; Holmer, Marianne

    2001-02-01

    Carbon mineralization of fresh and aged diatoms ( Skeletonema costatum) and barley hay ( Hordeum vulgare) was followed for 23 to 35 d in sandy and silty sediment. By the use of a thin-layer flow-through technique, it was possible to expose the sediment selectively for oxygen, nitrate or sulfate as electron acceptors in the terminal oxidation of organic carbon. Decomposition took place in two basic stages. Mineralization of the rapidly leachable fraction of the fresh materials occurred rapidly and with the same constant rate regardless of the electron acceptor available, indicating that the dissolved organic carbon released initially was labile and readily available for all heterotrophic respirers. In the case of diatoms, decay of the remaining, more refractory, particulate fraction of fresh and aged diatoms were strikingly similar, although both were degraded 5 to 10 times faster under oxic than anoxic conditions. Most of the particulate remains of diatoms after leaching apparently belong to one fraction, which maintains the same degradability even after prolonged aging. With respect to hay, the late divergence in rates of aerobic and anaerobic decay (a factor of 4 to 5 for aged hay only after 20 d) indicated that the larger hay particles (<500 μm) became exhausted in labile organic matter much slower through time than fine-particulate diatoms (˜20 μm). Anaerobic carbon mineralization rates of diatoms and hay particulates with sulfate and nitrate as electron acceptors were similar or up to two times faster with sulfate. The generally low levels of dissolved organic carbon in all incubations after the initial leaching phase suggest that the limiting step of decomposition under both aerobic and anaerobic decay is the initial hydrolytic attack on the complex particulate remains. Based on a volumetric model, we show that the exposure of anoxic subsurface sediment containing partly degraded organic material to oxygen via irrigated worm burrows or by reworking may

  5. 2008 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference-August 3-8, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Forbes and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2009-09-19

    The conference presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer and Transport in Molecular and Nano-scale Systems. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices.

  6. Removal of CO from CO-contaminated hydrogen gas by carbon-supported rhodium porphyrins using water-soluble electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Siroma, Zyun; Asahi, Masafumi; Ioroi, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    Carbon-supported Rh porphyrins catalyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide by water-soluble electron acceptors. The rate of this reaction is plotted as a function of the redox potential of the electron acceptor. The rate increases with an increase in the redox potential until it reaches a plateau. This profile can be explained in terms of the electrocatalytic CO oxidation activity of the Rh porphyrin. The removal of CO from CO(2%)/H2 by a solution containing a carbon-supported Rh porphyrin and an electron acceptor is examined. The complete conversion of CO to CO2 is achieved with only a slight amount of Rh porphyrins. Rh porphyrin on carbon black gives higher conversion than that dissolved in solution. This reaction can be used not only to remove CO in anode gas of stationary polymer electrolyte fuel cells but also to regenerate a reductant in indirect CO fuel cell systems.

  7. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  8. FTIR spectroscopy of the photoreduction of the bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor in reaction centers of Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabedryk, E.; Andrianambinintsoa, S.; Dejonghe, D.; Breton, J.

    1995-05-01

    The photoreduction of the bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor H A in reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis has been monitored by light-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy at 10°C, in the presence of reductant and mediator. The striking similarity of the H A-/H A spectra obtained for Rb. sphaeroides and Rps. viridis reflects comparable interactions of the bacteriopheophytin electron acceptor with the protein in both reaction centers and implies that the photoreduction of H A affects conserved amino acid residues. The H A-/H A spectra are interpreted by comparison with model compound spectra of the anion radicals of bacteriopheophytin a and b,a nd by analysis of 1H/2H isotope effects. The downshift of the 1677 cm -1 mode in Rb. sphaeroides (1681 cm -1 in Rps. viridis) reaction centers with respect to the model compound is interpreted in terms of a strongly perturbed 9-keto carbonyl of H A. This perturbation most probably originates from hydrogen bonding to Glu L104. At least part of the positive signal at 1591 cm -1 in Rb. sphaeroides and at 1601 cm -1 in Rps. viridis is assigned to the 9-keto carbonyl mode of H A-. From 1H/2H exchange experiments, it is proposed that the COO 1H side chain of Glu L104 contributes to the 1745-1735 cm -1 spectral range with the corresponding COO 2H signal displaced to lower frequencies and partly hidden under the 1732 cm -1 band.

  9. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  10. Protein sequences and redox titrations indicate that the electron acceptors in reaction centers from heliobacteria are similar to Photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Trost, J T; Brune, D C; Blankenship, R E

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers isolated from Heliobacillus mobilis exhibit a single major protein on SDS-PAGE of 47 000 Mr. Attempts to sequence the reaction center polypeptide indicated that the N-terminus is blocked. After enzymatic and chemical cleavage, four peptide fragments were sequenced from the Heliobacillus mobilis apoprotein. Only one of these sequences showed significant specific similarity to any of the protein and deduced protein sequences in the GenBank data base. This fragment is identical with 56% of the residues, including both cysteines, found in highly conserved region that is proposed to bind iron-sulfur center Fx in the Photosystem I reaction center peptide that is the psaB gene product. The similarity to the psaA gene product in this region is 48%. Redox titrations of laser-flash-induced photobleaching with millisecond decay kinetics on isolated reaction centers from Heliobacterium gestii indicate a midpoint potential of -414 mV with n = 2 titration behavior. In membranes, the behavior is intermediate between n = 1 and n = 2, and the apparent midpoint potential is -444 mV. This is compared to the behavior in Photosystem I, where the intermediate electron acceptor A1, thought to be a phylloquinone molecule, has been proposed to undergo a double reduction at low redox potentials in the presence of viologen redox mediators. These results strongly suggest that the acceptor side electron transfer system in reaction centers from heliobacteria is indeed analogous to that found in Photosystem I. The sequence similarities indicate that the divergence of the heliobacteria from the Photosystem I line occurred before the gene duplication and subsequent divergence that lead to the heterodimeric protein core of the Photosystem I reaction center.

  11. Comparison of approaches for simulating reactive solute transport involving organic degradation reactions by multiple terminal electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive solute transport models are useful tools for analyzing complex geochemical behavior resulting from biodegradation of organic compounds by multiple terminal electron acceptors (TEAPs). The usual approach of simulating the reactions of multiple TEAPs by an irreversible Monod rate law was compared with simulations that assumed a partial local equilibrium or kinetically controlled reactions subject to the requirement that the Gibbs free energy of reaction (?? G) was either less than zero or less than a threshold value. Simulations were performed using a single organic substrate and O2, FeOOH, SO4-2 and CO2 as the terminal electron acceptors. It was assumed that the organic substrate was slowly and completely fermented to CO2 and H2 and the H2 was oxidized by the TEAPs. Simulations using the Monod approach showed that this irreversible rate law forced the reduction of both FeOOH and CO2 to proceed even when ?? G was positive. This resulted in an over prediction in amount of FeOOH reduced to Fe(II) in parts of the domain and it resulted in large errors in pH. Simulations using mass action kinetics agreed with equilibrium simulations for the case of large rate constants. The extent of reductive dissolution of FeOOH was strongly dependent on the thermodynamic stability of the FeOOH phase. Transport simulations performed assuming that the reactions of the TEAPs stopped when ?? G exceeded a threshold value showed that only simulated H2 concentrations were affected if the threshold value was the same for each TEAP. Simulated H2 concentrations were controlled by the fastest reaction of the TEAP, but it was common for reactions to occur concomitantly rather than sequentially. ?? 2003. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. Electron and hole polaron accumulation in low-bandgap ambipolar donor-acceptor polymer transistors imaged by infrared microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, O.; Mueller, A. S.; Stinson, H. T.; Yuen, J. D.; Heeger, A. J.; Basov, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    A resurgence in the use of the donor-acceptor approach in synthesizing conjugated polymers has resulted in a family of high-mobility ambipolar systems with exceptionally narrow energy bandgaps below 1 eV. The ability to transport both electrons and holes is critical for device applications such as organic light-emitting diodes and transistors. Infrared spectroscopy offers direct access to the low-energy excitations associated with injected charge carriers. Here we use a diffraction-limited IR microscope to probe the spectroscopic signatures of electron and hole injection in the conduction channel of an organic field-effect transistor based on an ambipolar DA polymer polydiketopyrrolopyrrole-benzobisthiadiazole. We observe distinct polaronic absorptions for both electrons and holes and spatially map the carrier distribution from the source to drain electrodes for both unipolar and ambipolar biasing regimes. For ambipolar device configurations, we observe the spatial evolution of hole-induced to electron-induced polaron absorptions throughout the transport path. Our work provides a platform for combined transport and infrared studies of organic semiconductors on micron length scales relevant to functional devices.

  13. Microscopic simulations of electronic excitations in donor-acceptor heterojunctions of small-molecule based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeier, Bjoern

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental processes involving electronic excitations govern the functionality of molecular materials in which the dynamics of excitons and charges is determined by an interplay of molecular electronic structure and morphological order. To understand, e.g., charge separation and recombination at donor-acceptor heterojunctions in organic solar cells, knowledge about the microscopic details influencing these dynamics in the bulk and across the interface is required. For a set of prototypical heterojunctions of small-molecule donor materials with C60, we employ a hybrid QM/MM approach linking density-functional and many-body Green's functions theory and analyze the charged and neutral electronic excitations therein. We pay special attention the spatially-resolved electron/hole transport levels, as well as the relative energies of Frenkel and charge-transfer excitations at the interface. Finally, we link the molecular architecture of the donor material, its orientation on the fullerene substrate as well as mesoscale order to the solar cell performance.

  14. [Mechanisms of electron transfer to insoluble terminal acceptors in chemoorganotrophic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Samarukha, I A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of electron transfer of association of chemoorganotrophic bacteria to the anode in microbial fuel cells are summarized in the survey. These mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and are divided into the mechanisms of mediator electron transfer, mechanisms of electron transfer with intermediate products of bacterial metabolism and mechanism of direct transfer of electrons from the cell surface. Thus, electron transfer mediators are artificial or synthesized by bacteria riboflavins and phenazine derivatives, which also determine the ability of bacteria to antagonism. The microorganisms with hydrolytic and exoelectrogenic activity are involved in electron transfer mechanisms that are mediated by intermediate metabolic products, which are low molecular carboxylic acids, alcohols, hydrogen etc. The direct transfer of electrons to insoluble anode is possible due to membrane structures (cytochromes, pili, etc.). Association of microorganisms, and thus the biochemical mechanisms of electron transfer depend on the origin of the inoculum, substrate composition, mass transfer, conditions of aeration, potentials and location of electrodes and others, that are defined by technological and design parameters.

  15. Effects of acceptors on halogenated organic compound biotransformations in a biofilm column

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, G.D.; Bouwer, E.J. )

    1991-06-01

    The transformability of trihalomethanes, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichlorethane, 1,2-dibromomethane, tetrachlorethylene, dibromochloropropane, and chlorinated benzenes was evaluated by a biofilm utilizing a mixture of primary electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate). These compounds at concentrations commonly found in groundwater were continuously administered for 4 years to a biofilm column reactor that resembled polluted groundwater environments. Acetate was the primary substrate to support microbial growth. Sequential biofilm zones or aerobic respiration, denitrification, and sulfate reduction developed within the column. Transformation of the halogenated aliphatic compounds coincided with the onset of sulfate in the column feed decreased the steady-state removals for several of the halogenated aliphatic compounds. These results suggest that sulfate was an important primary electron acceptor. Aerobic transformations of the chlorinated benzenes were incomplete due to the rapid depletion of oxygen and limited aerobic zone at the column inlet.

  16. Biotransformation of 17α-methyltestosterone in sediment under different electron acceptor conditions.

    PubMed

    Homklin, Supreeda; Ong, Say Kee; Limpiyakorn, Tawan

    2011-03-01

    17α-Methyltestosterone (MT), an anabolic androgenic steroid, is used widely in inducing an all male population in aquaculture farming of fish, such as Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Current understanding of the occurrence and fate of MT in the sediments and the surrounding areas of the aquaculture ponds are very limited. Bioassay tests showed that MT was biotransformed under aerobic and sulfate-reducing conditions with a half-life of 3.8d and 5.3d, respectively, with complete disappearance of androgenic activity. However, under methanogenic condition, MT was found to biotransform but the androgenic activity continued to persist even after 45 d of incubation. In contrast, MT was found to transform slowly under iron(III)-reducing condition and was hardly transformed under nitrate-reducing condition. A possible reason for the lack of transformation of MT under nitrate-reducing condition is the presence of the methyl group at the C-17 position. The results of this study suggest that MT and its degradation products with androgenic activity may potentially accumulate in the sediments of fish farming ponds under iron(III)-reducing, nitrate-reducing and methanogenic conditions.

  17. Intermolecular electron transfer promoted by directional donor-acceptor attractions in self-assembled diketopyrrolopyrrole-thiophene films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiying; Jia, Hui; Wang, Lanfen; Wu, Yishi; Zhan, Chuanlang; Fu, Hongbing; Yao, Jiannian

    2012-11-01

    The photophysics of a symmetric triad consisting of two bithiophene (BT) units covalently linked to a central diketopyrrolopyrrole unit (DPP) has been investigated both in dichloromethane and in the thin film. The DPP-BT film exhibits a red-shifted low-energy absorption band compared to its solution, which is indicative of efficient π-π interactions in the solid-state phase. The steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence results revealed that the photoluminescence was subjected to severe emission quenching when DPP-BT changes from its solution phase to its film form. Further femtosecond transient absorption studies clarified that rapid intermolecular electron transfer accounts for the considerable fluorescence quenching event. The structural characterization of DPP-BT nanobelts, based on GIXRD and SAED patterns, suggested that the composite may be self-assembled into a slipped face-to-face configuration in the film, providing compact interlayer D-A interactions. As a result, intermolecular electron transfer is promoted by the favorable donor-acceptor attractions between the adjacent molecules. Moreover, this packing configuration provides a moderate channel for charge transportation. The hole mobility, which was measured based on a single-belt field-effect transistor, was found to be around 0.07 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Our observation reveals the role of spatial orientation in photophysical processes and the consequential semiconductor performance, providing guidance for the development and self-assembly of new opto-electronic molecules. PMID:22951990

  18. Electronic Structure of Fullerene Acceptors in Organic Bulk-Heterojunctions: A Combined EPR and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Mardis, Kristy L; Webb, Jeremy N; Holloway, Tarita; Niklas, Jens; Poluektov, Oleg G

    2015-12-01

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices are a promising alternative energy source. Attempts to improve their performance have focused on the optimization of electron-donating polymers, while electron-accepting fullerenes have received less attention. Here, we report an electronic structure study of the widely used soluble fullerene derivatives PC61BM and PC71BM in their singly reduced state, that are generated in the polymer:fullerene blends upon light-induced charge separation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations characterize the electronic structures of the fullerene radical anions through spin density distributions and magnetic resonance parameters. The good agreement of the calculated magnetic resonance parameters with those determined experimentally by advanced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows the validation of the DFT calculations. Thus, for the first time, the complete set of magnetic resonance parameters including directions of the principal g-tensor axes were determined. For both molecules, no spin density is present on the PCBM side chain, and the axis of the largest g-value lies along the PCBM molecular axis. While the spin density distribution is largely uniform for PC61BM, it is not evenly distributed for PC71BM.

  19. Electronic Structure of Fullerene Acceptors in Organic Bulk-Heterojunctions. A Combined EPR and DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mardis, Kristy L.; Webb, J.; Holloway, Tarita; Niklas, Jens; Poluektov, Oleg G.

    2015-11-16

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices are a promising alternative energy source. Attempts to improve their performance have focused on the optimization of electron-donating polymers, while electron-accepting fullerenes have received less attention. Here, we report an electronic structure study of the widely used soluble fullerene derivatives PC61BM and PC71BM in their singly reduced state, that are generated in the polymer:fullerene blends upon light-induced charge separation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations characterize the electronic structures of the fullerene radical anions through spin density distributions and magnetic resonance parameters. The good agreement of the calculated magnetic resonance parameters with those determined experimentally by advanced electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) allows the validation of the DFT calculations. Thus, for the first time, the complete set of magnetic resonance parameters including directions of the principal g-tensor axes were determined. For both molecules, no spin density is present on the PCBM side chain, and the axis of the largest g-value lies along the PCBM molecular axis. While the spin density distribution is largely uniform for PC61BM, it is not evenly distributed for PC71BM.

  20. Indan-1,3-dione electron-acceptor small molecules for solution-processable solar cells: a structure-property correlation.

    PubMed

    Winzenberg, Kevin N; Kemppinen, Peter; Scholes, Fiona H; Collis, Gavin E; Shu, Ying; Singh, Th Birendra; Bilic, Ante; Forsyth, Craig M; Watkins, Scott E

    2013-07-18

    A structure-device performance correlation in bulk heterojunction solar cells for new indandione-derived small molecule electron acceptors, FEHIDT and F8IDT, is presented. Devices based on the former exhibit higher power conversion efficiency (2.4%) and higher open circuit voltage, a finding consistent with reduced intermolecular interactions. PMID:23739171

  1. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  2. Charge transfer in the electron donor-acceptor complexes of a meso-phenol BODIPY dye with chloranils and fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Animesh; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Mula, Soumyaditya; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2015-02-01

    UV-Vis spectral investigations of electron donor-acceptor complexes of laser dye 2,6-Diethyl-4,4-difluoro-1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-8-(4‧-hydroxyphenyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indecene (1c) with chloranils and fullerenes are reported in toluene medium. Well defined charge transfer (CT) absorption bands have been located in the visible region. Oscillator strengths, transition dipole and resonance energies of the CT complexes have been estimated. Vertical ionization potential of 1c has been determined utilizing Mulliken's equation. A possible mechanism for the interaction between electronic subsystems of chloranils, [60]- and [70]fullerenes with three different BODIPY dyes (1a, 1b and 1c shown in Fig. 1) have been discussed in comparing the parameters like degree of charge transfer and binding constant in nonpolar toluene. Comparison of 1c complexes is done with DFT/B3LYP/6-31G optimized gas phase geometries.

  3. Magnetic field enhanced electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes based on electron donor-acceptor exciplex blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniya, Sangita; Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; McLaughlin, Ryan; Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    2016-03-01

    A useful process for light harvesting from injected electron-hole pairs in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) is the transfer from triplet excitons (T) to singlet excitons (S) via reverse intersystem crossing (RISC). This process adds a delayed electro-luminescence (EL) emission component that is known as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). We have studied electron donor (D)/acceptor(A) blends that form an exciplex manifold in which the energy difference, ΔEST between the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) levels is relatively small (<100 meV), and thus allows RISC at ambient temperature. We found that the EL emission in OLED based on the exciplex blend is enhanced up to 40% by applying a relatively weak magnetic field of 50 mT at ambient. Moreover the MEL response is activated with activation energy similar that of the EL emission. This suggests that the large magneto-EL originates from an additional spin-mixing channel between singlet and triplet states of the generated exciplexes, which is due to TADF. We will report on the MEL dependencies on the temperature, bias voltage, and D-A materials for optimum OLED performance. Supported by SAMSUNG Global Research Outreach (GRO) program, and also by the NSF-Material Science & Engineering Center (MRSEC) program at the University of Utah (DMR-1121252).

  4. Electron acceptors based on functionalizable cyclopenta[hi]aceanthrylenes and dicyclopenta[de,mn]tetracenes.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jordan D; Jellison, Jessica L; Finke, Aaron D; Wang, Lichang; Plunkett, Kyle N

    2012-09-26

    We report the synthesis and selective functionalization of two externally fused cyclopenta-fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (CP-PAHs) and demonstrate their electron accepting behavior. 2,7-Bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopenta[hi]aceanthrylene (1) and 2,8-bis(trimethylsilyl)dicyclopenta[de,mn]tetracene (4) were prepared in a one-pot, palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling of (trimethylsilyl)acetylene and either 9,10-dibromoanthracene or 5,11-dibromotetracene, respectively. The trimethylsilyl groups were selectively converted into bromides via substitution with N-bromosuccinimide to create universal partners (2 and 6) for metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. To demonstrate the utility of the halogenated CP-PAHs, we successfully employed a Sonogashira cross-coupling between the CP-PAHs and a phenylacetylene derivative. The resulting compounds (3 and 7) were found to be highly conjugated between the CP-PAH core and the substituents, as demonstrated by large bathochromic shifts in the absorption spectra as well as density functional theory calculations. Ethynylated CP-PAHs 3 and 7 were found to possess low optical bandgaps (1.52 and 1.51 eV, respectively) and displayed two reversible reductions. We further demonstrated the fullerene-like electron-accepting behavior of 3 through solution-phase fluorescence quenching of the prototypical electron donor, poly(3-hexylthiophene).

  5. Modulating the Redox Potential of the Stable Electron Acceptor, QB, in Mutagenized Photosystem II Reaction Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Zoee; Sayre, Richard

    2011-02-10

    One of the unique features of electron transfer processes in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RC) is the exclusive transfer of electrons down only one of the two parallel cofactor branches. In contrast to the RC core polypeptides (psaA and psaB) of photosystem I (PSI), where electron transfer occurs down both parallel redox-active cofactor branches, there is greater protein-cofactor asymmetry between the PSII RC core polypeptides (D1 and D2). We have focused on the identification of protein-cofactor relationships that determine the branch along which primary charge separation occurs (P680+/pheophytin-(Pheo)). We have previously shown that mutagenesis of the strong hydrogen-bonding residue, D1-E130, to less polar residues (D1-E130Q,H,L) shifted the midpoint potential of the PheoD1/PheoD1- couple to more negative values, reducing the quantum yield of primary charge separation. We did not observe, however, electron transfer down the inactive branch in D1-E130 mutants. The protein residue corresponding to D1-E130 on the inactive branch is D2-Q129 which presumably has a reduced hydrogen-bonding interaction with PheoD2 relative to the D1-E130 residue with PheoD1. Analysis of the recent 2.9 Å cyanobacterial PSII crystal structure indicated, however, that the D2-Q129 residue was too distant from the PheoD2 headgroup to serve as a possible hydrogen bond donor and directly impact its midpoint potential as well as potentially determine the directionality of electron transfer. Our objective was to characterize the function of this highly conserved inactive branch residue by replacing it with a nonconservative leucine or a conservative histidine residue. Measurements of Chl fluorescence decay kinetics and thermoluminescence studies indicate that the mutagenesis of D2-Q129 decreases the redox gap between QA and QB due to a lowering of the redox potential of QB. The

  6. 5' modification of duplex DNA with a ruthenium electron donor-acceptor pair using solid-phase DNA synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Natia L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Incorporation of metalated nucleosides into DNA through covalent modification is crucial to measurement of thermal electron-transfer rates and the dependence of these rates with structure, distance, and position. Here, we report the first synthesis of an electron donor-acceptor pair of 5' metallonucleosides and their subsequent incorporation into oligonucleotides using solid-phase DNA synthesis techniques. Large-scale syntheses of metal-containing oligonucleotides are achieved using 5' modified phosporamidites containing [Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (acac is acetylacetonato; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (3) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (4). Duplexes formed with the metal-containing oligonucleotides exhibit thermal stability comparable to the corresponding unmetalated duplexes (T(m) of modified duplex = 49 degrees C vs T(m) of unmodified duplex = 47 degrees C). Electrochemical (3, E(1/2) = -0.04 V vs NHE; 4, E(1/2) = 1.12 V vs NHE), absorption (3, lambda(max) = 568, 369 nm; 4, lambda(max) = 480 nm), and emission (4, lambda(max) = 720 nm, tau = 55 ns, Phi = 1.2 x 10(-)(4)) data for the ruthenium-modified nucleosides and oligonucleotides indicate that incorporation into an oligonucleotide does not perturb the electronic properties of the ruthenium complex or the DNA significantly. In addition, the absence of any change in the emission properties upon metalated duplex formation suggests that the [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+)[Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) pair will provide a valuable probe for DNA-mediated electron-transfer studies.

  7. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  8. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. PMID:27318730

  9. The electronic structure and second-order nonlinear optical properties of donor-acceptor acetylenes - A detailed investigation of structure-property relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, A. E.; Graham, Eva; Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Perry, Joseph W.; Cheng, L.-T.; Perry, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of donor-acceptor acetylene compounds was synthesized in which systematic changes in both the conjugation length and the donor-acceptor strength were made. The effect of these structural changes on the spectroscopic and electronic properties of the molecules and, ultimately, on the measured second-order molecular hyperpolarizabilities (beta) was investigated. It was found that increases in the donor-acceptor strength resulted in increases in the magnitude of beta. For this class of molecules, the increase is dominated by the energy of the intramolecular charge-transfer transition, while factors such as the ground to excited-state dipole moment change and the transition-moment integral are much less important. Increasing the conjugation length from one to two acetylene linkers did not result in an increase in the value of beta; however, beta increased sharply in going from two acetylenes to three. This increase is attributed to the superposition of several nearly isoenergetic excited states.

  10. Description of electron transfer in the ground and excited states of organic donor–acceptor systems by single-reference and multi-reference density functional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Michael

    2014-09-28

    Electron transfer in the ground and excited states of a model donor–acceptor (D–A) system is investigated using the single-reference and multi-reference density functional theory (DFT) methods. To analyze the results of the calculations, a simple two-site multi-reference model was derived that predicts a stepwise electron transfer in the S{sub 0} state and a wave-like dependence of the S{sub 1} electron transfer on the external stimulus. The standard single-reference Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT approach and the time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) method failed to describe the correct dependence of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electron transfer on the external electric field applied along the donor–acceptor system. The multi-reference DFT approach, the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method, was able to successfully reproduce the correct behavior of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} electron transfer on the applied field. The REKS method was benchmarked against experimentally measured gas phase charge transfer excitations in a series of organic donor–acceptor complexes and displayed its ability to describe this type of electronic transitions with a very high accuracy, mean absolute error of 0.05 eV with the use of the standard range separated density functionals. On the basis of the calculations undertaken in this work, it is suggested that the non-adiabatic coupling between the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} states may interfere with the electron transfer in a weakly coupled donor–acceptor system. It is also suggested that the electronic excitation of a D{sup +}–A{sup −} system may play a dual role by assisting the further electron transfer at certain magnitudes of the applied electric field and causing the backward transfer at lower electric field strengths.

  11. Global transcriptional start site mapping in Geobacter sulfurreducens during growth with two different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    González, Getzabeth; Labastida, Aurora; Jímenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Morett, Enrique; Juárez, Katy

    2016-09-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is an anaerobic soil bacterium that is involved in biogeochemical cycles of elements such as Fe and Mn. Although significant progress has been made in the understanding of the electron transfer processes in G. sulfurreducens, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms involved in their control. To expand the study of gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens, we carried out a genome-wide identification of transcription start sites (TSS) by 5'RACE and by deep RNA sequencing of primary mRNAs in two growth conditions. TSSs were identified along G. sulfurreducens genome and over 50% of them were located in the upstream region of the associated gene, and in some cases we detected genes with more than one TSS. Our global mapping of TSSs contributes with valuable information, which is needed for the study of transcript structure and transcription regulation signals and can ultimately contribute to the understanding of transcription initiation phenomena in G. sulfurreducens. PMID:27488344

  12. The FX iron-sulfur cluster serves as the terminal bound electron acceptor in heliobacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Steven P; Golbeck, John H

    2012-03-01

    Phototrophs of the family Heliobacteriaceae contain the simplest known Type I reaction center (RC), consisting of a homodimeric (PshA)(2) core devoid of bound cytochromes and antenna proteins. Unlike plant and cyanobacterial Photosystem I in which the F(A)/F(B) protein, PsaC, is tightly bound to P(700)-F(X) cores, the RCs of Heliobacterium modesticaldum contain two F(A)/F(B) proteins, PshBI and PshBII, which are loosely bound to P(800)-F(X) cores. These two 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins have been proposed to function as mobile redox proteins, reducing downstream metabolic partners much in the same manner as does [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin or flavodoxin (Fld) in PS I. Using P(800)-F(X) cores devoid of PshBI and PshBII, we show that iron-sulfur cluster F(X) directly reduces Fld without the involvement of F(A) or F(B) (Fld is used as a proxy for soluble redox proteins even though a gene encoding Fld is not identified in the H. modesticaldum genome). The reduction of Fld is suppressed by the addition of PshBI or PshBII, an effect explained by competition for the electron on F(X). In contrast, P(700)-F(X) cores require the presence of the PsaC, and hence, the F(A)/F(B) clusters for Fld (or ferredoxin) reduction. Thus, in H. modesticaldum, the interpolypeptide F(X) cluster serves as the terminal bound electron acceptor. This finding implies that the homodimeric (PshA)(2) cores should be capable of donating electrons to a wide variety of yet-to-be characterized soluble redox partners. PMID:22297911

  13. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42− ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation. PMID:27731395

  14. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42‑ ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation.

  15. De Novo Sequencing of Heparan Sulfate Oligosaccharides by Electron-Activated Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Yu, Xiang; Mao, Yang; Costello, Catherine E.; Zaia, Joseph; Lin, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Structural characterization of highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) is challenging because of the extensive sulfate losses mediated by free protons. While removal of the free protons may be achieved through the use of derivatization, metal cation adducts, and/or electrospray supercharging reagents, these steps add complexity to the experimental workflow. It is therefore desirable to develop an analytical approach for GAG sequencing that does not require derivatization or addition of reagents to the electrospray solution. Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) can produce extensive and informative fragmentation for GAGs without the need to remove free protons from the precursor ions. However, EDD is an inefficient process, often requiring consumption of large sample quantities (typically several micrograms), particularly for highly sulfated GAG ions. Here, we report that with improved instrumentation, optimization of the ionization and ion transfer parameters, and enhanced EDD efficiency, it is possible to generate highly informative EDD spectra of highly sulfated GAGs on the liquid chromatography (LC) time-scale, with consumption of only a few nanograms of sample. We further show that negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) is an even more effective fragmentation technique for GAG sequencing, producing fewer sulfate losses while consuming smaller amount of samples. Finally, a simple algorithm was developed for de novo HS sequencing based on their high resolution tandem mass spectra. These results demonstrate the potential of EDD and NETD as sensitive analytical tools for detailed, high-throughput, de novo structural analyses of highly sulfated GAGs. PMID:24224699

  16. Assembly of coupled redox fuel cells using copper as electron acceptors to generate power and its in-situ retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-Min; Xu, Wei; Li, Gang; Liu, Zhan-Meng; Wu, Zu-Cheng; Li, Bo-Geng

    2016-01-01

    Energy extraction from waste has attracted much interest nowadays. Herein, a coupled redox fuel cell (CRFC) device using heavy metals, such as copper, as an electron acceptor is assembled to testify the recoveries of both electricity and the precious metal without energy consumption. In this study, a NaBH4-Cu(II) CRFC was employed as an example to retrieve copper from a dilute solution with self-electricity production. The properties of the CRFC have been characterized, and the open circuit voltage was 1.65 V with a maximum power density of 7.2 W m−2 at an initial Cu2+ concentration of 1,600 mg L−1 in the catholyte. 99.9% of the 400 mg L−1 copper was harvested after operation for 24 h, and the product formed on the cathode was identified as elemental copper. The CRFC demonstrated that useful chemicals were recovered and the electricity contained in the chemicals was produced in a self-powered retrieval process. PMID:26877144

  17. Assembly of coupled redox fuel cells using copper as electron acceptors to generate power and its in-situ retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Min; Xu, Wei; Li, Gang; Liu, Zhan-Meng; Wu, Zu-Cheng; Li, Bo-Geng

    2016-01-01

    Energy extraction from waste has attracted much interest nowadays. Herein, a coupled redox fuel cell (CRFC) device using heavy metals, such as copper, as an electron acceptor is assembled to testify the recoveries of both electricity and the precious metal without energy consumption. In this study, a NaBH4-Cu(II) CRFC was employed as an example to retrieve copper from a dilute solution with self-electricity production. The properties of the CRFC have been characterized, and the open circuit voltage was 1.65 V with a maximum power density of 7.2 W m(-2) at an initial Cu(2+) concentration of 1,600 mg L(-1) in the catholyte. 99.9% of the 400 mg L(-1) copper was harvested after operation for 24 h, and the product formed on the cathode was identified as elemental copper. The CRFC demonstrated that useful chemicals were recovered and the electricity contained in the chemicals was produced in a self-powered retrieval process. PMID:26877144

  18. An Inexpensive Co-Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxide Composite with Electron Donor-Acceptor Character for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shufang; Lu, Jun; Yan, Dongpeng; Qin, Yumei; Li, Hailong; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, the inexpensive 4,4-diaminostilbene-2,2-disulfonate (DAS) and 4,4-dinitro-stilbene-2,2- disulfonate (DNS) anions with arbitrary molar ratios were successfully co-intercalated into Zn2Al-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite exhibited the broad UV-visible light absorption and fluorescence quenching, which was a direct indication of photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process between the intercalated DAS (donor) and DNS (acceptor) anions. This was confirmed by the matched HOMO/LUMO energy levels alignment of the intercalated DAS and DNS anions, which was also compatible for water splitting. The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite was fabricated as the photoanode and Pt as the cathode. Under the UV-visible light illumination, the enhanced photo-generated current (4.67 mA/cm(2) at 0.8 V vs. SCE) was generated in the external circuit, and the photoelectrochemical water split was realized. Furthermore, this photoelectrochemical water splitting performance had excellent crystalline, electrochemical and optical stability. Therefore, this novel inorganic/organic hybrid photoanode exhibited potential application prospect in photoelectrochemical water splitting.

  19. Electron donor-acceptor interaction of 3,4-dimethylaniline with 2,3-dicyano-1,4-naphthoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Magadum, Subash R.; Budni, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    The electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction between 2,3-dicyano-1,4-naphthoquinone (DCNQ) and 3,4-dimethylaniline (3,4-DMA) is studied in chloroform, dichloromethane and 1:1 (v/v) mixture of chloroform and dichloromethane. The rate of formation of the product was measured as a function of time using UV-vis spectrophotometer. The formation constant ( K) and molar extinction coefficient ( ɛ) values for the formation of EDA complex were evaluated in the temperature range of 20-35 °C. The pseudo-first-order rate constant ( k1) and the second-order rate constant ( k2) for the disappearance of EDA complex and for the formation of product were evaluated. The activation parameters (Δ H#, Δ S# and Δ G#) of the reaction were determined by temperature dependence of rate constants using the Arrhenius plots. The effect of relative permittivity of the medium on the reaction is discussed. The observed results indicate that formation of final product proceeds through initial formation of EDA complex as an intermediate. The product of the reaction was purified by column chromatography method and identified as 3-( N-3,4-dimethyl-phenylamino)-2-cyano-1,4-naphthoquinone by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of kinetic, analytical and spectroscopic results, a plausible mechanism for the formation of EDA complex and its transformation into product is proposed.

  20. An Inexpensive Co-Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxide Composite with Electron Donor-Acceptor Character for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shufang; Lu, Jun; Yan, Dongpeng; Qin, Yumei; Li, Hailong; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the inexpensive 4,4-diaminostilbene-2,2-disulfonate (DAS) and 4,4-dinitro-stilbene-2,2- disulfonate (DNS) anions with arbitrary molar ratios were successfully co-intercalated into Zn2Al-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite exhibited the broad UV-visible light absorption and fluorescence quenching, which was a direct indication of photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process between the intercalated DAS (donor) and DNS (acceptor) anions. This was confirmed by the matched HOMO/LUMO energy levels alignment of the intercalated DAS and DNS anions, which was also compatible for water splitting. The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite was fabricated as the photoanode and Pt as the cathode. Under the UV-visible light illumination, the enhanced photo-generated current (4.67 mA/cm2 at 0.8 V vs. SCE) was generated in the external circuit, and the photoelectrochemical water split was realized. Furthermore, this photoelectrochemical water splitting performance had excellent crystalline, electrochemical and optical stability. Therefore, this novel inorganic/organic hybrid photoanode exhibited potential application prospect in photoelectrochemical water splitting. PMID:26174201

  1. Self-assembly properties of semiconducting donor-acceptor-donor bithienyl derivatives of tetrazine and thiadiazole-effect of the electron accepting central ring.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Joanna; Knor, Marek; Jaroch, Tomasz; Maranda-Niedbala, Agnieszka; Kurach, Ewa; Kotwica, Kamil; Nowakowski, Robert; Djurado, David; Pecaut, Jacques; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Pron, Adam

    2013-11-26

    Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study the effect of the electron-accepting unit and the alkyl substituent's position on the type and extent of 2D supramolecular organization of penta-ring donor-acceptor-donor (DAD) semiconductors, consisting of either tetrazine or thiadiazole central acceptor ring symmetrically attached to two bithienyl groups. Microscopic observations of monomolecular layers on HOPG of four alkyl derivatives of the studied adsorbates indicate significant differences in their 2D organizations. Ordered monolayers of thiadiazole derivatives are relatively loose and, independent of the position of alkyl substituents, characterized by large intermolecular separation of acceptor units in the adjacent molecules located in the face-to-face configuration. The 2D supramolecular architecture in both derivatives of thiadiazole is very sensitive to the alkyl substituent's position. Significantly different behavior is observed for derivatives of tetrazine (which is a stronger electron acceptor). Stronger intermolecular DA interactions in these adsorbates generate an intermolecular shift in the monolayer, which is a dominant factor determining the 2D structural organization. As a consequence of this molecular arrangement, tetrazine groups (A segments) face thiophene rings (D segments) of the neighboring molecules. Monolayers of tetrazine derivatives are therefore much more densely packed and characterized by similar π-stacking of molecules independently of the position of alkyl substituents. Moreover, a comparative study of 3D supramolecular organization, deduced from the X-ray diffraction patterns, is also presented clearly confirming the polymorphism of the studied adsorbates.

  2. Formation of tellurium nanocrystals during anaerobic growth of bacteria that use Te oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baesman, S.M.; Bullen, T.D.; Dewald, J.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Curran, S.; Islam, F.S.; Beveridge, T.J.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [??] = -0.4 to -1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods (???10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger (???1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards (???100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillium barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Hydroxycinnamic acids used as external acceptors of electrons: an energetic advantage for strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons.

  4. Hydroxycinnamic Acids Used as External Acceptors of Electrons: an Energetic Advantage for Strictly Heterofermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD+/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD+/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons. PMID:25261518

  5. Accurate Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Acceptor Molecules I. Reference Data at the CCSD(T) Complete Basis Set Limit.

    PubMed

    Richard, Ryan M; Marshall, Michael S; Dolgounitcheva, O; Ortiz, J V; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Marom, Noa; Sherrill, C David

    2016-02-01

    In designing organic materials for electronics applications, particularly for organic photovoltaics (OPV), the ionization potential (IP) of the donor and the electron affinity (EA) of the acceptor play key roles. This makes OPV design an appealing application for computational chemistry since IPs and EAs are readily calculable from most electronic structure methods. Unfortunately reliable, high-accuracy wave function methods, such as coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] in the complete basis set (CBS) limit are too expensive for routine applications to this problem for any but the smallest of systems. One solution is to calibrate approximate, less computationally expensive methods against a database of high-accuracy IP/EA values; however, to our knowledge, no such database exists for systems related to OPV design. The present work is the first of a multipart study whose overarching goal is to determine which computational methods can be used to reliably compute IPs and EAs of electron acceptors. This part introduces a database of 24 known organic electron acceptors and provides high-accuracy vertical IP and EA values expected to be within ±0.03 eV of the true non-relativistic, vertical CCSD(T)/CBS limit. Convergence of IP and EA values toward the CBS limit is studied systematically for the Hartree-Fock, MP2 correlation, and beyond-MP2 coupled cluster contributions to the focal point estimates. PMID:26731487

  6. Characterization of Shewanella oneidensis MtrC: a cell-surface decaheme cytochrome involved in respiratory electron transport to extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, Robert S.; Jepson, Brian N.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Field, Sarah J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David

    2007-09-04

    Abstract MtrC is a decaheme c-type cytochrome associated with the outer cell membrane of Fe(III)-respiring species of the Shewanella genus. It is proposed to play a role in anaerobic respiration by mediating electron transfer to extracellular mineral oxides that can serve as terminal electron acceptors. The present work presents the first spectropotentiometric and voltammetric characterization of MtrC, using protein purified from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Potentiometric titrations, monitored by UV–vis absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, reveal that the hemes within MtrC titrate over a broad potential range spanning between approximately +100 and approximately *500 mV (vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). Across this potential window the UV– vis absorption spectra are characteristic of low-spin c-type hemes and the EPR spectra reveal broad, complex features that suggest the presence of magnetically spin-coupled lowspin c-hemes. Non-catalytic protein film voltammetry of MtrC demonstrates reversible electrochemistry over a potential window similar to that disclosed spectroscopically. The voltammetry also allows definition of kinetic properties of MtrC in direct electron exchange with a solid electrode surface and during reduction of a model Fe(III) substrate. Taken together, the data provide quantitative information on the potential domain in which MtrC can operate.

  7. Electrochemical response of a biofilm community to changes in electron-acceptor redox potential elucidated using microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbour, T.; Wrighton, K. C.; Mullin, S. W.; Luef, B.; Gilbert, B.; Banfield, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, we have limited insight into how mineral properties affect dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) or the microbial communities that contain them. Advances in our understanding of DMRB metabolism have been achieved using microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which exploit the ability of these organisms to transfer electrons extracellularly. By replacing the mineral electron acceptor with a conductive electrode under potentiostat control, the activity of microorganisms capable of interfacial electron transfer can be quantified by the current flowing through the electrode and related to the thermodynamics of respiration. We seek to understand how communities and their individual members respond to changes in mineralogy, and expect mineral redox potential to be a primary control. The ability to precisely control the redox potential of the electron-accepting anodic electrode is our primary motivation for using MFCs. We inoculated duplicate MFCs containing 10 mM acetate in phosphate buffered media with a slurry of subsurface sediment and groundwater obtained from the Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site at Rifle, CO. Electroactive biofilms were established on graphite anodes poised at a favorable potential (0.0 V vs. SHE) before poising at -0.2 V—a potential representative of natural iron reduction. The current was stable across both anodes over more than 100 days of operation, and the percentage of the electrons in acetate recovered as current ("Coulombic efficiency") was typically 70 to >90%. Current density reached 0.4 A/m2 at -0.2 V, to a max of over 1.0 A/m2 at or above ~0.0 V (based on geometric electrode surface area). Media exchanges and biofilm cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments indicate that electrode-attached microbial communities were responsible for primary electron transfer. Cryo-electron and confocal fluorescence microscopies of the biofilm reveal numerous morphologies of viable microorganisms that are currently being characterized

  8. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Degraded model of radiation-induced acceptor defects for GaN-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Long; Hao, Yue; Zhao, Yuan-Fu; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Gao, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Pei-Xian

    2009-07-01

    Using depletion approximation theory and introducing acceptor defects which can characterize radiation induced deep-level defects in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures, we set up a radiation damage model of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) to separately simulate the effects of several main radiation damage mechanisms and the complete radiation damage effect simultaneously considering the degradation in mobility. Our calculated results, consistent with the experimental results, indicate that thin AlGaN barrier layer, high Al content and high doping concentration are favourable for restraining the shifts of threshold voltage in the AlGaN/GaN HEMT; when the acceptor concentration induced is less than 1014cm-3, the shifts in threshold voltage are not obvious; only when the acceptor concentration induced is higher than 1016cm-3, will the shifts of threshold voltage remarkably increase; the increase of threshold voltage, resulting from radiation induced acceptor, mainly contributes to the degradation in drain saturation current of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic, but has no effect on the transconductance in the saturation area.

  9. Polar lipid fatty acids, LPS-hydroxy fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of three Geobacter strains, and variation with electron acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron; Lovley, Derek; Woodard, Trevor L.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2009-02-01

    The polar lipid fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide hydroxy-fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of Geobacter metallireducens str. GS-15, Geobacter sulfurreducens str. PCA, and Geobacter bemidjiensis str. Bem are reported. Also, the lipids of G. metallireducens were compared when grown with Fe3+ or nitrate as electron acceptors and G. sulfurreducens with Fe3+ or fumarate. In all experiments, the most abundant polar lipid fatty acids were 14:0, i15:0, 16:1*7c, 16:1*5c, and 16:0; lipopolysaccharide hydroxyfatty acids were dominated by 3oh16:0, 3oh14:0, 9oh16:0, and 10oh16:0; and menaquinone-8 was the most abundant respiratory quinone. Some variation in lipid proWles with strain were observed, but not with electron acceptor.

  10. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: a novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater.

    PubMed

    Pous, Narcis; Casentini, Barbara; Rossetti, Simona; Fazi, Stefano; Puig, Sebastià; Aulenta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment.

  11. Self-Assembly of Electron Donor-Acceptor-Based Carbazole Derivatives: Novel Fluorescent Organic Nanoprobes for Both One- and Two-Photon Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Wencheng; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Li, King Fai; Chen, Rui; Adachi, Chihaya; Chen, Zhan; Rogach, Andrey L; Zhu, Guangyu; Yu, Peter K N; Zhang, Wenjun; Cheah, Kok Wai; Zhang, Xiaohong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-05-11

    In this study, we report fluorescent organic nanoprobes with intense blue, green, and orange-red emissions prepared by self-assembling three carbazole derivatives into nanorods/nanoparticles. The three compounds consist of two or four electron-donating carbazole groups linked to a central dicyanobenzene electron acceptor. Steric hindrance from the carbazole groups leads to noncoplanar 3D molecular structures favorable to fluorescence in the solid state, while the donor-acceptor structures endow the molecules with good two-photon excited emission properties. The fluorescent organic nanoprobes exhibit good water dispersibility, low cytotoxicity, superior resistance against photodegradation and photobleaching. Both one- and two-photon fluorescent imaging were shown in the A549 cell line. Two-photon fluorescence imaging with the fluorescent probes was demonstrated to be more effective in visualizing and distinguishing cellular details compared to conventional one-photon fluorescence imaging.

  12. Hexuronic acid stereochemistry determination in chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan oligosaccharides by electron detachment dissociation.

    PubMed

    Leach, Franklin E; Ly, Mellisa; Laremore, Tatiana N; Wolff, Jeremy J; Perlow, Jacob; Linhardt, Robert J; Amster, I Jonathan

    2012-09-01

    Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) has previously provided stereo-specific product ions that allow for the assignment of the acidic C-5stereochemistry in heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), but application of the same methodology to an epimer pair in the chondroitin sulfate glycoform class does not provide the same result. A series of experiments have been conducted in which glycosaminoglycan precursor ions are independently activated by electron detachment dissociation (EDD), electron induced dissociation (EID), and negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) to assign the stereochemistry in chondroitin sulfate (CS) epimers and investigate the mechanisms for product ion formation during EDD in CS glycoforms. This approach allows for the assignment of electronic excitation products formed by EID and detachment products to radical pathways in NETD, both of which occur simultaneously during EDD. The uronic acid stereochemistry in electron detachment spectra produces intensity differences when assigned glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages are compared. The variations in the intensities of the doubly deprotonated (0,2)X(3) and Y(3) ions have been shown to be indicative of CS-A/DS composition during the CID of binary mixtures. These ions can provide insight into the uronic acid composition of binary mixtures in EDD, but the relative abundances, although reproducible, are low compared with those in a CID spectrum acquired on an ion trap. The application of principal component analysis (PCA) presents a multivariate approach to determining the uronic acid stereochemistry spectra of these GAGs by taking advantage of the reproducible peak distributions produced by electron detachment.

  13. Hexuronic Acid Stereochemistry Determination in Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycan Oligosaccharides by Electron Detachment Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Franklin E.; Ly, Mellisa; Laremore, Tatiana N.; Wolff, Jeremy J.; Perlow, Jacob; Linhardt, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2012-09-01

    Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) has previously provided stereo-specific product ions that allow for the assignment of the acidic C-5stereochemistry in heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), but application of the same methodology to an epimer pair in the chondroitin sulfate glycoform class does not provide the same result. A series of experiments have been conducted in which glycosaminoglycan precursor ions are independently activated by electron detachment dissociation (EDD), electron induced dissociation (EID), and negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) to assign the stereochemistry in chondroitin sulfate (CS) epimers and investigate the mechanisms for product ion formation during EDD in CS glycoforms. This approach allows for the assignment of electronic excitation products formed by EID and detachment products to radical pathways in NETD, both of which occur simultaneously during EDD. The uronic acid stereochemistry in electron detachment spectra produces intensity differences when assigned glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages are compared. The variations in the intensities of the doubly deprotonated 0,2X3 and Y3 ions have been shown to be indicative of CS-A/DS composition during the CID of binary mixtures. These ions can provide insight into the uronic acid composition of binary mixtures in EDD, but the relative abundances, although reproducible, are low compared with those in a CID spectrum acquired on an ion trap. The application of principal component analysis (PCA) presents a multivariate approach to determining the uronic acid stereochemistry spectra of these GAGs by taking advantage of the reproducible peak distributions produced by electron detachment.

  14. Supramolecular donor-acceptor hybrids of porphyrins/phthalocyanines with fullerenes/carbon nanotubes: electron transfer, sensing, switching, and catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Francis; Ito, Osamu

    2009-09-01

    Since the three-dimensional electron-accepting fullerene has been found to be an excellent building block for self-assembled supramolecular systems, we have investigated photoinduced electron transfer processes in supramolecular fullerene systems with porphyrins and phthalocyanines as electron donors to mimic natural photosynthesis. We have successfully formed self-assembled supramolecular dyads and triads via metal-ligand coordination, crown-ether inclusion, ion pairing, hydrogen-bonding, or pi-pi stacking interactions. Although the single mode of binding gives usually flexible supramolecular structures, the newly developed strategy of multiple modes of binding results in conjugates of defined distance and orientation between the donor and acceptor entities, which influences the overall electron transfer reactions. In these conjugates, we observe the anticipated acceleration of the charge separation process and deceleration of the charge recombination process. Applications of these supramolecular systems for reversible photoswitching of inter- and intramolecular electron transfer events open up new opportunities in the area of photosensors. Extension of the self-assembly approaches to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) results in SWNT-porphyrin/phthalocyanine nanohybrids capable of undergoing photoinduced electron transfer. These photochemical processes lead to photocatalytic reactions accumulating redox active substances of electron acceptor/mediator entities with the help of a sacrificial electron donor. Studies on these self-assembled supramolecular dyads, triads, tetrads, etc., are only in the beginning stages and future studies anticipate involvement of more complex systems targeted for better performances in light-driven devices. PMID:19668806

  15. Changes in phosphorylation of adenosine phosphate and redox state of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) in Geobacter sulfurreducens in response to electron acceptor and anode potential variation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Nicholas D; Regan, John M

    2015-12-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens is one of the dominant bacterial species found in biofilms growing on anodes in bioelectrochemical systems. The intracellular concentrations of reduced and oxidized forms of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NADH and NAD(+), respectively) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH and NADP(+), respectively) as well as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) were measured in G. sulfurreducens using fumarate, Fe(III)-citrate, or anodes poised at different potentials (110, 10, -90, and -190 mV (vs. SHE)) as the electron acceptor. The ratios of CNADH/CNAD+ (0.088±0.022) and CNADPH/CNADP+ (0.268±0.098) were similar under all anode potentials tested and with Fe(III)-citrate (reduced extracellularly). Both ratios significantly increased with fumarate as the electron acceptor (0.331±0.094 for NAD and 1.96±0.37 for NADP). The adenylate energy charge (the fraction of phosphorylation in intracellular adenosine phosphates) was maintained near 0.47 under almost all conditions. Anode-growing biofilms demonstrated a significantly higher molar ratio of ATP/ADP relative to suspended cultures grown on fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate. These results provide evidence that the cellular location of reduction and not the redox potential of the electron acceptor controls the intracellular redox potential in G. sulfurreducens and that biofilm growth alters adenylate phosphorylation.

  16. Crystallization and electron paramagnetic resonance characterization of the complex of photosystem I with its natural electron acceptor ferredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Fromme, Petra; Bottin, Hervé; Krauss, Norbert; Sétif, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The formation of a transient complex between photosystem I and ferredoxin is involved in the process of ferredoxin photoreduction in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Reduced ferredoxin is an essential redox intermediate involved in many assimilatory processes and is necessary for the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH. Single crystals from a complex of photosystem I with ferredoxin were grown using PEG 400 and CaCl(2) as precipitation agents. The crystals diffract x-rays to a resolution of 7-8 A. The space group was determined to be orthorhombic with the unit cell dimensions a = 194 A, b = 208 A, and c = 354 A. The crystals contain photosystem I and ferredoxin in a 1:1 ratio. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements on these crystals are reported, where EPR signals of the three [4Fe-4S] clusters F(A), F(B), F(X), and the [2Fe-2S] cluster of ferredoxin were detected. From the EPR spectra observed at three particular orientations of the crystal in the magnetic field, the full orientation pattern of the F g-tensor was simulated. This simulation is consistent with the presence of 12 magnetically inequivalent F clusters per unit cell with the C(3) axis of the PSI trimers oriented at (23 degrees, 72 degrees, 77 degrees ) to the unit cell axes. PMID:12324399

  17. Growth of iron(III)-reducing bacteria on clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor and comparison of growth yields on a variety of oxidized iron forms.

    PubMed

    Kostka, Joel E; Dalton, Dava D; Skelton, Hayley; Dollhopf, Sherry; Stucki, Joseph W

    2002-12-01

    Smectite clay minerals are abundant in soils and sediments worldwide and are typically rich in Fe. While recent investigations have shown that the structural Fe(III) bound in clay minerals is reduced by microorganisms, previous studies have not tested growth with clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor. Here we have demonstrated that a pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 as well as enrichment cultures of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria from rice paddy soil and subsurface sediments are capable of conserving energy for growth with the structural Fe(III) bound in smectite clay as the sole electron acceptor. Pure cultures of S. oneidensis were used for more detailed growth rate and yield experiments on various solid- and soluble-phase electron acceptors [smectite, Fe(III) oxyhydroxide FeOOH, Fe(III) citrate, and oxygen] in the same minimal medium. Growth was assessed as direct cell counts or as an increase in cell carbon (measured as particulate organic carbon). Cell counts showed that similar growth of S. oneidensis (10(8) cells ml(-1)) occurred with smectitic Fe(III) and on other Fe forms [amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, and Fe citrate] or oxygen as the electron acceptor. In contrast, cell yields of S. oneidensis measured as the increase in cell carbon were similar on all Fe forms tested while yields on oxygen were five times higher, in agreement with thermodynamic predictions. Over a range of particle loadings (0.5 to 4 g liter(-1)), the increase in cell number was highly correlated to the amount of structural Fe in smectite reduced. From phylogenetic analysis of the complete 16S rRNA gene sequences, a predominance of clones retrieved from the clay mineral-reducing enrichment cultures were most closely related to the low-G+C gram-positive members of the Bacteria (Clostridium and Desulfitobacterium) and the delta-Proteobacteria (members of the Geobacteraceae). Results indicate that growth with smectitic Fe(III) is similar in magnitude to that with Fe

  18. A non-fullerene electron acceptor based on fluorene and diketopyrrolopyrrole building blocks for solution-processable organic solar cells with an impressive open-circuit voltage.

    PubMed

    Patil, Hemlata; Zu, Wang Xi; Gupta, Akhil; Chellappan, Vijila; Bilic, Ante; Sonar, Prashant; Rananaware, Anushri; Bhosale, Sidhanath V; Bhosale, Sheshanath V

    2014-11-21

    A novel solution-processable non-fullerene electron acceptor 6,6'-(5,5'-(9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl)bis(thiophene-5,2-diyl))bis(2,5-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-3-(thiophen-2-yl)pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4(2H,5H)-dione) (DPP1) based on fluorene and diketopyrrolopyrrole conjugated moieties was designed, synthesized and fully characterized. DPP1 exhibited excellent solubility and high thermal stability which are essential for easy processing. Upon using DPP1 as an acceptor with the classical electron donor poly(3-hexylthiophene), solution processable bulk-heterojunction solar cells afforded a power conversion efficiency of 1.2% with a high open-circuit voltage (1.1 V). As per our knowledge, this value of open circuit voltage is one of the highest values reported so far for a bulk-heterojunction device using DPP1 as a non-fullerene acceptor.

  19. EPR studies of the vitamin K 1 semiquinone radical anion. Comparison to the electron acceptor A 1 in green plant photosystem I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurnauer, Marion C.; Brown, James W.; Gast, P.; Feezel, Laura L.

    Suggestions that the electron acceptor, A 1, in Photosystem I is a quinone have come from both optical and epr experiments. Vitamin K 1 (phylloquinone) is present in the PSI complex with a stoichiometry of two molecules per reaction center. In order to determine if A 1 can be identified with vitamin K 1, X-band and Q-band epr properties of the vitamin K 1 radical anion in frozen alcohol solutions are examined. The results are compared to the epr properties that have been observed for the reduced A 1 acceptor in vivo. The g-values obtained for the vitamin K 1 radical anion are consistent with identifying A 1 with vitamin K 1.

  20. Bimolecular electron transfer reactions in coumarin amine systems: Donor acceptor orientational effect on diffusion-controlled reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpati, A. K.; Nath, S.; Kumbhakar, M.; Maity, D. K.; Senthilkumar, S.; Pal, H.

    2008-04-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions between excited coumarin dyes and different aliphatic amine (AlA) and aromatic amine (ArA) donors have been investigated in acetonitrile solution using steady-state (SS) and time-resolved (TR) fluorescence quenching measurements. No ground state complex or emissive exciplex formation has been indicated in these systems. SS and TR measurements give similar quenching constants ( kq) for each of the coumarin-amine pairs, suggesting dynamic nature of interaction in these systems. On correlating kq values with the free energy changes (Δ G0) of the ET reactions show the typical Rehm-Weller type of behavior as expected for bimolecular ET reactions under diffusive condition, where kq increases with -Δ G0 at the lower exergonicity (-Δ G0) region but ultimately saturate to a diffusion-limited value (kqDC) at the higher exergonicity region. It is, however, interestingly observed that the kqDC values vary largely depending on the type of the amines used. Thus, kqDC is much higher with ArAs than AlAs. Similarly, the kqDC for cyclic monoamine 1-azabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (ABCO) is distinctly lower and that for cyclic diamine 1,4-diazabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (DABCO) is distinctly higher than the kqDC value obtained for other noncyclic AlAs. These differences in the kqDC values have been rationalized on the basis of the differences in the orientational restrictions involved in the ET reactions with different types of amines. As understood, n-type donors (AlAs) introduce large orientational restriction and thus significantly reduces the ET efficiency in comparison to the π-type donors (ArAs). Structural constrains are inferred to be the reason for the differences in the kqDC values involving ABCO, DABCO donors in comparison to other noncyclic AlAs. Supportive evidence for the orientational restrictions involving different types of amines donors has also been obtained from DFT based quantum chemical calculations on the molecular orbitals of

  1. Achieving high performance non-fullerene organic solar cells through tuning the numbers of electron deficient building blocks of molecular acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Chen, Yusheng; Chen, Shangshang; Dong, Tao; Deng, Wei; Lv, Lei; Yang, Saina; Yan, He; Huang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Two analogous dimer and tetramer compounds, SF-PDI2 and SF-PDI4, were designed, theoretically calculated, synthesized, and developed as electron acceptors for organic solar cells. The effects of the number of the electron deficient building blocks on the optical absorption, energy levels, charge transport, morphology, crystallinity, and photovoltaic performance of the molecules were investigated. In combination with two different donors, PTB7-Th and PffBT4T-2OD, the results showed that increasing the numbers of PDI building blocks is beneficial to photovoltaic performance and leads to efficiency over 5%.

  2. Electron microscopic characterization of the sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris: biofilms and clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, M.; Remis, J.; Jorgens, D.; Zemla, M.; Singer, M.; Schmitt, J.; Gorby, Y.; Hazen, T.; Wall, J.; Elias, D.; Torok, T.

    2008-12-01

    have developed an on-grid culturing and whole-mount imaging approach, which under electron-acceptor limiting conditions resulted in the presence of filaments and vesicles making this system an interesting surrogate assay for DvH-related metal reduction under a number of environmentally relevant conditions, including stress conditions. Moreover efforts, as part of the GTL-PCAP project, are underway to correlate intracellular protein expression and localization patterns, as obtained by SNAP-tag labeling and photoconversion, with extracellular metal deposition in order to determine the respective role of the various proteins in physiology and metal reduction. We have further started to characterize by SEM and TEM the clumping behavior of DvH both wildtype and megaplasmid minus under batch liquid culture conditions, and found differences in the extracellular abundance of filaments as well as differences metal deposition patterns that occur at the onset of clumping and which may promote or indeed by responsible for clumping behavior. Clumping may be a first step of biofilm formation. For a complete understanding such morphological studies need to be accompanied by studies of protein expression through microarray analysis and possibly protein localization patterns.

  3. The role of O2 as an electron acceptor alternative to CO2 in photosynthesis of the common marine angiosperm Zostera marina L.

    PubMed

    Buapet, Pimchanok; Björk, Mats

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the role of O2 as an electron acceptor alternative to CO2 in photosynthesis of the common marine angiosperm Zostera marina L. Electron transport rates (ETRs) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of Z. marina were measured under saturating irradiance in synthetic seawater containing 2.2 mM DIC and no DIC with different O2 levels (air-equilibrated levels, 3 % of air equilibrium and restored air-equilibrated levels). Lowering O2 did not affect ETR when DIC was provided, while it caused a decrease in ETR and an increase in NPQ in DIC-free media, indicating that O2 acted as an alternative electron acceptor under low DIC. The ETR and NPQ as a function of irradiance were subsequently assessed in synthetic seawater containing (1) 2.2 mM DIC, air-equilibrated O2; (2) saturating CO2, no O2; and (3) no DIC, air-equilibrated O2. These treatments were combined with glycolaldehyde pre-incubation. Glycolaldehyde caused a marked decrease in ETR in DIC-free medium, indicating significant electron flow supported by photorespiration. Combining glycolaldehyde with O2 depletion completely suppressed ETR suggesting the operation of the Mehler reaction, a possibility supported by the photosynthesis-dependent superoxide production. However, no notable effect of suppressing the Mehler reaction on NPQ was observed. It is concluded that during DIC-limiting conditions, such as those frequently occurring in the habitats of Z. marina, captured light energy exceeds what is utilised for the assimilation of available carbon, and photorespiration is a major alternative electron acceptor, while the contribution of the Mehler reaction is minor.

  4. Transcriptional Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with an Electrode Compared to Fe(III)Citrate or Oxygen as Terminal Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Miriam A.; Bar, Haim Y.; Beg, Qasim K.; Segrè, Daniel; Booth, James; Cotta, Michael A.; Angenent, Largus T.

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a target of extensive research in the fields of bioelectrochemical systems and bioremediation because of its versatile metabolic capabilities, especially with regard to respiration with extracellular electron acceptors. The physiological activity of S. oneidensis to respire at electrodes is of great interest, but the growth conditions in thin-layer biofilms make physiological analyses experimentally challenging. Here, we took a global approach to evaluate physiological activity with an electrode as terminal electron acceptor for the generation of electric current. We performed expression analysis with DNA microarrays to compare the overall gene expression with an electrode to that with soluble iron(III) or oxygen as the electron acceptor and applied new hierarchical model-based statistics for the differential expression analysis. We confirmed the differential expression of many genes that have previously been reported to be involved in electrode respiration, such as the entire mtr operon. We also formulate hypotheses on other possible gene involvements in electrode respiration, for example, a role of ScyA in inter-protein electron transfer and a regulatory role of the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase under anaerobic conditions. Further, we hypothesize that electrode respiration imposes a significant stress on S. oneidensis, resulting in higher energetic costs for electrode respiration than for soluble iron(III) respiration, which fosters a higher metabolic turnover to cover energy needs. Our hypotheses now require experimental verification, but this expression analysis provides a fundamental platform for further studies into the molecular mechanisms of S. oneidensis electron transfer and the physiologically special situation of growth on a poised-potential surface. PMID:22319591

  5. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Effects of charge transfer interaction of graphene with electron donor and acceptor molecules examined using Raman spectroscopy and cognate techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voggu, Rakesh; Das, Barun; Sekhar Rout, Chandra; Rao, C. N. R.

    2008-11-01

    The effects of the interaction of few-layer graphene with electron donor and acceptor molecules have been investigated by employing Raman spectroscopy, and the results compared with those from electrochemical doping. The G-band softens progressively with increasing concentration of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) which is an electron donor, while the band stiffens with increasing concentration of tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) which is an electron acceptor. Interaction with both TTF and TCNE broadens the G-band. Hole and electron doping by electrochemical means, however, stiffen and sharpen the G-band. The 2D-band position is also affected by interaction with TTF and TCNE. More importantly, the intensity of the 2D-band decreases markedly with the concentration of either. The ratio of intensities of the 2D-band and G-band decreases with an increase in TTF or TCNE concentration, and provides a means for carrier titration in the charge transfer system. Unlike the intensity of the 2D-band, that of the D-band increases on interaction with TTF or TCNE. All of these effects occur due to molecular charge transfer, also evidenced by the occurrence of charge transfer bands in the electronic absorption spectra. The electrical resistivity of graphene varies in opposite directions on interaction with TTF and TCNE, the resistivity depending on the concentration of either compound.

  6. Oxygen as Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    Like most bacteria, Escherichia coli has a flexible and branched respiratory chain that enables the prokaryote to live under a variety of environmental conditions, from highly aerobic to completely anaerobic. In general, the bacterial respiratory chain is composed of dehydrogenases, a quinone pool, and reductases. Substrate-specific dehydrogenases transfer reducing equivalents from various donor substrates (NADH, succinate, glycerophosphate, formate, hydrogen, pyruvate, and lactate) to a quinone pool (menaquinone, ubiquinone, and dimethylmenoquinone). Then electrons from reduced quinones (quinols) are transferred by terminal reductases to different electron acceptors. Under aerobic growth conditions, the terminal electron acceptor is molecular oxygen. A transfer of electrons from quinol to O₂ is served by two major oxidoreductases (oxidases), cytochrome bo₃ encoded by cyoABCDE and cytochrome bd encoded by cydABX. Terminal oxidases of aerobic respiratory chains of bacteria, which use O₂ as the final electron acceptor, can oxidize one of two alternative electron donors, either cytochrome c or quinol. This review compares the effects of different inhibitors on the respiratory activities of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd in E. coli. It also presents a discussion on the genetics and the prosthetic groups of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd. The E. coli membrane contains three types of quinones that all have an octaprenyl side chain (C₄₀). It has been proposed that the bo₃ oxidase can have two ubiquinone-binding sites with different affinities. "WHAT'S NEW" IN THE REVISED ARTICLE: The revised article comprises additional information about subunit composition of cytochrome bd and its role in bacterial resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stresses. Also, we present the novel data on the electrogenic function of appBCX-encoded cytochrome bd-II, a second bd-type oxidase that had been thought not to contribute to generation of a proton motive force in E

  7. Oxygen as Acceptor.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    Like most bacteria, Escherichia coli has a flexible and branched respiratory chain that enables the prokaryote to live under a variety of environmental conditions, from highly aerobic to completely anaerobic. In general, the bacterial respiratory chain is composed of dehydrogenases, a quinone pool, and reductases. Substrate-specific dehydrogenases transfer reducing equivalents from various donor substrates (NADH, succinate, glycerophosphate, formate, hydrogen, pyruvate, and lactate) to a quinone pool (menaquinone, ubiquinone, and dimethylmenoquinone). Then electrons from reduced quinones (quinols) are transferred by terminal reductases to different electron acceptors. Under aerobic growth conditions, the terminal electron acceptor is molecular oxygen. A transfer of electrons from quinol to O₂ is served by two major oxidoreductases (oxidases), cytochrome bo₃ encoded by cyoABCDE and cytochrome bd encoded by cydABX. Terminal oxidases of aerobic respiratory chains of bacteria, which use O₂ as the final electron acceptor, can oxidize one of two alternative electron donors, either cytochrome c or quinol. This review compares the effects of different inhibitors on the respiratory activities of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd in E. coli. It also presents a discussion on the genetics and the prosthetic groups of cytochrome bo₃ and cytochrome bd. The E. coli membrane contains three types of quinones that all have an octaprenyl side chain (C₄₀). It has been proposed that the bo₃ oxidase can have two ubiquinone-binding sites with different affinities. "WHAT'S NEW" IN THE REVISED ARTICLE: The revised article comprises additional information about subunit composition of cytochrome bd and its role in bacterial resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stresses. Also, we present the novel data on the electrogenic function of appBCX-encoded cytochrome bd-II, a second bd-type oxidase that had been thought not to contribute to generation of a proton motive force in E

  8. Tuning Optical and Electron Donor Properties by Peripheral Thio-Aryl Substitution of Subphthalocyanine: A New Series of Donor-Acceptor Hybrids for Photoinduced Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Kc, Chandra B; Lim, Gary N; D'Souza, Francis

    2016-09-01

    Subphthalocyanine (SubPc), a unique ring-reduced member of the common phthalocyanines family, although known for its higher absorptivity, reveals narrow absorption with peak maxima around 570 nm thus limiting its utility in light-energy-harvesting applications. In the present study, by peripheral thio-aryl substitution of SubPc macrocycle, the spectral properties have been modulated to extend the absorption and emission well into the visible/near-IR region. Additionally, for α-ring-substituted derivatives, facile oxidation of SubPc was witnessed, thus making these derivatives better electron donors. Next, the preparation of donor-acceptor dyads containing the well-known electron acceptor C60 connected to the central boron atom of SubPc was accomplished by making use of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Control experiments and free-energy calculations using the redox and spectral data suggested that the observed fluorescence quenching of SubPc in these dyads is due to electron transfer. Accordingly, transient spectral studies performed both in polar and nonpolar solvents conclusively proved electron transfer to be the quenching mechanism in these dyads. The measured rate constants by fitting kinetic data revealed efficient charge separation and charge recombination processes, suggesting that these dyads could be useful materials for the construction of light-to-electricity or light-to-fuel production devices. PMID:27515576

  9. (E)-2,2'dibromo-7,7'-bis(diphenylamino)-9,9' bifluorenylidene as a new electron acceptor for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, On You; Kim, Hee Un; Park, Jong Baek; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-11-01

    (E)-2,2'-Dibromo-7,7'-bis(diphenylamino)-9,9'-bifluorenylidene (BDPABF) was synthesized as a new non-fullerene-type electron acceptor for organic photovoltaic cells. The UV-visible absorption spectra of BDPABF showed two main bands at 319 and 474 nm in a chloroform solution and 320 and 481 nm as a solid thin film. The optical band gap of BDPABF was determined to be 2.34 eV by measuring the onset absorption wavelength of the solid thin film. The ionization potential of BDPABF was determined to be 5.59 eV using photoelectron spectroscopy. The measured lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy level of BDPABF was - 3.25 eV. Its electron-accepting ability was investigated through a Stern-Volmer quenching experiment. The intensity of the photoluminescence of P3HT dramatically decreased upon the addition of BDPABF. The measured Stern-Volmer quenching constant was 5.3 x 10(4) M(-1). Photovoltaic devices were fabricated using P3HT as the electron donor and BDPABF as the electron acceptor at various composition ratios. The optimized device showed a maximum power conversion efficiency of 0.27% with an open-circuit voltage of 0.71 V, short-circuit current density of 1.29 mA/cm2, and fill factor of 0.29 after thermal annealing at 100 degrees C for 5 min.

  10. Tuning Optical and Electron Donor Properties by Peripheral Thio-Aryl Substitution of Subphthalocyanine: A New Series of Donor-Acceptor Hybrids for Photoinduced Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Kc, Chandra B; Lim, Gary N; D'Souza, Francis

    2016-09-01

    Subphthalocyanine (SubPc), a unique ring-reduced member of the common phthalocyanines family, although known for its higher absorptivity, reveals narrow absorption with peak maxima around 570 nm thus limiting its utility in light-energy-harvesting applications. In the present study, by peripheral thio-aryl substitution of SubPc macrocycle, the spectral properties have been modulated to extend the absorption and emission well into the visible/near-IR region. Additionally, for α-ring-substituted derivatives, facile oxidation of SubPc was witnessed, thus making these derivatives better electron donors. Next, the preparation of donor-acceptor dyads containing the well-known electron acceptor C60 connected to the central boron atom of SubPc was accomplished by making use of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Control experiments and free-energy calculations using the redox and spectral data suggested that the observed fluorescence quenching of SubPc in these dyads is due to electron transfer. Accordingly, transient spectral studies performed both in polar and nonpolar solvents conclusively proved electron transfer to be the quenching mechanism in these dyads. The measured rate constants by fitting kinetic data revealed efficient charge separation and charge recombination processes, suggesting that these dyads could be useful materials for the construction of light-to-electricity or light-to-fuel production devices.

  11. Periplasmic Cytochrome c(3) of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Is Directly Involved in H2-Mediated Metal but Not Sulfate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic parameters and the role of cytochrome c3 in sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) reduction were investigated in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. While sulfate reduction followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km 220 uM), loss of Fe(III) and U(VI) was first-order at all concentrations tested. Initial reduction rates of all electron acceptors were similar for cells grown with H2 and sulfate, while cultures grown using lactate and sulfate had similar rates of metal loss but lower sulfate reduction activities. The similarities in metal, but not sulfate, reduction with H2 and lactate suggest divergent pathways. Respiration assays and reduced minus oxidized spectra were carried out to determine c-type cytochrome involvement in electron acceptor reduction. c-type cytochrome oxidation was immediate with Fe(III) and U(VI) in the presence of H2, lactate, or pyruvate. Sulfidogenesis occurred with all three electron donors and effectively oxidized the c-type cytochrome in lactate or pyruvate-reduced, but not H2-reduced cells. Correspondingly, electron acceptor competition assays with lactate or pyruvate as electron donors showed that Fe(III) inhibited U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) inhibited sulfate loss. However, sulfate reduction was slowed but not halted when H2 was the electron donor in the presence of Fe(III) or U(VI). U(VI) loss was still impeded by Fe(III) when H2 was used. Hence, we propose a modified pathway for the reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) which helps explain why these bacteria cannot grow using these metals. We further propose that cytochrome c3 is an electron carrier involved in lactate and pyruvate oxidation and is the reductase for alternate electron acceptors with higher redox potentials than sulfate.

  12. (Per)Chlorate-Reducing Bacteria Can Utilize Aerobic and Anaerobic Pathways of Aromatic Degradation with (Per)Chlorate as an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Loutey, Dana; Bauer, Stefan; Clark, Iain C.; Rohde, Robert A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Lucas, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathways involved in aromatic compound oxidation under perchlorate and chlorate [collectively known as (per)chlorate]-reducing conditions are poorly understood. Previous studies suggest that these are oxygenase-dependent pathways involving O2 biogenically produced during (per)chlorate respiration. Recently, we described Sedimenticola selenatireducens CUZ and Dechloromarinus chlorophilus NSS, which oxidized phenylacetate and benzoate, two key intermediates in aromatic compound catabolism, coupled to the reduction of perchlorate or chlorate, respectively, and nitrate. While strain CUZ also oxidized benzoate and phenylacetate with oxygen as an electron acceptor, strain NSS oxidized only the latter, even at a very low oxygen concentration (1%, vol/vol). Strains CUZ and NSS contain similar genes for both the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways of benzoate and phenylacetate degradation; however, the key genes (paaABCD) encoding the epoxidase of the aerobic-hybrid phenylacetate pathway were not found in either genome. By using transcriptomics and proteomics, as well as by monitoring metabolic intermediates, we investigated the utilization of the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways on different electron acceptors. For strain CUZ, the results indicated utilization of the anaerobic pathways with perchlorate and nitrate as electron acceptors and of the aerobic-hybrid pathways in the presence of oxygen. In contrast, proteomic results suggest that strain NSS may use a combination of the anaerobic and aerobic-hybrid pathways when growing on phenylacetate with chlorate. Though microbial (per)chlorate reduction produces molecular oxygen through the dismutation of chlorite (ClO2−), this study demonstrates that anaerobic pathways for the degradation of aromatics can still be utilized by these novel organisms. PMID:25805732

  13. High open circuit voltage organic photovoltaic cells fabricated using 9,9'-bifluorenylidene as a non-fullerene type electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Un; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Suh, Hongsuk; Kwak, Jeonghun; Kim, Dongwook; Grimsdale, Andrew C; Yoon, Sung Cheol; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    We have found that 9,9'BF can be used as an electron acceptor for P3HT-based OPVs while similar devices using 4,4'BP do not show any photovoltaic effect. This can be related to the respective aromaticity and antiaromaticity of the reduced forms of 9,9'BF or 4,4'BP. The OPV device fabricated using P3HT and 9,9'BF exhibited a PCE of 2.28% with a V(oc) of 1.07 V, a J(sc) of 5.04 mA cm(-2), and a FF of 0.42.

  14. Reduction of electron accumulation at InN(0001) surfaces via saturation of surface states by potassium and oxygen as donor- or acceptor-type adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhardt, A.; Reiß, S.; Krischok, S. Himmerlich, M.

    2014-01-28

    The influence of selected donor- and acceptor-type adsorbates on the electronic properties of InN(0001) surfaces is investigated implementing in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The changes in work function, surface band alignment, and chemical bond configurations are characterized during deposition of potassium and exposure to oxygen. Although an expected opponent charge transfer characteristic is observed with potassium donating its free electron to InN, while dissociated oxygen species extract partial charge from the substrate, a reduction of the surface electron accumulation occurs in both cases. This observation can be explained by adsorbate-induced saturation of free dangling bonds at the InN resulting in the disappearance of surface states, which initially pin the Fermi level and induce downward band bending.

  15. Systematic Investigations on the Roles of the Electron Acceptor and Neighboring Ethynylene Moiety in Porphyrins for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tiantian; Sun, Xi; Li, Xin; Ågren, Hans; Xie, Yongshu

    2015-10-01

    Cyanoacrylic and carboxyl groups have been developed as the most extensively used electron acceptor and anchoring group for the design of sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells. In terms of the photoelectric conversion efficiency, each of them has been demonstrated to be superior to the other one in certain cases. Herein, to further understand the effect of these two groups on cell efficiencies, a series of porphyrin sensitizers were designed and synthesized, with the acceptors systematically varied, and the effect of the neighboring ethynylene unit was also investigated. Compared with the sensitizer XW5 which contains a carboxyphenyl anchoring moiety directly linked to the meso-position of the porphyrin framework, the separate introduction of a strongly electron-withdrawing cyanoacrylic acid as the anchoring group or the insertion of an ethynylene unit can achieve broadened light absorption and IPCE response, resulting in higher Jsc and higher efficiency. Thus, compared with the efficiency of 4.77% for XW5, dyes XW1 and XW6 exhibit higher efficiencies of 7.09% and 5.92%, respectively. Simultaneous introduction of the cyanoacrylic acid and the ethynylene units into XW7 can further broaden light absorption and thus further improve the Jsc. However, XW7 exhibits the lowest Voc value, which is not only related to the floppy structure of the cyanoacrylic group but also related to the aggravated dye aggregation effect due to the extended framework. As a result, XW7 exhibits a relatively low efficiency of 5.75%. These results indicate that the combination of the ethynylene and cyanoacrylic groups is an unsuccessful approach. To address this problem, a cyano substituent was introduced to XW8 at the ortho position of the carboxyl group in the carboxyphenyl acceptor. Thus, XW8 exhibits the highest efficiency of 7.59% among these dyes. Further cosensitization of XW8 with XS3 dramatically improved the efficiency to 9.31%.

  16. Bi-induced acceptor level responsible for partial compensation of native free electron density in InP1-x Bi x dilute bismide alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelczuk, Łukasz; Stokowski, Hubert; Kopaczek, Jan; Zhang, Liyao; Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Kai; Wang, Peng; Wang, Shumin; Kudrawiec, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been applied to study electron and hole traps in InPBi alloys with 2.2 and 2.4% Bi grown by molecular beam epitaxy. One donor-like trap with the activation energy of 0.45-0.47 eV and one acceptor-like trap with activation energy of 0.08 eV have been identified in DLTS measurements. For the reference sample (InP grown at the same temperature), the deep donor trap has also been observed, while the acceptor trap was not detected. According to the literature, the deep donor level found in InP(Bi) at 0.45-0.47 eV below the conduction band has been attributed to the isolated PIn defect, while the second trap, which is observed only for Bi containing samples at 0.08 eV above the valence band can be attributed to Bi clusters in InPBi. This acceptor level was proposed to be responsible for the observed partial compensation of native free electron density in InPBi layers. It is also shown that the deep donor traps are active in photoluminescence (PL). A strong radiative recombination between donor traps and the valence band are observed in PL spectra at energy 0.6-0.8 eV, i.e. ~0.47 eV below the energy gap of InPBi, which is determined by contactless electroreflectance.

  17. Systematic Investigations on the Roles of the Electron Acceptor and Neighboring Ethynylene Moiety in Porphyrins for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tiantian; Sun, Xi; Li, Xin; Ågren, Hans; Xie, Yongshu

    2015-10-01

    Cyanoacrylic and carboxyl groups have been developed as the most extensively used electron acceptor and anchoring group for the design of sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells. In terms of the photoelectric conversion efficiency, each of them has been demonstrated to be superior to the other one in certain cases. Herein, to further understand the effect of these two groups on cell efficiencies, a series of porphyrin sensitizers were designed and synthesized, with the acceptors systematically varied, and the effect of the neighboring ethynylene unit was also investigated. Compared with the sensitizer XW5 which contains a carboxyphenyl anchoring moiety directly linked to the meso-position of the porphyrin framework, the separate introduction of a strongly electron-withdrawing cyanoacrylic acid as the anchoring group or the insertion of an ethynylene unit can achieve broadened light absorption and IPCE response, resulting in higher Jsc and higher efficiency. Thus, compared with the efficiency of 4.77% for XW5, dyes XW1 and XW6 exhibit higher efficiencies of 7.09% and 5.92%, respectively. Simultaneous introduction of the cyanoacrylic acid and the ethynylene units into XW7 can further broaden light absorption and thus further improve the Jsc. However, XW7 exhibits the lowest Voc value, which is not only related to the floppy structure of the cyanoacrylic group but also related to the aggravated dye aggregation effect due to the extended framework. As a result, XW7 exhibits a relatively low efficiency of 5.75%. These results indicate that the combination of the ethynylene and cyanoacrylic groups is an unsuccessful approach. To address this problem, a cyano substituent was introduced to XW8 at the ortho position of the carboxyl group in the carboxyphenyl acceptor. Thus, XW8 exhibits the highest efficiency of 7.59% among these dyes. Further cosensitization of XW8 with XS3 dramatically improved the efficiency to 9.31%. PMID:26355437

  18. Spectral investigations of multiple charge transfer complex of p-nitrophenol as an electron acceptor with donor p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, A.; Khan, I. M.; Ahmad, A.

    2011-10-01

    The convincing evidence have been given that both the interactions π-π and π-π* (between p-nitrophenol ( p-NTP) and p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde ( p-DAB)) are simultaneously involved. This has been established by using IR spectrometry. Association constant K evaluated by the method of Foster under the condition [A]0 = [D]0 with apply in this equation, [A]0/ A = 1/ Kɛλ[D]0 + 2/ɛλ, where [A]0 is the initial concentration of acceptor equal to [D]0, A is the absorbance of the complex at λ, K is the association constant, and ɛλ is the molar absorptivity of the complex at λ. In the IR spectral studies of several related organic compounds, one comes to the conclusion that p-NTP shows a broad band centred at 1600 cm-1 and to nitro asymmetric stretching vibrations. In the complex while the 1500 cm-1 band remains without shift, the broad band localized at 1600 cm-1 shift to 1610 cm-1. A shift of 10 cm-1 shows weak interactions. Studies on molecular complexes of organ metallic donors and acceptors are of very recent origin. Though alkyl donors have been extensively studied, very few studies have appeared on aryl donors.

  19. Production of electrically-conductive nanoscale filaments by sulfate-reducing bacteria in the microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Eaktasang, Numfon; Kang, Christina S; Lim, Heejun; Kwean, Oh Sung; Cho, Suyeon; Kim, Yohan; Kim, Han S

    2016-06-01

    This study reports that the obligate anaerobic microorganism, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a predominant sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) in soils and sediments, can produce nanoscale bacterial appendages for extracellular electron transfer. These nanofilaments were electrically-conductive (5.81S·m(-1)) and allowed SRBs to directly colonize the surface of insoluble or solid electron acceptors. Thus, the direct extracellular electron transfer to the insoluble electrode in the microbial fuel cell (MFC) was possible without inorganic electron-shuttling mediators. The production of nanofilaments was stimulated when only insoluble electron acceptors were available for cellular respiration. These results suggest that when availability of a soluble electron acceptor for SRBs (SO4(2-)) is limited, D. desulfuricans initiates the production of conductive nanofilaments as an alternative strategy to transfer electrons to insoluble electron acceptors. The findings of this study contribute to understanding of the role of SRBs in the biotransformation of various substances in soils and sediments and in the MFC.

  20. Electron acceptor-dependent identification of key anaerobic toluene degraders at a tar-oil-contaminated aquifer by Pyro-SIP.

    PubMed

    Pilloni, Giovanni; von Netzer, Frederick; Engel, Marion; Lueders, Tillmann

    2011-10-01

    Bioavailability of electron acceptors is probably the most limiting factor in the restoration of anoxic, contaminated environments. The oxidation of contaminants such as aromatic hydrocarbons, particularly in aquifers, often depends on the reduction of ferric iron or sulphate. We have previously detected a highly active fringe zone beneath a toluene plume at a tar-oil-contaminated aquifer in Germany, where a specialized community of contaminant degraders codominated by Desulfobulbaceae and Geobacteraceae had established. Although on-site geochemistry links degradation to sulphidogenic processes, dominating catabolic (benzylsuccinate synthase α-subunit, bssA) genes detected in situ appeared to be more related to those of Geobacter spp. Therefore, a stable isotope probing (SIP) incubation of sediment samples with (13)C(7)-toluene and comparative electron acceptor amendment was performed. We introduce pyrosequencing of templates from SIP microcosms as a powerful new strategy in SIP gradient interpretation (Pyro-SIP). Our results reveal the central role of Desulfobulbaceae in sulphidogenic toluene degradation in situ, and affiliate the detected bssA genes to this lineage. This and the absence of (13)C-labelled DNA of Geobacter spp. in SIP gradients preclude their relevance as toluene degraders in situ. In contrast, Betaproteobacteria related to Georgfuchsia spp. became labelled under iron-reducing conditions. Furthermore, secondary toluene degraders belonging to the Peptococcaceae detected in both treatments suggest the possibility of functional redundancy among anaerobic toluene degraders on site.

  1. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants selected for their inability to produce soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes are unable to respire Fe(III) as anaerobic electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morris E; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J; Taillefert, Martial

    2010-04-01

    Recent voltammetric analyses indicate that Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 produces soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes during anaerobic respiration of sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. Results of the present study expand the range of Shewanella species capable of producing soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes to include Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Soluble organic-Fe(III) was produced by S. oneidensis cultures incubated anaerobically with Fe(III) oxides, or with Fe(III) oxides and the alternate electron acceptor fumarate, but not in the presence of O(2), nitrate or trimethylamine-N-oxide. Chemical mutagenesis procedures were combined with a novel MicroElectrode Screening Array (MESA) to identify four (designated Sol) mutants with impaired ability to produce soluble organic-Fe(III) during anaerobic respiration of Fe(III) oxides. Two of the Sol mutants were deficient in anaerobic growth on both soluble Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III) oxide, yet retained the ability to grow on a suite of seven alternate electron acceptors. The rates of soluble organic-Fe(III) production were proportional to the rates of iron reduction by the S. oneidensis wild-type and Sol mutant strains, and all four Sol mutants retained wild-type siderophore production capability. Results of this study indicate that the production of soluble organic-Fe(III) may be an important intermediate step in the anaerobic respiration of both soluble and sparingly soluble forms of Fe(III) by S. oneidensis.

  2. Repurpose terbutaline sulfate for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Hyojung; Chung, Ah-Young; Park, Hae-Chul; Park, Rae Woong; Suk, Kyoungho; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Hyosil; Lee, KiYoung; Butte, Atul J.

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of new disease indications for approved drugs by computational methods has been based largely on the genomics signatures of drugs and diseases. We propose a method for drug repositioning that uses the clinical signatures extracted from over 13 years of electronic medical records from a tertiary hospital, including >9.4 M laboratory tests from >530,000 patients, in addition to diverse genomics signatures. Cross-validation using over 17,000 known drug–disease associations shows this approach outperforms various predictive models based on genomics signatures and a well-known “guilt-by-association” method. Interestingly, the prediction suggests that terbutaline sulfate, which is widely used for asthma, is a promising candidate for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis for which there are few therapeutic options. In vivo tests using zebrafish models found that terbutaline sulfate prevents defects in axons and neuromuscular junction degeneration in a dose-dependent manner. A therapeutic potential of terbutaline sulfate was also observed when axonal and neuromuscular junction degeneration have already occurred in zebrafish model. Cotreatment with a β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, butoxamine, suggests that the effect of terbutaline is mediated by activation of β2-adrenergic receptors. PMID:25739475

  3. Electronic structure and normal vibrations of the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate ion pair.

    PubMed

    Dhumal, Nilesh R; Kim, Hyung J; Kiefer, Johannes

    2011-04-21

    Electronic and structural properties of the ion pair 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate are studied using density functional methods. Three locally stable conformers of the ion pair complex are considered to analyze molecular interactions between its cation and anion. Manifestations of these interactions in the vibrational spectra are discussed and compared with experimental IR and Raman spectroscopy data. NBO analysis and difference electron density coupled with molecular electron density topography are used to interpret the frequency shifts of the normal vibrations of the ion pair, compared to the free anion and cation. Excitation energies of low-lying singlet excited states of the conformers are also studied. The density functional theory results are found to be in a reasonable agreement with experimental UV/vis absorption spectra.

  4. C20H4(C4F8)3: A Fluorine-Containing Annulated Corannulene that Is a Better Electron Acceptor Than C60

    SciTech Connect

    Kuvychko, Igor V.; Dubceac, Cristina; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.; Granovsky, Alexander A.; Popov, Alexey A.; Petrukhina, Marina A.; Strauss, Steven H.; Boltalina, Olga V.

    2013-07-15

    There has been increased interest in the design and applications of small polyaromatic molecules for energy conversion and storage, organic transistors and OLEDs, and other emerging areas of modern technology.[1] In particular, functionalized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were shown to demonstrate excellent electrical mobilities, in organic thin-film transistors, in some cases even under ambient conditions.[2] It has been suggested that air stability of such organic materials is correlated with their electronic properties, and more specifically, with a high electron affinity.[3] Until recently, geodesic PAHs, such as corannulene[4] or sumanene[5] and their numerous derivatives have not been seriously considered for optoelectronic applications because (i) they typically possess very low electron affinities (e.g., EA(C20H10) = 0.5(1) eV),[6] and (ii) laborious multistep syntheses with moderate-to-low yields made them practically unavailable for such studies.[7] Although the low availability of sumanene remains unchanged, significant progress has been made lately in the large-scale synthesis of corannulene.[8] Furthermore, our recent work demonstrated that functionalization of corannulene molecule with electron withdrawing groups (EWGs) results in drastic enhancement of its electron acceptor properties.[9] In particular, for trifluoromethylated derivative C20H5(CF3)5, a 950 mV positive shift in the reduction potential relative to the parent C20H10 was measured. We also predicted that other EWGs, including halogen atoms or cyanide group, could be used to enhance electron affinity of corannulene. Nearly linear correlation between the number of EWGs and the electron affinity (reduction potential) of the corresponding EWG-substituted corannulene molecules that was demonstrated by our DFT calculations, and, more recently, confirmed for C20H10-x(CF3)x=2,3,[10] provides a good tool for design of the molecules with desired electronic properties. Here, we report the

  5. Electronic energy and electron transfer processes in photoexcited donor-acceptor dyad and triad molecular systems based on triphenylene and perylene diimide units.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Woo, J H; Kim, E; Xiao, Y; Su, X; Mazur, L M; Attias, A-J; Fages, F; Cregut, O; Barsella, A; Mathevet, F; Mager, L; Wu, J W; D'Aléo, A; Ribierre, J-C

    2016-03-21

    We investigate the photophysical properties of organic donor-acceptor dyad and triad molecular systems based on triphenylene and perylene diimide units linked by a non-conjugated flexible bridge in solution using complementary optical spectroscopy techniques. When these molecules are diluted in dichloromethane solution, energy transfer from the triphenylene to the perylene diimide excited moieties is evidenced by time-resolved fluorescence measurements resulting in a quenching of the emission from the triphenylene moieties. Simultaneously, another quenching process that affects the emission from both donor and acceptor units is observed. Solution ultrafast transient absorption measurements provide evidence of photo-induced charge transfer from either the donor or the acceptor depending upon the excitation. Overall, the analysis of the detailed time-resolved spectroscopic measurements carried out in the dyad and triad systems as well as in the triphenylene and perylene diimide units alone provides useful information both to better understand the relations between energy and charge transfer processes with molecular structures, and for the design of future functional dyad and triad architectures based on donor and acceptor moieties for organic optoelectronic applications. PMID:26911420

  6. Preparation, spectroscopic and structural studies on charge-transfer complexes of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline with some electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.; Wagner, Christoph; Teleb, Said M.; Nour, El-Metwally; Elmosallamy, M. A. F.; Kaluđerović, Goran N.; Schmidt, Harry; Steinborn, Dirk

    2008-03-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) complexes formed in the reactions of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me 2phen) with some acceptors such as chloranil (Chl), picric acid (HPA) and chloranilic acid (H 2CA) have been studied in the defined solvent at room temperature. Based on elemental analysis and infrared spectra of the solid CT-complexes along with the photometric titration curves for the reactions, obtained data indicate the formation of 1:1 charge-transfer complexes [(Me 2phen)(Chl)] ( 1), [(Me 2phenH)(PA)] ( 2) and [(Me 2phenH)(HCA)] ( 3), respectively, was proposed. In the three complexes, infrared and 1H NMR spectroscopic data indicate a charge-transfer interaction and as far as complexes 2 and 3 are concerned this interaction is associated with a hydrogen bonding. The formation constants for the complexes ( KC) were shown to be dependent upon the nature of the electron acceptors used. The X-ray structure of complex 3 indicate the formation of dimeric units [Me 2phenH] 2[(HCA) 2] in which the two anions (HCA) - are connected by two O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds whereas the cations and anions are joined together by strong three-center (bifurcated) N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, the cations are arranged in a π-π stacking.

  7. Density functional study of the electronic structure of dye-functionalized fullerenes and their model donor-acceptor complexes containing P3HT.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Tunna; Garnica, Amanda; Paggen, Marina; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R

    2016-04-14

    We study the electronic structure of C60 fullerenes functionalized with a thiophene-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole-thiophene based chromophore using density functional theory combined with large polarized basis sets. As the attached chromophore has electron donor character, the functionalization of the fullerene leads to a donor-acceptor (DA) system. We examine in detail the effect of the linker and the addition site on the electronic structure of the functionalized fullerenes. We further study the electronic structure of these DA complexes with a focus on the charge transfer excitations. Finally, we examine the interface of the functionalized fullerenes with the widely used poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) donor. Our results show that all functionalized fullerenes with an exception of the C60-pyrrolidine [6,6], where the pyrrolidine is attached at a [6,6] site, have larger electron affinities relative to the pristine C60 fullerene. We also estimate the quasi-particle gap, lowest charge transfer excitation energy, and the exciton binding energies of the functionalized fullerene-P3MT model systems. Results show that the exciton binding energies in these model complexes are slightly smaller compared to a similarly prepared phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-P3MT complex.

  8. Density functional study of the electronic structure of dye-functionalized fullerenes and their model donor-acceptor complexes containing P3HT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Tunna; Garnica, Amanda; Paggen, Marina; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.

    2016-04-01

    We study the electronic structure of C60 fullerenes functionalized with a thiophene-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole-thiophene based chromophore using density functional theory combined with large polarized basis sets. As the attached chromophore has electron donor character, the functionalization of the fullerene leads to a donor-acceptor (DA) system. We examine in detail the effect of the linker and the addition site on the electronic structure of the functionalized fullerenes. We further study the electronic structure of these DA complexes with a focus on the charge transfer excitations. Finally, we examine the interface of the functionalized fullerenes with the widely used poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) donor. Our results show that all functionalized fullerenes with an exception of the C60-pyrrolidine [6,6], where the pyrrolidine is attached at a [6,6] site, have larger electron affinities relative to the pristine C60 fullerene. We also estimate the quasi-particle gap, lowest charge transfer excitation energy, and the exciton binding energies of the functionalized fullerene-P3MT model systems. Results show that the exciton binding energies in these model complexes are slightly smaller compared to a similarly prepared phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-P3MT complex.

  9. Photochromic and electrochromic performances of new types of donor/acceptor systems based on crosslinked polyviologen film and electron donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-ping; Ding, Guo-jing; Li, Chao-long; Wang, Yue-chuan

    2011-01-01

    Viologen-functionalized copolymer COPV2+ was synthesized by copolymer graft-modified, which was crosslinked by NH3·H2O gas-fumigated at 25 °C for 4 h due to the condensation of the siloxanes of COPV2+ film. Simultaneously, different donor/acceptor systems had been prepared based on crosslinked polyviologen film (COPV2+) and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (TMPD) or hydroxyethylferrocene (HEFc) in order to shorten the response times and improve contrast ratios in response to external photo- and potential stimuli. The evolution of structures from COPO to COPV2+ is carefully characterized. The COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films exhibited both photochromic and electrochromic performances. After UV irradiations, COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films changed their colors from colorless to deep blue, while optical transmissions at 610 nm decreased about 64% and 75%, respectively. When removing out from UV irradiation, the colored COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films faded to the original colors within about 60 min. When COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films were biased with negative voltage of -2.5 V, they changed their colors from colorless to deep blue in 4 s and 3 s, while the optical transmissions at 556 nm decreased about 81% and 75%, respectively. When electric impulse was switched off, the colored COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films faded to the original colors within about 7 s and 6 s, respectively.

  10. A pulsed electron beam synthesis of PEDOT conducting polymers by using sulfate radicals as oxidizing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletta, Cecilia; Cui, Zhenpeng; Dazzi, Alexandre; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Néron, Stéphane; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Remita, Samy

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an original radiolytic method, based on pulsed electron beam irradiation, is used for the synthesis of conducting PEDOT in an aqueous solution containing EDOT monomers in the presence of potassium persulfate, K2S2O8, at 0 °C. At this low temperature, EDOT monomers are not chemically oxidized by S2O82- anions, initiating PEDOT polymerization, but are rather oxidized by sulfate radicals, SO4•-, which are radiolytically generated by the reaction of solvated electrons, produced by water radiolysis, with persulfate anions. Successfully, as demonstrated by UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, irradiating the aqueous solution, by using a series of accumulated electron pulses, enables complete EDOT oxidation and quantitative in situ PEDOT polymerization through a step-by-step oxidation mechanism. The morphology of PEDOT polymers, mixed with unreacted K2S2O8 salt, is characterized by Cryo-TEM microscopy in aqueous solution and by SEM after deposition. Successfully, in the absence of any washing step, high resolution AFM microscopy, coupled with infrared nanospectroscopy, is used to discriminate between the organic polymers and the inorganic salt and to probe the local chemical composition of PEDOT nanostructures. The results demonstrate that PEDOT polymers form globular self-assembled nanostructures which preferentially adsorb onto unreacted K2S2O8 solid nanoplates. The present results first demonstrate the efficiency of sulfate radicals as oxidizing species for the preparation of nanostructured PEDOT polymers and second highlight the promising potentiality of electron accelerators in the field of conducting polymers synthesis.

  11. Effects of acceptor-donor complexes on electronic structure properties in co-doped TiO2: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cai, L. L.; Yuan, X. B.; Hu, G. C.; Ren, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the doping effects induced by impurity complexes on the electronic structures of anatase TiO2 based on the density functional theory. Mono-doping and co-doping effects are discussed separately. The results show that the impurity doping can make the band-edges shift. The induced defect levels in the band gaps by impurity doping reduce the band gap predominantly. The compensated acceptor-donor pairs in the co-doped TiO2 will improve the photoelectrochemical activity. From the calculations, it is also found that (S+Zr)-co-doped TiO2 has the ideal band gap and band edge, at the same time, the binding energy is higher than other systems, so (S+Zr)-co-doping in TiO2 is more promise in photoelectrochemical experiments.

  12. (Dibenzoylmethanato)boron difluoride derivatives containing triphenylamine moieties: a new type of electron-donor/π-acceptor system for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Yisilamu, Yilihamu; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Tomura, Masaaki; Funaki, Takashi; Sugihara, Hideki; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2014-10-01

    (Dibenzoylmethanato)boron difluoride derivatives containing triphenylamine moieties were synthesized as a new type of electron-donor/π-acceptor system. These new compounds exhibited long-wavelength absorptions in the UV/Vis spectra, and reversible oxidation and reduction waves in cyclic voltammetry experiments. Their amphoteric redox properties are based on their resonance hybrid forms, in which a positive charge is delocalized on the triphenylamine moieties and a negative charge is localized on the boron atoms. Molecular orbital (MO) calculations indicate that their HOMO and LUMO energies vary with the number of phenylene rings connected to the difluoroboron-chelating ring. This is useful for optimizing the HOMO and LUMO levels to an iodine redox (I(-)/I3(-)) potential and a titanium dioxide conduction band, respectively. Dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated by using these compounds as dye sensitizers exhibited solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies of 2.7-4.4 % under AM 1.5 solar light.

  13. Photoinduced intercomponent excited-state decays in a molecular dyad made of a dinuclear rhenium(I) chromophore and a fullerene electron acceptor unit.

    PubMed

    Nastasi, Francesco; Puntoriero, Fausto; Natali, Mirco; Mba, Miriam; Maggini, Michele; Mussini, Patrizia; Panigati, Monica; Campagna, Sebastiano

    2015-05-01

    A novel molecular dyad, 1, made of a dinuclear {[Re2(μ-X)2(CO)6(μ-pyridazine)]} component covalently-linked to a fullerene unit by a carbocyclic molecular bridge has been prepared and its redox, spectroscopic, and photophysical properties - including pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared region - have been investigated, along with those of its model species. Photoinduced, intercomponent electron transfer occurs in 1 from the thermally-equilibrated, triplet metal/ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)MLLCT) state of the dinuclear rhenium(I) subunit to the fullerene acceptor, with a time constant of about 100 ps. The so-formed triplet charge-separated state recombines in a few nanoseconds by a spin-selective process yielding, rather than the ground state, the locally-excited, triplet fullerene state, which finally decays to the ground state by intersystem crossing in about 290 ns.

  14. Electron Acceptors Induce Secretion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin under Anaerobic Conditions through Promotion of GspD Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Jin, Faguang

    2016-10-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), the major virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), can lead to severe diarrhea and promotes ETEC adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. Most previous in vitro studies focused on ETEC pathogenesis were conducted under aerobic conditions, which do not reflect the real situation of ETEC infection because the intestine is anoxic. In this study, the expression and secretion of LT under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions were determined; LT was not efficiently secreted into the supernatant under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions unless terminal electron acceptors (trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate [TMAO] or nitrate) were available. Furthermore, we found that the restoration effects of TMAO and nitrate on LT secretion could be inhibited by amytal or ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG E. coli strains, indicating that LT secretion under anaerobic conditions was dependent on the integrity of the respiratory chain. At the same time, electron acceptors increase the ATP level of ETEC, but this increase was not the main reason for LT secretion. Subsequently, the relationship between the integrity of the respiratory chain and the function of the type II secretion system was determined. The GspD protein, the secretin of ETEC, was assembled under anaerobic conditions and was accompanied by LT secretion when TMAO or nitrate was added. Our data also demonstrated that TMAO and nitrate could not induce the GspD assembly and LT secretion in ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG strains, respectively. Moreover, GspD assembly under anaerobic conditions was assisted by the pilot protein YghG.

  15. Electron Acceptors Induce Secretion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin under Anaerobic Conditions through Promotion of GspD Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Jin, Faguang

    2016-10-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), the major virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), can lead to severe diarrhea and promotes ETEC adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. Most previous in vitro studies focused on ETEC pathogenesis were conducted under aerobic conditions, which do not reflect the real situation of ETEC infection because the intestine is anoxic. In this study, the expression and secretion of LT under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions were determined; LT was not efficiently secreted into the supernatant under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions unless terminal electron acceptors (trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate [TMAO] or nitrate) were available. Furthermore, we found that the restoration effects of TMAO and nitrate on LT secretion could be inhibited by amytal or ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG E. coli strains, indicating that LT secretion under anaerobic conditions was dependent on the integrity of the respiratory chain. At the same time, electron acceptors increase the ATP level of ETEC, but this increase was not the main reason for LT secretion. Subsequently, the relationship between the integrity of the respiratory chain and the function of the type II secretion system was determined. The GspD protein, the secretin of ETEC, was assembled under anaerobic conditions and was accompanied by LT secretion when TMAO or nitrate was added. Our data also demonstrated that TMAO and nitrate could not induce the GspD assembly and LT secretion in ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG strains, respectively. Moreover, GspD assembly under anaerobic conditions was assisted by the pilot protein YghG. PMID:27430271

  16. Dynamics of methane production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Westermann, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1987-10-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition of poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses.

  17. Influence of Bicarbonate, Sulfate, and Electron Donors on Biological reduction of Uranium and Microbial Community Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wensui; Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Weimin; Yan, Tingfen; Criddle, Craig; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2007-01-01

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 mM or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and geoundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction.

  18. Sulfate and organic carbon removal by microbial fuel cell with sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfide-oxidising bacteria anodic biofilm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Liu, Xiang; Weng, Hsiang-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Biological sulfur removal can be achieved by reducing sulfate to sulfide with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and then oxidising sulfide to elemental sulfur (S(0)) with sulfide oxidising bacteria (SOB) for recovery. In sulfate-carbon wastewaters lacking electron acceptor for sulfide, excess sulfide will be produced and accumulated in the reactor. This study applied the microbial fuel cell (MFC) cultivated with the SRB+SOB anodic biofilm for treating the sulfate+organic carbon wastewaters. Excess sulfate ions were efficiently converted to sulfide by SRB cells in the biofilm, while the formed sulfide was diffused to the neighboring SOB cells to be irreversibly converted to S(0) with produced electrons being transferred to the anode. The cell-cell sulfide transport principally determined the electron flux of the MFC. Short diffusional distance of sulfide ions between cells significantly reduced the polarization resistances, hence enhancing performance of the MFC.

  19. Bidirectional sulfate diffusion in saline-lake sediments: Evidence from Devils Lake, northeast North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Komor, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic gradients in pore water in Devils Lake indicate that maximum rates of sulfate reduction occur between 1 and 3 cm depth in the bottom sediments. Dissolved sulfate diffuses into the sulfate-reduction zone upward from deeply buried saline pore water at an average rate of 1.4 x 10-5 μmol ⋅ cm-2 ⋅ s-1, and downward from the overlying water column at an average rate of 2.4 x 10-5 μmol ⋅ cm-2 ⋅ s-1. The result is a bidirectional flux of sulfate into the sulfate-reduction zone. Upward-diffusing sulfate provides a ready supply of electron acceptors for sulfate-reducing bacteria even at fairly great depths in the sediments. The abundance of electron acceptors enables sulfate-reducing bacteria to outcompete methanogenic bacteria for organic material and thereby suppress methane production. Suppression of methanogenesis may be widespread in sulfate-rich lakes and wetlands and may limit methane fluxes from these water bodies to the atmosphere.

  20. Enrichment and identification of biosurfactant-producing oil field microbiota utilizing electron acceptors other than oxygen and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Kryachko, Yuriy; Semler, Diana; Vogrinetz, John; Lemke, Markus; Links, Matthew G; McCarthy, E Luke; Haug, Brenda; Hemmingsen, Sean M

    2016-08-10

    Microorganisms indigenous to an oil reservoir were grown in media containing either sucrose or proteins in four steel vessels under anoxic conditions at 30°C and 8.3MPa for 30days, to enrich biosurfactant producers. Fermentation of substrate was possible in the protein-containing medium and either fermentation or respiration through reduction of sulfate occurred in the sucrose-containing medium. Growth of microorganisms led to 3.4-5.4-fold surface tension reduction indicating production of biosurfactants in amounts sufficient for enhancement of gas-driven oil recovery. Analysis of sequenced cpn60 amplicons showed that Pseudomonas sp. highly similar to biosurfactant producing P. fluorescens and to Pseudomonas sp. strain TKP predominated, and a bacterium highly similar to biosurfactant producing Bacillus mojavensis was present in vessels. Analysis of 16S rDNA amplicons allowed only genus-level identification of these bacteria. Thus, cpn60-amplicon analysis was a more relevant tool for identification of putative biosurfactant producers than 16S rDNA-amplicon analysis.

  1. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers.

    PubMed

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-02-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device.

  2. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers

    PubMed Central

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device. PMID:26933691

  3. Theoretical characterization of photoinduced electron transfer in rigidly linked donor-acceptor molecules: the fragment charge difference and the generalized Mulliken-Hush schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sheng-Jui; Chen, Hung-Cheng; You, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Kuan-Lin; Chow, Tahsin J.; Chen, I.-Chia; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2010-10-01

    We calculate the electron transfer (ET) rates for a series of heptacyclo[6.6.0.02,6.03,13.014,11.05,9.010,14]-tetradecane (HCTD) linked donor-acceptor molecules. The electronic coupling factor was calculated by the fragment charge difference (FCD) [19] and the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) schemes [20]. We found that the FCD is less prone to problems commonly seen in the GMH scheme, especially when the coupling values are small. For a 3-state case where the charge transfer (CT) state is coupled with two different locally excited (LE) states, we tested with the 3-state approach for the GMH scheme [30], and found that it works well with the FCD scheme. A simplified direct diagonalization based on Rust's 3-state scheme was also proposed and tested. This simplified scheme does not require a manual assignment of the states, and it yields coupling values that are largely similar to those from the full Rust's approach. The overall electron transfer (ET) coupling rates were also calculated.

  4. Synthesis, and spectroscopic studies of charge transfer complex of 1,2-dimethylimidazole as an electron donor with π-acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol in different polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyan, Lal; Khan, Ishaat M.; Ahmad, Afaq

    2015-07-01

    The charge transfer (CT) complex of 1,2-dimethylimidazole (DMI) as an electron donor with π acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol (DNN) has been studied spectrophotometrically in different solvents like chloroform, acetonitrile, methanol, methylene chloride, etc. at room temperature. The CT complex which is formed through the transfer of lone pair electrons from DMI to DNN exhibits well resolved CT bands and the regions of these bands were remarkably different from those of the donor and acceptor. The stoichiometry of the CT complex was found to be 1:1 by a straight-line method between donor and acceptor with maximum absorption bands. The novel CT complex has been characterized by FTIR, TGA-DTA, powder XRD, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. The Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been used to determine the formation constant (KCT), molar extinction coefficient (εCT), standard gibbs free energy (ΔG°) and other physical parameters of the CT complex. The formation constant recorded higher values and molar extinction coefficient recorded lower values in chloroform compared with methylene chloride, methanol and acetonitrile, confirming the strong interaction between the molecular orbital's of donor and acceptor in the ground state in less polar solvent. This CT complex has been studied by absorption spectra of donor 1,2-dimethylimidazole (DMI) and acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol (DNN) by using the spectrophotometric technique in various solvents at room temperature.

  5. Soluble Iron as an In Situ Indicator of the Redox State of Humic Substances in Arctic Soil: Implications for Seasonal Regeneration of Oxidized Terminal Electron Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, D.; Zlamal, J. E.; Srinivas, A. J.; Raab, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ferric iron (Fe(III)) and humic substances (HS) are important terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration in wet tundra soils of the Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, Alaska. These soils are rich in both solid phase Fe minerals (including oxides such as ferrihydrite and goethite and other minerals with reduced or mixed valence such as siderite and magnetite) and soluble Fe, chelated by siderophores and other small organic molecules. This latter pool may also include nanocolloidal Fe: extremely fine-grained minerals that pass through a 0.2 micron filter. Both the solid phase and aqueous Fe pools undergo seasonal changes in redox state as a result of biological reduction by Fe-reducing microorganisms and oxidation by a variety of potential mechanisms, both abiotic and biotic. These redox cycles of solid and aqueous pools are not in phase: solid phase Fe became progressively more reduced from mid- to late summer, while aqueous phase Fe became reduced over the first half of the summer. It is well-known that HS interact with Fe, and that HS can act as electron shuttles in the reduction of Fe oxides. In other ecosystems chelated Fe(III) has been incubated with soil samples and the resulting Fe(II) produced is used as an indicator of the reducing power of HS. In these Fe-rich Arctic soils, HS are continuously in contact with chelated Fe, and therefore we interpret the redox state of this pool as an indicator of HS redox status. To verify this we conducted redox titrations of extracted HS with both reduced and oxidized Fe chelates and showed that chelated Fe could interact with HS both as electron acceptor and donator. In a field experiment, the addition of oxidized humic acids to soils resulted in an immediate oxidation of the aqueous Fe pool within 24 hours, which we attribute to abiotic oxidation of Fe by HS, followed by a slow reduction of this pool over the next week, presumably due to biological Fe reduction of the HS/aqueous Fe pool. At the end of summer

  6. Metabolic flexibility of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Plugge, Caroline M; Zhang, Weiwen; Scholten, Johannes C M; Stams, Alfons J M

    2011-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRB) are a very diverse group of anaerobic bacteria that are omnipresent in nature and play an imperative role in the global cycling of carbon and sulfur. In anoxic marine sediments sulfate reduction accounts for up to 50% of the entire organic mineralization in coastal and shelf ecosystems where sulfate diffuses several meters deep into the sediment. As a consequence, SRB would be expected in the sulfate-containing upper sediment layers, whereas methanogenic archaea would be expected to succeed in the deeper sulfate-depleted layers of the sediment. Where sediments are high in organic matter, sulfate is depleted at shallow sediment depths, and biogenic methane production will occur. In the absence of sulfate, many SRB ferment organic acids and alcohols, producing hydrogen, acetate, and carbon dioxide, and may even rely on hydrogen- and acetate-scavenging methanogens to convert organic compounds to methane. SRB can establish two different life styles, and these can be termed as sulfidogenic and acetogenic, hydrogenogenic metabolism. The advantage of having different metabolic capabilities is that it raises the chance of survival in environments when electron acceptors become depleted. In marine sediments, SRB and methanogens do not compete but rather complement each other in the degradation of organic matter. Also in freshwater ecosystems with sulfate concentrations of only 10-200 μM, sulfate is consumed efficiently within the top several cm of the sediments. Here, many of the δ-Proteobacteria present have the genetic machinery to perform dissimilatory sulfate reduction, yet they have an acetogenic, hydrogenogenic way of life. In this review we evaluate the physiology and metabolic mode of SRB in relation with their environment.

  7. Photoinduced electron donor/acceptor processes in colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots and nitroxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Poulami

    Electron transfer (ET) processes are one of the most researched topics for applications ranging from energy conversion to catalysis. An exciting variation is utilizing colloidal semiconductor nanostructures to explore such processes. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a novel class of light harvesting, emitting and charge-separation materials for applications such as solar energy conversion. Detailed knowledge of the quantitative dissociation of the photogenerated excitons and the interfacial charge- (electron/hole) transfer is essential for optimization of the overall efficiency of many such applications. Organic free radicals are the attractive counterparts for studying ET to/from QDs because these undergo single-electron transfer steps in reversible fashion. Nitroxides are an exciting class of stable organic free radicals, which have recently been demonstrated to be efficient as redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells, making them even more interesting for the aforementioned studies. This dissertation investigates the interaction between nitroxide free radicals TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), 4-amino-TEMPO (4-amino- 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and II-VI semiconductor (CdSe and CdTe) QDs. The nature of interaction in these hybrids has been examined through ground-state UV-Vis absorbance, steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transient absorbance, upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The detailed analysis of the PL quenching indicates that the intrinsic charge transfer is ultrafast however, the overall quenching is still limited by the lower binding capacities and slower diffusion related kinetics. Careful analysis of the time resolved PL decay kinetics reveal that the decay rate constants are distributed and that the trap states are involved in the overall quenching process. The ultrafast hole transfer from CdSe QDs to 4-Amino TEMPO observed

  8. PbS Quantum-Dot Depleted Heterojunction Solar Cells Employing CdS Nanorod Arrays as the Electron Acceptor with Enhanced Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xudong; Liu, Shangjing; Chang, Yajing; Li, Guopeng; Mi, Longfei; Wang, Xiaoming; Jiang, Yang

    2015-10-21

    Depleted heterojunction (DH) solar cells have shown great potential in power conversion. A 3-D DH structure was first designed and fabricated through a layer-by-layer spin-coating technique to increase the interfacial contact of p-type PbS quantum dots (QDs) and n-type CdS nanorod arrays. As a result, a decent power conversion efficiency of 4.78% in this structure was achieved, which is five times the efficiency of a planar heterojunction structure of a similar thickness. In the 3-D DH structure, n-type CdS nanorod arrays (NRs) were grown vertically as electron acceptors, on which p-type PbS quantum dots were deposited as absorbing materials in a layer-by-layer spin-coating fashion. The results are discussed in view of effective transportation of electrons through CdS NRs than the hopping transportation in large nanoparticle-based CdS film, the enlarged interfacial area, and shortened carrier diffusion distance.

  9. New acceptor-bridge-donor strategy for enhancing NLO response with long-range excess electron transfer from the NH2...M/M3O donor (M = Li, Na, K) to inside the electron hole cage C20F19 acceptor through the unusual σ chain bridge (CH2)4.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wang, Jia-Jun; Li, Ying; Wu, Di; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhi-Ru; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-04-01

    Using the strong electron hole cage C20F19 acceptor, the NH2...M/M3O (M = Li, Na, and K) complicated donors with excess electron, and the unusual σ chain (CH2)4 bridge, we construct a new kind of electride molecular salt e(-)@C20F19-(CH2)4-NH2...M(+)/M3O(+) (M = Li, Na, and K) with excess electron anion inside the hole cage (to be encapsulated excess electron-hole pair) serving as a new A-B-D strategy for enhancing nonlinear optical (NLO) response. An interesting push-pull mechanism of excess electron generation and its long-range transfer is exhibited. The excess electron is pushed out from the (super)alkali atom M/M3O by the lone pair of NH2 in the donor and further pulled inside the hole cage C20F19 acceptor through the efficient long σ chain (CH2)4 bridge. Owing to the long-range electron transfer, the new designed electride molecular salts with the excess electron-hole pair exhibit large NLO response. For the e(-)@C20F19-(CH2)4-NH2...Na(+), its large first hyperpolarizability (β0) reaches up to 9.5 × 10(6) au, which is about 2.4 × 10(4) times the 400 au for the relative e(-)@C20F20...Na(+) without the extended chain (CH2)4-NH2. It is shown that the new strategy is considerably efficient in enhancing the NLO response for the salts. In addition, the effects of different bridges and alkali atomic number on β0 are also exhibited. Further, three modulating factors are found for enhancing NLO response. They are the σ chain bridge, bridge-end group with lone pair, and (super)alkali atom. The new knowledge may be significant for designing new NLO materials and electronic devices with electrons inside the cages. They may also be the basis of establishing potential organic chemistry with electron-hole pair.

  10. On the Potential of Using the Al7 Superatom as an Excess Electron Acceptor To Construct Materials with Excellent Nonlinear Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaoyuan; Liao, Kuntian; Peng, Bin; Luo, Qiong

    2016-05-01

    With the aid of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we found that, when alkali metal approaches the Al7 superatom, its outermost s-value electron can be trapped by Al7 to give the superatom compound MAl7 (M = Li, Na, K) with an excess electron. Different analyses including natural bond orbital (NBO), electron localization function (ELF), and energy decomposition analysis (EDA) show that the resulting M-Al bond is strong and has a polar covalent character. The optimizations of self-assemblies (MAl7)n (n = 2, 3) have been performed to explore the stability of MAl7 in the solid state. The results reveal that only NaAl7 can keep its structural integrity as a building block upon self-assembling, while serious aggregations between Al7 clusters occur in the dimers and trimers of LiAl7 and KAl7, despite the fact that the Li-Al7 and K-Al7 bond energies are comparable to that of Na-Al7. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations for (NaAl7)n (n = 2, 3) indicate that these species are stable toward fragmentation at 300 K. The β0 values of (NaAl7)n (n = 1, 2, and 3) predicted at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(3df) level of theory are in the range of 1.6 × 10(4)a.u. to 7.5 × 10(4) a.u.. This theoretical study implies that NaAl7 is a promising candidate for nolinear optical (NLO) materials. We provide theoretical evidence for the possibility of using the Al7 superatom as an excess electron acceptor to construct materials with excellent NLO properties. Further experimental research is invited.

  11. On the Potential of Using the Al7 Superatom as an Excess Electron Acceptor To Construct Materials with Excellent Nonlinear Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaoyuan; Liao, Kuntian; Peng, Bin; Luo, Qiong

    2016-05-01

    With the aid of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we found that, when alkali metal approaches the Al7 superatom, its outermost s-value electron can be trapped by Al7 to give the superatom compound MAl7 (M = Li, Na, K) with an excess electron. Different analyses including natural bond orbital (NBO), electron localization function (ELF), and energy decomposition analysis (EDA) show that the resulting M-Al bond is strong and has a polar covalent character. The optimizations of self-assemblies (MAl7)n (n = 2, 3) have been performed to explore the stability of MAl7 in the solid state. The results reveal that only NaAl7 can keep its structural integrity as a building block upon self-assembling, while serious aggregations between Al7 clusters occur in the dimers and trimers of LiAl7 and KAl7, despite the fact that the Li-Al7 and K-Al7 bond energies are comparable to that of Na-Al7. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations for (NaAl7)n (n = 2, 3) indicate that these species are stable toward fragmentation at 300 K. The β0 values of (NaAl7)n (n = 1, 2, and 3) predicted at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(3df) level of theory are in the range of 1.6 × 10(4)a.u. to 7.5 × 10(4) a.u.. This theoretical study implies that NaAl7 is a promising candidate for nolinear optical (NLO) materials. We provide theoretical evidence for the possibility of using the Al7 superatom as an excess electron acceptor to construct materials with excellent NLO properties. Further experimental research is invited. PMID:27064431

  12. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Qiu, Zhennan; Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice.

  13. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Qiu, Zhennan; Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice. PMID:26598971

  14. Evolution of the microbial community of the biofilm in a methane-based membrane biofilm reactor reducing multiple electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ran; Luo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Jia-Xian; Zhang, Yin; Wen, Li-Lian; Shi, Ling-Dong; Tang, Youneng; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Previous work documented complete perchlorate reduction in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) using methane as the sole electron donor and carbon source. This work explores how the biofilm's microbial community evolved as the biofilm stage-wise reduced different combinations of perchlorate, nitrate, and nitrite. The initial inoculum, carrying out anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (ANMO-D), was dominated by uncultured Anaerolineaceae and Ferruginibacter sp. The microbial community significantly changed after it was inoculated into the CH4-based MBfR and fed with a medium containing perchlorate and nitrite. Archaea were lost within the first 40 days, and the uncultured Anaerolineaceae and Ferruginibacter sp. also had significant losses. Replacing them were anoxic methanotrophs, especially Methylocystis, which accounted for more than 25 % of total bacteria. Once the methanotrophs became important, methanol-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria, namely, Methloversatilis and Methylophilus, became important in the biofilm, probably by utilizing organic matter generated by the metabolism of methanotrophs. When methane consumption was equal to the maximum-possible electron-donor supply, Methylomonas, also an anoxic methanotroph, accounted for >10 % of total bacteria and remained a major part of the community until the end of the experiments. We propose that aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification and perchlorate reduction (AMO-D and AMO-PR) directly oxidized methane and reduced NO3 (-) to NO2 (-) or N2O under anoxic condition, producing organic matter for methanol-assimilating denitrification and perchlorate reduction (MA-D and MA-PR) to reduce NO3 (-). Simultaneously, bacteria capable of anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification and perchlorate reduction (ANMO-D and ANMO-PR) used methane as the electron donor to respire NO3 (-) or ClO4 (-) directly. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26841777

  15. Large dielectric constant, high acceptor density, and deep electron traps in perovskite solar cell material CsGeI3

    DOE PAGES

    Ming, Wenmei; Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2016-08-16

    Here we report that many metal halides that contain cations with the ns2 electronic configuration have recently been discovered as high-performance optoelectronic materials. In particular, solar cells based on lead halide perovskites have shown great promise as evidenced by the rapid increase of the power conversion efficiency. In this paper, we show density functional theory calculations of electronic structure and dielectric and defect properties of CsGeI3 (a lead-free halide perovskite material). The potential of CsGeI3 as a solar cell material is assessed based on its intrinsic properties. We find anomalously large Born effective charges and a large static dielectric constantmore » dominated by lattice polarization, which should reduce carrier scattering, trapping, and recombination by screening charged defects and impurities. Defect calculations show that CsGeI3 is a p-type semiconductor and its hole density can be modified by varying the chemical potentials of the constituent elements. Despite the reduction of long-range Coulomb attraction by strong screening, the iodine vacancy in CsGeI3 is found to be a deep electron trap due to the short-range potential, i.e., strong Ge–Ge covalent bonding, which should limit electron transport efficiency in p-type CsGeI3. This is in contrast to the shallow iodine vacancies found in several Pb and Sn halide perovskites (e.g., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and CsSnI3). The low-hole-density CsGeI3 may be a useful solar absorber material but the presence of the low-energy deep iodine vacancy may significantly reduce the open circuit voltage of the solar cell. Still, on the other hand, CsGeI3 may be used as an efficient hole transport material in solar cells due to its small hole effective mass, the absence of low-energy deep hole traps, and the favorable band offset with solar absorber materials such as dye molecules and CH3NH3PbI3.« less

  16. The surface properties of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 and S. oneidensis MR-1: the effect of pH and terminal electron acceptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the surface characteristics of two strains of Shewanella sp., S. oneidensis MR-1 and S. putrefaciens 200, that were grown under aerobic conditions as well as under anaerobic conditions with trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) as the electron acceptor. The investigation focused on the experimental determination of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) under a range of pH and ionic strength, as well as by subsequent modeling in which Shewanella cells were considered to be soft particles with water- and ion-permeable outermost layers. Results The soft layer of p200 is significantly more highly charged (i.e., more negative) than that of MR-1. The effect of electron acceptor on the soft particle characteristics of Shewanella sp. is complex. The fixed charge density, which is a measure of the deionized and deprotonated functional groups in the soft layer polymers, is slightly greater (i.e., more negative) for aerobically grown p200 than for p200 grown with TMAO. On the other hand, the fixed charge density of aerobically grown MR1 is slightly less than that of p200 grown with TMAO. The effect of pH on the soft particle characteristics is also complex, and does not exhibit a clear pH-dependent trend. Conclusions The Shewanella surface characteristics were attributed to the nature of the outermost soft layer, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in case of p200 and lypopolysaccharides (LPS) in case of MR1 which generally lacks EPS. The growth conditions (i.e., aerobic vs. anaerobic TMAO) have an influence on the soft layer characteristics of Shewanella sp. cells. Meanwhile, the clear pH dependency of the mechanical and morphological characteristics of EPS and LPS layers, observed in previous studies through atomic force microscopy, adhesion tests and spectroscopies, cannot be corroborated by the electrohydrodynamics-based soft particle characteristics which does not exhibited a clear pH dependency in this study. While the electrohydrodynamics-based soft

  17. Acetoclastic methanogenesis is likely the dominant biochemical pathway of palmitate degradation in the presence of sulfate.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lei; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Wang, Li-Ying; Liu, Jin-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong; Yang, Shi-Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are important intermediates in the anaerobic degradation of n-alkanes. In order to find out the biochemical processes involved in the degradation of LCFAs, palmitate (a typical LCFA) was used as a substrate, and low-temperature oilfield production fluids were used as a source of microorganisms to establish two anaerobic systems, one with addition of sulfate as exogenous electron acceptor (SP), another without exogenous electron acceptor (MP) and both incubated at room temperature. After more than 2 years of incubation, about 48 and 57.4% of the palmitate were degraded in samples of MP and SP, respectively. Methane production reached 1408 and 1064 μmol for MP and SP, respectively. Clone libraries of archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed that the predominant archaea in the sulfate-amended cultures (SP) was Methanosaeta whereas Methanocalculus dominated the culture without addition of exogenous sulfate (MP). This observation shows that palmitate could be biodegraded into methane through β-oxidation and acetoclastic methanogenesis in the presence of with or without sulfate. The high occurrence of Methanosaeta in the sulfate-amended system indicates that acetoclastic methanogenesis was not inhibited/little affected by the addition of sulfate. Acetoclastic methanogenesis might be the predominant biochemchimcal pathway of methane generation in enrichment cultures amended with sulfate. These results shed light on alternative methanogenic pathways in the presence of sulfate.

  18. Ferrocene-dithiolene hybrids: control of strong donor-acceptor electronic communication to reverse the charge transfer direction.

    PubMed

    Kusamoto, Tetsuro; Takada, Kenji; Sakamoto, Ryota; Kume, Shoko; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2012-11-19

    We prepared a novel class of ferrocene-dithiolene hybrid molecules, FcS4dt(Me)2 and FcS4dt[Pt((t)Bu2bpy)] (where FcS4dt indicates 2-(1,3-dithia[3]ferrocenophane-2-ylidene)-1,3-dithiole-4,5-dithiolate and (t)Bu2bpy indicates 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine), in which the ferrocene moiety was bound to the planar conjugated dithiolene skeleton via two sulfur atoms such that the cyclopentadienyl rings were perpendicular to the dithiolene backbone. The physical properties and electronic structures of the complexes and their oxidized species [FcS4dt(Me)2](•+) and [FcS4dt[Pt((t)Bu2bpy)

  19. Preferential Use of an Anode as an Electron Acceptor by an Acidophilic Bacterium in the Presence of Oxygen▿

    PubMed Central

    Malki, Moustafa; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo; Fernandez, Victor M.

    2008-01-01

    Several anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria have been shown to be able to donate electrons directly to an electrode. This property is of great interest for microbial fuel cell development. To date, microbial fuel cell design requires avoiding O2 diffusion from the cathodic compartment to the sensitive anodic compartment. Here, we show that Acidiphilium sp. strain 3.2 Sup 5 cells that were isolated from an extreme acidic environment are able to colonize graphite felt electrodes. These bacterial electrodes were able to produce high-density electrocatalytic currents, up to 3 A/m2 at a poised potential of +0.15 V (compared to the value for the reference standard calomel electrode) in the absence of redox mediators, by oxidizing glucose even at saturating air concentrations and very low pHs. PMID:18487393

  20. Cyanomethylbenzoic acid: an acceptor for donor-π-acceptor chromophores used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wanchun; Gupta, Akhil; Kashif, Muhammad Kalim; Duffy, Noel; Bilic, Ante; Evans, Richard A; Spiccia, Leone; Bach, Udo

    2013-02-01

    Sensing the sun: Incorporation of a cyanomethyl benzoic acid electron acceptor into donor-π-acceptor sensitizers for dye-sensitized-solar cell is shown to lead to devices with improved conversion efficiency when compared with more widely used cyanoacetic acid acceptor.

  1. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. G.; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su Y.

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.

  2. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D. Corolewski, Caleb D.; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. Grant; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence indicates these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.4, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO{sub 2} contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals is attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a Zn vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g{sub ⊥} = 2.0015 and g{sub //} = 2.0056, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0035.

  3. Electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cells performance in donor/acceptor copolymers and fullerene: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Basabe, Y.; Borges, B. G. A. L.; Rocco, M. L. M. E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br; Marchiori, C. F. N.; Yamamoto, N. A. D.; Koehler, M.; Roman, L. S. E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br; Macedo, A. G.

    2014-04-07

    By combining experimental and theoretical approaches, the electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cell performance in donor/acceptor copolymer poly[2,7-(9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-dibenzosilole)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl) benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PSiF-DBT) films and blended with 6,6.-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (PSiF-DBT:PCBM) were investigated. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical PSiF-DBT UV-Vis absorption spectrum is observed and the main molecular orbitals contributing to the spectrum were determined using DFT single point calculations. Non-coplanar configuration was determined by geometric optimization calculation in isolated PSiF-DBT pentamer and corroborated by angular variation of the sulphur 1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra. Edge-on and plane-on molecular orientations were obtained for thiophene and benzothiadiazole units, respectively. A power conversion efficiency up to 1.58%, open circuit voltage of 0.51 V, short circuit current of 8.71 mA/cm{sup 2} and a fill factor of 35% was obtained using blended PSiF-DBT:PCBM as active layer in a bulk heterojunction solar cell. Ultrafast electron dynamics in the low-femtosecond regime was evaluated by resonant Auger spectroscopy using the core-hole clock methodology around sulphur 1s absorption edge. Electron delocalization times for PSiF-DBT and PSiF-DBT:PCBM polymeric films were derived for selected excitation energies corresponding to the main transitions in the sulphur 1s NEXAFS spectra. The mixture of PSiF-DBT with PCBM improves the charge transfer process involving the π* molecular orbital of the thiophene units.

  4. Electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cells performance in donor/acceptor copolymers and fullerene: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Basabe, Y.; Marchiori, C. F. N.; Borges, B. G. A. L.; Yamamoto, N. A. D.; Macedo, A. G.; Koehler, M.; Roman, L. S.; Rocco, M. L. M.

    2014-04-01

    By combining experimental and theoretical approaches, the electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cell performance in donor/acceptor copolymer poly[2,7-(9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-dibenzosilole)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PSiF-DBT) films and blended with 6,6.-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (PSiF-DBT:PCBM) were investigated. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical PSiF-DBT UV-Vis absorption spectrum is observed and the main molecular orbitals contributing to the spectrum were determined using DFT single point calculations. Non-coplanar configuration was determined by geometric optimization calculation in isolated PSiF-DBT pentamer and corroborated by angular variation of the sulphur 1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra. Edge-on and plane-on molecular orientations were obtained for thiophene and benzothiadiazole units, respectively. A power conversion efficiency up to 1.58%, open circuit voltage of 0.51 V, short circuit current of 8.71 mA/cm2 and a fill factor of 35% was obtained using blended PSiF-DBT:PCBM as active layer in a bulk heterojunction solar cell. Ultrafast electron dynamics in the low-femtosecond regime was evaluated by resonant Auger spectroscopy using the core-hole clock methodology around sulphur 1s absorption edge. Electron delocalization times for PSiF-DBT and PSiF-DBT:PCBM polymeric films were derived for selected excitation energies corresponding to the main transitions in the sulphur 1s NEXAFS spectra. The mixture of PSiF-DBT with PCBM improves the charge transfer process involving the π* molecular orbital of the thiophene units.

  5. Associative Memory Acceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Card, Roger

    The properties of an associative memory are examined in this paper from the viewpoint of automata theory. A device called an associative memory acceptor is studied under real-time operation. The family "L" of languages accepted by real-time associative memory acceptors is shown to properly contain the family of languages accepted by one-tape,…

  6. Enhancement of p-Type Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Performance by Supramolecular Assembly of Electron Donor and Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Haining; Oscarsson, Johan; Gabrielsson, Erik; Eriksson, Susanna K.; Lindblad, Rebecka; Xu, Bo; Hao, Yan; Boschloo, Gerrit; Johansson, Erik M. J.; Gardner, James M.; Hagfeldt, Anders; Rensmo, Håkan; Sun, Licheng

    2014-01-01

    Supramolecular interactions based on porphyrin and fullerene derivatives were successfully adopted to improve the photovoltaic performance of p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements suggest a change in binding configuration of ZnTCPP after co-sensitization with C60PPy, which could be ascribed to supramolecular interaction between ZnTCPP and C60PPy. The performance of the ZnTCPP/C60PPy-based p-type DSC has been increased by a factor of 4 in comparison with the DSC with the ZnTCPP alone. At 560 nm, the IPCE value of DSCs based on ZnTCPP/C60PPy was a factor of 10 greater than that generated by ZnTCPP-based DSCs. The influence of different electrolytes on charge extraction and electron lifetime was investigated and showed that the enhanced Voc from the Co2+/3+(dtbp)3-based device is due to the positive EF shift of NiO. PMID:24603319

  7. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  8. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    SciTech Connect

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  9. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  10. Benzo[e]pyrene skeleton dipyrylium dication with a strong donor-acceptor-donor interaction, and its two-electron reduced molecule.

    PubMed

    Rao, Koya Prabhakara; Kondo, Mio; Sakamoto, Ryota; Kusamoto, Tetsuro; Nishikawa, Michihiro; Kume, Shoko; Nihei, Masayuki; Oshio, Hiroki; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    The donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) conjugated molecules 1,4-bis(diarylaminophenylethynyl)anthraquinone (1,4-Am(2)Aq) and 1,4-bis(ferrocenylethynyl)anthraquinone (1,4-Fc(2)Aq), undergo a double proton cyclization reaction with bis(trifluoromethanesulfone)imide acid (TFSIH) to yield 1,4-bis(diarylaminophenyl or ferrocenyl) dipyrylium salts [1,4-R(2)Pyl(2)](TFSI)(2) (R=Am or Fc) with novel planar pentacyclic structures similar to the aromatic benzo[e]pyrene-type skeleton. [1,4-Am(2)Pyl(2)](TFSI)(2) could be reduced to give the neutral molecule [1,4-Am(2)Pyl(2)](0), which is stable and maintains the benzo[e]pyrene-type skeleton. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first oxygen-atom-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with 22 (4n+2) π-electrons. The obtained condensed-ring benzo[e]pyrene-type skeleton compounds show physical and chemical properties that are significantly different from those of [1,5-Am(2)Pyl(2)](TFSI)(2), which has a perylene-type skeleton.

  11. Involvement and specificity of Shewanella oneidensis outer membrane cytochromes in the reduction of soluble and solid-phase terminal electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Bücking, Clemens; Popp, Felix; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Gescher, Johannes

    2010-05-01

    The formation of outer membrane (OM) cytochromes seems to be a key step in the evolution of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. They are believed to be the endpoints of an extended respiratory chain to the surface of the cell that establishes the connection to insoluble electron acceptors such as iron or manganese oxides. The gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains the genetic information for five putative OM cytochromes. In this study, the role and specificity of these proteins were investigated. All experiments were conducted using a markerless deletion mutant in all five OM cytochromes that was complemented via the expression of single, plasmid-encoded genes. MtrC and MtrF were shown to be potent reductases of chelated ferric iron, birnessite, and a carbon anode in a microbial fuel cell. OmcA-producing cells were unable to catalyze iron and electrode reduction, although the protein was correctly produced and oriented. However, OmcA production resulted in a higher birnessite reduction rate compared with the mutant. The presence of the decaheme cytochrome SO_2931 as well as the diheme cytochrome SO_1659 did not rescue the phenotype of the deletion mutant.

  12. Electronic and optical properties of novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds for applications in blue-emitting organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legaspi, Christian M.; Stubbs, Regan E.; Yaron, David J.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Kemboi, Abraham; Picker, Jesse; Fossum, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have received a significant attention over the past decade due to their energy-saving potential. We have recently synthesized two novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds and analyzed their optical properties to determine their suitability for use as blue emitters in OLEDs. These compounds show remarkable photo-stability and high quantum yields in the blue region of the spectrum. In addition, they have highly solvatochromic emission. In non-polar solvents, bright, blue-shifted (λmax ≈ 398 nm), and highly structured emission is seen. With increasing solvent dielectric constant, the emission becomes weaker, red-shifted (λmax ≈ 507 nm), and broad. We aim to determine the underlying cause of these changes. Electronic structure calculations indicate the presence of multiple excited states with comparable oscillator strength. These states are of interest because there are several with charge-transfer (CT) character, and others centered on the donor moiety. We theorize that CT states play a role in the observed changes in emission lineshape and may promote charge mobility for electrofluorescence in OLEDs. In the future, we plan to use Stark spectroscopy to analyze the polarity of excited states and transient absorption spectroscopy to observe the dynamics in the excited state.

  13. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  14. Proteome of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as the electron acceptor.

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y-H R.; Hixson, Kim K.; Aklujkar, Ma; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Mester, Tunde

    2008-12-01

    e(III) oxides are the most abundant source of reducible Fe(III) by microorganisms in most soils and sediments, yet few studies on the physiology of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms during growth on Fe(III) oxide have been conducted because of the technical difficulties in working with cell growth and harvest in the presence of Fe(III) oxides. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a representative of the Geobacter species that predominate in a variety of subsurface environments in which Fe(III) oxide is important. In order to better understand the physiology of Geobacter species during growth on Fe(III) oxide, the proteome of G. sulfurreducens grown on Fe(III) oxide was compared with the proteome of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) citrate. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) revealed 19 proteins that were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). These included proteins related to protein synthesis, electron transfer and energy production, oxidative stress, protein folding, outer membrane proteins, nitrogen metabolism and hypothetical proteins. Further analysis of the proteome with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag method revealed additional proteins associated with growth on Fe(III) oxide. These included the outer-membrane c-type cytochrome, OmcS and OmcG, which genetic studies have suggested are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction. Furthermore, several other cytochromes, as yet unstudied, were detected to be significantly up regulated during growth on Fe(III) oxide and other proteins of unknown function were more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide than on soluble Fe(III). PilA, the structural protein for pili, which is required for Fe(III) oxide reduction, and other pilin-associated proteins were also more abundant during growth on Fe(III) oxide. Confirmation of the differential expression of proteins known to be important in Fe(III) oxide reduction was observed, and an additional number of previously

  15. Revisiting Modes of energy generation in sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Joachimiak, Marcin; Chakraborty, Romy; Zhou, Aifen; Fortney, Julian; Geller, Jil; Wall, Judy; Zhou, Jizhong; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Keasling, Jay; Chhabra, Swapnil

    2010-05-17

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in global sulfur and carbon cycling through their ability to completely mineralize organic matter while respiring sulfate to hydrogen sulfide. They are ubiquitous in anaerobic environments and have the ability to reduce toxic metals like Cr(VI) and U(VI). While SRB have been studied for over three decades, bioenergetic modes of this group of microbes are poorly understood. Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) has served as a model SRB over the last decade with the accumulation of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic data under a wide variety of stressors. To further investigate the three hypothesized modes of energy generation in this anaerobe we conducted a systematic study involving multiple electron donor and acceptor combinations for growth. DvH was grown at 37oC in a defined medium with (a) lactate + thiosulfate, (b) lactate + sulfite (c) lactate + sulfate, (d) pyruvate + sulfate, (e) H2 + acetate + sulfate, (f) formate + acetate + sulfate, g) formate + sulfate and (h) pyruvate fermentation. Cells were harvested at mid-log phase of growth for all conditions for transcriptomics, when the optical density at 600nm was in the range 0.42-0.5. Initial results indicate that cells grown on lactate do not appear to significantly differentiate their gene expression profiles when presented with different electron acceptors. These profiles however differ significantly from those observed during growth with other electron donors such as H2 and formate, as well as during fermentative growth. Together the gene expression changes in the presence of different electron donors provide insights into the ability of DvH to differentially reduce metals such as Cr(VI). Here we present revised modes of energy generation in DvH in light of this new transcriptomic evidence.

  16. An electronic spectroscopic study of micellisation of surfactants and solvation of homomicelles formed by cationic or anionic surfactants using a solvatochromic electron donor acceptor dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-10-01

    Solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence bands of a donor-acceptor dye have been utilised for following the micellisation and for probing the polarity of the aqueous homomicellar phase provided separately by cationic (cetyltrimethylammonimum bromide, CTAB and dodecyltrimethylammonimum bromide, DTAB) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) surfactant. Results indicate that for a low concentration of surfactant (below cmc) the dye forms a dimer in aqueous solution. In a micellar media, however, the dye exists as monomers. A strong dye-micelle interaction, as indicated by the shift of the solvatochromic intramolecular charge transfer band of the dye, has also been indicated. The absorption and fluorescence parameters of the dye have been utilised for studying the onset of aggregation of the surfactants. An iterative procedure has been developed for the estimation of cmc and the distribution coefficient (KD) of the dye between the aqueous and the micellar phase. All the parameters provide convergent values of cmc. A high value of KD indicates that the dye exists predominantly in the micellar phase. The solvatochromic parameters characterising the dipolarity-polarisability (π*) and H-bond donation ability (α) of modes of solvation interaction in different micellar media have been estimated. The dye is found to distribute itself between two regions in a catanionic vesicle formed by surfactants SDS and DTAB, one being relatively polar than other. The distribution coefficients have been found out using the fluorescence data.

  17. An electronic spectroscopic study of micellisation of surfactants and solvation of homomicelles formed by cationic or anionic surfactants using a solvatochromic electron donor acceptor dye.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-10-15

    Solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence bands of a donor-acceptor dye have been utilised for following the micellisation and for probing the polarity of the aqueous homomicellar phase provided separately by cationic (cetyltrimethylammonimum bromide, CTAB and dodecyltrimethylammonimum bromide, DTAB) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) surfactant. Results indicate that for a low concentration of surfactant (below cmc) the dye forms a dimer in aqueous solution. In a micellar media, however, the dye exists as monomers. A strong dye-micelle interaction, as indicated by the shift of the solvatochromic intramolecular charge transfer band of the dye, has also been indicated. The absorption and fluorescence parameters of the dye have been utilised for studying the onset of aggregation of the surfactants. An iterative procedure has been developed for the estimation of cmc and the distribution coefficient (KD) of the dye between the aqueous and the micellar phase. All the parameters provide convergent values of cmc. A high value of KD indicates that the dye exists predominantly in the micellar phase. The solvatochromic parameters characterising the dipolarity-polarisability (π(*)) and H-bond donation ability (α) of modes of solvation interaction in different micellar media have been estimated. The dye is found to distribute itself between two regions in a catanionic vesicle formed by surfactants SDS and DTAB, one being relatively polar than other. The distribution coefficients have been found out using the fluorescence data.

  18. A putative multicopper protein secreted by an atypical type II secretion system involved in the reduction of insoluble electron acceptors in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Teena; Childers, Susan E; Glaven, Richard; Lovley, Derek R; Mester, Tünde

    2006-08-01

    Extracellular electron transfer onto Fe(III) oxides in Geobacter sulfurreducens is considered to require proteins that must be exported to the outer surface of the cell. In order to investigate this, the putative gene for OxpG, the pseudopilin involved in a type II general secretion pathway of Gram-negative bacteria, was deleted. The mutant was unable to grow with insoluble Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor. Growth on soluble Fe(III) was not affected. An analysis of proteins that accumulated in the periplasm of the oxpG mutant, but not in the wild-type, led to the identification of a secreted protein, OmpB. OmpB is predicted to be a multicopper protein, with highest homology to the manganese oxidase, MofA, from Leptothrix discophora. OmpB contains a potential Fe(III)-binding site and a fibronectin type III domain, suggesting a possible role for this protein in accessing Fe(III) oxides. OmpB was localized to the membrane fraction of G. sulfurreducens and in the supernatant of growing cultures, consistent with the type II secretion system exporting OmpB. A mutant in which ompB was deleted had the same phenotype as the oxpG mutant, suggesting that the failure to export OmpB was responsible for the inability of the oxpG-deficient mutant to reduce Fe(III) oxide. This is the first report that proposes a role for a multicopper oxidase-like protein in an anaerobic organism. These results further emphasize the importance of outer-membrane proteins in Fe(III) oxide reduction and suggest that outer-membrane proteins other than c-type cytochromes are required for Fe(III) oxide reduction in Geobacter species. PMID:16849792

  19. Evaluation of toxicity reduction of sodium dodecyl sulfate submitted to electron beam radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, M. F.; Moraes, M. C. F.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Borrely, S. I.

    2004-09-01

    Surfactants, as detergent active substances, are an important source of pollution causing biological adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Several data have been showing ecological disturbance due to the high concentration of surfactants on receiving waters and on wastewater treatment plants. Ionizing radiation has been proved as an effective technology to decompose organic substances and few papers have included ecotoxicological aspects. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity of a specific surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), when diluted in distilled water and submitted to electron beam radiation. The study included two test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. Radiation processing resulted in an important acute toxicity removal for both assays, which can be summarized between 70% and 96%, using 3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 kGy as radiation doses. Nevertheless, lower doses demonstrated better effect than 9.0 and 12.0 kGy and the bacterium assay was more sensitive to SDS than crustacean assay.

  20. The interaction domain of the redox protein adrenodoxin is mandatory for binding of the electron acceptor CYP11A1, but is not required for binding of the electron donor adrenodoxin reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, Achim; Hannemann, Frank; Mueller, Juergen J.; Heinemann, Udo; Bernhardt, Rita . E-mail: ritabern@mx.uni-saarland.de

    2005-12-09

    Adrenodoxin (Adx) is a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin involved in electron transfer reactions in the steroid hormone biosynthesis of mammals. In this study, we deleted the sequence coding for the complete interaction domain in the Adx cDNA. The expressed recombinant protein consists of the amino acids 1-60, followed by the residues 89-128, and represents only the core domain of Adx (Adx-cd) but still incorporates the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Adx-cd accepts electrons from its natural redox partner, adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), and forms an individual complex with this NADPH-dependent flavoprotein. In contrast, formation of a complex with the natural electron acceptor, CYP11A1, as well as electron transfer to this steroid hydroxylase is prevented. By an electrostatic and van der Waals energy minimization procedure, complexes between AdR and Adx-cd have been proposed which have binding areas different from the native complex. Electron transport remains possible, despite longer electron transfer pathways.

  1. Photophysical properties of some methylindoles and studies on quenching reactions in their excited singlet and triplet states in presence of the electron acceptor 2-nitrofluorene at 296 K as well as at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, S.; De, R.; Ganguly, T.

    1998-01-01

    Electronic absorption, steady state and time resolved, in the domain of nanosecond order, luminescence techniques were employed to study the photophysical properties of some electron donors methylindoles, e.g. 1-methylindole (1MI), 2-methylindole (2MI), 3-methylindole (3MI) and 5-methylindole (5MI) in nonpolar and polar environments at 296 K and in ethanol (EtOH) rigid glassy matrix at 77 K in the presence of electron acceptor 2-nitrofluorene (2NF). It has been proposed that at room temperature and in polar acetonitrile (ACN) solvent, MI (1, 2 or 3) emission originates mainly from the closely lying lowest excited states S 1 ( 1L b), S 2 ( 1L a) and the charge transfer (CT) exciplex state which is formed due to solute-highly polar solvent ACN interaction. This CT state has its origin in 1L a. The room temperature fluorescence quenchings of the MI donors in presence of acceptor 2NF are found to be mainly due to photoinduced electron transfer (ET), excitational energy transfer and transient quenching processes. Out of the three processes Förster's long range energy transfer seems to be the most dominant one. At 77 K singlet-singlet and triplet-triplet energy transfer processes seem to be responsible for the observed quenching in fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra of the donor molecules in presence of the acceptor 2NF.

  2. Enhanced in situ bioremediation of BTEX-contaminated groundwater by combined injection of nitrate and sulfate.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J A; Rahme, H; Hopkins, G D; Lebron, C; Reinhard, M

    2001-04-15

    Enhancement of in situ anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX compounds was demonstrated at a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in Seal Beach, CA. Specifically, combined injection of nitrate and sulfate into the contaminated aquifer was used to accelerate BTEX removal as compared to remediation by natural attenuation. An array of multi-level sampling wells was used to monitor the evolution of the in situ spatial distributions of the electron acceptors and the BTEX compounds. Nitrate was utilized preferentially over sulfate and was completely consumed within a horizontal distance of 4-6 m from the injection well; sulfate reduction occurred in the region outside the denitrifying zone. By combining injection of both nitrate and sulfate, the total electron acceptor capacity was enhanced without violating practical considerations that limit the amount of nitrate or sulfate that can be added individually. Degradation of total xylene appears linked to sulfate utilization, indicating another advantage of combined injection versus injection of nitrate alone. Benzene degradation also appears to have been stimulated by the nitrate and sulfate injection close to the injection well but only toward the end of the 15-month demonstration. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that benzene can be biodegraded anaerobically after other preferentially degraded hydrocarbons have been removed. PMID:11329718

  3. Enhanced in situ bioremediation of BTEX-contaminated groundwater by combined injection of nitrate and sulfate.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J A; Rahme, H; Hopkins, G D; Lebron, C; Reinhard, M

    2001-04-15

    Enhancement of in situ anaerobic biodegradation of BTEX compounds was demonstrated at a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in Seal Beach, CA. Specifically, combined injection of nitrate and sulfate into the contaminated aquifer was used to accelerate BTEX removal as compared to remediation by natural attenuation. An array of multi-level sampling wells was used to monitor the evolution of the in situ spatial distributions of the electron acceptors and the BTEX compounds. Nitrate was utilized preferentially over sulfate and was completely consumed within a horizontal distance of 4-6 m from the injection well; sulfate reduction occurred in the region outside the denitrifying zone. By combining injection of both nitrate and sulfate, the total electron acceptor capacity was enhanced without violating practical considerations that limit the amount of nitrate or sulfate that can be added individually. Degradation of total xylene appears linked to sulfate utilization, indicating another advantage of combined injection versus injection of nitrate alone. Benzene degradation also appears to have been stimulated by the nitrate and sulfate injection close to the injection well but only toward the end of the 15-month demonstration. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that benzene can be biodegraded anaerobically after other preferentially degraded hydrocarbons have been removed.

  4. The Nature of the Donor Motif in Acceptor-Bridge-Donor Dyes as an Influence in the Electron Photo-Injection Mechanism in DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Ximena; Schott-Verdugo, Stephan; Rodriguez-Serrano, Angela; Schott, Eduardo

    2016-03-10

    The combination and balance of acceptor(A)-bridge-donor(D) architecture of molecules confer suitable attributes and/or properties to act as efficient light-harvesting and sensitizers in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). An important process in a DSSC performance is the electron photoinjection (PI) mechanism which can take place either via type I (indirect), that consists in injecting from the excited state of the dye to the semiconductor, or type II (direct), where the PI is from the ground state of the dye to the semiconductor upon photoexcitation. Here, we present a computational study about the role of the donor motif in the PI mechanisms displayed from a family of 11 A-bridge-D structured dyes to a (TiO2)15 anatase cluster. To this end, different donor motifs (D1-D11) were evaluated while the A and bridge motifs remained the same. All the computations were carried out within the DFT framework, using the B3LYP, PW91, PBE, M06L and CAM-B3LYP functionals. The 6-31G(d) basis set was employed for nonmetallic atoms and the LANL2DZ pseudopotential for Ti atoms. The solvation effects were incorporated using the polarized continuum model (PCM) for acetonitrile. As benchmark systems, alizarin and naphthalenediol dyes were analyzed, as they are known to undergo Type I and Type II PI pathways in DSSCs, respectively. Donors in the studied family of dyes could influence to drive Type I or II PI since it was found that D2 could show some Type II PI route, showing a new absorption band, although with CAM-B3LYP this shows a very low oscillator strength, while the remaining dyes behave according to Type I photoinjectors. Finally, the photovoltaic parameters that govern the light absorption process were evaluated, as the use of these criteria could be applied to predict the efficiency of the studied dyes in DSSCs devices. PMID:26900717

  5. The strontium inorganic mutant of the water oxidizing center (CaMn4O5) of PSII improves WOC efficiency but slows electron flux through the terminal acceptors.

    PubMed

    Gates, Colin; Ananyev, Gennady; Dismukes, G Charles

    2016-09-01

    Herein we extend prior studies of biosynthetic strontium replacement of calcium in PSII-WOC core particles to characterize whole cells. Previous studies of Thermosynechococcus elongatus found a lower rate of light-saturated O2 from isolated PSII-WOC(Sr) cores and 5-8× slower rate of oxygen release. We find similar properties in whole cells, and show it is due to a 20% larger Arrhenius activation barrier for O2 evolution. Cellular adaptation to the sluggish PSII-WOC(Sr) cycle occurs in which flux through the QAQB acceptor gate becomes limiting for turnover rate in vivo. Benzoquinone derivatives that bind to QB site remove this kinetic chokepoint yielding 31% greater O2 quantum yield (QY) of PSII-WOC(Sr) vs. PSII-WOC(Ca). QY and efficiency of the WOC(Sr) catalytic cycle are greatly improved at low light flux, due to fewer misses and backward transitions and 3-fold longer lifetime of the unstable S3 state, attributed to greater thermodynamic stabilization of the WOC(Sr) relative to the photoactive tyrosine YZ. More linear and less cyclic electron flow through PSII occurs per PSII-WOC(Sr). The organismal response to the more active PSII centers in Sr-grown cells at 45°C is to lower the number of active PSII-WOC per Chl, producing comparable oxygen and energy per cell. We conclude that redox and protonic energy fluxes created by PSII are primary determinants for optimal growth rate of T. elongatus. We further conclude that the (Sr-favored) intermediate-spin S=5/2 form of the S2 state is the active form in the catalytic cycle relative to the low-spin S=1/2 form. PMID:27317268

  6. Modified molecular interactions of the pheophytin and plastoquinone electron acceptors in photosystem II of chlorophyll D-containing Acaryochloris marina as revealed by FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yuko; Endo, Kaichiro; Tomo, Tatsuya; Noguchi, Takumi

    2015-08-01

    Acaryochloris marina is a unique cyanobacterium that contains chlorophyll (Chl) d as a major pigment. Because Chl d has smaller excitation energy than Chl a used in ordinary photosynthetic organisms, the energetics of the photosystems of A. marina have been the subject of interest. It was previously shown that the redox potentials (E m's) of the redox-active pheophytin a (Pheo) and the primary plastoquinone electron acceptor (QA) in photosystem II (PSII) of A. marina are higher than those in Chl a-containing PSII, to compensate for the smaller excitation energy of Chl d (Allakhverdiev et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107: 3924-3929, 2010; ibid. 108: 8054-8058, 2011). To clarify the mechanisms of these E m increases, in this study, we have investigated the molecular interactions of Pheo and QA in PSII core complexes from A. marina using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Light-induced FTIR difference spectra upon single reduction of Pheo and QA showed that spectral features in the regions of the keto and ester C=O stretches and the chlorin ring vibrations of Pheo and in the CO/CC stretching region of the Q A (-) semiquinone anion in A. marina are significantly different from those of the corresponding spectra in Chl a-containing cyanobacteria. These observations indicate that the molecular interactions, including the hydrogen bond interactions at the C=O groups, of these cofactors are modified in their binding sites of PSII proteins. From these results, along with the sequence information of the D1 and D2 proteins, it is suggested that A. marina tunes the E m's of Pheo and QA by altering nearby hydrogen bond networks to modify the structures of the binding pockets of these cofactors.

  7. Bacterial reduction of highly concentrated perchlorate: Kinetics and influence of co-existing electron acceptors, temperature, pH and electron donors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanping; Gao, Naiyun; Chu, Wenhai; Wang, Shuaifeng; Xu, Jianhong

    2016-04-01

    Perchlorate reduction kinetics and effects of various environmental conditions on removal of perchlorate from synthetic water were investigated to seek high-strength perchlorate removal using mixed perchlorate reducing bacteria. Results demonstrated that perchlorate (50-1500 mg L(-1)) could be degraded rapidly within 28 h under the optimal conditions. The maximum specific perchlorate reduction rate (qmax) and half saturation constant (Ks) were 0.92 mg-perchlorate (mg-dry weight)(-1) h(-1) and 157.7 mg L(-1), respectively. In the ClO4(-)-NO3(-) systems obvious but recoverable lags were caused in perchlorate reduction and the lag time increased with the ratio of nitrate to perchlorate concentration increasing from 0.5 to 3. While in the ClO4(-)-SO4(2-) systems inhibitions didn't occur until the ratio of sulfate to perchlorate concentration exceeded 10. The optimum temperature and pH value were 35 °C and 6.85, respectively. The optimal acetate-to-perchlorate ratio that could consume all perchlorate and acetate simultaneously was about 2. Dechloromonas, one of the most prominent perchlorate reducing bacteria, was identified as the dominant bacterium in the acclimated culture (69.33% of the whole clones). The study demonstrated that the perchlorate-acclimated mixed microorganisms can readily and efficiently realize reduction of highly concentrated perchlorate in wastewater.

  8. Experimental and computational studies of a multi-electron donor-acceptor ligand containing the thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole core and its incorporation into a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, Felix J; Faust, Thomas B; Chan, Bun; Hua, Carol; D'Alessandro, Deanna M; Kepert, Cameron J

    2014-12-22

    A ligand containing the thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole (TzTz) core (acceptor) with terminal triarylamine moieties (donors), N,N'-(thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole-2,5-diylbis(4,1-phenylene))bis(N-(pyridine-4-yl)pyridin-4-amine (1), was designed as a donor-acceptor system for incorporation into electronically active metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The capacity for the ligand to undergo multiple sequential oxidation and reduction processes was examined using UV/Vis-near-infrared spectroelectrochemistry (UV/Vis-NIR SEC) in combination with DFT calculations. The delocalized nature of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) was found to inhibit charge-transfer interactions between the terminal triarylamine moieties upon oxidation, whereas radical species localized on the TzTz core were formed upon reduction. Conversion of 1 to diamagnetic 2+ and 4+ species resulted in marked changes in the emission spectra. Incorporation of this highly delocalized multi-electron donor-acceptor ligand into a new two-dimensional MOF, [Zn(NO3 )2 (1)] (2), resulted in an inhibition of the oxidation processes, but retention of the reduction capability of 1. Changes in the electrochemistry of 1 upon integration into 2 are broadly consistent with the geometric and electronic constraints enforced by ligation. PMID:25346539

  9. PHOTOVOLTAIC PROPERTIES OF AU-MEROCYANINE-TiO2 SANDWICH CELLS. II. PROPERTIES OF ILLUMINATED CELLS AND EFFECTS OF DOPING WITH ELECTRON ACCEPTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Skotheim, T.; Yang, J.-M.; Otvos, J.; Klein, M.P.

    1980-07-01

    Photocurrent generation in thin films of a merocyanine photosensitizing dye sandwiched between a TiO{sub 2} single crystal doped n type and an Au overlayer has been studied using photovoltaic techniques. A theoretical model was developed to explain the observed photovoltaic properties. The model assumes that the principal route for the formation of charge carriers is via singlet excitons diffusing to the merocyanine - TiO{sub 2} interface followed by dissociation of the excitons into electron-hole pairs, the electrons being injected into the TiO{sub 2} conduction band and the holes into the merocyanine. The model also incorporates field dependence of the quantum efficiency for charge generation. An exciton diffusion length of 79 {angstrom} was determined by analyzing the short circuit action spectra using the theoretical model developed. The low fill factor of 0.35 for these cells was attributed to the field dependence of the quantum efficiency and the high series resistance of the undoped merocyanine films. Doping the merocyanine films with iodine was found to increase both the dark conductivity and the steady state photoconductivity, the latter by as much as a factor of 5. This resulted in a quantum yield of 12% for a 500 {angstrom} thick film and an increase in the fill factor to 0.44 giving a monochromatic power conversion efficiency of 0.4% at 520 nm. The carrier generation in iodine doped films is shown to result from a bulk process, possibly involving collisions between singlet excitons and acceptor-hole complexes resulting in activation out of the bound states formed by the charge-transfer complex. The quenching of excitons in the immediate vicinity of the metal surface was studied by monitoring the photoconductive response of a 200 {angstrom} merocyanine film with varying thickness of perylene sandwiched between the metal and the merocyanine. Perylene was shown to be able to transport the photoexcited holes from the merocyanine to the Au electrode. The

  10. Anaerobic biodegradation of explosives and related compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria : a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C. F.; Manning, J.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Notre Dame

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, research on microbial degradation of explosives and nitroaromatic compounds has increased. Most studies of the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic microorganisms. Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Few review papers exist, and those deal mainly with aerobic bacterial degradation of explosives; none deals with anaerobic bacteria. In this paper, we review the anaerobic metabolic processes in the degradation of explosives and nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions.

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Peer HA; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons JM; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with 13C-labeled CH4 (13CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, 13C-labeled CO2 (13CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with 13CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for 13CO2 production from 13CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  12. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Peer Ha; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons Jm; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with (13)C-labeled CH4 ((13)CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, (13)C-labeled CO2 ((13)CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with (13)CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for (13)CO2 production from (13)CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  13. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  14. DEGRADATION OF TOLUENE AND P-XYLENE IN ANAEROBIC MICROCOSMS: EVIDENCE FOR SULFATE AS A TERMINAL ELECTRON ACCEPTOR. (R825689C045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Geochemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in a Coastal Plain aquifer. 1. Sulfate from confining beds as an oxidant in microbial CO2 production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; McMahon, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    A primary source of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the Black Creek aquifer of South Carolina is carbon dioxide produced by microbially mediated oxidation of sedimentary organic matter. Groundwater chemistry data indicate, however, that the available mass of inorganic electron acceptors (oxygen, Fe(III), and sulfate) and observed methane production is inadequate to account for observed CO2 production. Although sulfate concentrations are low (approximately 0.05-0.10 mM) in aquifer water throughout the flow system, sulfate concentrations are greater in confining-bed pore water (0.4-20 mM). The distribution of culturable sulfate-reducing bacteria in these sediments suggests that this concentration gradient is maintained by greater sulfate-reducing activity in sands than in clays. Calculations based on Fick's Law indicate that possible rates of sulfate diffusion to aquifer sediments are sufficient to explain observed rates of CO2 production (about 10-5 mmoll-1 year-1), thus eliminating the apparent electron-acceptor deficit. Furthermore, concentrations of dissolved hydrogen in aquifer water are in the range characteristic of sulfate reduction (2-6 nM), which provides independent evidence that sulfate reduction is the predominant terminal electron-accepting process in this system. The observed accumulation of pyrite- and calcite-cemented sandstones at sand-clay interfaces is direct physical evidence that these processes have been continuing over the history of these sediments. ?? 1991.

  16. Use of organic substrates as electron donors for biological sulfate reduction in gypsiferous mine soils from Nakhon Si Thammarat (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-04-01

    Soils in some mining areas contain a high gypsum content, which can give adverse effects to the environment and may cause many cultivation problems, such as a low water retention capacity and low fertility. The quality of such mine soils can be improved by reducing the soil's gypsum content. This study aims to develop an appropriate in situ bioremediation technology for abbreviating the gypsum content of mine soils by using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The technology was applied to a mine soil from a gypsum mine in the southern part of Thailand which contains a high sulfate content (150 g kg(-1)). Cheap organic substrates with low or no cost, such as rice husk, pig farm wastewater treatment sludge and coconut husk chips were mixed (60:20:20 by volume) and supplied to the soil as electron donors for the SRB. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 59% was achieved in the soil mixed with 40% organic mixture, corresponding to a reduction of the soil gypsum content from 25% to 7.5%. For economic gains, this treated soil can be further used for agriculture and the produced sulfide can be recovered as the fertilizer elemental sulfur. PMID:24332728

  17. Use of organic substrates as electron donors for biological sulfate reduction in gypsiferous mine soils from Nakhon Si Thammarat (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-04-01

    Soils in some mining areas contain a high gypsum content, which can give adverse effects to the environment and may cause many cultivation problems, such as a low water retention capacity and low fertility. The quality of such mine soils can be improved by reducing the soil's gypsum content. This study aims to develop an appropriate in situ bioremediation technology for abbreviating the gypsum content of mine soils by using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The technology was applied to a mine soil from a gypsum mine in the southern part of Thailand which contains a high sulfate content (150 g kg(-1)). Cheap organic substrates with low or no cost, such as rice husk, pig farm wastewater treatment sludge and coconut husk chips were mixed (60:20:20 by volume) and supplied to the soil as electron donors for the SRB. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 59% was achieved in the soil mixed with 40% organic mixture, corresponding to a reduction of the soil gypsum content from 25% to 7.5%. For economic gains, this treated soil can be further used for agriculture and the produced sulfide can be recovered as the fertilizer elemental sulfur.

  18. Effects of inorganic electron acceptors on methanogenesis and methanotrophy and on the community structure of bacteria and archaea in sediments of a boreal lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Karvinen, Anu; Nykänen, Hannu; Peura, Sari; Tiirola, Marja; Mäki, Anita; Kankaala, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments are globally significant sources of CH4 to the atmosphere, but the factors controlling the production and consumption of CH4 in these systems are understudied. Increasing availability of electron acceptors (EA) (other than CO2) in sediments can decrease or even suppress CH4 production by diverting the electron flow (from H2 and organic substances) from methanogenic to other anaerobic respiration pathways. However, whether these changes in microbial function extend down to changes in the structure of microbial communities is not known. Also anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) could be enhanced by increased availability of EAs (SO42-, NO3-, Fe3+ and Mn4+), but information on the role of this process in lake sediments is scarce. We studied the effects of inorganic EAs on the potential for CH4 production and consumption and on the structure of microbial communities in sediments of a boreal lake. Anoxic slurries of sediment samples collected from two depths (0 - 10 cm; 10 - 30 cm) of the profundal zone of a boreal, mesotrophic Lake Ätäskö, were amended with 1) CH4 or with CH4 and either 2) 10 mM Mn4+, 3) 10 mM Fe3+, 4) O2 or 5) CH2F2 (inhibitor of aerobic methane oxidation) and incubated at +10° C for up to 4 months. Furthermore, slurries from the 10 - 30 cm layer were amended with CH4 and either 6) 2 mM NO3- or 7) 2 mM SO42- and incubated at +4 ° C for up to 14 months. The processes were measured using 13C-labelling and by concentration measurements of CH4 and CO2. Effects of treatments 1-3 on microbial communities were also analysed by next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA, as well as methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene amplicons and mRNA transcripts. CH4 production (max. 83 nmol gdw-1d-1) took place in the anaerobic treatments but was generally decreased by the addition of NO3-, SO42-, Fe3+ and Mn4+. Although the structure of sediment archaeal community was resistant to Fe3+/Mn4+ - additions, slight changes in the structure of bacterial community

  19. Effects of inorganic electron acceptors on methanogenesis and methanotrophy and on the community structure of bacteria and archaea in sediments of a boreal lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Karvinen, Anu; Nykänen, Hannu; Peura, Sari; Tiirola, Marja; Mäki, Anita; Kankaala, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments are globally significant sources of CH4 to the atmosphere, but the factors controlling the production and consumption of CH4 in these systems are understudied. Increasing availability of electron acceptors (EA) (other than CO2) in sediments can decrease or even suppress CH4 production by diverting the electron flow (from H2 and organic substances) from methanogenic to other anaerobic respiration pathways. However, whether these changes in microbial function extend down to changes in the structure of microbial communities is not known. Also anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) could be enhanced by increased availability of EAs (SO42‑, NO3‑, Fe3+ and Mn4+), but information on the role of this process in lake sediments is scarce. We studied the effects of inorganic EAs on the potential for CH4 production and consumption and on the structure of microbial communities in sediments of a boreal lake. Anoxic slurries of sediment samples collected from two depths (0 - 10 cm; 10 - 30 cm) of the profundal zone of a boreal, mesotrophic Lake Ätäskö, were amended with 1) CH4 or with CH4 and either 2) 10 mM Mn4+, 3) 10 mM Fe3+, 4) O2 or 5) CH2F2 (inhibitor of aerobic methane oxidation) and incubated at +10° C for up to 4 months. Furthermore, slurries from the 10 - 30 cm layer were amended with CH4 and either 6) 2 mM NO3‑ or 7) 2 mM SO42‑ and incubated at +4 ° C for up to 14 months. The processes were measured using 13C-labelling and by concentration measurements of CH4 and CO2. Effects of treatments 1-3 on microbial communities were also analysed by next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA, as well as methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene amplicons and mRNA transcripts. CH4 production (max. 83 nmol gdw‑1d‑1) took place in the anaerobic treatments but was generally decreased by the addition of NO3‑, SO42‑, Fe3+ and Mn4+. Although the structure of sediment archaeal community was resistant to Fe3+/Mn4+ - additions, slight changes in the structure of

  20. Comparative survey of potential nitrate and sulfate reduction rates in aquatic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverman, Anniet M.; Pallud, Céline; Abell, Jeffrey; Cappellen, Philippe Van

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate and sulfate are two major terminal electron acceptors of anaerobic respiration in nearshore sediments. Potential nitrate and sulfate reduction rates (NRR and SRR) were determined on surficial sediments sampled at 14 sites representing a wide range of shallow-water depositional environments. The rates were obtained by supplying undisturbed slices of sediments with nitrate, sulfate or both using a flow-through reactor technique. No external electron donor was added to the sediments. The results indicate that all studied sediments harbored viable and coexisting nitrate- and sulfate-reducing communities, which were able to instantaneously consume the electron acceptors supplied to the reactors. On average, NRR exceeded SRR by about one order of magnitude (309 ± 180 nmol NO3- cm-3 h-1versus 37 ± 29 nmol SO42- cm-3 h-1). The NRR:SRR molar ratio, however, varied significantly from site to site, with values ranging from 1.7 to 59. Nitrite production, indicative of incomplete nitrate reduction, was observed in all studied sediments and, on average, accounted for 45% of NRR (range 3-80%). Production of sulfate under nitrate-reducing conditions was observed in 10 out of 14 of the studied sediments, suggesting a common occurrence of sulfide oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction. Oxidation of sulfide accounted for 0 to 40% of NRR in the nitrate-only experiments. When both electron acceptors were supplied simultaneously, net sulfate consumption decreased on average by 45%. The effect of nitrate on SRR was highly variable, however, ranging from near complete inhibition to a 25% enhancement of SRR. Overall, the results of this study point to the need to critically reassess the model formulations used to represent anaerobic respiration processes and their interactions in early diagenetic models.

  1. Nickel recovery from electronic waste II electrodeposition of Ni and Ni-Fe alloys from diluted sulfate solutions.

    PubMed

    Robotin, B; Ispas, A; Coman, V; Bund, A; Ilea, P

    2013-11-01

    This study focuses on the electrodeposition of Ni and Ni-Fe alloys from synthetic solutions similar to those obtained by the dissolution of electron gun (an electrical component of cathode ray tubes) waste. The influence of various parameters (pH, electrolyte composition, Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) ratio, current density) on the electrodeposition process was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRFA) were used to provide information about the obtained deposits' thickness, morphology, and elemental composition. By controlling the experimental parameters, the composition of the Ni-Fe alloys can be tailored towards specific applications. Complementarily, the differences in the nucleation mechanisms for Ni, Fe and Ni-Fe deposition from sulfate solutions have been evaluated and discussed using cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronoamperometry. The obtained results suggest a progressive nucleation mechanism for Ni, while for Fe and Ni-Fe, the obtained data points are best fitted to an instantaneous nucleation model.

  2. Nickel recovery from electronic waste II electrodeposition of Ni and Ni-Fe alloys from diluted sulfate solutions.

    PubMed

    Robotin, B; Ispas, A; Coman, V; Bund, A; Ilea, P

    2013-11-01

    This study focuses on the electrodeposition of Ni and Ni-Fe alloys from synthetic solutions similar to those obtained by the dissolution of electron gun (an electrical component of cathode ray tubes) waste. The influence of various parameters (pH, electrolyte composition, Ni(2+)/Fe(2+) ratio, current density) on the electrodeposition process was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRFA) were used to provide information about the obtained deposits' thickness, morphology, and elemental composition. By controlling the experimental parameters, the composition of the Ni-Fe alloys can be tailored towards specific applications. Complementarily, the differences in the nucleation mechanisms for Ni, Fe and Ni-Fe deposition from sulfate solutions have been evaluated and discussed using cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronoamperometry. The obtained results suggest a progressive nucleation mechanism for Ni, while for Fe and Ni-Fe, the obtained data points are best fitted to an instantaneous nucleation model. PMID:23809618

  3. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Makarashvili, Vakho; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Quigley, Kevin; Stepinski, Dominique; Vandegrift, George

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  4. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  5. Effects of Iron and Nitrogen Limitation on Sulfur Isotope Fractionation during Microbial Sulfate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shuhei; Bosak, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing microbes utilize sulfate as an electron acceptor and produce sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. Thus, the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sediments can trace microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and it also has the potential to reflect the physiology of sulfate-reducing microbes. This study investigates the relationship between the availability of iron and reduced nitrogen and the magnitude of S-isotope fractionation during MSR by a marine sulfate-reducing bacterium, DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio species, isolated from salt marsh in Cape Cod, MA. Submicromolar levels of iron increase sulfur isotope fractionation by about 50% relative to iron-replete cultures of DMSS-1. Iron-limited cultures also exhibit decreased cytochrome c-to-total protein ratios and cell-specific sulfate reduction rates (csSRR), implying changes in the electron transport chain that couples carbon and sulfur metabolisms. When DMSS-1 fixes nitrogen in ammonium-deficient medium, it also produces larger fractionation, but it occurs at faster csSRRs than in the ammonium-replete control cultures. The energy and reducing power required for nitrogen fixation may be responsible for the reverse trend between S-isotope fractionation and csSRR in this case. Iron deficiency and nitrogen fixation by sulfate-reducing microbes may lead to the large observed S-isotope effects in some euxinic basins and various anoxic sediments. PMID:23001667

  6. Sulfate removal and sulfur transformation in constructed wetlands: The roles of filling material and plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Yue; Zhou, Qi; Huang, Jingang; Vymazal, Jan; Kuschk, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Sulfate in effluent is a challenging issue for wastewater reuse around the world. In this study, sulfur (S) removal and transformation in five batch constructed wetlands (CWs) treating secondary effluent were investigated. The results showed that the presence of the plant cattail (Typha latifolia) had little effect on sulfate removal, while the carbon-rich litter it generated greatly improved sulfate removal, but with limited sulfide accumulation in the pore-water. After sulfate removal, most of the S was deposited with the valence states S (-II) and S (0) on the iron-rich gravel surface, and acid volatile sulfide was the main S sink in the litter-added CWs. High-throughput pyrosequencing revealed that sulfate-reducing bacteria (i.e. Desulfobacter) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (i.e. Thiobacillus) were dominant in the litter-added CWs, which led to a sustainable S cycle between sulfate and sulfide. Overall, this study suggests that recycling plant litter and iron-rich filling material in CWs gives an opportunity to utilize the S in the wastewater as both an electron acceptor for sulfate reduction and as an electron donor for nitrate reduction coupled with sulfide oxidation. This leads to the simultaneous removal of sulfate, nitrate, and organics without discharging toxic sulfide into the receiving water body. PMID:27423407

  7. Sulfate removal and sulfur transformation in constructed wetlands: The roles of filling material and plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Wen, Yue; Zhou, Qi; Huang, Jingang; Vymazal, Jan; Kuschk, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Sulfate in effluent is a challenging issue for wastewater reuse around the world. In this study, sulfur (S) removal and transformation in five batch constructed wetlands (CWs) treating secondary effluent were investigated. The results showed that the presence of the plant cattail (Typha latifolia) had little effect on sulfate removal, while the carbon-rich litter it generated greatly improved sulfate removal, but with limited sulfide accumulation in the pore-water. After sulfate removal, most of the S was deposited with the valence states S (-II) and S (0) on the iron-rich gravel surface, and acid volatile sulfide was the main S sink in the litter-added CWs. High-throughput pyrosequencing revealed that sulfate-reducing bacteria (i.e. Desulfobacter) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (i.e. Thiobacillus) were dominant in the litter-added CWs, which led to a sustainable S cycle between sulfate and sulfide. Overall, this study suggests that recycling plant litter and iron-rich filling material in CWs gives an opportunity to utilize the S in the wastewater as both an electron acceptor for sulfate reduction and as an electron donor for nitrate reduction coupled with sulfide oxidation. This leads to the simultaneous removal of sulfate, nitrate, and organics without discharging toxic sulfide into the receiving water body.

  8. Encapsulation of MEH-PPV:PCBM Hybrids in the Cores of Block Copolymer Micellar Assemblies: Photoinduced Electron Transfer in a Nanoscale Donor-Acceptor System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suxiao; Ryan, James William; Singh, Amita; Beirne, Jason Gerard; Palomares, Emilio; Redmond, Gareth

    2016-01-12

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate that conjugated polymer:fullerene hybrid nanoparticles encapsulated in the hydrophobic cores of triblock copolymer micelles may successfully act as spatially confined donor-acceptor systems capable of facilitating photoinduced charge carrier separation. To this end, aqueous dispersions of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) nanoparticles were first prepared by solubilization of the polymer in the cores of poly(oxyethylene)-poly(oxypropylene)-poly(oxyethylene) triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127 micelles. A number of significant optical spectroscopic changes were observed on transfer of the conjugated polymer from a nonaqueous solvent to the aqueous micellar environment. These were primarily attributed to increased interchain interactions due to conjugated polymer chain collapse during encapsulation in the micellar cores. When prepared in buffer solution, the micelles exhibited good long-term collodial stability. When MEH-PPV micelles were blended by the addition of controlled amounts of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), the observed correspondence of photoluminescence emission quenching, quantum yield decreases, and emission lifetime shortening with increasing PCBM concentration indicated efficient photoinduced donor-to-acceptor charge transfer between MEH-PPV and the fullerenes in the cores of the micelles, an assignment that was confirmed by transient absorption spectroscopic monitoring of carrier photogeneration and recombination. PMID:26653672

  9. Electron Capture Dissociation of Divalent Metal-adducted Sulfated N-Glycans Released from Bovine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Sulfated N-glycans released from bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) were ionized with the divalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Co by electrospray ionization (ESI). These metal-adducted species were subjected to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) and the corresponding fragmentation patterns were compared. IRMPD generated extensive glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, but most product ions suffered from sulfonate loss. Internal fragments were also observed, which complicated the spectra. ECD provided complementary structural information compared with IRMPD, and all observed product ions retained the sulfonate group, allowing sulfonate localization. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of ECD towards metal-adducted sulfated N-glycans released from a glycoprotein. Due to the ability of IRMPD and ECD to provide complementary structural information, the combination of the two strategies is a promising and valuable tool for glycan structural characterization. The influence of different metal ions was also examined. Calcium adducts appeared to be the most promising species because of high sensitivity and ability to provide extensive structural information.

  10. Application of the Stopped Flow Technique to the TiO₂-Heterogeneous Photocatalysis of Hexavalent Chromium in Aqueous Suspensions: Comparison with O₂ and H₂O₂ as Electron Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Meichtry, Jorge M; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Litter, Marta I

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of the transfer of electrons stored in TiO2 nanoparticles to Cr(VI) in aqueous solution have been investigated using the stopped flow technique. TiO2 nanoparticles were previously irradiated under UV light in the presence of formic acid, and trapped electrons (e(trap)(-)) were made to react with Cr(VI) as acceptor species; other common acceptor species such as O2 and H2O2 were also tested. The temporal evolution of the number of trapped electrons was followed by the decrease in the absorbance at 600 nm, and the kinetics of the electron-transfer reaction was modeled. Additionally, the rate of formation of the surface complex between Cr(VI) and TiO2 was determined with the stopped flow technique by following the evolution of the absorbance at 400 nm of suspensions of nonirradiated TiO2 nanoparticles and Cr(VI) at different concentrations. An approximately quadratic relationship was observed between the maximum absorbance of the surface complex and the concentration of Cr(VI), suggesting that Cr(VI) adsorbs onto the TiO2 surface as dichromate. The kinetic analyses indicate that the electron transfer from TiO2 to Cr(VI) does not require the previous formation of the Cr(VI)-TiO2 surface complex, at least the complex detected here through the stopped flow experiments. When previously irradiated TiO2 was used to follow the evolution of the Cr(VI)-TiO2 complex, an inhibition of the formation of the complex was observed, which can be related to the TiO2 deactivation caused by Cr(III) deposition.

  11. Characterization of the specificities of human blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase toward sulfated/sialylated/fucosylated acceptors: evidence for an inverse relationship between alpha 1,2-L-fucosylation of Gal and alpha 1,6-L-fucosylation of asparagine-linked GlcNAc.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Jain, R K; Larsen, R D; Wlasichuk, K; Matta, K L

    1996-07-01

    The assembly of complex structures bearing the H determinant was examined by characterizing the specificities of a cloned blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase (FT) toward a variety of sulfated, sialylated, or fucosylated Gal beta 1,3/4GlcNAc beta- or Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha-based acceptor structures. (a) As compared to the basic type 2, Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-(K(m) = 1.67 mM), the basic type 1 was 137% active (K(m) = 0.83 mM). (b) On C-6 sulfation of Gal, type 1 became 142.1% active and type 2 became 223.0% active (K(m) = 0.45 mM). (c) On C-6 sulfation of GlcNAc, type 2 showed 33.7% activity. (d) On C-3 or C-4 fucosylation of GlcNAc, both types 1 and 2 lost activity. (e) Type 1 showed 70.8% and 5.8% activity, respectively, on C-6 and C-4 O-methylation of GlcNAc. (f) Type 1 retained 18.8% activity on alpha 2,6-sialylation of GlcNAc. (g) Terminal type 1 or 2 of extended chain had lower activity. (h) With Gal in place of GlcNAc in type 1, the activity became 43.2%. (i) Compounds with terminal alpha 1,3-linked Gal were inactive. (j) Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha- (the T-hapten) was approximately 0.4-fold as active as Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-. (k) C-6 sulfation of Gal on the T-hapten did not affect the acceptor activity. (l) C-6 sulfation of GalNAc decreased the activity to 70%, whereas on C-6 sulfation of both Gal and GalNAc the T-hapten lost the acceptor ability. (m) C-6 sialylation of GalNAc also led to inactivity. (n) beta 1,6 branching from GalNAc of the T-hapten by a GlcNAc residue or by units such as Gal beta 1, 4GlcNAc-, Gal beta 1,4(Fuc alpha 1,3)GlcNAc-, or 3-sulfoGal beta 1,4GlcNAc- resulted in 111.9%, 282.8%, 48.3%, and 75.3% activities, respectively. (o) The enhancement of enzyme affinity by a sulfo group on C-6 of Gal was demonstrated by an increase (approximately 5-fold) in the K(m) for Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta 1,6(Gal beta 1,3)GalNAc alpha-O-Bn in presence of 6-sulfoGal beta 1,- 4GlcNAc beta-O-Me (3.0 mM). (p) Among the two sites in

  12. Characterization of the specificities of human blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase toward sulfated/sialylated/fucosylated acceptors: evidence for an inverse relationship between alpha 1,2-L-fucosylation of Gal and alpha 1,6-L-fucosylation of asparagine-linked GlcNAc.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Jain, R K; Larsen, R D; Wlasichuk, K; Matta, K L

    1996-07-01

    The assembly of complex structures bearing the H determinant was examined by characterizing the specificities of a cloned blood group H gene-specified alpha 1,2-L-fucosyltransferase (FT) toward a variety of sulfated, sialylated, or fucosylated Gal beta 1,3/4GlcNAc beta- or Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha-based acceptor structures. (a) As compared to the basic type 2, Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-(K(m) = 1.67 mM), the basic type 1 was 137% active (K(m) = 0.83 mM). (b) On C-6 sulfation of Gal, type 1 became 142.1% active and type 2 became 223.0% active (K(m) = 0.45 mM). (c) On C-6 sulfation of GlcNAc, type 2 showed 33.7% activity. (d) On C-3 or C-4 fucosylation of GlcNAc, both types 1 and 2 lost activity. (e) Type 1 showed 70.8% and 5.8% activity, respectively, on C-6 and C-4 O-methylation of GlcNAc. (f) Type 1 retained 18.8% activity on alpha 2,6-sialylation of GlcNAc. (g) Terminal type 1 or 2 of extended chain had lower activity. (h) With Gal in place of GlcNAc in type 1, the activity became 43.2%. (i) Compounds with terminal alpha 1,3-linked Gal were inactive. (j) Gal beta 1,3GalNAc alpha- (the T-hapten) was approximately 0.4-fold as active as Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta-. (k) C-6 sulfation of Gal on the T-hapten did not affect the acceptor activity. (l) C-6 sulfation of GalNAc decreased the activity to 70%, whereas on C-6 sulfation of both Gal and GalNAc the T-hapten lost the acceptor ability. (m) C-6 sialylation of GalNAc also led to inactivity. (n) beta 1,6 branching from GalNAc of the T-hapten by a GlcNAc residue or by units such as Gal beta 1, 4GlcNAc-, Gal beta 1,4(Fuc alpha 1,3)GlcNAc-, or 3-sulfoGal beta 1,4GlcNAc- resulted in 111.9%, 282.8%, 48.3%, and 75.3% activities, respectively. (o) The enhancement of enzyme affinity by a sulfo group on C-6 of Gal was demonstrated by an increase (approximately 5-fold) in the K(m) for Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc beta 1,6(Gal beta 1,3)GalNAc alpha-O-Bn in presence of 6-sulfoGal beta 1,- 4GlcNAc beta-O-Me (3.0 mM). (p) Among the two sites in

  13. Chondroitin sulfate

    MedlinePlus

    ... is usually manufactured from animal sources, such as shark and cow cartilage. Chondroitin sulfate is used for ... contain chondroitin sulfate, in combination with glucosamine sulfate, shark cartilage, and camphor. Some people also inject chondroitin ...

  14. Production of electrically-conductive nanoscale filaments by sulfate-reducing bacteria in the microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Eaktasang, Numfon; Kang, Christina S; Lim, Heejun; Kwean, Oh Sung; Cho, Suyeon; Kim, Yohan; Kim, Han S

    2016-06-01

    This study reports that the obligate anaerobic microorganism, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a predominant sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) in soils and sediments, can produce nanoscale bacterial appendages for extracellular electron transfer. These nanofilaments were electrically-conductive (5.81S·m(-1)) and allowed SRBs to directly colonize the surface of insoluble or solid electron acceptors. Thus, the direct extracellular electron transfer to the insoluble electrode in the microbial fuel cell (MFC) was possible without inorganic electron-shuttling mediators. The production of nanofilaments was stimulated when only insoluble electron acceptors were available for cellular respiration. These results suggest that when availability of a soluble electron acceptor for SRBs (SO4(2-)) is limited, D. desulfuricans initiates the production of conductive nanofilaments as an alternative strategy to transfer electrons to insoluble electron acceptors. The findings of this study contribute to understanding of the role of SRBs in the biotransformation of various substances in soils and sediments and in the MFC. PMID:26818576

  15. Electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase is central to hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis in sulfate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, W.; Flynn, T. M.; Suess, M.; Bradley, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A significant range in microbial lipid 2H/1H ratios is observed in modern marine sediments [Li et al. 2009. GCA]. The magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation between microbial lipids and growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O) is hypothesized to relate to the central carbon and energy metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS]. These observations have raised the intriguing possibility for culture independent identification of the dominant metabolic pathways operating in environments critical to the geological record. One such metabolism we would like to track for its global significance in sedimentary carbon cycling is bacterial sulfate reduction [Jørgensen. 1982. Nature]. To-date, heterotrophic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have been observed to produce lipids that are depleted in fatty acid H-isotope composition, relative to growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ -125 to -175 ‰), with experiments on different substrates yielding little variability [Campbell et al. 2009. GCA; Osburn. 2013; Dawson et al. 2015. Geobiology]. In stark contrast, aerobic heterotrophs show a wide range in fractionations (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ +300 to -125‰) which seems to scale with the route cellular carbon metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS; Heinzelmann et al. 2015. Front Microbio]. Recent work in aerobic methylotrophs [Bradley et al. 2014. AGU] implicates transhydrogenase (TH) activity as a critical control on 2ɛlipid-H2O. This work suggests a specific driving mechanism for this range in fractionation is the ratio of intracellular NADPH/NADH, and more fundamentally, the intracellular redox state. In SRB a key component of energy metabolism is the activity of electron-bifurcating TH [Price et al. 2014. Front Microbio], for which a recent transposon mutant library has generated a number of knockouts in the target gene [Kuehl et al. 2014. mBio] in the model organism Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20. In this study we compare growth rates, fatty acid concentrations and 2ɛlipid-H2O from wild type and TH

  16. Acceptor impurity activation in III-nitride light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Römer, Friedhard Witzigmann, Bernd

    2015-01-12

    In this work, the role of the acceptor doping and the acceptor activation and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based multi-quantum well light emitting diode is studied by microscopic simulation. Acceptor impurities in GaN are subject to a high activation energy which depends on the presence of proximate dopant atoms and the electric field. A combined model for the dopant ionization and activation barrier reduction has been developed and implemented in a semiconductor carrier transport simulator. By model calculations, we demonstrate the impact of the acceptor activation mechanisms on the decay of the IQE at high current densities, which is known as the efficiency droop. A major contributor to the droop is the electron leakage which is largely affected by the acceptor doping.

  17. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor. PMID:27021522

  18. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor. PMID:27021522

  19. Nickel recovery from electronic waste II Electrodeposition of Ni and Ni–Fe alloys from diluted sulfate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Robotin, B.; Ispas, A.; Coman, V.; Bund, A.; Ilea, P.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Ni can be recovered from EG wastes as pure Ni or as Ni–Fe alloys. • The control of the experimental conditions gives a certain alloy composition. • Unusual deposits morphology shows different nucleation mechanisms for Ni vs Fe. • The nucleation mechanism was progressive for Ni and instantaneous for Fe and Ni–Fe. - Abstract: This study focuses on the electrodeposition of Ni and Ni–Fe alloys from synthetic solutions similar to those obtained by the dissolution of electron gun (an electrical component of cathode ray tubes) waste. The influence of various parameters (pH, electrolyte composition, Ni{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 2+} ratio, current density) on the electrodeposition process was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRFA) were used to provide information about the obtained deposits’ thickness, morphology, and elemental composition. By controlling the experimental parameters, the composition of the Ni–Fe alloys can be tailored towards specific applications. Complementarily, the differences in the nucleation mechanisms for Ni, Fe and Ni–Fe deposition from sulfate solutions have been evaluated and discussed using cyclic voltammetry and potential step chronoamperometry. The obtained results suggest a progressive nucleation mechanism for Ni, while for Fe and Ni–Fe, the obtained data points are best fitted to an instantaneous nucleation model.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the cydDC operon, encoding a heterodimeric ABC transporter required for assembly of cytochromes c and bd in Escherichia coli K-12: regulation by oxygen and alternative electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G M; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Poole, R K

    1997-01-01

    The expression of the cydDC operon was investigated by using a chromosomal phi(cydD-lacZ) transcriptional fusion and primer extension analysis. A single transcriptional start site was found for cydD located 68 bp upstream of the translational start site, and Northern blot analysis confirmed that cydDC is transcribed as a polycistronic message independently of the upstream gene trxB. cydDC was highly expressed under aerobic growth conditions and during anaerobic growth with alternative electron acceptors. Aerobic expression was independent of ArcA and Fnr, but induction of cydDC by nitrate and nitrite was dependent on NarL and Fnr. PMID:9335308

  1. Inside the alkalinity engine: the role of electron donors in the organomineralization potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, K L; Kading, T J; Braissant, O; Dupraz, C; Visscher, P T

    2012-11-01

    Mineral precipitation in microbial mats may have been the key to their preservation as fossil stromatolites, potentially documenting evidence of the earliest life on Earth. Two factors that contribute to carbonate mineral precipitation are the saturation index (SI) and the presence of nucleation sites. Both of these can be influenced by micro-organisms, which can either alter SI through their metabolisms, or produce and consume organic substances such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that can affect nucleation. It is the balance of individual metabolisms within the mat community that determines the pH and the dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, thereby potentially increasing the alkalinity and consequently the SI. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are an important component of this 'alkalinity engine.' The activity of SRB often peaks in layers where CaCO(3) precipitates, and mineral precipitation has been demonstrated in SRB cultures; however, the effect of their metabolism on the alkalinity engine and actual contribution to mineral precipitation is the subject of controversy. Here, we show through culture experiments, theoretical calculations, and geochemical modeling studies that the pH, alkalinity, and organomineralization potential will vary depending on the type of electron donor. Specifically, hydrogen and formate can increase the pH, but electron donors like lactate and ethanol, and to a lesser extent glycolate, decrease the pH. The implication of this for the lithification of mats is that the combination of processes supplying electron donors and the utilization of these compounds by SRB may be critical to promoting mineral precipitation.

  2. Quantifying the electron donor and acceptor ability of the ketimide ligands in M(N=CtBu2)4 (M = V, Nb, Ta)

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Peter L.; Liss, Cameron J.; Lewis, Richard A.; Morochnik, Simona; Szpunar, David E.; Telser, Joshua; Hayton, Trevor W.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) to VCl3 in THF, followed by addition of 0.5 equiv I2, generates the homoleptic V(IV) ketimide complex, V(N=CtBu2)4 (1), in 42% yield. Similarly, reaction of 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) with NbCl4(THF)2 in THF affords the homoleptic Nb(IV) ketimide complex, Nb(N=CtBu2)4 (2), in 55% yield. Seeking to extend the series to the tantalum congener, a new Ta(IV) starting material, TaCl4(TMEDA) (3), was prepared via reduction of TaCl5 with Et3SiH, followed by addition of TMEDA. Reaction of 3 with 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) in THF results in a isolation of a Ta(V) ketimide complex, Ta(Cl)(N=CtBu2)4 (5), which can be isolated in 32% yield. Reaction of 5 with Tl(OTf) yields Ta(OTf)(N=CtBu2)4 (6) in 44% yield. Subsequent reduction of 6 with Cp*2Co in toluene generates the homoleptic Ta(IV) congener Ta(N=CtBu2)4 (7), although the yields are poor. All three homoleptic Group 5 ketimide complexes exhibit squashed tetrahedral geometries in the solid state, as determined by X-ray crystallography. This geometry leads to a dx2−y21 (2B1 in D2d) ground state, as supported by DFT calculations. EPR spectroscopic analysis of 1 and 2, performed at X- and Q-band frequencies (~9 and 35 GHz, respectively), further supports the 2B1 ground state assignment, while comparison of 1, 2, and 7 with related Group 5 tetra(aryl), tetra(amido) and tetra(alkoxo) complexes shows a higher M-L covalency in the ketimide-metal interaction. In addition, a ligand field analysis of 1 and 2 demonstrates that the ketimide ligand is both a strong π-donor and strong π-acceptor, an unusual combination found in very few organometallic ligands. PMID:26419513

  3. Shewanella oneidensis in a lactate-fed pure-culture and a glucose-fed co-culture with Lactococcus lactis with an electrode as electron acceptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) employing mixed microbial communities as biocatalysts are gaining importance as potential renewable energy, bioremediation, or biosensing devices. While we are beginning to understand how individual microbial species interact with an electrode as electron donor, li...

  4. Bi-anchoring organic sensitizers of type D-(π-A)2 comprising thiophene-2-acetonitrile as π-spacer and malonic acid as electron acceptor for dye sensitized solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Gachumale Saritha; Ramkumar, Sekar; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Anandan, Sambandam

    2015-06-01

    Two new bi-anchoring organic sensitizers of type D-(π-A)2 comprising the identical π-spacer (thiophene-2-acetonitrile) and electron acceptor (malonic acid) but different aryl amine as electron donors (diphenylamine and carbazole) were synthesized, characterized and fabricated metal free dye-sensitized solar cell devices. The intra molecular charge transfer property and electrochemical property of these dyes were investigated by molecular absorption, emission, cyclic voltammetric experiments and in addition, quantum chemical calculation studies were performed to provide sufficient driving force for the electron injection into the conduction band of TiO2 which leads to efficient charge collection. Among the fabricated devices, carbazole based device exhibits high current conversion efficiency (η = 4.7%) with a short circuit current density (JSC) 15.3 mA/cm2, an open circuit photo voltage (VOC) of 0.59 V and a fill factor of 0.44 under AM 1.5 illumination (85 mW/cm2) compared to diphenylamine based device.

  5. New insights into the transformation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate to gypsum using time-resolved cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saha, Amitesh; Lee, Jinkee; Pancera, Sabrina M; Bräeu, Michael F; Kempter, Andreas; Tripathi, Anubhav; Bose, Arijit

    2012-07-31

    We use time-resolved cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (TR-cryo-TEM) on a supersaturated solution of calcium sulfate hemihydrate to examine the early stages of particle formation during the hydration of the hemihydrate. As hydration proceeds, we observe nanoscale amorphous clusters that evolve to amorphous particles and then reorganize to crystalline gypsum within tens of seconds. Our results indicate that a multistep particle formation model, where an amorphous phase forms first, followed by the transformation into a crystalline product, is applicable even at time scales of the order of tens of seconds for this system. The addition of a small amount of citric acid significantly delays the reorganization to gypsum crystals. We hypothesize that available calcium ions form complexes with the acid by binding to the carboxylic groups. Their incorporation into a growing particle produces disorder and extends the time over which the amorphous phase exists. We see evidence of patches of "trapped" amorphous phase within the growing gypsum crystals at time scales of the order of 24 h. This is confirmed by complementary X-ray diffraction experiments. Direct imaging of nanoscale samples by TR-cryo-TEM is a powerful technique for a fundamental understanding of crystallization and many other evolving systems.

  6. Experimental Results for Direct Electron Irradiation of a Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, R.; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Stepinski, Dominique; Jerden, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2015-01-30

    In support of the development of accelerator-driven production of fission product Mo-99 as proposed by SHINE Medical Technologies, a 35 MeV electron linac was used to irradiate depleted-uranium (DU) uranyl sulfate dissolved in pH 1 sulfuric acid at average power densities of 6 kW, 12 kW, and 15 kW. During these irradiations, gas bubbles were generated in the solution due to the radiolytic decomposition of water molecules in the solution. Multiple video cameras were used to record the behavior of bubble generation and transport in the solution. Seven six-channel thermocouples were used to record temperature gradients in the solution from self-heating. Measurements of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations in a helium sweep gas were recorded by a gas chromatograph to estimate production rates during irradiation. These data are being used to validate a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the experiment that includes multiphase flow and a custom bubble injection model for the solution region.

  7. Metal-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots: effects of nanoparticles and molecular electron donors and acceptors on the photofading kinetics.

    PubMed

    Abualnaja, Khamael M; Šiller, Lidija; Horrocks, Benjamin R

    2015-04-10

    Alkyl-capped silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) show enhanced luminescence when drop cast as films on glass slides in mixtures with Ag or Au nanoparticles or the electron donor ferrocene (Fc). Metal enhancement of quantum dot photoluminescence (PL) is known to arise from a combination of the intense near-field associated with the surface plasmon of the metal on the rate of absorption and the decrease in the lifetime of the excited state. Here we present evidence that an additional factor is also involved: electron transfer from the metal to the quantum dot. Under CW irradiation with an argon ion laser at 488 nm, SiQDs undergo a reversible photofading of the PL as the particles photoionize. A steady-state condition is established by the competition between photoionization and electron-hole recombination. The fading of the initial PL I0 to the steady-state value I∞ can be modelled by a simple first order decay with a lognormal distribution of rates, which reflects the heterogeneity of the sample. In the presence of Ag and Au nanoparticles, the modal rate constants of photofading increase by factors of up to 4-fold and the ratio I0/I∞ decreases by factors up to 5-fold; this is consistent with an increase in the rate of electron-hole recombination facilitated by the metal nanoparticles acting as sources of electrons. Further support for this interpretation comes from the enhancement in PL observed in photofading experiments with films of SiQDs mixed with Fc; this compound is a well-known one-electron donor, but shows no plasmon band which complicates the estimation of PL enhancement with Ag NPs.

  8. Metal-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots: effects of nanoparticles and molecular electron donors and acceptors on the photofading kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualnaja, Khamael M.; Šiller, Lidija; Horrocks, Benjamin R.

    2015-04-01

    Alkyl-capped silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) show enhanced luminescence when drop cast as films on glass slides in mixtures with Ag or Au nanoparticles or the electron donor ferrocene (Fc). Metal enhancement of quantum dot photoluminescence (PL) is known to arise from a combination of the intense near-field associated with the surface plasmon of the metal on the rate of absorption and the decrease in the lifetime of the excited state. Here we present evidence that an additional factor is also involved: electron transfer from the metal to the quantum dot. Under CW irradiation with an argon ion laser at 488 nm, SiQDs undergo a reversible photofading of the PL as the particles photoionize. A steady-state condition is established by the competition between photoionization and electron-hole recombination. The fading of the initial PL I0 to the steady-state value {{I}∞ } can be modelled by a simple first order decay with a lognormal distribution of rates, which reflects the heterogeneity of the sample. In the presence of Ag and Au nanoparticles, the modal rate constants of photofading increase by factors of up to 4-fold and the ratio {{I}0}/{{I}∞ } decreases by factors up to 5-fold; this is consistent with an increase in the rate of electron-hole recombination facilitated by the metal nanoparticles acting as sources of electrons. Further support for this interpretation comes from the enhancement in PL observed in photofading experiments with films of SiQDs mixed with Fc; this compound is a well-known one-electron donor, but shows no plasmon band which complicates the estimation of PL enhancement with Ag NPs.

  9. Microsensor Measurements of Sulfate Reduction and Sulfide Oxidation in Compact Microbial Communities of Aerobic Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Michael; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    1992-01-01

    The microzonation of O2 respiration, H2S oxidation, and SO42- reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100 μm) with microsensors for O2, S2-, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured concentration profiles by using a simple one-dimensional diffusion reaction model. The importance of electron acceptor and electron donor availability for the microzonation of respiratory processes and their reaction rates was investigated. Oxygen respiration was found in the upper 0.2 to 0.4 mm of the biofilm, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H2S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O2 in a narrow reaction zone, and no H2S escaped to the overlying water. Turnover times of H2S and O2 in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H2S oxidation. Anaerobic H2S oxidation with NO3- could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO42- or organic substrate increased as a result of deepening of the sulfate reduction zone or an increase in the sulfate reduction intensity, respectively. PMID:16348687

  10. Genes for Uranium Bioremediation in the Anaerobic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2001-06-01

    The objectives of the previous grant period were designed to explore the electron transport pathway employed by the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). More specifically experiments were designed to determine whether U(VI) reduction by members of the genus Desulfovibrio was mediated by a unique, dedicated reductase or occurred as a fortuitous reaction with a reductase naturally involved in alternative reduction processes. In addition, the regulation of the hierarchical expression of terminal electron acceptors (reductases) in the SRB was to be examined.

  11. Sulfur cycling in contaminated aquifers: What can we learn from oxygen isotopes in sulfate? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoeller, K.; Vogt, C.; Hoth, N.

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial reduction of dissolved sulfate (BSR) is a key process determining the natural attenuation in many contaminated aquifers. For example, in groundwater bodies affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) BSR reduces the contaminant load by producing alkalinity and facilitating a sustainable fixation of sulfur in the sediment. In aquifers contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons sulfate may act as a terminal electron acceptor for the anaerobic oxidation of the organic contaminants to carbon dioxide and water. Due to the isotope selectivity of sulfate reducing bacteria, BSR shows the most pronounced isotope fractionation within the sulfur cycle. While sulfur displays a straightforward kinetic enrichment in the residual sulfate described by the enrichment factor epsilon (ɛ), the mechanism of oxygen isotope fractionation is still being discussed controversially. Nevertheless, it is agreed on that oxygen isotope exchange between ambient water and residual sulfate occurs during BSR in natural environments. With respect to this potential isotope exchange, the fractionation parameter theta (θ) is introduced instead of the kinetic enrichment factor epsilon (ɛ). The dual isotope system considering both sulfate-sulfur and sulfate-oxygen isotope fractionation and the respective fractionation parameters ɛ and θ provides an excellent tool for the recognition and quantification of BSR. Beyond that, the dual isotope approach may help identify and estimate interfering sulfur transformations such as re-oxidation and disproportionation processes which is especially vital for the understanding of the overall natural attenuation potential of the investigated aquifers. We present two examples from different field studies showing the benefits of applying the combination of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in dissolved sulfate to reveal the details of the sulfur cycle. The first case study is concerned with the evaluation of the potential for BSR in an AMD-affected aquifer close to an

  12. Electron spin echo of Cu(2+) in the triglycine sulfate crystal family (TGS, TGSe, TGFB): electron spin-lattice relaxation, Debye temperature and spin-phonon coupling.

    PubMed

    Lijewski, S; Goslar, J; Hoffmann, S K

    2006-07-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation of Cu(2+) has been studied by the electron spin echo technique in the temperature range 4.2-115 K in triglycine sulfate (TGS) family crystals. Assuming that the relaxation is due to Raman relaxation processes the Debye temperature Θ(D) was determined as 190 K for TGS, 168 K for triglycine selenate (TGSe) and 179 K for triglycine fluoroberyllate (TGFB). We also calculated the Θ(D) values from the sound velocities derived from available elastic constants. The elastic Debye temperatures were found as 348 K for TGS, 288 K for TGSe and 372 K for TGFB. The results shown good agreement with specific heat data for TGS. The elastic Θ(D) are considerably larger than those determined from the Raman spin-lattice relaxation. The possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. We propose to use a modified expression describing two-phonon Raman relaxation with a single variable only (Θ(D)) after elimination of the sound velocity. Moreover, we show that the relaxation data can be fitted using the elastic Debye temperature value as a constant with an additional relaxation process contributing at low temperatures. This mechanism can be related to a local mode of the Cu(2+) defect in the host lattice. Electron paramagnetic resonance g-factors and hyperfine splitting were analysed in terms of the molecular orbital theory and the d-orbital energies and covalency factors of the Cu(gly)(2) complexes were found. Using the structural data and calculated orbital energies the spin-phonon coupling matrix element of the second-order Raman process was calculated as 553 cm(-1) for TGS, 742 cm(-1) for TGSe and 569 cm(-1) for TGFB. PMID:21690828

  13. Dynamics of iron-acceptor-pair formation in co-doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.; Gibaja, F.; Graf, O.; Gross, D.; Kaes, M.; Heuer, M.; Kirscht, F.; Möller, C.; Lauer, K.

    2013-11-11

    The pairing dynamics of interstitial iron and dopants in silicon co-doped with phosphorous and several acceptor types are presented. The classical picture of iron-acceptor pairing dynamics is expanded to include the thermalization of iron between different dopants. The thermalization is quantitatively described using Boltzmann statistics and different iron-acceptor binding energies. The proper understanding of the pairing dynamics of iron in co-doped silicon will provide additional information on the electronic properties of iron-acceptor pairs and may become an analytical method to quantify and differentiate acceptors in co-doped silicon.

  14. Dominance of sulfur-fueled iron oxide reduction in low-sulfate freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Colleen M; Lentini, Chris J; Tang, Yuanzhi; Johnston, David T; Wankel, Scott D; Jardine, Philip M

    2015-11-01

    A central tenant in microbial biogeochemistry is that microbial metabolisms follow a predictable sequence of terminal electron acceptors based on the energetic yield for the reaction. It is thereby oftentimes assumed that microbial respiration of ferric iron outcompetes sulfate in all but high-sulfate systems, and thus sulfide has little influence on freshwater or terrestrial iron cycling. Observations of sulfate reduction in low-sulfate environments have been attributed to the presumed presence of highly crystalline iron oxides allowing sulfate reduction to be more energetically favored. Here we identified the iron-reducing processes under low-sulfate conditions within columns containing freshwater sediments amended with structurally diverse iron oxides and fermentation products that fuel anaerobic respiration. We show that despite low sulfate concentrations and regardless of iron oxide substrate (ferrihydrite, Al-ferrihydrite, goethite, hematite), sulfidization was a dominant pathway in iron reduction. This process was mediated by (re)cycling of sulfur upon reaction of sulfide and iron oxides to support continued sulfur-based respiration--a cryptic sulfur cycle involving generation and consumption of sulfur intermediates. Although canonical iron respiration was not observed in the sediments amended with the more crystalline iron oxides, iron respiration did become dominant in the presence of ferrihydrite once sulfate was consumed. Thus, despite more favorable energetics, ferrihydrite reduction did not precede sulfate reduction and instead an inverse redox zonation was observed. These findings indicate that sulfur (re)cycling is a dominant force in iron cycling even in low-sulfate systems and in a manner difficult to predict using the classical thermodynamic ladder.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of the primary charge separation reactions in Photosystem I: effect of the replacement of the axial ligands to the electron acceptor A₀.

    PubMed

    Milanovsky, Georgy E; Ptushenko, Vasily V; Golbeck, John H; Semenov, Alexey Yu; Cherepanov, Dmitry A

    2014-09-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations, a semi-continuum (SC) approach, and quantum chemistry (QC) calculations were employed together to investigate the molecular mechanics of ultrafast charge separation reactions in Photosystem I (PS I) of Thermosynechococcus elongatus. A molecular model of PS I was developed with the aim to relate the atomic structure with electron transfer events in the two branches of cofactors. A structural flexibility map of PS I was constructed based on MD simulations, which demonstrated its rigid hydrophobic core and more flexible peripheral regions. The MD model permitted the study of atomic movements (dielectric polarization) in response to primary and secondary charge separations, while QC calculations were used to estimate the direct chemical effect of the A(0A)/A(0B) ligands (Met or Asn in the 688/668 position) on the redox potential of chlorophylls A(0A)/A(0B) and phylloquinones A(1A)/A(1B). A combination of MD and SC approaches was used to estimate reorganization energies λ of the primary (λ₁) and secondary (λ₂ ) charge separation reactions, which were found to be independent of the active branch of electron transfer; in PS I from the wild type, λ₁ was estimated to be 390 ± 20mV, while λ₂ was estimated to be higher at 445 ± 15mV. MD and QC approaches were used to describe the effect of substituting Met688(PsaA)/Met668(PsaB) by Asn688(PsaA)/Asn668(PsaB) on the energetics of electron transfer. Unlike Met, which has limited degrees of freedom in the site, Asn was found to switch between two relatively stable conformations depending on cofactor charge. The introduction of Asn and its conformation flexibility significantly affected the reorganization energy of charge separation and the redox potentials of chlorophylls A(0A)/A(0B) and phylloquinones A(1A)/A(1B), which may explain the experimentally observed slowdown of secondary electron transfer in the M688N(PsaA) variant. This article is part of a special issue entitled

  16. Menaquinone-7 in the reaction center complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme functions as the electron acceptor A1.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, B; Frigaard, N U; Yang, F; Zybailov, B; Miller, M; Golbeck, J H; Scheller, H V

    1998-03-10

    Photosynthetically active reaction center complexes were prepared from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIMB 8327, and the content of quinones was determined by extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The analysis showed a stoichiometry of 1.7 molecules of menaquinone-7/reaction center. No other quinones were detected in the isolated reaction centers, whereas membrane preparations also contained chlorobiumquinone. The possible involvement of quinones in electron transport was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. A highly anisotropic radical was detected by Q-band EPR spectroscopy in both membranes and isolated reaction centers following dark reduction with sodium dithionite and photoaccumulation at 205 K. At 34 GHz, the EPR spectrum is characterized by a g tensor with gxx = 2.0063, gyy = 2.0052, gzz = 2.0020 and delta B of 0.7 mT, consistent with its identification as a quinone. This spectrum is highly similar in terms of g values and line widths to photoaccumulated A1- in photosystem I of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. The results indicate that menaquinone-7 in the green sulfur bacterial reaction center is analogous to phylloquinone in photosystem I.

  17. Shewanella oneidensis in a lactate-fed pure-culture and a glucose-fed co-culture with Lactococcus lactis with an electrode as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam A; Bar, Haim Y; Beg, Qasim K; Segrè, Daniel; Booth, James; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2011-02-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) employing mixed microbial communities as biocatalysts are gaining importance as potential renewable energy, bioremediation, or biosensing devices. While we are beginning to understand how individual microbial species interact with an electrode as electron donor, little is known about the interactions between different microbial species in a community: sugar fermenting bacteria can interact with current producing microbes in a fashion that is either neutral, positively enhancing, or even negatively affecting. Here, we compare the bioelectrochemical performance of Shewanella oneidensis in a pure-culture and in a co-culture with the homolactic acid fermenter Lactococcus lactis at conditions that are pertinent to conventional BES operation. While S. oneidensis alone can only use lactate as electron donor for current production, the co-culture is able to convert glucose into current with a comparable coulombic efficiency of ∼17%. With (electro)-chemical analysis and transcription profiling, we found that the BES performance and S. oneidensis physiology were not significantly different whether grown as a pure- or co-culture. Thus, the microbes worked together in a purely substrate based (neutral) relationship. These co-culture experiments represent an important step in understanding microbial interactions in BES communities with the goal to design complex microbial communities, which specifically convert target substrates into electricity. PMID:21036604

  18. Metabolite-enabled mutualistic interaction between Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli in a co-culture using an electrode as electron acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Qichun; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Cao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions in planktonic microbial communities have been extensively studied. However, our understanding on mutualistic communities consisting of co-existing planktonic cells and biofilms is limited. Here, we report a planktonic cells-biofilm mutualistic system established by the fermentative bacterium Escherichia coli and the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis in a bioelectrochemical device, where planktonic cells in the anode media interact with the biofilms on the electrode. Our results show that the transfer of formate is the key mechanism in this mutualistic system. More importantly, we demonstrate that the relative distribution of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the liquid media and biofilm is likely driven by their metabolic functions towards an optimum communal metabolism in the bioelectrochemical device. RNA sequencing-based transcriptomic analyses of the interacting organisms in the mutualistic system potentially reveal differential expression of genes involved in extracellular electron transfer pathways in both species in the planktonic cultures and biofilms. PMID:26061569

  19. Electronic structure of p-type perylene monoimide-based donor-acceptor dyes on the nickel oxide (100) surface: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Kontkanen, O V; Niskanen, M; Hukka, T I; Rantala, T T

    2016-05-25

    A p-type dye-sensitized solar cell, where the dye injects a hole into the semiconductor, could be combined with a typical Grätzel cell to create an efficient tandem device. However, the current p-type devices suffer from low efficiency. Here, geometries and electronic structures of four perylenemonoimide-based dyes () both as free and adsorbed on the NiO(100) semiconductor surface have been investigated to gain a better understanding of the p-type devices. In particular, the electronic transitions relevant to charge transfer between the dye and the surface have been identified. Excitations have been evaluated using the time-dependent DFT calculations, and the roles of frontier orbitals and band edges in transitions have been assessed. The adsorbed dyes can adopt either upright or slightly tilted geometries depending on the structure of the anchoring group and the binding mode of the dye. The adsorption slightly lowers the NiO band gap, from 4.06 eV to 3.90-3.96 eV, depending on the surface-adsorbate system and the band gaps of the dye molecules by 0.1-0.2 eV. Additionally, the adsorption mode of dye moves the LUMO+1 level down by 0.5 eV. The effective mass of charge carrier holes is significantly smaller at the NiO surface than in the bulk indicating the importance of surface conductivity. We also found that the potential drop, i.e. the driving force for charge transfer from NiO to the dye molecule, depends on the adsorption mode of . PMID:27224900

  20. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Ras, D.; Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-01

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe2 solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe2/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe2 layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w2 and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  1. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ras, D. Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-15

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2}/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe{sub 2} layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w{sup 2} and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  2. Desulfonatronobacter acidivorans gen. nov., sp. nov. and Desulfobulbus alkaliphilus sp. nov., haloalkaliphilic heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Panteleeva, Anzhela N; Muyzer, Gerard

    2012-09-01

    Two types of heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were isolated from anoxic sediments of hypersaline soda lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia). The isolates used propionate as an energy and carbon source. Strain APT2(T) was enriched and isolated with thiosulfate as the electron acceptor. Strains APS1(T) and ASS1 were isolated with sulfate. Strain APT2(T) was a short rod and motile with a single subpolar flagellum, while strains APS1(T) and ASS1 were lemon-shaped oval rods and motile with a single polar flagellum and thin flagella-like filaments. Strain APT2(T) grew by complete oxidation of C(3)-C(8) fatty acids with thiosulfate or sulfate as the electron acceptor, while strains APS1(T) and ASS1 were much less versatile and utilized only propionate and pyruvate as the electron donor and carbon source with sulfate or sulfite as the electron acceptor. Furthermore, strains APS1(T) and ASS1 oxidized propionate incompletely to form acetate. All of the isolates were moderately halophilic and obligately alkaliphilic. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the isolates in the order Desulfobacterales of the class Deltaproteobacteria. Strain APT2(T) belonged to the family Desulfobacteraceae and clustered with a halophilic SRB, Desulfosalsimonas propionicica PropA(T). Strains APS1(T) and ASS1 were closely related to each other and clustered with the genus Desulfobulbus of the family Desulfobulbaceae. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis, the isolates are proposed to represent two novel taxa, Desulfonatronobacter acidivorans gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain of the type species APT2(T) = DSM 24257(T) = UNIQEM U853(T)) and Desulfobulbus alkaliphilus sp. nov. (type strain APS1(T) = DSM 24258(T) = UNIQEM U900(T)).

  3. Synthesis, spectral investigations, antimicrobial activity and DNA-binding studies of novel charge transfer complex of 1,10-phenanthroline as an electron donor with π-acceptor p-Nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ishaat M.; Ahmad, Afaq

    2010-08-01

    Proton or charge transfer (CT) complex of donor, 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) with π-acceptor, p-Nitrophenol (PNP) has been studied spectrophotometrically in methanol at room temperature. The binding of the CT complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA has been investigated by fluorescence spectrum, to establish the ability of the CT complex of its interaction with DNA. Stern-Volmer quenching constant ( Ksv) has also been calculated. The formation constant ( KCT), molar extinction coefficient ( ɛCT), free energy (Δ Go) and stoichiometric ratio of the CT complex have been determined by Benesi-Hildebrand equation. The stoichiometry was found to be 1:1. The CT complex was screened for its pharmacology as antibacterial and antifungal activity against various bacterial and fungal strains, showing excellent antibacterial and antifungal activity. The newly synthesized CT complex has been characterized by FTIR spectra, elemental analysis, 1H NMR, electronic absorption spectra. TGA-DTA studies were also carried out to check the stability of CT complex.

  4. Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T simultaneously transcribes many rdhA genes during organohalide respiration with 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,2,3-TCP as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kalpataru; Bowman, Kimberly S; Rainey, Fred A; Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Moe, William M

    2014-05-01

    The genome sequence of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T) contains numerous loci annotated as reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes based on inferred protein sequence identity with functional dehalogenases of other bacterial species. Many of these genes are truncated, lack adjacent regulatory elements, or lack cognate genes coding for membrane-anchoring proteins typical of the functionally characterized active reductive dehalogenases of organohalide-respiring bacteria. To investigate the expression patterns of the rdh genes in D. lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T), oligonucleotide primers were designed to uniquely target 25 rdh genes present in the genome as well as four putative regulatory genes. RNA extracts from cultures of strain BL-DC-9(T) actively dechlorinating three different electron acceptors, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane were reverse-transcribed and subjected to PCR amplification using rdh-specific primers. Nineteen rdh gene transcripts, including 13 full-length rdhA genes, six truncated rdhA genes, and five rdhA genes having cognate rdhB genes were consistently detected during the dechlorination of all three of the polychlorinated alkanes tested. Transcripts from all four of the putative regulatory genes were also consistently detected. Results reported here expand the diversity of bacteria known to simultaneously transcribe multiple rdh genes and provide insights into the transcription factors associated with rdh gene expression.

  5. Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens BL-DC-9T simultaneously transcribes many rdhA genes during organohalide respiration with 1,2-DCA, 1,2-DCP, and 1,2,3-TCP as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kalpataru; Bowman, Kimberly S; Rainey, Fred A; Siddaramappa, Shivakumara; Challacombe, Jean F; Moe, William M

    2014-05-01

    The genome sequence of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T) contains numerous loci annotated as reductive dehalogenase homologous (rdh) genes based on inferred protein sequence identity with functional dehalogenases of other bacterial species. Many of these genes are truncated, lack adjacent regulatory elements, or lack cognate genes coding for membrane-anchoring proteins typical of the functionally characterized active reductive dehalogenases of organohalide-respiring bacteria. To investigate the expression patterns of the rdh genes in D. lykanthroporepellensBL-DC-9(T), oligonucleotide primers were designed to uniquely target 25 rdh genes present in the genome as well as four putative regulatory genes. RNA extracts from cultures of strain BL-DC-9(T) actively dechlorinating three different electron acceptors, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,2,3-trichloropropane were reverse-transcribed and subjected to PCR amplification using rdh-specific primers. Nineteen rdh gene transcripts, including 13 full-length rdhA genes, six truncated rdhA genes, and five rdhA genes having cognate rdhB genes were consistently detected during the dechlorination of all three of the polychlorinated alkanes tested. Transcripts from all four of the putative regulatory genes were also consistently detected. Results reported here expand the diversity of bacteria known to simultaneously transcribe multiple rdh genes and provide insights into the transcription factors associated with rdh gene expression. PMID:24673292

  6. Impact of electronic coupling, symmetry, and planarization on one- and two-photon properties of triarylamines with one, two, or three diarylboryl acceptors.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Nikolay S; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Yesudas, Kada; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Perry, Joseph W; Pron, Agnieszka; Kivala, Milan; Müllen, Klaus

    2012-04-19

    We have performed a study of the one- and two-photon absorption properties of a systematically varied series of triarylamino-compounds with one, two, or three attached diarylborane arms arranged in linear dipolar, bent dipolar, and octupolar geometries. Two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra were measured over a wide spectral range with femtosecond laser pulses. We found that on going from the single-arm to the two- and three-arm systems, the peak in two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-section is suppressed by factors of 3-11 for the lowest excitonic level associated with the electronic coupling of the arms, whereas it is enhanced by factors of 4-8 for the higher excitonic level. These results show that the coupling of arms redistributes the 2PA cross-section between the excitonic levels in a manner that strongly favors the higher-energy excitonic level. The experimental data on one- and two-photon cross-sections, ground- and excited-state transition dipole moments, and permanent dipole moment differences between the ground and the lowest excited states were compared to the results obtained from a simple Frenkel exciton model and from highly correlated quantum-chemical calculations. It has been found that planarization of the structure around the triarylamine moiety leads to a sizable increase in peak 2PA cross-section for the lowest excitonic level of the two-arm system, whereas for the three-arm system, the corresponding peak was weakened and shifted to lower energy. Our studies show the importance of the interarm coupling, number of arms, and structural planarity on both the enhancement and the suppression of two-photon cross-sections in multiarm molecules.

  7. The ecophysiology of sulfur isotope fractionation by sulfate reducing bacteria in response to variable environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, W.; Bradley, A. S.; Johnston, D. T.; Pereira, I. A. C.; Venceslau, S.; Wallace, C.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reducers (MSR) drive the Earth's biogeochemical sulfur cycle. At the heart of this energy metabolism is a cascade of redox transformations coupling organic carbon and/or hydrogen oxidation to the dissimilatory reduction of sulfate to sulfide. The sulfide produced is depleted in the heavier isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. The magnitude of discrimination (fractionation) depends on: i) the cell-specific sulfate reduction rate (csSRR, Kaplan & Rittenberg (1964) Can. J. Microbio.; Chambers et al. (1975) Can. J. Microbio; Sim et al. (2011) GCA; Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS), ii) the ambient sulfate concentration (Harrison & Thode (1958) Research; Habicht et al. (2002) Science; Bradley et al. in review), iii) both sulfate and electron donor availability, or iv) an intrinsic physiological limitation (e.g. cellular division rate). When neither sulfate nor electron donor limits csSRR a more complex function relates the magnitude of isotope fractionation to cell physiology and environmental conditions. In recent and on-going work we have examined the importance of enzyme-specific fractionation factors, as well as the influence of electron donor or electron acceptor availability under carefully controlled culture conditions (e.g. Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS). In light of recent advances in MSR genetics and biochemistry we utilize well-characterized mutant strains, along with a continuous-culture methodology (Leavitt et al. (2013) PNAS) to further probe the fractionation capacity of this metabolism under controlled physiological conditions. We present our latest findings on the magnitude of S and D/H isotope fractionation in both wild type and mutant strains. We will discuss these in light of recent theoretical advances (Wing & Halevy (2014) PNAS), examining the mode and relevance of MSR isotope fractionation in the laboratory to modern and ancient environmental settings, particularly anoxic marine sediments.

  8. Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii sp. nov., a novel, arsenite-oxidizing haloalkaliphilic gammaproteobacterium capable of chemoautotrophic or heterotrophic growth with nitrate or oxygen as the electron acceptor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoeft, S.E.; Blum, J.S.; Stolz, J.F.; Tabita, F.R.; Witte, B.; King, G.M.; Santini, J.M.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    A facultative chemoautotrophic bacterium, strain MLHE-1T, was isolated from Mono Lake, an alkaline hypersaline soda lake in California, USA. Cells of strain MLHE-1T were Gram-negative, short motile rods that grew with inorganic electron donors (arsenite, hydrogen, sulfide or thiosulfate) coupled with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. No aerobic growth was attained with arsenite or sulfide, but hydrogen sustained both aerobic and anaerobic growth. No growth occurred when nitrite or nitrous oxide was substituted for nitrate. Heterotrophic growth was observed under aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Cells of strain MLHE-1T could oxidize but not grow on CO, while CH4 neither supported growth nor was it oxidized. When grown chemoautotrophically, strain MLHE-1T assimilated inorganic carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate pathway, with the activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) functioning optimally at 0.1 M NaCl and at pH 7.3. Strain MLHE-1T grew over broad ranges of pH (7.3-10.0; optimum, 9.3), salinity (115-190 g l-1; optimum 30 g l-1) and temperature (113-40 ??C; optimum, 30 ??C). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain MLHE-1T in the class Gammaproteobacteria (family Ectothiorhodospiraceae) and most closely related to Alkalispirillum mobile (98.5%) and Alkalilimnicola halodurans (98.6%), although none of these three haloalkaliphilic micro-organisms were capable of photoautotrophic growth and only strain MLHE-1T was able to oxidize As(III). On the basis of physiological characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization data, it is suggested that strain MLHE-1T represents a novel species within the genus Alkalilimnicola for which the name Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is proposed. The type strain is MLHE-1T (=DSM 17681T =ATCC BAA-1101T). Aspects of the annotated full genome of Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii are discussed in the light of its physiology. ?? 2007 IUMS.

  9. Comparative c-type cytochrome expression analysis in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C grown with soluble and insoluble oxidised metal electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Silke; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Wagner, Darlene D; Pffifner, Susan; Loeffler, Frank E

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C encode 40 and 69 putative c-type cytochrome genes, respectively. Deletion mutant and biochemical studies have assigned specific functions to a few c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to oxidised metals in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Although promising, the genetic approach is limited to gene deletions that produce a distinct phenotype, and organism for which a genetic system is available. To more comprehensively investigate and compare c-type cytochrome expression in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C, proteomic measurements were used to characterise lysates of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) and insoluble Mn(IV) (as MnO2) as electron acceptors. Strain MR-1 expressed 19 and 20, and strain 2CP-C expressed 27 and 25 c-type cytochromes when grown with Fe(III) and Mn(IV), respectively. The majority of c-type cytochromes (77% for strain MR-1 and 63% for strain 2CP-C) were expressed under both growth conditions; however, the analysis also revealed unique c-type cytochromes that were specifically expressed in cells grown with soluble Fe(III) or insoluble Mn(IV). Proteomic characterisation proved to be a promising approach for determining the c-type cytochrome complement expressed under different growth conditions, and will help elucidating the specific functions of more c-type cytochromes that are the basis for Shewanella and Anaeromyxobacter respiratory versatility.

  10. Relationship between microbial sulfate reduction rates and sulfur isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsu'Ura, F.

    2009-12-01

    Sulfate reduction is one of the common processes to obtain energy for certain types of microorganisms.They use hydrogen gas or organic substrates as electron donor and sulfates as electron acceptor, and reduce sulfates to sulfides. Sulfate reducing microbes extend across domains Archea and Bacteria, and are believed to be one of the earliest forms of terrestrial life (Shen 2004). The origin of 34S-depleted (light) sulfide sulfur, especially δ34S < -30 ‰, around hydrothermal vents or beneath the sea-floor is speculated to be the products of sulfate reducers. But laboratory experiments using sulfate reducers fail to produce such light sulfur, and many models were proposed to explain the discrepancy. Canfield et al. (2006) proposed so-called "standard model" based on previous studies. The standard model explained the reason for the large fractionation by temperature dependence of sulfur isotopic fractionation factor and rate of sulfate reduction, which indicated the growth conditions of microbes. However, they failed to prove their model by their other experiments (Canfield et al., 2006). In this study, I performed laboratory culture experiment of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) to explain the 34S-depleted sulfide sulfur. [Experiments] To compare the result with Canfield et al. (2006), I used Desulfovibrio desulfuricans for my laboratory culture experiment. D. desulfuricans was inoculated into glass vials, which contain 40ml of liquid culture media slightly modified from DSMZ #63 medium.Excess amount of Fe (II) is added to the DSMZ#63 medium to precipitate sulfide as iron sulfide. The vials were incubated at 25°C, 30°C, and 37°C, respectively. 21 vials were used for one temperature and sulfide and sulfate was collected from each three glass vials at every 12 hours from 72 hours to 144 hours after start of incubation. The sulfide was precipitated as iron sulfide and the sulfate was precipitated as barite. Sulfur isotope compositions of sulfate and sulfide were

  11. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-06-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO{sub 2}. Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions.

  12. Tetrathiafulvalene-based mixed-valence acceptor-donor-acceptor triads: a joint theoretical and experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Calbo, Joaquín; Aragó, Juan; Otón, Francisco; Lloveras, Vega; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Vidal-Gancedo, José; Veciana, Jaume; Rovira, Concepció; Ortí, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    This work presents a joint theoretical and experimental characterisation of the structural and electronic properties of two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-based acceptor-donor-acceptor triads (BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ; BQ is naphthoquinone and BTCNQ is benzotetracyano-p-quinodimethane) in their neutral and reduced states. The study is performed with the use of electrochemical, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and UV/Vis/NIR spectroelectrochemical techniques guided by quantum-chemical calculations. Emphasis is placed on the mixed-valence properties of both triads in their radical anion states. The electrochemical and EPR results reveal that both BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ triads in their radical anion states behave as class-II mixed-valence compounds with significant electronic communication between the acceptor moieties. Density functional theory calculations (BLYP35/cc-pVTZ), taking into account the solvent effects, predict charge-localised species (BQ(.-)-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ(.-)-TTF-BTCNQ) as the most stable structures for the radical anion states of both triads. A stronger localisation is found both experimentally and theoretically for the BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ anion, in accordance with the more electron-withdrawing character of the BTCNQ acceptor. CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations suggest that the low-energy, broad absorption bands observed experimentally for the BQ-TTF-BQ and BTCNQ-TTF-BTCNQ radical anions are associated with the intervalence charge transfer (IV-CT) electronic transition and two nearby donor-to-acceptor CT excitations. The study highlights the molecular efficiency of the electron-donor TTF unit as a molecular wire connecting two acceptor redox centres.

  13. The structure and bonding of iron-acceptor pairs in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Assali, L.V.C.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    The highly mobile interstitial iron and Group III impurities (B, Al, Ga, In) form iron-acceptor pairs in silicon. Based on the migration kinetics and taking host silicon as a dielectric medium, we have simulated the pairing process in a static silicon lattice. Different from the conventional point charge ionic model, our phenomenological calculations include (1) a correction that takes into account valence electron cloud polarization which adds a short range, attractive interaction in the iron-acceptor pair bonding; and (2) silicon lattice relaxation due to the atomic size difference which causes a local strain field. Our model explains qualitatively (1) trends among the iron-acceptor pairs revealing an increase of the electronic state hole emission energy with increasing principal quantum number of acceptor and decreasing pair separation distance; and (2) the stable and metastable sites and configurational symmetries of the iron-acceptor pairs. The iron-acceptor pairing and bonding mechanism is also discussed.

  14. Alteration of Nontronite NAU-2 by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, H.; Li, Y.; Sears, S.; Yang, J.; Deng, B.; Zhang, C. L.

    2004-05-01

    Iron-rich clay minerals are abundant in the natural environment. The goal of this study is to understand the mechanisms of enhanced reduction of Fe(III) in Fe-rich clay minerals under sulfate-reducing conditions. In particular, biogenic reduction of the structural Fe(III) and release of other elements in a nontronite sample (NAu-2) are studied using a Desulfovibrio spp. strain G-11 with or without amended sulfate. The microbial production of Fe(II) from NAu-2 was about 10% of total structural Fe(III) (30 mM) when Fe(III) was available as the sole electron acceptor. The production of Fe(II), however, reached 29% of total structural Fe(III) when both Fe(III) and SO4= (50 mM) were concurrently used as the electron acceptors. Abiotic production of Fe(II) from reaction of NAu-2 with Na2S (50 mM), on the other hand, was only ca. 7.5% of total structural Fe(III). The enhanced reduction of structural Fe(III) by G-11, particularly in the presence of sulfate, is directly related to the growth rate and metabolic activities of the bacteria which results in destruction of the structure of the nontronite. Analyses by SEM, TEM, XRD, and EDS revealed significant changes in the structure and composition of NAu-2 during its alteration by bacterial sulfate reduction. G-11 could also derive nutrients from NAu-2 to support its growth in the absence of amended minerals and vitamins. Results of this study suggest that sulfate-reducing bacteria may play a more significant role in cycling of Fe, S, and other elements during alteration of Fe-rich clay minerals and other silicate minerals than previously recognized.

  15. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally.

  16. Characterization of the manganese O2-evolving complex and the iron-quinone acceptor complex in photosystem II from a thermophilic cyanobacterium by electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A E; Yachandra, V K; Guiles, R D; Cole, J L; Dexheimer, S L; Britt, R D; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1988-05-31

    The Mn donor complex in the S1 and S2 states and the iron-quinone acceptor complex (Fe2+-Q) in O2-evolving photosystem II (PS II) preparations from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp., have been studied with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Illumination of these preparations at 220-240 K results in formation of a multiline EPR signal very similar to that assigned to a Mn S2 species observed in spinach PS II, together with g = 1.8 and 1.9 EPR signals similar to the Fe2+-QA- acceptor signals seen in spinach PS II. Illumination at 110-160 K does not produce the g = 1.8 or 1.9 EPR signals, nor the multiline or g = 4.1 EPR signals associated with the S2 state of PS II in spinach; however, a signal which peaks at g = 1.6 appears. The most probable assignment of this signal is an altered configuration of the Fe2+-QA- complex. In addition, no donor signal was seen upon warming the 140 K illuminated sample to 215 K. Following continuous illumination at temperatures between 140 and 215 K, the average X-ray absorption Mn K-edge inflection energy changes from 6550 eV for a dark-adapted (S1) sample to 6551 eV for the illuminated (S2) sample. The shift in edge inflection energy indicates an oxidation of Mn, and the absolute edge inflection energies indicate an average Mn oxidation state higher than Mn(II). Upon illumination a significant change was observed in the shape of the features associated with 1s to 3d transitions. The S1 spectrum resembles those of Mn(III) complexes, and the S2 spectrum resembles those of Mn(IV) complexes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum of the Mn complex is similar in the S1 and S2 states. Simulations indicate O or N ligands at 1.75 +/- 0.05 A, transition metal neighbor(s) at 2.73 +/- 0.05 A, which are assumed to be Mn, and terminal ligands which are probably N and O at a range of distances around 2.2 A. The Mn-O bond length of 1.75 A and the transition metal at 2.7 A

  17. D/H fractionation in lipids of facultative and obligate denitrifying and sulfate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, M. R.; Sessions, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of lipids has been shown to vary broadly in both cultured bacteria and in environmental samples. Culturing studies have indicated that this variability may primarily reflect metabolism; however, the limited number of organisms studied thus far prevents application of these trends to interpretation of environmental samples. Here we report D/H fractionations in anaerobic bacteria, including both facultative and obligate anaerobic organisms with a range of electron donors, acceptors, and metabolic pathways. Experiments using the metabolically flexible alphaproteobacterium Paracoccus denitrificans probe particular central metabolic pathways using a range of terminal electron acceptors. While a large range of δD values has been observed during aerobic metabolism, denitrifying cultures produce a more limited range in δD values that are more similar to each other than the corresponding aerobic culture. Data from the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus indicate that chemolithoautotrophy and anaerobic heterotrophy can produce similar δD values, and are similar between bacteria despite differing metabolic pathways. These results suggest that the fractionation of D/H depends both on the specific metabolic pathway and the electron acceptor. While this is not inconsistent with previous studies, it suggests the simple correspondence between δD and metabolism previously understood from aerobic bacteria is not universally applicable.

  18. New acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type copolymers for efficient organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghomrasni, S.; Ayachi, S.; Alimi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Three new conjugated systems alternating acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) type copolymers have been investigated by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) at the 6-31g (d) level of theory. 4,4‧-Dimethoxy-chalcone, also called the 1,3-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (BMP), has been used as a common acceptor moiety. It forced intra-molecular S⋯O interactions through alternating oligo-thiophene derivatives: 4-AlkylThiophenes (4-ATP), 4-AlkylBithiophenes (4-ABTP) and 4-Thienylene Vinylene (4-TEV) as donor moieties. The band gap, HOMO and LUMO electron distributions as well as optical properties were analyzed for each molecule. The fully optimized resulting copolymers showed low band gaps (2.2-2.8 eV) and deep HOMO energy levels ranging from -4.66 to -4.86 eV. A broad absorption [300-900 nm] covering the solar spectrum and absorption maxima ranges from 486 to 604 nm. In addition, organic photovoltaic cells (OPCs) based on alternating copolymers in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) composites with the 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl) propyl-1-phenyl-[6,6]-C61 (PCBM), as an acceptor, have been optimized. Thus, the band gap decreased to 1.62 eV, the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) were about 3-5% and the open circuit voltage Voc of the resulting molecules decreased from 1.50 to 1.27 eV.

  19. Sulfated SnO2 modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes - A mixed proton-electron conducting support for Pt catalysts in direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinwei; Zhu, Hong; Guo, Zhijun; Wei, Yongsheng; Wang, Fanghui

    2011-03-01

    We report on the synthesis of sulfated SnO2 modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites as new supports of Pt catalyst (Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs) with the aims to enhance electron and proton conductivity and also catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation. The Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst is synthesized by a combination of improved sol-gel and pulse-microwave assisted polyol methods. The surface presence, morphology and structure of the Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The electrocatalytic properties of the Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst for ethanol oxidation reactions are investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that Pt-S-SnO2/MWCNTs catalyst exhibits higher catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation than Pt supported on non-sulfated SnO2/MWCNTs composites.

  20. Iron reduction and alteration of nontronite NAu-2 by a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Liang; Vali, Hojatollah; Sears, S. Kelly; Yang, John; Deng, Baolin; Zhang, Chuanlun L.

    2004-08-01

    Iron-rich clay minerals are abundant in the natural environment and are an important source of iron for microbial metabolism. The objective of this study was to understand the mechanism(s) of enhanced reduction of Fe(III) in iron-rich 2:1 clay minerals under sulfate-reducing conditions. In particular, biogenic reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite NAu-2, an Fe-rich smectite-group mineral, was studied using a Desulfovibrio spp. strain G-11 with or without amended sulfate. The microbial production of Fe(II) from NAu-2 is about 10% of total structural Fe(III) (30 mM) when Fe(III) is available as the sole electron acceptor. The measured production of Fe(II), however, can reach 29% of the total structural Fe(III) during sulfate reduction by G-11 when sulfate (50 mM) is concurrently added with NAu-2. In contrast, abiotic production of Fe(II) from the reaction of NAu-2 with Na 2S (50 mM) is only ca. 7.5% of the total structural Fe(III). The enhanced reduction of structural Fe(III) by G-11, particularly in the presence of sulfate, is closely related to the growth rate and metabolic activities of the bacteria. Analyses by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy reveal significant changes in the structure and composition of NAu-2 during its alteration by bacterial sulfate reduction. G-11 can also derive nutrients from NAu-2 to support its growth in the absence of amended minerals and vitamins. Results of this study suggest that sulfate-reducing bacteria may play a more significant role than previously recognized in the cycling of Fe, S, and other elements during alteration of Fe-rich 2:1 clay minerals and other silicate minerals.

  1. Synthetic heparan sulfate dodecasaccharides reveal single sulfation site interconverts CXCL8 and CXCL12 chemokine biology† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc05222j

    PubMed Central

    Jayson, Gordon C.; Hansen, Steen U.; Miller, Gavin J.; Cole, Claire L.; Rushton, Graham; Avizienyte, Egle

    2015-01-01

    The multigram-scale synthesis of a sulfation-site programmed heparin-like dodecasaccharide is described. Evaluation alongside dodecasaccharides lacking this single glucosamine O6-sulfation, or having per-O6-sulfation, shows that site-specific modification of the terminal glucosamine dramatically interconverts regulation of in vitro and in vivo biology mediated by the two important chemokines, CXCL12 (SDF1α) or CXCL8 (IL-8). PMID:26234943

  2. Organic solar cells based on acceptor-functionalized diketopyrrolopyrrole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sanjay S.; Serrano, Luis A.; Ebenhoch, Bernd; Rotello, Vincent M.; Cooke, Graeme; Samuel, Ifor D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three solution processable diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives featuring acceptor units attached to the core by alkyne linker units is reported. Cyclic voltammetry and density functional theory calculations indicate that the DPP derivatives possess similar HOMO and LUMO energies. Solar cells were fabricated by blending the synthesized DPP derivatives with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyrate methyl ester. The influence of donor:acceptor blend ratio, film thickness, annealing temperature, and annealing time on device performance was studied. Differences in device performance were related to atomic force microscopy measurements of the films. The highest power conversion efficiency of 1.76% was achieved for the DPP derivative functionalized with an aldehyde electron-withdrawing group with a 1∶0.7 donor:acceptor ratio when the active layer was annealed for 10 min at 110°C.

  3. Desulfovibrio zosterae sp. nov., a new sulfate reducer isolated from surface-sterilized roots of the seagrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, J T; Liesack, W; Finster, K

    1999-04-01

    A sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain lacT, was isolated from surface-sterilized roots of the benthic macrophyte Zostera marina. Cells were motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Strain lacT utilized lactate, pyruvate, malate, ethanol, L-alanine, fumarate, choline and fructose with sulfate as electron acceptor. In addition, fumarate, pyruvate and fructose were also degraded without an external electron acceptor. Sulfate could be substituted with thiosulfate, sulfite and elemental sulfur. Optimal growth was observed between 32.5 and 34.5 degrees C, at an NaCl concentration of 0.2 M and in a pH range between 6.8 and 7.3. The G + C content of the DNA was 42.7 +/- 0.2 mol%. Desulfoviridin and catalase were present. Strain lacT contained c-type cytochromes. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and the fatty acid pattern grouped this isolate into the genus Desulfovibrio. However, strain lacT differs from all other described Desulfovibrio species on the bases of its 16S rRNA gene sequence, the G + C content, its cellular lipid pattern and the utilization pattern of substrates. These characteristics establish strain lacT (= DSM 11974T) as a novel species of the genus Desulfovibrio, for which the name Desulfovibrio zosterae sp. nov. is proposed.

  4. Isolation of sulfate-reducing bacteria from sediments above the deep-subseafloor aquifer.

    PubMed

    Fichtel, Katja; Mathes, Falko; Könneke, Martin; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2012-01-01

    On a global scale, crustal fluids fuel a large part of the deep-subseafloor biosphere by providing electron acceptors for microbial respiration. In this study, we examined bacterial cultures from sediments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific (IODP Site U1301). The sediments comprise three distinctive compartments: an upper sulfate-containing zone, formed by bottom-seawater diffusion, a sulfate-depleted zone, and a second (∼140 m thick) sulfate-containing zone influenced by fluid diffusion from the basaltic aquifer. In order to identify and characterize sulfate-reducing bacteria, enrichment cultures from different sediment layers were set up, analyzed by molecular screening, and used for isolating pure cultures. The initial enrichments harbored specific communities of heterotrophic microorganisms. Strains affiliated to Desulfosporosinus lacus, Desulfotomaculum sp., and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis were isolated only from the top layers (1.3-9.1 meters below seafloor, mbsf), while several strains of Desulfovibrio indonesiensis and a relative of Desulfotignum balticum were obtained from near-basement sediments (240-262 mbsf). Physiological tests on three selected strains affiliated to Dv. aespoeensis, Dv. indonesiensis, and Desulfotignum balticum indicated that all reduce sulfate with a limited number of short-chain n-alcohols or fatty acids and were able to ferment either ethanol, pyruvate, or betaine. All three isolates shared the capacity of growing chemolithotrophically with H(2) as sole electron donor. Strain P23, affiliating with Dv. indonesiensis, even grew autotrophically in the absence of any organic compounds. Thus, H(2) might be an essential electron donor in the deep-subseafloor where the availability of organic substrates is limited. The isolation of non-sporeforming sulfate reducers from fluid-influenced layers indicates that they have survived the long-term burial as active populations even after the separation from the seafloor hundreds

  5. Isolation of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria from Sediments Above the Deep-Subseafloor Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Fichtel, Katja; Mathes, Falko; Könneke, Martin; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2011-01-01

    On a global scale, crustal fluids fuel a large part of the deep-subseafloor biosphere by providing electron acceptors for microbial respiration. In this study, we examined bacterial cultures from sediments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific (IODP Site U1301). The sediments comprise three distinctive compartments: an upper sulfate-containing zone, formed by bottom-seawater diffusion, a sulfate-depleted zone, and a second (∼140 m thick) sulfate-containing zone influenced by fluid diffusion from the basaltic aquifer. In order to identify and characterize sulfate-reducing bacteria, enrichment cultures from different sediment layers were set up, analyzed by molecular screening, and used for isolating pure cultures. The initial enrichments harbored specific communities of heterotrophic microorganisms. Strains affiliated to Desulfosporosinus lacus, Desulfotomaculum sp., and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis were isolated only from the top layers (1.3–9.1 meters below seafloor, mbsf), while several strains of Desulfovibrio indonesiensis and a relative of Desulfotignum balticum were obtained from near-basement sediments (240–262 mbsf). Physiological tests on three selected strains affiliated to Dv. aespoeensis, Dv. indonesiensis, and Desulfotignum balticum indicated that all reduce sulfate with a limited number of short-chain n-alcohols or fatty acids and were able to ferment either ethanol, pyruvate, or betaine. All three isolates shared the capacity of growing chemolithotrophically with H2 as sole electron donor. Strain P23, affiliating with Dv. indonesiensis, even grew autotrophically in the absence of any organic compounds. Thus, H2 might be an essential electron donor in the deep-subseafloor where the availability of organic substrates is limited. The isolation of non-sporeforming sulfate reducers from fluid-influenced layers indicates that they have survived the long-term burial as active populations even after the separation from the seafloor hundreds

  6. Enzymatic iron and uranium reduction by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Roden, E.E.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Woodward, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The potential for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to enzymatically reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated. Five species of Desulfovibrio as well as Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobulbus propionicus reduced Fe(III) chelated with nitrilotriacetic acid as well as insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Fe(III) oxide reduction resulted in the accumulation of magnetite and siderite. Desulfobacter postgatei reduced the chelated Fe(III) but not Fe(III) oxide. Desulfobacter curvatus, Desulfomonile tiedjei, and Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans did not reduce Fe(III). Only Desulfovibrio species reduced U(VI). U(VI) reduction resulted in the precipitation of uraninite. None of the SRB that reduced Fe(III) or U(VI) appeared to conserve enough energy to support growth from this reaction. However, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans metabolized H2 down to lower concentrations with Fe(III) or U(VI) as the electron acceptor than with sulfate, suggesting that these metals may be preferred electron acceptors at the low H2 concentrations present in most marine sediments. Molybdate did not inhibit Fe(III) reduction by D. desulfuricans. This indicates that the inability of molybdate to inhibit Fe(III) reduction in marine sediments does not rule out the possibility that SRB are important catalysts for Fe(III) reduction. The results demonstrate that although SRB were previously considered to reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) indirectly through the production of sulfide, they may also directly reduce Fe(III) and U(VI) through enzymatic mechanisms. These findings, as well as our recent discovery that the So-reducing microorganism Desulfuromonas acetoxidans can reduce Fe(III), demonstrate that there are close links between the microbial sulfur, iron, and uranium cycles in anaerobic marine sediments. ?? 1993.

  7. Reduction and precipitation of neptunium(V) by sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J. E.; Rittmann, B. E.; Reed, D. T.

    1999-10-21

    Migration of neptunium, as NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, has been identified as a potentially important pathway for actinide release at nuclear waste repositories and existing sites of subsurface contamination. Reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) will likely reduce its volubility, resulting in lowered subsurface migration. The ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to utilize Np(V) as an electron acceptor was investigated, because these bacteria are active in many anaerobic aquifers and are known to facilitate the reduction of metals and radionuclides. Pure and mixed cultures of SRB were able to precipitate neptunium during utilization of pyruvate, lactate, and hydrogen as electron donors in the presence and absence of sulfate. The neptunium in the precipitate was identified as Np(IV) using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. In mixed-culture studies, the addition of hydrogen to consortia grown by pyruvate fermentation stimulated neptunium reduction and precipitation. Experiments with pure cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, growing by lactate fermentation in the absence of sulfate or by sulfate reduction, confirm that the organism is active in neptunium reduction and precipitation. Based on our results, the activity of SRB in the subsurface may have a significant, and potentially beneficial, impact on actinide mobility by reducing neptunium volubility.

  8. Through-Solvent Tunneling in Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Molecules Containing a Molecular Cleft.

    PubMed

    Graff, B M; Lamont, D N; Parker, M F L; Bloom, B P; Schafmeister, C E; Waldeck, D H

    2016-08-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is used to investigate the solvent-mediated electron tunneling between electron donor and acceptor groups in polar solvents. Bis-peptide scaffolds are used to control the spatial positioning of electron donor and acceptor groups and create a molecular cleft. The photoinduced electron transfer is studied for two different cleft sizes, and the electronic coupling is found to be controlled by the nature of the solvent and the ability of the molecular cleft to accommodate it, as well as interact directly with it. These studies demonstrate the importance of electron tunneling through nonbonded contacts and reveal a strategy for examining such tunneling pathways in polar solvents. PMID:27401503

  9. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Studies of Single Crystals of Manganese Ion-Doped Ammonium Sulfate, Gadolinium Ion-Doped Ammonium Praseodymium SULFATE.WATER, Vanadium Oxide Ion-Doped M Ammonium SULFATE.WATER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiansheng

    Detailed X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements on single crystals of Mn^ {2+}-doped (NH_4)_2 SO_4, Gd^ {3+}-doped NH_4Pr(SO _4)_2cdot4H _2O, VO^{2+} -doped M(NH_4)_2(SO _4)_2cdot6H_2 O (M = Cd, Co, Mg, Fe, Zn) and Mg(ND_4) _2(SO_4)_2cdot 6D_2O, and Cu^ {2+}-doped MNa_2(SO _4)_2cdot4H _2O (M = Mg, Co) are made at variable temperatures. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters for Mn^{2+ }, Gd^{3+}, VO^{2+} and Cu ^{2+} ions are evaluated using a least-squares-fitting procedure. The positions and local symmetries of the impurity ions in these hosts have been well deduced. The ferroelectric transition in (NH_4) _2SO_4 has been extensively studied via the splittings of Mn^{2+ } EPR lines, leading to the determination of the critical exponent beta. The existence of two inequivalent sublattices in the (NH _4)_2SO_4 crystal is confirmed. Temperature variation of Gd^{3+ } EPR spectra reveal two first-order phase transitions in the NH_4Pr(SO _4)_2cdot4H_2 O crystal. The host-ion spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) times (tau) of Pr^ {3+} have been estimated via the EPR linewidths of Gd^{3+} impurity ions using an appropriate expression. The predominant processes of SLR of Pr^{3+} host -ions have been deduced. The superhyperfine structures of VO^ {2+} EPR spectra in the hydrated Tutton -salt hosts M(NH_4)_2(SO _4)_2cdot6H_2 O have been well explained by comparison with the VO^{2+} EPR spectra in the deuterated host crystal Mg(ND_4)_2 (SO_4)_2cdot6D _2O. Using the VO^ {2+} EPR and optical-absorption spectra, the bonding coefficients of the (VO(H_2 O)_5]^{2+ } complex have been estimated. The systematics of EPR of the VO^{2+} ion in this series of Tutton salts is analyzed. The impurity-host exchange-interaction constant of VO^{2+}-Fe ^{2+} pair is determined in the Fe(NH_4)_2(SO_4) _2cdot6H_2O host, using the g-shift due to the exchange interaction and the shape of the crystal at liquid-helium temperature. The tau values of Fe^ {2+} and Co^{2+} in the Fe(NH_4)_2(SO _4

  10. Covalent non-fused tetrathiafulvalene-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Pop, Flavia; Avarvari, Narcis

    2016-06-28

    Covalent donor-acceptor (D-A) systems have significantly contributed to the development of many organic materials and to molecular electronics. Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) represents one of the most widely studied donor precursors and has been incorporated into the structure of many D-A derivatives with the objective of obtaining redox control and modulation of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), in order to address switchable emissive systems and to take advantage of its propensity to form regular stacks in the solid state. In this review, we focus on the main families of non-fused TTF-acceptors, which are classified according to the nature of the acceptor: nitrogen-containing heterocycles, BODIPY, perylenes and electron poor unsaturated hydrocarbons, as well as radical acceptors. We describe herein the most representative members of each family with a brief mention of their synthesis and a special focus on their D-A characteristics. Special attention is given to ICT and its modulation, fluorescence quenching and switching, photoconductivity, bistability and spin distribution by discussing and comparing spectroscopic and electrochemical features, photophysical properties, solid-state properties and theoretical calculations. PMID:27193500

  11. Fine structure of the Mn acceptor in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Debus, J.; Averkiev, N. S.; Dimitriev, G. S.; Sapega, V. F.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-06-01

    We reveal the electronic level structure of the Mn acceptor, which consists of a valence-band hole bound to an Mn2 + ion, in presence of applied uniaxial stress and an external magnetic field in bulk GaAs. Resonant spin-flip Raman scattering is used to measure the g factor of the AMn0 center in the ground and excited states with the total angular momenta F =1 and F =2 and characterize the optical selection rules of the spin-flip transitions between these Mn-acceptor states. We determine the random stress fields near the Mn acceptor, the constant of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the valence-band holes and the electrons of the inner Mn2 + shell as well as the deformation potential for the exchange energy. The p -d exchange energy, in particular, decreases significantly with increasing compressive stress. By combining the experimental Raman study with the developed theoretical model on the scattering efficiency, in which also the random local and external uniaxial stresses and magnetic field are considered, the fine structure of the Mn acceptor is determined in full detail.

  12. Diethyl sulfate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Diethyl sulfate ; CASRN 64 - 67 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  13. Dimethyl sulfate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dimethyl sulfate ; CASRN 77 - 78 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  14. Microsensor measurements of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation in compact microbial communities of aerobic biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehl, M.; Joergensen, B.B. )

    1992-04-01

    The microzonation of O{sub 2} respiration, H{sub 2}S oxidation, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} reduction in aerobic trickling-filter biofilms was studied by measuring concentration profiles at high spatial resolution (25 to 100 {mu}m) with microsensors for O{sub 2}, S{sup 2{minus}}, and pH. Specific reaction rates were calculated from measured concentration profiles by using a simple one-dimensional diffusion reaction model. The importance of electron acceptor and electron donor availability for the microzonation of respiratory processes and their reaction rates was investigated. Oxygen respiration was found in the upper 0.2 to 0.4 mm of the biofilm, whereas sulfate reduction occurred in deeper, anoxic parts of the biofilm. Sulfate reduction accounted for up to 50% of the total mineralization of organic carbon in the biofilms. All H{sub 2}S produced from sulfate reduction was reoxidized by O{sub 2} in a narrow reaction zone, and no H{sub 2}S escaped to the overlying water. Turnover times of H{sub 2}S and O{sub 2} in the reaction zone were only a few seconds owing to rapid bacterial H{sub 2}S oxidation. Anaerobic H{sub 2}S oxidation with NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} could be induced by addition of nitrate to the medium. Total sulfate reduction rates increased when the availability of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} or organic substrate increased as a result of deepening of the sulfate reduction zone or an increase in the sulfate reduction intensity, respectively.

  15. Electron spin echo modulation study of sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide micellar solutions in the presence of urea: Evidence for urea interaction at the micellar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Baglioni, P. ); Ferroni, E. ); Kevan, L. )

    1990-05-17

    Electron spin echo studies have been carried out for a series of x-doxylstearic acid (x-DSA, x = 5,7,10,12,16) and 4-octanoyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy (C{sub 8}-TEMPO) spin probes in micellar solutions of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cationic dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) in D{sub 2}O and in the presence of 2 or 6 M urea or urea-d{sub 4}. Modulation effects due to the interaction of the unpaired electron with urea and water deuteriums show that urea does not affect the bent conformation of the x-DSA probe in the micelle. The analysis of the deuterium modulation depth and the Fourier transformation of the two-pulse electron spin echo spectra show that urea interacts with the surfactant polar headgroups at the micelle surface. These results support recent molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo calculations of micellar systems and are in agreement with direct interaction of urea at micellar surfaces in which it replaces some water molecules in the surface region.

  16. Extracellular Electron Transfer Is a Bottleneck in the Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of C1018 Carbon Steel by the Biofilm of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchao; Feng, Hao; Liu, Zhiyong; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Carbon steels are widely used in the oil and gas industry from downhole tubing to transport trunk lines. Microbes form biofilms, some of which cause the so-called microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steels. MIC by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is often a leading cause in MIC failures. Electrogenic SRB sessile cells harvest extracellular electrons from elemental iron oxidation for energy production in their metabolism. A previous study suggested that electron mediators riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) both accelerated the MIC of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm that is a corrosive SRB biofilm. Compared with stainless steels, carbon steels are usually far more prone to SRB attacks because SRB biofilms form much denser biofilms on carbon steel surfaces with a sessile cell density that is two orders of magnitude higher. In this work, C1018 carbon steel coupons were used in tests of MIC by D. vulgaris with and without an electron mediator. Experimental weight loss and pit depth data conclusively confirmed that both riboflavin and FAD were able to accelerate D. vulgaris attack against the carbon steel considerably. It has important implications in MIC failure analysis and MIC mitigation in the oil and gas industry. PMID:26308855

  17. Suppression of Raman electron spin relaxation of radicals in crystals. Comparison of Cu2+ and free radical relaxation in triglycine sulfate and Tutton salt single crystals.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Lijewski, S

    2011-08-31

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation was measured by the electron spin echo method in a broad temperature range above 4.2 K for Cu(2+) ions and free radicals produced by ionizing radiation in triglycine sulfate (TGS) and Tutton salt (NH4)(2)Zn(SO4)2 ⋅ 6H2O crystals. Localization of the paramagnetic centres in the crystal unit cells was determined from continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. Various spin relaxation processes and mechanisms are outlined. Cu(2+) ions relax fast via two-phonon Raman processes in both crystals involving the whole phonon spectrum of the host lattice. This relaxation is slightly slower for TGS where Cu(2+) ions are in the interstitial position. The ordinary Raman processes do not contribute to the radical relaxation which relaxes via the local phonon mode. The local mode lies within the acoustic phonon band for radicals in TGS but within the optical phonon range in (NH4)(2)Zn(SO4)2 ⋅ 6H2O. In the latter the cross-relaxation was considered. A lack of phonons around the radical molecules suggested a local crystal amorphisation produced by x- or γ-rays.

  18. Extracellular Electron Transfer Is a Bottleneck in the Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of C1018 Carbon Steel by the Biofilm of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Li, Huabing; Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Feng, Hao; Liu, Zhiyong; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Carbon steels are widely used in the oil and gas industry from downhole tubing to transport trunk lines. Microbes form biofilms, some of which cause the so-called microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steels. MIC by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is often a leading cause in MIC failures. Electrogenic SRB sessile cells harvest extracellular electrons from elemental iron oxidation for energy production in their metabolism. A previous study suggested that electron mediators riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) both accelerated the MIC of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm that is a corrosive SRB biofilm. Compared with stainless steels, carbon steels are usually far more prone to SRB attacks because SRB biofilms form much denser biofilms on carbon steel surfaces with a sessile cell density that is two orders of magnitude higher. In this work, C1018 carbon steel coupons were used in tests of MIC by D. vulgaris with and without an electron mediator. Experimental weight loss and pit depth data conclusively confirmed that both riboflavin and FAD were able to accelerate D. vulgaris attack against the carbon steel considerably. It has important implications in MIC failure analysis and MIC mitigation in the oil and gas industry. PMID:26308855

  19. Extracellular Electron Transfer Is a Bottleneck in the Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion of C1018 Carbon Steel by the Biofilm of Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Li, Huabing; Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Feng, Hao; Liu, Zhiyong; Li, Xiaogang; Gu, Tingyue; Yang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Carbon steels are widely used in the oil and gas industry from downhole tubing to transport trunk lines. Microbes form biofilms, some of which cause the so-called microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steels. MIC by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) is often a leading cause in MIC failures. Electrogenic SRB sessile cells harvest extracellular electrons from elemental iron oxidation for energy production in their metabolism. A previous study suggested that electron mediators riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) both accelerated the MIC of 304 stainless steel by the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm that is a corrosive SRB biofilm. Compared with stainless steels, carbon steels are usually far more prone to SRB attacks because SRB biofilms form much denser biofilms on carbon steel surfaces with a sessile cell density that is two orders of magnitude higher. In this work, C1018 carbon steel coupons were used in tests of MIC by D. vulgaris with and without an electron mediator. Experimental weight loss and pit depth data conclusively confirmed that both riboflavin and FAD were able to accelerate D. vulgaris attack against the carbon steel considerably. It has important implications in MIC failure analysis and MIC mitigation in the oil and gas industry.

  20. Acceptors in bulk and nanoscale ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.

    2012-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor that emits bright UV light, with little wasted heat. This intrinsic feature makes it a promising material for energy-efficient white lighting, nano-lasers, and other optical applications. For devices to be competitive, however, it is necessary to develop reliable p-type doping. Although substitutional nitrogen has been considered as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO, theoretical and experimental work indicates that nitrogen is a deep acceptor and will not lead to p-type conductivity. This talk will highlight recent experiments on ZnO:N at low temperatures. A red/near-IR photoluminescence (PL) band is correlated with the presence of deep nitrogen acceptors. PL excitation (PLE) measurements show an absorption threshold of 2.26 eV, in good agreement with theory. Magnetic resonance experiments provide further evidence for this assignment. The results of these studies seem to rule out group-V elements as shallow acceptors in ZnO, contradicting numerous reports in the literature. If these acceptors do not work as advertised, is there a viable alternative? Optical studies on ZnO nanocrystals show some intriguing leads. At liquid-helium temperatures, a series of sharp IR absorption peaks arise from an unknown acceptor impurity. The data are consistent with a hydrogenic acceptor 0.46 eV above the valence band edge. While this binding energy is still too deep for many practical applications, it represents a significant improvement over the ˜ 1.3 eV binding energy for nitrogen acceptors. Nanocrystals present another twist. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, surface states are especially important. Specifically, electron-hole recombination at the surface give rises to a red luminescence band. From our PL and IR experiments, we have developed a ``unified'' model that attempts to explain acceptor and surface states in ZnO nanocrystals. This model could provide a useful framework for designing future nanoscale ZnO devices.

  1. Biochemistry, physiology and biotechnology of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barton, Larry L; Fauque, Guy D

    2009-01-01

    Chemolithotrophic bacteria that use sulfate as terminal electron acceptor (sulfate-reducing bacteria) constitute a unique physiological group of microorganisms that couple anaerobic electron transport to ATP synthesis. These bacteria (220 species of 60 genera) can use a large variety of compounds as electron donors and to mediate electron flow they have a vast array of proteins with redox active metal groups. This chapter deals with the distribution in the environment and the major physiological and metabolic characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This chapter presents our current knowledge of soluble electron transfer proteins and transmembrane redox complexes that are playing an essential role in the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway of SRB of the genus Desulfovibrio. Environmentally important activities displayed by SRB are a consequence of the unique electron transport components or the production of high levels of H(2)S. The capability of SRB to utilize hydrocarbons in pure cultures and consortia has resulted in using these bacteria for bioremediation of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) compounds in contaminated soils. Specific strains of SRB are capable of reducing 3-chlorobenzoate, chloroethenes, or nitroaromatic compounds and this has resulted in proposals to use SRB for bioremediation of environments containing trinitrotoluene and polychloroethenes. Since SRB have displayed dissimilatory reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI), several biotechnology procedures have been proposed for using SRB in bioremediation of toxic metals. Additional non-specific metal reductase activity has resulted in using SRB for recovery of precious metals (e.g. platinum, palladium and gold) from waste streams. Since bacterially produced sulfide contributes to the souring of oil fields, corrosion of concrete, and discoloration of stonework is a serious problem, there is considerable interest in controlling the sulfidogenic activity of the SRB. The

  2. Biochemistry, physiology and biotechnology of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barton, Larry L; Fauque, Guy D

    2009-01-01

    Chemolithotrophic bacteria that use sulfate as terminal electron acceptor (sulfate-reducing bacteria) constitute a unique physiological group of microorganisms that couple anaerobic electron transport to ATP synthesis. These bacteria (220 species of 60 genera) can use a large variety of compounds as electron donors and to mediate electron flow they have a vast array of proteins with redox active metal groups. This chapter deals with the distribution in the environment and the major physiological and metabolic characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). This chapter presents our current knowledge of soluble electron transfer proteins and transmembrane redox complexes that are playing an essential role in the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway of SRB of the genus Desulfovibrio. Environmentally important activities displayed by SRB are a consequence of the unique electron transport components or the production of high levels of H(2)S. The capability of SRB to utilize hydrocarbons in pure cultures and consortia has resulted in using these bacteria for bioremediation of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) compounds in contaminated soils. Specific strains of SRB are capable of reducing 3-chlorobenzoate, chloroethenes, or nitroaromatic compounds and this has resulted in proposals to use SRB for bioremediation of environments containing trinitrotoluene and polychloroethenes. Since SRB have displayed dissimilatory reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI), several biotechnology procedures have been proposed for using SRB in bioremediation of toxic metals. Additional non-specific metal reductase activity has resulted in using SRB for recovery of precious metals (e.g. platinum, palladium and gold) from waste streams. Since bacterially produced sulfide contributes to the souring of oil fields, corrosion of concrete, and discoloration of stonework is a serious problem, there is considerable interest in controlling the sulfidogenic activity of the SRB. The

  3. Threshold-like complexation of conjugated polymers with small molecule acceptors in solution within the neighbor-effect model.

    PubMed

    Sosorev, Andrey Yu; Parashchuk, Olga D; Zapunidi, Sergey A; Kashtanov, Grigoriy S; Golovnin, Ilya V; Kommanaboyina, Srikanth; Perepichka, Igor F; Paraschuk, Dmitry Yu

    2016-02-14

    In some donor-acceptor blends based on conjugated polymers, a pronounced charge-transfer complex (CTC) forms in the electronic ground state. In contrast to small-molecule donor-acceptor blends, the CTC concentration in polymer:acceptor solution can increase with the acceptor content in a threshold-like way. This threshold-like behavior was earlier attributed to the neighbor effect (NE) in the polymer complexation, i.e., next CTCs are preferentially formed near the existing ones; however, the NE origin is unknown. To address the factors affecting the NE, we record the optical absorption data for blends of the most studied conjugated polymers, poly(2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), with electron acceptors of fluorene series, 1,8-dinitro-9,10-antraquinone (), and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane () in different solvents, and then analyze the data within the NE model. We have found that the NE depends on the polymer and acceptor molecular skeletons and solvent, while it does not depend on the acceptor electron affinity and polymer concentration. We conclude that the NE operates within a single macromolecule and stems from planarization of the polymer chain involved in the CTC with an acceptor molecule; as a result, the probability of further complexation with the next acceptor molecules at the adjacent repeat units increases. The steric and electronic microscopic mechanisms of NE are discussed.

  4. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy. PMID:25400629

  5. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly,more » during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.« less

  6. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Ray, Jayashree; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Bauer, Stefan; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-10-31

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13) is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1) is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. We found that during hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  7. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    PubMed

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements. PMID:27440174

  8. Free Carrier Generation in Organic Photovoltaic Bulk Heterojunctions of Conjugated Polymers with Molecular Acceptors: Planar versus Spherical Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nardes, Alexandre M.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-03-05

    We present a comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85 % of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. Here, we propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  9. Free carrier generation in organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions of conjugated polymers with molecular acceptors: planar versus spherical acceptors.

    PubMed

    Nardes, Alexandre M; Ferguson, Andrew J; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    A comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device is presented. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85% of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. We propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  10. Free carrier generation in organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions of conjugated polymers with molecular acceptors: planar versus spherical acceptors.

    PubMed

    Nardes, Alexandre M; Ferguson, Andrew J; Wolfer, Pascal; Gui, Kurt; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Kopidakis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    A comparative study of the photophysical performance of the prototypical fullerene derivative PC61BM with a planar small-molecule acceptor in an organic photovoltaic device is presented. The small-molecule planar acceptor is 2-[{7-(9,9-di-n-propyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl}methylene]malononitrile, termed K12. We discuss photoinduced free charge-carrier generation and transport in blends of PC61BM or K12 with poly(3-n-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), surveying literature results for P3HT:PC61BM and presenting new results on P3HT:K12. For both systems we also review previous work on film structure and correlate the structural and photophysical results. In both cases, a disordered mixed phase is formed between P3HT and the acceptor, although the photophysical properties of this mixed phase differ markedly for PC61BM and K12. In the case of PC61BM the mixed phase acts as a free carrier generation region that can efficiently shuttle carriers to the pure polymer and fullerene domains. As a result, the vast majority of excitons quenched in P3HT:PC61BM blends yield free carriers detected by the contactless time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) method. In contrast, approximately 85% of the excitons quenched in P3HT:K12 do not result in free carriers over the nanosecond timescale of the TRMC experiment. We attribute this to poor electron-transport properties in the mixed P3HT:K12 phase. We propose that the observed differences can be traced to the respective shapes of PC61BM and K12: the three-dimensional nature of the fullerene cage facilitates coupling between PC61BM molecules irrespective of their relative orientation, whereas for K12 strong electronic coupling is only expected for molecules oriented with their π systems parallel to each other. Comparison between the eutectic compositions of the P3HT:PC61BM and P3HT:K12 shows that the former contains enough fullerene to form a percolation pathway for electrons, whereas the latter contains a sub

  11. Bright Solid-State Emission of Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor and Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-24

    The development of disilane-bridged donor-acceptor-donor (D-Si-Si-A-Si-Si-D) and acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-Si-Si-D-Si-Si-A) compounds is described. Both types of compound showed strong emission (λem =ca. 500 and ca. 400 nm, respectively) in the solid state with high quantum yields (Φ: up to 0.85). Compound 4 exhibited aggregation-induced emission enhancement in solution. X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structures of 2, 4, and 12 had no intermolecular π-π interactions to suppress the nonradiative transition in the solid state.

  12. Acceptor conductivity in bulk zinc oxide (0001) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adekore, Bababunmi Tolu

    ZnO is a promising wide bandgap semiconductor. Its renowned and prominent properties as its bandgap of 3.37eV at 4.2K; its very high excitonic binding energy, 60meV; its high melting temperature, 2248K constitute the basis for the recently renewed and sustained scientific interests in the material. In addition to the foregoing, the availability of bulk substrates of industrially relevant sizes provides important opportunities such as homoepitaxial deposition of the material which is a technological asset in the production of efficient optoelectronic and electronic devices. The nemesis of wide bandgap materials cannot be more exemplified than in ZnO. The notorious limitation of asymmetric doping and the haunting plague of electrically active point defects dim the bright future of the material. In this case, the search for reliable and consistent acceptor conductivity in bulk substrates has been hitherto, unsuccessful. In the dissertation that now follows, our efforts have been concerted in the search for a reliable acceptor. We have carefully investigated the science of point defects in the material, especially those responsible for the high donor conductivity. We also investigated and herein report variety of techniques of introducing acceptors into the material. We employ the most relevant and informative characterization techniques in verifying both the intended conductivity and the response of intrinsic crystals to variation in temperature and strain. And finally we explain deviations, where they exist, from ideal acceptor characteristics. Our work on reliable acceptor has been articulated in four papers. The first establishing capacitance based methods of monitoring electrically active donor defects. The second investigates the nature of anion acceptors on the oxygen sublattice. A study similar to the preceding study was conducted for cation acceptors on the zinc sublattice and reported in the third paper. Finally, an analysis of the response of the crystal to

  13. Bacterial dissimilatory reduction of arsenate and sulfate in meromictic Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Dowdle, P.R.; Hoeft, S.; Sharp, J.O.; Schaefer, J.K.; Miller, L.G.; Switzer, Blum J.; Smith, R.L.; Bloom, N.S.; Wallschlaeger, D.

    2000-01-01

    The stratified (meromictic) water column of alkaline and hypersaline Mono Lake, California, contains high concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic (~200 ??mol/L). Arsenic speciation changes from arsenate [As (V)] to arsenite [As (III)] with the transition from oxic surface waters (misolimnion) to anoxic bottom waters (monimolimnion). A radioassay was devised to measure the reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) and tested using cell suspensions of the As (V)-respiring Bacillus selenitireducens, which completely reduced the 73As (V). In field experiments, no significant activity was noted in the aerobic mixolimnion waters, but reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) was observed in all the monimolimnion samples. Rate constants ranged from 0.02 to 0.3/day, with the highest values in the samples from the deepest depths (24 and 28 m). The highest activities occurred between 18 and 21 m, where As (V) abundant (rate, ~5.9 ??mol/L per day). In contrast, sulfate reduction occurred at depths below 21 m, with the highest rates attained at 28 m (rate, ~2.3 ??mol/L per day). These results indicate that As (V) ranks second in importance, after sulfate, as an electron acceptor for anaerobic bacterial respiration in the water column. Annual arsenate respiration may mineralize as much as 14.2% of the pelagic photosynthetic carbon fixed during meromixis. When combined with sulfate-reduction data, anaerobic respiration in the water column can mineralize 32-55% of this primary production. As lakes of this type approach salt saturation, As (V) can become the most important electron acceptor for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. A new classification of the amino acid side chains based on doublet acceptor energy levels.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, S F; Morgan, R S; Brooks, C L

    1988-01-01

    We describe a new classification of the amino acid side chains based on the potential energy level at which each will accept an extra (doublet) electron. The doublet acceptor energy level, and the doublet acceptor orbital were calculated using semiempirical INDO/2-UHF molecular orbital theory. The results of these calculations show that the side chains fall into four groups. We have termed these groups repulsive, insulating, semiconducting, and attractive in accordance with where each lies on the relative energy scale. We use this classification to examine the role of residues between the donor and acceptor in modulating the rate and mechanism of electron transfer in proteins. With the calculated acceptor levels, we construct a potential barrier for those residues between the donor and acceptor. It is the area beneath this barrier that determines the decay of electronic coupling between donor and acceptor, and thus the transfer rate. We have used this schematic approach to characterize the four electron transfer pathways in myoglobin recently studied by Mayo et al. (Mayo, S.L., W.R. Ellis, R.J. Crutchley, and H.B. Gray. 1986. Science [Wash. DC]. 233:948-952). PMID:3342271

  15. The nitrogen cycle in anaerobic methanotrophic mats of the Black Sea is linked to sulfate reduction and biomass decomposition.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Michael; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen-Tomm, Martin; Basen, Mirko; Bastida, Felipe; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) mats host methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. Little is known about the nitrogen cycle in these communities. Here, we link the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) to the nitrogen cycle in microbial mats of the Black Sea by using stable isotope probing. We used four different (15)N-labeled sources of nitrogen: dinitrogen, nitrate, nitrite and ammonium. We estimated the nitrogen incorporation rates into the total biomass and the methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR). Dinitrogen played an insignificant role as nitrogen source. Assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction occurred. High rates of nitrate reduction to dinitrogen were stimulated by methane and sulfate, suggesting that oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds such as sulfides was necessary for AOM with nitrate as electron acceptor. Nitrate reduction to dinitrogen occurred also in the absence of methane as electron donor but at six times slower rates. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was independent of AOM. Ammonium was used for biomass synthesis under all conditions. The pivotal enzyme in AOM coupled to sulfate reduction, MCR, was synthesized from nitrate and ammonium. Results show that AOM coupled to sulfate reduction along with biomass decomposition drive the nitrogen cycle in the ANME mats of the Black Sea and that MCR enzymes are involved in this process.

  16. Dechlorination of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) by sulfate-reducing bacteria from an aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Sonier, D N; Duran, N L; Smith, G B

    1994-01-01

    Groundwater samples were obtained from a deep aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds. One-milliliter samples contained 9.2 x 10(5) total bacteria (by acridine orange microscopic counts) and 2.5 x 10(3) sulfate-reducing bacteria (by most probable number analysis). Samples were incubated anaerobically in a basal salts medium with acetate as the electron donor and nitrate and sulfate as the electron acceptors. Residual levels of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) in samples were biotically degraded, while trichloroethylene was not. When successively higher levels of CFC-11 were added, increasingly rapid degradation rates were observed. Concomitant with CFC-11 degradation was the near stoichiometric production of fluorodichloromethane (HCFC-21); the production of HCFC-21 was verified by mass spectrometry. CFC-11 degradation was dependent on the presence of acetate (or butyrate) and sulfate but was independent of nitrate. Other carbon sources such as lactate and isopropanol did not support the degradation. The addition of 1 mM sodium sulfide completely inhibited CFC-11 degradation; however, degradation occurred in the presence of 2 mM 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. These results indicate that the anaerobic dechlorination of CFC-11 is carried out by sulfate-reducing bacteria and not by denitrifying or methanogenic bacteria. Images PMID:7811093

  17. Dechlorination of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) by sulfate-reducing bacteria from an aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sonier, D N; Duran, N L; Smith, G B

    1994-12-01

    Groundwater samples were obtained from a deep aquifer contaminated with halogenated aliphatic compounds. One-milliliter samples contained 9.2 x 10(5) total bacteria (by acridine orange microscopic counts) and 2.5 x 10(3) sulfate-reducing bacteria (by most probable number analysis). Samples were incubated anaerobically in a basal salts medium with acetate as the electron donor and nitrate and sulfate as the electron acceptors. Residual levels of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) in samples were biotically degraded, while trichloroethylene was not. When successively higher levels of CFC-11 were added, increasingly rapid degradation rates were observed. Concomitant with CFC-11 degradation was the near stoichiometric production of fluorodichloromethane (HCFC-21); the production of HCFC-21 was verified by mass spectrometry. CFC-11 degradation was dependent on the presence of acetate (or butyrate) and sulfate but was independent of nitrate. Other carbon sources such as lactate and isopropanol did not support the degradation. The addition of 1 mM sodium sulfide completely inhibited CFC-11 degradation; however, degradation occurred in the presence of 2 mM 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. These results indicate that the anaerobic dechlorination of CFC-11 is carried out by sulfate-reducing bacteria and not by denitrifying or methanogenic bacteria. PMID:7811093

  18. Optical Spectroscopy of Acceptors in Semiconductors: I. Acceptor Complexes in Neutron Transmutation-Doped Silicon. I. Piezospectroscopy of Beryllium Double Acceptors in Germanium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrec, Charles Raymond

    Substitutional group III impurities in group IV elemental semiconductors bind a hole from the valence band and are solid-state analogs of the hydrogen atom; likewise, group II impurities bind two holes and are analogs of the helium atom. In these materials, the electronic transitions from the acceptor s-like ground state to the p-like excited states are infrared active. A high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer, and a liquid-helium cooled germanium bolometer and glass sample cryostat are ideally suited to study these effects. When silicon is exposed to neutron radiation, a fraction of the atoms are converted to phosphorus. After annealing, these impurity atoms occupy substitutional locations and are thus donors. When the initial crystal is p-type and the final phosphorus concentration is less than that of the acceptor, the sample is left p-type but highly compensated. This results in broadening of the transition lines. However, before complete annealing, it is discovered that a new, extremely shallow acceptor is formed, with an ionization energy of 28.24 meV, which is far shallower than any previously known. Neutral Be in Ge is known to be a double acceptor. Under uniaxial stress, the single hole (1s)^2 to (1s)(np) excitation spectrum shows splittings and polarization effects. These piezospectroscopic effects were observed for a compressive force vec F | (111) and vec F | (100). The phenomenological shear deformation potential constants have been deduced for the ground and excited states of the D transition.

  19. Influence of nitrate and sulfate reduction in the bioelectrochemically assisted dechlorination of cis-DCE.

    PubMed

    Lai, Agnese; Verdini, Roberta; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigated the reductive dechlorination (RD) of cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) (average influent 14.2±0.7 μM) by a bioelectrochemical system (BES), in the presence of real contaminated groundwater containing high levels of nitrate and sulfate. The BES enhanced both the RD and competing reactions, such as nitrate and sulfate reductions, which occurred with neither an external organic carbon source nor any inoculum other than the indigenous microbial consortia in the real groundwater. In preliminary batch tests, RD and full nitrate removal occurred after a short lag phase, whereas sulfate reduction occurred slowly and alongside the RD. Under continuous flow conditions (hydraulic retention time, HRT, 1.4 d), the competition of different electron acceptors was strongly affected by the cathodic potential in the range -550 to -750 mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). Nitrate reduction was driven to completion at all tested cathodic potentials, whereas sulfate reduction and the RD rate increased as the cathodic potential became more negative. At -750 mV vs. SHE, strong methanogenesis was also observed and became the most important sink of electrons. The overall coulombic efficiency decreased while the potential became more negative. The RD contribution was always less than 1%. Hence, greater energy consumption was required to obtain higher RD rate and better conversion. Anodic oxidation was only observed at -750 mV vs. SHE where almost 39% of residual vinyl chloride (VC) was oxidized and the sulfate was formed back from sulfide (further contributing to electric waste).

  20. Multiple sulfur isotope signatures of sulfite and thiosulfate reduction by the model dissimilatory sulfate-reducer, Desulfovibrio alaskensis str. G20

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Cummins, Renata; Schmidt, Marian L.; Sim, Min S.; Ono, Shuhei; Bradley, Alexander S.; Johnston, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction serves as a key metabolic carbon remineralization process in anoxic marine environments. Sulfate reducing microorganisms can impart a wide range in mass-dependent sulfur isotopic fractionation. As such, the presence and relative activity of these organisms is identifiable from geological materials. By extension, sulfur isotope records are used to infer the redox balance of marine sedimentary environments, and the oxidation state of Earth's oceans and atmosphere. However, recent work suggests that our understandi