Science.gov

Sample records for electron beam technique

  1. Improved electron-beam welding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, B.

    1970-01-01

    Electron-beam generator produces high quality welds without vaporization by relying on the mobility and hydrodynamic properties of the material in its liquid phase. The power density of the beam is relative to the speed of the workpiece, producing an inclined weld-front.

  2. Electron Beam Instrumentation Techniques Using Coherent Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. X.

    1997-05-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in short electron bunches for different applications such as short wavelength FELs, linear colliders, advanced accelerators such as laser or plasma wakefield accelerators, and Compton backscattering X-ray sources. A short bunch length is needed to meet various requirements such as high peak current, low momentum spread, high luminosity, small ratio of bunch length to plasma wavelength, or accurate timing. Meanwhile, much progress has been made on photoinjectors and different magnetic and RF bunching schemes to produce very short bunches. Measurement of those short bunches becomes essential to develop, characterize, and operate such demanding machines. Conventionally, bunch duration of short electron bunches is measured by transverse RF deflecting cavities or streak camera. With such devices it becomes very challenging to measure bunch length down to a few hundred femtoseconds. Many frequency domain techniques have been recently developed, based on a relation between bunch profile and coherent radiation spectrum. These techniques provide excellent performance for short bunches. In this paper, coherent radiation and its applications to bunch length measurement will be discussed. A strategy for bunch length control at Jefferson Lab will be presented, which includes a noninvasive coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) monitor, a zero-phasing technique used to calibrate the CSR detector, and phase transfer measurement used to correct RF phase drifts.

  3. Electro-optic techniques in electron beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Toth, Csaba; Matlis, Nicholas; Plateau, Guillaume; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17

    Electron accelerators such as laser wakefield accelerators, linear accelerators driving free electron lasers, or femto-sliced synchrotrons, are capable of producing femtosecond-long electron bunches. Single-shot characterization of the temporal charge profile is crucial for operation, optimization, and application of such accelerators. A variety of electro-optic sampling (EOS) techniques exists for the temporal analysis. In EOS, the field profile from the electron bunch (or the field profile from its coherent radiation) will be transferred onto a laser pulse co-propagating through an electro-optic crystal. This paper will address the most common EOS schemes and will list their advantages and limitations. Strong points that all techniques share are the ultra-short time resolution (tens of femtoseconds) and the single-shot capabilities. Besides introducing the theory behind EOS, data from various research groups is presented for each technique.

  4. Carbon-nanotube electron-beam (C-beam) crystallization technique for silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Su Woong; Kang, Jung Su; Park, Kyu Chang

    2016-02-01

    We introduced a carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron beam (C-beam) for thin film crystallization and thin film transistor (TFT) applications. As a source of electron emission, a CNT emitter which had been grown on a silicon wafer with a resist-assisted patterning (RAP) process was used. By using the C-beam exposure, we successfully crystallized a silicon thin film that had nano-sized crystalline grains. The distribution of crystalline grain size was about 10 ˜ 30 nm. This nanocrystalline silicon thin film definitely had three crystalline directions which are (111), (220) and (311), respectively. The silicon TFTs crystallized by using a C-beam exposure showed a field effect mobility of 20 cm2/Vs and an on/off ratio of more than 107. The C-beam exposure can modify the bonding network of amorphous silicon with its proper energy.

  5. Facile electron-beam lithography technique for irregular and fragile substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiyoung; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex

    2014-10-27

    A facile technique is presented which enables high-resolution electron beam lithography on irregularly-shaped, non-planar or fragile substrates such as the edges of a silicon chip, thin and narrow suspended beams and bridges, or small cylindrical wires. The method involves a spin-free dry-transfer of pre-formed uniform-thickness polymethyl methacrylate, followed by conventional electron beam writing, metal deposition, and lift-off. High-resolution patterning is demonstrated for challenging target substrates. The technique should find broad application in micro- and nano-technology research arenas.

  6. Facile electron-beam lithography technique for irregular and fragile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex

    2014-10-01

    A facile technique is presented which enables high-resolution electron beam lithography on irregularly-shaped, non-planar or fragile substrates such as the edges of a silicon chip, thin and narrow suspended beams and bridges, or small cylindrical wires. The method involves a spin-free dry-transfer of pre-formed uniform-thickness polymethyl methacrylate, followed by conventional electron beam writing, metal deposition, and lift-off. High-resolution patterning is demonstrated for challenging target substrates. The technique should find broad application in micro- and nano-technology research arenas.

  7. Overview of Alternative Bunching and Current-shaping Techniques for Low-Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Techniques to bunch or shape an electron beam at low energies (E <15 MeV) have important implications toward the realization of table-top radiation sources [1] or to the design of compact multi-user free-electron lasers[2]. This paper provides an overview of alternative methods recently developed including techniques such as wakefield-based bunching, space-charge-driven microbunching via wave-breaking [3], ab-initio shaping of the electron-emission process [4], and phase space exchangers. Practical applications of some of these methods to foreseen free-electron-laser configurations are also briefly discussed [5].

  8. Electron beam energy and Ge nanocrystal size effects on the minority carrier diffusion length measured by the nano-electron beam induced current technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Quang-Tri; El Hdiy, Abdelillah; Troyon, Michel

    2011-07-01

    The near-field electron beam induced current technique is used to study the minority carrier effective diffusion length versus electron beam energy on structures containing spherical Ge nanocrystals (NCs) with diameters of 50 nm and 70 nm formed by a two step dewetting/nucleation process. For both nanocrystal sizes, the effective diffusion length increases with the electron beam energy and then decreases from a threshold energy, which depends on the nanocrystal size. The effective diffusion length is smaller at low energy for NCs of larger size because of their larger surface recombination velocity, due to a better charge trapping efficiency.

  9. Group velocity delay spectroscopy technique for industrial monitoring of electron beam induced vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J J; Berzins, L V; Sharma, M N

    1998-09-24

    Spectroscopic techniques are ideal for characterization and process control of electron beam generated vapor plumes. Absorption based techniques work well for a wide variety of applications, but are difficult to apply to optically dense or opaque vapor plumes. We describe an approach for monitoring optically dense vapor plumes that is based on measuring the group velocity delay of a laser beam near an optical transition to determine the vapor density. This technique has a larger dynamic range than absorption spectroscopy. We describe our progress towards a robust system to monitor aluminum vaporization in an industrial environment. Aluminum was chosen because of its prevalence in high performance aircraft alloys. In these applications, composition control of the alloy constituents is critical to the deposition process. Data is presented demonstrating the superior dynamic range of the measurement. In addition, preliminary data demonstrating aluminum vapor rate control in an electron beam evaporator is presented. Alternative applications where this technique could be useful are discussed. Keywords: Group velocity delay spectroscopy, optical beat signal, optical heterodyne, index of refraction, laser absorption spectroscopy, external cavity diode laser (ECDL), electron beam vaporization, vapor density, vapor phase manufacturing, process control

  10. Emittance and Energy Measurements of Low-Energy Electron Beam Using Optical Transition Radiation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Iijima, Hokuto; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Imai, Takayuki; Ueda, Toru; Watanabe, Takahiro; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2005-03-01

    Emittance and energy of an electron beam in the range of 8 to 22 MeV were measured via optical transition radiation (OTR) techniques. The beam divergence effect on observations of the far-field OTR image at low energies was studied by means of numerical analysis. The numerical analysis indicates that if the beam divergence is under 1.5 mrad, a simultaneous single-shot measurement of emittance and energy is possible. The results of the single-shot experiment agree with independent measurements conducted using the quadrupole scan method and an electron spectrometer. The experiments were performed with an S-band linac at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, The University of Tokyo (UTNL).

  11. Site control technique for quantum dots using electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Kanji; Jung, JaeHun; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2014-05-15

    To develop simple and high throughput sit definition technique for quantum dots (QDs), the electron beam induced deposition (EBID) method was used as desorption guide of phosphorus atoms form InP substrate. As the results one or a few indium (In) droplets (DLs) were created in the carbon grid pattern by thermal annealing at a temperature of 450°C for 10 min in the ultra high vacuum condition. The size of In DLs was larger than QDs, but arsenide DLs by molecular beam in growth chamber emitted wavelength of 1.028μm at 50K by photoluminescence measurement.

  12. Practical Framework for an Electron Beam Induced Current Technique Based on a Numerical Optimization Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hideshi; Soeda, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    A practical framework for an electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique has been established for conductive materials based on a numerical optimization approach. Although the conventional EBIC technique is useful for evaluating the distributions of dopants or crystal defects in semiconductor transistors, issues related to the reproducibility and quantitative capability of measurements using this technique persist. For instance, it is difficult to acquire high-quality EBIC images throughout continuous tests due to variation in operator skill or test environment. Recently, due to the evaluation of EBIC equipment performance and the numerical optimization of equipment items, the constant acquisition of high contrast images has become possible, improving the reproducibility as well as yield regardless of operator skill or test environment. The technique proposed herein is even more sensitive and quantitative than scanning probe microscopy, an imaging technique that can possibly damage the sample. The new technique is expected to benefit the electrical evaluation of fragile or soft materials along with LSI materials.

  13. Advanced semiconductor diagnosis by multidimensional electron-beam-induced current technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Yuan, X; Sekiguchi, T

    2008-01-01

    We present advanced semiconductor diagnosis by using electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. By varying the parameters such as temperature, accelerating voltage (V(acc)), bias voltage, and stressing time, it is possible to extend EBIC application from conventional defect characterization to advanced device diagnosis. As an electron beam can excite a certain volume even beneath the surface passive layer, EBIC can be effectively employed to diagnose complicated devices with hybrid structure. Three topics were selected to demonstrate EBIC applications. First, the recombination activities of grain boundaries and their interaction with Fe impurity in photovoltaic multicrystalline Si (mc-Si) are clarified by temperature-dependent EBIC. Second, the detection of dislocations between strained-Si and SiGe virtual substrate are shown to overcome the limitation of depletion region. Third, the observation of leakage sites in high-k gate dielectric is demonstrated for the characterization of advanced hybrid device structures.

  14. Time-resolved measurement technique for pulsed electron beam envelope basing on framing and streaking principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Huang; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The time-resolved electron beam envelope parameters, including cross sectional distribution and beam centroid position, are very important for the study of beam transmission characteristics in a magnetic field and for verifying the rationality of the magnetic field parameters employed. One kind of high time-resolved beam envelope measurement system has recently been developed, constituted of a high-speed framing camera and a streak camera. It can obtain three panoramic images of the beam and time continuous information along the given beam profile simultaneously. Recently obtained data has proved that several fast vibrations of the beam envelope along the diameter direction occur during the front and the tail parts of the electron beam. The vibration period is several nanoseconds. The effect of magnetic field on the electron beam is also observed and verified. Beam debugging experiments have proved that the existing beam transmission design is reasonable and viable. This beam envelope measurement system will establish a good foundation for beam physics research. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10675104, 11375162)

  15. Electron Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriott, Lloyd R.

    1997-04-01

    Electron beams have played a significant role in semiconductor technology for more than twenty years. Early electron beam machines used a raster scanned beam spot to write patterns in electron-sensitive polymer resist materials. The main application of electron beam lithography has been in mask making. Despite the inherently high spatial resolution and wide process margins of electron beam lithography, the writing rate for semiconductor wafers has been too slow to be economically viable on a large scale. In the late 1970's, variable shape electron beam writing was developed, projecting a rectangular beam whose size can be varied for each "shot" exposure of a particular pattern, allowing some integrated circuits to be made economically where a variety of "customized" patterns are desired. In the cell or block projection electron beam exposure technique, a unit cell of a repetitive pattern is projected repeatedly to increase the level of parallelism. This can work well for highly repetitive patterns such as memory chips but is not well suited to complex varying patterns such as microprocessors. The rapid progress in the performance of integrated circuits has been largely driven by progress in optical lithography, through improvements in lens design and fabrication as well as the use of shorter wavelengths for the exposure radiation. Due to limitations from the opacity of lens and mask materials, it is unlikely that conventional optical printing methods can be used at wavelengths below 193 nm or feature sizes much below 180 nm. One candidate technology for a post-optical era is the Scattering with Angular Limitation Projection Electron-beam Lithography (SCALPEL) approach, which combines the high resolution and wide process latitude inherent in electron beam lithography with the throughput of a parallel projection system. A mask consisting of a low atomic number membrane and a high atomic number pattern layer is uniformly illuminated with high energy (100 ke

  16. Characterization of Inx Ga1-x As-GaAs heterostructures via electron beam techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Barojas, Estela; Silva-Gonzalez, Rutilo; Serrano-Rojas, Rosa Maria; Vidal-Borbolla, Miguel Angel

    2005-03-01

    In the case of strained superlattices abrupt heterointerfaces are required because compositional fluctuations at heterointerfaces results in uncertainty in both composition and lattice constant. The aim of this work is to study exsitu the surface morphology, the periodicity and elemental composition of a set of 3 InGaAs-GaAs heterostructures grown on GaAs (100) substrates by a molecular beam epitaxy system. The heterostructures are formed by 10 periods of InGaAs-GaAs epitaxially grown on GaAs substrates with nominal thickness of 500 and 1000 å, respectively. The techniques used for this purpose are the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The In content in the heterostructures is determined from corresponding Auger depth profiles. This work has been supported by VIEP-BUAP, Project No. II53G02.

  17. Electron cooling of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    Electron cooling of electron (and positron) sources may be important for future linear collider applications. In order to cool electrons with electrons, an intermediary positron beam must be employed, since it is impossible to merge two beams of identical particles into the cooling straight. By adjusting the beta functions of the electron and positron lattices appropriately, the final emittance of the stored electron beam can be made less than the emittance of the cooling electron beam. This paper will discuss accelerator physics issues relating to an electron-cooled electron beam source.

  18. Preparation and characterization of indium zinc oxide thin films by electron beam evaporation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzi, Reza; Mirkhani, Valiollah; Moghadam, Majid; Tangestaninejad, Shahram; Mohammadpoor-Baltork, Iraj; Fallah, Hamid Reza; Dastjerdi, Mohammad Javad Vahid; Modayemzadeh, Hamed Reza

    2011-04-15

    In this work, the preparation of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO thin films by electron beam evaporation technique on glass substrates is reported. Optical and electrical properties of these films were investigated. The effect of dopant amount and annealing temperature on the optical and electrical properties of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZnO thin films was also studied. Different amount of ZnO was used as dopant and the films were annealed at different temperature. The results showed that the most crystalline, transparent and uniform films with lowest resistivity were obtained using 25 wt% of ZnO annealed at 500 {sup o}C.

  19. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  20. A comparison of TPS and different measurement techniques in small-field electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Donmez Kesen, Nazmiye Cakir, Aydin; Okutan, Murat; Bilge, Hatice

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, small-field electron beams have been used for the treatment of superficial lesions, which requires small circular fields. However, when using very small electron fields, some significant dosimetric problems may occur. In this study, dose distributions and outputs of circular fields with dimensions of 5 cm and smaller, for nominal energies of 6, 9, and 15 MeV from the Siemens ONCOR Linac, were measured and compared with data from a treatment planning system using the pencil-beam algorithm in electron beam calculations. All dose distribution measurements were performed using the Gafchromic EBT film; these measurements were compared with data that were obtained from the Computerized Medical Systems (CMS) XiO treatment planning system (TPS), using the gamma-index method in the PTW VeriSoft software program. Output measurements were performed using the Gafchromic EBT film, an Advanced Markus ion chamber, and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD). Although the pencil-beam algorithm is used to model electron beams in many clinics, there is no substantial amount of detailed information in the literature about its use. As the field size decreased, the point of maximum dose moved closer to the surface. Output factors were consistent; differences from the values obtained from the TPS were, at maximum, 42% for 6 and 15 MeV and 32% for 9 MeV. When the dose distributions from the TPS were compared with the measurements from the Gafchromic EBT films, it was observed that the results were consistent for 2-cm diameter and larger fields, but the outputs for fields of 1-cm diameter and smaller were not consistent. In CMS XiO TPS, calculated using the pencil-beam algorithm, the dose distributions of electron treatment fields that were created with circular cutout of a 1-cm diameter were not appropriate for patient treatment and the pencil-beam algorithm is not convenient for monitor unit (MU) calculations in electron dosimetry.

  1. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  2. Pulse radiolysis based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with double-pulse injection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinfeng; Kondoh, Takafumi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Youichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2006-09-01

    A new pulse radiolysis system based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with oblique double-pulse injection was developed for studying ultrafast chemical kinetics and primary processes of radiation chemistry. The time resolution of 5.2 ps was obtained by measuring transient absorption kinetics of hydrated electrons in water. The optical density of hydrated electrons was measured as a function of the electron charge. The data indicate that the double-laser-pulse injection technique was a powerful tool for observing the transient absorptions with a good signal to noise ratio in pulse radiolysis.

  3. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    During the previous reporting period (Quarter Six), the charging and removal of a fine, high resistivity aerosol using the advanced technology of electron beam precipitation was successfully accomplished. Precharging a dust stream circulating through the EBP wind tunnel produced collection efficiency figures of up to 40 times greater than with corona charging and collection alone (Table 1). The increased system collection efficiency attributed to electron beam precharging was determined to be the result of increased particle charge. It was found that as precharger electric field was raised, collection efficiency became greater. In sequence, saturation particle charge varies with the precharger electric field strength, particle migration velocity varies with the precharger and collector electric field, and collection efficiency varies with the migration velocity. Maximizing the system collection efficiency requires both a high charging electric field (provided by the E-beam precharger), and a high collecting electric field (provided by the collector wires and plates). Because increased particle collection efficiency is directly attributable to higher particle charge, the focus of research during Quarter Seven was shifted to learning more about the actual charge magnitude on the aerosol particles. Charge determinations in precipitators have traditionally been made on bulk dust samples collected from the flue gas stream, which gives an overall charge vs. mass (Q/M) ratio measurement. More recently, techniques have been developed which allow the measurement of the charge on individual particles in a rapid and repeatable fashion. One such advanced technique has been developed at FSU for use in characterizing the electron beam precharger.

  4. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a process by which NASA hopes to build metal parts in zero gravity environments. It's a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and a solid wi...

  5. Experimental generation of longitudinally-modulated electron beams using an emittance exchange technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E; Piot, P.; Johnson, A.; Lumpkin, A.; Maxwell, T.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R.; /FERMILAB

    2010-08-01

    We report our experimental demonstration of longitudinal phase space modulation using a transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange technique. The experiment is carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermi National Accelerator Lab. A vertical multi-slit plate is inserted into the beamline prior to the emittance exchange, thus introducing beam horizontal profile modulation. After the emittance exchange, the longitudinal phase space coordinates (energy and time structures) of the beam are modulated accordingly. This is a clear demonstration of the transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange. In this paper, we present our experimental results on the measurement of energy profile as well as numerical simulations of the experiment.

  6. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  7. TEM sample preparation using a new nanofabrication technique combining electron-beam-induced deposition and low-energy ion milling.

    PubMed

    Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki; Tanaka, Miyoko; Takeguchi, Masaki; Song, Minghui; Furuya, Kazuo

    2006-12-01

    A new TEM sample preparation technique using electron-beam-induced deposition combined with low-energy ion milling was used to fabricate for two different shapes of sample, conical and plate. High-quality HREM images can be obtained from samples prepared by this technique. A desired sample position can be obtained with high accuracy, and the total sample preparation time can be much less than conventional techniques. Because the gas deposition system used can easily be integrated in a conventional SEM, the method can be performed in any laboratory equipped with a SEM and an ion milling machine.

  8. Structural, Electrical and Optical Properties of Gallium Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films Prepared by Electron Beam Evaporation Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarani, S.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2011-07-15

    High quality gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) films are prepared by electron beam evaporation technique. The effect of substrate temperature on structural, electrical and optical properties was studied in detail. The prepared films are polycrystalline in nature with c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. The resistivity of the film decreases and the optical transparency increases as the substrate temperature increases from room temperature to 150 deg. C. The film produce the optical band gap of 3.47 eV.

  9. Nanocrystalline biphasic resorbable calcium phosphate (HAp/β-TCP) thin film prepared by electron beam evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elayaraja, K.; Chandra, V. Sarath; Joshy, M. I. Ahymah; Suganthi, R. V.; Asokan, K.; Kalkura, S. Narayana

    2013-06-01

    Biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) thin film having resorbable β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and non-resorbable hydroxyapatite (HAp) phases having enhanced bioactivity was synthesized by electron beam evaporation technique. Nanosized BCP was deposited as a layer (500 nm) on (0 0 1) silicon substrate by electron beam evaporation and crystalline phase of samples were found to improve on annealing at 700 °C. Uniform deposition of calcium phosphate on silicon substrate was verified from elemental mapping using scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDX). Annealing of the samples led to a decrease in surface roughness, hydrophobicity and dissolution of the coating layer. Amoxicillin loaded thin films exhibited significant bacterial resistance. In addition, BCP thin films did not exhibit any cytotoxicity. Antibiotics incorporated BCP coated implants might prevent the post-surgical infections and could promote bone-bonding of orthopedic devices.

  10. Electron-beam manipulation techniques in the SINBAD Linac for external injection in plasma wake-field acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, B.; Assmann, R.; Behrens, C.; Brinkmann, R.; Dorda, U.; Floettmann, K.; Hartl, I.; Huening, M.; Nie, Y.; Schlarb, H.; Zhu, J.

    2016-09-01

    The SINBAD facility (Short and INnovative Bunches and Accelerators at Desy) is foreseen to host various experiments in the field of production of ultra-short electron bunches and novel high gradient acceleration techniques. Besides studying novel acceleration techniques aiming to produce high brightness short electron bunches, the ARD group at DESY is working on the design of a conventional RF accelerator that will allow the production of low charge (0.5 pC - few pC) ultra-short electron bunches (having full width half maximum, FWHM, length ≤ 1 fs - few fs). The setup will allow the direct experimental comparison of the performance achievable by using different compression techniques (velocity bunching, magnetic compression, hybrid compression schemes). At a later stage the SINBAD linac will be used to inject such electron bunches into a laser driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator, which imposes strong requirements on parameters such as the arrival time jitter and the pointing stability of the beam. In this paper we review the compression techniques that are foreseen at SINBAD and we underline the differences in terms of peak current, beam quality and arrival time stability.

  11. Welding of Mo-Based Alloy Using Electron Beam and Laser-GTAW Hybrid Welding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Kumar, Santosh; Tewari, Raghvendra; Dey, Gautam Kumar

    2016-03-01

    In the current study, welding of TZM (molybdenum-based alloy) plates in square-butt configuration was carried out using electron beam and laser-GTAW hybrid power sources. Microstructures of weld joint containing three zones—parent metal, heat-affected zone, and fusion zone—were clearly identified when examined through optical and scanning electron microscopy. The weld joints were found to be sound with very wide fusion and heat-affected zones. The microstructure of the fusion zone was coarse-grained. as-solidified microstructure, while the microstructure of heat-affected zone was the recrystallized microstructure with reduction in grain size as distance from the fusion line increased. Microhardness profile using Vickers hardness tester was obtained across the weld region, and the tensile properties of the weld joints were evaluated by performing room temperature tensile test and fracture was examined using scanning electron microscope. Joint coefficient of the weld joints were ~40 to 45 pct of that of the parent metals with nonmeasurable tensile ductility with predominantly transgranular mode of fracture indicating weakness along the grain boundary. Detailed orientation imaging and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to understand the most dominating factor in introducing weld joint brittleness.

  12. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  13. Development of a Monte Carlo-Based Electron Beam Treatment Planning System: Clinical Application in Optimization of a Combined-Electron Technique for Treatment of Retinoblastoma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Beteri, Abdulkarim A.

    1990-06-01

    Development of a new three-dimensional Monte Carlo code for simulating electron transport in heterogeneous media for the purpose of electron-beam treatment planning is described. It involved the devising of improved mathematical representations for the probability distributions governing the processes of electron multiple-scattering and bremsstrahlung production. An efficient technique is used for random -sampling the probability distributions based on a modified acceptance-rejection sampling method that employs an envelope -type rejection function. In addition to predicting correct electron fluence differential in energy, angle, and both energy and angle at different depths in a variety of materials, the developed code is capable of predicting the following: (1) one-cubic-millimeter resolution electron absorbed-dose distributions in a heterogeneous phantom irradiated by electrons through circular, square, and rectangular fields at different SSD's; (2) perturbation patterns in the absorbed -dose distributions caused by the three most common perturbing agents encountered in the human body (body surface obliquity, bone heterogeneities, and air cavities); (3) dose enhancement anterior to a bone heterogeneity; (4) absorbed-dose perturbations caused by an air cavity adjacent to an irradiated volume but outside the radiation field. This study investigated the effect of heterogeneities on absorbed-dose distributions in phantoms irradiated by electron beams. Perturbation patterns are correctly predicted in depth-dose curves and in absorbed-dose distributions throughout an irradiated volume. For example, the code correctly predicts the doubling of the maximum absorbed dose along the beam central axis when a long narrow air cavity is centered in the field, and isodose level perturbations associated with surface obliquity and the presence of heterogeneities. The developed code is used in optimization of a combined-electron-beams irradiation technique for treatment of

  14. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully performed under a range of experimental conditions during Quarter Six of the contract. The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to extend the efficiency of particle charging and collection using a fine, monodisperse aerosol at relatively large loadings in the FSU Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high dust concentration. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will normally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electron beam precharging investigation performed during the period covered by Quarter Six used virtually the same experimental apparatus and procedures as in previous contract work, and these are described for review in this report. This investigation was part of an experimental effort which ran nearly continuously for nine months, encompassing work on the electrostatic collecting section, electron beam precharger, and particle charge-to-radius measuring apparatus. A summary of the work on dc electron beam precipitation is presented here.

  15. Optical techniques for electron-beam characterizations on the APS SASE FEL project

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Yang, B.X.; Berg, W.J.; White, M.; Lewellen, J.W.; Milton, S.V.

    1998-09-01

    At the Advanced Photon Source (APS) the injector linac`s DC thermionic gun is being supplemented by a low-emittance rf thermionic gun that will support the SASE FEL project. To address the anticipated smaller beam sizes, the standard Chromox beam-profiling screens are being complemented by optical transition radiation (OTR) and Ce-doped YAG single-crystal converters. Direct comparisons of the effective conversion efficiency, spatial resolution, and time response of the three converter screen types have been performed using the DC thermionic gun`s beam accelerated to 400 to 650 MeV. An apparent blurring of observed beam size with increasing incident charge areal density in the YAG crystal was observed for the first time. Only the OTR was prompt enough for the few-ps domain micropulse bunch length measurements performed with a stream camera. Initial beam images of the rf-thermionic gun beam have also been obtained.

  16. Chromosome interior observation by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) using ionic liquid technique.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Tohru; Dwiranti, Astari; Kaneyoshi, Kohei; Fukuda, Shota; Kometani, Reo; Nakao, Masayuki; Takata, Hideaki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Ohmido, Nobuko; Fukui, Kiichi

    2014-10-01

    Attempts to elucidate chromosome structure have long remained elusive. Electron microscopy is useful for chromosome structure research because of its high resolution and magnification. However, biological samples such as chromosomes need to be subjected to various preparation steps, including dehydration, drying, and metal/carbon coating, which may induce shrinkage and artifacts. The ionic liquid technique has recently been developed and it enables sample preparation without dehydration, drying, or coating, providing a sample that is closer to the native condition. Concurrently, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) has been developed, allowing the investigation and direct analysis of chromosome interiors. In this study, we investigated chromosome interiors by FIB/SEM using plant and human chromosomes prepared by the ionic liquid technique. As a result, two types of chromosomes, with and without cavities, were visualized, both for barley and human chromosomes prepared by critical point drying. However, chromosome interiors were revealed only as a solid structure, lacking cavities, when prepared by the ionic liquid technique. Our results suggest that the existence and size of cavities depend on the preparation procedures. We conclude that combination of the ionic liquid technique and FIB/SEM is a powerful tool for chromosome study.

  17. Electron beam polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Charles K.

    1998-12-01

    Along with its well known charge and mass, the electron also carries an intrinsic angular momentum, or spin. The rules of quantum mechanics allow us to measure only the probability that the electron spin is in one of two allowed spin states. When a beam carries a net excess of electrons in one of these two allowed spin states, the beam is said to be polarized. The beam polarization may be measured by observing a sufficient number of electrons scattered by a spin-dependent interaction. For electrons, the useful scattering processes involve Coulomb scattering by heavy nuclei, or scattering from either polarized photons or other polarized electrons (known as Mott, Compton, and Mo/ller scattering, respectively). In this tutorial, we will briefly review how beam polarization is measured through a general scattering process, followed by a discussion of how the three scattering processes above are used to measure electron beam polarization. Descriptions of electron polarimeters based on the three scattering processes will be given.

  18. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  19. Electron beam pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Electron-beam-pumped semiconductor ultra-violet optical sources (ESUVOSs) are disclosed that use ballistic electron pumped wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The sources may produce incoherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped light emitting triodes (ELETs). The sources may produce coherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped laser triodes (ELTs). The ELTs may take the form of electron-beam-pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (EVCSEL) or edge emitting electron-beam-pumped lasers (EEELs). The semiconductor medium may take the form of an aluminum gallium nitride alloy that has a mole fraction of aluminum selected to give a desired emission wavelength, diamond, or diamond-like carbon (DLC). The sources may be produced from discrete components that are assembled after their individual formation or they may be produced using batch MEMS-type or semiconductor-type processing techniques to build them up in a whole or partial monolithic manner, or combination thereof.

  20. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  1. Local electrical properties of n-AlInAs/i-GaInAs electron channel structures characterized by the probe-electron-beam-induced current technique.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Nokuo, Takeshi; Chen, Jun; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    We developed a probe-electron-beam-induced current (probe-EBIC) technique to investigate the electrical properties of n-Al(0.48)In(0.52)As/i-Ga(0.30)In(0.70)As electron channel structures for a high-electron-mobility transistor, grown on a lattice-matched InP substrate and lattice-mismatched GaAs (001) and Si (001) substrates. EBIC imaging of planar surfaces at low magnifications revealed misfit dislocations originating from the AlInAs-graded buffer layer. The cross-sections of GaInAs channel structures on an InP substrate were studied by high-magnification EBIC imaging as well as cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. EBIC imaging showed that the structure is nearly defect-free and the carrier depletion zone extends from the channel toward the i-AlInAs buffer layer.

  2. Structural and Optical Properties of Cd 1- x Se x Thin Films Deposited by Electron Beam Evaporation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ravishankar Nath; Verma, Aneet Kumar; Rahul, Vishwakarma, S. R.

    2011-10-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) thin films deposited by means of electron beam evaporation technique under high vacuum ˜10 -5 torr on ultrasonically cleaned glass substrate. Using stating materials of various compositions of cadmium and selenium using formula Cd 1- x Se x where x is orbitory constant having value 0.20≤ x ≤0.40 here we take less value of x for the creation of anion vacancy in thin films. In present work the structural properties have been studies using XRD technique and found that starting materials and thin films both are polycrystalline in nature having hexagonal structure. Here we study the effect of composition ratio Cd/Se in starting material and its prepared thin films on its grain size and lattice parameter. From the analysis of X-Ray diffractogram found that lattice parameter and grain size both are decreases with increasing Cd/Se ratio in thin films as well as in starting material the preferred orientation in thin films along (100) plane. The surface morphology was studied using SEM characterization and found that films are smooth and homogeneous. The films have been analysed for optical band gap and absorbed a direct band gap.

  3. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  4. Landsat electron beam recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, P. F.; Whitley, J. P.

    A minicomputer-controlled electron beam recorder (EBR) presently in use at the Brazilian Government's Institute De Pesquisas Espaclais (INPE) satellite ground station is described. This 5-in.-film-size EBR is used to record both Landsat and SPOT satellite imagery in South America. A brief electron beam recorder technology review is presented. The EBR is capable of recording both vector and text data from computer-aided design, publishing, and line art systems and raster data from image scanners, raster image processors (RIPS), halftone/screen generators, and remote image sensors. A variety of image formats may be recorded on numerous film sizes (16 mm, 35 mm, 70 mm, 105 mm, 5-in, 5.5-in., and 9.5-in.). These recordings are used directly or optically enlarged depending on the final product.

  5. Measuring electron beam polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, J.

    1992-12-01

    A two-hour discussion session was held on electron beam polarimetry including representatives from Halls A, B, and C. Presentations included a description of an existing Mo/ller polarimeter at the MIT-Bates laboratory, plans for Mo/ller polarimeters in Halls A and B, and a Compton (i.e., ``laser backscatter'') polarimeter planned for Hall A. This paper is a summary of those discussions.

  6. Towards demonstration of electron cooling with bunched electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.

    2012-01-11

    All electron cooling systems which were in operation so far employed electron beam generated with an electrostatic electron gun in DC operating mode, immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. At low energies magnetic field is also being used to transport electron beam through the cooling section from the gun to the collector. At higher energies (few MeV), it was shown that one can have simpler electron beam transport without continuous magnetic field. Because of a rather weak magnetic field on the cathode and in the cooling section the latter approach was referred to as 'non-magnetized cooling', since there was no suppression of the transverse angular spread of the electron beam with the magnetic field in the cooling section. Such a cooler successfully operated at FNAL (2005-11) at electron beam energy of 4.3 MeV. Providing cooling at even higher energies would be easier with RF acceleration of electron beam, and thus using bunched electron beam for cooling. Significant efforts were devoted to explore various aspects of such bunched electron beam cooling as part of R and D of high-energy electron cooling for RHIC. However, experimental studies of such cooling are still lacking. Establishing this technique experimentally would be extremely useful for future high-energy applications. Presently there is an ongoing effort to build Proof-of-Principle (PoP) experiment of Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) at RHIC, which promises to be superior to conventional electron cooling for high energies. Since the CEC experiment is based on bunched electron beam and it has sections where electron beam co-propagates with the ion beam at the same velocity, it also provides a unique opportunity to explore experimentally conventional electron cooling but for the first time with a bunched electron beam. As a result, it allows us to explore techniques needed for the high-energy electron cooling such as 'painting' with a short electron beam and control of ion beam distribution under

  7. Electron Beam Lithography Double Step Exposure Technique for Fabrication of Mushroom-Like Profile in Bilayer Resist System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornelia, Indykiewicz; Bogdan, Paszkiewicz; Tomasz, Szymański; Regina, Paszkiewicz

    2015-01-01

    The Hi/Lo bilayer resist system exposure in e-beam lithography (EBL) process, intended for mushroom-like profile fabrication, was studied. Different exposure parameters and theirs influence on the resist layers were simulated in CASINO software and the obtained results were compared with the experimental data. The AFM technique was used for the estimation of the e-beam penetration depth in the resist stack. Performed numerical and experimental results allow us to establish the useful ranges of the exposure parameters.

  8. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  9. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  10. Bone bonding strength of diamond-structured porous titanium-alloy implants manufactured using the electron beam-melting technique.

    PubMed

    Hara, Daisuke; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sato, Taishi; Hirata, Masanobu; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohno, Yusuke; Yoshimoto, Kensei; Yoshihara, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akihiro; Nakao, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined the bone bonding strength of diamond-structured porous titanium-alloy (Porous-Ti-alloy) manufactured using the electron beam-melting technique in comparison with fiber mesh-coated or rough-surfaced implants. Cylindrical implants with four different pore sizes (500, 640, 800, and 1000μm) of Porous-Ti-alloy, titanium fiber mesh (FM), and surfaces roughened by titanium arc spray (Ti-spray) were implanted into the distal femur of rabbits. Bone bonding strength and histological bone ingrowth were evaluated at 4 and 12weeks after implantation. The bone bonding strength of Porous-Ti-alloy implants (640μm pore size) increased over time from 541.4N at 4weeks to 704.6N at 12weeks and was comparable to that of FM and Ti-spray implants at both weeks. No breakage of the porous structure after mechanical testing was found with Porous-Ti-alloy implants. Histological bone ingrowth that increased with implantation time occurred along the inner structure of Porous-Ti-alloy implants. There was no difference in bone ingrowth in Porous-Ti-alloy implants with pore sizes among 500, 640, and 800μm; however, less bone ingrowth was observed with the 1000μm pore size. These results indicated Porous-Ti-alloy implants with pore size under 800μm provided biologically active and mechanically stable surface for implant fixation to bone, and had potential advantages for weight bearing orthopedic implants such as acetabular cups. PMID:26652463

  11. Bone bonding strength of diamond-structured porous titanium-alloy implants manufactured using the electron beam-melting technique.

    PubMed

    Hara, Daisuke; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sato, Taishi; Hirata, Masanobu; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohno, Yusuke; Yoshimoto, Kensei; Yoshihara, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akihiro; Nakao, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined the bone bonding strength of diamond-structured porous titanium-alloy (Porous-Ti-alloy) manufactured using the electron beam-melting technique in comparison with fiber mesh-coated or rough-surfaced implants. Cylindrical implants with four different pore sizes (500, 640, 800, and 1000μm) of Porous-Ti-alloy, titanium fiber mesh (FM), and surfaces roughened by titanium arc spray (Ti-spray) were implanted into the distal femur of rabbits. Bone bonding strength and histological bone ingrowth were evaluated at 4 and 12weeks after implantation. The bone bonding strength of Porous-Ti-alloy implants (640μm pore size) increased over time from 541.4N at 4weeks to 704.6N at 12weeks and was comparable to that of FM and Ti-spray implants at both weeks. No breakage of the porous structure after mechanical testing was found with Porous-Ti-alloy implants. Histological bone ingrowth that increased with implantation time occurred along the inner structure of Porous-Ti-alloy implants. There was no difference in bone ingrowth in Porous-Ti-alloy implants with pore sizes among 500, 640, and 800μm; however, less bone ingrowth was observed with the 1000μm pore size. These results indicated Porous-Ti-alloy implants with pore size under 800μm provided biologically active and mechanically stable surface for implant fixation to bone, and had potential advantages for weight bearing orthopedic implants such as acetabular cups.

  12. Electrical characterization of electron beam induced damage on sub-10 nm n-channel MOS transistors using nano-probing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jonghyuk; Lee, Sungho; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2016-11-01

    Electron beam induced damage on sub-10 nm n-channel MOS transistors was evaluated using an atomic force microscopy-based nano-probing technique. After electron beam irradiation, all the device parameters shifted including threshold voltage (V th), saturation current, sub-threshold slope and transistor leakage current. A negative shift in V th occurred at low electron beam acceleration voltage (V acc) because of the increase in oxide trapped holes generated by excited plasmons. At high V acc, however, a positive V th shift was observed because of an increased contribution of interface trap generation caused by the deeper electron penetration depth. In addition, interface trap generation not only degraded the sub-threshold slope due to the additional capacitance from the generated interface traps, but also increased transistor leakage current due to changes in junction characteristics. Our studies show that it is critical to avoid electron beam exposure before electrical characterization on sub-10 nm devices even in the range of less than 1.0 kV of V acc using nano-probe systems.

  13. Electron Beams for Fast Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Davies, J. R.; Silva, L. O.

    2004-11-01

    In the fast ignitor scenario an intense relativistic electron beam is used to deposit energy inside the fuel target and trigger the thermonuclear reaction. This electron beam is produced on the outer plasma layer of the target by the interaction of an ultra-intense laser. The energy transfer from the laser to the electron beam, and the stability of the propagation of the electron beam are crucial for a successful fast ignitor scheme. We have used three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the OSIRIS.framework [1] to explore the self-consistent generation of high current electron beams by ultra intense lasers. Novel laser pulse configurations are explored in order to generate electron beams transporting more energy, and capable of avoiding the deleterious effects of collisionless instabilities in the plasma corona. [1] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342-351, (Springer, Heidelberg, 2002);

  14. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, Sergei M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  15. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

  16. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Quarter Eight of the Pulsed Electron Precharging project was principally devoted to the operation of the E-beam precharger in the pulsed anode mode. We shall first briefly review the motivation for carrying out this project and the experimental approach used. The combustion of low sulfur coal for the purpose of generating electric energy in power plants results in the production of a flue gas containing very high resistivity fly ash. This fly ash is not easily collected by conventional electrostatic precipitators due to the large electric potential difference which develops across the layer of fly ash on the collector plate. If this layer of collected material is allowed to reach a thickness as great as is normally desirable before rapping'' the plates, then the collected fly ash is subject to re-entrainment into the flue gas stream due to back-corona. The back-corona corona problem is described more fully in the next section of this report. This re-entrainment problem can be eliminated through reduction of the voltage applied across the high voltage wires and the grounded plates of the electrostatic precipitator. This is not a good solution to the problem since the charging capability and collection efficiency of the precipitator system are both greatly reduced at the low voltages required to avoid the back-corona problem. Another approach to solving the problems inherent in collecting high resistivity fly ash in an electrostatic precipitator is to decouple the charging and collecting functions. At FSU an electron beam precharger is employed directly before (upstream in the flue gas pathway) the precipitator. This precharger can be optimized for the charging function while the downstream collector can be optimized for collection of the high-resistivity fly ash.

  17. Electron Beam Diagnostics in Plasmas Based on Electron Beam Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Darrin; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Blackwell, David; Walton, Scott; Murphy, Donald; Fernsler, Richard; Meger, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Over the last few years, electron beam ionization has been shown to be a viable generator of high density plasmas with numerous applications in materials modification. To better understand these plasmas, we have fielded electron beam diagnostics to more clearly understand the propagation of the beam as it travels through the background gas and creates the plasma. These diagnostics vary greatly in sophistication, ranging from differentially pumped systems with energy selective elements to metal 'hockey pucks' covered with thin layers of insulation to electrically isolate the detector from the plasma but pass high energy beam electrons. Most importantly, absolute measurements of spatially resolved beam current densities are measured in a variety of pulsed and continuous beam sources. The energy distribution of the beam current(s) will be further discussed, through experiments incorporating various energy resolving elements such as simple grids and more sophisticated cylindrical lens geometries. The results are compared with other experiments of high energy electron beams through gases and appropriate disparities and caveats will be discussed. Finally, plasma parameters are correlated to the measured beam parameters for a more global picture of electron beam produced plasmas.

  18. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  19. Focusing Electron Beams at SLAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the development of a set of magnets that focus high-energy electron and positron beams causing them to collide, annihilate each other, and generate new particles. Explains how dipoles bend the beam, how quadrupoles focus the beam, how the focal length is calculated, and the superconducting final focus. (MDH)

  20. First experimental test of quadrupole lens-free multiple profile monitor technique for electron beam emittance measurement with a PW laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krus, M.; Levato, T.; Kim, H. T.; Grittani, G.; Margarone, D.; Jeong, T. M.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.

    2015-05-01

    The quadrupole lens free multiple profile emittance measurement method is an adaptation of the standard multiple profile monitor method for electron beam emittance measurement which was tested at PW laser system. This single shot technique allows to obtain the emittance from beam profile radii fit by means of Twiss (Courant-Snyder) parameters. Lanex scintillating screens were used as profile monitors due to their high yield of visible photons. However, on the other hand, the screen is a source of multiple Coulomb scattering which can influence the beam profile on the following screens at relatively low electron energies. Nevertheless, the contribution of the multiple scattering can be effectively subtracted from the signal by e.g. Bayes unfolding. For high energy beams (E > 0.5 GeV), the multiple scattering contribution is negligible. The presented diagnostics is easy to be implemented into standard experimental setups without any special requests for alignment procedure. Moreover, it can be useful in the optimization phase of the laser plasma accelerator where beam fundamental parameters (energy, energy spread, divergence, pointing) typically fluctuate shot-to- shot.

  1. Green's Function Technique in Forming Intensive Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Valentin

    The numerical extensions of the Green's function technique have been used to represent a space charge of intensive beams in three-dimensional (3D) case. The introduced tri-linear approximation helps to avoid the numerical noise of space charge density on the beam boundary, peculiar to the commonly used piecewise-constant approximation. Both artificial and real singularities for the potential and field gradients have been analyzed. The efficiency of the suggested numerical algorithms has been demonstrated by benchmark tests. The design of the electron gun for an X-band sheet-beam klystron has been done using these algorithms.

  2. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry using vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, René; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Belenguer, Tomás

    2011-12-01

    We show that it is possible to perform electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) using, for the first time to our knowledge, vortex beams as the reference beam. The technique we propose is easy to implement, and the advantages obtained are, among others, environmental stability, lower processing time, and the possibility to switch between traditional ESPI and spiral ESPI. The experimental results clearly show the advantages of using the proposed technique for deformation studies of complex structures.

  3. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Quarter Nine of the Pulsed Electron Precharging project was principally devoted to reviewing and interpreting the experimental results obtained during the past eight quarters of the project. We shall first briefly review the motivation for carrying out this project and the experimental approach used. The combustion of low sulfur coal for the purpose of generating electric energy in power plants results in the production of a flue gas containing very high resistivity fly ash. This fly ash is not easily collected by conventional electrostatic precipitators due to the large electric potential difference which develops across the layer of fly ash on the collector plate. If this layer of collected material is allowed to reach a thickness as great as is nominally desirable before rapping'' the plates, then the collected fly ash is subject to re-entrainment into the flue gas stream due to back-corona. The back-corona corona problem is described more fully in the next section of this report. This re-entrainment problem can be eliminated through reduction of the voltage applied across the high voltage wires and the grounded plates of the electrostatic precipitator. This is not a good solution to the problem since the charging capability and collection efficiency of the precipitator system are both greatly reduced at the low voltages and resultant small corona currents required to avoid the back-corona problem. Another approach to solving the problems inherent in collecting high resistivity fly ash in an electrostatic precipitator is to decouple the charging and collecting functions. At FSU an electron beam precharger is employed directly before (upstream in the flue gas pathway) the precipitator.

  4. Generation of electron Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lereah, Yossi; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-02-21

    Within the framework of quantum mechanics, a unique particle wave packet exists in the form of the Airy function. Its counterintuitive properties are revealed as it propagates in time or space: the quantum probability wave packet preserves its shape despite dispersion or diffraction and propagates along a parabolic caustic trajectory, even though no force is applied. This does not contradict Newton's laws of motion, because the wave packet centroid propagates along a straight line. Nearly 30 years later, this wave packet, known as an accelerating Airy beam, was realized in the optical domain; later it was generalized to an orthogonal and complete family of beams that propagate along parabolic trajectories, as well as to beams that propagate along arbitrary convex trajectories. Here we report the experimental generation and observation of the Airy beams of free electrons. These electron Airy beams were generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, which imprinted on the electrons' wavefunction a cubic phase modulation in the transverse plane. The highest-intensity lobes of the generated beams indeed followed parabolic trajectories. We directly observed a non-spreading electron wavefunction that self-heals, restoring its original shape after passing an obstacle. This holographic generation of electron Airy beams opens up new avenues for steering electronic wave packets like their photonic counterparts, because the wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories.

  5. Electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1994-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from this program includes 'The Timing of Electron Beam Signatures in Hard X-Ray and Radio: Solar Flare Observations by BATSE/Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and PHOENIX'; 'Coherent-Phase or Random-Phase Acceleration of Electron Beams in Solar Flares'; 'Particle Acceleration in Flares'; 'Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares'; 'Sequences of Correlated Hard X-Ray and Type 3 Bursts During Solar Flares'; and 'Solar Electron Beams Detected in Hard X-Rays and Radiowaves.' Abstracts and reprints of each are attached to this report.

  6. A comparative study of the electrical properties of Pd/ZnO Schottky contacts fabricated using electron beam deposition and resistive/thermal evaporation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mtangi, W.; Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Coelho, S. M. M.; Legodi, M. J.; Nel, J. M.; Meyer, W. E.; Chawanda, A.

    2011-11-01

    A systematic investigation to check the quality of Pd Schottky contacts deposited on ZnO has been performed on electron beam (e-beam) deposited and resistively/thermally evaporated samples using current-voltage, IV, and conventional deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Room temperature IV measurements reveal the dominance of pure thermionic emission on the resistively evaporated contacts, while the e-beam deposited contacts show the dominance of generation recombination at low voltages, <0.30 V, and the dominance of pure thermionic emission at high voltages, greater than 0.30 V. The resistively evaporated contacts have very low reverse currents of the order of 10{sup -10} A at a reverse voltage of 1.0 V whereas the e-beam deposited contacts have reverse currents of the order of 10{sup -6} A at 1.0 V. Average ideality factors have been determined as (1.43 {+-} 0.01) and (1.66 {+-} 0.02) for the resistively evaporated contacts and e-beam deposited contacts, respectively. The IV barrier heights have been calculated as (0.721 {+-} 0.002) eV and (0.624 {+-} 0.005) eV for the resistively evaporated and e-beam deposited contacts, respectively. Conventional DLTS measurements reveal the presence of three prominent defects in both the resistive and e-beam contacts. Two extra peaks with energy levels of 0.60 and 0.81 eV below the conduction band minimum have been observed in the e-beam deposited contacts. These have been explained as contributing to the generation recombination current that dominates at low voltages and high leakage currents. Based on the reverse current at 1.0 V, the degree of rectification, the dominant current transport mechanism and the observed defects, we conclude that the resistive evaporation technique yields better quality Schottky contacts for use in solar cells and ultraviolet detectors compared to the e-beam deposition technique. The 0.60 eV has been identified as possibly related to the unoccupied level for the doubly charged

  7. High-resolution periodically poled structure in diazo-dye-substituted polymer film based on direct electron-beam writing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Okihiro; Che, Yanlong; Okamoto, Naomichi; Fujimura, Hisashi; Egami, Chikara; Umegaki, Shinsuke

    1998-11-01

    A periodically poled pattern in diazo-dye-substituted nonlinear optical polymer film is fabricated by direct electron-beam (EB) writing. It is found that the second-order nonlinearity of corona-poled polymer thin film is erased after EB irradiation. Moreover, the exposed region can be easily removed by conventional wet development. A high-resolution periodically poled structure (i.e., χ(2) grating) with a period of 0.60 μm is demonstrated based on the direct EB writing technique.

  8. Electron-beam welder circle generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Generator rotates electron beam and performs other convenient functions during welding process. Device eliminates time-consuming techniques relying heavily on operator's skill. Welding speed is varied with frequency selector, and amplitudes of x- and y-axes are varied by adjusting phase shift. Both high and low-range adjustments are available, and each axis can be separately controlled. Crosshair is provided for set-up and beam alinements.

  9. Dual-Cathode Electron-Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Conley, Joseph M.; Wittry, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Beam from either cathode electromagnetically aligned with exit port. Electron beam from either of two cathodes deflected by magnetic and electric fields to central axis. Mechanical alignment of beam easy because cathode axes, anode apertures, and electron trajectories coplanar. Applications where uninterrupted service needed: scanning electron microscopes, transmission electron microscopes, electron-beam lithography equipment, Auger instruments, and microfocused x-ray sources.

  10. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    , photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V(20 Gy). The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  11. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa’n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-10-01

    -only plans (mean = 16.2 ± 3%, p < 0.001). As expected, photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy}. The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  12. Electron Beam Materials Irradiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2012-06-01

    Radiation processing is a well established method for enhancing the properties of materials and commercial products by treating them with ionizing energy in the form of high-energy electrons, X-rays, and gamma rays. Beneficial effects include polymerizing, cross-linking, grafting and degrading plastics, sterilizing single-use medical devices, disinfecting and disinfesting fresh foods, purifying drinking water, treating wastewater and other toxic waste materials that harm the environment, and many other applications that are still being evaluated. Industrial electron accelerators of several types have been developed and are being used for these applications. More than 1800 electron accelerators are presently installed in facilities worldwide for these purposes.

  13. Electron beam controller. [using magnetic field to refocus spent electron beam in microwave oscillator tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An electron beam device which extracts energy from an electron beam before the electrons of the beam are captured by a collector apparatus is described. The device produces refocusing of a spent electron beam by minimizing tranverse electron velocities in the beam where the electrons, having a multiplicity of axial velocities, are sorted at high efficiency by collector electrodes.

  14. Electron beam modeling on LTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalkowski, Gregory; Majeski, Richard; Schmitt, John

    2014-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a low aspect ratio tokamak with a steel clad copper shell that can be heated to 300-400 °C and coated with lithium. The lithium coating has been shown to decrease impurities in the plasma and decrease the recycling coefficient, improving plasma performance. The coating is applied to the walls by heating the shells, then using an electron beam to evaporate a pool of lithium located at the bottom of the shell. The beam is steered using the magnetic field generated by the field coils. This method allows for rapid evaporation of the lithium, producing a 50-100 nm coating in approximately 5 minutes. The current electron beam system can only coat half of the shell surface. A new electron beam system has been installed on LTX to coat the remaining shell surface. A model of this electron gun has been created using the AMaze program series (Field Precision LCC). The model will be used to find the magnetic fields needed to steer the electron beam produced by the gun to the lithium pool. The model will also show the electropotential produced both at the electron gun head and in the vessel. The model may also be used to find the dispersion of the beam and therefore the effective power density of the beam as it impacts the lithium pool. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344 and in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship.

  15. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  16. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  17. Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rimjaem, S.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, M.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Thongbai, C.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond (fs) electron bunches. Theses short bunches are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet (a-magnet) serving as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a SLAC-type linear accelerator (linac). The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. Cylindrical electron beam diode

    DOEpatents

    Bolduc, Paul E.

    1976-01-01

    A diode discharge device may include a tubular anode concentrically encircled by and spaced from a tubular cathode electrode with ends intermediate the ends of said anode electrode, and a metal conductive housing having a tubular wall disposed around the cathode electrode with end walls connected to the anode electrode. High energy electron current coupling is through an opening in the housing tubular wall to a portion of the cathode electrode intermediate its ends. Suitable utilization means may be within the anode electrode at positions to be irradiated by electrons emitted from the cathode electrode and transmitted through the anode walls.

  19. Electron beam cutting

    DOEpatents

    Mochel, M.E.; Humphreys, C.J.

    1985-04-02

    A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions. 2 figs.

  20. Electron beam cutting

    DOEpatents

    Mochel, Margaret E.; Humphreys, Colin J.

    1985-04-02

    A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions.

  1. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Ganjiang; Nowak, Daniel Anthony; Murphy, John Thomas

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  2. Electronic Packaging Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A characteristic of aerospace system design is that equipment size and weight must always be kept to a minimum, even in small components such as electronic packages. The dictates of spacecraft design have spawned a number of high-density packaging techniques, among them methods of connecting circuits in printed wiring boards by processes called stitchbond welding and parallel gap welding. These processes help designers compress more components into less space; they also afford weight savings and lower production costs.

  3. Toward a cold electron beam in the Fermilab's Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali S. Tupikov et al.

    2004-05-12

    Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring [1]. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through 20-m long cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 0.1 mrad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of beam quality measurements in the cooler prototype.

  4. Generation and application of bessel beams in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Harris, Jérémie; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Balboni, Roberto; Mafakheri, Erfan; Dennis, Mark R; Frabboni, Stefano; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-07-01

    We report a systematic treatment of the holographic generation of electron Bessel beams, with a view to applications in electron microscopy. We describe in detail the theory underlying hologram patterning, as well as the actual electron-optical configuration used experimentally. We show that by optimizing our nanofabrication recipe, electron Bessel beams can be generated with relative efficiencies reaching 37±3%. We also demonstrate by tuning various hologram parameters that electron Bessel beams can be produced with many visible rings, making them ideal for interferometric applications, or in more highly localized forms with fewer rings, more suitable for imaging. We describe the settings required to tune beam localization in this way, and explore beam and hologram configurations that allow the convergences and topological charges of electron Bessel beams to be controlled. We also characterize the phase structure of the Bessel beams generated with our technique, using a simulation procedure that accounts for imperfections in the hologram manufacturing process. PMID:27203186

  5. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  6. Intraoperative Localization of Tantalum Markers for Proton Beam Radiation of Choroidal Melanoma by an Opto-Electronic Navigation System: A Novel Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Amstutz, Christoph A.; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E.; Foerster, Michael H.; Heufelder, Jens; Kowal, Jens H.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: External beam proton radiation therapy has been used since 1975 to treat choroidal melanoma. For tumor location determination during proton radiation treatment, surgical tantalum clips are registered with image data. This report introduces the intraoperative application of an opto-electronic navigation system to determine with high precision the position of the tantalum markers and their spatial relationship to the tumor and anatomical landmarks. The application of the technique in the first 4 patients is described. Methods and Materials: A navigated reference base was attached noninvasively to the eye, and a navigated pointer device was used to record the spatial position of the tantalum markers, the tumor, and anatomical landmarks. Measurement accuracy was assessed on ex vivo porcine eye specimen by repetitive recording of the tantalum marker positions. The method was applied intraoperatively on 4 patients undergoing routine tantalum clip surgery. The spatial position information delivered by the navigation system was compared to the geometric data generated by the EYEPLAN software. Results: In the ex vivo experiments, the maximum repetition error was 0.34 mm. For the intraoperative application, the root mean square error of paired-points matching of the marker positions from the navigation system and from the EYEPLAN software was 0.701-1.25 mm. Conclusions: Navigation systems are a feasible tool for accurate localization of tantalum markers and anatomic landmarks. They can provide additional geometric information, and therefore have the potential to increase the reliability and accuracy of external beam proton radiation therapy for choroidal melanoma.

  7. APPARATUS FOR ELECTRON BEAM HEATING CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Jones, W.H.; Reece, J.B.

    1962-09-18

    An improved electron beam welding or melting apparatus is designed which utilizes a high voltage rectifier operating below its temperature saturation region to decrease variations in electron beam current which normally result from the gas generated in such apparatus. (AEC)

  8. Principle of Terahertz Radiation Using Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Young-Min; Choi, Eun-Mi; Park, Gun-Sik

    This part introduces high power THz coherent radiation sources that take advantage of free electron beams. Following a description of characteristics on vacuum electron devices (VEDs), fundamental radiation principle of beam-wave interaction is explained with specifying their types and applications. Conventional high power microwave VEDs such as klystrons, TWTs, gyrotrons, and FELs are described in their technical perspectives with brief overview of device characteristics. Addressing technical challenges on up-conversion-to-THz of conventional approach, this part explores the state-of-the-art micro-VEDs considered for modern THz applications such as communication, imaging, sensing, spectroscopy, and so on, which are combined with modern microfabrication technologies. Novel MEMS techniques to microminiaturize RF components such as electron gun and RF interaction circuits are also presented.

  9. Probing the magnetsophere with artificial electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of the University of Minnesota Electron Echo experiments, which so far have included five sounding rocket experiments. The concept of the Echo experiment is to inject electron beam pulses from a rocket into the ionosphere at altitudes in the range from 100 to 300 km. The electrons move to the conjugate hemisphere following magnetic field lines and return on neighboring field lines to the neighborhood of the rocket where the pulses may be detected and analyzed. Attention is given to the detection and analysis of echoes, the structure of echoes, and the Echo V experiment. The Echo V experiment showed clearly that detection of remote echo beams by atmospheric fluorescence using low light level TV system is not a viable technique. A future experiment is to use throw-away detectors for direct remote echo detection.

  10. Practical Teaching about Electron Beams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawson, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    If you have seen tubes like the ones we describe here in the back of a cupboard but have been reluctant to use them, now is the time to get them out. The aim of this article is to record the history of teaching about electron beams, particularly with Teltron equipment, and in doing so encourage those schools that are equipped with these tubes to…

  11. CuO SnO2 element as hydrogen sulfide gas sensor prepared by a sequential electron beam evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Khanna, Atul; Tripathi, Pragya; Nandedkar, R. V.; Potdar, S. R.; Chaudhari, S. M.; Bhatti, S. S.

    2003-10-01

    CuO-SnO2 thin film elements were prepared by sequential evaporation of Sn and Cu metals in high vacuum conditions by an electron beam evaporation technique and subsequent oxidation of the metallic bilayer under flowing oxygen conditions. The electrical properties of the thin film element were studied by a two probe method in the temperature range 110-220°C. On exposing the CuO-SnO2 thin films to a H2S-air mixture, it is observed that the resistance decreases by several thousand times. The H2S sensitivity of the thin film element was measured at three sensor operating temperatures. While the sensitivity decreased with an increase in temperature, both the response and recovery times improved with increasing temperature. The sensor element was selective to H2S gas and did not show any sensitivity to hydrogen and ethanol. The extraordinarily high sensitivity to H2S gas is attributed to the outstanding promoter action of CuO along with the unique porous structure of the thin film element as revealed by scanning electron microscopy studies.

  12. Plasma diagnostic techniques using particle beam probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, W C

    1980-07-01

    A brief overview is given of particle beam probing. The fundamental concepts common to all techniques are discussed as well as the design considerations for choosing a particular diagnostic technique. The capabilities of existing and proposed techniques, and the present status of the techniques in major magnetic confinement geometries is also presented. Techniques which involve the injection of a beam of neutral particles into the plasma are then considered. The techniques of beam attenuation, beam scattering, and active charge exchange using a beam of light particles such as hydrogen or helium are first presented. Optical measurements of the Zeeman splitting of the radiation from a neutral lithium beam is then discussed, including a new proposal for significantly improving this technique through the addition of a dye laser. Two techniques involving the injection of heavy neutral particles are then presented, and the section concludes with two proposed techniques for measuring the properties of the alpha particles produced from actual fusion reactions. The diagnostic techniques which are based upon the injection of a beam of charged particles into the plasma are next described. The advantages and limitations of these techniques in comparison with the neutral techniques are discussed, followed by a description of specific techniques.

  13. Collimation Studies with Hollow Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Saewert, G.W.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Recent experimental studies at the Fermilab Tevatron collider have shown that magnetically confined hollow electron beams can act as a new kind of collimator for high-intensity beams in storage rings. In a hollow electron beam collimator, electrons enclose the circulating beam. Their electric charge kicks halo particles transversely. If their distribution is axially symmetric, the beam core is unaffected. This device is complementary to conventional two-stage collimation systems: the electron beam can be placed arbitrarily close to the circulating beam; and particle removal is smooth, so that the device is a diffusion enhancer rather than a hard aperture limitation. The concept was tested in the Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the existing electron lenses. We describe some of the technical aspects of hollow-beam scraping and the results of recent measurements.

  14. Beam shaping for holographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2014-09-01

    Uniform intensity of laser radiation is very important in holographic and interferometry technologies, therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Holography and interferometry have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam, most important of them are flatness of phase front and extended depth of field. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality demanding holography and interferometry. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers piShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. This approach is used in SLM-based technologies of Computer Generated Holography, Dot-Matrix mastering of security holograms, holographic data storage, holographic projection, lithography, interferometric recording of Volume Bragg Gratings. High optical quality of resulting flat-top beam allows applying additional optical components to vary beam size and shape, thus adapting an optical system to requirements of a particular application. This paper will describe design basics of refractive beam shapers and optical layouts of their applying in holographic systems. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  15. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H.; Henry, J. James; Davenport, Clyde M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  16. Electron beam nanosculpting of Kirkendall oxide nanochannels.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Molina-Luna, Leopoldo; Buffière, Marie; Tessier, Pierre-Yves; Du, Ke; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Bittencourt, Carla; Snyders, Rony

    2014-02-25

    The nanomanipulation of metal nanoparticles inside oxide nanotubes, synthesized by means of the Kirkendall effect, is demonstrated. In this strategy, a focused electron beam, extracted from a transmission electron microscope source, is used to site-selectively heat the oxide material in order to generate and steer a metal ion diffusion flux inside the nanochannels. The metal ion flux generated inside the tube is a consequence of the reduction of the oxide phase occurring upon exposure to the e-beam. We further show that the directional migration of the metal ions inside the nanotubes can be achieved by locally tuning the chemistry and the morphology of the channel at the nanoscale. This allows sculpting organized metal nanoparticles inside the nanotubes with various sizes, shapes, and periodicities. This nanomanipulation technique is very promising since it enables creating unique nanostructures that, at present, cannot be produced by an alternative classical synthesis route.

  17. Microstructural investigation of the oxidation behavior of Cu in Ag-coated Cu films using a focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Hwan; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of elucidating a detailed mechanism for the oxidation behavior in submicron Cu particles coated with a thin Ag layer, the dewetting of Ag and the oxidation behavior of Cu in Ag-coated Cu films upon heating were investigated with a focused ion beam transmission electron microscopy technique. A slight dewetting of the Ag layer began at approximately 200 °C and aggregates of Cu2O particles were formed on the Ag layer, indicating that the initial Cu2O phase was formed on the thin Ag layer. Voids were formed in the Cu layer because of Cu atoms diffusing through the thin Ag layer to be oxidized in the upper Cu2O aggregates. After being heated to 250 °C, the Ag layer became more irregular, and in some regions, it disappeared because of intensive dewetting. The number and average size of the voids also increased. At 300 °C, a hollow structure with a Cu2O shell was formed. Pillar-like structures of unoxidized Cu and large voids were found under the Cu2O layer.

  18. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  19. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  20. Quantitative experiments with electrons in a positively charged beam

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Covo, M K; Cohen, R; Baca, D; Bieniosek, F; Friedman, A; Leister, C; Lund, S M; Seidl, P; Sharp, W

    2006-12-06

    Intense ion beams are difficult to maintain as non-neutral plasmas. Experiments and simulations are used to study the complex interactions between beam ions and (unwanted) electrons. Such ''electron clouds'' limit the performance of many accelerators. To characterize electron clouds, a number of parameters are measured including: total and local electron production and loss for each of three major sources, beam potential versus time, electron line-charge density, and gas pressure within the beam. Electron control methods include surface treatments to reduce electron and gas emission, and techniques to remove electrons from the beam, or block their capture by the beam. Detailed, self-consistent simulations include beam-transport fields, and electron and gas generation and transport; these compute unexpectedly rich behavior, much of which is confirmed experimentally. For example, in a quadrupole magnetic field, ion and dense electron plasmas interact to produce multi-kV oscillations in the electron plasma and distortions of the beam velocity space distribution, without the system becoming homogeneous or locally neutral.

  1. Electron-Beam Recombination Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoades, Robert Lewis

    1992-01-01

    The first known instance of electron-beam pumping of the 546.1 nm mercury laser is reported. This has been achieved using high-energy electrons to create intense ionization in a coaxial diode chamber containing a mixture of noble gases with a small amount of mercury vapor. Also reported are the results of a study of the 585.3 nm neon laser in He:Ne:Ar mixtures under similar experimental conditions. Both of these lasers are believed to be predominantly pumped by recombination. For the mercury laser, kinetic processes in the partially ionized plasma following the excitation pulse of high-energy electrons should favor the production of atomic mercury ions and molecular ions containing mercury. Subsequent recombination with electrons heavily favors the production of the 7^3S and 6^3 D states of Hg, of which 7^3S is the upper level of the reported laser. For the neon laser, the dominant recombining ion has been previously shown to be Ne_2^{+}. One of the dominant roles of helium in recombination lasers is inferred from the data for the neon laser at low helium concentrations. Helium appears to be necessary for the rapid relaxation of the electron energy which then increases the reaction rates for all known recombination processes thus increasing the pump rate into the upper state.

  2. The effect of Ag diffusion on properties of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x thin films produced by electron beam deposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görür, O.; Küçükömeroğlu, T.; Terzioğlu, C.; Varilci, A.; Altunbaş, M.

    2005-01-01

    Superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x thin films were prepared on pure MgO and Ag/MgO substrates (without and with Ag buffer layer) using an electron beam evaporation technique. The effects of isothermal annealing temperature and Ag diffusion on the crystalline structure and some superconducting properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, critical temperature, critical current density and room temperature resistivity measurements. The optimum annealing conditions causing a high degree of preferential orientation with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrates were found to be the isothermal annealing at 930 °C for 5 h. Annealing of films on Ag/MgO substrates is accompanied by Ag diffusion from the buffer layer into YBCO films. The higher rate of crystallization of the YBCO films, the higher degree of c-axis orientation, the higher dense surface morphology, the increased lattice parameter c (by ≈0.1%), the reduced room temperature resistivity (2-3 times), the slightly enchanced critical temperature ( Tc = 92 K at R = 0) and the critical current density ( Jc = 4.2 × 10 5 A/cm 2 at 77 K) were observed for the Ag-doped films (on Ag/MgO substrates) in comparison with those for the undoped films (on MgO substrates). The temperature dependence of the Ag diffusion coefficient in YBCO films in the range 600-800 °C was described by the relation D = 1.9 × 10 -6 exp(-0.73 eV/kT).

  3. Adjusting an electron beam for drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childress, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reticle contains two concentric circles: inner circle insures beam circularity and outer circle is guide to prevent beam from cutting workpiece clamp. Precise measurement of beam and clamp are required with old reticle. New reticle speeds up electron-beam drilling process by eliminating need to rotate eyepiece to make measurements against reticle scale.

  4. Generation of Electron Bessel Beams with Nondiffractive Spreading by a Nanofabricated Annular Slit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Koh; Hirakawa, Kazuma; Nambu, Hiroki; Tanaka, Nobuo; Uchida, Masaya

    2016-04-01

    The shaping of a wavefront of free electrons has been experimentally realized very recently. We report the generation of an electron Bessel beam using a nanofabricated annular slit. We directly observe that electron Bessel beams propagate while maintaining a narrow beam width over a long propagation distance. In addition, we experimentally verify the self-healing property of these electron beams, which can reconstruct their shape after passing an obstacle. The experimental results are compared with simulation results of the propagation including a hexagonal slit. The present technique of electron Bessel beam generation can be used to develop a novel electron-beam-shaping, an atomic manipulation technique, and a new electron microscopy.

  5. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  6. Beam rotation and shear in a large electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, C.R.; Oona, H.; Shurter, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The time averaged electron beam current distribution of one of the electron guns of the Large Aperture Module (LAM) of the Aurora laser was measured as part of a larger set of experiments designed to study the electron beam transport to and energy deposition in the LAM laser chamber. The LAM laser chamber has a 1-m {times} 1-m aperture and is pumped from two sides along a 2-m length. A 10 ga. stainless steel sheet was placed inside the laser chamber and served multiple purposes. First, it was used to convert high energy electrons into X-rays in order to make radiograms of the electron beam. Second, the sheet was used as a Faraday cup to measure the total beam current. Third, individual Faraday cups were mounted on the plate to sample the time history of the electron beam at various positions. Each of the LAM electron gun diodes produces a beam of 750 kV electrons with a total current of about 500 kA which is relatively uniform over the cathode area of 1 m {times} 2 m. An applied magnetic field of about 1300 Gauss is used to prevent pinch of the beam during beam transport.

  7. Quantitative Experiments With Electrons in a Positively Charged Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Covo, M K; Cohen, R; Baca, D; Bieniosek, F; Friedman, A; Leister, C; Lund, S M; Seidl, P; Sharp, W

    2006-10-27

    Intense ion beams are an extreme example of, and difficult to maintain as, a non-neutral plasma. Experiments and simulations are used to study the complex interactions between beam ions and (unwanted) electrons. Such ''electron clouds'' limit the performance of many accelerators. To characterize electron clouds, a number of parameters are measured including: total and local electron production and loss for each of three major sources, beam potential versus time, electron line-charge density, and gas pressure within the beam. Electron control methods include surface treatments to reduce electron and gas emission, and techniques to remove, or block, electrons from the beam. Detailed, self-consistent simulations include beam-transport fields, and electron and gas generation and consistent transport, to compute unexpectedly rich behavior, much of which is confirmed experimentally. For example, in a quadrupole magnetic field, ion and dense electron plasmas interact to produce multi-kV oscillations in the electron plasma and distortions of the beam velocity space distribution, without becoming homogenous or locally neutral.

  8. Plasma lenses for focusing relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Wheeler, S.; Leemans, W.

    1997-04-01

    The next generation of colliders require tightly focused beams with high luminosity. To focus charged particle beams for such applications, a plasma focusing scheme has been proposed. Plasma lenses can be overdense (plasma density, n{sub p} much greater than electron beam density, n{sub b}) or underdense (n{sub p} less than 2 n{sub b}). In overdense lenses the space-charge force of the electron beam is canceled by the plasma and the remaining magnetic force causes the electron beam to self-pinch. The focusing gradient is nonlinear, resulting in spherical aberrations. In underdense lenses, the self-forces of the electron beam cancel, allowing the plasma ions to focus the beam. Although for a given beam density, a uniform underdense lens produces smaller focusing gradients than an overdense lens, it produces better beam quality since the focusing is done by plasma ions. The underdense lens can be improved by tapering the density of the plasma for optimal focusing. The underdense lens performance can be enhanced further by producing adiabatic plasma lenses to avoid the Oide limit on spot size due to synchrotron radiation by the electron beam. The plasma lens experiment at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) is designed to study the properties of plasma lenses in both overdense and underdense regimes. In particular, important issues such as electron beam matching, time response of the lens, lens aberrations and shot-to-shot reproducibility are being investigated.

  9. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  10. Rippled-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe a new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. Due to nonlinearities in the orbit equation, the interaction can be made autoresonant, where the phase and amplitude of the gain is independent of the beam energy.

  11. Decarburization of uranium via electron beam processing

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R H

    1998-10-23

    For many commercial and military applications, the successive Vacuum Induction Melting of uranium metal in graphite crucibles results in a product which is out of specification in carbon. The current recovery method involves dissolution of the metal in acid and chemical purification. This is both expensive and generates mixed waste. A study was undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate the feasibility of reducing the carbon content of uranium metal using electron beam techniques. Results will be presented on the rate and extent of carbon removal as a function of various operating parameters.

  12. Application of optical beams to electrons in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulis, A.; Masir, M. Ramezani; Peeters, F. M.

    2011-03-01

    The technique of beam optics is applied to the description of the wave function of Dirac electrons. This approach is illustrated by considering electron transmission through simple nonhomogeneous structures, such as flat and bent p-n junctions and superlattices. We found that a convex p-n junction compresses the beam waist, while a concave interface widens it without loosing its focusing properties. At a flat p-n junction the waist of the transmitted Gaussian beam can be narrowed or widened, depending on the angle of incidence. A general condition is derived for the occurrence of beam collimation in a superlattice which is less stringent than previous discussed.

  13. Low energy electron magnetometer using a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low energy electron beam magnetometer utilizes near-monoenergetic electrons thereby reducing errors due to electron energy spread and electron nonuniform angular distribution. In a first embodiment, atoms in an atomic beam of an inert gas are excited to a Rydberg state and then electrons of near zero energy are detached from the Rydberg atoms. The near zero energy electrons are then accelerated by an electric field V(acc) to form the electron beam. In a second embodiment, a filament emits electrons into an electrostatic analyzer which selects electrons at a predetermined energy level within a very narrow range. These selected electrons make up the electron beam that is subjected to the magnetic field being measured.

  14. Optics of electron beam in the Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey V.; Kazakevich, G.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2005-11-01

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of {approx}0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within {approx}0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as {approx}0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analyzed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved.

  15. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  16. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  17. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Baertling, Y.; Hoppe, D.; Kuksanov, N.; Fadeev, S.; Salimov, R.

    2012-09-15

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  18. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography.

    PubMed

    Hampel, U; Bärtling, Y; Hoppe, D; Kuksanov, N; Fadeev, S; Salimov, R

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  19. Redesigned Electron-Beam Furnace Boosts Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    1995-01-01

    Redesigned electron-beam furnace features carousel of greater capacity so more experiments conducted per loading, and time spent on reloading and vacuum pump-down reduced. Common mounting plate for electron source and carousel simplifies installation and reduces vibration.

  20. Patterned electrochemical deposition of copper using an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Heijer, Mark den; Shao, Ingrid; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Radisic, Alex

    2014-02-01

    We describe a technique for patterning clusters of metal using electrochemical deposition. By operating an electrochemical cell in the transmission electron microscope, we deposit Cu on Au under potentiostatic conditions. For acidified copper sulphate electrolytes, nucleation occurs uniformly over the electrode. However, when chloride ions are added there is a range of applied potentials over which nucleation occurs only in areas irradiated by the electron beam. By scanning the beam we control nucleation to form patterns of deposited copper. We discuss the mechanism for this effect in terms of electron beam-induced reactions with copper chloride, and consider possible applications.

  1. Focused electron beam in pyroelectric electron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Imashuku, Susumu; Imanishi, Akira; Kawai, Jun

    2013-07-15

    We report a method to focus the electron beam generated using a pyroelectric crystal. An electron beam with a spot size of 100 μm was achieved by applying an electrical field to an electroconductive needle tip set on a pyroelectric crystal. When the focused electron beam bombarded a sample, characteristic X-rays of the sample were only detected due to the production of an electric field between the needle tip and the sample.

  2. LHC particle collimation with hollow electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Drozhdin, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron have proven themselves as safe and very reliable instruments which can be effectively used in hadron collider operation for a number of applications, including compensation of beam-beam effects [1], a DC beam removal from abort gaps [2], and as a versatile diagnostic tool. In this article, we--following the original proposal [3,4]--consider in more detail a possibility of using electron lenses with hollow electron beam for ion and proton collimation in LHC and the Tevatron.

  3. Electron beam selectively seals porous metal filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J. A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1968-01-01

    Electron beam welding selectively seals the outer surfaces of porous metal filters and impedances used in fluid flow systems. The outer surface can be sealed by melting a thin outer layer of the porous material with an electron beam so that the melted material fills all surface pores.

  4. Purification of Niobium by Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, M.; Mirji, K. V.; Prasad, V. V. Satya; Baligidad, R. G.; Gokhale, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Pure niobium metal, produced by alumino-thermic reduction of niobium oxide, contains various impurities which need to be reduced to acceptable levels to obtain aerospace grade purity. In the present work, an attempt has been made to refine niobium metals by electron beam drip melting technique to achieve purity confirming to the ASTM standard. Input power to the electron gun and melt rate were varied to observe their combined effect on extend of refining and loss of niobium. Electron beam (EB) melting is shown to reduce alkali metals, trace elements and interstitial impurities well below the specified limits. The reduction in the impurities during EB melting is attributed to evaporation and degassing due to the combined effect of high vacuum and high melt surface temperature. The % removal of interstitial impurities is essentially a function of melt rate and input power. As the melt rate decreases or input power increases, the impurity levels in the solidified niobium ingot decrease. The EB refining process is also accompanied by considerable amount of niobium loss, which is attributed to evaporation of pure niobium and niobium sub-oxide. Like other impurities, Nb loss increases with decreasing melt rate or increase in input power.

  5. Separating Isotopes With Laser And Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, Sandor

    1989-01-01

    Need for second laser eliminated. In scheme for separation of isotopes, electrons of suitable kinetic energy ionize specific isotope excited by laser beam in magnetic field. Ionization by electron beams cheap and efficient in comparison to ionization by laser beams, and requires no special technical developments. Feasibility of new scheme demonstrated in selective ionization of Ba138, making possible separation of isotope from Ba isotopes of atomic weight 130, 132, 134, 135, 136, and 137.

  6. Digital retrospective motion-mode display and processing of electron beam cine-computed tomography and other cross-sectional cardiac imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Judd E.; Rumberger, John A.; Buithieu, Jean; Behrenbeck, Thomas; Breen, Jerome F.; Sheedy, Patrick F., II

    1995-05-01

    Electron beam computed tomography is unparalleled in its ability to consistently produce high quality dynamic images of the human heart. Its use in quantification of left ventricular dynamics is well established in both clinical and research applications. However, the image analysis tools supplied with the scanners offer a limited number of analysis options. They are based on embedded computer systems which have not been significantly upgraded since the scanner was introduced over a decade ago in spite of the explosive improvements in available computer power which have occured during this period. To address these shortcomings, a workstation-based ventricular analysis system has been developed at our institution. This system, which has been in use for over five years, is based on current workstation technology and therefore has benefited from the periodic upgrades in processor performance available to these systems. The dynamic image segmentation component of this system is an interactively supervised, semi-automatic surface identification and tracking system. It characterizes the endocardial and epicardial surfaces of the left ventricle as two concentric 4D hyper-space polyhedrons. Each of these polyhedrons have nearly ten thousand vertices which are deposited into a relational database. The right ventricle is also processed in a similar manner. This database is queried by other custom components which extract ventricular function parameters such as regional ejection fraction and wall stress. The interactive tool which supervises dynamic image segmentation has been enhanced with a temporal domain display. The operator interactively chooses the spatial location of the endpoints of a line segment while the corresponding space/time image is displayed. These images, with content resembling M-Mode echocardiography, benefit form electron beam computed tomography's high spatial and contrast resolution. The segmented surfaces are displayed along with the imagery. These

  7. Ion Beam Analysis Techniques in Interdisciplinary Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Respaldiza, Miguel A.; Ager, Francisco J.

    1999-12-31

    The ion beam analysis techniques emerge in the last years as one of the main applications of electrostatic accelerators. A short summary of the most used IBA techniques will be given as well as some examples of applications in interdisciplinary sciences.

  8. Ion beam analysis techniques in interdisciplinary applications

    SciTech Connect

    Respaldiza, Miguel A.; Ager, Francisco J.

    1999-11-16

    The ion beam analysis techniques emerge in the last years as one of the main applications of electrostatic accelerators. A short summary of the most used IBA techniques will be given as well as some examples of applications in interdisciplinary sciences.

  9. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-08

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world`s largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide.

  10. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.J.; Prelec, K.

    1990-07-17

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source. 2 figs.

  11. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Kovarik, Vincent J.; Prelec, Krsto

    1990-01-01

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source.

  12. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  13. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-10

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  14. Focused electron beam induced deposition: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Porrati, Fabrizio; Schwalb, Christian; Winhold, Marcel; Sachser, Roland; Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan; Fantner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a direct-writing technique with nanometer resolution, which has received strongly increasing attention within the last decade. In FEBID a precursor previously adsorbed on a substrate surface is dissociated in the focus of an electron beam. After 20 years of continuous development FEBID has reached a stage at which this technique is now particularly attractive for several areas in both, basic and applied research. The present topical review addresses selected examples that highlight this development in the areas of charge-transport regimes in nanogranular metals close to an insulator-to-metal transition, the use of these materials for strain- and magnetic-field sensing, and the prospect of extending FEBID to multicomponent systems, such as binary alloys and intermetallic compounds with cooperative ground states. Results: After a brief introduction to the technique, recent work concerning FEBID of Pt–Si alloys and (hard-magnetic) Co–Pt intermetallic compounds on the nanometer scale is reviewed. The growth process in the presence of two precursors, whose flux is independently controlled, is analyzed within a continuum model of FEBID that employs rate equations. Predictions are made for the tunability of the composition of the Co–Pt system by simply changing the dwell time of the electron beam during the writing process. The charge-transport regimes of nanogranular metals are reviewed next with a focus on recent theoretical advancements in the field. As a case study the transport properties of Pt–C nanogranular FEBID structures are discussed. It is shown that by means of a post-growth electron-irradiation treatment the electronic intergrain-coupling strength can be continuously tuned over a wide range. This provides unique access to the transport properties of this material close to the insulator-to-metal transition. In the last part of the review, recent developments in mechanical strain

  15. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S.

    2013-03-01

    Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of 14O (71 s), 42K (12.4 h), 43K (22.2 h), and 41Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 103 particles per second (pps). About 3.2 × 103 pps of 1.4 MeV 14O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

  16. Optimizing C{sup 4+} and C{sup 5+} beams of the Kei2 electron cyclotron resonance ion source using a special gas-mixing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Drentje, A.G.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.

    2006-03-15

    With the prototype electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the next carbon therapy facility in Japan a series of measurements has been performed in order (a) to find the best condition for producing high beam currents of C{sup 4+} ions, and (b) to study the effect of 'special' gas mixing by using a chemical compound as a feed gas. The effect would then appear as an increase in high charge state production in this case of C{sup 5+} ions. In 'regular' gas-mixing experiments it is well known that an isotopic phenomenon occurs: a heavier isotope of the mixing gas is increasing the production of high charge states of the beam gas ions. A similar isotopic effect has been found in the present experiment: with deuterated methane (CD{sub 4} gas) the C{sup 5+} beam currents are about 10% higher than with regular methane (CH{sub 4} gas). The 'mixing-gas' ratio D (or H) to C can be decreased by choosing, e.g., butane gas; in this case the isotopic effect for C{sup 5+} production is even stronger (>15%). For production of C{sup 4+} ions the isotopic effect appears to be absent. Clearly this is related to the much easier production. It turns out that the relative amount of carbon is much more important: butane gives about 10% higher C{sup 4+}-ion currents than methane.

  17. Beam dynamics in rf guns and emittance correction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, Luca

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a general review of beam dynamics in a laser-driven rf gun. The peculiarity of such an accelerating structure versus other conventional multi-cell linac structures is underlined on the basis of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem, which is found to give a theoretical background for the well known Kim's model. A basic explanation for some proposed methods to correct rf induced emittance growth is also derived from the theorem. We also present three emittance correction techniques for the recovery of space-charge induced emittance growth, namely the optimum distributed disk-like bunch technique, the use of rf spatial harmonics to correct spherical aberration induced by space charge forces and the technique of emittance filtering by clipping the electron beam. The expected performances regarding the beam quality achievable with different techniques, as predicted by scaling laws and simulations, are analyzed, and, where available, compared to experimental results.

  18. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  19. Optimizing the electron beam parameters for head-on beam-beam compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Pikin, A.; Gu, X.

    2011-03-28

    Head-on beam-beam compensation is adopted to compensate the large beam-beam tune spread from the protonproton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Two e-lenses are being built and to be in stalled near IP10 in the end of 2011. In this article we perform numeric simulation to investigate the effect of the electron beam parameters on the proton dynamics. The electron beam parameters include its transverse profile, size, current, offset and random errors in them. In this article we studied the effect of the electron beam parameters on the proton dynamics. The electron beam parameters include its transverse shape, size, current, offset and their random errors. From the study, we require that the electron beam size can not be smaller than the proton beam's. And the random noise in the electron current should be better than 0.1%. The offset of electron beam w.r.t. the proton beam center is crucial to head-on beam-beam compensation. Its random errors should be below {+-}8{micro}m.

  20. Laser beam shaping for biomedical microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Kaiser, Peter; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-04-01

    Uniform illumination of a working field is very important in optical systems of confocal microscopy and various implementations of fluorescence microscopy like TIR, SSIM, STORM, PALM to enhance performance of these laser-based research techniques. Widely used TEM00 laser sources are characterized by essentially non-uniform Gaussian intensity profile which leads usually to non-uniform intensity distribution in a microscope working field or in a field of microlenses array of a confocal microscope optical system, this non-uniform illumination results in instability of measuring procedure and reducing precision of quantitative measurements. Therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) profile is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Due to high demands to optical image quality the mentioned techniques have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam: flatness of phase front and extended depth of field, - from this point of view the microscopy techniques are similar to holography and interferometry. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality required in discussed microscopy techniques. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers πShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. The main function of a beam shaper is transformation of laser intensity profile, further beam transformation to provide optimum for a particular technique spot size and shape has to

  1. Imaging Techniques for Relativistic Beams: Issues and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, Alex H.; Wendt, Manfred; /Fermilab

    2012-02-01

    Characterizations of transverse profiles for low-power beams in the accelerators of the proposed linear colliders (ILC and CLIC) using imaging techniques are being evaluated. Assessments of the issues and limitations for imaging relativistic beams with intercepting scintillator or optical transition radiation screens are presented based on low-energy tests at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector and are planned for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab. We have described several of the issues and limitations one encounters with the imaging of relativistic electron beams. We have reported our initial tests at the A0PI facility and our plans to extend these studies to the GeV scale at the ASTA facility. We also have plans to test these concepts with 23-GeV beams at the FACET facility at SLAC in the coming year. It appears the future remains bright for imaging techniques in ILC-relevant parameter space.

  2. Electron beam irradiated silver nanowires for a highly transparent heater

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chan-Hwa; Oh, Seung Kyu; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cha, Yu-Jung; Kwak, Joon Seop; Shin, Jae-Heon; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Cheong, Woo-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Transparent heaters have attracted increasing attention for their usefulness in vehicle windows, outdoor displays, and periscopes. We present high performance transparent heaters based on Ag nanowires with electron beam irradiation. We obtained an Ag-nanowire thin film with 48 ohm/sq of sheet resistance and 88.8% (substrate included) transmittance at 550 nm after electron beam irradiation for 120 sec. We demonstrate that the electron beam creates nano-soldering at the junctions of the Ag nanowires, which produces lower sheet resistance and improved adhesion of the Ag nanowires. We fabricated a transparent heater with Ag nanowires after electron beam irradiation, and obtained a temperature of 51 °C within 1 min at an applied voltage of 7 V. The presented technique will be useful in a wide range of applications for transparent heaters. PMID:26639760

  3. Electron beam irradiated silver nanowires for a highly transparent heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Chan-Hwa; Oh, Seung Kyu; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cha, Yu-Jung; Kwak, Joon Seop; Shin, Jae-Heon; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Cheong, Woo-Seok

    2015-12-01

    Transparent heaters have attracted increasing attention for their usefulness in vehicle windows, outdoor displays, and periscopes. We present high performance transparent heaters based on Ag nanowires with electron beam irradiation. We obtained an Ag-nanowire thin film with 48 ohm/sq of sheet resistance and 88.8% (substrate included) transmittance at 550 nm after electron beam irradiation for 120 sec. We demonstrate that the electron beam creates nano-soldering at the junctions of the Ag nanowires, which produces lower sheet resistance and improved adhesion of the Ag nanowires. We fabricated a transparent heater with Ag nanowires after electron beam irradiation, and obtained a temperature of 51 °C within 1 min at an applied voltage of 7 V. The presented technique will be useful in a wide range of applications for transparent heaters.

  4. Continuum models of focused electron beam induced processing

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Charlene; Friedli, Vinzenz; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Utke, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) is a suite of direct-write, high resolution techniques that enable fabrication and editing of nanostructured materials inside scanning electron microscopes and other focused electron beam (FEB) systems. Here we detail continuum techniques that are used to model FEBIP, and release software that can be used to simulate a wide range of processes reported in the FEBIP literature. These include: (i) etching and deposition performed using precursors that interact with a surface through physisorption and activated chemisorption, (ii) gas mixtures used to perform simultaneous focused electron beam induced etching and deposition (FEBIE and FEBID), and (iii) etch processes that proceed through multiple reaction pathways and generate a number of reaction products at the substrate surface. We also review and release software for Monte Carlo modeling of the precursor gas flux which is needed as an input parameter for continuum FEBIP models. PMID:26425405

  5. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  6. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  7. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Changbiao

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  8. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  9. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  10. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  11. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  12. Electron beam depolarization in a damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    1993-04-01

    Depolarization of a polarized electron beam injected into a damping ring is analyzed by extending calculations conventionally applied to proton synchrotrons. Synchrotron radiation in an electron ring gives rise to both polarizing and depolarizing effects. In a damping ring, the beam is stored for a time much less than the time for self polarization. Spin flip radiation may therefore be neglected. Synchrotron radiation without spin flips, however, must be considered as the resonance strength depends on the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude which changes as the electron beam is radiation damped. An expression for the beam polarization at extraction is derived which takes into account radiation damping. The results are applied to the electron ring at the Stanford Linear Collider and are compared with numerical matrix formalisms.

  13. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  14. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-06-09

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  15. Technical Seminar: Electron Beam Forming Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    EBF³ uses a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment to create a molten pool on a metallic substrate. This layer-additive process enables fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. The ...

  16. Electron beam, laser beam and plasma arc welding studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    This program was undertaken as an initial step in establishing an evaluation framework which would permit a priori selection of advanced welding processes for specific applications. To this end, a direct comparison of laser beam, electron beam and arc welding of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was undertaken. Ti-6Al-4V was selected for use in view of its established welding characteristics and its importance in aerospace applications.

  17. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  18. Beam Dynamics in an Electron Lens with the Warp Particle-in-cell Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Moens, Vince; Redaelli, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are a mature technique for beam manipulation in colliders and storage rings. In an electron lens, a pulsed, magnetically confined electron beam with a given current-density profile interacts with the circulating beam to obtain the desired effect. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for beam-beam compensation, for abort-gap clearing, and for halo scraping. They will be used in RHIC at BNL for head-on beam-beam compensation, and their application to the Large Hadron Collider for halo control is under development. At Fermilab, electron lenses will be implemented as lattice elements for nonlinear integrable optics. The design of electron lenses requires tools to calculate the kicks and wakefields experienced by the circulating beam. We use the Warp particle-in-cell code to study generation, transport, and evolution of the electron beam. For the first time, a fully 3-dimensional code is used for this purpose.

  19. Electron-beam furnace with magnetic stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, H.R.; Knecht, J.A. II

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes an electron-beam comprising: a. An evacuable chamber having a port for coupling the chamber to vacuum pump means; b. a trough-shaped hearth within the chamber for holding material to be melted, the hearth having a spout for issuing a flow of molten material therefrom; c. a crucible positioned within the chamber for receiving molten material flowing from the hearth; d. one or more electron guns each for producing an energetic beam of electrons, each electron gun being positioned a relatively large distance away from the hearth and the crucible; e. magnetic beam deflection means forming an integral part of each electron gun for scanning and shaping the beam produced thereby across the hearth or the crucible; and f. magnetic means adjacent to the hearth and the crucible for producing a relatively weak magnetic field in the vicinity of the hearth and the crucible for preventing erratic deflections of the scanning electron beams without significantly altering the trajectories of such beams.

  20. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Isabel A; Dance, David R; Skinner, Claire L; Evans, Phil M

    2005-08-01

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDIvol) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDIvol to an effective dose. PMID:16193782

  1. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Isabel A.; Dance, David R.; Skinner, Claire L.; Evans, Phil M.

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDI{sub vol}) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDI{sub vol} to an effective dose.

  2. A reflex electron beam discharge as a plasma source for electron beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.S.; Rocca, J.J.; Szapiro, B. )

    1988-10-01

    A reflex electron beam glow discharge has been used as a plasma source for the generation of broad-area electron beams. An electron current of 120 A (12 A/cm/sup 2/) was extracted from the plasma in 10 ..mu..s pulses and accelerated to energies greater than 1 keV in the gap between two grids. The scaling of the scheme for the generation of multikiloamp high-energy beams is discussed.

  3. Electron Beam Technology - Some Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Munawar; Fazal-E-Aleem

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam technology has been in focus since long due to wide variety of applications in research and industry. One of the important modes of e-beam production is through thermionic emission. Improvements and advancement in enhancing the capabilities of electron beam sources compatible with the task to be accomplished at a reduced cost are therefore necessary. We give an update of the recently developed and reported e-guns which are easy to fabricate, assemble and more efficient. Besides being cost effective, these guns are user friendly.

  4. Control and Manipulation of Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2009-01-22

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  5. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  6. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  7. A conceptual design for an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-02-15

    This report is a brief description of a model electron beam, which is meant to serve as a pulsed heat source that vaporizes a metal fleck into an ''under-dense'' cloud. See Reference 1. The envelope of the electron beam is calculated from the paraxial ray equation, as stated in Reference 2. The examples shown here are for 5 A, 200 keV beams that focus to waists of under 0.4 mm diameter, within a cylindrical volume of 10 cm radius and length. The magnetic fields assumed in the examples are moderate, 0.11 T and 0.35 T, and can probably be created by permanent magnets.

  8. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  9. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  10. Nonlinear wave scattering and electron beam relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschietti, L.; Dum, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The role played by nonlinear scattering during the relaxation of a warm electron beam is investigated through a numerical code based on kinetic equations. The code encompasses the quasi-linear wave-electron interaction and wave-wave scattering off ion clouds. Ions with velocities 2 nu sub i (nu sub i being the ion thermal velocity) are found to be the most efficient for scattering the Langmuir waves off their polarization clouds. The transfer rate of the spectrum out of resonance with the beam is larger by a factor 3 compared to usual estimates. The changes produced in the dispersion relation by the presence of the beam electrons dramatically alter the characteristics of the secondary spectrum. In a late phase the classic condensate K of about 0 is depleted, with the formation of a new condensate in resonance with the flat-topped beam distribution, which follows from the fact that the mere presence of the beam electrons creates a minimum in the frequency-wave-number relation. For strong and slow beams, the predictions of the code are found to be in excellent agreement with the results of the particle simulation if a dispersion relation that includes the beam is used.

  11. Tokomak disruption runaway electron beam energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yian

    2012-10-01

    Disruption is one of the major concerns in magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) research. People believe the energetic runaway electron beam can damage the first wall by depositing most of its energy to certain region as heat, melting the wall. However, as the energy of the beam electron is very high (up to 50 MeV), most of the beam energy should be converted as gamma radiation and escape, and the fraction of thermal energy deposition is relatively small. We will calculate the runaway electron energy deposition in typical first wall configurations in ITER disruption scenario, and give the temperature profile of the wall. We will also calculate the bremsstrahlung gamma ray spectra of the beam and discuss the consequences.

  12. Comparative Electrical Study on n-Type Cd1-XSeX and CdSe Thin Films Deposited by Electron Beam Evaporation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Aneet Kumar; Tripathi, Ravishankar Nath; Vishwakarma, Rahul S. R.

    2011-10-01

    Since the last two decades, in the area of electronics, group II-VI compounds have drawn considerable interest due to their various applications. Cadmium selenide (CdSe), a member of this group, is one of the promising semiconducting material from its application point of view. The n-type Cd1-XSeX and CdSe films have been deposited onto ultra cleaned glass substrates by electron bean evaporated technique under 10-5 torr vacuum. The n-type Cd1-XSeX thin films has confirmed by Hall effect data. The resistivity of the film has been determined by I-V measurement using four probe setup. It is observed that the resistivity decreases with increases Cd/Se ratio and we found that n-type Cd1-XSeX thin films is more better than CdSe thin films.

  13. Correlation in a coherent electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Tetsuji; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Tonomura, Akira

    2011-06-15

    Correlations between successive detections in beams of free electrons are studied with a transmission electron microscope. For incoherent illumination of the detectors, a certain random coincidence probability is observed, indicative for uncorrelated arrival times of the electrons. When the illumination is changed from incoherent to coherent, a reduction of the random coincidence probability is observed, indicative for antibunching in the arrival times of the electrons. However, the amount of reduction is larger than the theoretically expected value calculated from the Pauli principle, forbidding more than one identical fermion to occupy the same quantum state. For a certain coherent illumination of the detectors, where we use magnetic lenses in electron microscopes for magnifications of the coherence length, we find an enhanced coincidence probability, indicative for bunching in the arrival times of the electrons. This originates from correlations in beams of free electrons due to Coulomb interactions.

  14. Electron-beam induced synthesis of nanostructures: a review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, I G; Bachmatiuk, A; Bezugly, V; Kunstmann, J; Gemming, T; Liu, Z; Cuniberti, G; Rümmeli, M H

    2016-06-01

    As the success of nanostructures grows in modern society so does the importance of our ability to control their synthesis in precise manners, often with atomic precision as this can directly affect the final properties of the nanostructures. Hence it is crucial to have both deep insight, ideally with real-time temporal resolution, and precise control during the fabrication of nanomaterials. Transmission electron microscopy offers these attributes potentially providing atomic resolution with near real time temporal resolution. In addition, one can fabricate nanostructures in situ in a TEM. This can be achieved with the use of environmental electron microscopes and/or specialized specimen holders. A rather simpler and rapidly growing approach is to take advantage of the imaging electron beam as a tool for in situ reactions. This is possible because there is a wealth of electron specimen interactions, which, when implemented under controlled conditions, enable different approaches to fabricate nanostructures. Moreover, when using the electron beam to drive reactions no specialized specimen holders or peripheral equipment is required. This review is dedicated to explore the body of work available on electron-beam induced synthesis techniques with in situ capabilities. Particular emphasis is placed on the electron beam-induced synthesis of nanostructures conducted inside a TEM, viz. the e-beam is the sole (or primary) agent triggering and driving the synthesis process.

  15. Electron-beam induced synthesis of nanostructures: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, I. G.; Bachmatiuk, A.; Bezugly, V.; Kunstmann, J.; Gemming, T.; Liu, Z.; Cuniberti, G.; Rümmeli, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    As the success of nanostructures grows in modern society so does the importance of our ability to control their synthesis in precise manners, often with atomic precision as this can directly affect the final properties of the nanostructures. Hence it is crucial to have both deep insight, ideally with real-time temporal resolution, and precise control during the fabrication of nanomaterials. Transmission electron microscopy offers these attributes potentially providing atomic resolution with near real time temporal resolution. In addition, one can fabricate nanostructures in situ in a TEM. This can be achieved with the use of environmental electron microscopes and/or specialized specimen holders. A rather simpler and rapidly growing approach is to take advantage of the imaging electron beam as a tool for in situ reactions. This is possible because there is a wealth of electron specimen interactions, which, when implemented under controlled conditions, enable different approaches to fabricate nanostructures. Moreover, when using the electron beam to drive reactions no specialized specimen holders or peripheral equipment is required. This review is dedicated to explore the body of work available on electron-beam induced synthesis techniques with in situ capabilities. Particular emphasis is placed on the electron beam-induced synthesis of nanostructures conducted inside a TEM, viz. the e-beam is the sole (or primary) agent triggering and driving the synthesis process.

  16. Electron-beam induced synthesis of nanostructures: a review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, I G; Bachmatiuk, A; Bezugly, V; Kunstmann, J; Gemming, T; Liu, Z; Cuniberti, G; Rümmeli, M H

    2016-06-01

    As the success of nanostructures grows in modern society so does the importance of our ability to control their synthesis in precise manners, often with atomic precision as this can directly affect the final properties of the nanostructures. Hence it is crucial to have both deep insight, ideally with real-time temporal resolution, and precise control during the fabrication of nanomaterials. Transmission electron microscopy offers these attributes potentially providing atomic resolution with near real time temporal resolution. In addition, one can fabricate nanostructures in situ in a TEM. This can be achieved with the use of environmental electron microscopes and/or specialized specimen holders. A rather simpler and rapidly growing approach is to take advantage of the imaging electron beam as a tool for in situ reactions. This is possible because there is a wealth of electron specimen interactions, which, when implemented under controlled conditions, enable different approaches to fabricate nanostructures. Moreover, when using the electron beam to drive reactions no specialized specimen holders or peripheral equipment is required. This review is dedicated to explore the body of work available on electron-beam induced synthesis techniques with in situ capabilities. Particular emphasis is placed on the electron beam-induced synthesis of nanostructures conducted inside a TEM, viz. the e-beam is the sole (or primary) agent triggering and driving the synthesis process. PMID:27211080

  17. Electron beam assisted field evaporation of insulating nanowires/tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, N. P.; Niguès, A.; Choueib, M.; Perisanu, S.; Ayari, A.; Poncharal, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Siria, A.; Vincent, P.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate field evaporation of insulating materials, specifically BN nanotubes and undoped Si nanowires, assisted by a convergent electron beam. Electron irradiation leads to positive charging at the nano-object's apex and to an important increase of the local electric field thus inducing field evaporation. Experiments performed both in a transmission electron microscope and in a scanning electron microscope are presented. This technique permits the selective evaporation of individual nanowires in complex materials. Electron assisted field evaporation could be an interesting alternative or complementary to laser induced field desorption used in atom probe tomography of insulating materials.

  18. Electron beam assisted field evaporation of insulating nanowires/tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, N. P. Niguès, A.; Choueib, M.; Perisanu, S.; Ayari, A.; Poncharal, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Siria, A.; Vincent, P.

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate field evaporation of insulating materials, specifically BN nanotubes and undoped Si nanowires, assisted by a convergent electron beam. Electron irradiation leads to positive charging at the nano-object's apex and to an important increase of the local electric field thus inducing field evaporation. Experiments performed both in a transmission electron microscope and in a scanning electron microscope are presented. This technique permits the selective evaporation of individual nanowires in complex materials. Electron assisted field evaporation could be an interesting alternative or complementary to laser induced field desorption used in atom probe tomography of insulating materials.

  19. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Akanuma, A.; Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-09-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods.

  20. WEBEXPIR: Windowless target electron beam experimental irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierckx, Marc; Schuurmans, Paul; Heyse, Jan; Rosseel, Kris; Van Tichelen, Katrien; Nactergal, Benoit; Vandeplassche, Dirk; Aoust, Thierry; Abs, Michel; Guertin, Arnaud; Buhour, Jean-Michel; Cadiou, Arnaud; Abderrahim, Hamid Aït

    2008-06-01

    The windowless target electron beam experimental irradiation (WEBEXPIR) program was set-up as part of the MYRRHA/XT-ADS R&D effort on the spallation target design to investigate the interaction of a proton beam with a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) free surface. In particular, possible free surface distortion or shockwave effects in nominal conditions and during sudden beam on/off transient situations, as well as possible enhanced evaporation were assessed. An experiment was conceived at the IBA TT-1000 Rhodotron, where a 7 MeV electron beam was used to simulate the high power deposition at the MYRRHA/XT-ADS LBE free surface. The geometry and the LBE flow characteristics in the WEBEXPIR set-up were made as representative as possible of the actual situation in the MYRRHA/XT-ADS spallation target. Irradiation experiments were carried out at beam currents of up to 10 mA, corresponding to 40 times the nominal beam current necessary to reproduce the MYRRHA/XT-ADS conditions. Preliminary analyses show that the WEBEXPIR free surface flow was not disturbed by the interaction with the electron beam and that vacuum conditions stayed well within the design specifications.

  1. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  2. Electron beam damage in oxides: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes a variety of beam damage phenomena relating to oxides in (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, and underlines the shortcomings of currently popular mechanisms. These phenomena include mass loss, valence state reduction, phase decomposition, precipitation, gas bubble formation, phase transformation, amorphization and crystallization. Moreover, beam damage is also dependent on specimen thickness, specimen orientation, beam voltage, beam current density and beam size. This article incorporates all of these damage phenomena and experimental dependences into a general description, interpreted by a unified mechanism of damage by induced electric field. The induced electric field is produced by positive charges, which are generated from excitation and ionization. The distribution of the induced electric fields inside a specimen is beam-illumination- and specimen-shape- dependent, and associated with the experimental dependence of beam damage. Broadly speaking, the mechanism operates differently in two types of material. In type I, damage increases the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus divergent, resulting in phase separation. In type II, damage reduces the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus convergent, resulting in phase transformation. Damage by this mechanism is dependent on electron-beam current density. The two experimental thresholds are current density and irradiation time. The mechanism comes into effect when these thresholds are exceeded, below which the conventional mechanisms of knock-on and radiolysis still dominate.

  3. Electron beam damage in oxides: a review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes a variety of beam damage phenomena relating to oxides in (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, and underlines the shortcomings of currently popular mechanisms. These phenomena include mass loss, valence state reduction, phase decomposition, precipitation, gas bubble formation, phase transformation, amorphization and crystallization. Moreover, beam damage is also dependent on specimen thickness, specimen orientation, beam voltage, beam current density and beam size. This article incorporates all of these damage phenomena and experimental dependences into a general description, interpreted by a unified mechanism of damage by induced electric field. The induced electric field is produced by positive charges, which are generated from excitation and ionization. The distribution of the induced electric fields inside a specimen is beam-illumination- and specimen-shape- dependent, and associated with the experimental dependence of beam damage. Broadly speaking, the mechanism operates differently in two types of material. In type I, damage increases the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus divergent, resulting in phase separation. In type II, damage reduces the resistivity of the irradiated materials, and is thus convergent, resulting in phase transformation. Damage by this mechanism is dependent on electron-beam current density. The two experimental thresholds are current density and irradiation time. The mechanism comes into effect when these thresholds are exceeded, below which the conventional mechanisms of knock-on and radiolysis still dominate.

  4. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt

    2012-01-01

    limited, defined region. Using this technique a 460 MeV electron beam was produced with an energy spread of 5%. This technique is directly scalable to multi-GeV electron beam generation with sub-percent energy spreads.

  5. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  6. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  7. Highly charged ion beam applied to lithography technique.

    PubMed

    Momota, Sadao; Nojiri, Yoichi; Taniguchi, Jun; Miyamoto, Iwao; Morita, Noboru; Kawasegi, Noritaka

    2008-02-01

    In various fields of nanotechnology, the importance of nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) structures is increasing. In order to develop an efficient process to fabricate nanoscale 3D structures, we have applied highly charged ion (HCI) beams to the ion-beam lithography (IBL) technique. Ar-ion beams with various charge states (1+ to 9+) were applied to fabricate spin on glass (SOG) and Si by means of the IBL technique. The Ar ions were prepared by a facility built at Kochi University of Technology, which includes an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (NANOGAN, 10 GHz). IBL fabrication was performed as a function of not only the charge state but also the energy and the dose of Ar ions. The present results show that the application of an Ar(9+) beam reduces the etching time for SOG and enhances the etching depth compared with those observed with Ar ions in lower charged states. Considering the high-energy deposition of HCI at a surface, the former phenomena can be understood consistently. Also, the latter phenomena can be understood based on anomalously deep structural changes, which are remarkable for glasses. Furthermore, it has also been shown that the etching depth can be easily controlled with the kinetic energy of the Ar ions. These results show the possibilities of the IBL technique with HCI beams in the field of nanoscale 3D fabrication. PMID:18315242

  8. Beam Charge Asymmetry Monitors for Low Intensity Continuous Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Claude Denard; Arne P. Freyberger; Youri Sharabian

    2001-05-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Lab typically operates with CW electron beam currents in the range of 1 - 10 nA. This low beam current coupled with a 30 Hz flip rate of the beam helicity required the development of new devices to measure and monitor the beam charge asymmetry. We have developed four independent devices with sufficient bandwidth for readout at 30 Hz rate: a synchrotron light monitor (SLM), two backward optical transition radiation monitors (OTR) and a Faraday Cup. Photomultipliers operating in current mode provided the readout of the light from the SLM and the OTRs, while high bandwidth electronics provided the readout from the Faraday cup. Using {approximately}6 helicity pairs, we measured the beam charge asymmetry to a statistically accuracy which is better than 0.05%. We present the results from the successful operation of these devices during the fall 2000 physics program. The reliability and the bandwidth of the devices allowed us to control the gain on the source laser by means of a feedback loop.

  9. Shaping single walled nanotubes with an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zobelli, A.; Gloter, A.; Colliex, C.; Ewels, C. P.

    2008-01-15

    We show that electron irradiation in a dedicated scanning transmission microscope can be used as a nano-electron-lithography technique allowing the controlled reshaping of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. The required irradiation conditions have been optimized on the basis of total knock-on cross sections calculated within density functional based methods. It is then possible to induce morphological modifications, such as a local change of the tube chirality, by sequentially removing several tens of atoms with a nanometrical spatial resolution. We show that electron beam heating effects are limited. Thus, electron beam induced vacancy migration and nucleation might be excluded. These irradiation techniques could open new opportunities for nanoengineering a large variety of nanostructured materials.

  10. Electron beam-assisted healing of nanopores in magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Wu, Shujing; Jia, Shuangfeng; Cao, Ajing; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2013-05-01

    Nanopore-based sensing has emerged as a promising candidate for affordable and powerful DNA sequencing technologies. Herein, we demonstrate that nanopores can be successfully fabricated in Mg alloys via focused electron beam (e-beam) technology. Employing in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, we obtained unambiguous evidence that layer-by-layer growth of atomic planes at the nanopore periphery occurs when the e-beam is spread out, leading to the shrinkage and eventual disappearance of nanopores. The proposed healing process was attributed to the e-beam-induced anisotropic diffusion of Mg atoms in the vicinity of nanopore edges. A plausible diffusion mechanism that describes the observed phenomena is discussed. Our results constitute the first experimental investigation of nanopores in Mg alloys. Direct evidence of the healing process has advanced our fundamental understanding of surface science, which is of great practical importance for many technological applications, including thin film deposition and surface nanopatterning.

  11. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Teruya, A.T.; Elmer, J.W.

    1996-12-10

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process. 4 figs.

  12. Modification & alignment of beam line of 10 MeV RF electron beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnwal, R.; Ghodke, S. R.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Kumar, M.; Jayaprakash, D.; Chindarkar, A. R.; Mishra, R. L.; Dolas, S.; Kulkarni, S. Y.; Kumar, M.; P, Dixit K.; S, Acharya; Barje, S. R.; Lawangare, N. K.; C, Saroj P.; Nimje, V. T.; Chandan, S.; Tillu, A. R.; V, Sharma; Chavan, R. B.; V, Yadav; P, Roychowdhury; Mittal, K. C.; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Ray, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    A 10 MeV, 10 kW RF industrial Electron linac designed and developed at BARC is installed at the Electron Beam Center Kharghar, Navi Mumbai. The entire RF accelerator assembly consists of Electron gun, RF source, RF linac structure, Beam diagnostic chamber, Drift tube, Scanning magnet, Beam sensing aperture, Scan horn, and is spread over two floors at EBC. The paper discusses in detail about the alignment procedure adopted for the equipments of 10 MeV RF beamline. The complete electron beamline will be maintained under ultra high vacuum of the order of 10-7 torr. The paper discusses about the present problem of alignment, measurement technique of alignment, reason for misalignment, possible ways to solve the problem, equipment used for alignment, supports & arrestors, verification of alignment under vacuum

  13. Pulsed-electron-beam annealing of ion-implantation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, A. C.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Little, R. G.; Minnucci, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Short-duration high-intensity pulsed electron beams have been used to anneal ion-implantation damage in silicon and to electrically activate the dopant species. Lattice regrowth and dopant activation were determined using He(+)-4 backscattering, SEM, TEM, and device performance characteristics as diagnostic techniques. The annealing mechanism is believed to be liquid-phase epitaxial regrowth initiating from the substrate. The high-temperature transient pulse produced by the electron beam causes the dopant to diffuse rapidly in the region where the liquid state is achieved.

  14. Linac Coherent Light Source Electron Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2007-04-27

    This paper describes the design and simulation of the electron beam collimation system in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Dark current is expected from the gun and some of the accelerating cavities. Particle tracking of the expected dark current through the entire LCLS linac, from gun through FEL undulator, is used to estimate final particle extent in the undulator as well as expected beam loss at each collimator or aperture restriction. A table of collimators and aperture restrictions is listed along with halo particle loss results, which includes an estimate of average continuous beam power lost. In addition, the transverse wakefield alignment tolerances are calculated for each collimator.

  15. Pulsed electron beam emission in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, T.; Hawkins, J. G.; Reeves, G. D; Banks, P. M.; Bush, R. I

    1988-01-01

    During the Spacelab-2 mission of July 1985, electron beams (1 keV, 50-150 mA) pulsed at ELF and VLF frequencies were emitted from the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The wave fields generated by the beam were monitored by a Plasma Diagnostics Package which was released as a free-flying subsatellite during a six hour period. Measurements of the Orbiter potential and the return current during beam emissions were obtained from a Charge and Current Probe mounted in the payload bay.

  16. Characterization of 2219 Aluminum Produced by Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a new electron beam freeform fabrication (EB F(sup 3)) technique to fabricate metal parts. This process introduces metal wire into a molten pool created by a focused electron beam. Potential aerospace applications for this technology include ground-based fabrication of airframe structures and on-orbit construction and repair of space components and structures. Processing windows for reliably producing high quality 2219 aluminum parts using the EB F(sup 3) technique are being defined. The effects of translation speed, wire feed rate, and beam power on the resulting microstructures and mechanical properties are explored. Tensile properties (ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation) show little effect over the range of processing conditions tested. Basic processing-microstructure-property correlations are drawn for the EB F(sup 3) process.

  17. LOW EMITTANCE ELECTRON BEAMS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    An electron cooler, based on an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will be the first electron cooler operating at high energy with bunched beams. In order to achieve sufficient cooling of the ion beams the electron have to have a charge of 5 nC and a normalized emittance less than 4 {mu}. This paper presents the progress in optimizing the injector and the emittance improvements from shaping the charge distribution in the bunch.

  18. Prototype electron lens set-up for the Tevatron beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Saewert, G.; Santucci, J.; Sery, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Shiltsev, V.; Wildman, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Arapov, L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Logachov, P.; Sharapa, A.; Skarbo, B.; Sukhina, B.

    1999-05-17

    A prototype "electron lens" for the Tevatron beam-beam compensation project is commissioned at Fermilab. We de-scribe the set-up, report results of the first tests of the elec-tron beam, and discuss future plans.

  19. Electron-beam studies of Schottky-barrier detector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peckerar, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the surface anomalies occurring in Schottky-barrier particle detectors identifiable by means of an electron beam technique employed by Czaja (1965) for analyzing defects in diode structures. The technique is shown to make possible the detection and identification of the following anomalies: (1) chemical contamination of the detector surface; (2) mechanical damage of the wafer substrates; (3) damage introduced in semiconductor surface preparation; (4) radiation damage; and (5) defective surface metallization.

  20. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Vasko, A. C.; Karpov, V. G.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-28

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  1. Electron beam treatment of stack gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, N.; Kawamura, K.; Miller, G.

    A method of simultaneously removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from high sulfur, coal-fired utility boiler combustion gases is discussed. Process development history is briefly presented and salient details of a commercial demonstration unit currently under construction at an electric utility power plant in Indiana are given. Detailed discussion on the design details and performance requirements of a cable connected set of 80 kW electron beam sources precedes a discussion of the projected economics of the process. Requirements for future electron beam machine configurations and capacities as well as impact on the radiation machine manufacturing industry, assuming acceptance of the process by the electric utilities, are presented.

  2. Cryogenic electron beam induced chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Martin, Aiden A; Toth, Milos

    2014-11-12

    Cryogenic cooling is used to enable efficient, gas-mediated electron beam induced etching (EBIE) in cases where the etch rate is negligible at room and elevated substrate temperatures. The process is demonstrated using nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) as the etch precursor, and Si, SiO2, SiC, and Si3N4 as the materials volatilized by an electron beam. Cryogenic cooling broadens the range of precursors that can be used for EBIE, and enables high-resolution, deterministic etching of materials that are volatilized spontaneously by conventional etch precursors as demonstrated here by NF3 and XeF2 EBIE of silicon. PMID:25333843

  3. Electron beam irradiation of gemstone for color enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Sarada; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Hashim, Siti A'iasah; Ahmad, Shamshad; Jusoh, Mohd Suhaimi

    2012-09-01

    Numerous treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones obtained from Pakistan. The study shows that EB irradiation not only enhances the color but can also improves the clarity of some type of gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 KGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the natural and the faceted gemstones. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market.

  4. Electron beam irradiation of gemstone for color enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Idris, Sarada; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Hashim, Siti A'iasah; Ahmad, Shamshad; Jusoh, Mohd Suhaimi

    2012-09-26

    Numerous treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones obtained from Pakistan. The study shows that EB irradiation not only enhances the color but can also improves the clarity of some type of gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 KGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the natural and the faceted gemstones. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market.

  5. Electron beams in research and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehnert, R.

    1995-11-01

    Fast electrons lose their energy by inelastic collisions with electrons of target molecules forming secondary electrons and excited molecules. Coulomb interaction of secondary electrons with valence electrons of neighboring molecules leads to the formation of radical cations, thermalized electrons, excited molecular states and radicals. The primary reactive species initiate chemical reactions in the materials irradiated. Polymer modifications using accelerated electrons such as cross-linking of cable insulation, tubes, pipes and moldings, vulcanization of elastomers, grafting of polymer surfaces, processing of foamed plastics and heat shrinkable materials have gained wide industrial acceptance. A steadily growing electron beam technology is curing of paints, lacquers, printing inks and functional coatings. Electron beam processing offers high productivity, the possibility to treat the materials at normal temperature and pressure, excellent process control and clean production conditions. On an industrial scale the most important application of fast electrons is curing of 100% reactive monomer/prepolymer systems. Mainly acrylates and epoxides are used to formulate functional coatings on substrates such as paper, foil, wood, fibre board and high pressure laminates. A survey is given about the reaction mechanism of curing, the characterization of cured coatings, and of some industrial application.

  6. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2008-03-25

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  7. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam.

    PubMed

    Gloi, Aime M

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12-20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6-9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  8. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV).

  9. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  10. Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J.; Weir, J.T.

    1999-10-06

    These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.

  11. Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M. S.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-02-15

    For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

  12. Simulation of electron transport during electron-beam-induced deposition of nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present a numerical investigation of energy and charge distributions during electron-beam-induced growth of tungsten nanostructures on SiO2 substrates by using a Monte Carlo simulation of the electron transport. This study gives a quantitative insight into the deposition of energy and charge in the substrate and in the already existing metallic nanostructures in the presence of the electron beam. We analyze electron trajectories, inelastic mean free paths, and the distribution of backscattered electrons in different compositions and at different depths of the deposit. We find that, while in the early stages of the nanostructure growth a significant fraction of electron trajectories still interacts with the substrate, when the nanostructure becomes thicker the transport takes place almost exclusively in the nanostructure. In particular, a larger deposit density leads to enhanced electron backscattering. This work shows how mesoscopic radiation-transport techniques can contribute to a model that addresses the multi-scale nature of the electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) process. Furthermore, similar simulations can help to understand the role that is played by backscattered electrons and emitted secondary electrons in the change of structural properties of nanostructured materials during post-growth electron-beam treatments. PMID:24367747

  13. Auroral electron beams near the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcilwain, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Intense beams of electrons traveling parallel to the local magnetic field have been observed at a magnetic latitude of 11 deg and a radial distance of 6.6 earth radii. The distribution function for electrons traveling within 8 deg of the field line direction is typically flat or slightly rising up to a break point beyond which it decreases as inversely as the 5-10th power of v. The energy corresponding to the break point velocity is usually between 0.1 and 10 keV. These beams are found to occur on closed field lines at the inner edge of the plasma sheet and thus at the root of the earth's magnetotail. Beams with break point energies greater than 2 keV seem to occur only within the first 10 minutes after the onset of hot plasma injection associated with a magnetospheric substorm.

  14. SLC polarized beam source electron optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Early, R.A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Spencer, C.M.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the beam-line from the polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10{sup {minus}11}-Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photocathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. The quality of the optics for the 160-kV beam is crucial since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line consists of a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Focusing is provided by a pair of Helmholtz coils and by several iron-encased solenoidal lenses. Our optics design is based on beam transport simulations using 2{1/2}-D particle-in-cell codes to model the gun and to solve the fully-relativistic time-dependent equations of motion in three dimensions for electrons in the presence of azimuthally symmetric electromagnetic fields. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Electron Beam Applications in Chemical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Dragusin, M.; Radoiu, M.; Moraru, R.; Oproiu, C.; Cojocaru, G.; Margarit, C.

    1997-05-01

    Our recent results in the field of polymeric materials obtained by electron beam irradiation are presented. Two types of polymeric flocculants and three hydrogels are described. The effects of radiation absorbed dose and chemical composition of the irradiated solutions upon the polymeric materials characteristics are discussed. The required absorbed dose levels to produce the polymeric flocculants are in the range of 0.4 kGy to 1 kGy, and 4 kGy to 12 kGy for hydrogels. Experimental results obtained by testing polymeric flocculants with waste water from food industry are given. Plymeric materials processing was developed on a pilot small scale level with a 0.7 kW and 5.5 MeV linac built in Romania. A new facility for application of combined electron beam and microwave irradiation in the field of polymeric materials preparation is presently under investigation. Preliminary results have demonstrated that some polymeric flocculants characteristics, such as linearity, were improved by using combined electron beam and microwave irradiation. Also, the absorbed dose levels decreases in comparison with those required when only electron beam irradiation was used.

  16. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, N.; Dabrowski, A. E.; Fabbri, F.; Grassi, T.; Hughes, E.; Mans, J.; Montanari, A.; Orfanelli, S.; Rusack, R.; Torromeo, G.; Stickland, D. P.; Stifter, K.

    2016-02-01

    The CMS Beam Halo Monitor has been successfully installed in the CMS cavern in LHC Long Shutdown 1 for measuring the machine induced background for LHC Run II. The system is based on 40 detector units composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The readout electronics chain uses many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadronic Calorimeter electronics, with dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time, with few nanosecond resolution, and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics uses microTCA technology and receives data via a high-speed 5 Gbps asynchronous link. It records histograms with sub-bunch crossing timing resolution and is read out via IPbus using the newly designed CMS data acquisition for non-event based data. The data is processed in real time and published to CMS and the LHC, providing online feedback on the beam quality. A dedicated calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate short triggered pulses of light to monitor the efficiency of the system. The electronics has been in operation since the first LHC beams of Run II and has served as the first demonstration of the new QIE10, Microsemi Igloo2 FPGA and high-speed 5 Gbps link with LHC data.

  17. Electron-Beam Diagnostic Methods for Hypersonic Flow Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work was the evaluation of the use of electron-bean fluorescence for flow measurements during hypersonic flight. Both analytical and numerical models were developed in this investigation to evaluate quantitatively flow field imaging concepts based upon the electron beam fluorescence technique for use in flight research and wind tunnel applications. Specific models were developed for: (1) fluorescence excitation/emission for nitrogen, (2) rotational fluorescence spectrum for nitrogen, (3) single and multiple scattering of electrons in a variable density medium, (4) spatial and spectral distribution of fluorescence, (5) measurement of rotational temperature and density, (6) optical filter design for fluorescence imaging, and (7) temperature accuracy and signal acquisition time requirements. Application of these models to a typical hypersonic wind tunnel flow is presented. In particular, the capability of simulating the fluorescence resulting from electron impact ionization in a variable density nitrogen or air flow provides the capability to evaluate the design of imaging instruments for flow field mapping. The result of this analysis is a recommendation that quantitative measurements of hypersonic flow fields using electron-bean fluorescence is a tractable method with electron beam energies of 100 keV. With lower electron energies, electron scattering increases with significant beam divergence which makes quantitative imaging difficult. The potential application of the analytical and numerical models developed in this work is in the design of a flow field imaging instrument for use in hypersonic wind tunnels or onboard a flight research vehicle.

  18. Electron beam targets vapor-phase contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Electron-beam bombardment has long been known to break down complex molecules. Zapit Technology, Inc. (Santa Clara, California) is in the process of commercializing a treatment system, tested in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses electron beams to destroy vapor-phase toxic wastes. Drawing relatively low-power beams, the system is said to offer a low-cost way to oxidize chlorinated and non-chlorinated organic compounds. The unit has been developed to treat vapor-phase organic wastes at temperatures less than 400 F, and at ambient pressures. Candidates streams include process of gases, and organics collected during soil-vapor extraction or stripped from wastewater and groundwater streams. Inside the Zapit treatment unit, a continuous stream of ionizing electrons is generated by a cathode and is accelerated to nearly the speed of light through a metal grid. As the pollutant stream passes through the reaction chamber, it is bombarded by this electron beam. In the process, complex organic molecules are broken down into water, carbon dioxide, and, if chlorinated compounds are present, hydrochloric acid. During groundwater treatment, an air stripper converts dissolved organics in a vapor phase, which is passed through the electron-beam unit. The offgases from the Zapit unit are passed through an acid scrubber (using sodium hydroxide) to neutralize any byproduct HCl and through a carbon-adsorption unit for final polishing. Industrial offgases can be fed directly into the Zapit treatment unit, without the intermediate air stripper. Electrical power requirements are relatively low.

  19. Femtosecond, High-Brightness Electron Beam Generation and Advanced Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Brown, W J; Tremaine, A M; Kuba, J; Hartemann, F V; Fittinghoff, D N

    2005-02-02

    This document serves as the final report for LDRD project number 04-LW-031, in which we created subpicosecond length, kilo-amp peak current electron beams with the 100 MeV electron/positron linac, using a novel technique designed to produce ultra-short bunch lengths while maintaining the high brightness produced by the S-band photoinjector. In addition, a diagnostic to measure the temporal distribution of the beam was investigated, as conventional pulse length measurement techniques do not apply to extremely short pulses. The creation and diagnosis of beams with both femtosecond length and high transverse brightness is of major concern to next generation acceleration and radiation production experiments. This work leveraged the previous investment in the PLEIADES facility and it's ability to produce high brightness electron beams. In addition, the ultra-short electron pulses generated by this work have been used in conjunction with the PLEIADES X-ray source to produce sub-picosecond, high-brightness X-ray pulses.

  20. Nondestructive Measurement of Orbital Angular Momentum for an Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larocque, Hugo; Bouchard, Frédéric; Grillo, Vincenzo; Sit, Alicia; Frabboni, Stefano; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Padgett, Miles J.; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2016-10-01

    Free electrons with a helical phase front, referred to as "twisted" electrons, possess an orbital angular momentum (OAM) and, hence, a quantized magnetic dipole moment along their propagation direction. This intrinsic magnetic moment can be used to probe material properties. Twisted electrons thus have numerous potential applications in materials science. Measuring this quantity often relies on a series of projective measurements that subsequently change the OAM carried by the electrons. In this Letter, we propose a nondestructive way of measuring an electron beam's OAM through the interaction of this associated magnetic dipole with a conductive loop. Such an interaction results in the generation of induced currents within the loop, which are found to be directly proportional to the electron's OAM value. Moreover, the electron experiences no OAM variations and only minimal energy losses upon the measurement, and, hence, the nondestructive nature of the proposed technique.

  1. MULTIPLE ELECTRON BEAM ION PUMP AND SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, R.E.

    1962-02-27

    A vacuum pump is designed which operates by ionizing incoming air and by withdrawing the ions from the system by means of electrical fields. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical housing communicable with the vessel to be evacuated and having a thin wall section in one end. Suitable coils provide a longitudinal magnetic field within the cylinder. A broad cathode and an anode structure is provided to establish a plurality of adjacent electron beams which are parallel to the cylinder axis. Electron reflector means are provided so that each of the beams constitutes a PIG or reflex discharge. Such structure provides a large region in which incoming gas molecules may be ionized by electron bombardment. A charged electrode assembly accelerates the ions through the thin window, thereby removing the gas from the system. The invention may also be utilized as a highly efficient ion source. (AEC)

  2. Electron beam facility for divertor target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, A.; Gagen-Torn, V.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    To test different concepts of divertor targets and bumpers an electron beam facility was assembled in Efremov Institute. It consists of a vacuum chamber (3m{sup 3}), vacuum pump, electron beam gun, manipulator to place and remove the samples, water loop and liquid metal loop. The following diagnostics of mock-ups is stipulated: (1) temperature distribution on the mock-up working surface (scanning pyrometer and infra-red imager); (2) temperature distribution over mocked-up thickness in 3 typical cross-sections (thermo-couples); (3) cracking dynamics during thermal cycling (acoustic-emission method), (4) defects in the mock-up before and after tests (ultra-sonic diagnostics, electron and optical microscopes). Carbon-based and beryllium mock-ups are made for experimental feasibility study of water and liquid-metal-cooled divertor/bumper concepts.

  3. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiation effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.

  4. Advanced techniques for characterization of ion beam modified materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yanwen; Debelle, Aurélien; Boulle, Alexandre; Kluth, Patrick; Tuomisto, Filip

    2014-10-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of damage formation in materials irradiated with energetic ions is essential for the field of ion-beam materials modification and engineering. Utilizing incident ions, electrons, photons, and positrons, various analysis techniques, including Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), electron RBS, Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, are routinely used or gaining increasing attention in characterizing ion beam modified materials. The distinctive information, recent developments, and some perspectives in these techniques are reviewed in this paper. Applications of these techniques are discussed to demonstrate their unique ability for studying ion-solid interactions and the corresponding radiationmore » effects in modified depths ranging from a few nm to a few tens of μm, and to provide information on electronic and atomic structure of the materials, defect configuration and concentration, as well as phase stability, amorphization and recrystallization processes. Finally, such knowledge contributes to our fundamental understanding over a wide range of extreme conditions essential for enhancing material performance and also for design and synthesis of new materials to address a broad variety of future energy applications.« less

  5. High energy electron beams for ceramic joining

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Helmich, D.R.; Loehman, R.E.; Clifford, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Joining of structural ceramics is possible using high melting point metals such as Mo and Pt that are heated with a high energy electron beam, with the potential for high temperature joining. A 10 MeV electron beam can penetrate through 1 cm of ceramic, offering the possibility of buried interface joining. Because of transient heating and the lower heat capacity of the metal relative to the ceramic, a pulsed high power beam has the potential for melting the metal without decomposing or melting the ceramic. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the process with a series of 10 MeV, 1 kW electron beam experiments. Shear strengths up to 28 MPa have been measured. This strength is comparable to that reported in the literature for bonding silicon nitride to molybdenum with copper-silver-titanium braze, but weaker than that reported for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with gold-nickel braze. The bonding mechanism appears to be a thin silicide layer.

  6. Comparison study of the partial-breast irradiation techniques: Dosimetric analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, electron beam therapy, and helical tomotherapy depending on various tumor locations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Joo; Park, So-Hyun; Son, Seok-Hyun; Cheon, Keum-Seong; Choi, Byung-Ock; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2013-10-01

    The partial-breast irradiation (PBI) technique, an alternative to whole-breast irradiation, is a beam delivery method that uses a limited range of treatment volume. The present study was designed to determine the optimal PBI treatment modalities for 8 different tumor locations. Treatment planning was performed on computed tomography (CT) data sets of 6 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Tumor locations were classified into 8 subsections according to breast quadrant and depth. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), electron beam therapy (ET), and helical tomotherapy (H-TOMO) were utilized to evaluate the dosimetric effect for each tumor location. Conformation number (CN), radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and dose delivered to healthy tissue were estimated. The Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analysis. The ET approach showed good sparing effects and acceptable target coverage for the lower inner quadrant—superficial (LIQ-S) and lower inner quadrant—deep (LIQ-D) locations. The H-TOMO method was the least effective technique as no evaluation index achieved superiority for all tumor locations except CN. The ET method is advisable for treating LIQ-S and LIQ-D tumors, as opposed to 3D-CRT or H-TOMO, because of acceptable target coverage and much lower dose applied to surrounding tissue.

  7. Melt pool dynamics during selective electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharowsky, T.; Osmanlic, F.; Singer, R. F.; Körner, C.

    2014-03-01

    Electron beam melting is a promising additive manufacturing technique for metal parts. Nevertheless, the process is still poorly understood making further investigations indispensable to allow a prediction of the part's quality. To improve the understanding of the process especially the beam powder interaction, process observation at the relevant time scale is necessary. Due to the difficult accessibility of the building area, the high temperatures, radiation and the very high scanning speeds during the melting process the observation requires an augmented effort in the observation equipment. A high speed camera in combination with an illumination laser, band pass filter and mirror system is suitable for the observation of the electron beam melting process. The equipment allows to observe the melting process with a high spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper the adjustment of the equipment and results of the lifetime and the oscillation frequencies of the melt pool for a simple geometry are presented.

  8. Electron Accelerators for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga

    2007-10-10

    The summary of this paper is that to optimize the design of an electron drive, one must: (a) specify carefully the user requirements--beam energy, beam power, duty factor, and longitudinal and transverse emittance; (b) evaluate different machine options including capital cost, 10-year operating cost and delivery time. The author is convinced elegant solutions are available with existing technology. There are several design options and technology choices. Decisions will depend on system optimization, in-house infrastructure and expertise (e.g. cryogenics, SRF, lasers), synergy with other programs.

  9. Direct write electron beam lithography: a historical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Hans C.

    2010-09-01

    Maskless pattern generation capability in combination with practically limitless resolution made probe-forming electron beam systems attractive tools in the semiconductor fabrication process. However, serial exposure of pattern elements with a scanning beam is a slow process and throughput presented a key challenge in electron beam lithography from the beginning. To meet this challenge imaging concepts with increasing exposure efficiency have been developed projecting ever larger number of pixels in parallel. This evolution started in the 1960s with the SEM-type Gaussian beam systems writing one pixel at a time directly on wafers. During the 1970s IBM pioneered the concept of shaped beams containing multiple pixels which led to higher throughput and an early success of e-beam direct write (EBDW) in large scale manufacturing of semiconductor chips. EBDW in a mix-and match approach with optical lithography provided unique flexibility in part number management and cycle time reduction and proved extremely cost effective in IBM's Quick-Turn-Around-Time (QTAT) facilities. But shaped beams did not keep pace with Moore's law because of limitations imposed by the physics of charged particles: Coulomb interactions between beam electrons cause image blur and consequently limit beam current and throughput. A new technology approach was needed. Physically separating beam electrons into multiple beamlets to reduce Coulomb interaction led to the development of massively parallel projection of pixels. Electron projection lithography (EPL) - a mask based imaging technique emulating optical steppers - was pursued during the 1990s by Bell Labs with SCALPEL and by IBM with PREVAIL in partnership with Nikon. In 2003 Nikon shipped the first NCR-EB1A e-beam stepper based on the PREVAIL technology to Selete. It exposed pattern segments containing 10 million pixels in single shot and represented the first successful demonstration of massively parallel pixel projection. However the window

  10. Installation Status of the Electron Beam Profiler for the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Alvarez, M.; Fitzgerald, J.; Lundberg, C.; Prieto, P.; Roberts, M.; Zagel, J.; Blokland, W.

    2015-11-06

    The planned neutrino program at Fermilab requires large proton beam intensities in excess of 2 MW. Measuring the transverse profiles of these high intensity beams is challenging and often depends on non-invasive techniques. One such technique involves measuring the deflection of a probe beam of electrons with a trajectory perpendicular to the proton beam. A device such as this is already in use at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL and the installation of a similar device is underway in the Main Injector at Fermilab. The present installation status of the electron beam profiler for the Main Injector will be discussed together with some simulations and test stand results.

  11. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  12. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A D; Karnewar, A K; Holikatti, A C; Yadav, S; Puntambekar, T A; Singh, G; Singh, P

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  13. Electron beam analysis of particulate cometary material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, John

    1989-01-01

    Electron microscopy will be useful for characterization of inorganic dust grains in returned comet nucleus samples. The choice of instrument(s) will depend primarily on the nature of the samples, but ultimately a variety of electron-beam methods could be employed. Scanning and analytical (transmission) electron microscopy are the logical choise for morphological, mineralogical, and bulk chemical analyses of dust grains removed from ices. It may also be possible to examine unmelted ice/dust mixtures using an environmental scanning electron microscope equipped with a cryo-transfer unit and a cold stage. Electron microscopic observations of comet nuclei might include: (1) porosities of dust grains; (2) morphologies and microstructures of individual mineral grains; (3) relative abundances of olivine, pyroxene, and glass; and (4) the presence of phases that might have resulted from aqueous alteration (layer silicates, carbonates, sulfates).

  14. Progress with Tevatron Electron Lens Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Stancari, G.; Zhang, X.

    2010-05-19

    Tevatron electron lenses have been successfully used to mitigate bunch-to-bunch differences caused by longrange beam-beam interactions. For this purpose, the electron beam with uniform transverse density distribution was used. Another planned application of the electron lens is the suppression of tune spread due to head-on beam-beam collisions. For this purpose, the transverse distribution of the E{sup -} beam must be matched to that of the antiproton beam. In 2009, the Gaussian profile electron gun was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We report on the first experiments with non-linear beam-beam compensation. Discussed topics include measurement and control of the betatron tune spread, importance of the beam alignment and stability, and effect of electron lens on the antiproton beam lifetime.

  15. Disabling CNT Electronic Devices by Use of Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petkov, Mihail

    2008-01-01

    Bombardment with tightly focused electron beams has been suggested as a means of electrically disabling selected individual carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) in electronic devices. Evidence in support of the suggestion was obtained in an experiment in which a CNT field-effect transistor was disabled (see figure) by focusing a 1-keV electron beam on a CNT that served as the active channel of a field-effect transistor (FET). Such bombardment could be useful in the manufacture of nonvolatile-memory circuits containing CNT FETs. Ultimately, in order to obtain the best electronic performances in CNT FETs and other electronic devices, it will be necessary to fabricate the devices such that each one contains only a single CNT as an active element. At present, this is difficult because there is no way to grow a single CNT at a specific location and with a specific orientation. Instead, the common practice is to build CNTs into electronic devices by relying on spatial distribution to bridge contacts. This practice results in some devices containing no CNTs and some devices containing more than one CNT. Thus, CNT FETs have statistically distributed electronic characteristics (including switching voltages, gains, and mixtures of metallic and semiconducting CNTs). According to the suggestion, by using a 1-keV electron beam (e.g., a beam from a scanning electron microscope), a particular nanotube could be rendered electrically dysfunctional. This procedure could be repeated as many times as necessary on different CNTs in a device until all of the excess CNTs in the device had been disabled, leaving only one CNT as an active element (e.g., as FET channel). The physical mechanism through which a CNT becomes electrically disabled is not yet understood. On one hand, data in the literature show that electron kinetic energy >86 keV is needed to cause displacement damage in a CNT. On the other hand, inasmuch as a 1-keV beam focused on a small spot (typically a few tens of nanometers wide

  16. Electron beam chemistry produces high purity metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; May, C. E.; Marsik, S. J.; Lad, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Application of radiation chemistry for deposition of metals by irradiation of aqueous solutions with high energy electrons is presented. Design of reaction vessel for irradiation of solution is illustrated. Features of radiochemical technique and procedures followed are described.

  17. Beam Dynamics Considerations in Electron Ion Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    The nuclear physics community is converging on the idea that the next large project after FRIB should be an electron-ion collider. Both Brookhaven National Lab and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility have developed accelerator designs, both of which need novel solutions to accelerator physics problems. In this talk we discuss some of the problems that must be solved and their solutions. Examples in novel beam optics systems, beam cooling, and beam polarization control will be presented. Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177. The U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for U.S. Government purposes.

  18. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutton, Andrew

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  19. Further remarks on electron beam pumping of laser materials.

    PubMed

    Klein, C A

    1966-12-01

    This article demonstrates that recently completed studies on the energy dissipation of kilovolt electron beams in solids provide readily applicable methods for assessing the situation in electron beam pumped lasers. PMID:20057662

  20. Electron-beam flow visualization - Applications in the definition of configuration aerothermal characteristics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, W. C.; Arrington, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons between flow visualization systems using electron-beam fluorescence, schlieren, and shadowgraph techniques illustrate the advantages associated with the electron beam. Specific applications of this method as an aid in defining the origin of erosion on a heat-transfer model are cited. Results of combined electron-beam oil-flow studies on configurations illustrate that the simultaneous definition of the external flow field and its surface flow can be obtained. Comparisons between the electron-beam oil-flow visualization method and phase-change coating heat-transfer tests on a shuttle ascent configuration indicate the complementary nature of these two testing techniques. Potential methods for improving the electron-beam technique are included.

  1. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

    2002-06-25

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

  2. Dots-on-the-fly electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotalo, Tero J.; Niemi, Tapio

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for electron-beam lithography (EBL) of periodic nanostructures. This technique can rapidly produce arrays of various metallic and etched nanostructures with line and pitch dimensions approaching the beam spot size. Our approach is based on often neglected functionality which is inherent in most modern EBL systems. The raster/vector beam exposure system of the EBL software is exploited to produce arrays of pixel-like spots without the need to define coordinates for each spot in the array. Producing large arrays with traditional EBL techniques is cumbersome during pattern design, usually leads to large data files and easily results in system memory overload during patterning. In Dots-on-the-fly (DOTF) patterning, instead of specifying the locations of individual spots, a boundary for the array is given and the spacing between spots within the boundary is specified by the beam step size. A designed pattern element thus becomes a container object, with beam spacing acting as a parameterized location list for an array of spots confined by that container. With the DOTF method, a single pattern element, such as a square, rectangle or circle, can be used to produce a large array containing thousands of spots. In addition to simple arrays of nano-dots, we expand the technique to produce more complex, highly tunable arrays and structures on substrates of silicon, ITO/ FTO coated glass, as well as uncoated fused silica, quartz and sapphire.

  3. Electron beam-switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, L.D.; Murray, J.R.; Goldhar, J.; Bradley, L.P.

    1979-12-11

    A method and apparatus are designed for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  4. An electron beam imaging system for quality assurance in IORT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, F.; Rossi, M.; Morigi, M. P.; Brancaccio, R.; Paltrinieri, E.; Bettuzzi, M.; Romani, D.; Ciocca, M.; Tosi, G.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, M.

    2004-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy is a special radiotherapy technique, which enables a high dose of radiation to be given in a single fraction during oncological surgery. The major stumbling block to the large-scale application of the technique is the transfer of the patient, with an open wound, from the operating room to the radiation therapy bunker, with the consequent organisational problems and the increased risk of infection. To overcome these limitations, in the last few years a new kind of linear accelerator, the Novac 7, conceived for direct use in the surgical room, has become available. Novac 7 can deliver electron beams of different energies (3, 5, 7 and 9 MeV), with a high dose rate (up to 20 Gy/min). The aim of this work, funded by ENEA in the framework of a research contract, is the development of an innovative system for on-line measurements of 2D dose distributions and electron beam characterisation, before radiotherapy treatment with Novac 7. The system is made up of the following components: (a) an electron-light converter; (b) a 14 bit cooled CCD camera; (c) a personal computer with an ad hoc written software for image acquisition and processing. The performances of the prototype have been characterised experimentally with different electron-light converters. Several tests have concerned the assessment of the detector response as a function of impulse number and electron beam energy. Finally, the experimental results concerning beam profiles have been compared with data acquired with other dosimetric techniques. The achieved results make it possible to say that the developed system is suitable for fast quality assurance measurements and verification of 2D dose distributions.

  5. Electron-beam distillation of natural polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. V.; Makarov, I. E.; Ershov, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysis of cellulose, lignin, and chitin may be upgraded by the use of an electron-beam irradiation. The radiation-thermal destruction mode does more probable production of liquid low-molecular-weight products instead of solid pyrolitic oligomers. Furans, methoxyphenols, and pyridines are dominant products of high-temperature radiolysis of cellulose, lignin, and chitin, respectively. The mechanism of chain destruction of natural polymers is considered.

  6. Preventing Contamination In Electron-Beam Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, Wesley D.; Gulbrandsen, Kevin A.; Oleksiak, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Simple expedient eliminates time-consuming, expensive manual hand grinding. Use of groove and backup tube greatly reduces postweld cleanup in some electron-beam welding operations. Tube-backup method developed for titanium parts, configurations of which prevents use of solid-block backup. In new welding configuration, tube inserted in groove to prevent contact between alumina beads and molten weld root. When welding complete and beads and tube removed, only minor spatter remains and is ground away easily.

  7. Electron beam curing of thin film polymer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manepalli, Rahul Nagaraj

    2000-10-01

    Thin film polymer dielectrics are widely used in the microelectronics industry for a variety of applications. In order to be used for these applications, polymers are required to have excellent dielectric, chemical and mechanical properties with dimensional stability at high temperatures. Typically, these polymers are solvent cast onto the desired substrate and a cure process involving treatment at high temperatures for several hours is necessary to chemically cure the film. In this study, a novel cure technique involving electron beam exposure of polymer dielectrics is investigated. It is proposed to replace the long, conventional thermal cure cycle with a shorter, electron beam cure process. Five commercially available and commonly used polymer dielectrics are chosen for this study. The polymers chosen comprise a variety of different backbone chemistries, (polyimides, benzocyclobutene and polynorbornene) which encompass the classes of materials presently used in the microelectronics industry. The electrical, mechanical and optical properties in the film are characterized and correlated to the electron beam dose. Chemical changes in film are examined through FTIR and 13C solid state NMR spectroscopy. The effect of electron beam induced crosslinking on the multilayering behavior in certain polymer systems is also investigated.

  8. Electron Beam Welding of Gear Wheels by Splitted Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dřímal, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    This contribution deals with the issue of electron beam welding of high-accurate gear wheels composed of a spur gearing and fluted shaft joined with a face weld for automotive industry. Both parts made of the high-strength low-alloy steel are welded in the condition after final machining and heat treatment, performed by case hardening, whereas it is required that the run-out in the critical point of weldment after welding, i. e. after the final operation, would be 0.04 mm max.. In case of common welding procedure, cracks were formed in the weld, initiated by spiking in the weld root. Crack formation was prevented by the use of an interlocking joint with a rounded recess and suitable welding parameters, eliminating crack initiation by spiking in the weld root. Minimisation of the welding distortions was achieved by the application of tack welding with simultaneous splitting of one beam into two parts in the opposite sections of circumferential face weld attained on the principle of a new system of controlled deflection with digital scanning of the beam. This welding procedure assured that the weldment temperature after welding would not be higher than 400 °C. Thus, this procedure allowed achieving the final run-outs in the critical point of gearwheels within the maximum range up to 0.04 mm, which is acceptable for the given application. Accurate optical measurements did not reveal any changes in the teeth dimensions.

  9. Susceptor heating device for electron beam brazing

    DOEpatents

    Antieau, Susan M.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A brazing device and method are provided which locally apply a controlled amount of heat to a selected area, within a vacuum. The device brazes two components together with a brazing metal. A susceptor plate is placed in thermal contact with one of the components. A serrated pedestal supports the susceptor plate. When the pedestal and susceptor plate are in place, an electron gun irradiates an electron beam at the susceptor plate such that the susceptor plate is sufficiently heated to transfer heat through the one component and melt the brazing metal.

  10. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  11. Experimental studies of compensation of beam beam effects with Tevatron electron lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Bishofberger, K.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-04-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this paper, we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980 GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron electron lenses.

  12. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  13. Transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischebeck, Rasmus; Prat, Eduard; Thominet, Vincent; Ozkan Loch, Cigdem

    2015-08-01

    A transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams is presented, which overcomes resolution issues in present designs by observing the Scheimpflug imaging condition as well as the Snell-Descartes law of refraction in the scintillating crystal. Coherent optical transition radiation emitted by highly compressed electron bunches on the surface of the crystal is directed away from the camera, allowing to use the monitor for profile measurements of electron bunches suitable for X-ray free electron lasers. The optical design has been verified by ray tracing simulations, and the angular dependency of the resolution has been verified experimentally. An instrument according to the presented design principles has been used in the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility, and different scintillator materials have been tested. Measurements in conjunction with a transverse deflecting radiofrequency structure and an array of quadrupole magnets demonstrate a normalized slice emittance of 25 nm in the core of a 30 fC electron beam at a pulse length of 10 ps and a particle energy of 230 MeV.

  14. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocketborne instrumentation have confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes have been observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Out of this number, 95 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2-, 4-, or 8-keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher-energy electrons led the lower-energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. An alternative interpretation is briefly examined, and its relative merit in describing the observations is evaluated. The injection process is discussed in some detail as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection for both processes.

  15. Electron-configuration-reset time-differential recoil-in-vacuum technique for excited-state g-factor measurements on fast exotic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchbery, Andrew E.; Mantica, Paul F.; Wilson, Anna N.

    2005-04-01

    A modified version of the time-differential recoil-in-vacuum (or plunger) technique is proposed as a method for measuring the g factors of excited states in rapidly moving exotic nuclei with Z < or approx. 20.

  16. Advanced Diagnostics for Developing High-Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.-J.; Yakimenko, V.

    1998-11-24

    The production of high-brightness particle beams calls for the development of advanced beam diagnostics. High brightness beams, meaning beams with a high density in phase space, are important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and advanced accelerator systems. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a high charge. This diagnostic system has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One component of the system is the measurement of a slice emittance which provides a measurement of transverse beam properties (such as emittance) as a function of the longitudinal position. Changing the laser pulse profile of a photocathode RF gun has been suggested as one way to achieve non-linear emittance compensation and improve the brightness and that can be diagnosed by the slice emittance system. The other element of the diagnostic is the tomographic reconstruction of the transverse phase. In our work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This high precision phase space tomography together with the ability to modify the radial charge distribution of the electron beam presents an opportunity to improve the emittance and apply non-linear radial emittance corrections. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics leads to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections. This should lead to great improvements in the beam brightness.

  17. ADVANCED DIAGNOSTICS FOR DEVELOPING HIGH-BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    1998-11-24

    The production of high-brightness particle beams calls for the development of advanced beam diagnostics. High brightness beams, meaning beams with a high density in phase space, are important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and advanced accelerator systems. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a high charge. This diagnostic system has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One component of the system is the measurement of a slice emittance which provides a measurement of transverse beam properties (such as emittance) as a function of the longitudinal position. Changing the laser pulse profile of a photocathode RF gun has been suggested as one way to achieve non-linear emittance compensation and improve the brightness and that can be diagnosed by the slice emittance system. The other element of the diagnostic is the tomographic reconstruction of the transverse phase. In our work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This high precision phase space tomography together with the ability to modify the radial charge distribution of the electron beam presents an opportunity to improve the emittance and apply non-linear radial emittance corrections. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics leads to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections. This should lead to great improvements in the beam brightness.

  18. Miniature electron microscope beam column optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Jody Stuart

    This investigation is in the area of electrostatic lens design with the overarching goal of contributing to the creation of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope (SEM) for use in mineralogical analysis or detection of signs of life on the surface of Mars. Such an instrument could also have application in the exploration of Earth's moon, planetary moons, asteroids, or comets. Other embodiments could include tabletop or field portable SEMs for use on Earth. The scope of this research is in the design of a beam column that attains focusing, demagnification, and aberration control within the smallest achievable package. The goals of planetary exploration and of spaceflight in general impose severe constraints on the instrument's mass and electrical power consumption, while favoring a robust design of small size and high rigidity that is also simple to align. To meet these requirements a design using electrostatic lenses was favored because of the lower power requirement and mass of electrostatic versus magnetic lenses, their relatively simple construction, as well as inherently easier shielding from extraneous fields. In modeling the lens field, a hybrid of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) and a Fourier series solution was employed, whereby an initial solution from the BEM is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain for the subsequent Fourier series solution. The approach is applicable to many problems in physics and combines the inherent precision of this series solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized electrode shapes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. A significant speed increase in tracing rays is also observed. The modeling technique has been validated by reproducing example ray-traces through

  19. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  20. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.

    1996-01-01

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  1. RHIC electron lens beam transport system design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2010-10-01

    To apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC, two electron lenses are designed and will be installed at IP10. Electron beam transport system is one of important subsystem, which is used to transport electron beam from electron gun side to collector side. This system should be able to change beam size inside superconducting magnet and control beam position with 5 mm in horizontal and vertical plane. Some other design considerations for this beam transport system are also reported in this paper. The head-on beam-beam effect is one of important nonlinear source in storage ring and linear colliders, which have limited the luminosity improvement of many colliders, such as SppS, Tevatron and RHIC. In order to enhance the performance of colliders, beam-beam effects can be compensated with direct space charge compensation, indirect space charge compensation or betatron phase cancellation scheme. Like other colliders, indirect space charge compensation scheme (Electron Lens) was also proposed for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam-beam compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The two similar electron lenses are located in IR10 between the DX magnets. One RHIC electron lens consists of one DC electron gun, one superconducting magnet, one electron collector and beam transport system.

  2. Optimizing the beam-beam alignment in an electron lens using bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Thieberger, P.; Haug, E.

    2010-05-23

    Installation of electron lenses for the purpose of head-on beam-beam compensation is foreseen at RHIC. To optimize the relative alignment of the electron lens beam with the circulating proton (or ion) beam, photon detectors will be installed to measure the bremsstrahlung generated by momentum transfer from protons to electrons. We present the detector layout and simulations of the bremsstrahlung signal as function of beam offset and crossing angle.

  3. Coherent Radiation from Relativistic Electron Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Ren

    Two new laser concepts, the Ion-Ripple Laser (IRL) and the Ion-Channel Laser (ICL), are proposed. A unified theory for coherent radiation from relativistic electron beams devices is developed; the theory not only links the physics of Cyclotron Masers (CMs) and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) but covers the physics of the IRLs and the ICLs. We have also invented a new numerical method, the Neo-Finite -Difference (NFD) method, for electromagnetic plasma simulations and applied it to studies of these lasers. The unified amplification theory compares the growth mechanisms. Two bunching mechanisms (both axial and azimuthal) exist, not only for the noncollective single electron resonance regime, but also in the collective gain regime. Competition or reinforcement between the two bunching mechanisms is determined by the q value (a parameter that determines how the electron oscillation frequency depends on energy), the electron axial velocity, and the wave phase velocity. The unified theory concludes that, for wave amplification, the sign of the electron mismatch frequency is required to be the same as the sign of a bunching parameter that is determined by the total bunching. In an IRL, a relativistic electron beam propagates obliquely through an ion ripple in a plasma. The radiation frequency depends on the beam energy, the ripple wave number, and the angle: omega ~ 2gamma ^{2}k_{ir}ccos theta. By proper choice of device parameters, sources of microwaves, optical, and perhaps even X-rays can be made. The dispersion relation for wave coupling is derived and used to calculate the radiation frequency and linear growth rate. The nonlinear saturation mechanism is explored. Computer simulation is used to verify the ideas, scaling laws and nonlinear mechanisms. In an ICL, the ion focusing force causes the electrons to oscillate about the channel axis and plays a similar role to the magnetic field in a CM. This electron motion is nonlinear and is studied. Simulations were performed

  4. Experimental demonstration of colliding beam lifetime improvement by electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Alexahin, Yuri; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Bishofberger, Kip; /Los Alamos

    2007-10-01

    We report successful application of space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam for improvement of particle lifetime determined by beam-beam interaction in high-energy collider. In our experiments, an electron lens, a novel instrument developed for the beam-beam compensation, was set on a 980-GeV proton bunch in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The proton bunch losses due to its interaction with antiproton beam were reduced by a factor of 2 when the electron lens was operating. We describe the principle of electron lens operation and present experimental results.

  5. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  6. Electron beam induced current in the high injection regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Paul M.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Koirala, Prakash; Collins, Robert W.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2015-07-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful technique which measures the charge collection efficiency of photovoltaics with sub-micron spatial resolution. The exciting electron beam results in a high generation rate density of electron-hole pairs, which may drive the system into nonlinear regimes. An analytic model is presented which describes the EBIC response when the total electron-hole pair generation rate exceeds the rate at which carriers are extracted by the photovoltaic cell, and charge accumulation and screening occur. The model provides a simple estimate of the onset of the high injection regime in terms of the material resistivity and thickness, and provides a straightforward way to predict the EBIC lineshape in the high injection regime. The model is verified by comparing its predictions to numerical simulations in one- and two-dimensions. Features of the experimental data, such as the magnitude and position of maximum collection efficiency versus electron beam current, are consistent with the three-dimensional model.

  7. Electron beam induced current in the high injection regime.

    PubMed

    Haney, Paul M; Yoon, Heayoung P; Koirala, Prakash; Collins, Robert W; Zhitenev, Nikolai B

    2015-07-24

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful technique which measures the charge collection efficiency of photovoltaics with sub-micron spatial resolution. The exciting electron beam results in a high generation rate density of electron-hole pairs, which may drive the system into nonlinear regimes. An analytic model is presented which describes the EBIC response when the total electron-hole pair generation rate exceeds the rate at which carriers are extracted by the photovoltaic cell, and charge accumulation and screening occur. The model provides a simple estimate of the onset of the high injection regime in terms of the material resistivity and thickness, and provides a straightforward way to predict the EBIC lineshape in the high injection regime. The model is verified by comparing its predictions to numerical simulations in one- and two-dimensions. Features of the experimental data, such as the magnitude and position of maximum collection efficiency versus electron beam current, are consistent with the three-dimensional model.

  8. Focused electron-beam-induced etching of silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, S.J.; Fowlkes, J.D.; Rack, P.D.

    2005-08-01

    Focused electron-beam (FEB)-induced etching of silicon dioxide with xenon difluoride has been investigated as a selective nanoscale etching technique. In order to gain an understanding of the parameters that control etch rate and etch efficiency, the effects of beam current, beam energy, and scan rate conditions on the FEB process were examined. High etch rates were obtained for low beam energy, high beam current, and high scan rates. Experimental results also indicated that the FEB etch process is governed by the electron-stimulated desorption of oxygen from the SiO{sub 2} matrix, and subsequently rate limited by XeF{sub 2} availability. Based on experimental evidence and existing literature, a simple, two-step model was introduced to qualitatively describe the etch mechanism. The model involves a cyclical process, which is initiated by the reduction of a surface layer of SiO{sub 2} to elemental silicon. The exposed silicon surface is then removed by a chemical-mediated etch reaction.

  9. Focused electron-beam-induced etching of silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randolph, S. J.; Fowlkes, J. D.; Rack, P. D.

    2005-08-01

    Focused electron-beam (FEB)-induced etching of silicon dioxide with xenon difluoride has been investigated as a selective nanoscale etching technique. In order to gain an understanding of the parameters that control etch rate and etch efficiency, the effects of beam current, beam energy, and scan rate conditions on the FEB process were examined. High etch rates were obtained for low beam energy, high beam current, and high scan rates. Experimental results also indicated that the FEB etch process is governed by the electron-stimulated desorption of oxygen from the SiO2 matrix, and subsequently rate limited by XeF2 availability. Based on experimental evidence and existing literature, a simple, two-step model was introduced to qualitatively describe the etch mechanism. The model involves a cyclical process, which is initiated by the reduction of a surface layer of SiO2 to elemental silicon. The exposed silicon surface is then removed by a chemical-mediated etch reaction.

  10. Bunch length effects in the beam-beam compensation with an electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2010-02-25

    Electron lenses for the head-on beam-beam compensation are under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The bunch length is of the same order as the {beta}-function at the interaction point, and a proton passing through another proton bunch experiences a substantial phase shift which modifies the beam-beam interaction. We review the effect of the bunch length in the single pass beam-beam interaction, apply the same analysis to a proton passing through a long electron lens, and study the single pass beam-beam compensation with long bunches. We also discuss the beam-beam compensation of the electron beam in an electron-ion collider ring.

  11. Segmented photon beams technique for irradiation of postmastectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Semaniak, Anna; Jodkiewicz, Zbigniew; Skowrońska-Gardas, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Aim To present the segmented photon beams technique (SPBT) for irradiation of postmastectomy patients. Background In majority of techniques for irradiation of posmastectomy patients, a few adjacent photon or electron beams were usually implemented in order to encompass different parts of the target. In the presented SPBT technique, the radiotherapy plan consists of 6 isocentric photon beams and the area CTV includes both the chest wall and the supraclavicular area. This makes it possible to provide a uniform dose to the CTV with no hot and cold points and enables the determination of doses for the entire volume of critical organs. Methods and material The treatment forward-IMRT plan comprises six isocentric 4 and 15 MV photon beams. Modulation of the dose distribution for each field was obtained by applying three segments on average. The total dose of 45 Gy was administered in 20 fractions. Dose distributions in target volume and organs at risk were evaluated for 70 randomly chosen patients. Results On average, 94.8% of the CTV volume received doses within 95–107% of the prescribed dose. The average volume of the heart receiving a dose of 30 Gy and lager was 2% for patients with left breast cancer. The average dose to the lung on the irradiation side was always lower than 15.5 Gy and the average V20 Gy was below 35.5%. Conclusions The SPBT complies with requirements for high dose homogeneity within the target volume and satisfactory level of sparing of organs at risk. PMID:24377005

  12. Specimen Behavior in the Electron Beam.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, R M

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that cryo-EM specimens are severely damaged by a level of electron exposure that is much lower than what is needed to obtain high-resolution images from single macromolecules. Perhaps less well appreciated in the cryo-EM literature, the vitreous ice in which samples are suspended is equally sensitivity to radiation damage. This chapter provides a review of several fundamental topics such as inelastic scattering of electrons, radiation chemistry, and radiation biology, which-together-can help one to understand why radiation damage occurs so "easily." This chapter also addresses the issue of beam-induced motion that occurs at even lower levels of electron exposure. While specimen charging may be a contributor to this motion, it is argued that both radiation-induced relief of preexisting stress and damage-induced generation of additional stress may be the dominant causes of radiation-induced movement. PMID:27572722

  13. Designing a beam transport system for RHIC's electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We designed two electron lenses to apply head-on beam-beam compensation for RHIC; they will be installed near IP10. The electron-beam transport system is an important subsystem of the entire electron-lens system. Electrons are transported from the electron gun to the main solenoid and further to the collector. The system must allow for changes of the electron beam size inside the superconducting magnet, and for changes of the electron position by 5 mm in the horizontal- and vertical-planes.

  14. Use of beam deflection to control an electron beam wire deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for controlling an electron beam process wherein a wire is melted and deposited on a substrate as a molten pool comprises generating the electron beam with a complex raster pattern, and directing the beam onto an outer surface of the wire to thereby control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool. Directing the beam selectively heats the outer surface of the wire and maintains the position of the wire with respect to the molten pool. An apparatus for controlling an electron beam process includes a beam gun adapted for generating the electron beam, and a controller adapted for providing the electron beam with a complex raster pattern and for directing the electron beam onto an outer surface of the wire to control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool.

  15. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  16. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  17. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  18. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Hongxiu; Neil, George R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  19. A Gridded Electron Gun for a Sheet Beam Klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, M. E.; Miram, G.; Ives, R. L.; Ivanov, V.; Krasnykh, A.

    2003-12-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc.(CCR) is developing rectangular, gridded, thermionic, dispenser-cathode guns for sheet beam devices. The first application is expected to be klystrons for advanced particle accelerators and colliders. The current generation of accelerators typically use klystrons with a cylindrical beam generated by a Pierce-type electron gun. As RF power is pushed to higher levels, space charge forces in the electron beam limit the amount of current that can be transmitted at a given voltage. The options are to increase the beam voltage, leading to problems with X-Ray shielding and modulator and power supply design, or to develop new techniques for lowering the space charge forces in the electron beam. In this device, the beam has a rectangular cross section. The thickness is constrained as it would in a normal, cylindrically symmetric klystron with a Pierce gun. However, the width of the beam is many times the thickness, and the resulting cross sectional area is much larger than in the conventional device. This allows much higher current and/or a lower voltage before space charge forces become too high. The current program addresses issues related to beam formation at the emitter surface, design and implementation of shadow and control grids in a rectangular geometry. It is directed toward a robust, cost-effective, and reliable mechanical design. A prototype device will be developed that will operate at 415 kV, 250 A for an 80 MW, X-Band, sheet-beam klystron. The cathode will have 100 cm2 of cathode area with an average cathode current loading of 2.5 A/cm2. For short pulse formation, the use of a grid was chosen. The gun has been designed with a combination of 2-D and 3-D codes. 2-D codes were used to determine the starting point for the electrodes to produce the compression (which is in only 1 direction.) These results showed that a very high quality beam could be achieved even in the presence of the shadow grid. 3-D results have shown that the

  20. Imaging of Electron Beam Induced Current in Epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Shin; Boeckl, John; Lu, Weijie; Park, J. H.; Mitchel, W. C.; Tetlak, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    It has been observed that there forms a Schottky junction between graphene and SiC in epitaxial graphene due to the work function difference. As a result, it is viable to apply the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique on epitaxial graphene due to the fact that it needs a built-in field and ample electron generation volume to generate EBIC. EBIC is an important characterization technique, which identifies electrically active impurities/defects, detects local built-in field, and measures minority carrier diffusion length. In this paper, we use a FEI SEM equipped with a current amplifier to investigate the spatial mapping of EBIC. The incident electron beam generates excited electron-hole pairs in SiC and the minority carriers are collected through the Schottky junction before flowing into graphene. EBIC imaging reveals mesoscopic domains of bright and dark contrast areas due to local EBIC polarity and magnitude, which is believed to be the result of spatial fluctuation in the carrier density in graphene. We also investigate the electron energy dependence, which modulates the EBIC magnitude. With an analytical drift-diffusion current model, we are able to extract the minority carrier diffusion length in the SiC, which is on the order of micro meter.

  1. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    PubMed Central

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  2. Electron beam simulation from gun to collector: Towards a complete solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mertzig, R. Shornikov, A. Wenander, F.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2015-01-09

    An electron-beam simulation technique for high-resolution complete EBIS/T modelling is presented. The technique was benchmarked on the high compression HEC{sup 2} test-stand with an electron beam current, current density and energy of 10 A, 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and 49.2 keV, and on the immersed electron beam at REXEBIS for electron beam characteristics of 0.4 A, 200 A/cm{sup 2} and 4.5 keV. In both Brillouin-like and immersed beams the electron-beam radius varies from several millimeters at the gun, through some hundreds of micrometers in the ionization region to a few centimeters at the collector over a total length of several meters. We report on our approach for finding optimal meshing parameters, based on the local beam properties such as magnetic field-strength, electron energy and beam radius. This approach combined with dividing the problem domain into sub-domains, and subsequent splicing of the local solutions allowed us to simulate the beam propagation in EBISes from the gun to the collector using a conventional PC in about 24–36 h. Brillouin-like electron beams propagated through the complete EBIS were used to analyze the beam behavior within the collector region. We checked whether elastically reflected paraxial electrons from a Brillouin-like beam will escape from the collector region and add to the loss current. We have also studied the power deposition profiles as function of applied potentials using two electrode geometries for a Brillouin-like beam including the effects of backscattered electrons.

  3. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  4. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not "sorcery" but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  5. Two-Beam Instability in Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey V.; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    The drift motion of cooling electrons makes them able to respond to transverse perturbations of a cooled ion beam. This response may lead to dipole or quadrupole transverse instabilities at specific longitudinal wave numbers. While the dipole instabilities can be suppressed by a combination of the Landau damping, machine impedance, and the active damper, the quadrupole and higher order modes can lead to either emittance growth, or a lifetime degradation, or both. The growth rates of these instabilities are strongly determined by the machine x-y coupling. Thus, tuning out of the coupling resonance and/or reduction of the machine coupling can be an efficient remedy for these instabilities.

  6. Suprathermal electrons produced by beam-plasma-discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments conducted with a low energy plasma lens, HARP, in the electron beam of the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center indicate that an enhanced population of 50 to 300 volt electrons appear when the beam goes into the Beam-Plasma Discharge (BPD) mode. Below the BPD instability the electron distribution appears to be characterized as non-energized single particle scattering and energy loss. At 100 cm from the beam core in the BPD mode the fluxes parallel to the beam are reduced by a factor of 20 with respect to the fluxes at 25 cm. Some evidence for isotropy near the beam core is presented.

  7. Fundamental Proximity Effects in Focused electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, Harald; Smith, Daryl; Haber, Thomas; Rack, Philip D; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique.

  8. Experimental and simulation studies of beam-beam compensation with Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Zhang, X.L.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2007-06-01

    Initially the Tevatron Electron Lenses (TELs) were intended for compensation of the beam-beam effect on the antiproton beam [1]. Owing to recent increase in the number of antiprotons and reduction in their emittance, it is the proton beam now that suffers most from the beam-beam effect [2]. We present results of beam studies, compare them with the results of computer simulations using LIFETRAC code and discuss possibilities of further improvements of the Beam-Beam Compensation efficiency in the Tevatron.

  9. JINR test facility for studies FEL bunching technique for CLIC driving beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbilov, G.V.; Fateev, A.A.; Ivanov, I.N.

    1995-12-31

    SILUND-21 linear induction accelerator (energy up to 10 MeV, peak current about of 1 kA, pulse duration 50 - 70 ns) is constructed at JINR in the framework of experimental program to study free electron laser physics, a problem of two-beam acceleration and microwave electronics. In this paper we present project of an experiment to adopt the FEL bunching technique for generation of the CLIC driving beam.

  10. Electron Beam Technology for Environmental Pollution Control.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, there are over 1700 electron beam (EB) units in commercial use, providing an estimated added value to numerous products, amounting to 100 billion USD or more. High-current electron accelerators are used in diverse industries to enhance the physical and chemical properties of materials and to reduce undesirable contaminants such as pathogens, toxic byproducts, or emissions. Over the past few decades, EB technologies have been developed aimed at ensuring the safety of gaseous and liquid effluents discharged to the environment. It has been demonstrated that EB technologies for flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification, and sludge hygienization can be effectively deployed to mitigate environmental degradation. Recently, extensive work has been carried out on the use of EB for environmental remediation, which also includes the removal of emerging contaminants such as VOCs, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and potential EDCs.

  11. The Electron Beam Semiconductor (EBS) amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    True, R. M.; Baxendale, J. F.

    1980-07-01

    The Electron Beam Semiconductor (EBS) concept has existed for three decades; but only within the last decade has an active, well-defined program been underway to develop devices that can operate as high-power radio frequency(RF) amplifiers, fast risetime switches, and current and voltage pulse amplifiers. This report discusses the test procedures, data and results of reliability testing of RF and video pulse EBS amplifiers at Electronics Research and Development Command (ERADCOM), Fort Monmouth, New Jersey. Also, the experimental analysis of the series connected diode EBS device is described in detail. Finally, the report concludes with a discussion of the state-of-the-art of EBS and future trends of the technology.

  12. The electron beam instability and turbulence theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Extensions and practical applications of recent observations of electron beam-plasma interactions are investigated for the range of turbulence theories, extending from quasi-linear to strong turbulence theory, which have been developed on the basis of the Langmuir-wave excitation model. Electron foreshock observations have indicated that linear instability theory must encompass the excitation of waves whose frequencies are substantially different from those of the plasma frequency; the point of departure for such extensions should be a quantitative test of existing theories, and particle simulations conducive to such testing are presented. A step-by-step addition of physical considerations is used in such simulation studies to differentiate among nonlinear turbulence effects.

  13. Electron Beam Technology for Environmental Pollution Control.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, there are over 1700 electron beam (EB) units in commercial use, providing an estimated added value to numerous products, amounting to 100 billion USD or more. High-current electron accelerators are used in diverse industries to enhance the physical and chemical properties of materials and to reduce undesirable contaminants such as pathogens, toxic byproducts, or emissions. Over the past few decades, EB technologies have been developed aimed at ensuring the safety of gaseous and liquid effluents discharged to the environment. It has been demonstrated that EB technologies for flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification, and sludge hygienization can be effectively deployed to mitigate environmental degradation. Recently, extensive work has been carried out on the use of EB for environmental remediation, which also includes the removal of emerging contaminants such as VOCs, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and potential EDCs. PMID:27620188

  14. An electron beam polarimeter based on scattering from a windowless, polarized hydrogen gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, Jan; Milner, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Here we present the idea to develop a precision polarimeter for low energy, intense polarized electron beams using a windowless polarized hydrogen gas cell fed by an atomic beam source. This technique would use proven technology used successfully in both the electron scattering experiments: HERMES with 27 GeV electron and positron beams at DESY, and BLAST with 850 MeV electron beams at MIT-Bates. At 100 MeV beam energy, both spin-dependent Mo/ller and elastic electron-proton scattering processes have a high cross section and sizable spin asymmetries. The concept is described and estimates for realistic rates for elastic electron-proton scattering and Mo/ller scattering are presented. A number of important issues which affect the ultimate systematic uncertainty are identified.

  15. Scintillation of lead tungstate crystal studied with single-electron beam from KUFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Rizwan, Mohamad Uozumi, Yusuke; Matsuo, Kazuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Kii, Toshiteru; Zen, Heishun; Tsamalaidze, Zviadi; Evtoukhovitch, Petr; Valentin, Samoilov

    2015-04-29

    Lead tungstate (PWO) crystal has a very fast response, high atomic density and high radiation hardness. Therefore, they are suitable to be used for high-energy nuclear data measurements under high-background circumstances. Although a good electron-ion separation with a pulse shape analysis technique is essential, scintillation pulse shapes have not been observed with electron beams of a wide energy range. A single-electron beam technique has been developed at Kyoto University Free Electron Laser (KUFEL), and electron beams of 4-38 MeV are available. During the experiments, single electron beams bombarded a PWO crystal. By using oscilloscope we observed scintillation pulses of a PWO crystal coupled with a photomultiplier tube. Measured spectra were compared with the simulation code of EGS5 to analyze scattering effects. As the result, the pulse amplitudes show good linearity and the pulse shapes are almost constant in the observed energy range.

  16. A critical literature review of focused electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dorp, W. F. van; Hagen, C. W.

    2008-10-15

    , there is a limited understanding of the mechanism of electron induced precursor dissociation. In many cases, the deposit composition is not directly dependent on the stoichiometric composition of the precursor and the electron induced decomposition paths can be very different from those expected from calculations or thermal decomposition. The dissociation mechanism is one of the key factors determining the purity of the deposits and a better understanding of this process will help develop electron beam induced deposition into a viable nanofabrication technique00.

  17. Electron beam deposition for nanofabrication: Insights from surface science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnuk, J. D.; Rosenberg, S. G.; Gorham, J. M.; van Dorp, W. F.; Hagen, C. W.; Fairbrother, D. H.

    2011-02-01

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) is a direct-write lithographic technique that utilizes the dissociation of volatile precursors by a focused electron beam in a low vacuum environment to create nanostructures. Notable advantages of EBID over competing lithographic techniques are that it is a single step process that allows three-dimensional free-standing structures to be created, including features with single-nanometer scale dimensions. However, despite the inherent advantages of EBID, scientific and technological issues are impeding its development as an industrial nanofabrication tool. Perhaps the greatest single limitation of EBID is that metal-containing nanostructures deposited from organometallic precursors typically possess unacceptable levels of organic contamination which adversely affects the material's properties. In addition to the issue of purity, there is also a lack of understanding and quantitative information on the fundamental surface reactions and reaction cross-sections that are responsible for EBID. In this prospective, we describe how surface analytical techniques have begun to provide mechanistic and kinetic insights into the molecular level processes associated with EBID. This has been achieved by observing the effect of electron irradiation on nanometer thick films of organometallic precursors adsorbed onto solid substrates at low temperatures (< 200 K) under ultra-high vacuum conditions. Experimental observations include probing changes in surface composition, metal oxidation state, and the evolution of volatile species. Insights into surface reactions associated with purification strategies are also detailed. We also discuss unresolved scientific challenges and opportunities for future EBID research.

  18. Electron molecular beam epitaxy: Layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides via pulsed electron-beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comes, Ryan; Gu, Man; Khokhlov, Mikhail; Liu, Hongxue; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Complex oxide epitaxial film growth is a rich and exciting field, owing to the wide variety of physical properties present in oxides. These properties include ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, spin-polarization, and a variety of other correlated phenomena. Traditionally, high quality epitaxial oxide films have been grown via oxide molecular beam epitaxy or pulsed laser deposition. Here, we present the growth of high quality epitaxial films using an alternative approach, the pulsed electron-beam deposition technique. We demonstrate all three epitaxial growth modes in different oxide systems: Frank-van der Merwe (layer-by-layer); Stranski-Krastanov (layer-then-island); and Volmer-Weber (island). Analysis of film quality and morphology is presented and techniques to optimize the morphology of films are discussed.

  19. 'Programming' Electron Beam Ion Traps To Produce Atomic Data Relevant To Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Currell, Fred; O'Rourke, Brian; Kavanagh, Anthony; Li Yueming; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hirofumi

    2009-09-10

    After a brief review of the processes taking place in electron beam ions traps (EBITs), the means by which EBITs are used to make measurements of electron impact ionization cross-sections and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths are discussed. In particular, results from a study involving holmium ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap are used to illustrate a technique for studying dielectronic recombination in open-shell target ions.

  20. High power, electron-beam induced switching in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpetti, R.D.; Hofer, W.W.; Kania, D.R.; Schoenbach, K.H.; Joshi, R.P.; Molina, C.; Brinkmann, R.P.

    1993-07-01

    We are developing a high voltage, high average power, electron-beam controlled diamond switch that could significantly impact high power solid-state electronics in industrial and defense applications. An electron-beam controlled thin-film diamond could switch well over 100 kW average power at MHz frequencies, greater than 5 kV, and with high efficiency. This performance is due to the excellent thermal and electronic properties of diamond, the high efficiency achieved with electron beam control, and the demonstrated effectiveness of microchannel cooling. Our electron beam penetration depth measurements agree with our Monte-Carlo calculations. We have not observed electron beam damage in diamond for beam energies up to 150 keV. In this paper we describe our experimental and calculational results and research objectives.

  1. Electron-beam diagnostic for space-charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2005-02-01

    A nonperturbing electron-beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for heavy ion fusion beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron-beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the neutralized transport experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  2. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2004-09-25

    A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  3. Local zone wise elastic and plastic properties of electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy using digital image correlation technique: A comparative study between uniform stress and virtual fields method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saranath, K. M.; Ramji, M.

    2015-05-01

    Joining of materials using welding results in the formation of material zones with varying microstructure across the weld. Extraction of the mechanical properties of those individual heterogeneous zones are important in designing components and structures comprised of welds. In this study, the zone wise local extraction of the elastic and plastic properties of an electron beam welded Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy has been carried out using both the uniform stress method (USM) and the virtual fields method (VFM) involving digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The surface strain field obtained using DIC technique from a transverse weld specimen tensile testing is used for extracting the zone wise strain evolution. Initially, using uniform stress assumption, zone wise full range stress-strain curves are extracted. In USM methodology, the elastic and plastic material models are fitted to the zone wise stress-strain curves and required parameters are extracted from it. But inherent disadvantage is lot of images need to be processed for the parameter extraction. Recently, VFM is gaining lot of popularity in characterization domain as it is robust, accurate and faster. VFM is based on the principle of virtual work where, the weak form of local equilibrium equations and kinematically admissible virtual displacement fields are utilized for parameter extraction. Hollomon's power law is used here as the hardening rule. Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, strength coefficient and strain hardening exponent are the parameters extracted zone wise using both USM and VFM. A Vicker's microhardness measurement is also conducted across the weld zone towards mapping the strength behavior. Fusion zone has reported higher yield strength, strength coefficient and Poisson's ratio. Young's modulus value is found decreasing from base metal towards the fusion zone. The trend observed in parameter variation across the weld zone obtained by both USM and VFM compares very well. Due

  4. Propagation of electron and positron beams in long, dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Patric; Blue, Brent; Clayton, Chris; Decker, Franz-Joseph; Hogan, Mark; Hunag, Chengkun; Joshi, Chan; Katsouleas, Tom; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren; O'Connell, Caollionn; Siemann, Robert; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2008-04-01

    Electron beams with density larger than the plasma density can propagate through plasmas without significant emittance growth. The electron beam expels the plasma electrons from the bunch volume and propagate in a pure, uniform ion column. In contrast, positron beams attract plasma electrons that flow through the positron bunch. As a result the plasma focusing force is nonlinear, a charge halo forms around the bunch, and the bunch emittance grows. After some distance into the plasma, the bunch emittance reaches an approximately constant value, and the beam and the plasma focusing force reach a steady state. Experimental results obtained with electron and positron bunches, as well as numerical simulation results will be presented.

  5. Calculating electron beam properties in an ionized benzene channel

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D.R.

    1986-08-01

    We have derived formulas for the equilibrium-beam radius and other properties of an electron beam propagating in an ionized benzene channel. These formulas have been determined for two special cases. The first was for Gaussian spatial profiles for both the electron and laser beams. We obtained an analytical result for the equilibrium-beam radius, even though we included both KrF laser-induced and collisional sources of ionization of different sizes. The second case we considered was for laser and electron beams with flat radial profiles. These calculations were performed to determine if a laser-guided electron beam could reduce the focal size of an electron accelerator. We also developed a personal-computer spreadsheet program that receives 10 inputs and calculates 26 dependent quantities relating to the beam and ionization properties.

  6. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adli, E.; Gessner, S. J.; Corde, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Bjerke, H. H.

    2015-02-09

    We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design allows for measuring large beam sizes, with large photon yield per beam charge and excellent signal linearity with beam charge. Furthermore, the profile monitor signal is independent of the particle energy for ultrarelativistic particles. Different design and parameter considerations are discussed. A Cherenkov light-based profile monitor has been installed at the FACET User Facility at SLAC. Finally, we report on the measured performance of this profile monitor.

  7. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOEpatents

    Bolstad, Jon O.

    1987-01-01

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  8. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOEpatents

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  9. Electron Beam Emission Characteristics from Plasma Focus Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Patran, A.; Wong, D.; Hassan, S. M.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Lee, P.; Lee, S.; Rawat, R. S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we observed the characteristics of the electron beam emission from our plasma focus machine filling neon, argon, helium and hydrogen. Rogowski coil and CCD based magnetic spectrometer were used to obtain temporal and energy distribution of electron emission. And the preliminary results of deposited FeCo thin film using electron beam from our plasma focus device were presented.

  10. Experiments to validate self-consistent beam-gas-electron code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Sharp, W. M.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Lund, S. M.; Vay, J.-L.; Coleman, J. E.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Furman, M. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.

    2007-11-01

    The WARP-POSINST model tracks beam ions and secondary particles (ions, electrons, gas molecules) in a self-consistent manner with techniques developed for heavy-ion fusion and e-cloud studies in high-intensity accelerators. We have developed simple experiments to exercise the code. Heavy-ion beams striking a surface cause gas desorption and electron emission, both of which can limit beam performance. Subsequent beam ions can ionize the gas, producing additional electrons. Two parallel plates, on either side of the beam and orthogonal to the end wall, are biased as a dipole: one grounded and the other biased to ± 10 kV. The electron current to a positive plate jumps to the electron emission value; then ramps slowly due to ionization of desorbed gas. This is a rigorous test of the particle dynamics of the model and constrains the secondary particle production coefficients.

  11. Residual, unresectable, or recurrent colorectal cancer: external beam irradiation and intraoperative electron beam boost +- resection

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L.L.; Cohen, A.C.; Dosoretz, D.D.; Shipley, W.U.; Hedberg, S.E.; Wood, W.C.; Rodkey, G.V.; Suit, H.D.

    1983-11-01

    While combinations of external beam radiation (XRT) and surgery decrease pelvic recurrence and improve survival in the subgroups with residual disease (postop XRT) or initially unresectable disease (preop XRT), local recurrence is still unacceptably high, and survival could be improved. In view of this, pilot studies were instituted at Massachusetts General Hospital in which 32 patients received the standard previous treatment of external beam irradiation and surgery but in addition had an intraoperative electron beam boost of 1000 to 1500 rad to the remaining tumor or tumor bed. For the 16 patients who presented with unresectable primary lesions, the addition of intraoperative radiotherapy has resulted in a total absence of local recurrence with a minimum 20 month follow-up, and survival rates are statistically better than for the previous group treated with only external beam irradiation and surgical resection. In the group with residual disease, again there have not been any local recurrences in the 7 patients who received all treatment modalities versus 54% and 26% for the group with gross and microscopic residual treated with only external beam techniques. The remaining 9 patients presented with recurrent unresectable lesions - 3 are alive (2 NED) at greater than or equal to 3 years.

  12. Highly efficient electron vortex beams generated by nanofabricated phase holograms

    SciTech Connect

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Mafakheri, Erfan; Frabboni, Stefano

    2014-01-27

    We propose an improved type of holographic-plate suitable for the shaping of electron beams. The plate is fabricated by a focused ion beam on a silicon nitride membrane and introduces a controllable phase shift to the electron wavefunction. We adopted the optimal blazed-profile design for the phase hologram, which results in the generation of highly efficient (25%) electron vortex beams. This approach paves the route towards applications in nano-scale imaging and materials science.

  13. Electron beam diagnostics tool based on Cherenkov radiation in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukolov, A. V.; Novokshonov, A. I.; Potylitsyn, A. P.; Uglov, S. R.

    2016-07-01

    The results of experimental investigations of Cherenkov radiation in optical fibers with 0.6 mm thickness which were used to scan an electron beam of 5.7 MeV energy are presented. Using such a technique for beam profile measurements it is possible to create a compact and reliable device compared to existing systems based on ionization chambers.

  14. Electron capture acceleration channel in a slit laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. X.; Scheid, W.; Ho, Y. K.

    2007-03-12

    Using numerical simulations, the authors find that the electrons can be captured and accelerated to high energies (GeV) in a slit laser beam with an intensity of I{lambda}{sup 2}{approx}10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} {mu}m{sup 2}, where {lambda} is the laser wavelength in units of {mu}m. The range of the optimum incident energy is very wide, even up to GeV. These results are of interest for experiments because the relatively low intensity can be achieved with present chirped pulse amplification technique and a wide range of incident energies means that a multistage acceleration is possible.

  15. Microbial Safety Improvement of Sea Buckthorn by Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemţanu, Monica R.; Minea, R.; Mazilu, Elena; Rǎdulescu, Nora

    2007-04-01

    The commercialization of medicinal plants and/or their products is highly increased in Romania lately. One of the most used herbs is sea buckthorn being well known for its quality with a large potential for curing some diseases. Sea buckthorn can be contaminated with undesirable microorganisms which may affect negatively its quality. The paper presents the results regarding the action of a non-conventional technology meaning electron beam technique on sea buckthorn in order to improve its microbiological quality. Our study revealed that the sea buckthorn microbial load has been improved after 3 kGy irradiation keeping its active principles.

  16. Industrial perspective on focused electron beam-induced processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bret, Tristan; Hofmann, Thorsten; Edinger, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    After a short overview of the historical developments of the technique of gas-assisted focused electron beam-induced processing (mostly deposition and etching), this paper deals with the applications of this technology to photolithographic mask repair. A commented list of results is shown on different mask types, for different types of defects, and at different node generations. The scope of this article is double: summarize the state of the art in a fast-paced highly specific industrial environment driven by "Moore's law" and feedback to academic researchers some technologically relevant directions for further investigations.

  17. Microbial Safety Improvement of Sea Buckthorn by Electron Beam Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemtanu, Monica R.; Minea, R.; Mazilu, Elena; Radulescu, Nora

    2007-04-23

    The commercialization of medicinal plants and/or their products is highly increased in Romania lately. One of the most used herbs is sea buckthorn being well known for its quality with a large potential for curing some diseases. Sea buckthorn can be contaminated with undesirable microorganisms which may affect negatively its quality. The paper presents the results regarding the action of a non-conventional technology meaning electron beam technique on sea buckthorn in order to improve its microbiological quality. Our study revealed that the sea buckthorn microbial load has been improved after 3 kGy irradiation keeping its active principles.

  18. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A.; Vick, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices.

  19. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam.

    PubMed

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A; Vick, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices. PMID:27586090

  20. Non-destructive imaging of buried electronic interfaces using a decelerated scanning electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, Atsufumi; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Murphy, Benedict A.; Vick, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology enables the production of atomically abrupt interfaces in multilayered junctions, allowing for an increase in the number of transistors in a processor. However, uniform electron transport has not yet been achieved across the entire interfacial area in junctions due to the existence of local defects, causing local heating and reduction in transport efficiency. To date, junction uniformity has been predominantly assessed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, which requires slicing and milling processes that can potentially introduce additional damage and deformation. It is therefore essential to develop an alternative non-destructive method. Here we show a non-destructive technique using scanning electron microscopy to map buried junction properties. By controlling the electron-beam energy, we demonstrate the contrast imaging of local junction resistances at a controlled depth. This technique can be applied to any buried junctions, from conventional semiconductor and metal devices to organic devices. PMID:27586090

  1. The electron-beam FGT process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Norman W.; Hirano, Shinichi

    The electron-beam process is one of the most effective methods of removing SO 2 and NO x from industrial flue gases. This flue gas treatment consists of adding a small amount of ammonia to the flue gas and irradiating the gas by means of an electron beam, thereby causing reactions which convert the SO 2 and NO x to ammonium sulfate and ammonium-sulfate nitrate. These salts may then be collected from the flue gas by means of such conventional collectors as an elecrtostatic precipitator or baghouse. This process has numerous advantages over currently-used conventional processes as follows: 1) The process simultaneously removes SO 2 and NO x from flue gas at high efficiency levels; 2) It is a dry process which is easily controlled and has excellent load-following capability; 3) Stock-gas reheat is not required; 4) The pollutants are converted into a salable agricultural fertilizer; 5) The process has low capital and operating cost requirements. Test results from the most recent pilot plant in Indianapolis, Indiana, will be discussed showing various characteristics of process control, temperature relationships, radiation dosage, pollution removals at various conditions, and by-product collection usage evaluations. The results will show what will be required in future commercial installations and what accelerator equipment will be required, including various configuration of irradiation zone process design. The economic evaluation will include studies of cost sensitivity and by-product pay back. Various designs for large scale plants indicate the process will have a place in the future clean-up of environmental pollutants.

  2. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  3. Hollow Electron Beam Collimator: R and D Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Drozhdin, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; Kabantsev, A.

    2010-11-04

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  4. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Assmann, R.; Kabantsev, A.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-06-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  5. Plasma and ion barrier for electron beam spot stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Snell, Charles M.

    2000-03-01

    High-current electron beams of small spot size are used for high-resolution x-ray radiography of dense objects. Intense energy deposition in the bremsstrahlung target causes generation of ions which can propagate upstream and disrupt the electron beam. We have investigated the use of a thin beryllium foil placed 1-2 cm in front of the target, which serves as a barrier for the ions but is essentially transparent to the incoming electron beam. Analysis and computer simulations confirm that this confinement method will halt ion propagation and preserve the spot size stability of the electron beam. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Tensile Strength of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masayuki; Shimbo, Minoru; Miyano, Yasushi

    In this paper, the effects of the intensity of electron beam and the variation with time after irradiation of electron beam on the tensile strength of the polypropylene (PP), which is widely used as medicine containers, were investigated. PP with and without colorants were used first and samples irradiated under various intensity of EB. A tensile test on the irradiated samples with elapsed time after the irradiation of the electron beam was carried out. The effects of those factors on the tensile strength were discussed. The following results were obtained (1) The tensile strength of PP decreased due to the influence of the electron beam irradiation, however the rate of the decrease in strength was small compared with the original one. Furthermore, the rate of the decrease in strength was very small owing to the variation with time after the EB irradiation. (2) The tensile rupture strength of PP increased and the rupture strain owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, these rupture strength increased and the rupture strain decreased along with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. (3) The tensile rupture strain energy of PP decreased owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, the strain energy decreases with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. Moreover, the strength characteristics of PP with colorants received greater influence of electron beam compared with the one without colorants.

  7. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  8. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  9. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  10. UV laser ionization and electron beam diagnostics for plasma lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.

    1995-04-01

    A comprehensive study of focusing of relativistic electron beams with overdense and underdense plasma lenses requires careful control of plasma density and scale lengths. Plasma lens experiments are planned at the Beam Test Facility of the LBL Center for Beam Physics, using the 50 MeV electron beam delivered by the linac injector from the Advanced Light Source. Here we present results from an interferometric study of plasmas produced in tri-propylamine vapor with a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm. To study temporal dynamics of plasma lenses we have developed an electron beam diagnostic using optical transition radiation to time resolve beam size and divergence. Electron beam ionization of the plasma has also been investigated.

  11. Electron beam directed etching of hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Elbadawi, Christopher; Tran, Trong Toan; Kolíbal, Miroslav; Šikola, Tomáš; Scott, John; Cai, Qiran; Li, Lu Hua; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor; Lobo, Charlene

    2016-09-28

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is a wide bandgap van der Waals material with unique optical properties that make it attractive for two dimensional (2D) photonic and optoelectronic devices. However, broad deployment and exploitation of hBN is limited by alack of suitable material and device processing and nano prototyping techniques. Here we present a high resolution, single step electron beam technique for chemical dry etching of hBN. Etching is achieved using H2O as a precursor gas, at both room temperature and elevated hBN temperatures. The technique enables damage-free, nano scale, iterative patterning of supported and suspended 2D hBN, thus opening the door to facile fabrication of hBN-based 2D heterostructures and devices. PMID:27603125

  12. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  13. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2015-08-11

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  14. Development of mobile electron beam plant for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bumsoo; Kim, Jinkyu; Kang, Wongu; Choi, Jang Seung; Jeong, Kwang-Young

    2016-07-01

    Due to the necessity of pilot scale test facility for continuous treatment of wastewater and gases on site, a mobile electron beam irradiation system mounted on a trailer has developed. This mobile electron beam irradiation system is designed for the individual field application with self-shielded structure of steel plate and lead block which will satisfy the required safety figures of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Shielding of a mobile electron accelerator of 0.7 MeV, 30 mA has been designed and examined by Monte Carlo technique. Based on a 3-D model of electron accelerator shielding which is designed with steel and lead shield, radiation leakage was examined using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) Code. Simulations with two different versions (version 4c2 and version 5) of MCNP code showed agreements within statistical uncertainties, and the highest leakage expected is 5.5061×10-01 (1±0.0454) μSv/h, which is far below the tolerable radiation dose limit for occupational workers. This unit could treat up to 500 m3 of liquid waste per day at 2 kGy or 10,000 N m3 of gases per hour at 15 kGy.

  15. Electron beam magnetic switch for a plurality of free electron lasers

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for forming and utilizing a sequence of electron beam segments, each of the same temporal length (substantially 15 nsec), with consecutive beams being separated by a constant time interval of the order of 3 nsec. The beam sequence is used for simultaneous inputs to a plurality of wiggler magnet systems that also accept the laser beams to be amplified by interaction with the co-propagating electron beams. The electron beams are arranged substantially in a circle to allow proper distribution of and simultaneous switching out of the beam segments to their respective wiggler magnets.

  16. Experimental investigation of a 1 kA/cm² sheet beam plasma cathode electron gun.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niraj; Pal, Udit Narayan; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Prajesh, Rahul; Prakash, Ram

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a cold cathode based sheet-beam plasma cathode electron gun is reported with achieved sheet-beam current density ∼1 kA/cm(2) from pseudospark based argon plasma for pulse length of ∼200 ns in a single shot experiment. For the qualitative assessment of the sheet-beam, an arrangement of three isolated metallic-sheets is proposed. The actual shape and size of the sheet-electron-beam are obtained through a non-conventional method by proposing a dielectric charging technique and scanning electron microscope based imaging. As distinct from the earlier developed sheet beam sources, the generated sheet-beam has been propagated more than 190 mm distance in a drift space region maintaining sheet structure without assistance of any external magnetic field.

  17. Experimental investigation of a 1 kA/cm2 sheet beam plasma cathode electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Niraj; Narayan Pal, Udit; Kumar Pal, Dharmendra; Prajesh, Rahul; Prakash, Ram

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a cold cathode based sheet-beam plasma cathode electron gun is reported with achieved sheet-beam current density ˜1 kA/cm2 from pseudospark based argon plasma for pulse length of ˜200 ns in a single shot experiment. For the qualitative assessment of the sheet-beam, an arrangement of three isolated metallic-sheets is proposed. The actual shape and size of the sheet-electron-beam are obtained through a non-conventional method by proposing a dielectric charging technique and scanning electron microscope based imaging. As distinct from the earlier developed sheet beam sources, the generated sheet-beam has been propagated more than 190 mm distance in a drift space region maintaining sheet structure without assistance of any external magnetic field.

  18. Electron-beam induced current characterization of back-surface field solar cells using a chopped scanning electron microscope beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, K. L.; Cheng, L.-J.

    1984-01-01

    A chopped electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique for the chacterization of back-surface field (BSF) solar cells is presented. It is shown that the effective recombination velocity of the low-high junction forming the back-surface field of BSF cells, in addition to the diffusion length and the surface recombination velocity of the surface perpendicular to both the p-n and low-high junctions, can be determined from the data provided by a single EBIC scan. The method for doing so is described and illustrated. Certain experimental considerations taken to enhance the quality of the EBIC data are also discussed.

  19. Technology of alignment mark in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Min; Xu, Tang; Chen, Baoqin; Niu, Jiebin

    2014-08-01

    Electron beam direct wring lithography has been an indispensable approach by which all sorts of novel nano-scale devices include many kinds optical devices can be fabricated. Alignment accuracy is a key factor especially to those devices which need multi-level lithography. In addition to electron beam lithography system itself the quality of alignment mark directly influences alignment accuracy. This paper introduces fundamental of alignment mark detection and discusses some techniques of alignment mark fabrication along with considerations for obtaining highly accurate alignment taking JBX5000LS and JBX6300FS e-beam lithography systems for example. The fundamental of alignment mark detection is expounded first. Many kinds of factors which can impact on the quality of alignment mark are analyzed including mark materials, depth of mark groove and influence of multi-channel process. It has been proved from experiments that material used as metal mark with higher average atomic number is better beneficial for getting high alignment accuracy. Depth of mark groove is required to 1.5~5 μm on our experience. The more process steps alignment mark must pass through, the more probability of being damaged there will be. So the compatibility of alignment mark fabrication with the whole device process and the protection of alignment mark are both need to be considered in advance.

  20. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Previtali, Valentina; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  1. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adli, E.; Gessner, S. J.; Corde, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Bjerke, H. H.

    2015-02-09

    We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design allows for measuring large beam sizes, with large photon yield per beam charge and excellent signal linearity with beam charge. Furthermore, the profile monitor signal is independent of the particle energy for ultrarelativistic particles. Different design and parameter considerations are discussed. A Cherenkov light-based profile monitor has been installed at the FACET User Facility at SLAC. Finally,more » we report on the measured performance of this profile monitor.« less

  2. Current understanding and issues on electron beam injection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    The status of the physics understanding involved in electron beam injection in space is reviewed. The paper examines our understanding of beam plasma interactions and their associated wave and energized particle spectra of the processes involved in the beam plasma discharge, and of the vehicle charge neutralization. 'Strawman' models are presented for comparison with experimental observations.

  3. Effect of electron beam pulse width on time-of-flight spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A simple but useful formula describing the effect of electron gun pulse width on the time of flight (TOF) spectra measured in translational spectroscopy experiments is developed. An approximately monoenergetic pulsed electrostatically focused electron beam traverses a scattering cell filled with a Maxwellian gas. Inelastic electron collisions with the gas produce metastable particles, ions, scattered electrons, and photons which then pass through a collimating slit system at right angles to the electron beam. TOF techniques are used to separate the photon signal from the metastable particle signal and to measure the TOF distribution of the metastable species.

  4. Quantum effects in electron beam pumped GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Yahia, M. E.; Azzouz, I. M.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-19

    Propagation of waves in nano-sized GaAs semiconductor induced by electron beam are investigated. A dispersion relation is derived by using quantum hydrodynamics equations including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation potentials, and degenerate pressures. It is found that the propagating modes are instable and strongly depend on the electron beam parameters, as well as the quantum recoil effects and degenerate pressures. The instability region shrinks with the increase of the semiconductor number density. The instability arises because of the energetic electron beam produces electron-hole pairs, which do not keep in phase with the electrostatic potential arising from the pair plasma.

  5. Study of a non-intrusive electron beam radius diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; DeVolder, B.G.; Goldstein, J.C.; Snell, C.M.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have evaluated the usefulness and limitation of a non-intrusive beam radius diagnostic which is based on the measurement of the magnetic moment of a high-current electron beam in an axisymmetric focusing magnetic field, and relates the beam root-mean-square (RMS) radius to the change in magnetic flux through a diamagnetic loop encircling the beam. An analytic formula that gives the RMS radius of the electron beam at a given axial position and a given time is derived and compared with results from a 2-D particle-in-cell code. The study has established criteria for its validity and optimal applications.

  6. Enhanced modified faraday cup for determination of power density distribution of electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2001-01-01

    An improved tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron or ion beam using electron beam profile data acquired by an enhanced modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power ion or electron beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits, one slit being about twice the width of the other slits, is placed above a Faraday cup. The electron or ion beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. The enlarged slit enables orientation of the beam profile with respect to the coordinates of the welding chamber. A second disk having slits therein is positioned below the first slit disk and inside of the Faraday cup and provides a shield to eliminate the majority of secondary electrons and ions from leaving the Faraday cup. Also, a ring is located below the second slit disk to help minimize the amount of secondary electrons and ions from being produced. In addition, a beam trap is located in the Faraday cup to provide even more containment of the electron or ion beam when full beam current is being examined through the center hole of the modified Faraday cup.

  7. Monoenergetic collimated nano-Coulomb electron beams driven by crossed laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jingwei; Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M.; Ruhl, H.; Luan Shixia; Yu Wei

    2013-07-08

    Monoenergetic collimated electron acceleration by two crossed laser beams is investigated through an analytical model and particle-in-cell simulations. Electron bunches with a total charge of order nano-Coulombs are accelerated by the axial electric field formed by the crossed laser beams to nearly 760 MeV with an energy spread of 2.7%. The transverse components of both electric and magnetic fields vanish along the axis, making the electron beam highly collimated. This acceleration scheme appears promising in producing high quality electron beams.

  8. Nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Hoff, Brad W.; Tang Wilkin; Heidger, Susan; Shiffler, Don; Allen-Flowers, Jordan

    2012-12-15

    Gated field emission cathodes can provide short electron pulses without the requirement of laser systems or cathode heating required by photoemission or thermionic cathodes. The large electric field requirement for field emission to take place can be achieved by using a high aspect ratio cathode with a large field enhancement factor which reduces the voltage requirement for emission. In this paper, a cathode gate driver based on the output pulse train from a nonlinear transmission line is experimentally demonstrated. The application of the pulse train to a tufted carbon fiber field emission cathode generates short electron pulses. The pulses are approximately 2 ns in duration with emission currents of several mA, and the train contains up to 6 pulses at a frequency of 100 MHz. Particle-in-cell simulation is used to predict the characteristic of the current pulse train generated from a single carbon fiber field emission cathode using the same technique.

  9. Automation of neutral beam source conditioning with artificial intelligence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.R.; Canales, T.W.; Lager, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a system that automates neutral beam source conditioning. The system achieves this with artificial intelligence techniques. The architecture of the system is presented followed by a description of its performance.

  10. Annular-beam, 17 GHz free-electron maser experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.

    1997-06-01

    Experiments have been conducted on a 15-17 GHz free electron maser (FEM) for producing a 500 MW output pulse with a phase stability appropriate for linear collider applications. The electron beam source was a 1 {mu}s, 800 kV, 5 kA, 6-cm-dia annular electron beam machine called BANSHEE. The beam interacted with the TM{sub 02} and TM{sub 03} mode Raman FEM amplifier in a corrugated cylindrical waveguide where the beam runs close to the interaction device walls to reduce the power density in the fields. This greatly reduced the kinetic energy loss caused by the beam potential depression associated with the space charge which was a significant advantage in comparison with conventional solid beam microwave tubes at the same beam current. The experiment was operated in a single shot mode with a large number of diagnostics to measure power, frequency and energy.

  11. Electron beam welding produces improved duplex crack arrest specimens

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.; Hudson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The crack arrest toughness, K/sub Ia/, is generally determined using a monolithic compact type specimen which contains a brittle weld bead to act as a crack initiation site. To test at higher temperatures and toughnesses, electron beam (EB) welded duplex specimens were fabricated. These specimens required the joining of hardened 4340 steel, which acts as the crack initiator, to A533 grade B class 1 steel base material and submerged arc welds in this base metal. The successful fabrication of these specimens required the development of an EB welding procedure with a very narrow heat-affected zone (HAZ). A technique was also developed to eliminate the porosity which was always present in the EB welds through the submerged arc weld deposit region of the joint. The technique involved remelting the joint surface of the A533 steel containing the submerged arc weld to a controlled depth using an oscillated electron beam. This remelt in vacuum reduced the gaseous constituents to low levels and prevented porosity from forming in the deep penetration EB welds between this surface and the 4340 steel.

  12. Intense electron beam propagation across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Striffler, C.D.; Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Reiser, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we consider the propagation of an intense electron-ion beam across an applied magnetic field. In the absence of the applied field, the beam system is in a Bennett equilibrium state that involves electrons with both large axial and thermal velocities and a cold stationary space-charge neutralizing ion species. Typical parameters under consideration are V{sub o} {approximately} 1 MV, I {approximately} 5 kA, T{sub e} {approximately} 100 keV, and beam radii {approximately} 1 cm. We find that in the intense beam regime, the propagation is limited due to space-charge depression caused by the deflection of the electron beam by the transverse field. This critical field is of the order of the peak self-magnetic field of the electron beam which is substantially higher than the single particle cut-off field. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. FEL gain calculation for imperfectly matched electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swent, R. L.; Berryman, K. W.

    1995-04-01

    We present here the details of an analytical small-signal gain calculation. The analysis builds on the basic one-dimensional analytical calculation by modeling the effects of finite electron beam size and imperfect matching of the electron beam to the wiggler. The calculation uses TRANSPORT [SLAC-91, Rev. 2 (1977)] parameters to describe the electron beam in order to easily take the output of beam transport calculations and use them as the input for FEL gain calculations. The model accepts an arbitrary TRANSPORT beam and includes the effects of energy spread, beam size, betatron oscillations, and focussing in the wiggle plane. The model has allowed us to calculate the range over which our FEL can be tuned by changing the electron energy alone (i.e., without changing any magnets).

  14. Electron-beam activated GaAs-switches

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkman, G.; Hur, J.; Jiang, B.; Reinhardt, N.; Allen, R.J.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1994-12-31

    Electron-beam excitation allows the authors to modulate the conductance of wide-gap semi-insulating semiconductors over a wide range and to use them as variable resistors and as high power switches. The penetration depth of electrons, the electron range, was computed by means of a Monte-Carlo code. For electron energies of 30 keV, it is approximately 2 micrometers. In order to activate the switch material over a larger depth, the switch material, semi-insulating GaAs, was doped over a thickness corresponding to the electron range with zinc, which form shallow acceptors in GaAs. The Zn layers serves as an efficient source of cathodoluminescence, transforming the electron energy into photon energy and therefore converting the electron-beam activated switch into a photoconductive one. Experiments with 2 mm semi-insulating GaAs-switches with p-doped cathode layer have been performed where the electron beam was injected through one of the metal contacts which were placed on either face of the GaAs wafer. The 500 ns electron beam has electron energies of up to 30 keV and current densities of several A/cm{sup 2}. The results show that electron-beam controlled GaAs switches can be safely operated at switch voltages of several kV`s and current densities of 50 A/cm{sup 2} with low energy electron-beams as control elements.

  15. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2002-01-01

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  16. Electron Beam-Cure Polymer Matrix Composites: Processing and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, G.; Frame, B.; Jensen, B.; Nettles, A.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from NASA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are evaluating a series of electron beam curable composites for application in reusable launch vehicle airframe and propulsion systems. Objectives are to develop electron beam curable composites that are useful at cryogenic to elevated temperatures (-217 C to 200 C), validate key mechanical properties of these composites, and demonstrate cost-saving fabrication methods at the subcomponent level. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites is an enabling capability for production of aerospace structures in a non-autoclave process. Payoffs of this technology will be fabrication of composite structures at room temperature, reduced tooling cost and cure time, and improvements in component durability. This presentation covers the results of material property evaluations for electron beam-cured composites made with either unidirectional tape or woven fabric architectures. Resin systems have been evaluated for performance in ambient, cryogenic, and elevated temperature conditions. Results for electron beam composites and similar composites cured in conventional processes are reviewed for comparison. Fabrication demonstrations were also performed for electron beam-cured composite airframe and propulsion piping subcomponents. These parts have been built to validate manufacturing methods with electron beam composite materials, to evaluate electron beam curing processing parameters, and to demonstrate lightweight, low-cost tooling options.

  17. T-3 electron-beam-excited laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R A

    1981-02-01

    A laser system specifically designed to study the kinetics of electron-beam driven systems is described. Details of the system are given along with measurements of the electron-beam uniformity and deposition in the laser medium. Some HF laser results obtained with this system are also given.

  18. Metastable atom probe for measuring electron beam density profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, J. M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metastable atom probe was developed for measuring current density in electron beam as function of two arbitrary coordinates, with spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm. Probe shows effects of space charge, magnetic fields, and other factors which influence electron current density, but operates with such low beam densities that introduced perturbation is very small.

  19. Solar cell evaluation using electron beam induced current with the large chamber scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Tara; Kintzel, Edward; Marienhoff, Peter; Klein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    An initial study using electron beam induced current (EBIC) to evaluate solar cells has been carried out with the large chamber scanning electron microscope (LC-SEM) at the Western Kentucky University Nondestructive Analysis Center. EBIC is a scanning electron microscope technique used for the characterization of semiconductors. To facilitate our studies, we developed a Solar Amplification System (SASY) for analyzing current distribution and defects within a solar cell module. Preliminary qualitative results will be shown for a solar cell module that demonstrates the viability of the technique using the LC-SEM. Quantitative EBIC experiments will be carried out to analyze defects and minority carrier properties. Additionally, a well-focused spot of light from an LED mounted at the side of the SEM column will scan the same area of the solar cell using the LC-SEM positioning system. SASY will then output the solar efficiency to be compared with the minority carrier properties found using EBIC.

  20. Asymmetric Hopf bifurcation for proton beams with electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, X.; Ball, M.; Brabson, B.; Budnick, J.; East, G.; Ellison, M.; Hamilton, B.; Lee, S.Y.; Li, D.; Liu, J.Y.; Pei, A.; Riabko, A.; Wang, L.; Wang, Y.; Caussyn, D.D.; Colestock, P.; Ng, K.Y.; Hedblom, K.; Syphers, M.

    1995-12-31

    We observed maintained longitudinal limiting cycle oscillations, which grew rapidly once a critical threshold in the relative velocity between the proton beam and the cooling electrons was exceeded. The threshold for the bifurcation of a fixed point into a limit cycle, also known as a Hopf bifurcation, was found to be asymmetric with respect to the relative velocity. This asymmetry of Hopf bifurcation was found to be related to the electron beam alignment with respect to the stored proton beam.

  1. Electron Gun For Multiple Beam Klystron Using Magnetic Focusing

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Miram, George; Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2004-07-27

    An RF device comprising a plurality of drift tubes, each drift tube having a plurality of gaps defining resonant cavities, is immersed in an axial magnetic field. RF energy is introduced at an input RF port at one of these resonant cavities and collected at an output RF port at a different RF cavity. A plurality of electron beams passes through these drift tubes, and each electron beam has an individual magnetic shaping applied which enables confined beam transport through the drift tubes.

  2. Electron-muon ranger: performance in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bene, P.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Cadoux, F.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Debieux, S.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Greis, J.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Husi, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Masciocchi, F.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nicola, L.; Noah Messomo, E.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rothenfusser, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Sandström, R.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/c.

  3. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta inmore » the range 100–280 MeV/c.« less

  4. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100–280 MeV/c.

  5. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Ban, G.; Celona, L.; Lunney, D.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O.; Kalvas, T.; and others

    2012-02-15

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  6. Flow velocity measurement of zirconium and copper atomic beams generated using a strip electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, S.; Sahu, G. K.; Patankar, R. A.; Thakur, K. B.

    2012-06-01

    Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) is an established method of isotope separation for various elements used in the nuclear industry. Real-time knowledge of vapor flux, density and flow velocity of the atomic beam is essential in the AVLIS process to estimate the throughput, ionization yield and laser repetition rate, respectively. Conventional techniques used in EB-PVD and thin film coating do not provide these parameters independently. The microbalance technique, on the contrary, provides atomic flux, flow velocity and atom density simultaneously. In the present work, flux and flow velocity of copper and zirconium atomic beams are measured using the microbalance technique. The atomic beams are generated by electron beam heating using a strip-type electron gun with the electron beam power ranging from 36 kW up to 100 kW corresponding to the temperature ranges of 1740 to 1950 K (Kn=0.73 to 0.08) for copper and 2606 to 3269 K (Kn=20.95 to 0.12) for zirconium. The measurement on copper was carried out as a benchmark as the copper atomic beam has been reported to behave as an ideal monatomic gas due to the absence of any low-lying metastable states of copper. However, the velocity of the copper atomic beam was found to be much higher than that reported earlier. This is explained on the basis of electron impact excitation. For the atomic beam of zirconium, which has two low-lying metastable states, it was observed that the measured velocities approached the maximum velocity due to adiabatic free expansion, but could not attain it. This implicates only partial contributions to the atomic beam velocity from both thermal as well as electron impact excitation as the atom density of zirconium was not high enough even at the highest applied electron beam power.

  7. Conceptual Design of Electron-Beam Generated Plasma Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Rauf, Shahid; Dorf, Leonid; Collins, Ken; Boris, David; Walton, Scott

    2015-09-01

    Realization of the next generation of high-density nanostructured devices is predicated on etching features with atomic layer resolution, no damage and high selectivity. High energy electron beams generate plasmas with unique features that make them attractive for applications requiring monolayer precision. In these plasmas, high energy beam electrons ionize the background gas and the resultant daughter electrons cool to low temperatures via collisions with gas molecules and lack of any accelerating fields. For example, an electron temperature of <0.6 eV with densities comparable to conventional plasma sources can be obtained in molecular gases. The chemistry in such plasmas can significantly differ from RF plasmas as the ions/radicals are produced primarily by beam electrons rather than those in the tail of a low energy distribution. In this work, we will discuss the conceptual design of an electron beam based plasma processing system. Plasma properties will be discussed for Ar, Ar/N2, and O2 plasmas using a computational plasma model, and comparisons made to experiments. The fluid plasma model is coupled to a Monte Carlo kinetic model for beam electrons which considers gas phase collisions and the effect of electric and magnetic fields on electron motion. The impact of critical operating parameters such as magnetic field, beam energy, and gas pressure on plasma characteristics in electron-beam plasma processing systems will be discussed. Partially supported by the NRL base program.

  8. Electron lenses for compensation of beam-beam effects: Tevatron, RHIC, LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Since previous BEAM'06 workshop a year ago, significant progress has been made in the field of beam-beam compensation (BBC)--it has been experimentally demonstrated that both Tevatron Electron Lenses (TEL) significantly improve proton and luminosity lifetimes in high-luminosity stores. This article summarizes these results and discusses prospects of the BBC in Tevatron, RHIC and LHC.

  9. Transverse and longitudinal characterization of electron beams using interaction with optical near-fields.

    PubMed

    Kozák, Martin; McNeur, Joshua; Leedle, Kenneth J; Deng, Huiyang; Schönenberger, Norbert; Ruehl, Axel; Hartl, Ingmar; Hoogland, Heinar; Holzwarth, Ronald; Harris, James S; Byer, Robert L; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate an experimental technique for both transverse and longitudinal characterization of bunched femtosecond free electron beams. The operation principle is based on monitoring of the current of electrons that obtained an energy gain during the interaction with the synchronized optical near-field wave excited by femtosecond laser pulses. The synchronous accelerating/decelerating fields confined to the surface of a silicon nanostructure are characterized using a highly focused sub-relativistic electron beam. Here the transverse spatial resolution of 450 nm and femtosecond temporal resolution of 480 fs (sub-optical-cycle temporal regime is briefly discussed) achievable by this technique are demonstrated. PMID:27472587

  10. Etching with electron beam generated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, D.; Walton, S.G.; Muratore, C.; Fernsler, R.F.; Meger, R.A.

    2004-11-01

    A modulated electron beam generated plasma has been used to dry etch standard photoresist materials and silicon. Oxygen-argon mixtures were used to etch organic resist material and sulfur hexafluoride mixed with argon or oxygen was used for the silicon etching. Etch rates and anisotropy were determined with respect to gas compositions, incident ion energy (from an applied rf bias) and plasma duty factor. For 1818 negative resist and i-line resists the removal rate increased nearly linearly with ion energy (up to 220 nm/min at 100 eV), with reasonable anisotropic pattern transfer above 50 eV. Little change in etch rate was seen as gas composition went from pure oxygen to 70% argon, implying the resist removal mechanism in this system required the additional energy supplied by the ions. With silicon substrates at room temperature, mixtures of argon and sulfur hexafluoride etched approximately seven times faster (1375 nm/min) than mixtures of oxygen and sulfur hexafluoride ({approx}200 nm/min) with 200 eV ions, the difference is attributed to the passivation of the silicon by involatile silicon oxyfluoride (SiO{sub x}F{sub y}) compounds. At low incident ion energies, the Ar-SF{sub 6} mixtures showed a strong chemical (lateral) etch component before an ion-assisted regime, which started at {approx}75 eV. Etch rates were independent of the 0.5%-50% duty factors studied in this work.

  11. Onorbit electron beam welding experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The proposed experiment design calls for six panels to be welded, each having unique characteristics selected to yield specific results and information. The experiment is completely automated and the concept necessitated the design of a new, miniaturized, self-contained electron beam (EB) welding system, for which purpose a separate IR and D was funded by the contractor, Martin Marietta Corporation. Since future tasks beyond the proposed experiment might call for astronauts to perform hand-held EB gun repairs or for the gun to be interfaced with a dexterous robot such as the planned flight telerobotic servicer (FTS), the EB gun is designed to be dismountable from the automated system. In the experiment design, two separate, identical sets of weld panels will be welded, one on earth in a vacuum chamber and the other onorbit in the aft cargo bay of an orbiter. Since the main objective of the experiment is to demonstrate that high quality welds can be achieved under onorbit conditions, the welds produced will be subjected to a wide range of discriminating non-destructive Q.C. procedures and destructive physical tests. However, advantage will be taken of the availability of a fairly large quantity of welded material in the two series of welded specimens to widen the circle of investigative talent by providing material to academic and scientific institutions for examination.

  12. Electron beam cold hearth refining in Vallejo

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, J.H.C.

    1994-12-31

    Electron Beam Cold Hearth Refining Furnace (EBCHR) in Vallejo, California is alive, well, and girding itself for developing new markets. A brief review of the twelve years experience with EBCHR in Vallejo. Acquisition of the Vallejo facility by Axel Johnson Metals, Inc. paves the way for the development of new products and markets. A discussion of some of the new opportunities for the advancement of EBCHR technology. Discussed are advantages to the EBCHR process which include: extended surface area of molten metal exposed to higher vacuum; liberation of insoluble oxide particles to the surface of the melt; higher temperatures that allowed coarse solid particles like carbides and carbonitrides to be suspended in the fluid metal as fine micro-segregates, and enhanced removal of volatile trace impurities like lead, bismuth and cadmium. Future work for the company includes the continued recycling of alloys and also fabricating stainless steel for the piping of chip assembly plants. This is to prevent `killer defects` that ruin a memory chip.

  13. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Sujit K.; Chaki, T. K.; Tikku, V. K.; Pradhan, N. K.; Bhowmick, A. K.

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%.

  14. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Methods: Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Results: Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the

  15. Electron Cyclotron Maser Emissions from Evolving Fast Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, G. Q.; Tan, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    Fast electron beams (FEBs) are common products of solar active phenomena. Solar radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool for understanding FEBs and the solar plasma environment in which they propagate along solar magnetic fields. In particular, the evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to the interaction with the ambient plasma and field during propagation can significantly influence the efficiency and properties of their emissions. In this paper, we discuss the possible evolution of the energy spectrum and velocity distribution of FEBs due to energy loss processes and the pitch-angle effect caused by magnetic field inhomogeneity, and we analyze the effects of the evolution on electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) emission, which is one of the most important mechanisms for producing solar radio bursts by FEBs. Our results show that the growth rates all decrease with the energy loss factor Q, but increase with the magnetic mirror ratio σ as well as with the steepness index δ. Moreover, the evolution of FEBs can also significantly influence the fastest growing mode and the fastest growing phase angle. This leads to the change of the polarization sense of the ECM emission. In particular, our results also reveal that an FEB that undergoes different evolution processes will generate different types of ECM emission. We believe the present results to be very helpful for a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamic spectra of solar radio bursts.

  16. Total skin electron beam therapy using an inclinable couch on motorized table and a compensating filter

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, H.; Suzuki, K.; Shida, K.; Takahashi, H.; Kobayashi, D.; Seki, M.; Mori, Y.; Sakae, T.; Isobe, T.; Okumura, T.; Sakurai, H.

    2014-06-15

    Total skin electron beam is a specialized technique that involves irradiating the entire skin from the skin surface to only a few millimetres in depth. In the Stanford technique, the patient is in a standing position and six different directional positions are used during treatment. Our technique uses large electron beams in six directions with an inclinable couch on motorized table and a compensating filter was also used to spread the electron beam and move its intensity peak. Dose uniformity measurements were performed using Gafchromic films which indicated that the surface dose was 2.04 ± 0.05 Gy. This technique can ensure the dose reproducibility because the patient is fixed in place using an inclinable couch on a motorized table.

  17. Total skin electron beam therapy using an inclinable couch on motorized table and a compensating filter.

    PubMed

    Fuse, H; Suzuki, K; Shida, K; Mori, Y; Takahashi, H; Kobayashi, D; Seki, M; Isobe, T; Okumura, T; Sakae, T; Sakurai, H

    2014-06-01

    Total skin electron beam is a specialized technique that involves irradiating the entire skin from the skin surface to only a few millimetres in depth. In the Stanford technique, the patient is in a standing position and six different directional positions are used during treatment. Our technique uses large electron beams in six directions with an inclinable couch on motorized table and a compensating filter was also used to spread the electron beam and move its intensity peak. Dose uniformity measurements were performed using Gafchromic films which indicated that the surface dose was 2.04 ± 0.05 Gy. This technique can ensure the dose reproducibility because the patient is fixed in place using an inclinable couch on a motorized table. PMID:24985829

  18. Beam size measurement of the stored electron beam at the APS storage ring using zone plate optics and undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Yun, W.

    1997-10-01

    Beam sizes of the stored electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source storage ring were measured using zone-plate optics and undulator radiation. A gold Fresnel zone plate (3.5 {micro}m thick) located 33.9 meters from the x-ray source focused radiation of 18 keV, selected by a cryogenically cooled Si(111) crystal in horizontal deflection, and formed a source image in a transverse plane 2.41 m downstream. The sizes of the source image were determined from measured intensity profiles of x-ray fluorescence from a smooth nickel edge (1.5 {micro}m thick), fabricated using a lithographic technique, while the nickel edge was scanned across over the beam in the transverse plane. The measured vertical and horizontal sizes of the electron beam were 60 {+-} 4.3 {micro}m and 300 {+-} 13 {micro}m, respectively, in reasonable agreement with the expected values.

  19. Impact on electron velocity of hollow electron beam in HIRFL-CSR e-cooler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G. X.; Xia, J. W.; Yang, J. C.; Liu, W.; Wu, J. X.; Yin, X. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Wei, B. W.

    2003-08-01

    Cooling efficiency in electron cooling systems is closely related to the velocity of electron. The velocity of electron has offset due to the space charge of the intense electron beam in the drift tube of the cooling section and thus increases the temperature of electrons. In order to minimize this effect, a new type of electron gun is adopted to produce a hollow electron beam in HIRFL-CSR e-cooler project. The hot ion beam is cooled by Coulomb interaction with intense and cold hollow electron beams. Using typical parameters of the CSRm e-cooler, theoretical calculations comparing the impact of the space charge field on electron velocity for solid and hollow electron beam are carried out.

  20. Experimental observation of helical microbunching of a relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hemsing, E.; Knyazik, A.; O'Shea, F.; Marinelli, A.; Musumeci, P.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Tochitsky, S.

    2012-02-27

    Experimental observation of the microbunching of a relativistic electron beam at the second harmonic interaction frequency of a helical undulator is presented. The microbunching signal is observed from the coherent transition radiation of the electron beam and indicates experimental evidence of a dominantly helical electron beam density distribution. This result is in agreement with theoretical and numerical predictions and provides a proof-of-principle demonstration of proposed schemes designed to generate light with orbital angular momentum in high-gain free-electron lasers.

  1. A simple model of electron beam initiated dielectric breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, B. L.; Daniell, R. E.; Delmer, T. N.

    1985-01-01

    A steady state model that describes the internal charge distribution of a planar dielectric sample exposed to a uniform electron beam was developed. The model includes the effects of charge deposition and ionization of the beam, separate trap-modulated mobilities for electrons and holes, electron-hole recombination, and pair production by drifting thermal electrons. If the incident beam current is greater than a certain critical value (which depends on sample thickness as well as other sample properties), the steady state solution is non-physical.

  2. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N2). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  3. Diffractive optical elements on non-flat substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a technique for creating diffraction gratings on curved surfaces with electron beam lithography. The curved surface can act as an optical element to produce flat and aberration-free images in imaging spectrometers. In addition, the fabrication technique can modify the power structure of the grating orders so that there is more energy in the first order than for a typical grating. The inventors noticed that by using electron-beam lithography techniques, a variety of convex gratings that are well-suited to the requirements of imaging spectrometers can be manufactured.

  4. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O'Brien, D.W.

    1995-01-17

    A tomographic technique is disclosed for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0[degree] to 360[degree] and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figures.

  5. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; Teruya, A.T.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1995-11-21

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0{degree} to 360{degree} and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment. 12 figs.

  6. System for tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1995-01-01

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  7. Aperture Effects and Mismatch Oscillations in an Intense Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; O'Shea, P G

    2008-05-12

    When an electron beam is apertured, the transmitted beam current is the product of the incident beam current density and the aperture area. Space charge forces generally cause an increase in incident beam current to result in an increase in incident beam spot size. Under certain circumstances, the spot size will increase faster than the current, resulting in a decrease in current extracted from the aperture. When using a gridded electron gun, this can give rise to negative transconductance. In this paper, we explore this effect in the case of an intense beam propagating in a uniform focusing channel. We show that proper placement of the aperture can decouple the current extracted from the aperture from fluctuations in the source current, and that apertures can serve to alter longitudinal space charge wave propagation by changing the relative contribution of velocity and current modulation present in the beam.

  8. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, L.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Voelkl, E.; Moore, J.A.; Simpson, M.L.; Paulus, M.J.

    1999-04-06

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made. 5 figs.

  9. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, Larry R.; Thomas, Clarence E.; Voelkl, Edgar; Moore, James A.; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made.

  10. Electrical properties of irradiated PVA film by using ion/electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, M. M.; Osman, M.; Hashhash, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ion/electron beam bombardment has shown great potential for improving the surface properties of polymers. Low-energy charged (ion/electron) beam irradiation of polymers is a good technique to modify properties such as electrical conductivity, structural behavior, and their mechanical properties. This paper reports on the effect of nitrogen and electron beam irradiation on the electrical properties of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films. PVA films of 4 mm were exposed to a charged (ion/electron) beam for different treatment times (15, 30, and 60 minutes); the beam was produced from a dual beam source using nitrogen gas with the other ion/electron source parameters optimized. The dielectric loss tangent tan δ , electrical conductivity σ , and dielectric constant ɛ ^' } in the frequency range 100 Hz-100 kHz were measured at room temperature. The variation of dielectric constant and loss tangent as a function of frequency was also studied at room temperature. The dielectric constant was found to be strongly dependent on frequency for both ion and electron beam irradiation doses. The real (ɛ ^' }) and imaginary (ɛ ^' ' }) parts of the dielectric constant decreased with frequency for all irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The AC conductivity showed an increase with frequency for all samples under the influence of both ion and electron irradiation for different times. Photoluminescence (PL) spectral changes were also studied. The formation of clusters and defects (which serve as non-radiative centers on the polymer surface) is confirmed by the decrease in the PL intensity.

  11. Plasma Charge Current for Controlling and Monitoring Electron Beam Welding with Beam Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  12. Plasma charge current for controlling and monitoring electron beam welding with beam oscillation.

    PubMed

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-12-14

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process.

  13. Electron beam energy QA - a note on measurement tolerances.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Juergen; Nyflot, Matthew J; Smith, Wade P; Wottoon, Landon S; Young, Lori; Yang, Fei; Kim, Minsun; Hendrickson, Kristi R G; Ford, Eric; Kalet, Alan M; Cao, Ning; Dempsey, Claire; Sandison, George A

    2016-01-01

    Monthly QA is recommended to verify the constancy of high-energy electron beams generated for clinical use by linear accelerators. The tolerances are defined as 2%/2 mm in beam penetration according to AAPM task group report 142. The practical implementation is typically achieved by measuring the ratio of readings at two different depths, preferably near the depth of maximum dose and at the depth corresponding to half the dose maximum. Based on beam commissioning data, we show that the relationship between the ranges of energy ratios for different electron energies is highly nonlinear. We provide a formalism that translates measurement deviations in the reference ratios into change in beam penetration for electron energies for six Elekta (6-18 MeV) and eight Varian (6-22 MeV) electron beams. Experimental checks were conducted for each Elekta energy to compare calculated values with measurements, and it was shown that they are in agreement. For example, for a 6 MeV beam a deviation in the measured ionization ratio of ± 15% might still be acceptable (i.e., be within ± 2 mm), whereas for an 18 MeV beam the corresponding tolerance might be ± 6%. These values strongly depend on the initial ratio chosen. In summary, the relationship between differences of the ionization ratio and the corresponding beam energy are derived. The findings can be translated into acceptable tolerance values for monthly QA of electron beam energies. PMID:27074488

  14. Progress report on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Shiltsev et al.

    2003-07-09

    We discuss the original idea of beam-beam compensation (BBC) in Section I, sequence of events in 2001-2002 and use of the Tevatron Electron Beam (TEL) for DC beam removal in Section II, (anti)proton lifetime improvement in Section III, experimental data on the BBC attempts in Section IV and, conclusively, Section V is devoted to discussion on important phenomena, needed improvements and future plans.

  15. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  16. Limiting current of intense electron beams in a decelerating gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Beaudoin, B. L.; Thompson, C.; Karakkad, J. A.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    For numerous applications, it is desirable to develop electron beam driven efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation that are capable of producing the required power at beam voltages as low as possible. This trend is limited by space charge effects that cause the reduction of electron kinetic energy and can lead to electron reflection. So far, this effect was analyzed for intense beams propagating in uniform metallic pipes. In the present study, the limiting currents of intense electron beams are analyzed for the case of beam propagation in the tubes with gaps. A general treatment is illustrated by an example evaluating the limiting current in a high-power, tunable 1-10 MHz inductive output tube (IOT), which is currently under development for ionospheric modification. Results of the analytical theory are compared to results of numerical simulations. The results obtained allow one to estimate the interaction efficiency of IOTs.

  17. Laser cooling of electron beams for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Telnov, V.

    1996-10-01

    A novel method of electron beam cooling is considered which can be used for linear colliders. The electron beam is cooled during collision with focused powerful laser pulse. With reasonable laser parameters (laser flash energy about 10 J) one can decrease transverse beam emittances by a factor about 10 per one stage. The ultimate transverse emittances are much below that given by other methods. Depolarization of a beam during the cooling is about 5--15% for one stage. This method is especially useful for photon colliders and open new possibilities for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders and x-ray FEL based on high energy linacs.

  18. Free Electron Lasers with Slowly Varying Beam and Undulator Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2005-05-25

    The performance of a free electron lasers (FEL) is affected when the electron beam energy varies alone the undulator as would be caused by vacuum pipe wakefields and/or when the undulator strength parameter is tapered in the small signal regime until FEL saturation. In this paper, we present a self-consistent theory of FELs with slowly-varying beam and undulator parameters. A general method is developed to apply the WKB approximation to the beam-radiation system by employing the adjoint eigenvector that is orthogonal to the eigenfunctions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations. This method may be useful for other slowly varying processes in beam dynamics.

  19. Study of a high power hydrogen beam diagnostic based on secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Panasenkov, A.; Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2016-11-01

    In high power neutral beams for fusion, beam uniformity is an important figure of merit. Knowing the transverse power profile is essential during the initial phases of beam source operation, such as those expected for the ITER heating neutral beam (HNB) test facility. To measure it a diagnostic technique is proposed, based on the collection of secondary electrons generated by beam-surface and beam-gas interactions, by an array of positively biased collectors placed behind the calorimeter tubes. This measurement showed in the IREK test stand good proportionality to the primary beam current. To investigate the diagnostic performances in different conditions, we developed a numerical model of secondary electron emission, induced by beam particle impact on the copper tubes, and reproducing the cascade of secondary emission caused by successive electron impacts. The model is first validated against IREK measurements. It is then applied to the HNB case, to assess the locality of the measurement, the proportionality to the beam current density, and the influence of beam plasma.

  20. Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, A; Kholodnaya, G; Sazonov, R; Ponomarev, D

    2012-10-01

    The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm(2), the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm(2) (or with current density over 10 A/cm(2), pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time. PMID:23126757

  1. Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, A.; Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.

    2012-10-15

    The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm{sup 2}, the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} (or with current density over 10 A/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

  2. Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams.

    PubMed

    Pushkarev, A; Kholodnaya, G; Sazonov, R; Ponomarev, D

    2012-10-01

    The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm(2), the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm(2) (or with current density over 10 A/cm(2), pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

  3. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  4. Beam-induced electron modulations observed during TSS 1R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. G.; Burke, W. J.; Gough, M. P.; Machuzak, J. S.; Gentile, L. C.; Huang, C. Y.; Hardy, D. A.; Thompson, D. C.; Raitt, W. J.

    1999-08-01

    We report on modulations of electron fluxes at megahertz frequencies measured by the Shuttle Potential and Return Electron Experiment (SPREE) during fast pulsed electron gun (FPEG) beam experiments conducted after the tether break event of the Tethered Satellite System Reflight. Six intervals of sustained modulations were identified while FPEG emitted a 100 mA beam of 1 kev electrons. During five events the beam pitch angle αB was near 90° and the modulations were near even or odd half harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency fce. In the sixth event with 60°>=αB>=45°, electron modulations were near estimated values of the electron plasma frequency fpe and 2fpe. Whenever SPREE detected beam electrons modulated at a given frequency, secondary electrons were also modulated at the same frequency over a broad range of energies. Occasionally, some secondary electrons were modulated simultaneously at a second frequency. Multiple frequencies were related as ratios of low integers. In one case the beam electrons were simultaneously modulated at 0.8 MHz and 1.25 kHz. SPREE measurements suggest that the beam electrons propagate in cylindrical shells whose inner edge is marked by steep spatial gradients in fluxes at 1 keV [Hardy et al., 1995]. Inside the shell, electron distribution functions have positive slopes ∂f/∂v⊥>0 at velocities near that of the beam. Velocity space gradients act as free-energy sources to drive cavity modes that alter the instantaneous guiding centers of electrons causing SPREE to sample alternating parts of the beam cylinder's inner edge. Associated time-varying electric fields also modulated the fluxes of secondary electrons reaching SPREE. Other cavity modes may be excited through nonlinear processes [Calvert, 1982]. With αB far from 90°, electrons in the beam cylinder evolved toward bump-on-tail distributions to excite large-amplitude Langmuir modulations at fpe and its harmonics [Klimas, 1983]. Low-frequency modulations are attributed

  5. Electron beam dispersion measurements in nitrogen using two-dimensional imaging of N2(+) fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, L. H.; Twiss, R. G.; Cattolica, R. J.

    Experimental results are presented related to the radial spread of fluorescence excited by 10 and 20 KeV electron beams passing through nonflowing rarefied nitrogen at 293 K. An imaging technique for obtaining species distributions from measured beam-excited fluorescence is described, based on a signal inversion scheme mathematically equivalent to the inversion of the Abel integral equation. From fluorescence image data, measurements of beam radius, integrated signal intensity, and spatially resolved distributions of N2(+) first-negative-band fluorescence-emitting species have been made. Data are compared with earlier measurements and with an heuristic beam spread model.

  6. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-15

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU{sub m}, where U{sub m} is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  7. Parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.

    2011-05-01

    Conditions under which the number of runaway electrons in atmospheric-pressure air reaches ˜5 × 1010 are determined. Recommendations for creating runaway electron accelerators are given. Methods for measuring the parameters of a supershort avalanche electron beam and X-ray pulses from gas-filled diodes, as well as the discharge current and gap voltage, are described. A technique for determining the instant of runaway electron generation with respect to the voltage pulse is proposed. It is shown that the reduction in the gap voltage and the decrease in the beam current coincide in time. The mechanism of intense electron beam generation in gas-filled diodes is analyzed. It is confirmed experimentally that, in optimal regimes, the number of electrons generated in atmospheric-pressure air with energies T > eU m , where U m is the maximum gap voltage, is relatively small.

  8. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication: A Rapid Metal Deposition Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley REsearch Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Thus far, this technique has been demonstrated on aluminum and titanium alloys of interest for aerospace structural applications nickel and ferrous based alloys are also planned. Deposits resulting from 2219 aluminum demonstrations have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials ave exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rated in excess of 2500 cubic centimeters per hour (150 cubic inches per our) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  9. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-15

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  10. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (˜2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  11. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3. PMID:25725841

  12. Nano-electron beam induced current and hole charge dynamics through uncapped Ge nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, A.; El Hdiy, A.; Troyon, M.; Amiard, G.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I.

    2012-04-01

    Dynamics of hole storage in spherical Ge nanocrystals (NCs) formed by a two step dewetting/nucleation process on an oxide layer grown on an n-doped <001> silicon substrate is studied using a nano-electron beam induced current technique. Carrier generation is produced by an electron beam irradiation. The generated current is collected by an atomic force microscope—tip in contact mode at a fixed position away from the beam spot of about 0.5 µm. This distance represents the effective diffusion length of holes. The time constants of holes charging are determined and the effect of the NC size is underlined.

  13. Photon diagnostics for the study of electron beam properties of a VUV SASE-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerth, Ch.; Faatz, B.; Lokajczyk, T.; Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.

    2001-12-01

    A single-pass free-electron laser operating in the self-amplified spontaneous-emission (SASE) mode at around 100 nm is currently under test at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY. After first observation of SASE in February 2000, the photon beam has been characterized by different techniques. We present the methods of VUV photon diagnostics that were used to measure the spectral and angular distribution of the photon beam and how these properties are affected by the electron beam energy and orbit in the undulator.

  14. Stimulated electromagnetic interactions in spatiotemporally gyrating relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.A.; Chen, C.

    1999-07-01

    One possible method to significantly widen the band-widths of present gyroklystron amplifiers is to utilize extended interaction structures in the input sections, the buncher sections and the output sections, in conjunction with stagger tuning. Through extended interactions, however, electron beams can undergo stimulated electromagnetic interactions, causing multimode excitations. In this paper, the authors investigate stimulated electromagnetic interactions in relativistic electron beams gyrating in an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The electron gyrophases are assumed to have strong spatiotemporal correlations. By applying Vlassor-Maxwell equations together with Lorentz transformations, they obtain the general dispersion relation for electromagnetic and electrostatic wave perturbations on the electron beam for this system. The dispersion relation is used to analyze a variety of stimulated electromagnetic interactions on such electron beams. Results of these analyses are discussed.

  15. Reduction of oxide microtrenching by electron beam assisted etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, M.; Shaw, D. M.; Collins, G. J.

    2000-10-01

    High density plasma etching of submicron wide oxide trenches often results in non-ideal etched features. For example, microtrenching is the result of higher etch rate near the side wall as compared to the center of the trench. Herein, we apply a previously reported[1] high energy (100 - 900 eV) electron beam directed at the etching wafer surface to reduce microtrenching during the etching of 0.5 micron wide silicon dioxide (SiO2) trench patterns in an inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasma. The directed electron beam neutralizes the positive charge buildup at the bottom of the trench and reduces the microtrench formation. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of features etched with and without the electron beam show that the electron beam is effective in reducing microtrenching. [1] D. M. Shaw, M. Watanabe, G. J. Collins, and H. Sugai, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 38, 87 (1999).

  16. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Fawley, W.M.; Leemans, W. P.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.

    2009-05-04

    to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

  17. Separating the Spin States of a Free Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifkin, Neil

    2008-10-01

    In 1922 Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach set out to test the spacial quantization of the electron by passing a beam of neutral silver atoms through a transverse magnetic field. The interaction of the two projections of the electron's magnetic moment with the magnetic field resulted in a splitting of the beam. However, for some sixty years it was generally accepted that the spin of free electrons, and thus their magnetic moment, could not be measured with an experiment similar to that of Stern and Gerlach. The reason being that the lorentz force on charged particles is far greater than the force due to the magnetic moment of the electron, thus blurring any desired results. To reduce the lorentz force, the electrons could be passed through a magnetic field whose gradient is in the direction of the electrons' momentum. This longitudinal Stern-Gerlach device, with a superconducting magnet, could polarize the tails of a low energy electron beam.

  18. Controlled Electron Acceleration in a Plane Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataronis, J. A.; Petržílka, V.; Krlín, L.

    2002-11-01

    Through numerical modeling of the relativistic test particle motion of an ensemble of electrons in a plane laser beam, we show in the present contribution that a significant electron acceleration arises if an additional perpendicularly propagagating transverse laser beam with a randomized phase is present. We also demonstrate that the acceleration rate can be controlled by the power flux intensity of the additional laser beam. The power flux intensity of the additional beam can be typically much lower than the power flux intensity of the main laser beam. In the main laser beam, the electrons perform also a forward oscillating motion because of the effects of the magnetic field intensity of the beam. The acceleration results from the accumulation of the forward electron motion due to phase changes provided by the additional laser beam. For parameters of the PALS^1 device (Prague Asterix Laser System), the attainable electron energy is about 40 MeV in 10^4 wave periods. [2pt] Acknowledgments: This work has been supported by Czech grant GACR 202/00/1217 and USDOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER54398. [2pt] ^1K.Jungwirth et al., Phys. Plasmas 8 (2001) 2495.

  19. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Taminger, Karen M. B.; Bird, R. Keith

    2007-01-01

    The influence of reduced gravitational forces (in space and on the lunar or Martian surfaces) on manufacturing processes must be understood for effective fabrication and repair of structures and replacement parts during long duration space missions. The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process uses an electron beam and wire to fabricate metallic structures. The process efficiencies of the electron beam and the solid wire feedstock make the EBF3 process attractive for use in-space. This paper will describe the suitability of the EBF3 process in the space environment and will highlight preliminary testing of the EBF3 process in a zero-gravity environment.

  20. Faraday cup characterization of electron beam welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Burgardt, P.; Knaus, S.E.; Kautz, D.D.

    1987-10-12

    The use of the electron beam welding process to produce precision welds on many materials has been well documented in the literature. Some joint configurations may need more parameter control than is typically afforded by the standard electron beam welding machine. The repeatability and transferability of the electron beam welding parameters must also be regarded during weld development on many designs. Types of instrumentation which enhance the parameter control should be developed to higher levels. This instrumentation is important to the accurate transfer of technology between welding machines and production cycles. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zschornack, G.; König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A.

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  2. Stability of charged beam propagation through a relativistic hollow electron beam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.

    1981-09-01

    Stability properties of charged beam propagation through a relativistic hollow electron beam are investigated, in connection with present experimental applications in the collective particle accelerator. The stability analysis is carried out for long axial wavelength and low-frequency perturbations. A closed algebraic dispersion relation for coupled transverse oscillations is obtained for the solid and hollow beams with sharp-boundary density profiles. One of the most important features in the analysis is that the typical growth rate of the transverse oscillation is order of the hollow beam diocotron frequency, thereby severely limiting the solid beam propagation through a relativistic hollow electron beam. However, for a solid beam with a small radius, the fundamental mode perturbation (i.e., the dipole oscillation) is the most unstable mode.

  3. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  4. The use of electron beams for pasteurization of meats

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, K.R.; Kaye, R.J.; Turman, B.N.; Neau, E.L.

    1994-12-01

    Electron beam accelerators can be used for electronic pasteurization of meat products by: (1) using the electrons directly impacting the products, or (2) optimizing the conversion of electron energy to x-rays and treating the product with these x-rays. The choice of process depends on the configuration of the product when it is treated. For electron treatment, ten million electron volt (MeV) kinetic energy is the maximum allowed by international agreement. The depth of penetration of electrons with that energy into a product with density of meat is about five centimeters (cm). Two-sided treatment can be done on products up to 10 cm thick with a two-to-one ratio between minimum and maximum dose. Ground beef patties are about 1.25 cm (0.5 inch thick). Beams with 2.5 MeV electron energy could be used to treat these products. Our calculations show that maximum to minimum dose ratios less than 1.2 can be achieved with this energy if the transverse beam energy is small. If the product thickness is greater than 10 cm, x-rays can provide the needed dose uniformity. Uniform doses can be supplied for pallets with dimensions greater than 1.2 m on each side using x-rays from a 5 MeV electron beam. The efficiency of converting the electron beam to x-rays and configurations to achieve dose uniformity are discussed.

  5. Visualization of Trajectories of Electron Beams Emitted by an IonSource with Closed Electron Drift

    SciTech Connect

    Institue of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; Brown, Ian G.; Bordenjuk, Ian V.; Panchenko, Oleg A.; Sologub, Sergei V.; Brown, Ian G.

    2007-10-01

    Trajectories of electron beams emitted by an ion source with an anode layer and Hall electron closed drift orbits were visualized using light emission from a working gas excited by electrons. Gas discharge of magnetron type, arising in the beam drift region under the influence of an electric field of a target bias potential, was visualized.

  6. Electron gun for a multiple beam klystron with magnetic compression of the electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Tran, Hien T; Bui, Thuc; Attarian, Adam; Tallis, William; David, John; Forstall, Virginia; Andujar, Cynthia; Blach, Noah T; Brown, David B; Gadson, Sean E; Kiley, Erin M; Read, Michael

    2013-10-01

    A multi-beam electron gun provides a plurality N of cathode assemblies comprising a cathode, anode, and focus electrode, each cathode assembly having a local cathode axis and also a central cathode point defined by the intersection of the local cathode axis with the emitting surface of the cathode. Each cathode is arranged with its central point positioned in a plane orthogonal to a device central axis, with each cathode central point an equal distance from the device axis and with an included angle of 360/N between each cathode central point. The local axis of each cathode has a cathode divergence angle with respect to the central axis which is set such that the diverging magnetic field from a solenoidal coil is less than 5 degrees with respect to the projection of the local cathode axis onto a cathode reference plane formed by the device axis and the central cathode point, and the local axis of each cathode is also set such that the angle formed between the cathode reference plane and the local cathode axis results in minimum spiraling in the path of the electron beams in a homogenous magnetic field region of the solenoidal field generator.

  7. Development and characterization of advanced electron beam resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ankur

    Over the past twenty years, the amount of research and development work for electron beam resists has seriously lagged that performed for optical resists. This has been due mainly to the relatively low volume use of electron beam lithography for production purposes. However, as electron beam lithography is now becoming the primary solution for achieving future critical dimension requirements in mask making and appears to be a promising NGL technology, interest in electron beam resist development has increased in recent years. The primary issue in electron beam resist design centers around finding a single resist system that combines the required sensitivity and etch resistance that is needed to enable high volume production. In this work, the primary goal was to explore the development of a novel two-component non-chemically amplified electron beam resist material for high keV (>10 keV) patterning for mask-making with: (1) high contrast, (2) high sensitivity, (3) high resolution, and, (4) high etch resistance. Poly (2-methyl-1-pentene co 2-ethoxyethyl-methallyl ether sulfone) was used as a polymeric e-beam sensitive material conjunction with a series of commercial novolac resins to formulate electron beam resists. These two-component resists have been termed sulfone-novolac system (SNS) resists. The approach used in this project is to develop a suite of experimental tools and simulation models that can be used to aid in the rational design, formulation, and characterization of new electron beam resists. The main tasks that have been addressed are: (1) development of the electron beam resist characterization tool set, (2) understanding the fundamental material behavior of a non-chemically amplified polysulfone-novolac (SNS) e-beam resist for next generation mask making, (3) lithographic process development and optimization for the SNS resists, (4) evaluation of the lithographic performance of the SNS resists using the optimized processing conditions, and (5) develop

  8. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.; Schechter, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A proof-of-principle (POP) electron-beam pellet accelerator has been developed and used for accelerating hydrogen and deuterium pellets. An intact hydrogen pellet was accelerated to a speed of 460 m/s by an electron beam of 13.5 keV. 0.3 A, and 2 ms. The maximum speed is limited by the acceleration path length (0.4 m) and pellet integrity. Experimental data have been collected for several hundred hydrogen pellets, which were accelerated by electron beams with parameters of voltage up to 16 kV, current up to 0.4 A, and pulse length up to 10 ms. Preliminary results reveal that the measured burn velocity increases roughly with the square of the beam voltage, as the theoretical model predicts. The final pellet velocity is proportional to the exhaust velocity, which increases with the beam power. To reach the high exhaust velocity needed for accelerating pellets to >1000 m/s, a new electron gun, with its cathode indirectly heated by a graphite heater and an electron beam, is being developed to increase beam current and power. A rocket casing or shell around the pellet has been designed and developed to increase pellet strength and improve the electron-rocket coupling efficiency. We present the characteristics of this pellet accelerator, including new improvements. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  10. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  11. Effects of electron-beam irradiation on conducting polypyrrole nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Young Ki; Park, Dong Hyuk; Park, Se Hee; Park, Soung Kyu; Joo, Jinsoo

    2009-02-02

    Conducting polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires (NWs) were irradiated by a relatively high energy (300 keV-2 MeV) electron-beam (e-beam) generated from a linear electron accelerator in an atmospheric environment. From the current-voltage characteristics of pristine and 2 MeV e-beam irradiated PPy NWs, we observed a dramatic variation in resistance from 8.0x10{sup 2} to 1.45x10{sup 8} {omega}, that is, we observed a transition from conducting states to nonconducting states through the e-beam irradiation. To discern conformational changes and the doping states of PPy NWs through the e-beam irradiation, we measured Raman and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra for the PPy NWs. As the energy of the e-beam irradiation increased, we observed that the PPy NWs were changed from doping states to dedoping states with conformational modification including the variation in {pi}-conjugation length.

  12. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  13. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  14. Characterisation of the properties of a negative hydrogen ion beam by several beam diagnostic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurizio, R.; Fantz, U.; Bonomo, F.; Serianni, G.

    2016-06-01

    The beam properties of the BATMAN negative ion source, which is the prototype of one module of the source for the ITER neutral beam injection system, are characterised by means of three diagnostic techniques: beam emission spectroscopy (BES), the experimental calorimeter mini-STRIKE and a copper calorimeter. The main beam parameters—beam divergence, homogeneity and top-bottom asymmetries—are studied in different operational scenarios: with different magnetic filter field setups, source settings and with different gases (hydrogen or deuterium). Among all dependences, the influence of the magnetic field configuration on the beam and the evolution of the beam features during some conditioning days are investigated in detail. Data show that the stronger the filter field in the beam region, the higher the beam top-bottom asymmetry—likely a v× B effect. During the conditioning of the source, such vertical beam asymmetry increases as well, suggesting an inhomogeneous H -production at the first grid of the extraction system.

  15. Electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons and an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.; Devanandhan, S.; Lakhina, G. S.; Bharuthram, R.

    2016-08-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the obliquely propagating electron acoustic solitary waves having nonthermal hot electrons, cold and beam electrons, and ions in a magnetized plasma. We have employed reductive perturbation theory to derive the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation describing the nonlinear evolution of these waves. The two-dimensional plane wave solution of KdV-ZK equation is analyzed to study the effects of nonthermal and beam electrons on the characteristics of the solitons. Theoretical results predict negative potential solitary structures. We emphasize that the inclusion of finite temperature effects reduces the soliton amplitudes and the width of the solitons increases by an increase in the obliquity of the wave propagation. The numerical analysis is presented for the parameters corresponding to the observations of "burst a" event by Viking satellite on the auroral field lines.

  16. Electron-beam lithography for micro and nano-optical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Daniel W.; Muller, Richard E.; Echternach, Pierre M.

    2005-01-01

    Direct-write electron-beam lithography has proven to be a powerful technique for fabricating a variety of micro- and nano-optical devices. Binary E-beam lithography is the workhorse technique for fabricating optical devices that require complicated precision nano-scale features. We describe a bi-layer resist system and virtual-mark height measurement for improving the reliability of fabricating binary patterns. Analog E-beam lithography is a newer technique that has found significant application in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements. We describe our techniques for fabricating analog surface-relief profiles in E-beam resist, including some discussion regarding overcoming the problems of resist heating and charging. We also describe a multiple-field-size exposure scheme for suppression of field-stitch induced ghost diffraction orders produced by blazed diffraction gratings on non-flat substrates.

  17. Rarefied flow diagnostics using pulsed high-current electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojcik, Radoslaw M.; Schilling, John H.; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high-current short-pulse electron beams in low-density gas flow diagnostics is introduced. Efficient beam propagation is demonstrated for pressure up to 300 microns. The beams, generated by low-pressure pseudospark discharges in helium, provide extremely high fluorescence levels, allowing time-resolved visualization in high-background environments. The fluorescence signal frequency is species-dependent, allowing instantaneous visualization of mixing flowfields.

  18. Electron beam inactivation of Tulane virus on fresh produce, and mechanism of inactivation of human norovirus surrogates by electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Predmore, Ashley; Sanglay, Gabriel C; DiCaprio, Erin; Li, Jianrong; Uribe, R M; Lee, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Ionizing radiation, whether by electron beams or gamma rays, is a non-thermal processing technique used to improve the microbial safety and shelf-life of many different food products. This technology is highly effective against bacterial pathogens, but data on its effect against foodborne viruses is limited. A mechanism of viral inactivation has been proposed with gamma irradiation, but no published study discloses a mechanism for electron beam (e-beam). This study had three distinct goals: 1) evaluate the sensitivity of a human norovirus surrogate, Tulane virus (TV), to e-beam irradiation in foods, 2) compare the difference in sensitivity of TV and murine norovirus (MNV-1) to e-beam irradiation, and 3) determine the mechanism of inactivation of these two viruses by e-beam irradiation. TV was reduced from 7 log10 units to undetectable levels at target doses of 16 kGy or higher in two food matrices (strawberries and lettuce). MNV-1 was more resistant to e-beam treatment than TV. At target doses of 4 kGy, e-beam provided a 1.6 and 1.2 log reduction of MNV-1 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), compared to a 1.5 and 1.8 log reduction of TV in PBS and Opti-MEM, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that increased e-beam doses negatively affected the structure of both viruses. Analysis of viral proteins by SDS-PAGE found that irradiation also degraded viral proteins. Using RT-PCR, irradiation was shown to degrade viral genomic RNA. This suggests that the mechanism of inactivation of e-beam was likely the same as gamma irradiation as the damage to viral constituents led to inactivation. PMID:25590261

  19. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  20. Beam dynamics analysis in pulse compression using electron beam compact simulator for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Toru; Harada, Nob.

    2013-11-01

    In a final stage of an accelerator system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), pulse shaping and beam current increase by bunch compression are required for effective pellet implosion. A compact simulator with an electron beam was constructed to understand the beam dynamics. In this study, we investigate theoretically and numerically the beam dynamics for the extreme bunch compression in the final stage of HIF accelerator complex. The theoretical and numerical results implied that the compact experimental device simulates the beam dynamics around the stagnation point for initial low temperature condition.

  1. Isotope separation using tuned laser and electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, Sandor (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The apparatus comprises means for producing an atomic beam containing the isotope of interest and other isotopes. Means are provided for producing a magnetic field traversing the path of the atomic beam of an intensity sufficient to broaden the energy domain of the various individual magnetic sublevels of the isotope of interest and having the atomic beam passing therethrough. A laser beam is produced of a frequency and polarization selected to maximize the activation of only individual magnetic sublevels of the isotope of interest with the portion of its broadened energy domain most removed from other isotopes with the stream. The laser beam is directed so as to strike the atomic beam within the magnetic field and traverse the path of the atomic beam whereby only the isotope of interest is activated by the laser beam. The apparatus further includes means for producing a collimated and high intensity beam of electrons of narrow energy distribution within the magnetic field which is aimed so as to strike the atomic beam while the atomic beam is simultaneously struck by the laser beam and at an energy level selected to ionize the activated isotope of interest but not ground state species included therewith. Deflection means are disposed in the usual manner to collect the ions.

  2. Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.K.

    2005-04-12

    This paper reports the first observations of an anomalous hollow electron beam in the Duke storage ring. Created by exciting the single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, the hollow beam consists of a solid core inside and a large ring outside. We report the detailed measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern, spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying the transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wake field and the lattice nonlinearity. In addition, the hollow beam can be used as a powerful tool to study the linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  3. Transport of electron beams with initial transverse-longitudinal correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Lewellen, J. W.; Poole, B. R.

    2013-08-01

    When an electron beam whose current varies in time is extracted from a DC gun, the competition between the time-dependent space charge force and the time-independent focusing force will cause a correlation between radius, divergence, current, and position along the beam. This correlation will determine the beam's configuration in trace space, and together with the design of the downstream transport system, will determine the quality of the transport solutions that can be obtained, including the amplitude of the mismatch oscillations occurring in each slice of the beam. Recent simulations of a simplified diode with Pierce-type focusing operating at nonrelativistic voltages indicated that the radius and divergence of beams extracted from such guns can be approximated to high accuracy as linear functions of current. Here, we consider the impact of this dependence on the beam configuration in trace space and investigate the implications for matching and transport of such correlated beams in uniform linear focusing channels.

  4. Recent Studies of Hypernuclei Formation with Electron Beams at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, Patrick; Ayerbe Gayoso, Carlos; Böhm, Ralph; Borodina, Olga; Bosnar, Damir; Bozkurt, Vakkas; Debenjak, Luka; Distler, Michael O.; Esser, Anselm; Friščić, Ivica; Fujii, Yuu; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Gómez Rodríguez, Mar; Hashimoto, Osamu; Hirose, Satoshi; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, Masashi; Kim, Eunhee; Kusaka, Junichiro; Margaryan, Amur; Merkel, Harald; Müller, Ulrich; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Pochodzalla, Josef; Rappold, Christophe; Reinhold, Joerg; Saito, Takehiko R.; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Sánchez Majos, Salvador; Schlimme, B. Sören; Schoth, Matthias; Schulz, Florian; Sfienti, Concettina; Širca, Simon; Tang, Liguang; Thiel, Michaela; Tsukada, Kyo

    2014-08-01

    At the Mainz Microtron MAMI exploratory experiments on the spectroscopy of mesonic weak decays (MWD) of electroproduced Λ-hypernuclei were performed. A unique setup was realized to use the broad momentum-band kaon spectrometer K aos at zero degree angle with respect to the high-intensity electron beam direction to tag strangeness producing processes. A sample of order 103 MWD from a beryllium target was collected by the coincidence technique with the high-resolution multi-spectrometer facility of the A1 Collaboration. It is conjectured that this sample contains monochromatic two-body decays from stopped hyperfragment decays as well as a wide momentum distribution of quasi-free produced Λ- and Σ-hyperon decays and three-body decays from hyperfragments. Stopped hyperfragments will be identified as monochromatic peaks in the π - momentum spectrum from which their masses can be extracted with a precision of 50 keV/ c 2.

  5. A Gridded Electron Gun for a Sheet Beam Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Read, M.E.; Miram, G.; Ives, R.L.; Ivanov, V.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-04-25

    This paper describes the development of an electron gun for a sheet beam klystron. Initially intended for accelerator applications, the gun can operate at a higher perveance than one with a cylindrically symmetric beam. Results of 2D and 3D simulations are discussed.

  6. RADLAC II high current electron beam propagation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Shope, S.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Turman, B.N.; Crist, C.E.; Welch, D.R.; Struve, K.W.

    1992-08-01

    This resistive hose instability of an electron beam was observed to be convective in recent RADLAC II experiments for higher current shots. The effects of air scattering for these shots were minimal. These experiments and theory suggest low-frequency hose motion which does not appear convective may be due to rapid expansion and subsequent drifting of the beam nose.

  7. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  8. Acceleration of electrons in strong beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1984-12-01

    The effects of strong beam-plasma interactions on the electron population of the upper atmosphere have been investigated in an electron acceleration experiment performed with a sounding rocket. The rocket carried the Several Complex Experiments (SCEX) payload which included an electron accelerator, three disposable 'throwaway' detectors (TADs), and a stepped electron energy analyzer. The payload was launched in an auroral arc over the rocket at altitudes of 157 and 178 km, respectively. The performance characteristics of the instruments are discussed in detail. The data are combined with the results of laboratory measurements and show that electrons with energies of at least two and probably four times the injection energy of 2 keV were observed during strong beam-plasma interaction events. The interaction events occurred at pitch angles of 54 and 126 degrees. On the basis of the data it is proposed that the superenergization of the electrons is correlated with the length of the beam-plasma interaction region.

  9. Acceleration of electrons in strong beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of strong beam-plasma interactions on the electron population of the upper atmosphere have been investigated in an electron acceleration experiment performed with a sounding rocket. The rocket carried the Several Complex Experiments (SCEX) payload which included an electron accelerator, three disposable 'throwaway' detectors (TADs), and a stepped electron energy analyzer. The payload was launched in an auroral arc over the rocket at altitudes of 157 and 178 km, respectively. The performance characteristics of the instruments are discussed in detail. The data are combined with the results of laboratory measurements and show that electrons with energies of at least two and probably four times the injection energy of 2 keV were observed during strong beam-plasma interaction events. The interaction events occurred at pitch angles of 54 and 126 degrees. On the basis of the data it is proposed that the superenergization of the electrons is correlated with the length of the beam-plasma interaction region.

  10. High performance Si immersion gratings patterned with electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully-Santiago, Michael A.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Brooks, Cynthia B.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Muller, Richard E.

    2014-07-01

    Infrared spectrographs employing silicon immersion gratings can be significantly more compact than spectro- graphs using front-surface gratings. The Si gratings can also offer continuous wavelength coverage at high spectral resolution. The grooves in Si gratings are made with semiconductor lithography techniques, to date almost entirely using contact mask photolithography. Planned near-infrared astronomical spectrographs require either finer groove pitches or higher positional accuracy than standard UV contact mask photolithography can reach. A collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin Silicon Diffractive Optics Group and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Microdevices Laboratory has experimented with direct writing silicon immersion grating grooves with electron beam lithography. The patterning process involves depositing positive e-beam resist on 1 to 30 mm thick, 100 mm diameter monolithic crystalline silicon substrates. We then use the facility JEOL 9300FS e-beam writer at JPL to produce the linear pattern that defines the gratings. There are three key challenges to produce high-performance e-beam written silicon immersion gratings. (1) E- beam field and subfield stitching boundaries cause periodic cross-hatch structures along the grating grooves. The structures manifest themselves as spectral and spatial dimension ghosts in the diffraction limited point spread function (PSF) of the diffraction grating. In this paper, we show that the effects of e-beam field boundaries must be mitigated. We have significantly reduced ghost power with only minor increases in write time by using four or more field sizes of less than 500 μm. (2) The finite e-beam stage drift and run-out error cause large-scale structure in the wavefront error. We deal with this problem by applying a mark detection loop to check for and correct out minuscule stage drifts. We measure the level and direction of stage drift and show that mark detection reduces peak-to-valley wavefront error

  11. Brushless dc motor uses electron beam switching tube as commutator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P.

    1965-01-01

    Electron beam switching tube eliminates physical contact between rotor and stator in brushless dc motor. The tube and associated circuitry control the output of a dc source to sequentially energize the motor stator windings.

  12. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.

  13. Use of an Electron Beam for Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslave Derbenev

    2007-09-10

    Microwave instability of an electron beam can be used for a multiple increase in the collective response for the perturbation caused by a particle of a co-moving ion beam, i.e. for enhancement of friction force in electron cooling method. The low scale (hundreds GHz and higher frequency range) space charge or FEL type instabilities can be produced (depending on conditions) by introducing an alternating magnetic fields along the electron beam path. Beams’ optics and noise conditioning for obtaining a maximal cooling effect and related limitations will be discussed. The method promises to increase by a few orders of magnitude the cooling rate for heavy particle beams with a large emittance for a wide energy range with respect to either electron and conventional stochastic cooling.

  14. Electron beam seals outer surfaces of porous bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, W. H.; Kurtz, A. D.; Kurtz, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Porous tungsten plugs provide even airflow for frictionless bearings used in air bearing supported gyros. The plugs have their outer cylindrical surface sealed by an electron beam process to ensure unidirectional airflow through their exit ends.

  15. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-04-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields.

  16. Nanopore integrated with Au clusters formed under electron beam irradiation for single molecule analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Myoung Jin; Han, Chul Hee; Kim, Sung In; Yoo, Jung Ho; Park, Kyung Jin; Park, Nam Kyou; Kim, Yong-Sang

    2016-02-01

    Recently the single molecules such as protein and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) have been successfully characterized using a solidstate nanopore with an electrical detection technique. However, the optical plasmonic nanopore has yet to be fabricated. The optical detection technique can be better utilized as next generation ultrafast geneome sequencing devices due to the possible utilization of the current optical technique for genome sequencing. In this report, we have investigated the Au nanopore formation under the electron beam irradiation on an Au aperture. The circular-type nanoopening with ~ 5 nm diameter on the diffused membrane is fabricated by using 2 keV electron beam irradiation by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). We found the Au cluster on the periphery of the drilled aperture under a 2 keV electron beam irradiation. Immediately right after electron beam irradiation, no Au cluster and no Au crystal lattice structure on the diffused plane are observed. However, after the sample was kept for ~ 6 months under a room environment, the Au clusters are found on the diffused membrane and the Au crystal lattice structures on the diffused membrane are also found using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. These phenomena can be attributed to Ostwald ripening. In addition, the Au nano-hole on the 40 nm thick Au membrane was also drilled by using 200 keV scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Lund, S M; Bieniosek, F M; Lee, E P; Prost, L R; Seidl, P A; Vay, P-A

    2002-05-23

    Heavy-ion accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long durations. (Injected currents of order 1 A and 20 {micro}s at a few MeV for each of {approx}100 beams, will be compressed to the order of 100 A and 0.2 {micro}s, reaching GeV energies in a power plant driver.) This will be accompanied by beam ions impacting walls, liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation, the {approx}10% electron population predicted for driver-scale experiments will affect beam transport; but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron velocity is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles. We will also measure the depth of trapping of electrons, their axial and radial transport, and the effects of electrons on the ion beam.

  18. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  19. Theory And Design Of Thermionic Electron Beam Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Munawar; Fazal-e-Aleem

    2005-03-17

    Electron beam technology has a long history and wide applications in various fields including high-energy physics. The unique properties, which one can develop by using different configurations, have been one of the strongest driving forces for this multi-dimensional technology. In this paper, we will take up the subject along with applications in various areas of physics. We will particularly focus on the developments of electron beam sources by our laboratory.

  20. Large areas elemental mapping by ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Curado, J. F.; Allegro, P.; Moro, M. V.; Campos, P. H. O. V.; Santos, S. B.; Kajiya, E. A. M.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    The external beam line of the Laboratory for Material Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI) is a versatile setup for multi-technique analysis. X-ray detectors for Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) measurements, a Gamma-ray detector for Particle Induced Gamma- ray Emission (PIGE), and a particle detector for scattering analysis, such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), were already installed. In this work, we present some results, using a large (60-cm range) XYZ computer controlled sample positioning system, completely developed and build in our laboratory. The XYZ stage was installed at the external beam line and its high spacial resolution (better than 5 μm over the full range) enables positioning the sample with high accuracy and high reproducibility. The combination of a sub-millimeter beam with the large range XYZ robotic stage is being used to produce elemental maps of large areas in samples like paintings, ceramics, stones, fossils, and all sort of samples. Due to its particular characteristics, this is a unique device in the sense of multi-technique analysis of large areas. With the continuous development of the external beam line at LAMFI, coupled to the robotic XYZ stage, it is becoming a robust and reliable option for regular analysis of trace elements (Z > 5) competing with the traditional in-vacuum ion-beam-analysis with the advantage of automatic rastering.

  1. Focused electron beam induced deposition of magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Teresa, Jose M.

    2011-03-01

    Nanopatterning strategies of magnetic materials normally rely on standard techniques such as electron-beam lithography using electron-sensitive resists. Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is currently being investigated as an alternative single-step route to produce functional magnetic nanostructures. Thus, Co-based and Fe-based precursors have been recently investigated for the growth of magnetic nanostructures by FEBID. In the present contribution, I will give an overview of the existing literature on magnetic nanostructures by FEBID and I will focus on the growth of Co nanostructures by FEBID using Co 2 (CO)8 as precursor gas. The Co content in the nanostructures can reach 95%. Magnetotransport experiments indicate that full metallic behaviour is displayed with relatively low residual resistivity and standard anisotropic magnetoresistance (0.8%). The coercive field of nanowires with changing aspect ratio has been determined in nanowires with width down to 150 nm by means of Magneto-optical Kerr Effect and the magnetization reversal has been imaged by means of Magnetic Force Microscopy, Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy as well as Lorentz Microscopy experiments. Nano-Hall probes have been grown with remarkable minimum detectable magnetic flux. Noticeably, it has been found that the domain-wall propagation field is lower than the domain-wall nucleation field in L-shaped nanowires, with potential applications in magnetic logic, sensing and storage. The spin polarization of these Co nanodeposits has been determined through Andreev-Reflection experiments in ferromagnetic-superconducting nanocontacts and amounts to 35%. Recent results obtained in Fe-based nanostructures by FEBID using Fe 2 (CO)9 precursor will be also presented. I acknowledge the collaboration in this field with A. Fernandez-Pacheco, R. Cordoba, L. Serrano, S. Sangiao, L.A. Rodriguez, C. Magen, E. Snoeck, L. Morellon, M.R. Ibarra.

  2. Characterization of electron contamination in megavoltage photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Antonio Lopez; Teijeiro, Antonio; Garcia, Juan; Esperon, Jorge; Terron, J. Antonio; Ruiz, Diego P.; Carrion, Maria C.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to characterize electron contamination in photon beams in different clinical situations. Variations with field size, beam modifier (tray, shaping block) and source-surface distance (SSD) were studied. Percentage depth dose measurements with and without a purging magnet and replacing the air by helium were performed to identify the two electron sources that are clearly differentiated: air and treatment head. Previous analytical methods were used to fit the measured data, exploring the validity of these models. Electrons generated in the treatment head are more energetic and more important for larger field sizes, shorter SSD, and greater depths. This difference is much more noticeable for the 18 MV beam than for the 6 MV beam. If a tray is used as beam modifier, electron contamination increases, but the energy of these electrons is similar to that of electrons coming from the treatment head. Electron contamination could be fitted to a modified exponential curve. For machine modeling in a treatment planning system, setting SSD at 90 cm for input data could reduce errors for most isocentric treatments, because they will be delivered for SSD ranging from 80 to 100 cm. For very small field sizes, air-generated electrons must be considered independently, because of their different energetic spectrum and dosimetric influence.

  3. Mapping of minority carrier lifetime distributions in multicrystalline silicon using transient electron-beam-induced current.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Takuya; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Morita, Chiaki; Tanji, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    We have used transient electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) to map minority carrier lifetime distributions in multicrystalline Silicon (mc-Si). In this technique, the electron beam from a scanning transmission electron microscope was on-off modulated while the sample was scanned. The resulting transient EBIC was analyzed to form a lifetime map. An analytical function was introduced as part of the analysis in determining this map. We have verified this approach using numerical simulations and have reproduced a lifetime map for an mc-Si wafer.

  4. Electron-Cloud Effects on Heavy-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, T; Friedman, A; Cohen, R; Vay, J

    2004-03-29

    Stray electrons can be introduced in positive-charge accelerators for heavy ion fusion (or other applications) as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We are developing a capability for self-consistent simulation of ion beams with the electron clouds they produce. We report on an ingredient in this capability, the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on the dynamics of a coasting ion beam. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also be effective. We identify a possible instability associated with resonance with the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations.

  5. Reinforcing multiwall carbon nanotubes by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duchamp, Martial; Meunier, Richard; Smajda, Rita; Mionic, Marijana; Forro, Laszlo; Magrez, Arnaud; Seo, Jin Won; Song, Bo; Tomanek, David

    2010-10-15

    We study the effect of electron beam irradiation on the bending modulus of multiwall carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition. Atomic force microscopy observations of the nanotube deflection in the suspended-beam geometry suggest an internal, reversible stick-slip motion prior to irradiation, indicating presence of extended defects. Upon electron beam irradiation, nanotubes with an initial bending modulus exceeding 10 GPa initially get stiffer, before softening at high doses. Highly defective nanotubes with smaller initial bending moduli do not exhibit the initial reinforcement. These data are explained by ab initio molecular dynamics calculations suggesting a spontaneous cross-linking of neighboring nanotube walls at extended vacancy defects created by the electron beam, in agreement with electron microscopy observations. At low defect concentration, depending on the edge morphology, the covalent bonds between neighboring nanotube walls cause reinforcement by resisting relative motion of neighboring walls. At high concentration of defects that are present initially or induced by high electron beam dose, the structural integrity of the entire system suffers from increasing electron beam damage.

  6. Chemical and structural stability of lithium-ion battery electrode materials under electron beam.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M; Doeff, Marca M; Xin, Huolin L

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of chemical and structural dynamics in battery materials is essential to elucidation of structure-property relationships for rational design of advanced battery materials. Spatially resolved techniques, such as scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM), are widely applied to address this challenge. However, battery materials are susceptible to electron beam damage, complicating the data interpretation. In this study, we demonstrate that, under electron beam irradiation, the surface and bulk of battery materials undergo chemical and structural evolution equivalent to that observed during charge-discharge cycling. In a lithiated NiO nanosheet, a Li2CO3-containing surface reaction layer (SRL) was gradually decomposed during electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) acquisition. For cycled LiNi(0.4)Mn(0.4)Co(0.18)Ti(0.02)O2 particles, repeated electron beam irradiation induced a phase transition from an layered structure to an rock-salt structure, which is attributed to the stoichiometric lithium and oxygen removal from 3a and 6c sites, respectively. Nevertheless, it is still feasible to preserve pristine chemical environments by minimizing electron beam damage, for example, using fast electron imaging and spectroscopy. Finally, the present study provides examples of electron beam damage on lithium-ion battery materials and suggests that special attention is necessary to prevent misinterpretation of experimental results.

  7. Chemical and Structural Stability of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrode Materials under Electron Beam

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M.; Doeff, Marca M.; Xin, Huolin L.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of chemical and structural dynamics in battery materials is essential to elucidation of structure-property relationships for rational design of advanced battery materials. Spatially resolved techniques, such as scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM), are widely applied to address this challenge. However, battery materials are susceptible to electron beam damage, complicating the data interpretation. In this study, we demonstrate that, under electron beam irradiation, the surface and bulk of battery materials undergo chemical and structural evolution equivalent to that observed during charge-discharge cycling. In a lithiated NiO nanosheet, a Li2CO3-containing surface reaction layer (SRL) was gradually decomposed during electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) acquisition. For cycled LiNi0.4Mn0.4Co0.18Ti0.02O2 particles, repeated electron beam irradiation induced a phase transition from an layered structure to an rock-salt structure, which is attributed to the stoichiometric lithium and oxygen removal from 3a and 6c sites, respectively. Nevertheless, it is still feasible to preserve pristine chemical environments by minimizing electron beam damage, for example, using fast electron imaging and spectroscopy. Finally, the present study provides examples of electron beam damage on lithium-ion battery materials and suggests that special attention is necessary to prevent misinterpretation of experimental results. PMID:25027190

  8. Electron beam irradiation effects in Trombay nuclear waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Kadam, R. M.; Mishra, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Pujari, P. K.; Kaushik, C. P.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Tomar, B. S.; Godbole, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    Spectroscopic investigations were carried out on electron beam irradiated sodium barium borosilicate glasses, which is the base glass for immobilization of nuclear high level radioactive waste, generated from the research reactors at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay. This was done in order to access the defects generated in it under long term irradiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance was used to identify the defect centers generated in the borosilicate glass after irradiation. In addition, positron annihilation spectroscopy and infrared investigations were done on the samples to evaluate the radiation induced changes in the glass. It was found that, boron-oxygen and silicon based hole centers along with E' centers are getting formed in the glass after irradiation due to the breaking of the Si sbnd O bonds at regular tetrahedron sites of Si sbnd O sbnd Si. The positron annihilation spectroscopy data gave an idea regarding the free volume size and fraction of the glasses before and after irradiation. It was seen that, after irradiation the free volume size in the glass increased with creation of additional sites. Microwave power variation and temperature variation studies suggested the formation of at least five different radicals in the irradiated glasses. The spin Hamiltonian parameter of all the radical species were determined by computer simulation. An electron paramagnetic resonance spin counting technique was employed to evaluate the defect concentration in the glasses after irradiation.

  9. Power consumption and byproducts in electron beam and electrical discharge processing of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.

    1996-02-20

    Among the new methods being investigated for the post-process reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in atmospheric-pressure air streams are based on non-thermal plasmas. Electron beam, pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge methods are among the more extensively investigated techniques for producing non-thermal plasmas. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. In this paper the authors present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor, a pulsed corona and a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. They have used these reactors to study the removal of a wide variety of VOCs. The effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry have been studied. They present a description of the reactions that control the efficiency of the plasma process. They have found that pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge reactors are most suitable only for processes requiring O radicals. For VOCs requiring copious amounts of electrons, ions, N atoms or OH radicals, the use of electron beam reactors is generally the best way of minimizing the electrical power consumption. Electron beam processing is remarkably more effective for all of the VOCs tested. For control of VOC emissions from dilute, large volume sources such as paint spray booths, cost analysis shows that the electron beam method is cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.

  10. Ion and electron beam processing of condensed molecular solids to form thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M.; Mowlem, J.K.; Moore, J.F.; Strongin, D.R.

    1992-12-31

    Electron and ion beams can be used to deposit thin films and etch surfaces using gas phase precursors. However, the generation of undesirable gas phase products and the diffusion of the reactive species beyond the region irradiated by the electron or ion beam can limit selectivity. In this paper, the feasibility of processing condensed precursors such as diborane, tri-methyl aluminum, ammonia and water at 78 K with low energy ( 100--1000 eV) electron and ion beams (Ar{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 2}{sup +}) ranging in current density from 50 nA to several {mu}a per cm{sup 2} is examined. It was found that boron, boron nitride and stoichiometric aluminum oxide films could be deposited from the condensed volatile; species using charged particle beams and some of the physical and chemical aspects and limitations of this new technique are discussed.

  11. The use of artificial electron beams as probes of the distant magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments are reported in which electron beams were injected into the magnetosphere (with up to 40 kev energy and at current up to 0.8 A) to diagnose the plasma processes at great distance by measurements made in the ionosphere. In some of the experiments, the conjugate region atmosphere was used to detect the electron beam; in others, conjugate echoes were detected near the injection region. The echoes were found to respond to changes in the convection fields and to reflect auroral zone activity. Theoretical and experimental echo patterns are discussed. Evidence for beam pitch angle scattering and altered mirror heights is presented. The use of the atmospheric response to electron beams in the loss cone as a detector has been achieved using optical, X-ray, and radar techniques.

  12. Electron beam driven lower hybrid waves in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2013-05-15

    An electron beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma drives electrostatic lower hybrid waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. A dispersion relation and the growth rate of the instability for this process have been derived taking into account the dust charge fluctuations. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. Moreover, the growth rate of the instability increases with beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density. In addition, the dependence of the growth rate on the beam velocity is also discussed.

  13. Acceleration of electrons by a tightly focused intense laser beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping; Li, Ya-Dong; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2009-07-01

    The recent proposal to use Weinger transformation field (WTF) [Opt. Express 17, 4959-4969 (2009)] for describing tightly focused laser beams is investigated here in detail. In order to validate the accuracy of WTF, we derive the numerical field (NF) from the plane wave spectrum method. WTF is compared with NF and Lax series field (LSF). Results show that LSF is accurate close to the beam axis and divergent far from the beam axis, and WTF is always accurate. Moreover, electron dynamics in a tightly focused intense laser beam are simulated by LSF, WTF and NF, respectively. The results obtained by WTF are shown to be accurate.

  14. Electron Beam Lifetime in SPEAR3: Measurement and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Huang, X.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; /Pavilon Tech., Austin

    2007-12-19

    In this paper we report on electron beam lifetime measurements as a function of scraper position, RF voltage and bunch fill pattern in SPEAR3. We then outline development of an empirical, macroscopic model using the beam-loss rate equation. By identifying the dependence of loss coefficients on accelerator and beam parameters, a numerically-integrating simulator can be constructed to compute beam decay with time. In a companion paper, the simulator is used to train a parametric, non-linear dynamics model for the system [1].

  15. Acceleration of electrons by a tightly focused intense laser beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping; Li, Ya-Dong; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2009-07-01

    The recent proposal to use Weinger transformation field (WTF) [Opt. Express 17, 4959-4969 (2009)] for describing tightly focused laser beams is investigated here in detail. In order to validate the accuracy of WTF, we derive the numerical field (NF) from the plane wave spectrum method. WTF is compared with NF and Lax series field (LSF). Results show that LSF is accurate close to the beam axis and divergent far from the beam axis, and WTF is always accurate. Moreover, electron dynamics in a tightly focused intense laser beam are simulated by LSF, WTF and NF, respectively. The results obtained by WTF are shown to be accurate. PMID:19582099

  16. Accurate characterization of Monte Carlo calculated electron beams for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, C M; Faddegon, B A; Rogers, D W; Mackie, T R

    1997-03-01

    Monte Carlo studies of dose distributions in patients treated with radiotherapy electron beams would benefit from generalized models of clinical beams if such models introduce little error into the dose calculations. Methodology is presented for the design of beam models, including their evaluation in terms of how well they preserve the character of the clinical beam, and the effect of the beam models on the accuracy of dose distributions calculated with Monte Carlo. This methodology has been used to design beam models for electron beams from two linear accelerators, with either a scanned beam or a scattered beam. Monte Carlo simulations of the accelerator heads are done in which a record is kept of the particle phase-space, including the charge, energy, direction, and position of every particle that emerges from the treatment head, along with a tag regarding the details of the particle history. The character of the simulated beams are studied in detail and used to design various beam models from a simple point source to a sophisticated multiple-source model which treats particles from different parts of a linear accelerator as from different sub-sources. Dose distributions calculated using both the phase-space data and the multiple-source model agree within 2%, demonstrating that the model is adequate for the purpose of Monte Carlo treatment planning for the beams studied. Benefits of the beam models over phase-space data for dose calculation are shown to include shorter computation time in the treatment head simulation and a smaller disk space requirement, both of which impact on the clinical utility of Monte Carlo treatment planning.

  17. Proton Beam Writing: A New 3D Nanolithographic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kan, Jeroen A.; Bettiol, Andrew A.

    Current microelectronics production technologies are essentially two-dimensional (2D), and are well suited for the 2D topologies prevalent in microelectronics. As semiconductor devices are scaled down in size, and coupled with the integration of moving parts on a chip, there is expected to be a rising demand for smaller microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) devices. High aspect ratio three-dimensional (3D) microstructures with nanometer details are also of growing interest for optoelectronic devices. Therefore it is essential to develop new lithographic techniques suitable for the production of high aspect ratio 3D micro- and nanocomponents. Proton-beam (p-beam) writing at the nanometer level is being developed at the Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), National University of Singapore, and has been shown to be a promising new 3D lithographic technique [1, 2].

  18. Note: Characteristic beam parameter for the line electron gun.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M; Islam, G U; Zhou, Z; Chi, Y

    2013-11-01

    We have optimized the beam parameters of line source electron gun using Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre electron beam trajectory program (EGUN), utilizing electrostatic focusing only. We measured minimum beam diameter as 0.5 mm that corresponds to power density of 68.9 kW/cm(2) at 13.5 mm in the post-anode region which is more than two-fold (33 kW/cm(2)), of the previously reported results. The gun was operated for the validation of the theoretical results and found in good agreement. The gun is now without any magnetic and electrostatic focusing thus much simpler and more powerful. PMID:24289448

  19. Neoclassical electron transport in tokamaks with neutral-beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Akers, R.J.

    2005-04-15

    The collisional interaction between neutral-beam ions and bulk plasma electrons leads to convective transport of particles and energy similar to the well-known Ware pinch. These transport fluxes are calculated, and it is found that the particle flux is outward when the neutral beams are in the same direction as the plasma current and inward otherwise, while the opposite holds for the electron heat transport. This effectively shifts the neutral-beam fueling profile approximately one fast-ion banana width outward during coinjection and inward during counterinjection, and could help to explain why very different plasma behavior is sometimes observed when the direction of the plasma current is reversed.

  20. Note: Characteristic beam parameter for the line electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, M.; Islam, G. U.; Zhou, Z.; Chi, Y.

    2013-11-15

    We have optimized the beam parameters of line source electron gun using Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre electron beam trajectory program (EGUN), utilizing electrostatic focusing only. We measured minimum beam diameter as 0.5 mm that corresponds to power density of 68.9 kW/cm{sup 2} at 13.5 mm in the post-anode region which is more than two-fold (33 kW/cm{sup 2}), of the previously reported results. The gun was operated for the validation of the theoretical results and found in good agreement. The gun is now without any magnetic and electrostatic focusing thus much simpler and more powerful.

  1. Note: Characteristic beam parameter for the line electron gun.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M; Islam, G U; Zhou, Z; Chi, Y

    2013-11-01

    We have optimized the beam parameters of line source electron gun using Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre electron beam trajectory program (EGUN), utilizing electrostatic focusing only. We measured minimum beam diameter as 0.5 mm that corresponds to power density of 68.9 kW/cm(2) at 13.5 mm in the post-anode region which is more than two-fold (33 kW/cm(2)), of the previously reported results. The gun was operated for the validation of the theoretical results and found in good agreement. The gun is now without any magnetic and electrostatic focusing thus much simpler and more powerful.

  2. Note: Characteristic beam parameter for the line electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M.; Islam, G. U.; Zhou, Z.; Chi, Y.

    2013-11-01

    We have optimized the beam parameters of line source electron gun using Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre electron beam trajectory program (EGUN), utilizing electrostatic focusing only. We measured minimum beam diameter as 0.5 mm that corresponds to power density of 68.9 kW/cm2 at 13.5 mm in the post-anode region which is more than two-fold (33 kW/cm2), of the previously reported results. The gun was operated for the validation of the theoretical results and found in good agreement. The gun is now without any magnetic and electrostatic focusing thus much simpler and more powerful.

  3. Angular-momentum-dominated electron beams and flat-beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yin-e

    2005-06-01

    In the absence of external forces, if the dynamics within an electron beam is dominated by its angular momentum rather than other effects such as random thermal motion or self Coulomb-repulsive force (i.e., space-charge force), the beam is said to be angular-momentum-dominated. Such a beam can be directly applied to the field of electron-cooling of heavy ions; or it can be manipulated into an electron beam with large transverse emittance ratio, i.e., a flat beam. A flat beam is of interest for high-energy electron-positron colliders or accelerator-based light sources. An angular-momentum-dominated beam is generated at the Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector Laboratory (FNPL) and is accelerated to an energy of 16 MeV. The properties of such a beam is investigated systematically in experiment. The experimental results are in very good agreement with analytical expectations and simulation results. This lays a good foundation for the transformation of an angular-momentum-dominated beam into a flat beam. The round-to-flat beam transformer is composed of three skew quadrupoles. Based on a good knowledge of the angular-momentum-dominated beam, the quadrupoles are set to the proper strengths in order to apply a total torque which removes the angular momentum, resulting in a flat beam. For bunch charge around 0.5 nC, an emittance ratio of 100 ± 5 was measured, with the smaller normalized root-mean-square emittance around 0.4 mm-mrad. Effects limiting the flat-beam emittance ratio are investigated, such as the chromatic effects in the round-to-flat beam transformer, asymmetry in the initial angular-momentum-dominated beam, and space-charge effects. The most important limiting factor turns out to be the uncorrelated emittance growth caused by space charge when the beam energy is low, for example, in the rf gun area. As a result of such emittance growth prior to the round-to-flat beam transformer, the emittance ratio achievable in simulation decreases from orders of thousands to

  4. High speed focused ion and electron beam nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melngailis, John

    2009-03-01

    Both focused ion beams and electron beams can be used for direct, maskless, resistless nanofabrication as well as for lithography. So far the direct fabrication has been limited to applications such as photomask repair, circuit restructuring, failure analysis, and the creation of various highly specialized structures. Recent developments in maskless fabrication, so far aimed mainly at to resist exposure, suggest that this picture might change. For example, IMS in Vienna, Austria is developing an instrument that can be characterized as an ion beam or electron beam dot matrix printer. The total current on the sample available from this kind of instrument is at least three orders of magnitude larger than from a single beam instrument. This may lead to new applications of charged particle beam fabrication, as well as enable applications considered in the past but rejected because of very low throughput. An example of one such application is the direct writing of the identity in RFID tags using ion beam implantation. Recently we have also shown that electron beams can be used to deposit relatively pure platinum from an inorganic precursor gas, Pt(PF3)4. Such metal deposits can be used as contacts to carbon nanotubes, semiconductor nano wires, organic fibers, or other structures where conventional lithography is impractical.

  5. Whistler-mode radiation from the Spacelab 2 electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Steinberg, J. T.; Banks, P. M.; Bush, R. I.

    1986-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) performed a fly-around of the Shuttle at distances of up to 300 meters while an electron beam was being ejected from the Shuttle. A magnetic conjunction of the Shuttle and the PDP while the electron gun was operating in a steady (DC) mode is discussed. During this conjunction, the PDP detected a clear funnel-shaped emission that is believed to be caused by whistler-mode emission from the beam. Ray-path calculations show that the shape of the funnel can be accounted for by whistler-mode waves propagating near the resonance cone. Because the beam and waves are propagating in the same direction, the radiation must be produced by a Landau interaction with the beam. Other types of waves generated by the beam are also described.

  6. Superconducting nanowires by electron-beam-induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Shamashis; Li, Chuan; Guéron, S.; Bouchiat, H.; Baumier, Cedric; Fortuna, F.; Kasumov, Alik

    2015-01-26

    Superconducting nanowires can be fabricated by decomposition of an organometallic gas using a focused beam of Ga ions. However, physical damage and unintentional doping often result from the exposure to the ion beam, motivating the search for a means to achieve similar structures with a beam of electrons instead of ions. This has so far remained an experimental challenge. We report the fabrication of superconducting tungsten nanowires by electron-beam-induced-deposition, with critical temperature of 2.0 K and critical magnetic field of 3.7 T, and compare them with superconducting wires made with ions. This work is an important development for the template-free realization of nanoscale superconducting devices, without the requirement of an ion beam column.

  7. Coherent Cerenkov radiation from the Spacelab 2 electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1989-01-01

    The plasma environment of the Spacelab 2 mission was investigated through the deployment of the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) by the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the Orbiter's ejection of a continuous 1-keV/50-mA electron beam along a field line. As the PDP flew by the beam, its plasma-wave instrument detected intense whistler-mode radiation originating from the beam. A detailed model has been developed of the coherent Cerenkov emission process, using a one-dimensional computer simulation of the beam to model the expected phase space structure of the electrons. The power calculated for the modeled 200-m beam segment can easily account for the measured whistler mode wave power.

  8. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Paul M.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Gaury, Benoit; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2016-09-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However, we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces, we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find that the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells are most consistent with a charged surface and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials.

  9. An Optimized Nanoparticle Separator Enabled by Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Rack, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Size based separations technologies will inevitably benefit from advances in nanotechnology. Direct write nanofabrication provides a useful mechanism to deposit/etch nanoscale elements in environments otherwise inaccessible to conventional nanofabrication techniques. Here, electron beam induced deposition (EBID) was used to deposit an array of nanoscale features in a 3D environment with minimal material proximity effects outside the beam interaction region (BIR). Specifically, the membrane component of a nanoparticle separator was fabricated by depositing a linear array of sharply tipped nanopillars, with a singular pitch, designed for sub 50nm nanoparticle permeability. The nanopillar membrane was used in a dual capacity to control the flow of nanoparticles in the transaxial direction of the array while facilitating the sealing of the cellular sized compartment in the paraxial direction. An optimized growth recipe resulted which (1) maximized the growth efficiency of the membrane (which minimizes proximity effects), (2) preserved the fidelity of spacing between nanopillars (which maximizes the size based gating quality of the membrane) while (3) maintaining sharp nanopillar apexes for impaling an optically transparent polymeric lid critical for device sealing.

  10. An electron beam profile instrument based on FBGs.

    PubMed

    Sporea, Dan; Stăncălie, Andrei; Becherescu, Nicu; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Along with the dose rate and the total irradiation dose measurements, the knowledge of the beam localization and the beam profile/energy distribution in the beam are parameters of interest for charged particle accelerator installations when they are used in scientific investigations, industrial applications or medical treatments. The transverse profile of the beam, its position, its centroid location, and its focus or flatness depend on the instrument operating conditions or on the beam exit setup. Proof-of-concept of a new type of charged particle beam diagnostics based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) was demonstrated. Its operating principle relies on the measurement of the peak wavelength changes for an array of FBG sensors as function of the temperature following the exposure to an electron beam. Periodically, the sensor irradiation is stopped and the FBG are force cooled to a reference temperature with which the temperature influencing each sensor during beam exposure is compared. Commercially available FBGs, and FBGs written in radiation resistant optical fibers, were tested under electron beam irradiation in order to study their possible use in this application. PMID:25157554

  11. An electron beam profile instrument based on FBGs.

    PubMed

    Sporea, Dan; Stăncălie, Andrei; Becherescu, Nicu; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred

    2014-08-25

    Along with the dose rate and the total irradiation dose measurements, the knowledge of the beam localization and the beam profile/energy distribution in the beam are parameters of interest for charged particle accelerator installations when they are used in scientific investigations, industrial applications or medical treatments. The transverse profile of the beam, its position, its centroid location, and its focus or flatness depend on the instrument operating conditions or on the beam exit setup. Proof-of-concept of a new type of charged particle beam diagnostics based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) was demonstrated. Its operating principle relies on the measurement of the peak wavelength changes for an array of FBG sensors as function of the temperature following the exposure to an electron beam. Periodically, the sensor irradiation is stopped and the FBG are force cooled to a reference temperature with which the temperature influencing each sensor during beam exposure is compared. Commercially available FBGs, and FBGs written in radiation resistant optical fibers, were tested under electron beam irradiation in order to study their possible use in this application.

  12. An Electron Beam Profile Instrument Based on FBGs

    PubMed Central

    Sporea, Dan; Stăncălie, Andrei; Becherescu, Nicu; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Along with the dose rate and the total irradiation dose measurements, the knowledge of the beam localization and the beam profile/energy distribution in the beam are parameters of interest for charged particle accelerator installations when they are used in scientific investigations, industrial applications or medical treatments. The transverse profile of the beam, its position, its centroid location, and its focus or flatness depend on the instrument operating conditions or on the beam exit setup. Proof-of-concept of a new type of charged particle beam diagnostics based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) was demonstrated. Its operating principle relies on the measurement of the peak wavelength changes for an array of FBG sensors as function of the temperature following the exposure to an electron beam. Periodically, the sensor irradiation is stopped and the FBG are force cooled to a reference temperature with which the temperature influencing each sensor during beam exposure is compared. Commercially available FBGs, and FBGs written in radiation resistant optical fibers, were tested under electron beam irradiation in order to study their possible use in this application. PMID:25157554

  13. Electrostatic ion cyclotron, beam-plasma, and lower hybrid waves excited by an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Conrad, J. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves have been extensively investigated in connection with both space and laboratory plasmas. The present investigation has the objective to study the excitation of low-frequency waves in a multiion plasma by electron beams. The frequencies considered range from below the lowest gyrofrequency of the heaviest ion to about the lower hybrid frequency. It is shown that electron-beam instabilities can produce peaks in the growth rate below the cyclotron frequency of each ion species if nonzero perpendicular wave number effects are included in the ion dynamics. The dispersion relations for neutralized ion Bernstein (NIB) and pure ion Bernstein (PIB) waves are considered along with an instability analysis for a cold plasma and warm electron beam, the electron beam-plasma mode, banded ion cyclotron (EIC) waves with small perpendicular wavelengths, and the growth lengths of the waves.

  14. Compact electron-beam source for formation of neutral beams of very low vapor pressure materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, J. A.; Vroom, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to form metal vapors for neutral beam studies, an electron-beam heater and a power supply have been designed. The source, which measures about 30 x 50 x 70 mm, consists of a filament, accelerating plate (defined by pole pieces), and a supported target. The electrons from the filament are focused by the field penetration through a 2 mm slit in the high-voltage cage. They are then accelerated to about 5 kV to a ground plate. The electrons then follow a path in the magnetic field and strike the sample to be heated on its front surface. The assembly is attached to a water-cooled base plate. The electron beam source has produced beams of Ta and C particles with densities of about 10 to the 8th power/cu cm.

  15. Transverse profile of the electron beam for the RHIC electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Luo, Y.; Miller, T.; Tan, Y.; Thieberger, P.; Montag, C.; Pikin, A. I.

    2015-07-10

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for both the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.

  16. Transverse profile of the electron beam for the RHIC electron lenses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Luo, Y.; Miller, T.; Tan, Y.; Thieberger, P.; et al

    2015-07-10

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for bothmore » the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.« less

  17. Overview of Phase Space Manipulations of Relativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    Phase space manipulation is a process to rearrange beam's distribution in 6-D phase space. In this paper, we give an overview of the techniques for tailoring beam distribution in 2D, 4D, and 6D phase space to meet the requirements of various applications. These techniques become a new focus of accelerator physics R&D and very likely these advanced concepts will open up new opportunities in advanced accelerators and the science enabled by them.

  18. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  19. Relativistic electron-positron beams in gamma-ray bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.; Epstein, Richard I.

    1993-01-01

    Beams of relativistic electrons and/or positrons leaving the surface of a strongly magnetized neutron star may give rise to gamma-ray bursts. The beams could be accelerated by strong, magnetically aligned electric fields that are produced by oscillations of the stellar surface. Here we investigate the particle acceleration in these electric fields, the resulting electron-positron pair cascade, and the gamma-ray emission. We find that beams of electrons and positrons moving parallel to the magnetic field are generated, with a reported differential energy distribution. These beams produce the bulk of the gamma-ray burst radiation below about 1 MeV by the resonant Compton scattering of thermal photons emitted from the stellar surface. The escaping synchrotron radiation from the cascade dominates the radiation spectrum above about 1 MeV.

  20. Anti-planetward auroral electron beams at Saturn.

    PubMed

    Saur, J; Mauk, B H; Mitchell, D G; Krupp, N; Khurana, K K; Livi, S; Krimigis, S M; Newell, P T; Williams, D J; Brandt, P C; Lagg, A; Roussos, E; Dougherty, M K

    2006-02-01

    Strong discrete aurorae on Earth are excited by electrons, which are accelerated along magnetic field lines towards the planet. Surprisingly, electrons accelerated in the opposite direction have been recently observed. The mechanisms and significance of this anti-earthward acceleration are highly uncertain because only earthward acceleration was traditionally considered, and observations remain limited. It is also unclear whether upward acceleration of the electrons is a necessary part of the auroral process or simply a special feature of Earth's complex space environment. Here we report anti-planetward acceleration of electron beams in Saturn's magnetosphere along field lines that statistically map into regions of aurora. The energy spectrum of these beams is qualitatively similar to the ones observed at Earth, and the energy fluxes in the observed beams are comparable with the energies required to excite Saturn's aurora. These beams, along with the observations at Earth and the barely understood electron beams in Jupiter's magnetosphere, demonstrate that anti-planetward acceleration is a universal feature of aurorae. The energy contained in the beams shows that upward acceleration is an essential part of the overall auroral process.