Science.gov

Sample records for electron density profiles

  1. Electron Density Profiles of the Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinsch, Bodo W.; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from h,F2 to - 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms but most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis- status.htm1. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The TOPside Ionogram Scaler with True height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling - 70% of the ionograms. An <> is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle.

  2. Estimation of topside electron density profile using on-orbit measured GPS and electron density data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The topside ionophere have lacks of information about plasma, but it is important for human beings and scientific applicaiton. We establish an estimation method for electron density profile using Langmuir Probe and GPS data of CHAMP satellite and have comparision the method results with other satellites measurements. In order to develop the model, hydrostatic mapping function, vertical scale height, and vertical TEC(Total Electron Contents) are used for calculations. The electron density and GPS data with hydrostatic mapping function give the vertical TEC and after some algebra using exponential model of density profile give the vertical scale height of ionosphere. The scale height have about 10^2~10^3 km order of magnitude so it can be used exponential model again since the altitude of CHAMP. Therefore, apply the scale height to exponoential model we can get the topside electron density profile. The result of the density profile model can be compared with other satellite data as STSAT-1, ROCSAT, DMSP which is measured the electron density in similar Local Time, Latitude, Longitude but above the CHAMP. This comparison shows the method is accecptable and it can be applied to other reseach for topside ionosphere.

  3. Ionospheric electron density profile estimation using commercial AM broadcast signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, De; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Li; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yufeng; Chen, Wenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new method for estimating the bottom electron density profile by using commercial AM broadcast signals as non-cooperative signals is presented in this paper. Without requiring any dedicated transmitters, the required input data are the measured elevation angles of signals transmitted from the known locations of broadcast stations. The input data are inverted for the QPS model parameters depicting the electron density profile of the signal's reflection area by using a probabilistic inversion technique. This method has been validated on synthesized data and used with the real data provided by an HF direction-finding system situated near the city of Wuhan. The estimated parameters obtained by the proposed method have been compared with vertical ionosonde data and have been used to locate the Shijiazhuang broadcast station. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed ionospheric sounding method is feasible for obtaining useful electron density profiles.

  4. Automated Processing of ISIS Topside Ionograms into Electron Density Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinisch, bodo W.; Huang, Xueqin; Bilitza, Dieter; Hills, H. Kent

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of the topside ionosphere has for the most part relied on just a few years of data from topside sounder satellites. The widely used Bent et al. (1972) model, for example, is based on only 50,000 Alouette 1 profiles. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza, 1990, 2001) uses an analytical description of the graphs and tables provided by Bent et al. (1972). The Alouette 1, 2 and ISIS 1, 2 topside sounder satellites of the sixties and seventies were ahead of their times in terms of the sheer volume of data obtained and in terms of the computer and software requirements for data analysis. As a result, only a small percentage of the collected topside ionograms was converted into electron density profiles. Recently, a NASA-funded data restoration project has undertaken and is continuing the process of digitizing the Alouette/ISIS ionograms from the analog 7-track tapes. Our project involves the automated processing of these digital ionograms into electron density profiles. The project accomplished a set of important goals that will have a major impact on understanding and modeling of the topside ionosphere: (1) The TOPside Ionogram Scaling and True height inversion (TOPIST) software was developed for the automated scaling and inversion of topside ionograms. (2) The TOPIST software was applied to the over 300,000 ISIS-2 topside ionograms that had been digitized in the fkamework of a separate AISRP project (PI: R.F. Benson). (3) The new TOPIST-produced database of global electron density profiles for the topside ionosphere were made publicly available through NASA s National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) ftp archive at . (4) Earlier Alouette 1,2 and ISIS 1, 2 data sets of electron density profiles from manual scaling of selected sets of ionograms were converted fiom a highly-compressed binary format into a user-friendly ASCII format and made publicly available through nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov. The new database for the topside

  5. Metastable atom probe for measuring electron beam density profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, J. M.; Zorn, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Metastable atom probe was developed for measuring current density in electron beam as function of two arbitrary coordinates, with spatial resolution better than 0.5 mm. Probe shows effects of space charge, magnetic fields, and other factors which influence electron current density, but operates with such low beam densities that introduced perturbation is very small.

  6. Determination of Jupiter's electron density profile from plasma wave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Shaw, R. R.; Poynter, R. L.

    1981-09-01

    The electron density measurements obtained in the Jovian magnetosphere from the plasma wave instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are summarized. Three basic techniques for determining the electron density are discussed. They are (1) local measurements from the low-frequency cutoff of continuum radiation, (2) local measurements from the frequency of upper hybrid resonance emissions, and (3) integral measurements from the dispersion of whistlers. The limitations and advantages of each technique are reviewed.

  7. Calculating electron momentum densities and Compton profiles using the linear tetrahedron method.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, D; Billington, D; Haynes, T D; Millichamp, T E; Taylor, J W; Duffy, J A; Giblin, S R; Dewhurst, J K; Dugdale, S B

    2014-12-10

    A method for computing electron momentum densities and Compton profiles from ab initio calculations is presented. Reciprocal space is divided into optimally-shaped tetrahedra for interpolation, and the linear tetrahedron method is used to obtain the momentum density and its projections such as Compton profiles. Results are presented and evaluated against experimental data for Be, Cu, Ni, Fe3Pt, and YBa2Cu4O8, demonstrating the accuracy of our method in a wide variety of crystal structures.

  8. Gas temperature and electron density profiles in an argon dc microdischarge measured by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Ouk, Tola; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-03-01

    Optical emisssion spectroscopy was employed to study a high pressure (100 s of Torr), slot-type (600 μm interelectrode gap), argon dc microdischarge, with added traces of nitrogen. Spatially resolved gas temperature profiles were obtained by analyzing rovibrational bands of the N2 first positive system. The gas temperature peaked near the cathode and increased with current. The contribution of Stark broadening to the hydrogen Hβ emission lineshape was used to extract the electron density. The axial distribution of electron density as well as visual observation revealed that the microdischarge positive column was highly constricted. The electron density near the sheath edge increased with both pressure and current.

  9. Fast electron current density profile and diffusion studies during LHCD in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Rimini, F.

    1993-08-01

    Successful current profile control experiments using lower hybrid current drive (LCHD) clearly require knowledge of (1) the location of the driven fast electrons and (2) the ability to maintain that location from spreading due to radial diffusion. These issues can be addressed by examining the data from the hard x-ray camera on PBX-M, a unique diagnostic producing two-dimensional, time resolved tangential images of fast electron bremsstrahlung. Using modeling, these line-of-sight images are inverted to extract a radial fast electron current density profile. We note that ``hollow`` profiles have been observed, indicative of off-axis current drive. These profiles can then be used to calculate an upper bound for an effective fast electron diffusion constant: assuming an extremely radially narrow lower hybrid absorption profile and a transport model based on Rax and Moreau, a model fast electron current density profile is calculated and compared to the experimentally derived profile. The model diffusion constant is adjusted until a good match is found. Applied to steady-state quiescent modes on PBX-M, we obtain an upper limit for an effective diffusion constant of about D*=1.1 m{sup 2}/sec.

  10. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C.; Wang, L.; Xu, M.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  11. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y H; Yang, X Y; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  12. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  13. Propagation of terahertz waves in an atmospheric pressure microplasma with Epstein electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chengxun; Zhou Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jingwen W.; Sun Hongguo; Wang He; Du Yanwei; Xiang Xiaoli

    2011-03-15

    Propagation properties of terahertz (THz) waves in a bounded atmospheric-pressure microplasma (AMP) are analyzed in this study. A modified Epstein profile model is used to simulate the electron density distribution caused by the plasma sheaths. By introducing the dielectric constant of a Drude-Lorentz model and using the method of dividing the plasma into a series of subslabs with uniform electron density, the coefficients of power reflection, transmission, and absorption are derived for a bounded microplasma structure. The effects of size of microplasma, electron density profile, and collision frequency on the propagation of THz waves are analyzed numerically. The results indicate that the propagation of THz waves in AMPs depend greatly on the above three parameters. It is demonstrated that the THz wave can play an important role in AMPs diagnostics; meanwhile, the AMP can be used as a novel potential tool to control THz wave propagation.

  14. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 is a joint US/Taiwan radio occultation mission consisting of six identical micro-satellites. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric RO measurements. FS3/COSMIC data can make a positive impact on global ionosphere study providing essential information about height electron density distribu-tion. For correct using of the RO electron density profiles for geophysical analysis, modeling and other applications it is necessary to make validation of these data with electron density distributions obtained by another measurement techniques such as proven ground based facili-ties -ionosondes and IS radars. In fact as the ionosondes provide no direct information on the profile above the maximum electron density and the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC RO measurements can make an important contribution to the investigation of the topside part of the ionosphere. IS radars provide information about the whole electron density profile, so we can estimate the agreement of topside parts between two independent measurements. To validate the reliability of COS-MIC data we have used the ionospheric electron density profiles derived from IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6N, 36.3E, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7N, 117.8E). The Kharkiv radar is a sole incoherent scatter facility on the middle latitudes of Eu-ropean region. The radar operates with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power 2.0 MW. The Kharkiv IS radar is able to determine the heights-temporal distribution of ionosphere parameters in height range of 70-1500 km. At the ionosphere in-vestigation by incoherent scatter method there are directly measured the power spectrum (or autocorrelation function) of scattered signal. With using of rather complex procedure of the received signal processing it is possible to estimate the

  15. Bayesian modeling of JET Li-BES for edge electron density profiles using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, Jakob; Brix, Mathias; Ghim, Young-Chul; JET Contributors Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    A Bayesian model for the JET lithium beam emission spectroscopy (Li-BES) system has been developed to infer edge electron density profiles. The 26 spatial channels measure emission profiles with ~15 ms temporal resolution and ~1 cm spatial resolution. The lithium I (2p-2s) line radiation in an emission spectrum is calculated using a multi-state model, which expresses collisions between the neutral lithium beam atoms and the plasma particles as a set of differential equations. The emission spectrum is described in the model including photon and electronic noise, spectral line shapes, interference filter curves, and relative calibrations. This spectral modeling gets rid of the need of separate background measurements for calculating the intensity of the line radiation. Gaussian processes are applied to model both emission spectrum and edge electron density profile, and the electron temperature to calculate all the rate coefficients is obtained from the JET high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) system. The posterior distributions of the edge electron density profile are explored via the numerical technique and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplings. See the Appendix of F. Romanelli et al., Proceedings of the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 2014, Saint Petersburg, Russia.

  16. Electron density profiles obtained from CHAMP GPS radio occultation measurements: Initial results from GFZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arras, Christina; Schmidt, Torsten; Lee, Woo-Kyoung; Wickert, Jens; Heise, Stefan; Beyerle, Georg; Rothacher, Markus; Jakowski, Norbert

    GPS radio occultation signals received by Low Earth Orbit satellites provide global information about vertical distribution of lower atmospheric parameters (e.g., temperature and water vapour) and electron density in the ionosphere. Since its launch in July 2000 the German geoscience satellite CHAMP has collected about 400,000 occultation measurements. These data form a first and unique long-term dataset of ionospheric profiles, but also of other geophysical variables as temperature, pressure and water vapour in the lower atmosphere. We present initial results of the ionospheric occultation data analyses at GFZ. Vertical electron density profiles from CHAMP are derived using a recently developed software package. To obtain electron densities from calibrated TEC (Total Electron Content) data the so-called onion peeling method is used. The application of this technique allows for the derivation of the electron density profile iteratively starting from the top altitude. The derived profiles are compared with corresponding data processed by UCAR (University Corporation of Atmospheric Research) and DLR Neustrelitz, but also with independent PLP (Planar Langmuir Probe) measurements from CHAMP. These investigations are complemented by case studies comparing the profiles with ground based ionosonde measurements. The high vertical resolution of the derived ionospheric profiles reveals thin vertical ionospheric structures such as sporadic E layers. We investigate the occurrence distribution of these layers in more detail. Sporadic E appears predominantly during summer in the lower ionosphere and has a considerable effect on the propagation of the GPS radio occultation signals. This feature is used to derive information on the altitude and on the intensity of these irregularities.

  17. Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment employs an ultrastable oscillator aboard the spacecraft. The signal from the oscillator to Earth is refracted by the Martian ionosphere, allowing retrieval of electron density profiles versus radius and geopotential. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation measurements: (1) four obtained near northern summer solstice (Ls = 74-116, near aphelion) at high northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N), and (2) one set of profiles approaching equinox conditions (Ls = 135- 146) at high southern latitudes (64.7-69.1S). Electron density profiles (95 to 200 km) are examined over a narrow range of solar zenith angles (76.5-86.9 degrees) for local true solar times of (1) 3-4 hours and (2) 12.1 hours. Variations spanning 1-Martian year are specifically examined in the Northern hemisphere.

  18. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  19. The evolution of the DGR approach to model electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicella, S. M.; Leitinger, R.

    The paper describes the evolution of the "profiler" proposed by Di Giovanni and Radicella (1990) to calculate the electron density distribution with height up to the F2 peak based on the Epstein layer introduced originally by Rawer. Such model uses ionospheric characteristics routinely scaled from ionograms or models of such characteristics. Radicella and Zhang (1995) presented an improved version of the profiler able to give the electron density distribution on both the bottom and topside of the ionosphere and the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) by introducing a constant shape factor for the semi-Epstein layer above the F2 peak. This version of the DGR model was adopted by the European COST 238 action as the basis for its regional model of the ionosphere. Further efforts were made to improve the topside part of the profiler by taking into account the contribution of the plasmaspherie electron density. The three separate solutions that have been implemented are described. One of them was adopted by the European COST 251 as basis for its regional ionospheric model. Another one developed partially with European Space Agency (ESA) support has been adopted in the ESA European Geostationary Navigation Overlay System project ionospheric specifications. A modified version of this profiler has been implemented to forecast TEC values over Europe as a joint effort with the CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom and the Geophysical Institute, Sofia, Bulgaria.

  20. Vary-Chap topside electron density profile for IRI and GIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, Bodo; Bilitza, Dieter; Huang, Xueqin; Nsumei, Patrick

    2012-07-01

    Using ISIS-2 topside sounding data, a new representative model of the topside electron density distribution in form of ``Vary-Chap'' functions is being developed for use in IRI [Bilitza et al., 2011], and for the profile extension above hmF2 of bottomside profiles measured by the Digisonde Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO). A major challenge for topside N(h) modeling is finding a suitable mathematical representation of the topside vertical profiles. Many representations have been proposed including exponential functions, Epstein functions , sech-squared functions, and Chapman functions with one or two constant scale heights. The Vary-Chap function is a generalized α-Chapman profile, based on the work by Rishbeth and Garriott [1969], that uses a continuously varying shape function S(h): [\\frac{{N}({h})}{{N}_{{m}} } =[{S(h)}]^{{{-1/2}} } {exp}[\\frac{{1}}{{2}} [{1}-{Y(h)}-{exp}(-{Y(h)})

  1. Nighttime E-region Electron Density Profiles Measured During the EQUIS II Campaign at Kwajalein Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Fourre, R.; Kudeki, E.; Steigies, C. T.; Chau, K.; Sarango, M.

    2005-05-01

    The EQUIS II nighttime E-region rocket and radar measurements were made in order to improve our understanding of the electrodynamics associated with density gradients, neutral wind shear, and enhanced electric fields that develop post-sunset in the near-equatorial region. Four rocket experiments were launched on two separate nights in September, 2004 from Kwajalein Atoll (9.4° N, 167.5° E), while simultaneous E-region radar observations were made with the ALTAIR radar. The focus of this presentation are the electron density profiles measured by two instrumented rockets as they passed through the unstable region on the upleg and downleg. Each rocket used two Langmuir probes and an impedance probe of a new design to measure both the absolute electron density and small-scale density fluctuations with spatial scales on the order of one meter. The impedance probe returned measurements from 7 kHz to 4 MHz, using a new design that excited the plasma using a pseudo-white-noise generator, allowing for an altitude resolution of approximately 40 meters. These impedance curves allow determination of the electron density from the identification of the upper hybrid frequency. In addition, evidence is presented that the impedance probe observed the lower-frequency "series" resonance which is dependent on the electron temperature. Data from the Langmuir probes, a beacon experiment, and the impedance probe are compared and the resulting density profiles are examined to estimate their contribution to the observed electric field irregularities via the gradient-drift and other instabilities.

  2. Estimates of the Electron Density Profile on LTX Using FMCW Reflectometry and mm-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, W. A.; Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Holoman, T.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Labrie, D.; Schmitt, J. C.; Majeski, R.

    2014-10-01

    An FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer has been installed on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) for electron density profile and fluctuation measurements. This diagnostic consists of two channels using bistatic antennas with a combined frequency coverage of 13.5 -33 GHz, which corresponds to electron density measurements in the range of 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3 (in O-mode). Initial measurements will utilize O-mode polarization, which will require modeling of the plasma edge. Reflections from the center stack (delayometry above the peak cutoff frequency), as well as line density measurements from a 296 GHz interferometer (single-chord, radial midplane), will provide constraints for the profile reconstruction/estimate. Typical chord-averaged line densities on LTX range from 2 -6 ×1012 cm-3, which correspond to peak densities of 0 . 6 - 1 . 8 ×1013 cm-3 assuming a parabolic shape. If available, EFIT/LRDFIT results will provide additional constraints, as well as the possibility of utilizing data from measurements with X-mode or dual-mode (simultaneous O- and X-mode) polarization. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. The electron density distribution and field profile in underdense magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Etehadi-Abari, M.

    2010-03-15

    In this work propagation of a high frequency electromagnetic wave in underdense plasma in presence of an external magnetic field is investigated. When a constant magnetic field perpendicular to the motion of electrons is applied, then the electrons rotate around the magnetic field lines and generate electromagnetic part in the wake with a nonzero group velocity. By using of the Maxwell equations and nonlinear differential equation for the electric field a direct one-dimensional (1D) procedure for calculating hydrodynamic equations are developed and the electric and magnetic field profiles in the plasma are investigated. It is shown that by using the external (dc) magnetic field in constant laser intensity, the magnetic field profile in plasma deviates from the sinusoidal structure. It is found that the wavelength of electric and magnetic field oscillations increases by increasing the external magnetic field and the density distribution of electrons also increases in comparison to the unmagnetized underdense plasma. We noticed that by the increase in electron temperature in the unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas the electron density distribution ratio deltan/n{sub 0e} increases and the wavelength of electric and magnetic fields increase where in the magnetized system it becomes positive in some regions.

  4. High-resolution electron density profiles reveal influence of fatty acids on bilayer structure.

    PubMed Central

    Katsaras, J; Stinson, R H

    1990-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray diffraction studies were performed on gel phase-oriented bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC containing 40 mol% of either palmitic acid (PA) or palmitic acid brominated at the 2-position (BPA). Oriented samples were prepared using a method developed by us, which is as simple as powder sample preparations while offering all the advantages of oriented samples made by traditional methods. Phases were determined using swelling experiments with structure factors plotted in reciprocal space, creating a relatively smooth curve as the amount of water between the bilayers was changed. Continuous Fourier transforms were also calculated to further test the consistency of the phase assignments. The diffraction data were used to calculate absolute electron density profiles for different bilayers to a resolution of 5-6 A. Analysis indicates the following: (a) The electron density profiles for the three preparations are virtually identical in the hydrocarbon chain region. (b) There is a decrease in the electron density of the glycerol backbone-headgroup region and d-space in DPPC-PA compared to DPPC. (c) The bromine of fatty-acid brominated at the 2-position is in the vicinity of the glycerol backbone. (d) The bilayer thickness of DPPC containing either brominated or unbrominated fatty acid remains relatively constant with increased levels of hydration, unlike DPPC bilayers. PMID:2306509

  5. Rocket Measurement of a Daytime Electron Density Profile up to 620 Kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J. E.; Bauer, S. J.

    1961-01-01

    On April 27, 1961 at 1502 EST a four-stage research rocket was fired from Wallops Island, Virginia, to measure the ionospheric electron density distribution by means of Seddon's CW propagation technique. This experimental technique is based upon the dispersive Doppler effect measured at two harmonically related frequencies, in this case f = 12.267 Mc and 6f = 73.6 Mc. The electron density profile measured above the peak of the F2 region is representative of a diffusive-equilibrium distribution in an isothermal ionosphere having a temperature of 1640 deg +/- 90 deg K. This result, when compared with satellite and other data, indicates that the upper ionosphere is in thermodynamic equilibrium.

  6. The observations of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC ionospheric electron density profiles during 2006-2010 major solar eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C.; Liu, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    This study examines three-dimensional structures of the ionospheric response using electron density profiles derived from the GPS radio occultation experiment (GOX) on board FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellites and global ground-based GPS receivers during solar eclipses of 2006-2010. FS3/C electron density profiles observed before, during, and after the solar eclipses are used to find the induced traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in the vertical direction. We further apply the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) to compute the instantaneous frequencies and amplitudes for every point of the decomposed intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) from the F3/C electron density profiles. Meanwhile, total electron contents (TECs) derived from co-located ground-based GPS receivers are employed to obtain associated frequencies of the TIDs in the horizontal direction. Comparisons of the TIDs in the concurrent F3/C electron density profiles and GPS TEC allow us to find characteristics of the induced waves.

  7. Finding evidence for density fluctuation effects on electron cyclotron heating deposition profiles on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Brookman, M. W. Austin, M. E.; Petty, C. C.

    2015-12-10

    Theoretical work, computation, and results from TCV [J. Decker “Effect of density fluctuations on ECCD in ITER and TCV,” EPJ Web of Conf. 32, 01016 (2012)] suggest that density fluctuations in the edge region of a tokamak plasma can cause broadening of the ECH deposition profile. In this paper, a GUI tool is presented which is used for analysis of ECH deposition as a first step towards looking for this broadening, which could explain effects seen in previous DIII-D ECH transport studies [K.W. Gentle “Electron energy transport inferences from modulated electron cyclotron heating in DIII-D,” Phys. Plasmas 13, 012311 (2006)]. By applying an FFT to the T{sub e} measurements from the University of Texas’s 40-channel ECE Radiometer, and using a simplified thermal transport equation, the flux surface extent of ECH deposition is determined. The Fourier method analysis is compared with a Break-In-Slope (BIS) analysis and predictions from the ray-tracing code TORAY. Examination of multiple Fourier harmonics and BIS fitting methods allow an estimation of modulated transport coefficients and thereby the true ECH deposition profile. Correlations between edge fluctuations and ECH deposition in legacy data are also explored as a step towards establishing a link between fluctuations and deposition broadening in DIII-D.

  8. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar and ionosonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    2010-05-01

    Various Radio Occultation space missions have proved successful in addressing a broad range of scientific questions on climate change analysis, operational weather prediction, ionospheric research and space weather forecasting, calibrating other observing systems (e.g., radiosonde and other satellite observations), ionosphere studies (layered structures of the F and E layers and global distribution of the Sporadic Es layers), and Geodesy. The FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC is a joint Taiwan - US mission that provides a constellation of six micro-satellites. Each satellite carries three atmospheric science payloads: (1) a GPS RO receiver for ionospheric and neutral atmospheric profiling and precision orbit determination; (2) a Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP) for monitoring the electron density via nadir radiance measurements along the sub-satellite track; and (3) a Tri-Band Beacon (TBB) transmitter for ionospheric tomography and scintillation studies. So, this mission provides the unprecedented opportunities for global observations of the ionosphere and space weather research. In the given paper we used the measurements provided by IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6oN, 36.3oE, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7oN, 117.8oE) for the cases of winter and summer seasons (2007 and 2008) during quiet geomagnetic conditions and compare these ground measured data with the GPS COSMIC radio occultation ionospheric profiles. We also used data provided by Pruhonice ionosonde, that located at same latitude with Kharkiv ISR and Juliusruch ionosonde located at same longitude with Pruhonice ionosonde. The comparison of RO indicates that usually COSMIC RO profiles are in a good agreement with IS radar's profiles both in the F2 layer peak electron density (NmF2) and the bottom side part of the profiles and a good agreement with ionosonde profiles below the F2 layer peak. The coincidence of profiles is better in the cases when projection of the ray path of tangent

  9. High-latitude topside ionospheric vertical electron density profile changes in response to large magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2016-05-01

    Large magnetic-storm-induced changes were detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron density profiles Ne(h) in a database of profiles and digital topside ionograms, from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program, that enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained in nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm (Dst < -100 nT). Storms where Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere had better coverage of solar wind parameters than storms with available Ne(h) profiles in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during all storms, with enhancements and depletions sometimes near a factor of 10 and 0.1, respectively, but with substantial differences in the responses in the two hemispheres. Large spatial and/or temporal Ne(h) changes were often observed during Dst minimum and during the storm recovery phase. The storm-induced Ne(h) changes were the most pronounced and consistent in the Northern Hemisphere in that large enhancements were observed during winter nighttime and large depletions during winter and spring daytime. The limited available cases suggested that these Northern Hemisphere enhancements increased with increases of the time-shifted solar wind velocity v, magnetic field B, and with more negative values of the B components except for the highest common altitude (1100 km) of the profiles. There was also some evidence suggesting that the Northern Hemisphere depletions were related to changes in the solar wind parameters. Southern Hemisphere storm-induced enhancements and depletions were typically considerably less with depletions observed during summer nighttime conditions and enhancements during summer daytime and fall nighttime conditions.

  10. On the possible use of radio occultation middle latitude electron density profiles to retrieve thermospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei V.; Belehaki, Anna; Perrone, Loredanna; Zolesi, Bruno; Tsagouri, Ioanna

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates possible use of middle latitude daytime COSMIC and CHAMP ionospheric radio occultation (IRO) electron density profiles (EDPs) to retrieve thermospheric parameters, based on the Mikhailov et al. (2012) method. The aim of this investigation is to assess the applicability of this type of observations for the routine implementation of the method. According to the results extracted from the analysis presented here, about half of COSMIC IRO EDP observed under solar minimum (2007-2008) conditions gave neutral gas density with an inaccuracy close to the declared absolute inaccuracy ±(10-15)% of CHAMP observations, with the results being better than the empirical models JB-2008 and MSISE-00 provide. For the other half of IRO EDP, either the solution provided by the method had to be rejected due to insufficient accuracy or no solution could be obtained. For these cases, the parameters foF2 and hmF2 extracted from the corresponding IRO profiles have been found to be inconsistent with the classic mid-latitude daytime F2-layer formalism that the method relies on, and they are incompatible with the general trend provided by the IRI model. For solar maximum conditions (2002) the method was tested with IRO EDP from CHAMP and it is indicated that its performance is quite stable in the sense that a solution could be obtained for all the cases analyzed here. However available CHAMP EDP are confined by ~ 400 km in altitude and this might be the reason for the 20% bias of the retrieved densities toward larger values in respect to the observed densities. IRO observations up to 600 km under solar maximum are required to confirm the exact performance of the method.

  11. Reconstruction of the vertical electron density profile based on vertical TEC using the simulated annealing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Yang, Guobin; Zhu, Peng; Nishioka, Michi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Zhou, Chen; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to reconstruct the vertical electron density profile based on vertical Total Electron Content (TEC) using the simulated annealing algorithm. The present technique used the Quasi-parabolic segments (QPS) to model the bottomside ionosphere. The initial parameters of the ionosphere model were determined from both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza et al., 2014) and vertical TEC (vTEC). Then, the simulated annealing algorithm was used to search the best-fit parameters of the ionosphere model by comparing with the GPS-TEC. The performance and robust of this technique were verified by ionosonde data. The critical frequency (foF2) and peak height (hmF2) of the F2 layer obtained from ionograms recorded at different locations and on different days were compared with those calculated by the proposed method. The analysis of results shows that the present method is inspiring for obtaining foF2 from vTEC. However, the accuracy of hmF2 needs to be improved in the future work.

  12. Depth profile characterization technique for electron density in GaN films by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamijoh, Takaaki; Ma, Bei; Morita, Ken; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy is a noncontact measurement method for carrier density and mobility. In this article, the model determination procedure of layer-type nonuniform electron distribution is investigated, since the spectrum fitting hitherto has been conducted on the basis of a multilayer model defined in advance. A simplified case of a high-electron-density GaN layer embedded in a GaN matrix is mainly studied. The following procedure is found to be applicable. The first step is the determination of the high-density layer position in the vicinity of the surface, in the middle region, or in the vicinity of the interface. This is followed by the specification of the sheet electron density and the layer thickness of the high-density region. It is found that this procedure is also applicable to the characterization of two-dimensional electron gases in the vicinity of AlGaN/GaN heterointerfaces.

  13. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M.

    2015-02-15

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field.

  14. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  15. Energy confinement time and electron density profile shape in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.; Bell, M.G.; Goldston, R.J.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Johnson, D.W.; Scott, S.D.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Bitter, M.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R.; Dylla, H.F.; Grek, B.; Howell, R.B.; Hsuan , H.; Johnson, L.C.; Mansfield, D.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schivell, J.; Taylor, G.; Ulrickson, M.

    1989-11-01

    The electron density profiles of intense deuterium neutral-beam- heated plasmas (P{sub tot}/P{sub ohm} {gt} 10) are characterized as a peakedness parameter (F{sub ne} = n{sub eo}/{l angle}n{sub e}{r angle}) in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The gross energy confinement time ({tau}{sub E} = E{sub tot}/P{sub tot}) at the time of maximum stored energy is found to be a weak function of the plasma current and total heating power but depends strongly on the peakedness parameter. A regression study showed {tau}{sub E} = 2.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}F{sub ne}{sup 0.76}I{sub P}{sup 0.18}P{sub tot}{sup {minus}0.12} for a data set of 561 discharges in the TFTR. Also {tau}{sub E} can be represented as {tau}{sub E} = {tau}{sub E}{sup L}f(F{sub ne}), where {tau}{sub E}{sup L} is the empirical L-mode scaling result. A similar scaling applies to an appropriately defined incremental energy confinement time ({tau}{sub inc} = dE{sub tot}/dP{sub tot}{vert bar}{sub F{sub ne} = constant}). 14 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Comparison of the Ionospheric Electron Density Profiles Obtained by COSMIC Radio Occultation with Ground-based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharenkova, I.; Shagimuratov, I.; Krankowski, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Radio Occultation technique using GPS signals has been proven to be a promising technique to retrieve accurate profiles of the ionospheric electron density with high vertical resolution on a global scale. Formosat-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) is a joint scientific mission between Taiwan and the U.S.A. The mission placed six small micro-satellites into six different orbits at 700~800 kilometer above the earth surface. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric radio occultation (RO). With the ability of performing both rising and setting occultation, Formosat-3/COSMIC has been producing about 2000 profiles of the ionospheric electron density per day - much more than ever before. In the given paper we used the ionograms recorded by European ionosonde stations for the cases of winter and summer solstices and time of quiet and geomagnetically disturbed days in March 2008 and compare these ground measured data with the GPS COSMIC radio occultation ionospheric profiles. This result is important to validate the reliability of the COSMIC ionospheric observations using the radio occultation technique. The comparison of RO data with measurements provided by European ionosondes (Pruhonice, Iuliusruh, Ebre, Rome) indicates that usually COSMIC RO profiles are in a good agreement with ionosonde's profiles both in the F2 layer peak electron density (NmF2) and the bottom side part of the profiles. The coincidence of profiles is better in the cases when projection of the ray path of tangent points is closer to the ionosonde location. But it is necessary to mention that practically for all analyzed cases there are observed the understated values of electron density in the topside part of the ionosonde's profiles in compare with RO profiles. As the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC radio occultation measurements

  17. Assimilating Electron Density Profiles Measured by the Real Time Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory - GIRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Galkin, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    Operational applications of ionospheric models, whether they are first principles or data-driven models, rely on the accuracy of the models during quiet and disturbed conditions. Of course models can correctly describe ionospheric weather only if they assimilate measured ionospheric characteristics and electron density profiles (EDPs). For the "assimilating model" to make correct predictions, the measurements in turn must be accurate and reliable. Ionosondes provide the most accurate vertical EDPs at the site locations but do not cover all parts of the globe. Ionogram-derived EDPs have become the ground truth reference for ionospheric specification, presenting the unrivaled accuracy of the data on continuous demand for validation of alternative ionospheric techniques, including radio occultation, ultraviolet, and tomography. In recent years the digisonde network of ionosondes has grown to eighty stations and is expected to expand to more than 100 stations in the next couple of years. The new Digisonde-4D is running the Automatic Real Time Ionogram Scaler with True height inversion, ARTIST-5. The ARTIST-5 autoscaling program now calculates the EDPs together with density uncertainty limits at each height, making the data products suitable for ingestion in assimilative ionospheric models. In order to specify uncertainty at each height, two boundary profiles, inner and outer, are determined. The inner and outer boundaries reflect the uncertainties of the critical frequencies of each layer, the internal uncertainty of the starting height of the profile, and the uncertainties of the E valley model representation. The actual uncertainties are calculated from a cumulative difference characteristic representing a mismatch between automatically and manually scaled parameters (i.e., foF2, foF1) for the same ionogram. The cumulative differences are determined from statistical analysis of a large amount of ionograms for a specific station. The characteristics of interest are

  18. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Y; Manabe, T; Kajita, S; Ohno, N; Takagi, M; Tsuchiya, H; Morisaki, T

    2014-09-01

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ~4 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  19. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Y. Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M.; Kajita, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T.

    2014-09-15

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ∼4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} s{sup −1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  20. Ionospheric specification with analytical profilers: Evidences of non-Chapman electron density distribution in the upper ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, T.; Stankov, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    In relation to the development of an operational ionospheric monitoring and imaging system, the most frequently used analytical ionospheric profilers (Chapman, Epstein, Exponential) were investigated in terms of suitability for topside ionosphere modelling. For the purpose, topside sounder measurements onboard Alouette and ISIS satellites have been analysed. We have come to the conclusion that the use of the Chapman profiler should be exercised with precaution as there are evidences that there are conditions when other profilers are better fit for modelling purposes. This is highlighted during ionospheric disturbances (e.g. during geomagnetic storms), when the shape of the topside electron density distribution might be better described by an Epstein profiler rather than a Chapman profiler.

  1. Resonant enhancement of mode conversion in unmagnetized plasmas due to a periodic density modulation superimposed on a linear electron density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dae Jung; Kim, Kihong; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2010-10-15

    Mode conversion of p-polarized electromagnetic waves into longitudinal plasma oscillations at resonance points in cold, unmagnetized, and stratified plasmas, where a small periodic density modulation is superimposed on a linear electron density profile, is theoretically studied. The mode conversion coefficient and the magnetic field distribution are calculated in a numerically exact manner using the invariant imbedding theory of mode conversion. It is found that resonant enhancement of mode conversion, which is sometimes as high as 100%, can be achieved by tuning the incident angle, the modulation period, or the wave frequency. This phenomenon is explained as due to the formation of a standing wave near the resonance point.

  2. Ionosphere modeling by means of electron density profiles based on the satellite missions COSMIC, CHAMP and GRACE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limberger, Marco; Hugentobler, Urs; Schmidt, Michael; Dettmering, Denise; Liang, Wenjing; Jakowski, Norbert; Hoque, Mainul; Gerzen, Tatjana; Berdermann, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The Chapman function for the F2-layer of the ionsphere contains three physically defined key parameters, namely the maximum electron density NmF2, the corresponding peak height hmF2 and scale height HF2. Every quantity can be expressed as a series expansion in terms of the tensor product of three one-dimensional polynomial B-splines referring to longitude, latitude and time with unknown series coefficients. Polynomial B-splines are localizing base functions whose number depends on a level that is specified based on the density of given observations. In order to determine the three key parameters, an iterative estimation procedure is required since the Chapman function is non-linear. Therefore, prior information for the series coefficients have to be determined from initial values which can be extracted from a given model such as the Neustrelitz TEC model (NTCM). Depending on the spatial and temporal resolution of this initial model, the B-spline level will be set to allow for the representation of the parameters on a desired scale. The availability of observations with comparable density cannot be guaranteed but even in scenarios of less observation density it is possible to improve the initial parameters at those locations where measurements are given. Otherwise, data gaps are bridged by prior information. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) provide observations of the slant total electron content (STEC) with a high spatial and temporal resolution from a dense network of ground-based receivers. Nevertheless, the estimation of the key parameters suffers from an unfavorable geometry and the fact, that observations are given as integrated values of the electron density. The introduction of electron density profiles consisting of point wise measurements stabilizes the adjustment system. They can be derived for instance from radio occultation measurements between the Global Positioning System (GPS) and low earth orbiter (LEO) satellites. In the context of this

  3. A long-term study on the deletion criterion of questionable electron density profiles caused by ionospheric irregularities - COSMIC radio occultation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uma, G.; Brahmanandam, P. S.; Chu, Y. H.

    2016-06-01

    The crucial assumption made in the retrieval of radio-occultated atmospheric parameters is the spherical symmetry of the atmospheric refractive index, which implies that no horizontal gradient of the refractive index exists along the spherical shell. Nevertheless, the presence of density irregularities will lead to scintillation and multipath effects that often create highly fluctuating and random electron density profiles. In this study, it is proposed a reliable data quality control (QC) approach to remove questionable electron density profiles (due to the presence of ionospheric irregularities) retrieved using the COSMIC radio occultation (RO) technique based on two parameters, namely, the gradient and fluctuation of the topside density profile. Statistics of seven years density profiles (July 2006-May 2013) are presented by determining the aforementioned parameters for every density profile. The main advantage of this data QC is that it uses COSMIC RO electron density profiles retrieved from the slant total electron content (TEC) that is estimated from the excess phases of the GPS L1 and L2 frequencies only to delete the questionable profiles, instead of relying on any model and other observations. A systematic criterion has been developed based on the statistics to relinquish the so-called questionable density profiles. The computed gradients and fluctuations of the topside ionosphere electron density profiles have shown a few important features including, solar activity dependency and pronounced variations in between around +40° and -40° latitudes. After the removal of questionable profiles, both peak densities and heights of the ionosphere F layer are presented globally in different seasons of years during 2007 and 2012 that revealed several important features.

  4. High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density-Profile Changes in Response to Large Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2015-01-01

    Large magnetic-storm induced changes have been detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). The investigation was based on the large database of topside Ne(h) profiles and digital topside ionograms from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program available from the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov/isis/isis-status.html. This large database enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained when an ISIS satellite passed through nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm. A major goal was to relate the magnetic-storm induced high-latitude Ne(h) profile changes to solar-wind parameters. Thus an additional data constraint was to consider only storms where solar-wind data were available from the NASA/SPDF OMNIWeb database. Ten large magnetic storms (with Dst less than -100 nT) were identified that satisfied both the Ne(h) profile and the solar-wind data constraints. During five of these storms topside ionospheric Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude northern hemisphere and during the other five storms similar ionospheric data were available in the southern hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during each one of these storms. Our concentration in this paper is on the northern hemisphere. The data coverage was best for the northern-hemisphere winter. Here Ne(h) profile enhancements were always observed when the magnetic local time (MLT) was between 00 and 03 and Ne(h) profile depletions were always observed between 08 and 10 MLT. The observed Ne(h) deviations were compared with solar-wind parameters, with appropriate time shifts, for four storms.

  5. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U. Wi, H. M.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Kovácsik, Ákos

    2014-11-15

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels.

  6. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherford, Brandon R. E-mail: zax@esi-group.com E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Barnat, E. V. E-mail: zax@esi-group.com E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Xiong, Zhongmin E-mail: zax@esi-group.com E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Kushner, Mark J. E-mail: zax@esi-group.com E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu

    2014-09-14

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100–120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3×10⁹cm s⁻¹, depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  7. Global characteristics of the upper transition height derived from the topside Alouette/ISIS topside sounder electron density profiles, the Formosat-3/COSMIC density profiles and the IRI ion composition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truhlik, Vladimir; Triskova, Ludmila; Benson, Robert; Bilitza, Dieter; Chu, Philip; Richards, Phil G.; Wang, Yongli

    The upper transition height (Ht) (the altitude of the transition from heavy atomic ions to light ions or in the simplest form the transition from O+ to H+) is an important parameter, representing the boundary between the ionosphere and the plasmasphere. Ht is very sensitive to various geophysical parameters, like solar and magnetic activity and strongly depends on latitude and local time. There were numerous studies of this parameter in past decades. In spite of these efforts, no model satisfactorily represents this parameter so far. Moreover, surprising evidence of very low transition heights during the last prolonged solar minimum, of a level never obtained before, have been reported. We investigate the upper transition height on the global scale. We made progress in processing large data sets of Ht deduced from the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder and from the Formosat-3/COSMIC vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h) using the theoretical Global Plasma Ionosphere Density (GPID) model (Webb and Essex, 2004) and a revised non-linear function describing the scale height vs. altitude (Titheridge, 1976) to fit the vertical density profiles to the observed profiles and to determine the upper transition height. Since both methods require the plasma temperatures and their gradients as input, these are calculated using the IRI2012 model. Both methods are verified using a large amount of electron and ion density profiles simulated by the FLIP theoretical model and their accuracy is discussed. We compare the results from Alouette/ISIS and Formosat-3/COSMIC and present a global distribution of the calculated Ht and its dependence on geophysical parameters. Finally we compare it with Ht calculated using the IRI ion composition model. Titheridge, J.E., 1976. Ion Transition Heights from Topside Electron-Density Profiles. Planetary and Space Science 24 (3), 229-245. Webb, P.A., Essex, E.A., 2004. A dynamic global model of the plasmasphere. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar

  8. A New Inversion Routine to Produce Vertical Electron-Density Profiles from Ionospheric Topside-Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yongli; Benson, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Two software applications have been produced specifically for the analysis of some million digital topside ionograms produced by a recent analog-to-digital conversion effort of selected analog telemetry tapes from the Alouette-2, ISIS-1 and ISIS-2 satellites. One, TOPIST (TOPside Ionogram Scalar with True-height algorithm) from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, is designed for the automatic identification of the topside-ionogram ionospheric-reflection traces and their inversion into vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). TOPIST also has the capability of manual intervention. The other application, from the Goddard Space Flight Center based on the FORTRAN code of John E. Jackson from the 1960s, is designed as an IDL-based interactive program for the scaling of selected digital topside-sounder ionograms. The Jackson code has also been modified, with some effort, so as to run on modern computers. This modification was motivated by the need to scale selected ionograms from the millions of Alouette/ISIS topside-sounder ionograms that only exist on 35-mm film. During this modification, it became evident that it would be more efficient to design a new code, based on the capabilities of present-day computers, than to continue to modify the old code. Such a new code has been produced and here we will describe its capabilities and compare Ne(h) profiles produced from it with those produced by the Jackson code. The concept of the new code is to assume an initial Ne(h) and derive a final Ne(h) through an iteration process that makes the resulting apparent-height profile fir the scaled values within a certain error range. The new code can be used on the X-, O-, and Z-mode traces. It does not assume any predefined profile shape between two contiguous points, like the exponential rule used in Jackson s program. Instead, Monotone Piecewise Cubic Interpolation is applied in the global profile to keep the monotone nature of the profile, which also ensures better smoothness

  9. Improving the Automatic Inversion of Digital Alouette/ISIS Ionogram Reflection Traces into Topside Electron Density Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Huang, Xueqin; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The topside sounders of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program were designed as analog systems. The resulting ionograms were displayed on 35 mm film for analysis by visual inspection. Each of these satellites, launched between 1962 and 1971, produced data for 10 to 20 years. A number of the original telemetry tapes from this large data set have been converted directly into digital records. Software, known as the Topside Ionogram Scalar With True-Height (TOPIST) algorithm, has been produced and used for the automatic inversion of the ionogram reflection traces on more than 100,000 ISIS-2 digital topside ionograms into topside vertical electron density profiles Ne(h). Here we present some topside ionospheric solar cycle variations deduced from the TOPIST database to illustrate the scientific benefit of improving and expanding the topside ionospheric Ne(h) database. The profile improvements will be based on improvements in the TOPIST software motivated by direct comparisons between TOPIST profiles and profiles produced by manual scaling in the early days of the ISIS program. The database expansion will be based on new software designed to overcome limitations in the original digital topside ionogram database caused by difficulties encountered during the analog-to-digital conversion process in the detection of the ionogram frame sync pulse and/or the frequency markers. This improved and expanded TOPIST topside Ne(h) database will greatly enhance investigations into both short- and long-term ionospheric changes, e.g., the observed topside ionospheric responses to magnetic storms, induced by interplanetary magnetic clouds, and solar cycle variations, respectively.

  10. The neutral atmosphere of Mars at ionospheric heights: A method to derive neutral atmospheric parameters from MaRS electron density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Kerstin; Pätzold, Martin; Molina-Cuberos, Gregorio; Witasse, Olivier; Tellmann, Silvia; Häusler, Bernd; Bird, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The radio-science experiment MaRS (Mars Radio Science) on the Mars Express spacecraft sounds the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars since 2004. More than 600 vertical profiles of the Mars ionospheric electron density and lower atmosphere neutral density and temperature have been aquired. These simultaneous soundings of the ionosphere and the lower neutral atmosphere make it possible to get information on the behavior of the Mars neutral atmosphere at ionospheric heights, which is directly not accessible by radio sounding but indirectly from the observed ionospheric electron density profiles. A simple 1D neutral atmospheric model is combined with a 1D ionospheric model for altitude ranges from 80 km to 160 km. The start-scenario of the model neutral atmosphere depends on the observed neutral atmospheric density at lower altitudes. The modelled neutral atmosphere profile as input for the ionospheric model is iterated until an agreement with the true observed electron density has been achieved. Information on the state of the upper neutral atmosphere are derived from the agreement between the modeled and observed electron density profiles.

  11. Improving the Automatic Inversion of Digital ISIS-2 Ionogram Reflection Traces into Topside Vertical Electron-Density Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.; Truhlik, V.; Huang, X.; Wang, Y.; Bilitza, D.

    2011-01-01

    The topside-sounders on the four satellites of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program were designed as analog systems. The resulting ionograms were displayed on 35-mm film for analysis by visual inspection. Each of these satellites, launched between 1962 and 1971, produced data for 10 to 20 years. A number of the original telemetry tapes from this large data set have been converted directly into digital records. Software, known as the TOPside Ionogram Scalar with True-height (TOPIST) algorithm has been produced that enables the automatic inversion of ISIS-2 ionogram reflection traces into topside vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). More than million digital Alouette/ISIS topside ionograms have been produced and over 300,000 are from ISIS 2. Many of these ISIS-2 ionograms correspond to a passive mode of operation for the detection of natural radio emissions and thus do not contain ionospheric reflection traces. TOPIST, however, is not able to produce Ne(h) profiles from all of the ISIS-2 ionograms with reflection traces because some of them did not contain frequency information. This information was missing due to difficulties encountered during the analog-to-digital conversion process in the detection of the ionogram frame-sync pulse and/or the frequency markers. Of the many digital topside ionograms that TOPIST was able to process, over 200 were found where direct comparisons could be made with Ne(h) profiles that were produced by manual scaling in the early days of the ISIS program. While many of these comparisons indicated excellent agreement (<10% average difference over the entire profile) there were also many cases with large differences (more than a factor of two). Here we will report on two approaches to improve the automatic inversion process: (1) improve the quality of the digital ionogram database by remedying the missing frequency-information problem when possible, and (2) using the above-mentioned comparisons as

  12. Study of elf propagation anomalies as related to improved knowledge of electron density profiles produced by energetic particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Gunton, R. C.; Larsen, T. R.; Reagan, J. B.; Gaines, E. E.; Meyeroff, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of extremely low frequency (ELF) wave propagation anomalies as related to energetic particle precipitation, principally during solar particle events (SPE). Based on calculation of the predicted signal strengths at Tromso for transmissions from the Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF) a criterion has been selected for possible use in a field test operation. If the ion pair production rates at 40 km are equal to or greater than 1 x 1000/cc/sec then it is probable that a 3 dB or larger reduction in signal strength would occur for such an event. Since this preliminary criterion is based on ELF signal strength computation assuming no local time variations along the propagation path, more detailed calculations of the local time ionospheric effects should be performed. A study was made of the expected effect of local time variations during solar particle events on the ELF propagation over the path from WTF to Tromso. Electron and ion density profiles for the various segments of the test path were calculated with the ion chemistry model, taking into account the local time for each segment. In a comparison of conditions measured and calculated for SPE72 on 4 August 1972 near the peak of the event and conditions measured and calculated for a similar case assuming a season of 21 December, very little difference in signal strength attenuation over the path was found.

  13. Initial measurements of plasma current and electron density profiles using a polarimeter/interferometer (POINT) for long pulse operation in EAST (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Q.; Qian, J. P.; Jie, Y. X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Lian, H.; Wang, S. X.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Lan, T.; Yao, Y.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    A double-pass, radially viewing, far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for diagnosing the plasma current and electron density profiles in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). POINT has been operated routinely during the most recent experimental campaign and provides continuous 11 chord line-integrated Faraday effect and density measurement throughout the entire plasma discharge for all heating schemes and all plasma conditions (including ITER relevant scenario development). Reliability of both the polarimetric and interferometric measurements is demonstrated in 25 s plasmas with H-mode and 102 s long-pulse discharges. Current density, safety factor (q), and electron density profiles are reconstructed using equilibrium fitting code (EFIT) with POINT constraints for the plasma core.

  14. User's Guide: An Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup for the Profiling of the Power Density Distribution in Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Teruya, A T; Palmer, T A

    2002-06-01

    This handbook describes the assembly and operation of an enhanced Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) diagnostic device for measuring the power density distribution of high power electron beams used for welding. The most recent version of this diagnostic device, [1] Version 2.0, contains modifications to the hardware components of previous MFC designs.[2] These modifications allow for more complete capture of the electrons and better electrical grounding, thus improving the quality of the acquired data and enabling a more accurate computed tomographic (CT) reconstruction [3,4] of the power density distribution of the electron beam to be performed. [ 5-9

  15. Visualization of electronic density

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; Hashibon, Adham; Yaish, Yuval; Adler, Joan

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  16. Radial Profiles of Electron Density and Current Components at Cathode Surface in LaB6 Hollow Cathode Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Setsuo; Asano, Toshiaki; Morimiya, Osami

    1987-06-01

    Experimental studies on a hydrogen-fed LaB6 hollow cathode arc have been pursued. The plasma parameter in the cathode has been measured by a Langmuir probe. The radial variation in the electron density inside the cathode was calculated using the continuity and momentum equations, showing good agreement with the experimental results. The electron density at the cathode surface was estimated to be 15%-20% of that at the cathode axis. It was also found from the current balance that the arc current components at the cathode surface consist of a thermionic current which takes into account the Schottky effect, the ion current and the secondary electron current induced by ion bombardment. The ion current and the cathode surface is larger than the electron current emitted from the cathode.

  17. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  18. Density profile of water in nanoslit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodankar, S.; Perret, E.; Nygård, K.; Bunk, O.; Satapathy, D. K.; Espinosa Marzal, R. M.; Balmer, T. E.; Heuberger, M.; van der Veen, J. F.

    2012-07-01

    Confined water is abundant in the narrow pores of soil, clay, rock and biological systems. The water molecules are expected to assume layered structures between the confining surfaces, but details on the ordering behavior are lacking. In this letter we report density profiles of water across a narrow gap (1.7-1.9 nm) between cleaved mica surfaces studied using X-ray reflectivity. The profiles show pronounced electron density modulations within the gap. These indicate a partial hydration of cations (K+) on the mica surfaces and full hydration of desorbed cations within the gap. The average density of the confined water is close to that of bulk water.

  19. Spatial density profile of electrons near the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface revealed by time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yasuhiro Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Sato, Hiroki K.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2014-04-14

    The depth profile of the electron density near the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface has been studied by means of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A broad blue PL band is observed at 2.9 eV, originating from the two-carrier radiative recombination of interface-induced electrons and photoexcited holes. The PL lifetime of LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface is dominated by the three-carrier Auger recombination of electrons and holes and is sensitive to electron density. We tuned the probing depth by changing the excitation photon energy and evaluated the carrier-density profile using the relation between the carrier density and the PL lifetime. Our non-contact probe method based on PL spectroscopy indicates that the carriers are confined within several nanometers in depth near the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterostructures.

  20. Estimate of a D region ionospheric electron density profile from MF radio wave observations by the S-310-37 rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashihara, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Miyake, T.

    2016-01-01

    The S-310-37 rocket, launched at 11:20 (JST) on 16 January 2007, was equipped with a radio receiver to observe the medium-frequency (MF) radio wave propagation characteristics in the ionosphere. The radio receiver measured the intensity and the waveform of the radio wave at 873 kHz from the NHK Kumamoto broadcasting station. The polarized mode waves' intensity characteristics were obtained by analyzing the observed waveform. In this study, the S-310-37 rocket-observed polarized mode waves' propagation characteristics are analyzed in order to estimate the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region. These observations become better measurement approach because the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region is difficult to be observed by other equipment such as a Langmuir probe. A Langmuir probe can measure in the ionospheric D region; however, the absolute values may be off by the influence of wake effects around the sounding rocket. It is demonstrated that the propagation characteristics of the polarized mode waves can be successfully used to derive the electron density profile in the ionospheric D region.

  1. Characterization of metal profile notching as a result of electron shading in a high-density plasma etcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Fred

    1999-04-01

    In today's high volume manufacturing of semiconductor devices large amounts of capital are required to establish and operate production facilities. Therefore, IC manufacturers are now `cloning' processes to enable products and technologies to be transferred to other sites to provide optimum production flexibility. Unfortunately, these processes cannot always simply be lifted and `dropped' into a new facility, even if identical tools are used. During a process and product transfer from one Motorola fab to another the metal etch process exhibited some unexpected complications as severely undercut metal profiles were seen on certain products. Although initially not very well understood the reason for this defect turned out to be ion deflection due to electron shading. This paper will show that by applying the relevant statistical tools this mechanism can be controlled or even completely eliminated. Adjustment of plasma parameters will result in a process which yields excellent profile control.

  2. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  3. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; J. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; J. Menard

    2000-07-20

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. where the plasma frequency is much greater than the electron cyclotron frequency, as in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition. Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large perpendicular wavenumber. This paper reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub o} {approximately} 2 kG, {approximately}10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} {approx} to 10 -- 200 eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode-converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be less than or equal to T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance, where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for overdense plasmas.

  4. New Vary-Chap Profile of the Topside Ionosphere Electron Density Distribution for use with the IRI Model and the GIRO Real-Time Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nsumei, Patrick; Reinisch, Bodo W.; Huang, Xueqin; Bilitza, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    A new Vary-Chap function is introduced for the empirical modeling of the electron density N(h) profile in the topside ionosphere that uses a shape function S(h) in the generalized Chapman function. The Vary-Chap profile extends the bottomside profile that is specified by the IRI model or measured by the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) to the altitude of the ISIS-2 satellite. Some 80,000 topside profiles, measured by the topside sounder on the ISIS-2 satellite were analyzed, and the shape function S(h) was calculated for each profile. A parameterized function S*(h), composed of two sub-functions S1(h) and S2(h), is fitted to the measured S(h) profile using three free parameters. At altitudes just above the F2 layer peak height hmF2, the shape function S1 controls S(h), and at greater altitudes S2 controls S(h). The height of the intersection of S1 and S2 is defined as the transition height h(sub T) indicating the transition from an O(+) to an H(+)-dominated profile shape. The observed transition heights range from approx.500 km to 800 km.

  5. Interstellar Electron Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Hendrick Clark

    This study concerns the investigation of the form of the wavenumber spectrum of the Galactic electron density fluctuations through an examination of the scattering of the radio pulses emitted by pulsars as they propagate through the diffuse ionized interstellar gas. A widely used model for the electron density spectrum is based on the simple power-law: Pne(q)∝ q-β, where β = 11/3 is usually assumed, corresponding to Kolmogorov's turbulence spectrum. The simple Kolmogorov model provides satisfactory agreement for observations along many lines of sight; however, major inconsistencies remain. The inconsistencies suggest that an increase in the ratio of the power between the high (10-8[ m]-1≤ q<=10-7[ m]-1) and low (10-13[ m]-1≤ q<=10-12[ m]-1) wavenumbers is needed. This enhancement in the ratio can in turn be achieved by either including an inner scale, corresponding to a dissipation scale for the turbulent cascade, in the Kolmogorov spectrum or by considering steeper spectra. Spectra with spectral exponents β > 4 have been in general rejected based on observations of pulsar refractive scintillations. The special case of β = 4 has been given little attention and is analyzed in detail. Physically, this 'β = 4' model corresponds to the random distribution, both in location and orientation, of discrete objects with relatively sharp boundaries across the line of sight. An outer scale is included in the model to account for the average size of such objects. We compare the predictions of the inner-scale and β = 4 models both with published observations and observations we made as part of this investigation. We conclude that the form of the wavenumber spectrum is dependent on the line of sight. We propose a composite spectrum featuring a uniform background turbulence in presence of randomly distributed discrete objects, as modeled by the β = model.

  6. Solar cycle effects on the structure of the electron density profiles in the dayside ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliore, Arvydas J.; Luhmann, Janet G.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations from the changes in the electron density structure of the dayside ionosphere of Venus that were brought about by changing solar activity. The ionopause height is generally low for values of the solar zenith angle below about 50 deg regardless of the phase in the solar cycle. At solar maximum, and at times of intermediate solar activity, the ionopause height for solar zenith angles greater than about 50 deg is highly variable, ranging from a minimum of about 200 km to a maximum of more than 1000 km. At times of solar minimum the great majority of all ionopause heights for all solar zenith angles are uniformly low, lying between 200 and 300 km. It is argued that the compressed nature of the Venus atmosphere at solar minimum is produced by permeation of the ionosphere by the solar wind magnetic field, which occurs when the solar wind dynamic pressure exceeds the ionospheric plasma pressure.

  7. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in plasma produced by Nike KrF laser for laser plasma instability research.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J L; Karasik, M; Chan, L Y

    2015-08-01

    A grid image refractometer (GIR) has been implemented at the Nike krypton fluoride laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory. This instrument simultaneously measures propagation angles and transmissions of UV probe rays (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) refracted through plasma. We report results of the first Nike-GIR measurement on a CH plasma produced by the Nike laser pulse (∼1 ns FWHM) with the intensity of 1.1 × 10(15) W/cm(2). The measured angles and transmissions were processed to construct spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) in the underdense coronal region of the plasma. Using an inversion algorithm developed for the strongly refracted rays, the deployed GIR system probed electron densities up to 4 × 10(21) cm(-3) with the density scale length of 120 μm along the plasma symmetry axis. The resulting n(e) and T(e) profiles are verified to be self-consistent with the measured quantities of the refracted probe light. PMID:26329186

  8. Changes in the High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density Profiles in Response to Solar-Wind Perturbations During Large Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Arbacher, Becca

    2011-01-01

    The latest results from an investigation to establish links between solar-wind and topside-ionospheric parameters will be presented including a case where high-latitude topside electron-density Ne(h) profiles indicated dramatic rapid changes in the scale height during the main phase of a large magnetic storm (Dst < -200 nT). These scale-height changes suggest a large heat input to the topside ionosphere at this time. The topside profiles were derived from ISIS-1 digital ionograms obtained from the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDA Web). Solar-wind data obtained from the NASA OMNIWeb database indicated that the magnetic storm was due to a magnetic cloud. This event is one of several large magnetic storms being investigated during the interval from 1965 to 1984 when both solar-wind and digital topside ionograms, from either Alouette-2, ISIS-1, or ISIS-2, are potentially available.

  9. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  10. Variability of the bottomside (B0, B1) profile parameters of ionospheric electron density over the lower mid-latitude Cyprus and comparisons with IRI-2012 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Sampad Kumar; Haralambous, Haris; Mostafa, Md Golam

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigates the variations of the bottomside ionospheric electron density profile thickness (B0) and shape (B1) parameters, deduced from the manually scaled digisonde (DPS-4D) ionograms at the lower mid-latitude Cyprus (Geographic 35°N, 33°E) covering the period 2009-2014. The monthly median hourly values of these parameters during different seasons and solar activity conditions are compared with the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-2012) estimations using three different options namely: Bil-2000, Gul-1987, and ABT-2009. To ensure the quiet time profile, the ionograms of the geomagnetically disturbed periods are discarded from the datasets and the storm model in the IRI is intentionally turned off. The statistical studies reveal considerable discrepancies in the observed B0 parameters from the model simulations, though the divergences are minimal around the daytime and during the summer solstice seasons. Nevertheless, B0 with the Gul-1987 option apparently shows closer daytime value during the low solar active summer, whereas the ABT-2009 option manifested relatively better agreement during the high solar active summer months. The characteristic morning, evening, as well as nighttime departure in the model derived B0 parameters are conspicuous in all the seasons in spite of unnoticed perturbations in the B1, suggesting that further improvement in the existing model database is essential with additional in-situ experimental data across the lower mid-latitude region. The important extracts from this study may support in the international efforts of determining the best set of profile parameters for the climatological representation of the ionospheric electron density variation across the globe.

  11. Density profile of pyrolitic lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinmyo, R.; Hirose, K.; Ohishi, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Density profile of pyrolite at lower mantle high-pressure (P) and -temperature (T) conditions was investigated by using laser-heated diamond-anvil cell up to 117 GPa and 2800 K. The density was determined from chemical composition and unit-cell volume of each constituent mineral (MgSiO3-rich perovskite, ferropericlase and CaSiO3-rich perovskite). The chemical compositions of coexisting phases were analyzed by transmission electron microscope, and their volumes were obtained by in-situ X-ray diffraction measurements. To avoid extensive chemical segregation during laser-heating, sample was coated by gold that worked as a laser absorber (Sinmyo and Hirose 2010 PEPI). Results of chemical analyses show that Mg-Fe (total Fe) partitioning coefficient between MgSiO3-rich perovskite and ferropericlase [K* = (Fe*/Mg)Pv/(Fe*/Mg)Fp] is about 0.6, slightly higher than the value previously reported in the pyrolitic bulk composition (Murakami et al. 2005 GRL). The lower K* value in the previous study may be attributed to the chemical heterogeneity in the sample induced by strong temperature gradient during laser heating. The calculated density profile of pyrolite is indeed in good agreement with the PREM model within experimental errors, in contrast with the mismatch reported by the previous study (Ricolleau et al. 2009 GRL). Our results support the lower mantle has pyrolitic bulk composition, and thus it is not necessary to suppose the chemically stratification in the lower mantle.

  12. On the universality of void density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardelli, E.; Quilis, V.; Varela, J.

    2016-10-01

    The massive exploitation of cosmic voids for precision cosmology in the upcoming dark energy experiments, requires a robust understanding of their internal structure, particularly of their density profile. We show that the void density profile is insensitive to the void radius both in a catalogue of observed voids and in voids from a large cosmological simulation. However, the observed and simulated voids display remarkably different profile shapes, with the former having much steeper profiles than the latter. We ascribe such difference to the dependence of the observed profiles on the galaxy sample used to trace the matter distribution. Samples including low-mass galaxies lead to shallower profiles with respect to the samples where only massive galaxies are used, as faint galaxies live closer to the void centre. We argue that galaxies are biased tracers when used to probe the matter distribution within voids.

  13. The cosmological dependence of cluster density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, Mary M.; Evrard, August E.; Richstone, Douglas O.

    1994-10-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the shape of mean cluster density and velocity profiles in the nonlinear regime formed via gravitational instability. The dependence of the final structure on both cosmology and initial density field is examined, using a grid of cosmologies and scale-free initial power spectra P(k) varies as kn. Einstein-de Sitter, open (Omega0 = 0.2 and 0.1) and flat, low density (Omega0 = 0.2 lambda0 = 0.8) models are examined, with initial spectral indices n = -2, -1 and 0. For each model, we stack clusters in an appropriately scaled manner to define an average density profile in the nonlinear regime. The profiles are well fit by a power law rho(r) varies as r-alpha for radii whereat the local density contrast is between 100 and 3000. This covers 99% of the cluster volume. We find a clear trend toward steeper slopes (larger alphas) with both increasing n and decreasing Omega0. The Omega0 dependence is partially masked by the n dependence; there is degeneracy in the values of alpha between the Einstein-de Sitter and flat, low-density cosmologies. However, the profile slopes in the open models are consistently higher than the Omega = 1 values for the range of n examined. Cluster density profiles are thus potentially useful cosmological diagnostics. We find no evidence for a constant density core in any of the models, although the density profiles do tend to flatten at small radii. Much of the flattening is due to the force softening required by the simulations. An attempt is made to recover the unsoftened profiles assuming angular momentum invariance. The recovered profiles in Einstein-de Sitter cosmologies are consistent with a pure power law up to the highest density contrasts (106) accessible with our resolution. The low-density models show significant deviation from a power law above density contrasts approximately 105. We interpret this curvature as reflecting the non-scale-invariant nature of the background cosmology in these models. These

  14. The cosmological dependence of cluster density profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crone, Mary M.; Evrard, August E.; Richstone, Douglas O.

    1994-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the shape of mean cluster density and velocity profiles in the nonlinear regime formed via gravitational instability. The dependence of the final structure on both cosmology and initial density field is examined, using a grid of cosmologies and scale-free initial power spectra P(k) varies as k(exp n). Einstein-de Sitter, open (Omega(sub 0) = 0.2 and 0.1) and flat, low density (Omega(sub 0) = 0.2 lambda(sub 0) = 0.8) models are examined, with initial spectral indices n = -2, -1 and 0. For each model, we stack clusters in an appropriately scaled manner to define an average density profile in the nonlinear regime. The profiles are well fit by a power law rho(r) varies as r(exp -alpha) for radii whereat the local density contrast is between 100 and 3000. This covers 99% of the cluster volume. We find a clear trend toward steeper slopes (larger alphas) with both increasing n and decreasing Omega(sub 0). The Omega(sub 0) dependence is partially masked by the n dependence; there is degeneracy in the values of alpha between the Einstein-de Sitter and flat, low-density cosmologies. However, the profile slopes in the open models are consistently higher than the Omega = 1 values for the range of n examined. Cluster density profiles are thus potentially useful cosmological diagnostics. We find no evidence for a constant density core in any of the models, although the density profiles do tend to flatten at small radii. Much of the flattening is due to the force softening required by the simulations. An attempt is made to recover the unsoftened profiles assuming angular momentum invariance. The recovered profiles in Einstein-de Sitter cosmologies are consistent with a pure power law up to the highest density contrasts (10(exp 6)) accessible with our resolution. The low-density models show significant deviation from a power law above density contrasts approximately 10(exp 5). We interpret this curvature as reflecting the non

  15. Electron density distributions in the high-latitude magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, Ann M.

    1988-01-01

    Electron density profiles were constructed to study the plasma density depletions in the nightside auroral zone and the density variations with increasing altitude in the polar cap, using electric field spectrum measurements from the plasma wave instrument on DE-1. Sharply defined regions of depleted plasma densities were commonly observed on nightside auroral field lines, in which electron densities were strongly depleted in relation to the adjacent plasmaspheric and polar densities, forming a low-density cavity at about 70 deg invariant latitude. A correlation was found between low auroral plasma densities, upflowing ion distributions, and an energetic precipitating electron population, indicating that electron density depletions in the nightside auroral zone are directly associated with auroral acceleration processes.

  16. Ionospheric E-region electron density and neutral atmosphere variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stick, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron density deviations from a basic variation with the solar zenith angle were investigated. A model study was conducted in which the effects of changes in neutral and relative densities of atomic and molecular oxygen on calculated electron densities were compared with incoherent scatter measurements in the height range 100-117 km at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The feasibility of determining tides in the neutral atmosphere from electron density profiles was studied. It was determined that variations in phase between the density and temperature variation and the comparable magnitudes of their components make it appear improbable that the useful information on tidal modes can be obtained in this way.

  17. Universal density profile for cosmic voids.

    PubMed

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P M; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2014-06-27

    We present a simple empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in ΛCDM N-body simulations. This function is universal across void size and redshift, accurately describing a large radial range of scales around void centers with only two free parameters. In analogy to halo density profiles, these parameters describe the scale radius and the central density of voids. While we initially start with a more general four-parameter model, we find two of its parameters to be redundant, as they follow linear trends with the scale radius in two distinct regimes of the void sample, separated by its compensation scale. Assuming linear theory, we derive an analytic formula for the velocity profile of voids and find an excellent agreement with the numerical data as well. In our companion paper [Sutter et al., arXiv:1309.5087 [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. (to be published)

  18. Universal Density Profile for Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2014-06-01

    We present a simple empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in ΛCDM N-body simulations. This function is universal across void size and redshift, accurately describing a large radial range of scales around void centers with only two free parameters. In analogy to halo density profiles, these parameters describe the scale radius and the central density of voids. While we initially start with a more general four-parameter model, we find two of its parameters to be redundant, as they follow linear trends with the scale radius in two distinct regimes of the void sample, separated by its compensation scale. Assuming linear theory, we derive an analytic formula for the velocity profile of voids and find an excellent agreement with the numerical data as well. In our companion paper [Sutter et al., arXiv:1309.5087 [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. (to be published)

  19. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Spaleta, J.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either ''overdense,'' operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g., {omega}{sub pe}>>{Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau}>2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers as a result of their large k{sub perp}. In this article we report on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0}{approx}2kG, {approx}10{sup 13}cm{sup -3} and T{sub e}{approx}10--200eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {<=}T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in the edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe}>>{Omega}{sub ce}.

  20. Momentum-space properties from coordinate-space electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Harbola, Manoj K.; Zope, Rajendra R.; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    2005-05-22

    Electron density and electron momentum density, while independently tractable experimentally, bear no direct connection without going through the many-electron wave function. However, invoking a variant of the constrained-search formulation of density-functional theory, we develop a general scheme (valid for arbitrary external potentials) yielding decent momentum-space properties, starting exclusively from the coordinate-space electron density. A numerical illustration of the scheme is provided for the closed-shell atomic systems He, Be, and Ne in their ground state and for 1s{sup 1} 2s{sup 1} singlet electronic excited state for helium by calculating the Compton profiles and the expectation values derived from given coordinate-space electron densities.

  1. Determining Atmospheric-Density Profile of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarani, Siamak

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for measuring the atmospheric density of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, to create an accurate density profile as a function of altitude. This will allow mission planners to select safe flyby altitudes, and for navigation engineers to accurately predict the delta-v associated with those flybys. The spacecraft angular rate vector profile as a function of time is collected via telemetry from the onboard attitude estimator once every 2 seconds. The telemetry for thruster times, as a function of time, for eight Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters is gathered, once a second, from the Propulsion Manager algorithm of the Cassini onboard attitude-control flight software. Using these data, the ground software computes the angular momentum vector profile and the per-axis external torque as a function of time imparted from the spacecraft only due to the atmospheric drag. The software can then determine the Titan atmospheric density profile as a function of time and altitude with the known values of spacecraft center of mass, the Titan-relative range and velocity data, the projected area, and the aerocenter, along with the estimated drag coefficient in a free molecular flow field.

  2. Density Profile Measurement in the TS-4 Merging Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashiya, Hitoshi; Ono, Yasushi; Katsurai, Makoto

    1999-11-01

    A CO2 laser interferometer system is being developed to measure density profiles of merging plasmas in new-built plasma merging device, TS-4 (university of Tokyo Spherical torus-4). The TS-4 merging device introduces a flux-core method to produce compact toroid whose major and minor radii are 0.50m, 0.42m, and its electron density will be ranging from 5× 10^19 to 5 × 10^20, respectively. Its main experimental subjects are to investigate (1) merging formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC), (2) ultra-high-beta spherical tokamak (ST) formation by use of FRC, (3) comparative study of ST, spheromak, FRC and reversed-field pinches (RFP) and (4) laboratory experiment of magnetic reconnection. The multi-cannel Michelson interferometer with heterodyne modulator has from 5 to 10 beam paths of 60W CO2 laser (10.6μm) to measure radial profile of electron density on the midplane. The electron density profile of merging toroids especially around the ``X-point'' will be studied in detail and its physical properties will be discussed.

  3. Counterion density profiles at charged flexible membranes.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Christian C; Netz, Roland R

    2005-09-16

    Counterion distributions at charged flexible membranes are studied using analytical and simulation methods in both Poisson-Boltzmann and strong-coupling limits. The softer the membrane, the more smeared out the counterion-density profile becomes and counterions penetrate through the mean-membrane surface location, in agreement with anomalous scattering results. Repulsion between membrane charges enhances protrusions and induces short-scale membrane roughening.

  4. Electron density depletions in the nightside auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Burch, J. L.; Green, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 1 measurements are used to investigate regions of low electron density in the nightside auroral zone. Sharply defined regions of low electron density are found in auroral zone crossings from the predusk hours until the early morning hours at all radial distances up to at least 4.6 earth radii. Densities in the auroral cavity are shown to fall to values below 0.3/cu cm. Within the auroral cavity, electron-density-profile variations of a factor of 2 or more on spatial scales of tens of kilometers are found, and the electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency ratios are 0.02-0.4. The results suggest associations between the density depletions in the nightside auroral zone and auroral acceleration processes.

  5. Electron (charge) density studies of cellulose models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introductory material first describes electron density approaches and demonstrates visualization of electron lone pairs and bonding as concentrations of electron density. Then it focuses on the application of Bader’s Quantum Theory of Atoms-in-Molecules (AIM) to cellulose models. The purpose of the ...

  6. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  7. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena that relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions. Discusses the quantum mechanical background needed and presents ways of using models of electronic ground states to teach electronic structure, bonding concepts,…

  8. Column density profiles of multiphase gaseous haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cameron J.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Agertz, Oscar

    2016-05-01

    We analyse circumgalactic medium (CGM) in a suite of high-resolution cosmological re-simulations of a Milky Way size galaxy and show that CGM properties are quite sensitive to details of star formation-feedback loop modelling. The simulation that produces a realistic late-type galaxy, fails to reproduce existing observations of the CGM. In contrast, simulation that does not produce a realistic galaxy has the predicted CGM in better agreement with observations. This illustrates that properties of galaxies and properties of their CGM provide strong complementary constraints on the processes governing galaxy formation. Our simulations predict that column density profiles of ions are well described by an exponential function of projected distance d: N ∝ e^{-d/h_s}. Simulations thus indicate that the sharp drop in absorber detections at larger distances in observations does not correspond to a `boundary' of an ion, but reflects the underlying steep exponential column density profile. Furthermore, we find that ionization energy of ions is tightly correlated with the scaleheight hs: h_s ∝ E_ion^{0.74}. At z ≈ 0, warm gas traced by low-ionization species (e.g. Mg II and C IV) has hs ≈ 0.03 - 0.07Rvir, while higher ionization species (O VI and Ne VIII) have hs ≈ 0.32 - 0.45Rvir. Finally, the scaleheights of ions in our simulations evolve slower than the virial radius for z ≤ 2, but similarly to the halo scale radius, rs. Thus, we suggest that the column density profiles of galaxies at different redshifts should be scaled by rs rather than the halo virial radius.

  9. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  10. Electron density studies of methyl cellobioside

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental X-ray diffraction crystallography determines the variations in electron density that result from the periodic array of atoms in a crystal. Normally, the positions and type of atom are determined from the electron density based on an approximation that the atoms are spherical. However, t...

  11. Midplane Neutral Density Profiles in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Scotti, F.; Bell, R. E.; Leblanc, B. P.; Raman, R.

    2013-10-01

    The experimental determination of neutral densities in tokamak plasmas from line radiation is only accurate in the narrow region in which both the excitation rate and neutral density are significant; elsewhere the result is dominated by noise. We propose an alternative, simulation based inversion procedure utilizing tools developed in the validation of the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code against Gas Puff Imaging camera data. Here, the Balmer- β emission rate recorded by an absolutely calibrated tangentially viewing camera is used to quantify a simulated, ad hoc neutral gas source at the vacuum vessel wall. This procedure yields absolute radial profiles of deuterium atoms and molecules at midplane. The validity of this characterization of the gas source is confirmed by the similarity of the shapes of the simulated and observed light emission profiles. We also compare the resulting neutral pressures at the vessel walls with data from midplane micro-ion gauges. This work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals.

  13. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    PubMed

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  14. Stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in cold quantum plasma using ramp density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2012-10-15

    By using a transient density profile, we have demonstrated stationary self-focusing of an electromagnetic Gaussian beam in cold quantum plasma. The paper is devoted to the prospects of using upward increasing ramp density profile of an inhomogeneous nonlinear medium with quantum effects in self-focusing mechanism of high intense laser beam. We have found that the upward ramp density profile in addition to quantum effects causes much higher oscillation and better focusing of laser beam in cold quantum plasma in comparison to that in the classical relativistic case. Our computational results reveal the importance and influence of formation of electron density profiles in enhancing laser self-focusing.

  15. The circumburst density profile around GRB progenitors: a statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, S.; Klose, S.; Björnsson, G.; Jakobsson, P.; Kann, D. A.; Rossi, A.; Krühler, T.; Greiner, J.; Ferrero, P.

    2011-02-01

    According to our present understanding, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) originate from the collapse of massive stars, while short bursts are caused by to the coalescence of compact stellar objects. Because the afterglow evolution is determined by the circumburst density profile, n(r), traversed by the fireball, it can be used to distinguish between a constant density medium, n(r) = const., and a free stellar wind, n(r) ∝ r-2. Our goal is to derive the most probable circumburst density profile for a large number of Swift-detected bursts using well-sampled afterglow light curves in the optical and X-ray bands. We combined all publicly available optical and Swift/X-ray afterglow data from June 2005 to September 2009 to find the best-sampled late-time afterglow light curves. After applying several selection criteria, our final sample consists of 27 bursts, including one short burst. The afterglow evolution was then studied within the framework of the fireball model. We find that the majority (18) of the 27 afterglow light curves are compatible with a constant density medium (ISM case). Only 6 of the 27 afterglows show evidence of a wind profile at late times. In particular, we set upper limits on the wind termination-shock radius, RT, for GRB fireballs that are propagating into an ISM profile and lower limits on RT for those that were found to propagate through a wind medium. Observational evidence for ISM profiles dominates in GRB afterglow studies, implying that most GRB progenitors might have relatively small wind termination-shock radii. A smaller group of progenitors, however, seems to be characterised by significantly more extended wind regions. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  17. Laser Induced Tunnel Ionization and Electron Density Evolution in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Wiel, M. J. v. d.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2005-08-01

    An indigenously built Ti:sapphire laser system delivering 50 mJ, 100 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is employed to tunnel ionize air at 1 atm pressure and form a plasma channel. The laser is line focused using a cylindrical lens to a spot size of 20 μm× 1 mm. A folded wave interferometry is used to deduce the radial electron density profile by measuring the phase shift and employing Abel inversion. The maximum value of chord-integrated electron density and radial electron density are estimated to be approximately equal to 3.0× 1016 cm-2 and 4.0× 1018 cm-3 respectively with density scale length of 20 μm. These results have been theoretically interpreted by developing a unified formalism of tunnel ionization. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with the theory.

  18. Absolute electron density measurements in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. D.; Howlett, L. C.; Rao, N. B.; Ulwick, J. C.; Labelle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the electron density profile and its variations is crucial to further progress in understanding the physics of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere. To accomplish this, a plasma frequency probe was included in the payload complement of two rockets flown during the Condor rocket campaign conducted from Peru in March 1983. This paper presents density profiles of the disturbed equatorial ionosphere from a night-time flight in which spread-F conditions were present and from a day-time flight during strong electrojet conditions. Results from both flights are in excellent agreement with simultaneous radar data in that the regions of highly disturbed plasma coincide with the radar signatures. The spread-F rocket penetrated a topside depletion during both the upleg and downleg. The electrojet measurements showed a profile peaking at 1.3 x 10 to the 5th per cu cm at 106 km, with large scale fluctuations having amplitudes of roughly 10 percent seen only in the upward gradient in electron density. This is in agreement with plasma instability theory. It is further shown that simultaneous measurements by fixed-bias Langmuir probes, when normalized at a single point to the altitude profile of electron density, are inadequate to correctly parameterize the observed enhancements and depletions.

  19. Electron density measurements in highly electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental measurements of the electron density in very electronegative ‘ion–ion’ Ar–SF6 plasmas where previous investigations using Langmuir probes have observed electronegativities of up to 5000. The electron density is measured using a short matched dipole probe technique that provides a tolerance better than  ±2 · 1013 m‑3. The results demonstrate that the electron density in the low pressure plasma source (which contains a magnetic filter) can be reduced to around 2.7 · 1013 m‑3 with a corresponding plasma electronegativity of about 4000; close to that from fluid simulation predictions. The highest electronegativity, and lowest electron density, is achieved with a pure SF6 plasma, while adding only 6% SF6 to Ar allows the electronegativity to be increased from 0 to a few hundred with a corresponding decrease in the electron density by more than a thousand. The impedance probe based on a short matched dipole appears to be a practical diagnostic that can be used for independent measurements of the electron density in very electronegative plasmas, and opens up the possibility to further investigate and optimize electronegative plasma sources.

  20. Electron density measurements in highly electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental measurements of the electron density in very electronegative ‘ion-ion’ Ar-SF6 plasmas where previous investigations using Langmuir probes have observed electronegativities of up to 5000. The electron density is measured using a short matched dipole probe technique that provides a tolerance better than  ±2 · 1013 m-3. The results demonstrate that the electron density in the low pressure plasma source (which contains a magnetic filter) can be reduced to around 2.7 · 1013 m-3 with a corresponding plasma electronegativity of about 4000; close to that from fluid simulation predictions. The highest electronegativity, and lowest electron density, is achieved with a pure SF6 plasma, while adding only 6% SF6 to Ar allows the electronegativity to be increased from 0 to a few hundred with a corresponding decrease in the electron density by more than a thousand. The impedance probe based on a short matched dipole appears to be a practical diagnostic that can be used for independent measurements of the electron density in very electronegative plasmas, and opens up the possibility to further investigate and optimize electronegative plasma sources.

  1. Theoretical study of lithium ionic conductors by electronic stress tensor density and electronic kinetic energy density.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroo; Fujii, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Taku; Aihara, Yuichi; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of lithium ionic conductors, Li3PO4 and Li3PS4, using the electronic stress tensor density and kinetic energy density with special focus on the ionic bonds among them. We find that, as long as we examine the pattern of the eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor density, we cannot distinguish between the ionic bonds and bonds among metalloid atoms. We then show that they can be distinguished by looking at the morphology of the electronic interface, the zero surface of the electronic kinetic energy density. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The effect of the induced magnetic field on the electron density vertical profile of the Mars' ionosphere: A Mars Express MARSIS radar data analysis and interpretation, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Nicolás, M.; Sánchez-Cano, B.; Witasse, O.; Blelly, P.-L.; Vázquez, L.; Lester, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report the indirect detection of an induced magnetic field in the ionosphere of Mars and its effects on the electron density behaviour. The observations were made by the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) aboard Mars Express, in its Active Ionospheric Sounding mode. During several orbits on June 2006, the ionosphere showed an unusual behaviour, characterised by a compression of the plasma above the main ionospheric peak as observed by the topside total electron content, the plasma scale height, and the local plasma in the Mars Express surroundings. The compression was most likely due to an induced magnetic field originating from the solar wind and measured by the MARSIS antennas, which was able to penetrate into the ionosphere. In particular, for several profiles, the density distribution can be clearly defined by two different plasma scale heights, which indicates a transition region between both of them. From the balance of magnetic and thermal plasma pressures and from a comparison with a numerical model of the Martian ionosphere, the hypothesis of a penetrating induced magnetic field down to a transition altitude around 150 km is confirmed. This compressed ionosphere has also been compared with data from other orbits in the same location and at the same time period, i.e. 18.5 days of difference between first and last orbits, where there is no measured induced magnetic field, and the orbits show a clearly different behaviour.

  3. Absolute Measurement of Electron Cloud Density

    SciTech Connect

    Covo, M K; Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Seidl, P A; Logan, G; Bieniosek, F; Baca, D; Vay, J; Orlando, E; Vujic, J L

    2007-06-21

    Beam interaction with background gas and walls produces ubiquitous clouds of stray electrons that frequently limit the performance of particle accelerator and storage rings. Counterintuitively we obtained the electron cloud accumulation by measuring the expelled ions that are originated from the beam-background gas interaction, rather than by measuring electrons that reach the walls. The kinetic ion energy measured with a retarding field analyzer (RFA) maps the depressed beam space-charge potential and provides the dynamic electron cloud density. Clearing electrode current measurements give the static electron cloud background that complements and corroborates with the RFA measurements, providing an absolute measurement of electron cloud density during a 5 {micro}s duration beam pulse in a drift region of the magnetic transport section of the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL.

  4. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  5. Gyrokinetic modelling of stationary electron and impurity profiles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Skyman, A. Tegnered, D. Nordman, H. Strand, P.

    2014-09-15

    Particle transport due to Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG)/Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) turbulence is investigated using the gyrokinetic code GENE. Both a reduced quasilinear treatment and nonlinear simulations are performed for typical tokamak parameters corresponding to ITG dominated turbulence. The gyrokinetic results are compared and contrasted with results from a computationally efficient fluid model. A selfconsistent treatment is used, where the stationary local profiles are calculated corresponding to zero particle flux simultaneously for electrons and trace impurities. The scaling of the stationary profiles with magnetic shear, safety factor, electron-to-ion temperature ratio, collisionality, toroidal sheared rotation, plasma β, triangularity, and elongation is investigated. In addition, the effect of different main ion mass on the zero flux condition is discussed. The electron density gradient can significantly affect the stationary impurity profile scaling. It is therefore expected that a selfconsistent treatment will yield results more comparable to experimental results for parameter scans where the stationary background density profile is sensitive. This is shown to be the case in scans over magnetic shear, collisionality, elongation, and temperature ratio, for which the simultaneous zero flux electron and impurity profiles are calculated. A slight asymmetry between hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium with respect to profile peaking is obtained, in particular, for scans in collisionality and temperature ratio.

  6. Determination of the Electron Cyclotron Current Drive Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Schuster, D.I.; Makowski, M.A.

    1999-11-01

    Evaluation of the profile of non-inductive current density driven by absorption of electron cyclotron waves (ECCD) using time evolution of the poloidal flux indicated a broader profile than predicted by theory. To determine the nature of this broadening, a 1-1/2 D transport calculation of current density evolution was used to generate the signals which the DIII-D motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic would measure in the event that the current density evolution followed the neoclassical Ohm's law with the theoretical ECCD profile. Comparison with the measured MSE data indicates the experimental data is consistent with the ECCD profile predicted by theory. The simulations yield a lower limit on the magnitude of the ECCD which is at or above the value found in Fokker-Planck calculations of the ECCD including quasilinear and parallel electric field effects.

  7. Rocket measurements of electron density irregularities during MAC/SINE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulwick, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Four Super Arcas rockets were launched at the Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, as part of the MAC/SINE campaign to measure electron density irregularities with high spatial resolution in the cold summer polar mesosphere. They were launched as part of two salvos: the turbulent/gravity wave salvo (3 rockets) and the EISCAT/SOUSY radar salvo (one rocket). In both salvos meteorological rockets, measuring temperature and winds, were also launched and the SOUSY radar, located near the launch site, measured mesospheric turbulence. Electron density irregularities and strong gradients were measured by the rocket probes in the region of most intense backscatter observed by the radar. The electron density profiles (8 to 4 on ascent and 4 on descent) show very different characteristics in the peak scattering region and show marked spatial and temporal variability. These data are intercompared and discussed.

  8. Electronics. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability skills (competencies)…

  9. Density profile control in a large diameter, helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cluggish, B.P.; Anderegg, F.A.; Freeman, R.L.; Gilleland, J.; Hilsabeck, T.J.; Isler, R.C.; Lee, W.D.; Litvak, A.A.; Miller, R.L.; Ohkawa, T.; Putvinski, S.; Umstadter, K.R.; Winslow, D.L.

    2005-05-15

    Plasmas with peaked radial density profiles have been generated in the world's largest helicon device, with plasma diameters of over 70 cm. The density profiles can be manipulated by controlling the phase of the current in each strap of two multistrap antenna arrays. Phase settings that excite long axial wavelengths create hollow density profiles, whereas settings that excite short axial wavelengths create peaked density profiles. This change in density profile is consistent with the cold-plasma dispersion relation for helicon modes, which predicts a strong increase in the effective skin depth of the rf fields as the wavelength decreases. Scaling of the density with magnetic field, gas pressure, and rf power is also presented.

  10. Two-color terahertz interferometer based on the frequency-splitted orthogonal polarization modes of the water vapor laser and designed for measuring the electron density profile in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Letunov, A. A.; Logvinenko, V. P.; Zav'yalov, V. V.

    2008-03-15

    An upgraded diagnostics for measuring the electron density profile in the L-2M stellarator is proposed. The existing diagnostics employs an interferometer based on an HCN laser with a mechanical frequency shifter and unmagnetized InSb detectors cooled with liquid helium. It is proposed to replace the HCN laser with a water vapor laser operating simultaneously at two wavelengths (220 and 118 {mu}m). Being equipped with an anisotropic exit mirror, the water vapor laser allows the generation of orthogonally polarized, frequency-splitted modes at each of these wavelengths with a frequency difference of several tens of kilohertzs. Such a scheme makes it possible to get rid of the mechanical frequency shifter. Moreover, simultaneous measurements at two wavelengths allow one to reliably separate the phase increments introduced by the plasma electron component and by variations in the lengths of the interferometer arms. To take full advantage of this scheme, specially developed cryogenic receivers consisting of Ge and InSb photodetectors placed one after another will be used. To increase the response of the system near {lambda} = 220 {mu}m, the InSb detector is placed in a Almost-Equal-To 0.55-T magnetic field.

  11. New Data on the Topside Electron Density Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xue-Qin; Reinisch, Bodo; Bilitza, Dieter; Benson, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    The existing uncertainties about the electron density profiles in the topside ionosphere, i.e., in the height region from hmF2 to approx. 2000 km, require the search for new data sources. The ISIS and Alouette topside sounder satellites from the sixties to the eighties recorded millions of ionograms and most were not analyzed in terms of electron density profiles. In recent years an effort started to digitize the analog recordings to prepare the ionograms for computerized analysis. As of November 2001 about 350,000 ionograms have been digitized from the original 7-track analog tapes. These data are available in binary and CDF format from the anonymous ftp site of the National Space Science Data Center. A search site and browse capabilities on CDAWeb assist the scientific usage of these data. All information and access links can be found at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/space/isis/isis-status.html. This paper describes the ISIS data restoration effort and shows how the digital ionograms are automatically processed into electron density profiles from satellite orbit altitude (1400 km for ISIS-2) down to the F peak. Because of the large volume of data an automated processing algorithm is imperative. The automatic topside ionogram scaler with true height algorithm TOPIST software developed for this task is successfully scaling approx.70 % of the ionograms. An 'editing process' is available to manually scale the more difficult ionograms. The automated processing of the digitized ISIS ionograms is now underway, producing a much-needed database of topside electron density profiles for ionospheric modeling covering more than one solar cycle. The ISIS data restoration efforts are supported through NASA's Applied Systems and Information Research Program.

  12. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  13. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-01

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials. PMID:26646862

  14. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  15. Open-cluster density profiles derived using a kernel estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, Anton F.

    2016-03-01

    Surface and spatial radial density profiles in open clusters are derived using a kernel estimator method. Formulae are obtained for the contribution of every star into the spatial density profile. The evaluation of spatial density profiles is tested against open-cluster models from N-body experiments with N = 500. Surface density profiles are derived for seven open clusters (NGC 1502, 1960, 2287, 2516, 2682, 6819 and 6939) using Two-Micron All-Sky Survey data and for different limiting magnitudes. The selection of an optimal kernel half-width is discussed. It is shown that open-cluster radius estimates hardly depend on the kernel half-width. Hints of stellar mass segregation and structural features indicating cluster non-stationarity in the regular force field are found. A comparison with other investigations shows that the data on open-cluster sizes are often underestimated. The existence of an extended corona around the open cluster NGC 6939 was confirmed. A combined function composed of the King density profile for the cluster core and the uniform sphere for the cluster corona is shown to be a better approximation of the surface radial density profile.The King function alone does not reproduce surface density profiles of sample clusters properly. The number of stars, the cluster masses and the tidal radii in the Galactic gravitational field for the sample clusters are estimated. It is shown that NGC 6819 and 6939 are extended beyond their tidal surfaces.

  16. The Uppsala Electron-Density Server.

    PubMed

    Kleywegt, Gerard J; Harris, Mark R; Zou, Jin Yu; Taylor, Thomas C; Wählby, Anders; Jones, T Alwyn

    2004-12-01

    The Uppsala Electron Density Server (EDS; http://eds.bmc.uu.se/) is a web-based facility that provides access to electron-density maps and statistics concerning the fit of crystal structures and their maps. Maps are available for approximately 87% of the crystallographic Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries for which structure factors have been deposited and for which straightforward map calculations succeed in reproducing the published R value to within five percentage points. Here, an account is provided of the methods that are used to generate the information contained in the server. Some of the problems that are encountered in the map-generation process as well as some spin-offs of the project are also discussed.

  17. Synopsis of D- and E-region electron densities during the energy budget campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedrich, M.; Baker, K. D.; Brekke, A.; Dickinson, P. H. G.; Dumbs, A.; Grandal, B.; Thrane, E. V.; Smith, L. G.; Torkar, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    Electron density profiles from ground-based and rocket-borne measurements conducted at three sites in northern Scandinavia under various degrees of geophysical disturbances are presented. These data are checked against an instantaneous picture of the ionospheric absorption obtained via the dense riometer network. A map of the riometer absorption and measured electron densities over Scandinavia is given.

  18. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Relatively small discrepancies between Apollo 17 lunar neutron probe experiment (LNPE) data and theoretical calculations by Lingenfelter, Canfield, and Hampel in the effect of Cd absorption on the neutron density, and in the relative Sm-149 to Gd-157 capture rates reported previously, imply that the true lunar Gd-157 capture rate is about one-half of that derived theoretically.

  19. Void alignment and density profile applied to measuring cosmological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang

    2015-12-01

    We study the orientation and density profiles of the cosmological voids with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; Ahn et al.) 10 data. Using voids to test Alcock-Paczynski effect has been proposed and tested in both simulations and actual SDSS data. Previous observations imply that there exist an empirical stretching factor which plays an important role in the voids' orientation. Simulations indicate that this empirical stretching factor is caused by the void galaxies' peculiar velocities. Recently Hamaus et al. found that voids' density profiles are universal and their average velocities satisfy linear theory very well. In this paper, we first confirm that the stretching effect exists using independent analysis. We then apply the universal density profile to measure the cosmological parameters. We find that the void density profile can be a tool to measure the cosmological parameters.

  20. Electronics Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile covers the occupation of electronics technician. Section 1 provides the occupation definition. Section 2 lists development committee members. Section 3 provides the leveling codes--abbreviations for grade level, (by the end of grade 12, by the end of associate degree), academic codes (communications, math, or…

  1. Electron temperatures and densities in the Venus ionosphere - Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Krehbiel, J. P.; Nagy, A. F.; Donahue, T. M.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Pedersen, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe was used to obtain altitude profiles of electron temperature and density in the ionosphere of Venus. Elevated temperatures at times of low solar wind flux might indicate support for a certain model. According to this model, less than 5% of the solar wind energy is deposited at the ionopause and is conducted downward through an unmagnetized ionosphere to the region below 200 km where electron cooling to the neutral atmosphere proceeds rapidly. The patterns of electron temperatures and densities at higher solar wind fluxes are considered, the variability of the ionopause height in the late afternoon is noted, and the role of an induced magnetic barrier in the neighborhood of the ionopause is discussed.

  2. Electron Density Calibration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Martinez, F.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Celis-Lopez, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, A.

    2006-09-08

    Computed tomography (CT) images are used as basic input data for most modern radiosurgery treatment planning systems (TPS). CT data not only provide anatomic information to delineate target volumes, but also allow the introduction of corrections for tissue inhomogeneities into dose calculations during the treatment planning procedure. These corrections involve the determination of a relationship between tissue electron density ({rho}e) and their corresponding Hounsfield Units (HU). In this work, an elemental analysis of different commercial tissue equivalent materials using Scanning Electron Microscopy was carried out to characterize their chemical composition. The tissue equivalent materials were chosen to ensure a large range of {rho}e to be included in the CT scanner calibration. A phantom was designed and constructed with these materials to simulate the size of a human head.

  3. Electron density in the equatorial topside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.

    1985-01-01

    Ionospheric electron content studies have revealed severe discrepancies between Faraday measurements and model predictions at low latitudes. In this investigation, satellite data of AE-C and Aeros and incoherent scatter data from Jicamarca, Peru and Arecibo, Puerto Rico are used to examine the latitudinal and diurnal extent of this disagreement. It is found that in the modified dip range -30 deg to +30 deg the present IRI relative layer shape underestimates the thickness of the topside electron density during both, day and night. The Bent model which was used as a source for the IRI description performs somewhat better in this critical dip range, though it does not reach the observed values. Also it does not show the observed diurnal variation. A correction to the IRI formula is proposed that guarantees better agreement with the satellite and incoherent scatter data.

  4. Stimulated neutrino transformation with sinusoidal density profiles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Patton, K. M.

    2013-03-28

    Large amplitude oscillations between the states of a quantum system can be stimulated by sinusoidal external potentials with frequencies that are similar to the energy level splitting of the states or a fraction thereof. Situations where the applied frequency is equal to an integer fraction of the energy level splittings are known as parametric resonances. We investigate this effect for neutrinos both analytically and numerically for the case of arbitrary numbers of neutrino flavors. We look for environments where the effect may be observed and find that supernovae are the one realistic possibility due to the necessity of both largemore » densities and large amplitude fluctuations. In conclusion, the comparison of numerical and analytical results of neutrino propagation through a model supernova reveals that it is possible to predict the locations and strengths of the stimulated transitions that occur.« less

  5. Stimulated neutrino transformation with sinusoidal density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Patton, K. M.

    2013-03-28

    Large amplitude oscillations between the states of a quantum system can be stimulated by sinusoidal external potentials with frequencies that are similar to the energy level splitting of the states or a fraction thereof. Situations where the applied frequency is equal to an integer fraction of the energy level splittings are known as parametric resonances. We investigate this effect for neutrinos both analytically and numerically for the case of arbitrary numbers of neutrino flavors. We look for environments where the effect may be observed and find that supernovae are the one realistic possibility due to the necessity of both large densities and large amplitude fluctuations. In conclusion, the comparison of numerical and analytical results of neutrino propagation through a model supernova reveals that it is possible to predict the locations and strengths of the stimulated transitions that occur.

  6. A representative density profile of the North Greenland snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian Schaller, Christoph; Freitag, Johannes; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Laepple, Thomas; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Eisen, Olaf

    2016-09-01

    Along a traverse through North Greenland in May 2015 we collected snow cores up to 2 m depth and analyzed their density and water isotopic composition. A new sampling technique and an adapted algorithm for comparing data sets from different sites and aligning stratigraphic features are presented. We find good agreement of the density layering in the snowpack over hundreds of kilometers, which allows the construction of a representative density profile. The results are supported by an empirical statistical density model, which is used to generate sets of random profiles and validate the applied methods. Furthermore we are able to calculate annual accumulation rates, align melt layers and observe isotopic temperatures in the area back to 2010. Distinct relations of δ18O with both accumulation rate and density are deduced. Inter alia the depths of the 2012 melt layers and high-resolution densities are provided for applications in remote sensing.

  7. Temperature, N2, and N density profiles of Triton's atmosphere - Observations and model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.; Sandel, B. R.; Herbert, F.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Improved analysis of the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometer observations of the solar occultation by Triton yields the isothermal temperature and N2 number densities in the altitude range 475-675 km. The signature of atomic nitrogen in the occultation spectra is identified, its density profile is derived, and an experimental value of the escape rate of N atoms is given. The one-dimensional thermal conductivity equation for a spherical atmosphere is solved, taking into account CO heating and cooling and heating by precipitating electrons, solar radiation, and chemical effects. Finally, profiles of number densities of N, H2, and H are calculated.

  8. Weather Effects on the D-region Electron Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccles, V.; Rice, D.; Sojka, J. J.; Hunsucker, R. D.; Raitt, W. J.

    2009-05-01

    Studies of D-region ionization are complicated by the low electron densities and the altitude range involved. The D-region bottom-side densities are less than 100 cm-3 and the D-region altitudes are inaccessible to most in-situ measurements. Available methods, such as sounding rockets and incoherent scatter radar, can provide detailed profiles for specific times and locations, but mesoscale characterization of D-region weather effects is difficult to obtain. Specifically the horizontal structuring of these densities and to which drivers they are most sensitive is unclear. The response of the D-region to solar inputs, background radiation sources, and wind transport from high latitudes needs to be better understood to improve both our understanding and modeling efforts. The Agile beacon monitor network measures signal strength from radio beacons from three important frequency ranges. The measurements in three frequency ranges, VLF (3-30kHz), LF (30-300 kHz), and HF (0.3-30 MHz), cooperatively help define the D region more precisely. The daytime D-region is perhaps best known for absorption of frequencies below 30 MHz. Measurements of radio signal absorption are useful in describing the D-region response to solar flares and the winter absorption anomaly. Description of the D- region bottom-side and nighttime D-region density requires a different methodology. VLF and LF propagation analysis is sensitive to densities in the 0.1 to 10 cm-3 range. Networks of receivers over these frequency ranges provide an approach for observing the horizontal spatial distribution of the lower D-region density. The D-region electron densities may be inferred by interpreting signal levels at VLF, LF, and HF using D-region models and propagation analysis. This paper describes how the model electron density profiles are modified to include weather effects. Variations are observed in day and night data even during the quietest solar conditions; some variations are consistent with

  9. The flat density profiles of massive, and relaxed galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.

    2014-07-01

    The present paper is an extension and continuation of Del Popolo (2012a) which studied the role of baryon physics on clusters of galaxies formation. In the present paper, we studied by means of the SIM introduced in Del Popolo (2009), the total and DM density profiles, and the correlations among different quantities, observed by Newman et al. (2012a,b), in seven massive and relaxed clusters, namely MS2137, A963, A383, A611, A2537, A2667, A2390. As already found in Del Popolo 2012a, the density profiles depend on baryonic fraction, angular momentum, and the angular momentum transferred from baryons to DM through dynamical friction. Similarly to Newman et al. (2012a,b), the total density profile, in the radius range 0.003-0.03r200, has a mean total density profile in agreement with dissipationless simulations. The slope of the DM profiles of all clusters is flatter than -1. The slope, α, has a maximum value (including errors) of α = -0.88 in the case of A2390, and minimum value α = -0.14 for A2537. The baryonic component dominates the mass distribution at radii < 5-10 kpc, while the outer distribution is dark matter dominated. We found an anti-correlation among the slope α, the effective radius, Re, and the BCG mass, and a correlation among the core radius rcore, and Re. Moreover, the mass in 100 kpc (mainly dark matter) is correlated with the mass inside 5 kpc (mainly baryons). The behavior of the total mass density profile, the DM density profile, and the quoted correlations can be understood in a double phase scenario. In the first dissipative phase the proto-BCG forms, and in the second dissipationless phase, dynamical friction between baryonic clumps (collapsing to the center) and the DM halo flattens the inner slope of the density profile. In simple terms, the large scatter in the inner slope from cluster to cluster, and the anti-correlation among the slope, α and Re is due to the fact that in order to have a total mass density profile which is NFW

  10. The flat density profiles of massive, and relaxed galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Popolo, A. Del

    2014-07-01

    The present paper is an extension and continuation of Del Popolo (2012a) which studied the role of baryon physics on clusters of galaxies formation. In the present paper, we studied by means of the SIM introduced in Del Popolo (2009), the total and DM density profiles, and the correlations among different quantities, observed by Newman et al. (2012a,b), in seven massive and relaxed clusters, namely MS2137, A963, A383, A611, A2537, A2667, A2390. As already found in Del Popolo 2012a, the density profiles depend on baryonic fraction, angular momentum, and the angular momentum transferred from baryons to DM through dynamical friction. Similarly to Newman et al. (2012a,b), the total density profile, in the radius range 0.003–0.03r{sub 200}, has a mean total density profile in agreement with dissipationless simulations. The slope of the DM profiles of all clusters is flatter than -1. The slope, α, has a maximum value (including errors) of α = −0.88 in the case of A2390, and minimum value α = −0.14 for A2537. The baryonic component dominates the mass distribution at radii < 5–10 kpc, while the outer distribution is dark matter dominated. We found an anti-correlation among the slope α, the effective radius, R{sub e}, and the BCG mass, and a correlation among the core radius r{sub core}, and R{sub e}. Moreover, the mass in 100 kpc (mainly dark matter) is correlated with the mass inside 5 kpc (mainly baryons). The behavior of the total mass density profile, the DM density profile, and the quoted correlations can be understood in a double phase scenario. In the first dissipative phase the proto-BCG forms, and in the second dissipationless phase, dynamical friction between baryonic clumps (collapsing to the center) and the DM halo flattens the inner slope of the density profile. In simple terms, the large scatter in the inner slope from cluster to cluster, and the anti-correlation among the slope, α and R{sub e} is due to the fact that in order to have a total

  11. Transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischebeck, Rasmus; Prat, Eduard; Thominet, Vincent; Ozkan Loch, Cigdem

    2015-08-01

    A transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams is presented, which overcomes resolution issues in present designs by observing the Scheimpflug imaging condition as well as the Snell-Descartes law of refraction in the scintillating crystal. Coherent optical transition radiation emitted by highly compressed electron bunches on the surface of the crystal is directed away from the camera, allowing to use the monitor for profile measurements of electron bunches suitable for X-ray free electron lasers. The optical design has been verified by ray tracing simulations, and the angular dependency of the resolution has been verified experimentally. An instrument according to the presented design principles has been used in the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility, and different scintillator materials have been tested. Measurements in conjunction with a transverse deflecting radiofrequency structure and an array of quadrupole magnets demonstrate a normalized slice emittance of 25 nm in the core of a 30 fC electron beam at a pulse length of 10 ps and a particle energy of 230 MeV.

  12. Edge Stabilized Ribbon (ESR); Stress, Dislocation Density and Electronic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachs, E. M.

    1984-01-01

    The edge stabilized ribbon (ESR) silicon ribbon was grown in widths of 1, 2.2 and 4.0 inches at speeds ranging from .6 to 7 in/min, which result in ribbon thicknesses of 5 to 400 microns. One of the primary problems remaining in ESR growth is that of thermally induced mechanical stresses. This problem is manifested as ribbon with a high degree of residual stress or as ribbon with buckled ribbon. Thermal stresses result in a high dislocation density in the grown material, resulting in compromised electronic performance. Improvements in ribbon flatness were accomplished by modification of the ribbon cooling profile. Ribbon flatness and other experimental observations of ESR ribbon are discussed. Laser scanner measurements show a good correlation between diffusion length and dislocation density which indicates that the high dislocation densities are the primary cause of the poor current performance of ESR materials. Dislocation densities were reduced and improved electronic performance resulted. Laser scanner data on new and old material are presented.

  13. Atmospheric constituent density profiles from full disk solar occultation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpe, J. D.; Chang, C. S.; Strickland, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical methods are described which permit the derivation of the number of density profiles of atmospheric constituents from solar occultation measurements. The algorithm is first applied to measurements corresponding to an arbitrary solar-intensity distribution to calculate the normalized absorption profile. The application of Fourier transform to the integral equation yields a precise expression for the corresponding number density, and the solution is employed with the data given in the form of Laguerre polynomials. The algorithm is employed to calculate the results for the case of uniform distribution of solar intensity, and the results demonstrate the convergence properties of the method. The algorithm can be used to effectively model representative model-density profiles with constant and altitude-dependent scale heights.

  14. Universal void density profiles from simulation and SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadathur, S.; Hotchkiss, S.; Diego, J. M.; Iliev, I. T.; Gottlöber, S.; Watson, W. A.; Yepes, G.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the universality and self-similarity of void density profiles, for voids in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. Voids are identified using a modified version of the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm, with additional selection cuts. We find that voids in simulation are self-similar, meaning that their average rescaled profile does not depend on the void size, or - within the range of the simulated catalogue - on the redshift. Comparison of the profiles obtained from simulated and real voids shows an excellent match. The profiles of real voids also show a universal behaviour over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, number densities and redshifts. This points to a fundamental property of the voids found by the watershed algorithm, which can be exploited in future studies of voids.

  15. LASER-BASED PROFILE MONITOR FOR ELECTRON BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Marc C

    2003-05-27

    High performance TeV energy electron / positron colliders (LC) are the first machines to require online, non-invasive beam size monitors for micron and sub-micron for beam phase space optimization. Typical beam densities in the LC are well beyond the threshold density for single pulse melting and vaporization of any material, making conventional wire scanners ineffective. Using a finely focused, diffraction limited high power laser, it is possible to devise a sampling profile monitor that, in operation, resembles a wire scanner. Very high resolution laser-based profile monitors have been developed and tested, first at FFTB (SLAC) and later at SLC and ATF. The monitor has broad applicability and we review here the technology, application and status of ongoing research programs.

  16. A Microwave FMCW Reflectometer for Electron Density Measurements on LTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, W. A.; Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2013-10-01

    An FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer is being installed on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) for electron density profile and fluctuation measurements. The system has two channels covering 13.5-33 GHz for (O-mode) electron density measurements in the range of 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3 . The diagnostic can operate at ultrafast full-band sweep intervals (Δt >= 4 μ s), which allows the system to function as both a profile and fluctuation monitor. The reflectometer utilizes a mid-plane port on LTX and views the plasma through a 4.8 '' gap between the upper and lower in-vessel shells. A pair of bi-static conical horns are attached to the ends of 18 '' long circular waveguide sections and mounted on a rotatable flange. This sub-assembly is attached to a jacking stage such that the horns can be positioned arbitrarily close to the plasma edge, or retracted outside the main chamber. A rotary joint allows the polarization of the launch and receive waves to be independently selected. Further details of the design and capabilities of the diagnostic, along with preliminary data, will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Electron profile stiffness and critical gradient studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; White, A. E.; Burrell, K. H.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Holland, C.; McKee, G. R.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Smith, S. P.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.

    2012-08-01

    Electron profile stiffness was studied in DIII-D L-mode discharges by systematically varying the heat flux in a narrow region with electron cyclotron heating and measuring the local change produced in ∇Te. Electron stiffness was found to slowly increase with toroidal rotation velocity. A critical inverse temperature gradient scale length 1/LC ˜ 3 m-1 was identified at ρ =0.6 and found to be independent of rotation. Both the heat pulse diffusivity and the power balance diffusivity, the latter determined by integrating the measured dependence of the heat pulse diffusivity on -∇Te, were fit reasonably well by a model containing a critical inverse temperature gradient scale length and varying linearly with 1/LT above the threshold.

  18. Electron profile stiffness and critical gradient studies

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.; Smith, S. P.; White, A. E.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C.; McKee, G. R.

    2012-08-15

    Electron profile stiffness was studied in DIII-D L-mode discharges by systematically varying the heat flux in a narrow region with electron cyclotron heating and measuring the local change produced in {nabla}T{sub e}. Electron stiffness was found to slowly increase with toroidal rotation velocity. A critical inverse temperature gradient scale length 1/L{sub C} {approx} 3 m{sup -1} was identified at {rho}=0.6 and found to be independent of rotation. Both the heat pulse diffusivity and the power balance diffusivity, the latter determined by integrating the measured dependence of the heat pulse diffusivity on -{nabla}T{sub e}, were fit reasonably well by a model containing a critical inverse temperature gradient scale length and varying linearly with 1/L{sub T} above the threshold.

  19. Simulating confined particles with a flat density profile.

    PubMed

    Korolkovas, Airidas

    2016-08-01

    Particle simulations confined by sharp walls usually develop an oscillatory density profile. For some applications, most notably soft matter liquids, this behavior is often unrealistic and one expects a monotonic density climb instead. To reconcile simulations with experiments, we propose mirror-and-shift boundary conditions where each interface is mapped to a distant part of itself. The main result is that the particle density increases almost monotonically from zero to bulk, over a short distance of about one particle diameter. The method is applied to simulate a polymer brush in explicit solvent, grafted on a flat silicon substrate. The simulated density profile agrees favorably with neutron reflectometry measurements and self-consistent field theory results. PMID:27627239

  20. Simulating confined particles with a flat density profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkovas, Airidas

    2016-08-01

    Particle simulations confined by sharp walls usually develop an oscillatory density profile. For some applications, most notably soft matter liquids, this behavior is often unrealistic and one expects a monotonic density climb instead. To reconcile simulations with experiments, we propose mirror-and-shift boundary conditions where each interface is mapped to a distant part of itself. The main result is that the particle density increases almost monotonically from zero to bulk, over a short distance of about one particle diameter. The method is applied to simulate a polymer brush in explicit solvent, grafted on a flat silicon substrate. The simulated density profile agrees favorably with neutron reflectometry measurements and self-consistent field theory results.

  1. Imaginary time density-density correlations for two-dimensional electron gases at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, M.; Galli, D. E.; Moroni, S.; Vitali, E.

    2015-10-28

    We evaluate imaginary time density-density correlation functions for two-dimensional homogeneous electron gases of up to 42 particles in the continuum using the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method. We use periodic boundary conditions and up to 300 plane waves as basis set elements. We show that such methodology, once equipped with suitable numerical stabilization techniques necessary to deal with exponentials, products, and inversions of large matrices, gives access to the calculation of imaginary time correlation functions for medium-sized systems. We discuss the numerical stabilization techniques and the computational complexity of the methodology and we present the limitations related to the size of the systems on a quantitative basis. We perform the inverse Laplace transform of the obtained density-density correlation functions, assessing the ability of the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method to evaluate dynamical properties of medium-sized homogeneous fermion systems.

  2. Electron densities and alkali atoms in exoplanet atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lavvas, P.; Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2014-11-20

    We describe a detailed study on the properties of alkali atoms in extrasolar giant planets, and specifically focus on their role in generating the atmospheric free electron densities, as well as their impact on the transit depth observations. We focus our study on the case of HD 209458b, and we show that photoionization produces a large electron density in the middle atmosphere that is about two orders of magnitude larger than the density anticipated from thermal ionization. Our purely photochemical calculations, though, result in a much larger transit depth for K than observed for this planet. This result does not change even if the roles of molecular chemistry and excited state chemistry are considered for the alkali atoms. In contrast, the model results for the case of exoplanet XO-2b are in good agreement with the available observations. Given these results we discuss other possible scenarios, such as changes in the elemental abundances, changes in the temperature profiles, and the possible presence of clouds, which could potentially explain the observed HD 209458b alkali properties. We find that most of these scenarios cannot explain the observations, with the exception of a heterogeneous source (i.e., clouds or aerosols) under specific conditions, but we also note the discrepancies among the available observations.

  3. Calculation of nanodrop profile from fluid density distribution.

    PubMed

    Berim, Gersh O; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2016-05-01

    Two approaches are examined, which can be used to determine the drop profile from the fluid density distributions (FDDs) obtained on the basis of microscopic theories. For simplicity, only two-dimensional (cylindrical, or axisymmetrical) distributions are examined and it is assumed that the fluid is either in contact with a smooth solid or separated from the smooth solid by a lubricating liquid film. The first approach is based on the sharp-kink interface approximation in which the density of the liquid inside and the density of the vapor outside the drop are constant with the exception of the surface layer of the drop where the density is different from the above ones. In this case, the drop profile was calculated by minimizing the total potential energy of the system. The second approach is based on a nonuniform FDD obtained either by the density functional theory or molecular dynamics simulations. To determine the drop profile from such an FDD, which does not contain sharp interfaces, three procedures can be used. In the first two procedures, P1 and P2, the one-dimensional FDDs along straight lines which are parallel to the surface of the solid are extracted from the two-dimensional FDD. Each of those one-dimensional FDDs has a vapor-liquid interface at which the fluid density changes from vapor-like to liquid-like values. Procedure P1 uses the locations of the equimolar dividing surfaces for the one-dimensional FDDs as points of the drop profile. Procedure P2 is based on the assumption that the fluid density is constant on the surface of the drop, that density being selected either arbitrarily or as a fluid density at the location of the equimolar dividing surface for one of the one-dimensional FDDs employed in procedure P1. In the third procedure, P3, which is suggested for the first time in this paper, the one-dimensional FDDs are taken along the straight lines passing through a selected point inside the drop (radial line). Then, the drop profile is

  4. Measurement of the lunar neutron density profile. [Apollo 17 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.; Furst, M.; Weiss, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An in situ measurement of the lunar neutron density from 20 to 400 g/sq cm depth between the lunar surface was made by the Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment using particle tracks produced by the B10(n, alpha)Li7 reaction. Both the absolute magnitude and depth profile of the neutron density are in good agreement with past theoretical calculations. The effect of cadmium absorption on the neutron density and in the relative Sm149 to Gd157 capture rates obtained experimentally implies that the true lunar Gd157 capture rate is about one half of that calculated theoretically.

  5. Electrons trapped in single crystals of sucrose: Induced spin densities

    SciTech Connect

    Box, H.C.; Budzinski, E.E.; Freund, H.G. )

    1990-07-01

    Electrons are trapped at intermolecular sites in single crystals of sucrose {ital X} irradiated at 4.2 K. The coupling tensors for the hyperfine couplings between the electron and surrounding protons have been deduced from electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) data. Electron spin densities at nearby hydroxy protons are positive, whereas spin densities at the more remote protons of carbon-bound hydrogen atoms are negative. The origin of these negative spin densities is discussed.

  6. Electrons trapped in single crystals of sucrose: Induced spin densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, Harold C.; Budzinski, Edwin E.; Freund, Harold G.

    1990-07-01

    Electrons are trapped at intermolecular sites in single crystals of sucrose X irradiated at 4.2 K. The coupling tensors for the hyperfine couplings between the electron and surrounding protons have been deduced from electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) data. Electron spin densities at nearby hydroxy protons are positive, whereas spin densities at the more remote protons of carbon-bound hydrogen atoms are negative. The origin of these negative spin densities is discussed.

  7. New signal processing technique for density profile reconstruction using reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Ricaud, B.; Briolle, F.; Heuraux, S.

    2011-08-15

    Reflectometry profile measurement requires an accurate determination of the plasma reflected signal. Along with a good resolution and a high signal to noise ratio of the phase measurement, adequate data analysis is required. A new data processing based on time-frequency tomographic representation is used. It provides a clearer separation between multiple components and improves isolation of the relevant signals. In this paper, this data processing technique is applied to two sets of signals coming from two different reflectometer devices used on the Tore Supra tokamak. For the standard density profile reflectometry, it improves the initialization process and its reliability, providing a more accurate profile determination in the far scrape-off layer with density measurements as low as 10{sup 16} m{sup -1}. For a second reflectometer, which provides measurements in front of a lower hybrid launcher, this method improves the separation of the relevant plasma signal from multi-reflection processes due to the proximity of the plasma.

  8. Fitting of the Thomson scattering density and temperature profiles on the COMPASS tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanikova, E.; Peterka, M.; Bohm, P.; Bilkova, P.; Aftanas, M.; Sos, M.; Urban, J.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.

    2016-11-01

    A new technique for fitting the full radial profiles of electron density and temperature obtained by the Thomson scattering diagnostic in H-mode discharges on the COMPASS tokamak is described. The technique combines the conventionally used modified hyperbolic tangent function for the edge transport barrier (pedestal) fitting and a modification of a Gaussian function for fitting the core plasma. Low number of parameters of this combined function and their straightforward interpretability and controllability provide a robust method for obtaining physically reasonable profile fits. Deconvolution with the diagnostic instrument function is applied on the profile fit, taking into account the dependence on the actual magnetic configuration.

  9. Analytic expressions for mode conversion in a plasma at the peak of a parabolic density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel-Lipsker, D.E.; Fried, B.D.; Morales, G.J. )

    1992-07-01

    For mode conversion in an unmagnetized plasma with a parabolic density profile of scale length {ital L}, analytic expressions, in terms of parabolic cylinder functions, for the energy flux coefficients (reflection, transmission, and mode conversion) and the fields for both the direct'' problem (incident electromagnetic wave converting to a Langmuir wave) and the inverse'' problem (incident Langmuir wave converting to an electromagnetic wave) are derived for the case where the incident wave frequency {omega} matches the electron plasma frequency {omega}{sub {ital p}} at the peak of the density profile. The mode conversion coefficient for the direct problem is equal in magnitude to that of the inverse problem, and the corresponding reflection and transmission coefficients satisfy energy conservation. In contrast to the linear profile problem, the conversion efficiency depends explicitly on the value of the collision frequency (in the cold, collisional limit) or electron temperature (in the warm, collisionless limit), but a transformation of parameters relates the results for these two limits.

  10. Estimating tropical-forest density profiles from multibaseline interferometric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert; Chapman, Bruce; dos Santos, Joao Roberto; Dutra, Luciano; Goncalves, Fabio; da Costa Freitas, Corina; Mura, Jose Claudio; de Alencastro Graca, Paulo Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    Vertical profiles of forest density are potentially robust indicators of forest biomass, fire susceptibility and ecosystem function. Tropical forests, which are among the most dense and complicated targets for remote sensing, contain about 45% of the world's biomass. Remote sensing of tropical forest structure is therefore an important component to global biomass and carbon monitoring. This paper shows preliminary results of a multibasline interfereomtric SAR (InSAR) experiment over primary, secondary, and selectively logged forests at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. The profile shown results from inverse Fourier transforming 8 of the 18 baselines acquired. A profile is shown compared to lidar and field measurements. Results are highly preliminary and for qualitative assessment only. Parameter estimation will eventually replace Fourier inversion as the means to producing profiles.

  11. Electronic Flux Density beyond the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Axel; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2016-05-19

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the electronic wave function is typically real-valued and hence the electronic flux density (current density) seems to vanish. This is unfortunate for chemistry, because it precludes the possibility to monitor the electronic motion associated with the nuclear motion during chemical rearrangements from a Born-Oppenheimer simulation of the process. We study an electronic flux density obtained from a correction to the electronic wave function. This correction is derived via nuclear velocity perturbation theory applied in the framework of the exact factorization of electrons and nuclei. To compute the correction, only the ground state potential energy surface and the electronic wave function are needed. For a model system, we demonstrate that this electronic flux density approximates the true one very well, for coherent tunneling dynamics as well as for over-the-barrier scattering, and already for mass ratios between electrons and nuclei that are much larger than the true mass ratios.

  12. [Determination of electron density in atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharges by Stark broadening].

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Liu, Zhong-wei; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Fu-ping; Wang, Zheng-duo; Yang, Li-zhen

    2012-01-01

    The use of high frequency power to generate plasma at atmospheric pressure is a relatively new development. An apparatus of atmospheric pressure radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge was constructed. Plasma emission based measurement of electron density in discharge columns from Stark broadening Ar is discribed. The spacial profile of electron density was studied. In the middle of the discharge column, as the input power increases from 138 to 248 W, the electron density rises from 4.038 x 10(21) m(-3) to 4.75 x 10(21) m(-3). PMID:22497121

  13. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P. Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ross, P. W.; Scotti, F.

    2015-08-15

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 10{sup 17 }m{sup −3} and atomic densities ranging from 1 to 7 × 10{sup 16 }m{sup −3}; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. The uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤50%.

  14. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Scotti, F.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ross, P. W.

    2015-08-13

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 1017 m–3 and atomic densities ranging from 1 to 7 ×1016 m–3; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤ 50%.

  15. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stotler, D. P.; Scotti, F.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ross, P. W.

    2015-08-13

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 1017 m–3 and atomic densities ranging frommore » 1 to 7 ×1016 m–3; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤ 50%.« less

  16. Temperature, Density, and Heating Profiles of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Joseph; Martens, P. C.; Kankelborg, C.; Ritchie, M.; Scott, J.; Sharma, R.

    2013-07-01

    We show detailed results of a combined DEM and density-sensitive line ratio analysis of coronal loops observed simultaneously by EIS and AIA. The temperature and density profiles of the loop are compared to and isolated from those of the surrounding material, and these properties are fit to an analytic strand heating model developed by Martens (2010). This research builds on our previously reported work by analyzing a number of coronal loops (including one observed by the Hi-C rocket), improved background subtraction and loop fitting. These improvements allow us to place significant constraints on the heating distribution of coronal loops.

  17. Real-space density profile reconstruction of stacked voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisani, Alice; Sutter, P.; Lavaux, G.; Wandelt, B.

    2016-10-01

    Modern surveys allow us to access to high quality large scale structure measurements. In this framework, cosmic voids appear as a new potential probe of Cosmology. We discuss the use of cosmic voids as standard spheres and their capacity to constrain new physics, dark energy and cosmological models. We introduce the Alcock-Paczyński test and its use with voids. We discuss the main difficulties in treating with cosmic voids: redshift-space distortions, the sparsity of data, and peculiar velocities. We present a method to reconstruct the spherical density profiles of void stacks in real space, without redshift-space distortions. We show its application to a toy model and a dark matter simulation; as well as a first application to reconstruct real cosmic void stacks density profiles in real space from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  18. THE DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILE OF THE FORNAX DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl E-mail: gebhardt@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-02-10

    We construct axisymmetric Schwarzschild models to measure the mass profile of the Local Group dwarf galaxy Fornax. These models require no assumptions to be made about the orbital anisotropy of the stars, as is the case for commonly used Jeans models. We test a variety of parameterizations of dark matter density profiles and find cored models with uniform density {rho}{sub c} = (1.6 {+-} 0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} pc{sup -3} fit significantly better than the cuspy halos predicted by cold dark matter simulations. We also construct models with an intermediate-mass black hole, but are unable to make a detection. We place a 1{sigma} upper limit on the mass of a potential intermediate-mass black hole at M{sub .} {<=} 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }.

  19. Probing Electron Dynamics with the Laplacian of the Momentum Density

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, N.; MacDougall, Preston J.; Levit, M. Creon

    2012-09-24

    This chapter in the above-titled monograph presents topological analysis of the Laplacian of the electron momentum density in organic molecules. It relates topological features in this distribution to chemical and physical properties, particularly aromaticity and electron transport.

  20. Adaptive method for electron bunch profile prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Gessner, Spencer

    2015-10-01

    We report on an experiment performed at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, in which a new adaptive control algorithm, one with known, bounded update rates, despite operating on analytically unknown cost functions, was utilized in order to provide quasi-real-time bunch property estimates of the electron beam. Multiple parameters, such as arbitrary rf phase settings and other time-varying accelerator properties, were simultaneously tuned in order to match a simulated bunch energy spectrum with a measured energy spectrum. The simple adaptive scheme was digitally implemented using matlab and the experimental physics and industrial control system. The main result is a nonintrusive, nondestructive, real-time diagnostic scheme for prediction of bunch profiles, as well as other beam parameters, the precise control of which are important for the plasma wakefield acceleration experiments being explored at FACET. © 2015 authors. Published by the American Physical Society.

  1. Comet P/Giacobini-Zinner electron and H2O(+) column densities from ICE and ground-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.; Strauss, Michael A.; Spinrad, H.; Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    An H2O(+) spatial mission profile, extracted from an optical CCD spectrogram obtained during the ICE/Giacobini-Zinner encounter, is compared to the electron-density profile that was deduced from in situ measurements by the radio experiment aboard ICE. The electron column density along a line of sight has two components, one from the spherically symmetric coma, and the second from a thin plasma sheet, whenever it is along the line of sight. The deduced electron column-density profile agrees well with the observed H2O(+) emission profile. It is concluded that the electrons and the H2O(+) ions are distributed similarly 9600 km tailward from the cometary nucleus, that the ratio of number densities of H2O(+) ions to electrons is about 1/4 at this point, and that the width of the plasma sheet is about 16,000 km.

  2. [The reconstruction of welding arc 3D electron density distribution based on Stark broadening].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xue-Ming; Pan, Cheng-Gang; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2012-10-01

    The three-dimensional electron density is very important for welding arc quality control. In the present paper, Side-on characteristic line profile was collected by a spectrometer, and the lateral experimental data were approximated by a polynomial fitting. By applying an Abel inversion technique, the authors obtained the radial intensity distribution at each wavelength and thus constructed a profile for the radial positions. The Fourier transform was used to separate the Lorentz linear from the spectrum reconstructed, thus got the accurate Stark width. And we calculated the electronic density three-dimensional distribution of the TIG welding are plasma. PMID:23285847

  3. Implementation of the new multichannel X-mode edge density profile reflectometer for the ICRF antenna on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiam, D. E.; Silva, A.; Bobkov, V.; Carvalho, P. J.; Carvalho, P. F.; Cavazzana, R.; Conway, G. D.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Fattorini, L.; Faugel, H.; Fernandes, A.; Fünfgelder, H.; Gonçalves, B.; Guimarais, L.; De Masi, G.; Meneses, L.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Rocchi, G.; Santos, J. M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2016-11-01

    A new multichannel frequency modulated continuous-wave reflectometry diagnostic has been successfully installed and commissioned on ASDEX Upgrade to measure the plasma edge electron density profile evolution in front of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna. The design of the new three-strap ICRF antenna integrates ten pairs (sending and receiving) of microwave reflectometry antennas. The multichannel reflectometer can use three of these to measure the edge electron density profiles up to 2 × 1019 m-3, at different poloidal locations, allowing the direct study of the local plasma layers in front of the ICRF antenna. ICRF power coupling, operational effects, and poloidal variations of the plasma density profile can be consistently studied for the first time. In this work the diagnostic hardware architecture is described and the obtained density profile measurements were used to track outer radial plasma position and plasma shape.

  4. Compton profile study and electronic properties of tantalum diboride.

    PubMed

    Raykar, Veera; Bhamu, K C; Ahuja, B L

    2013-07-01

    We have reported the first-ever experimental Compton profile (CP) of TaB2 using 20 Ci(137)Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare the experimental data, we have also computed the theoretical CPs using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock (HF) within linear combination of the atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. In addition, we have reported energy bands and density of states of TaB2 using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) methods. A real space analysis of CP of TaB2 confirms its metallic character which is in tune with the cross-overs of Fermi level by energy bands and Fermi surface topology. A comparison of equal-valence-electron-density (EVED) experimental profiles of isoelectronic TaB2 and NbB2 show more covalent (or less ionic) character of TaB2 than that of NbB2 which is in agreement with available ionicity data.

  5. Electronic and nuclear flux densities in the H2 molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, G.; Paulus, B.; Pérez-Torres, J. F.; Pohl, V.

    2014-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and nuclear flux densities of a vibrating H2 molecule after an electronic excitation by a short femtosecond laser pulse. The final state, a coherent superposition of the electronic ground state X1Σg+ and the electronic excited state B1Σu+, evolves freely and permits the partition of the electronic flux density into two competing fluxes: the adiabatic and the transition flux density. The nature of the two fluxes allows us to identify two alternating dynamics of the electronic motion, occurring on the attosecond and the femtosecond time scales. In contradistinction to the adiabatic electronic flux density, the transition electronic flux density shows a dependence on the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field, encoding information of the interaction of the electrons with the electric field. Furthermore, the nuclear flux density displays multiple reversals, a quantum effect recently discovered by Manz et al. [J. Manz, J. F. Pérez-Torres, and Y. Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 153004 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.153004], calling for investigation of the electronic flux density.

  6. Density profile of pyrolite under the lower mantle conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ricolleau, Angele; Fei, Yingwei; Cottrell, Elizabeth; Watson, Heather; Deng, Liwei; Zhang, Li; Fiquet, Guillaume; Auzende, Anne-Line; Roskosz, Mathieu; Morard, Guillaume; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2009-04-13

    The pyrolite model is one of the possible compositions of the Earth's lower mantle. The lower mantle's composition is generally modelled by comparing seismic observations with mineral physics data of possible lower mantle end-member phases. Here, we report the compression behavior of a natural KLB-1 peridotite (a representative composition of the pyrolite model) in a quasi-hydrostatic environment at simultaneous high pressure (P) and temperature (T), covering the entire range of lower mantle P-T conditions up to 112 GPa. This is the first experimentally determined density profile of pyrolite under the lower mantle conditions. The results allow us to directly compare the measured density of peridotite mantle along the geotherm with the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) derived from seismic observations, without extrapolation. The comparison shows significant mismatch between the two, which calls for a re-evaluation of the PREM density model or a non-pyrolite lower mantle composition.

  7. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  8. A Modeling Study of the Ionospheric F Region Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.; Killeen, T. L.

    2002-12-01

    The high-resolution Thermosphere/Ionosphere Nested Grid (TING) model has been used to study the variability of ionospheric F region electron densities under various geophysical conditions. Important space weather phenomena such as the tongue of ionization and mid-latitude electron density trough, which are not well simulated in global models, can be readily studied using high spatial resolution nested grids. In this presentation we will discuss the effects of geomagnetic activity, solar cycle, seasonal and UT variations on the ionospheric F-region electron densities. It is found that geomagnetic activity can greatly enhance the polar cap tongue of ionization and nighttime auroral F region electron densities (blobs). Such enhancements in auroral electron densities have a strong effect not only locally, but also in the mid latitudes as a result of changes in the neutral circulation.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  10. Gutzwiller density functional theory for correlated electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, K. M.; Schmalian, J.; Wang, C. Z.

    2008-02-04

    We develop a density functional theory (DFT) and formalism for correlated electron systems by taking as reference an interacting electron system that has a ground state wave function which exactly obeys the Gutzwiller approximation for all one-particle operators. The solution of the many-electron problem is mapped onto the self-consistent solution of a set of single-particle Schroedinger equations, analogously to standard DFT-local density approximation calculations.

  11. Empirical models of the electron temperature and density in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Niemann, H. B.; Mayr, H. G.; Hoegy, W. R.; Nagy, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical models of the electron temperature and density of the late afternoon and nightside Venus ionosphere based on the Pioneer Venus measurements are presented. They describe the ionosphere conditions near 18 deg latitude between 150 and 700 km altitude for solar zenith angles of 80 to 180 deg, with a 10-fold decrease beyond 90 deg and a gradual decrease between 120 and 180 deg. The nightside electron density profile, the ion transport process, and electron precipitation are discussed. The high nocturnal temperatures and the well defined nightside ionopause suggest that energetic processes occur across the top of the entire nightside ionosphere, maintaining elevated temperatures.

  12. Modification of ionospheric electron density by dust suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, Rashmi; Singh Sodha, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of a dynamic analysis the effectiveness of dust suspension for the reduction and enhancement of electron density in the E-layer of the ionosphere has been investigated in this paper. The analysis is based on the modelling of the E-layer as the Chapman α layer (validated earlier); the electron/ion production function, arrived at by Chapman and effective electron temperature-dependent electron-ion recombination coefficients in agreement with observations have been used. The balance of the charge on the particles and the number/energy balance of the constituents have been taken into account. The following is the physics of the change in electron density in the ionosphere by the suspension of dust. First, the dust provides a source (emission) and sink (accretion) of electrons. Second, the dust emits photoelectrons with energies much higher than those of ambient electrons, which enhances the electron temperature, leading to a reduced electron-ion recombination coefficient, and thus to a higher electron density. An interplay of these processes and the natural processes of electron production/annihilation determines the electron density and temperature in the dust suspension in the ionosphere. The numerical results, corresponding to suspension of dust of silicate (high work function) and Cs coated bronze (low work function) in the E-layer at 105 \\text{km} are presented and discussed.

  13. Density distribution of high energy electrons in pulsed corona discharge of NO+N 2 mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenchun; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Younian

    2003-12-01

    Emission spectroscopy of the high-voltage pulsed positive corona discharge in a line-cylinder reactor is used to investigate the high-energy electron density distribution in the discharge gap. The relative overall emission intensity spatial distribution profile of the A 2Σ +→X 2Π transition of NO is successfully recorded against a severe electromagnetic pulse interference coming from the corona discharge at one atmosphere. The spectroscopic investigation shows that the high-energy electron density in the discharge has a nonlinearly decline in the radial distribution. When varying the discharge voltage, the absolute emission intensity of NO is different but the radial distribution profile is similar. If an oxygen flow was introduced into the discharge reactor, the emission intensity of NO decreases tremendously and, therefore, the high-energy electron density decreases reasonably.

  14. On the (non-)universality of halo density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemer, Benedikt

    We present a systematic study of the density profiles of dark matter halos in LambdaCDM cosmologies, focusing on the question whether these profiles are "universal", i.e., whether they follow the same functional form regardless of halo mass, redshift, cosmology, and other parameters. The inner profiles (r [special character omitted] R vir) can be described as a function of only mass and concentration, and we thus begin by investigating whether there is a universal, cosmology-independent relation between those two parameters. We propose a model in which concentration is a function only of a halo's peak height and the local slope of the matter power spectrum. This model matches the concentrations in LambdaCDM and scale-free simulations, correctly extrapolates over 16 orders of magnitude in halo mass, and differs significantly from all previously proposed models at high masses and redshifts. We find that the outer profiles (r [special character omitted] Rvir) are remarkably universal across redshifts when radii are rescaled by R200m, whereas the inner profiles are most universal in units of R200c, highlighting that universality depends upon the definition of the halo boundary. Furthermore, we discover that the profiles exhibit significant deviations from the supposedly universal analytic formulae previously suggested in the literature, such as the NFW and Einasto forms. In particular, the logarithmic slope of the profiles of massive or rapidly accreting halos steepens more sharply than predicted around r ≈ R200m, where the steepness increases with increasing peak height or mass accretion rate. We propose a new, accurate fitting formula that takes these dependencies into account. Finally, we demonstrate that the profile steepening corresponds to the caustic at the apocenter of infalling matter on its first orbit. We call the location of the caustic the splashback radius, Rsp, and propose this radius as a new, physically motivated definition of the halo boundary. We

  15. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  16. Investigating the Origins of Dark Matter Halo Density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Liliya L. R.; Babul, Arif; Dalcanton, Julianne J.

    2004-03-01

    Although high-resolution N-body simulations make robust empirical predictions of the density distribution within cold dark matter halos, these studies have yielded little physical insight into the origins of the distribution. We therefore attempt to investigate the problem using analytic and semianalytic approaches. Simple analytic considerations suggest that the inner slope of the central cusps in dark matter halos cannot be steeper than α=2 (where ρ~r-α), with α=1.5-1.7 being a more realistic upper limit. Moreover, our analysis suggests that any number of effects, whether real (e.g., angular momentum imparted by tidal torques and secondary perturbations) or artificial (e.g., two-body interactions, the accuracy of the numerical integrator, round-off errors) will result in shallower slopes. We also find that the halos should exhibit a well-defined relationship between rperi/rapo and jθ/jr. We derive this relationship analytically and speculate that it may be ``universal.'' Using a semianalytic scheme based on Ryden & Gunn, we further explore the relationship between the specific angular momentum distribution in a halo and its density profile. For present purposes, we restrict ourselves to halos that form primarily via the nearly smooth accretion of matter, and consider only the specific angular momentum generated by secondary perturbations associated with the cold dark matter spectrum of density fluctuations. Compared to those formed in N-body simulations, our ``semianalytic'' halos are more extended, have flatter rotation curves, and have a higher specific angular momentum, even though we have not yet taken into account the effects of tidal torques. Whether the density profile of numerical halos is indeed the result of loss in angular momentum outside the central region, and whether this loss is a feature of hierarchical merging and major mergers in particular, is under investigation.

  17. Measurement of electron density using reactance cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new measurement method of electron density using the reactance spectrum of the plasma in the cutoff probe system instead of the transmission spectrum. The highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma-cutoff probe system, as expected from previous circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], was measured using the full two-port error correction and automatic port extension methods of the network analyzer. The electron density can be obtained from the analysis of the measured reactance spectrum, based on circuit modeling. According to the circuit simulation results, the reactance cutoff probe can measure the electron density more precisely than the previous cutoff probe at low densities or at higher pressure. The obtained results for the electron density are presented and discussed for a wide range of experimental conditions, and this method is compared with previous methods (a cutoff probe using the transmission spectrum and a single Langmuir probe).

  18. Ionospheric Electron Density during Magnetically Active Times over Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz Erbaş, Bute; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul; Emine Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, R. A..

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyze electron density variations over Istanbul using Dynasonde observations during the magnetically active times. In order to perform statistical analyses, we first determined magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorm intervals from October 2012 to October 2015 using Kyoto's magnetic index data. Corresponding ionospheric parameters, such as critical frequency of F2 region (foF2), maximum electron density height (hmF2), total electron density (TEC) etc. were retrieved from Dynasonde data base at Istanbul Technical University's Space Weather Laboratory. To understand the behavior of electron density during the magnetically active times, we remove the background quiet time variations first and then quantify the anomalies. In this presentation, we will report results from our preliminary analyses from the selected cases corresponding to the strong magnetic storms. Initial results show lower electron densities at noon times and higher electron densities in the late afternoon toward sunset times when compared to the electron densities of magnetically quiet times. We also compare the results with IRI and TIEGCM ionospheric models in order to understand the physical and dynamical causes of these variations. During the presentation we will also discuss the role of these changes during the magnetically active times on the GPS communications through ionosphere.

  19. Dopant profiling based on scanning electron and helium ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chee, Augustus K W; Boden, Stuart A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluate and compare doping contrast generated inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and scanning helium ion microscope (SHIM). Specialised energy-filtering techniques are often required to produce strong doping contrast to map donor distributions using the secondary electron (SE) signal in the SEM. However, strong doping contrast can be obtained from n-type regions in the SHIM, even without energy-filtering. This SHIM technique is more sensitive than the SEM to donor density changes above its sensitivity threshold, i.e. of the order of 10(16) or 10(17)donorscm(-3) respectively on specimens with or without a p-n junction; its sensitivity limit is well above 2×10(17)acceptorscm(-3) on specimens with or without a p-n junction. Good correlation is found between the widths and slopes of experimentally measured doping contrast profiles of thin p-layers and the calculated widths and slopes of the potential energy distributions across these layers, at a depth of 1 to 3nm and 5 to 10nm below the surface in the SHIM and the SEM respectively. This is consistent with the mean escape depth of SEs in silicon being about 1.8nm and 7nm in the SHIM and SEM respectively, and we conclude that short escape depth, low energy SE signals are most suitable for donor profiling. PMID:26624515

  20. Dopant profiling based on scanning electron and helium ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chee, Augustus K W; Boden, Stuart A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluate and compare doping contrast generated inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and scanning helium ion microscope (SHIM). Specialised energy-filtering techniques are often required to produce strong doping contrast to map donor distributions using the secondary electron (SE) signal in the SEM. However, strong doping contrast can be obtained from n-type regions in the SHIM, even without energy-filtering. This SHIM technique is more sensitive than the SEM to donor density changes above its sensitivity threshold, i.e. of the order of 10(16) or 10(17)donorscm(-3) respectively on specimens with or without a p-n junction; its sensitivity limit is well above 2×10(17)acceptorscm(-3) on specimens with or without a p-n junction. Good correlation is found between the widths and slopes of experimentally measured doping contrast profiles of thin p-layers and the calculated widths and slopes of the potential energy distributions across these layers, at a depth of 1 to 3nm and 5 to 10nm below the surface in the SHIM and the SEM respectively. This is consistent with the mean escape depth of SEs in silicon being about 1.8nm and 7nm in the SHIM and SEM respectively, and we conclude that short escape depth, low energy SE signals are most suitable for donor profiling.

  1. Steady-state hollow electron temperature profiles in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweij, G.M.; Oomens, A.A.; Barth, C.J.; Beurskens, M.N.; Chu, C.C.; van Gelder, J.F.; Lok, J.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Pijper, F.J.; Polman, R.W.; Rommers, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    In the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project steady-state hollow electron temperature ({ital T}{sub {ital e}}) profiles have been sustained with strong off-axis electron cyclotron heating, creating a region of reversed magnetic shear. In this region the effective electron thermal diffusivity ({chi}{sub {ital e}}{sup {ital pb}}) is close to neoclassical in high density plasmas. For medium density, {chi}{sub {ital e}}{sup {ital pb}} is lower than neoclassical and may even be negative, indicating that off-diagonal elements in the transport matrix drive an electron heat flux up the {ital T}{sub {ital e}} gradient. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Gene expression profiling in peanut using high density oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Payton, Paxton; Kottapalli, Kameswara Rao; Rowland, Diane; Faircloth, Wilson; Guo, Baozhu; Burow, Mark; Puppala, Naveen; Gallo, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently has a significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate large-scale transcript responses to a variety of developmental and environmental signals, ultimately improving our understanding of plant biology. Results We have developed a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for peanut using 49,205 publicly available ESTs and tested the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues. To identify putatively tissue-specific genes and demonstrate the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues, we compared transcript levels in pod, peg, leaf, stem, and root tissues. Results from this experiment showed 108 putatively pod-specific/abundant genes, as well as transcripts whose expression was low or undetected in pod compared to peg, leaf, stem, or root. The transcripts significantly over-represented in pod include genes responsible for seed storage proteins and desiccation (e.g., late-embryogenesis abundant proteins, aquaporins, legumin B), oil production, and cellular defense. Additionally, almost half of the pod-abundant genes represent unknown genes allowing for the possibility of associating putative function to these previously uncharacterized genes. Conclusion The peanut oligonucleotide array represents the majority of publicly available peanut ESTs and can be used as a tool for expression profiling studies in diverse tissues. PMID:19523230

  3. Squeezed states of electrons and transitions of the density of states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung Joo; Um, Chung IN

    1993-01-01

    Electron systems which have low dimensional properties have been constructed by squeezing the motion in zero, one, or two-directions. An isolated quantum dot is modeled by a potential box with delta-profiled, penetrable potential walls embedded in a large outer box with infinitely high potential walls which represent the world function with respect to vacuum. We show the smooth crossover of the density of states from the three-dimensional to the quasi-zero dimensional electron gas.

  4. Validation of Ionosonde Electron Density Reconstruction Algorithms with IONOLAB-RAY in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gok, Gokhan; Mosna, Zbysek; Arikan, Feza; Arikan, Orhan; Erdem, Esra

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric observation is essentially accomplished by specialized radar systems called ionosondes. The time delay between the transmitted and received signals versus frequency is measured by the ionosondes and the received signals are processed to generate ionogram plots, which show the time delay or reflection height of signals with respect to transmitted frequency. The critical frequencies of ionospheric layers and virtual heights, that provide useful information about ionospheric structurecan be extracted from ionograms . Ionograms also indicate the amount of variability or disturbances in the ionosphere. With special inversion algorithms and tomographical methods, electron density profiles can also be estimated from the ionograms. Although structural pictures of ionosphere in the vertical direction can be observed from ionosonde measurements, some errors may arise due to inaccuracies that arise from signal propagation, modeling, data processing and tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Recently IONOLAB group (www.ionolab.org) developed a new algorithm for effective and accurate extraction of ionospheric parameters and reconstruction of electron density profile from ionograms. The electron density reconstruction algorithm applies advanced optimization techniques to calculate parameters of any existing analytical function which defines electron density with respect to height using ionogram measurement data. The process of reconstructing electron density with respect to height is known as the ionogram scaling or true height analysis. IONOLAB-RAY algorithm is a tool to investigate the propagation path and parameters of HF wave in the ionosphere. The algorithm models the wave propagation using ray representation under geometrical optics approximation. In the algorithm , the structural ionospheric characteristics arerepresented as realistically as possible including anisotropicity, inhomogenity and time dependence in 3-D voxel structure. The algorithm is also used

  5. Modification of ionospheric electron density by dust suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sweta; Mishra, Rashmi; Singh Sodha, Mahendra

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of a dynamic analysis the effectiveness of dust suspension for the reduction and enhancement of electron density in the E-layer of the ionosphere has been investigated in this paper. The analysis is based on the modelling of the E-layer as the Chapman α layer (validated earlier); the electron/ion production function, arrived at by Chapman and effective electron temperature-dependent electron–ion recombination coefficients in agreement with observations have been used. The balance of the charge on the particles and the number/energy balance of the constituents have been taken into account. The following is the physics of the change in electron density in the ionosphere by the suspension of dust. First, the dust provides a source (emission) and sink (accretion) of electrons. Second, the dust emits photoelectrons with energies much higher than those of ambient electrons, which enhances the electron temperature, leading to a reduced electron–ion recombination coefficient, and thus to a higher electron density. An interplay of these processes and the natural processes of electron production/annihilation determines the electron density and temperature in the dust suspension in the ionosphere. The numerical results, corresponding to suspension of dust of silicate (high work function) and Cs coated bronze (low work function) in the E-layer at 105 \\text{km} are presented and discussed.

  6. Electron density measurements in an atmospheric pressure air plasma by means of infrared heterodyne interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipold, Frank; Stark, Robert H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2000-09-01

    An infrared heterodyne interferometer has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the electron density in direct current, atmospheric pressure discharges in air. Spatial resolution of the electron density in the high-pressure glow discharge with characteristic dimensions on the order of 100 µm required the use of a CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 µm. For this wavelength and electron densities greater than 1011 cm-3 the index of refraction of the atmospheric air plasma is mainly determined by heavy particles rather than electrons. The electron contribution to the refractive index was separated from that of the heavy particles by taking the different relaxation times of the two particle species into account. With the discharge operated in a repetitive pulsed mode, the initial rapid change of the refractive index was assumed to be due to the increase in electron density, whereas the following slower rise is due to the decrease in gas density caused by gas heating. By reducing the time between pulses, direct current conditions were approached, and the electron density as well as the gas density, and gas temperature, respectively, were obtained through extrapolation. A computation inversion method was used to determine the radial distribution of the plasma parameters in the cylindrical discharge. For a direct-current filamentary discharge in air, at a current of 10 mA, the electron density was found to be 1013 cm-3 in the centre, decreasing to half of this value at a radial distance of 0.21 mm. Gaussian temperature profiles with σ = 1.1 mm and maximum values of 1000-2000 K in the centre were also obtained with, however, larger error margins than for electron densities.

  7. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements for the Solar Orbiter using the thermal noise spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, M.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zouganelis, I.; Bale, S. D.; Vilmer, N.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    The measurement of the solar wind electron temperature radial profile in the unexplored region between 1 and 45 R_s is of prime importance for understanding the solar wind acceleration. Solar Orbiter's location, combined with its ability to observe the corona in co-rotation, will furnish strong observational constraints on solar wind models. We discuss the implementation of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order (i) to get accurate measurements of the total electron density and core electron temperature and (ii) to allow direct determination of the spacecraft charging effects which affect the electron analyzers.

  8. The density profile of the elliptical planetary nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam; Zucker, Daniel B.; Balick, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    We present the three-dimensional density structure of the elliptical planetary nebula NGC 3242, deconvolved from its H-alpha image. Using the simplistic assumptions that each mass element preserves its original velocity, which is radial and depends only on latitude, we deduce from this density profile the variation of mass-loss rate from the progenitor of NGC 3242 with latitude and time. The resulting somewhat qualitative mass-loss geometry and history are used to constrain models for the formation of the elliptical structure of NGC 3242. We argue that a triple system, with a very close brown dwarf companion and a more massive distant tertiary star, is compatible with the morphology of NGC 3242. In this model the brown dwarf, of about 0.01 solar mass, shared a common envelope with the progenitor star, and spun up the envelope through deposition of angular momentum. The oblate rotating envelope blew an axisymmetrical wind. We suggest that the presence of a third star, with a mass of about 1 solar mass and an orbital period of about 4000 years, could have caused the large scale deviation from axial symmetry seen in the density structure.

  9. On the ECCD current density profile with particle diffusion in eITBs and its impact on the q-profile

    SciTech Connect

    Asp, E.; Sauter, O.; Coda, S.; Fable, E.; Goodman, T. P.; Turri, G.; Udintsev, V. S.; Zucca, C.

    2006-11-30

    The Fokker-Planck code CQL3D has been used to investigate the effect of radial particle diffusion on ECCD current density profiles in the TCV tokamak. For two discharges with electron internal transport barriers (eITB), the jcd and the resulting q-profile have been calculated and reconstructed. The studied eITBs are of two kinds: fully sustained non-inductive eITB with off-axis co-current ECCD, or with a large Ohmic current and on-axis counter ECCD. It is shown that different diffusion profiles do modify the ECCD current density profiles, but that the resulting q-profiles are less influenced due to the resulting necessary self-consistent inductive current contribution.

  10. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.; Munjal, N.; Vyas, V.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  11. Electron Densities Near Io from Galileo Plasma Wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Roux, A.; Bolton, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of electron densities obtained near Io from the Galileo plasma wave instrument during the first four flybys of Io. These flybys were Io, which was a downstream wake pass that occurred on December 7, 1995; I24, which was an upstream pass that occurred on October 11, 1999; I25, which was a south polar pass that occurred on November 26, 1999; and I27, which was an upstream pass that occurred on February 22, 2000. Two methods were used to measure the electron density. The first was based on the frequency of upper hybrid resonance emissions, and the second was based on the low-frequency cutoff of electromagnetic radiation at the electron plasma frequency. For three of the flybys, Io, I25, and I27, large density enhancements were observed near the closest approach to Io. The peak electron densities ranged from 2.1 to 6.8 x 10(exp 4) per cubic centimeters. These densities are consistent with previous radio occultation measurements of Io's ionosphere. No density enhancement was observed during the I24 flyby, most likely because the spacecraft trajectory passed too far upstream to penetrate Io's ionosphere. During two of the flybys, I25 and I27, abrupt step-like changes were observed at the outer boundaries of the region of enhanced electron density. Comparisons with magnetic field models and energetic particle measurements show that the abrupt density steps occur as the spacecraft penetrated the boundary of the Io flux tube, with the region of high plasma density on the inside of the flux tube. Most likely the enhanced electron density within the Io flux tube is associated with magnetic field lines that are frozen to Io by the high conductivity of Io's atmosphere, thereby enhancing the escape of plasma along the magnetic field lines that pass through Io's ionosphere.

  12. Line profiles of water for the non-uniform density distribution in a cometary coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szutowicz, S.

    2014-07-01

    Observations and modeling of the molecular lines provide powerful diagnostics of the physical conditions in a cometary coma such as the density and the velocity structure. The pure rotational transitions of ortho- and para-water for several comets has been recently successfully provided by the Herschel space telescope. The rotational lines of water are optically thick. The water line shapes and the OTF maps taken with the high-resolution instrument Herschel/HIFI allowed to localize an active region on the nucleus of comet 10P/Tempel 2, close to its pole [1]. The evidence of anisotropic outgassing of comets may be interpreted with models of non-uniform distribution of activity. A numerical model for the simulation of water line emission in cometary coma is presented. The model is based on a non-uniform density distribution and the escape probability method for treating radiative transfer. The excitation model includes collisions with water and electrons, and infrared pumping. The equations of statistical equilibrium are solved in all cells of the coma with constant properties like density, temperature, and expansion velocity. The gas density profile in the regions of enhanced activity is described by a density function for emission into the cone. The density within the cone can be constant or vary as a function of the angle with respect to the outgassing axis. The outgassing pattern model assumes also the isotropic emission or uniform emission outside the cone where the temperature, the density and the expansion velocity can differ from those within the cone. Two different parts of the coma (material inside the cone and outside it) are radiatively coupled, thus the integrated mean intensity depends also on the non-local contributions to the radiation field. Synthetic line profiles of water (ground-level rotational transition) as seen with different telescope beams (e.g., Herschel, or MIRO - the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter) are computed at various

  13. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1987-12-01

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1 to 5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, has been consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approximately 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser type cathodes.

  14. Evidence of Electron Density Enhancements at Enceladus' Apoapsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Groene, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Enceladus' plumes are the dominant source of plasma in Saturn's magnetosphere. Icy particles and water vapor are vented into the inner magnetosphere through fissures in Enceladus' southern polar region. These fissures are subjected to tidal stresses that vary as Enceladus moves in a slightly eccentric orbit around Saturn. Plume activity is greatest when tidal stress is minimal. This occurs when Enceladus is farthest away from Saturn in its orbit (the Enceladus apoapsis). This study will show temporal variations in the electron density distribution that correlate with the position of Enceladus in its orbit around Saturn, with strong density enhancements in the vicinity of Enceladus when the moon is near apoapsis. Equatorial electron density measurements derived from the upper hybrid resonance frequency from the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment are used to illustrate these electron density enhancements.

  15. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Miyamoto, Kenji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles. PMID:26932019

  16. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; White, A. E.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-12-01

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, kρe ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  17. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E.; Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, K. C.; Domier, C. W.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  18. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  19. An x-ray backlit Talbot-Lau deflectometer for high-energy-density electron density diagnostics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-02-10

    X-ray phase-contrast techniques can measure electron density gradients in high-energy-density plasmas through refraction induced phase shifts. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer consisting of free standing ultrathin gratings was deployed at an ultra-short, high-intensity laser system using K-shell emission from a 1-30 J, 8 ps laser pulse focused on thin Cu foil targets. Grating survival was demonstrated for 30 J, 8 ps laser pulses. The first x-ray deflectometry images obtained under laser backlighting showed up to 25% image contrast and thus enabled detection of electron areal density gradients with a maximum value of 8.1 ± 0.5 × 1023 cm₋3 in amore » low-Z millimeter sized sample. An electron density profile was obtained from refraction measurements with an error of <8%. We found the 50 ± 15 μm spatial resolution achieved across the full field of view was limited by the x-ray source-size, similar to conventional radiography.« less

  20. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T. S. Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-15

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is “at least as stable” as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  1. Localized electron heating and density peaking in downstream helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Bora, D.

    2015-06-01

    Localized electron temperature and density peaking at different axial locations in the downstream helicon plasma have been observed in a linear helicon device with both geometrical and magnetic expansion. The discharge is produced with an m=+1 right helical antenna powered by a RF source operating at 13.56 MHz. Axial wave field measurement shows the presence of damped helicon waves with standing wave character folded into it even at low densities (˜ {{10}16} m-3 ). The measured helicon wavelength is just about twice the antenna length and the phase velocity ≤ft({{v}p}\\right) is almost the speed required for electron impact ionization. These experimental observations strongly advocate the Landau damping heating and density production by the helicon waves, particularly in low density plasma such as ours. The electron temperature maximizes at 35-45 cm away from the antenna center in our experiments indicating a local source of heating at those locations. Different mechanisms responsible for this additional heating at a particular spatial location have been discussed for their possible roles. Further downstream from the location of the maximum electron temperature, a density peak located 55-65 cm away from the antenna is observed. This downstream density peaking can be explained through pressure balance in the system.

  2. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, T. S.; Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-01

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is "at least as stable" as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  3. Amplification of current density modulation in a FEL with an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.D.

    2011-03-28

    We show that the paraxial field equation for a free electron laser (FEL) in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-2 energy distribution can be reduced to a fourth ordinary differential equation (ODE). Its solution for arbitrary initial phase space density modulation has been derived in the wave-vector domain. For initial current modulation with Gaussian profile, close form solutions are obtained in space-time domain. In developing an analytical model for a FEL-based coherent electron cooling system, an infinite electron beam has been assumed for the modulation and correction processes. While the assumption has its limitation, it allows for an analytical close form solution to be obtained, which is essential for investigating the underlying scaling law, benchmarking the simulation codes and understanding the fundamental physics. 1D theory was previously applied to model a CeC FEL amplifier. However, the theory ignores diffraction effects and does not provide the transverse profile of the amplified electron density modulation. On the other hand, 3D theories developed for a finite electron beam usually have solutions expanded over infinite number of modes determined by the specific transverse boundary conditions. Unless the mode with the largest growth rate substantially dominates other modes, both evaluation and extracting scaling laws can be complicated. Furthermore, it is also preferable to have an analytical FEL model with assumptions consistent with the other two sections of a CeC system. Recently, we developed the FEL theory in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-1 (Lorentzian) energy distribution. Close form solutions have been obtained for the amplified current modulation initiated by an external electric field with various spatial-profiles. In this work, we extend the theory into {kappa}-2 energy distribution and study the evolution of current density induced by an initial density modulation.

  4. Measuring ionospheric electron density using the plasma frequency probe

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.D.; Baker, K.D. )

    1992-02-01

    During the past decade, the plasma frequency probe (PFP) has evolved into an accurate, proven method of measuring electron density in the ionosphere above about 90 km. The instrument uses an electrically short antenna mounted on a sounding rocket that is immersed in the plasma and notes the frequency where the antenna impedance is large and nonreactive. This frequency is closely related to the plasma frequency, which is a direct function of free electron concentration. The probe uses phase-locked loop technology to follow a changing electron density. Several sections of the plasma frequency probe circuitry are unique, especially the voltage-controlled oscillator that uses both an electronically tuned capacitor and inductor to give the wide tuning range needed for electron density measurements. The results from two recent sounding rocket flights (Thunderstorm II and CRIT II) under vastly different plasma conditions demonstrate the capabilities of the PFP and show the importance of in situ electron density measurements of understanding plasma processes. 9 refs.

  5. Radial Electron Temperature and Density Measurements Using Thomson Scattering System in GAMMA 10/PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Ohta, K.; Wang, X.; Chikatsu, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Imai, T.; Nakashima, Y.; Yasuhara, R.; Yamada, I.; Funaba, H.; Minami, T.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering (TS) system in GAMMA 10/PDX has been developed for the measurement of radial profiles of electron temperature and density in a single plasma and laser shot. The TS system has a large solid angle optical collection system and high-sensitivity signal detection system. The TS signals are obtained using four-channel high-speed digital oscilloscopes controlled by a Windows PC. We designed the acquisition program for six oscilloscopes to obtain 10-Hz TS signals in a single plasma shot, following which the time-dependent electron temperatures and densities can be determined. Moreover, in order to obtain larger TS signal intensity in the edge region, we added a second collection mirror. The radial electron temperatures and densities at six radial positions in GAMMA 10/PDX were successfully obtained.

  6. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  7. Comet P/Giacobini-Zinner electron and H2O column densities from ICE and ground-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer-Vernet, N.; Strauss, Michael A.; Steinberg, J. L.; Spinrad, Hyron; Mccarthy, Patrick J.

    1986-01-01

    An H2O(+) emission profile extracted from an optical CCD spectrogram obtained during the ICE/Giacobini-Zinner encounter is compared to the electron density profile deduced from in-situ measurements by the ratio experiment aboard ICE. It is concluded that the electrons and the H2O(+) ions are distributed similarly 9600 km tailward from the cometary nucleus; that the ratio of number densities of H2O(+) ions to electrons is 1/4 at this point; and that the width of the plasma sheet is 16,000 km.

  8. Simultaneous determination of electron beam profile and material response using self-consistent iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    We develop a novel iterative method to accurately measure electron beam shape (current density distribution) and monotonic material response as a function of position. A common method is to scan an electron beam across a knife edge along many angles to give an approximate measure of the beam profile, however such scans are not easy to obtain in all systems. The present work uses only an electron beam and multiple exposed regions of a thin film of photoresist to measure the complete beam profile for any beam shape, where the material response is characterized externally. This simplifies the setup of new experimental tools. We solve for self-consistent photoresist thickness loss response to dose and the electron beam profile simultaneously by optimizing a novel functional iteratively. We also show the successful implementation of the method in a real world data set corrupted by noise and other experimental variabilities.

  9. Rocket radio measurement of electron density in the nighttime ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Smith, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    One experimental technique based on the Faraday rotation effect of radio waves is presented for measuring electron density in the nighttime ionosphere at midlatitudes. High frequency linearly-polarized radio signals were transmitted to a linearly-polarized receiving system located in a spinning rocket moving through the ionosphere. Faraday rotation was observed in the reference plane of the rocket as a change in frequency of the detected receiver output. The frequency change was measured and the information was used to obtain electron density data. System performance was evaluated and some sources of error were identified. The data obtained was useful in calibrating a Langmuir probe experiment for electron density values of 100/cu cm and greater. Data from two rocket flights are presented to illustrate the experiment.

  10. Measurement of Electron Densities in a Pulsed Atmospheric Pressure Air Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipold, Frank; Stark, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2000-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges have been shown to serve as plasma cathodes for atmospheric pressure air discharges [1]. The high pressure discharges are operated dc at currents from 10 mA up to 30 mA and at average electric fields of 1.25 kV/cm. The electron density in the dc discharge was measured by an interferometrique technique [2]. For a dc filamentary air discharge with a current of 10 mA, the radial electron density distribution was found to be parabolic with a total width of 660 μ m and an electron density of ne = 10^13 cm-3 in the center of the discharge. The diagnostic technique has now also been applied to pulsed discharges. It was found that the method provides electron densities measurements for discharges with durations as low as 5 μ s. The spatial distribution of the index of refraction in the pulsed discharge was obtained by shifting the discharge volume through the laser beam and by using an inversion method to obtain the radial index profile. For the electron density with a assumed parabolic profile, the maximum value was measured as 1.17*10^14 cm-3. (10 mA atmospheric pressure air discharge. The temperature profile was found to be gaussian with a half width of 1.3 mm. Acknowledgement This work was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research in Cooperation with the DDR&E Air Plasma Ramparts MURI Program. References [1] Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 74, 3770 (1999) [2] Frank Leipold, Robert H. Stark, and Karl H. Schoenbach, to appear in J. Phys. D., Appl. Phys.

  11. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH2 at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ṡ 1015 cm-3 for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ṡ 1016 cm-3 for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  12. Shock-wave-based density down ramp for electron injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunmei; Li, Ji; Sun, Jun; Luo, Xisheng

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a sharp density transition for electron injection in laser wakefield acceleration through numerical study. This density transition is generated by a detached shock wave induced by a cylinder inserted into a supersonic helium gas flow. In a Mach 1.5 flow, the scale length of the density transition Lgrad can approximately equal to plasma wavelength λp at the shock front, and can be further reduced with an increase of the flow Mach number. A density down ramp with Lgrad≥λp can reduce the phase velocity of the wakefield and lower the energy threshold for the electrons to be trapped. Moreover, the quality of the accelerated beam may be greatly improved by precisely controlling of Lgrad to be one λp. For an even sharper density down ramp with Lgrad≪λp, the oscillating electrons in the plasma wave will up shift their phase when crossing the ramp, therefore a fraction of the electrons are injected into the accelerating field. For this injection mechanism, there is no threshold requirement for the pump laser intensity to reach wave breaking, which is a big advantage as compared with other injection mechanisms.

  13. Features of Electron Density Distribution in Delafossite Cualo2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogoreltsev, A. I.; Schmidt, S. V.; Gavrilenko, A. N.; Shulgin, D. A.; Korzun, B. V.; Matukhin, V. L.

    2015-07-01

    We have used pulsed 63,65Cu nuclear quadrupole resonance at room temperature to study the semiconductor compound CuAlO2 with a delafossite crystal structure, and we have determined the quadrupole frequency νQ = 28.12 MHz and the asymmetry parameter η ~ 0, which we used to study the features of the electron density distribution in the vicinity of the quadrupolar nucleus. In order to take into account the influence of correlation effects on the electric field gradient, we carried out ab initio calculations within the density functional theory (DFT) approximation using a set of correlation functionals VWN1RPA, VWN5, PW91LDA, CPW91, and B3LYP1. We mapped the electron density distribution in the vicinity of the quadrupolar copper nucleus for the Cu7Al6o{14/- 1} cluster and we calculated the size of the LUMO-HOMO gap, Δ ~ 3.33 eV. We established the anisotropy of the spatial electron density distribution. Based on analysis of the electron density distribution obtained, we suggest that the bond in CuAlO2 is not purely covalent.

  14. Effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2015-11-15

    The effect of q-nonextensive parameter and saturation time on the electron density steepening in electron-positron-ion plasmas is studied by particle in cell method. Phase space diagrams show that the size of the holes, and consequently, the number of trapped particles strongly depends on the q-parameter and saturation time. Furthermore, the mechanism of the instability and exchange of energy between electron-positron and electric field is explained by the profiles of the energy density. Moreover, it is found that the q-parameter, saturation time, and electron and positron velocities affect the nonlinear evolution of the electron density which leads to the steepening of its structure. The q-nonextensive parameter or degree of nonextensivity is the relation between temperature gradient and potential energy of the system. Therefore, the deviation of q-parameter from unity indicates the degree of inhomogeneity of temperature or deviation from equilibrium. Finally, using the kinetic theory, a generalized q-dispersion relation is presented for electron-positron-ion plasma systems. It is found that the simulation results in the linear regime are in good agreement with the growth rate results obtained by the kinetic theory.

  15. Probing post-bounce supernova density profile from neutrino signals

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Palmisano, V.

    2008-07-15

    Supernovae of Type II is a phenomenon that occurs at the end of the evolution of massive stars when the iron core of the star exceeds a mass limit. After the collapse of the core under gravity the shockwave alone does not succeed in expelling the mass of the star and in this sense the role of neutrinos is the most important mechanism to do so. During the emission of neutrinos flavor conversion is possible, related the phenomenon of oscillations, which however depends directly on the particular density profile of the medium. In this paper we present results of numerical simulations of neutrino flavor conversion in supernovae after bounce. The probabilities of survival for a given flavor in a complete three-flavors framework is estimated through an algorithm which conserves unitarity to a high degree of accuracy. The sensitivity of the results to the different adopted models for the supernova structure is examined in detail demonstrating how the neutrino signal could be used to check the validity of models.

  16. Anti-Viral Antibody Profiling by High Density Protein Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wiktor, Peter; Kahn, Peter; Brunner, Al; Khela, Amritpal; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Yu, Xiaobo; Magee, Mitch; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Gibson, David; Rooney, Madeleine E; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections elicit anti-viral antibodies and have been associated with various chronic diseases. Detection of these antibodies can facilitate diagnosis, treatment of infection and understanding of the mechanisms of virus associated diseases. In this work, we assayed anti-viral antibodies using a novel high density-nucleic acid programmable protein array (HD-NAPPA) platform. Individual viral proteins were expressed in situ directly from plasmids encoding proteins in an array of microscopic reaction chambers. Quality of protein display and serum response was assured by comparing intra- and inter- array correlation within or between printing batches with average correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. HD-NAPPA showed higher signal to background (S/B) ratio compared with standard NAPPA on planar glass slides and ELISA. Antibody responses to 761 antigens from 25 different viruses were profiled among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common as well as unique antibody reactivity patterns were detected between patients and healthy controls. We believe HD-viral-NAPPA will enable the study of host-pathogen interactions at unprecedented dimensions and elucidate the role of pathogen infections in disease development. PMID:25758251

  17. Measuring Protoplanetary Disk Gas Surface Density Profiles with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; McPartland, Conor

    2016-10-01

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams & Best to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity 13CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, M gas = 0.048 M ⊙, and accretion disk characteristic size R c = 213 au and gradient γ = 0.39. The same parameters match the C18O 2–1 image and indicate an abundance ratio [12CO]/[C18O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large 13CO 2–1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3–10 M Jup at 150 pc, ALMA observations with a resolution of 0.″2–0.″3 and integration times of ∼20 minutes allow reliable estimates of R c to within about 10 au and γ to within about 0.2. Economic gas imaging surveys are therefore feasible and offer the opportunity to open up a new dimension for studying disk structure and its evolution toward planet formation.

  18. Electron temperature and density measurements of laser induced germanium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hira; Arshad, Saboohi; Haq, S. U.; Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The germanium plasma produced by the fundamental harmonics (1064 nm) of Nd:YAG laser in single and double pulse configurations have been studied spectroscopically. The plasma is characterized by measuring the electron temperature using the Boltzmann plot method for neutral and ionized species and electron number density as a function of laser irradiance, ambient pressure, and distance from the target surface. It is observed that the plasma parameters have an increasing trend with laser irradiance (9-33 GW/cm2) and with ambient pressure (8-250 mbar). However, a decreasing trend is observed along the plume length up to 4.5 mm. The electron temperature and electron number density are also determined using a double pulse configuration, and their behavior at fixed energy ratio and different interpulse delays is discussed.

  19. Mobility of electrons in supercritical krypton: Role of density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Masaru; Holroyd, Richard A.; Preses, Jack M.

    2007-07-01

    Excess electrons were generated in supercritical krypton by means of pulsed x-ray irradiation, and the electron transport phenomena were studied. Electron signals immediately after a 30ps pulse showed a distinctive feature characteristic of the presence of the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the momentum transfer cross section. The dependence of the drift velocity vD on field strength was found to be concave upward in the low field region and then to go through a maximum with increasing field strength, which is also typical of the presence of a minimum in the scattering cross section at an intermediate field strength. A minimum in the electron mobility was observed at about one-half the critical density. The acoustical phonon scattering model, which successfully explained the mobility change in this density region in supercritical xenon, was again found to account for the mobility in supercritical krypton.

  20. Neutral wind estimation from 4-D ionospheric electron density images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta-Barua, S.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Curtis, N.

    2009-06-01

    We develop a new inversion algorithm for Estimating Model Parameters from Ionospheric Reverse Engineering (EMPIRE). The EMPIRE method uses four-dimensional images of global electron density to estimate the field-aligned neutral wind ionospheric driver when direct measurement is not available. We begin with a model of the electron continuity equation that includes production and loss rate estimates, as well as E × B drift, gravity, and diffusion effects. We use ion, electron, and neutral species temperatures and neutral densities from the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM-ASPEN) for estimating the magnitude of these effects. We then model the neutral wind as a power series at a given longitude for a range of latitudes and altitudes. As a test of our algorithm, we have input TIMEGCM electron densities to our algorithm. The model of the neutral wind is computed at hourly intervals and validated by comparing to the “true” TIMEGCM neutral wind fields. We show results for a storm day: 10 November 2004. The agreement between the winds derived from EMPIRE versus the TIMEGCM “true” winds appears to be time-dependent for the day under consideration. This may indicate that the diurnal variation in certain driving processes impacts the accuracy of our neutral wind model. Despite the potential temporal and spatial limits on accuracy, estimating neutral wind speed from measured electron density fields via our algorithm shows great promise as a complement to the more sparse radar and satellite measurements.

  1. Electron Density Measurement of Argon Containing Plasmas by Saturation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Wang, H.; Tomioka, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2014-10-01

    Langmuir probes are widely used for electron density measurements in plasmas. However, the use of a conventional probe should be avoided in a plasma which needs high purity because of the possibility of contamination. Optical measurements are suitable for these plasmas. In this work, we applied saturation spectroscopy to the electron density measurement. The peak height of the saturation spectrum is affected by the relaxation frequency of the related energy levels. In the case of the metastable levels of argon, the electron impact quenching rate, which is proportional to the electron density, is the dominant factor. In our experiments, an inductively coupled plasma source and a tunable cw diode laser were used. The frequency of the laser was scanned over the Doppler width of the 4 s[3/ 2 ] 2 o - 4 p[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (763.51 nm) transition. The experimental saturation spectrum was composed of a sharp Lorentzian peak and a broad base component, which was caused by velocity changing collisions. We deduced a new relationship between the saturation parameter and the measured saturated absorption spectrum with considering velocity changing collisions. We confirmed a linear relationship, which was expected theoretically, between the inverse of the saturation parameter and the electron density. Part of this work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24540529.

  2. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect

    Tickle, Ian J.

    2012-04-01

    A likelihood-based metric for scoring the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density is described. The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ{sup 2} significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor.

  3. A simple frequency sweep linearization method for FM density profile reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Adi; Hu, Jianqiang; Doyle, Edward; Zhang, Jin; Li, Hong; Zhou, Chu; Zhang, Xiaohui; Wang, Mingyuan; Lan, Tao; Xie, Jinglin; Liu, Wandong; Yu, Changxuan

    2015-11-01

    Frequency modulated, continuous wave (FMCW) reflectometry is widely used to measure the electron density profile on fusion devices. To ensure the output intermediate frequency signal is proportional to the propagation delay time, the frequency sweep should be linearized, especially for reflectometry with sweeping periods of only a few microseconds. We introduce a simple dynamic calibration technique to linearize the frequency sweep based on digital complex demodulation methods, without using a Fourier transform, which would induce a trade-off between frequency and time resolution. The technique is convenient as it can be done in the same conditions as for plasma measurements. The method is in use on the EAST profile reflectometer, and results will be presented. Work was supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under 11475173, National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy Development Program of China under 2013GB106002 and 2014GB109002, and US DOE Grants DE- SC0010424 and DE-SC0010469.

  4. Energetic ion and electron phase space densities in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mauk, B. H.; Keath, E. P.; Maclennan, C. G.

    1987-12-01

    Voyager 2 low-energy charged particle (LECP) data from the magnetosphere of Uranus have been analyzed to obtain proton and electron phase space density profiles. The Uranus proton profiles show an approximately exponential decline with decreasing radius for L ⪉ 9 in a relatively dense thermal plasma region with intense plasma wave activity. An analogy with the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn suggests a plasmasphere at Uranus. The ion flux tube content in the Uranian radiation belt is less than that in the other three cases. Proton and electron profiles are presented and discussed in detail. The magnetosphere of Uranus is the third planetary magnetosphere for which evidence of substorm activity has been adduced, after those of Earth and Mercury.

  5. Modeling Ionosphere Environments: Creating an ISS Electron Density Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurgew, Danielle N.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) maintains an altitude typically between 300 km and 400 km in low Earth orbit (LEO) which itself is situated in the Earth's ionosphere. The ionosphere is a region of partially ionized gas (plasma) formed by the photoionization of neutral atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere of Earth. It is important to understand what electron density the spacecraft is/will be operating in because the ionized gas along the ISS orbit interacts with the electrical power system resulting in charging of the vehicle. One instrument that is already operational onboard the ISS with a goal of monitoring electron density, electron temperature, and ISS floating potential is the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU). Although this tool is a valuable addition to the ISS, there are limitations concerning the data collection periods. The FPMU uses the Ku band communication frequency to transmit data from orbit. Use of this band for FPMU data runs is often terminated due to necessary observation of higher priority Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) and other operations on ISS. Thus, large gaps are present in FPMU data. The purpose of this study is to solve the issue of missing environmental data by implementing a secondary electron density data source, derived from the COSMIC satellite constellation, to create a model of ISS orbital environments. Extrapolating data specific to ISS orbital altitudes, we model the ionospheric electron density along the ISS orbit track to supply a set of data when the FPMU is unavailable. This computer model also provides an additional new source of electron density data that is used to confirm FPMU is operating correctly and supplements the original environmental data taken by FPMU.

  6. Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Deng, B. H.; Knapp, K.; Sun, X.; Thompson, M. C.

    2012-10-15

    In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO{sub 2} interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

  7. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-02-15

    Photon dose calculation algorithms (such as the pencil beam and collapsed cone, CC) model the attenuation of a primary photon beam in media other than water, by using pathlength scaling based on the relative mass density of the media to water. In this study, we assess if differences in the electron density between the water and media, with different atomic composition, can influence the accuracy of conventional photon dose calculations algorithms. A comparison is performed between an electron-density scaling method and the standard mass-density scaling method for (i) tissues present in the human body (such as bone, muscle, etc.), and for (ii) water-equivalent plastics, used in radiotherapy dosimetry and quality assurance. We demonstrate that the important material property that should be taken into account by photon dose algorithms is the electron density, and not the mass density. The mass-density scaling method is shown to overestimate, relative to electron-density predictions, the primary photon fluence for tissues in the human body and water-equivalent plastics, where 6%-7% and 10% differences were observed respectively for bone and air. However, in the case of patients, differences are expected to be smaller due to the large complexity of a treatment plan and of the patient anatomy and atomic composition and of the smaller thickness of bone/air that incident photon beams of a treatment plan may have to traverse. Differences have also been observed for conventional dose algorithms, such as CC, where an overestimate of the lung dose occurs, when irradiating lung tumors. The incorrect lung dose can be attributed to the incorrect modeling of the photon beam attenuation through the rib cage (thickness of 2-3 cm in bone upstream of the lung tumor) and through the lung and the oversimplified modeling of electron transport in convolution algorithms. In the present study, the overestimation of the primary photon fluence, using the mass-density scaling method, was shown

  8. Control of the current density profile with lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Chu, T.K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Greenough, N.; Hatcher, R.; Ignat, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kozub, T.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Sun, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; Valeo, E.; von Goeler, S.; Blush, L.; Doerner, R.; Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Harris, J.; Hirshman, S.; Isler, R.; Lee, D.; Jones, S.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; Levinton, F.; Timini, F.

    1993-07-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being explored as a means to control the current density profile on PBX-M with the goal of raising the central safety factor q(O) to values of 1.5-2 to facilitate access to a full-volume second stable regime. Initial experiments have been conducted with up to 400 kW of 4.6 GHz LH power in circular and indented plasmas with modest parameters. A tangential-viewing two-dimensional hard x-ray imaging diagnostic has been used to observe the bremsstrahlung emission from the suprathermal electrons generated during LHCD. Hollow hard x-ray images have indicated off-axis localization of the driven current. A serious obstacle to the control of the current density profile with LHCD is the concomitant generation of MHD activity, which can seriously degrade the confinement of suprathermal electrons. By combining neutral beam injection with LHCD, an MHD-free condition has been obtained where q(O) is raised above 1.

  9. Electron temperature profile invariance on OH, L- and H-mode plasmas and consequences for the anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1992-01-01

    The shapes of the electron temperature and electron density profiles in the OH, L- and H-mode confinement regimes of ASDEX are explored by statistical analysis. It is shown that the shape of Te(r) is conserved in the outer half of the plasma in these regimes and that it is invariant with respect to heating power, heating profile, density, density scale length, q value and ion mass. These results suggest that microturbulence constrains the shape of the temperature profile by adjusting the electron heat diffusivity χe(r). No such invariance is found for the temperature profile in the inner half of the plasma and for the density profile over the whole cross-section. Properties of the empirical electron heat diffusivity and the diffusion coefficient in different regimes can be described by Te profile invariance. The improved confinement with peaked density profiles, the reduction of χe in the bulk of H-mode plasmas and the power dependence of χe in the L-regime are discussed

  10. Probabilistic Fatigue Life Analysis of High Density Electronics Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Kolawa, E. A.; Sutharshana, S.; Newlin, L. E.; Creager, M.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of thin film metal interconnections in high density electronics packaging subjected to thermal cycling has been evaluated using a probabilistic fracture mechanics methodology. This probabilistic methodology includes characterization of thin film stress using an experimentally calibrated finite element model and simulation of flaw growth in the thin films using a stochastic crack growth model.

  11. Extreme atmospheric electron densities created by extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, Casper; Camporeale, Enrico; Ebert, Ute; Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia

    2016-04-01

    A sufficient density of free electrons and strong electric fields are the basic requirements to start any electrical discharge. In the context of thunderstorm discharges it has become clear that in addition droplets and or ice particles are required to enhance the electric field to values above breakdown. In our recent study [1] we have shown that these three ingredients have to interplay to allow for lightning inception, triggered by an extensive air shower event. The extensive air showers are a very stochastic natural phenomenon, creating highly coherent bursts of extreme electron density in our atmosphere. Predicting these electron density bursts accurately one has to take the uncertainty of the input variables into account. To this end we use uncertainty quantification methods, like in [2], to post-process our detailed Monte Carlo extensive air shower simulations, done with the CORSIKA [3] software package, which provides an efficient and elegant way to determine the distribution of the atmospheric electron density enhancements. We will present the latest results. [1] Dubinova, A., Rutjes, C., Ebert, E., Buitink, S., Scholten, O., and Trinh, G. T. N. "Prediction of Lightning Inception by Large Ice Particles and Extensive Air Showers." PRL 115 015002 (2015) [2] G.J.A. Loeven, J.A.S. Witteveen, H. Bijl, Probabilistic collocation: an efficient nonintrusive approach for arbitrarily distributed parametric uncertainties, 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, 2007, AIAA-2007-317 [3] Heck, Dieter, et al. CORSIKA: A Monte Carlo code to simulate extensive air showers. No. FZKA-6019. 1998.

  12. Interferometric measurement of the electron density in a pseudospark switch

    SciTech Connect

    Goertler, A.; Schwandner, A.; Frank, K.; Christiansen, J.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1995-12-31

    In the recent years pseudospark switches have been developed for several applications. The pseudospark is a low pressure gas discharge usable as a closing switch. For medium power sealed-off devices are available for tests. In the high current regime only devices connected to a vacuum system are in use. The pseudospark transforms from a special hollow cathode discharge to a metal vapor arc like discharge type when the current exceeds 35 kA. Fast shutter photographs of the discharge prove the appearance of filaments at currents exceeding 40 kA corresponding to a dip in the forward voltage drop and a rise of the erosion rate of about one order of magnitude (4 to 40 {micro}g/C) for molybdenum electrodes. The knowledge of the electron density distribution provides more information about these phenomena. The discharge is no more radial symmetric to the central apertures at these high currents. A contraction to a small area on the plane electrode surface takes place. Therefore a tomographic setup is necessary to measure the electron density distribution with interferometry. The interferograms are digitized and the electron density distribution is evaluated by a computer program. As a result the 3-dimensional electron density distribution of the total discharge volume for the time interval given by the exposure time of the laser beams is calculated.

  13. Ligand electronic properties modulate tau filament binding site density

    PubMed Central

    Cisek, Katryna; Jensen, Jordan R.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Kuret, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that bind tau-bearing neurofibrillary lesions are being sought for premortem diagnosis, staging, and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathic neurodegenerative diseases. The utility of these agents will depend on both their binding affinity and binding site density (Bmax). Previously we identified polarizability as a descriptor of protein aggregate binding affinity. To examine its contribution to binding site density, we investigated the ability of two closely related benzothiazole derivatives ((E)-2-[[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]azo]-6-methoxybenzothiazole) and ((E)-2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-6-methoxybenzothiazole)) that differed in polarizability to displace probes of high (Thioflavin S) and low (radiolabeled (E,E)-1-iodo-2,5-bis(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-methoxy)styrylbenzene; IMSB) density sites. Consistent with their site densities, Thioflavin S completely displaced radiolabeled IMSB, but IMSB was incapable of displacing Thioflavin S. Although both benzothiazoles displaced the low Bmax IMSB probe, only the highly polarizable analog displaced near saturating concentrations of the Thioflavin S probe. Quantum calculations showed that high polarizability reflected extensive pi-electron delocalization fostered by the presence of electron donating and accepting groups. These data suggest that electron delocalization promotes ligand binding at a subset of sites on tau aggregates that are present at high density, and that optimizing this aspect of ligand structure can yield tau-directed agents with superior diagnostic and therapeutic performance. PMID:23072817

  14. Electron Density of Active Region Outflows Measured by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, N.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-06-01

    In order to better understand the nature of active region outflows, the electron density was measured by using a density-sensitive line pair, Fe xiv 264.78 Å/274.20 Å. Because coronal line profiles of the outflow region are composed of a major component with a Doppler shift of ≤slant 10 km {{s}-1} and a minor component (enhanced blue wing, EBW) blueshifted by up to 100 km {{s}-1}, we extracted EBW from the line profiles through double-Gaussian fitting. We tried applying the simultaneous fitting to those two Fe xiv lines with several physical restrictions. Electron density for both components ({{n}Major} and {{n}EBW}, respectively) was calculated by referring to the theoretical intensity ratio as a function of electron density as per the CHIANTI database. We studied six locations in the outflow regions around NOAA AR10978. The average electron density was {{n}Major}={{10}9.16+/- 0.16} c{{m}-3} and {{n}EBW}={{10}8.74+/- 0.29} c{{m}-3}. The magnitude relationship between {{n}Major} and {{n}EBW} was the opposite in the eastern and western outflow regions. The column depth was also calculated for each component, which leads to the result that the outflows possess only a small fraction (∼0.1) in the eastern region, whereas they dominate over the major component in the line profiles by a factor of five in the western region. When taking into account the extended coronal structures, the western region can be thought to represent the mass leakage. In contrast, we suggest a possibility that the eastern region actually contributes to mass supply to coronal loops.

  15. Density functionals not based on the electron gas: local-density approximation for a Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Lima, N A; Silva, M F; Oliveira, L N; Capelle, K

    2003-04-11

    By shifting the reference system for the local-density approximation (LDA) from the electron gas to other model systems, one obtains a new class of density functionals, which by design account for the correlations present in the chosen reference system. This strategy is illustrated by constructing an explicit LDA for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. While the traditional ab initio LDA is based on a Fermi liquid (the three-dimensional interacting electron gas), this one is based on a Luttinger liquid. First applications to inhomogeneous Hubbard models, including one containing a localized impurity, are reported.

  16. Density functionals not based on the electron gas: local-density approximation for a Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Lima, N A; Silva, M F; Oliveira, L N; Capelle, K

    2003-04-11

    By shifting the reference system for the local-density approximation (LDA) from the electron gas to other model systems, one obtains a new class of density functionals, which by design account for the correlations present in the chosen reference system. This strategy is illustrated by constructing an explicit LDA for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. While the traditional ab initio LDA is based on a Fermi liquid (the three-dimensional interacting electron gas), this one is based on a Luttinger liquid. First applications to inhomogeneous Hubbard models, including one containing a localized impurity, are reported. PMID:12731934

  17. Relations among several nuclear and electronic density functional reactivity indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Luis, Josep M.; Duran, Miquel; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Solà, Miquel

    2003-11-01

    An expansion of the energy functional in terms of the total number of electrons and the normal coordinates within the canonical ensemble is presented. A comparison of this expansion with the expansion of the energy in terms of the total number of electrons and the external potential leads to new relations among common density functional reactivity descriptors. The formulas obtained provide explicit links between important quantities related to the chemical reactivity of a system. In particular, the relation between the nuclear and the electronic Fukui functions is recovered. The connection between the derivatives of the electronic energy and the nuclear repulsion energy with respect to the external potential offers a proof for the "Quantum Chemical le Chatelier Principle." Finally, the nuclear linear response function is defined and the relation of this function with the electronic linear response function is given.

  18. Two dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bihe

    An innovative plasma diagnostic technique, electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), was successfully developed and implemented on the TEXT-U and RTP tokamaks for the study of plasma electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. Due to the high spatial and temporal resolution of this new diagnostic, plasma filamentation was observed during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in TEXT-U, and was identified as multiple rotating magnetic islands. In RTP, under special plasma conditions, evidence for magnetic bubbling was first observed, which is characterized by the flattening of the electron temperature and pressure profiles over a small annular region of about 1-2 cm extent near the q = 2 surface. More important results arose from the detailed study of the broadband plasma turbulence in TEXT-U and RTP. With the first measurements of poloidal wavenumbers and dispersion relations, turbulent Te fluctuations in the confinement region of TEXT-U plasmas were identified as electron drift wave turbulence. The fluctuation amplitude is found to follow the mixing length scaling, and the fluctuation-induced conducted- heat flux can account for the observed anomalous energy transport in TEXT-U. In RTP, detailed ECEI study of broadband Te fluctuations has shown that many characteristics of the observed fluctuations are consistent with the predictions of toroidal ηi mode theory. These include the global dependence of the fluctuation frequency and amplitude on the plasma density and current. The measured isotope and impurity scalings quantitatively match the predictions of toroidal ηi mode theory. The ECEI measurements in combination with ECRH modification of T e profiles argue against the Te gradients serving as the driving force of the turbulence. With the detailed 2- D measurements of the fluctuation distribution over the plasma minor cross-section, large scale, coherent structures similar to the eigenmode structures predicted by toroidal ηi mode theory

  19. 1985 Voyager 2 Radio Ranging Measurements of Coronal Density: Asymmetry in the Radial Profiles Explained

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1996-01-01

    An asymmetry in the radial variation of electron density above the cast and west limbs of the Sun was inferred from centimeter wavelength ranging measurements conducted by Voyager 2 during its 1985 solar conjunction. The Voyager 2 ranging measurements, which took place in the heliocentric distance range of 7-40 solar radius, have been compared with the white-light coronagraph measurements of the underlying corona collected by the Mark 3 K-coronameter located at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory. It is shown that the disparity in radial profiles is not real but is instead caused by longitudinal variations stemming from the probing of significantly different source regions its revealed in the white-light measurements. These results improve our understanding of the probing abilities of ranging measurements and their relationship to white-light measurements. They reinforce the notion that the high-precision and high-sensitivity features of ranging measurements are more fully exploited in the investigation of density variations across the ubiquitous low-contrast raylike structures that permit the corona, rather than in determining radial density profiles.

  20. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  1. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    PubMed Central

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-01-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T–TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states. PMID:27181483

  2. Density and x-ray emission profile relationships in highly ionized high-Z laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kensuke; Fujioka, Shinsuke Ugomori, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Nozomi; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi Kawasaki, Masato; Suzuki, Yuhei; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tomita, Kentaro; Hirose, Ryoichi; Ejima, Takeo; Ohashi, Hayato; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sunahara, Atsushi; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Yanagida, Tatsuya

    2015-03-23

    We present a benchmark measurement of the electron density profile in the region where the electron density is 10{sup 19 }cm{sup –3} and where the bulk of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission occurs from isotropically expanding spherical high-Z gadolinium plasmas. It was found that, due to opacity effects, the observed EUV emission is mostly produced from an underdense region. We have analyzed time-resolved emission spectra with the aid of atomic structure calculations and find the multiple ion charge states around 18+ during the laser pulse irradiation.

  3. Analysis of line integrated electron density using plasma position data on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Y. U.; Chung, J.

    2010-10-15

    A 280 GHz single-channel horizontal millimeter-wave interferometer system has been installed for plasma electron density measurements on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. This system has a triangular beam path that does not pass through the plasma axis due to geometrical constraints in the superconducting tokamak. The term line density on KSTAR has a different meaning from the line density of other tokamaks. To estimate the peak density and the mean density from the measured line density, information on the position of the plasma is needed. The information has been calculated from tangentially viewed visible images using the toroidal symmetry of the plasma. Interface definition language routines have been developed for this purpose. The calculated plasma position data correspond well to calculation results from magnetic analysis. With the position data and an estimated plasma profile, the peak density and the mean density have been obtained from the line density. From these results, changes of plasma density themselves can be separated from effects of the plasma movements, so they can give valuable information on the plasma status.

  4. Scattering of diffracting beams of electron cyclotron waves by random density fluctuations in inhomogeneous plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Hannes; Maj, Omar; Poli, Emanuele

    2015-03-01

    The physics and first results of the new WKBeam code for electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas are presented. This code is developed on the basis of a kinetic radiative transfer model which is general enough to account for the effects of diffraction and density fluctuations on the beam. Our preliminary numerical results show a significant broadening of the power deposition profile in ITER due to scattering from random density fluctuations at the plasma edge, while such scattering effects are found to be negligible in medium-size tokamaks like ASDEX upgrade.

  5. Collimated fast electron beam generation in critical density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iwawaki, T. Habara, H.; Morita, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Baton, S.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Rousseaux, C.; Filippi, F.; Nazarov, W.

    2014-11-15

    Significantly collimated fast electron beam with a divergence angle 10° (FWHM) is observed when an ultra-intense laser pulse (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 300 fs) irradiates a uniform critical density plasma. The uniform plasma is created through the ionization of an ultra-low density (5 mg/c.c.) plastic foam by X-ray burst from the interaction of intense laser (I = 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, 600 ps) with a thin Cu foil. 2D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation well reproduces the collimated electron beam with a strong magnetic field in the region of the laser pulse propagation. To understand the physical mechanism of the collimation, we calculate energetic electron motion in the magnetic field obtained from the 2D PIC simulation. As the results, the strong magnetic field (300 MG) collimates electrons with energy over a few MeV. This collimation mechanism may attract attention in many applications such as electron acceleration, electron microscope and fast ignition of laser fusion.

  6. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  7. Nearly degenerate electron distributions and superluminal radiation densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    2010-02-01

    Polylogarithmic fugacity expansions of the partition function, the caloric and thermal equations of state, and the specific heat of fermionic power-law distributions are derived in the nearly degenerate low-temperature/high-density quantum regime. The spectral functions of an ultra-relativistic electron plasma are obtained by averaging the tachyonic radiation densities of inertial electrons with Fermi power-laws, whose entropy is shown to be extensive and stable. The averaged radiation densities are put to test by performing tachyonic cascade fits to the γ-ray spectrum of the TeV blazar Markarian 421 in a low and high emission state. Estimates of the thermal electron plasma in this active galactic nucleus are extracted from the spectral fits, such as temperature, number count, and internal energy. The tachyonic cascades reproduce the quiescent as well as a burst spectrum of the blazar obtained with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov detectors. Double-logarithmic plots of the differential tachyon flux exhibit intrinsic spectral curvature, caused by the Boltzmann factor of the electron gas.

  8. Coupled-channels quantum theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic processes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-03-22

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (j(e)), =1/2∫dR[Δ(b) (x;R) - Δ(a) (x;R)] even though the electrons certainly move in response to the movement of the nuclei. This article, the first of a pair, proposes a quantum-mechanical "coupled-channels" (CC) theory that allows the approximate extraction of j(e) from the electronically adiabatic BO wave function . The CC theory is detailed for H(2)(+), in which case j(e) can be resolved into components associated with two channels α (=a,b), each of which corresponds to the "collision" of an "internal" atom α (proton a or b plus electron) with the other nucleus β (proton b or a). The dynamical role of the electron, which accommodates itself instantaneously to the motion of the nuclei, is submerged in effective electronic probability (population) densities, Δ(α), associated with each channel (α). The Δ(α) densities are determined by the (time-independent) BO electronic energy eigenfunction, which depends parametrically on the configuration of the nuclei, the motion of which is governed by the usual BO nuclear Schrödinger equation. Intuitively appealing formal expressions for the electronic flux density are derived for H(2)(+).

  9. Assisted assignment of ligands corresponding to unknown electron density.

    SciTech Connect

    Binkowski, T. A.; Cuff, M.; Nocek, B.; Chang, C.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2010-01-03

    A semi-automated computational procedure to assist in the identification of bound ligands from unknown electron density has been developed. The atomic surface surrounding the density blob is compared to a library of three-dimensional ligand binding surfaces extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Ligands corresponding to surfaces which share physicochemical texture and geometric shape similarities are considered for assignment. The method is benchmarked against a set of well represented ligands from the PDB, in which we show that we can identify the correct ligand based on the corresponding binding surface. Finally, we apply the method during model building and refinement stages from structural genomics targets in which unknown density blobs were discovered. A semi-automated computational method is described which aims to assist crystallographers with assigning the identity of a ligand corresponding to unknown electron density. Using shape and physicochemical similarity assessments between the protein surface surrounding the density and a database of known ligand binding surfaces, a plausible list of candidate ligands are identified for consideration. The method is validated against highly observed ligands from the Protein Data Bank and results are shown from its use in a high-throughput structural genomics pipeline.

  10. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Ian J

    2012-04-01

    The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ(2) significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor.

  11. Adaptive robust control of longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeizadeh, Amin; Schilcher, Thomas; Smith, Roy S.

    2016-05-01

    Feedback control of the longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles are considered to be critical for beam control in accelerators. In the feedback scheme, the longitudinal or transverse beam profile is measured and compared to a desired profile to give an error estimate. The error is then used to act on the appropriate actuators to correct the profile. The role of the transverse feedback is to steer the beam in a particular trajectory, known as the "orbit." The common approach for orbit correction is based on approximately inverting the response matrix, and in the best case, involves regulating or filtering the singular values. In the current contribution, a more systematic and structured way of handling orbit correction is introduced giving robustness against uncertainties in the response matrix. Moreover, the input bounds are treated to avoid violating the limits of the corrector currents. The concept of the robust orbit correction has been successfully tested at the SwissFEL injector test facility. In the SwissFEL machine, a photo-injector laser system extracts electrons from a cathode and a similar robust control method is developed for the longitudinal feedback control of the current profile of the electron bunch. The method manipulates the angles of the crystals in the laser system to produce a desired charge distribution over the electron bunch length. This approach paves the way towards automation of laser pulse stacking.

  12. Electronic properties of solids excited with intermediate laser power densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirotti, Fausto; Tempo Beamline Team

    Intermediate laser power density up to about 100 GW/cm2 is below the surface damage threshold is currently used to induce modification in the physical properties on short time scales. The absorption of a short laser pulse induces non-equilibrium electronic distributions followed by lattice-mediated equilibrium taking place only in the picosecond range. The role of the hot electrons is particularly important in several domains as for example fast magnetization and demagnetization processes, laser induced phase transitions, charge density waves. Angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measuring directly energy and momentum of electrons is the most adapted tool to study the electronic excitations at short time scales during and after fast laser excitations. The main technical problem is the space charge created by the pumping laser pulse. I will present angular resolved multiphoton photoemission results obtained with 800 nm laser pulses showing how space charge electrons emitted during fast demagnetization processes can be measured. Unable enter Affiliation: CNRS-SOLEIL Synchrotron L'Orme des Merisiers , Saint Aubin 91192 Gif sur Yvette France.

  13. Comparison of topside electron density measured by Radio Occultation (RO) of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites and Digisondes on a global scale with IRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmay; Haralambous, Haris

    2016-07-01

    This paper represents a comparison of the topside electron density of the F2-layer measured by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites in terms of GPS radio occultation technique and digisondes as manually scaled ionograms being provided by DIDBase (Digital Ionogram Database) with IRI. This study encompasses data from more than 40 locations for an extended period from January 2007 to December 2015. It utilises a subset of around 1000 very well matched (in terms of bottomside) FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC - Digisonde electron density profile pairs to compare the corresponding topside electron density profiles with IRI. The selection criteria for the electron density profile pairs, apart from coincidence of COSMIC and Digisonde electron density in the bottomside, is a collocation distance of less than 2.5o in terms of latitude and longtitude and 15 min maximum time difference in measuring NmF2 with the two techniques.

  14. Enhanced modified faraday cup for determination of power density distribution of electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2001-01-01

    An improved tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron or ion beam using electron beam profile data acquired by an enhanced modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power ion or electron beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits, one slit being about twice the width of the other slits, is placed above a Faraday cup. The electron or ion beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. The enlarged slit enables orientation of the beam profile with respect to the coordinates of the welding chamber. A second disk having slits therein is positioned below the first slit disk and inside of the Faraday cup and provides a shield to eliminate the majority of secondary electrons and ions from leaving the Faraday cup. Also, a ring is located below the second slit disk to help minimize the amount of secondary electrons and ions from being produced. In addition, a beam trap is located in the Faraday cup to provide even more containment of the electron or ion beam when full beam current is being examined through the center hole of the modified Faraday cup.

  15. Excess electrons in ice: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Somesh Kr; Inam, Fakharul; Scandolo, Sandro

    2014-02-21

    We present a density functional theory study of the localization of excess electrons in the bulk and on the surface of crystalline and amorphous water ice. We analyze the initial stages of electron solvation in crystalline and amorphous ice. In the case of crystalline ice we find that excess electrons favor surface states over bulk states, even when the latter are localized at defect sites. In contrast, in amorphous ice excess electrons find it equally favorable to localize in bulk and in surface states which we attribute to the preexisting precursor states in the disordered structure. In all cases excess electrons are found to occupy the vacuum regions of the molecular network. The electron localization in the bulk of amorphous ice is assisted by its distorted hydrogen bonding network as opposed to the crystalline phase. Although qualitative, our results provide a simple interpretation of the large differences observed in the dynamics and localization of excess electrons in crystalline and amorphous ice films on metals.

  16. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of Hβ spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier.

  17. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Burke, Kieron; Yang, Zeng-hui; Ullrich, Carsten A.; Trail, John R.; Needs, Richard J.

    2014-05-14

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  18. Electron Density in Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Surface Wave Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Jasinski, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2008-03-19

    In this paper, we present results of the spectroscopic measurements of the electron density in a microwave surface wave sustained discharges in Ar and Ne at atmospheric pressure. The discharge in the form of a plasma column was generated inside a quartz tube cooled with a dielectric liquid. The microwave power delivered to the discharge via rectangular waveguide was applied in the range of 200-1500 W. In all investigations presented in this paper, the gas flow rate was relatively low (0.5 l/min), so the plasma column was generated in the form of a single filament, and the lengths of the upstream and downstream plasma columns were almost the same. The electron density in the plasma columns was determined using the method based on the Stark broadening of H{sub {beta}} spectral line, including plasma region inside the waveguide which was not investigated earlier.

  19. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  20. Total electron content and F-region electron density distribution near the magnetic equator in India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Sethia, G.; Chandra, H.; Deshpande, M. R.; Davies, K.; Murthy, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Total electron content derived from the group delay measurements of ATS-6 radio beacons received at Ootacamund (India) are compared with the electron-density vs height distributions derived from the ionosonde data of the nearby station Kodaikanal. The daily variation of equivalent vertical total electron content does not show the midday bite out which is so prominently present in the corresponding daily variation of the maximum F-region electron density. The topside electron content continues to increase from sunrise to a maximum value around 1500 LT, while the bottomside electron content reaches a maximum value around 0500 LT. Daily variations of these as well as other parameters, e.g. the vertical slab thickness, the bottomside semi-thickness, the height of the F2 peak have been also studied for a geomagnetically quiet and a disturbed day.

  1. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-01

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  2. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  3. Surprising resistivity decrease in manganites with constant electronic density.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gil, R; Ruiz-González, M L; Alonso, J M; Martínez, J L; Hernando, A; Vallet-Regí, M; González-Calbet, J M

    2013-12-01

    A decrease of eight orders of magnitude in the resistance of (La0.5Ca0.5)zMnO3 has been detected when the electronic density is kept constant while the calcium content is modified by introducing cationic vacancies. This effect is related to the disappearance of the charge ordering state and the emergence of an antiferromagnetic–ferromagnetic transition. Moreover, high values of the colossal magnetoresistance above room temperature are attained. PMID:24200948

  4. Cutoff probe using Fourier analysis for electron density measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Byung-Keun; You, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Dae-Woong; Chang, Hong-Young; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for cutoff probe using a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope, instead of a network analyzer. The nanosecond impulse generator supplies a radiating signal of broadband frequency spectrum simultaneously without frequency sweeping, while frequency sweeping method is used by a network analyzer in a previous method. The transmission spectrum (S21) was obtained through a Fourier analysis of the transmitted impulse signal detected by the oscilloscope and was used to measure the electron density. The results showed that the transmission frequency spectrum and the electron density obtained with a new method are very close to those obtained with a previous method using a network analyzer. And also, only 15 ns long signal was necessary for spectrum reconstruction. These results were also compared to the Langmuir probe's measurements with satisfactory results. This method is expected to provide not only fast measurement of absolute electron density, but also function in other diagnostic situations where a network analyzer would be used (a hairpin probe and an impedance probe) by replacing the network analyzer with a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope.

  5. Cutoff probe using Fourier analysis for electron density measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Byung-Keun; You, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Dae-Woong; Chang, Hong-Young; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung

    2012-01-15

    This paper proposes a new method for cutoff probe using a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope, instead of a network analyzer. The nanosecond impulse generator supplies a radiating signal of broadband frequency spectrum simultaneously without frequency sweeping, while frequency sweeping method is used by a network analyzer in a previous method. The transmission spectrum (S21) was obtained through a Fourier analysis of the transmitted impulse signal detected by the oscilloscope and was used to measure the electron density. The results showed that the transmission frequency spectrum and the electron density obtained with a new method are very close to those obtained with a previous method using a network analyzer. And also, only 15 ns long signal was necessary for spectrum reconstruction. These results were also compared to the Langmuir probe's measurements with satisfactory results. This method is expected to provide not only fast measurement of absolute electron density, but also function in other diagnostic situations where a network analyzer would be used (a hairpin probe and an impedance probe) by replacing the network analyzer with a nanosecond impulse generator and an oscilloscope.

  6. Three-dimensional electron density along the WSA and MSNA latitudes probed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F. Y.; Liu, J. Y.; Chang, L. C.; Lin, C. H.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we employ electron density profiles derived by the GPS radio occultation experiment aboard the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellites to examine the electron density on geographic latitudes of 40° to 80° in the Southern hemisphere and 30° to 60° in the Northern hemisphere at various global fixed local times from February 2009 to January 2010. The results reveal that an eastward shift of a single-peak plasma density feature occurs along the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) latitudes, while a double-peak plasma density feature appears along the northern Mid-latitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (MSNA) latitudes. A cross-comparison between three-dimensional F3/C electron density and HWM93 simulation confirms that the magnetic meridional effect and vertical effect caused by neutral winds exhibit the eastward shifts. Furthermore, we find that the eastward shift of the peaks when viewed as a function of local time suggests that they could be interpreted as being comprised of different tidal components with distinct zonal phase velocities in local time.

  7. A real-space stochastic density matrix approach for density functional electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Beck, Thomas L

    2015-12-21

    The recent development of real-space grid methods has led to more efficient, accurate, and adaptable approaches for large-scale electrostatics and density functional electronic structure modeling. With the incorporation of multiscale techniques, linear-scaling real-space solvers are possible for density functional problems if localized orbitals are used to represent the Kohn-Sham energy functional. These methods still suffer from high computational and storage overheads, however, due to extensive matrix operations related to the underlying wave function grid representation. In this paper, an alternative stochastic method is outlined that aims to solve directly for the one-electron density matrix in real space. In order to illustrate aspects of the method, model calculations are performed for simple one-dimensional problems that display some features of the more general problem, such as spatial nodes in the density matrix. This orbital-free approach may prove helpful considering a future involving increasingly parallel computing architectures. Its primary advantage is the near-locality of the random walks, allowing for simultaneous updates of the density matrix in different regions of space partitioned across the processors. In addition, it allows for testing and enforcement of the particle number and idempotency constraints through stabilization of a Feynman-Kac functional integral as opposed to the extensive matrix operations in traditional approaches. PMID:25969148

  8. Electron Density Measurements on LTX Using Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, S.; Nguyen, X. V.; Peebles, W. A.; Boyle, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Schmitt, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic evolution of the electron density profile is tracked using microwave and millimeter-wave diagnostics on LTX. The 296 GHz (λ =1 mm) interferometer provides a radial line density measurement at the midplane, while an FMCW (frequency-modulated continuous-wave) reflectometer (13.5 -33 GHz, or O-mode 0 . 2 - 1 . 3 ×1013 cm-3) provides density profile measurements for the low-field side. Data taken during FY2015 will be compared with measurements from Thomson scattering and estimates of the plasma position from LRDFIT. Measurements of density fluctuations due to low-frequency (<100 kHz) MHD instabilities will also be shown. Future plans include the installation of a correlation reflectomter (Ka-band, 27-40 GHz) with dual tuneable sources and a frequency bandwidth of up to 5 MHz. This system will utilize the same antennas as the profile reflectometer to provide radial and/or toroidal/poloidal correlations. Further diagnostic details will be presented at the meeting. Supported by U.S. DoE Grants DE-FG02-99ER54527 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. The calculation of free electron density in CASSANDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, L. K.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Harris, J. W. O.; Upcraft, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    CASSANDRA is an AWE opacity code used to model plasmas in local thermal equilibrium: there is a desire to expand its use to calculating plasma equations of state. CASSANDRA's self-consistent field calculation ( SCF) uses the local density approximation for bounds states and has a free electron contribution based upon the Thomas-Fermi model [B.J.B. Crowley et al., J. Quant. Spectro. Radiat. Trans. 71, 257(2001)]. Whilst this is applicable for very high temperature or low density plasmas; in hot and dense matter the effect of ionization will lead to discontinuities in the effective ionisation, Z⋆. The electron contribution to hydrostatic pressure is associated with Z⋆, thus these discontinuities produce unphysical jumps in the resulting calculated material pressure. We describe a procedure to mitigate the effect by calculating the free electron wave functions within the generalized ion-cell model [B.J.B. Crowley et al., Phys. Rev. A 41, 2179(1990)], and thus explicitly calculate free-electron resonances.

  10. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Mel E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu; Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W. E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  11. An instrument for in situ comet nucleus surface density profile measurement by gamma ray attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Andrew J.; Gadomski, Stanislaw; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Spohn, Tilman; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Whyndham, Matthew; Zarnecki, John C.

    2001-08-01

    The MUPUS experiment on the Rosetta Lander will measure thermal and mechanical properties as well as the bulk density of the cometary material at and just below the surface of the nucleus of comet 46P/Wirtanen. A profile of bulk density vs. depth will be obtained by measuring the attenuation of 662 keV gamma rays emitted by a 137Cs source. Compton scattering is the dominant interaction process at this energy, the attenuation depending directly on the total number of electrons along the source-detector path. This in turn is approximately proportional to the column density. We report here on the design of the bulk density instrument and the results of related Monte Carlo simulations, laboratory tests and calculations of the instrument's performance. The 137Cs radioisotope source is mounted in the tip of the MUPUS thermal probe - a 10 mm diameter rod, to be hammered into the surface of the nucleus to a depth of ˜370 mm. Two cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors mounted at the top of the probe will monitor the count rate of 662 keV photons. Due to the statistics of photon counting, the integration time required to measure column density to a particular accuracy varies with depth as well as with bulk density. The required integration time is minimised for a material thickness equal to twice the exponential attenuation length. At shallower depths the required time rises due to the smaller fractional change in count rate with varying depth, while at greater depths the reduced count rate demands longer integration times. The former effect and the fact that the first 45 mm of the source-detector path passes not through the comet but through the material of the probe, mean that the first density measurement cannot be made until the source has reached a depth of perhaps 100 mm. The laboratory experiments indicate that at this depth an integration time no less than 348 s (falling to 93.9 s at full penetration) would be required to measure a bulk density of 1000 kg m -3 to 5

  12. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  13. Inversion for the density-depth profile of polar firn using a stepped-frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthern, Robert J.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Hawley, Robert L.; Morris, Elizabeth M.

    2013-09-01

    Translating satellite measurements of ice sheet volume change into sea level contribution requires knowledge of the profile of density as a function of depth within the ice sheet and how this profile changes over time. This paper describes an interferometric method of inverting ground-penetrating radar returns for the profile of firn density as a function of depth. The method is an interferometric implementation of the common-midpoint approach, performed using a stepped-frequency, phase-sensitive ground-penetrating radar. By recording the phase difference of returns with a range of antenna separations, the different path lengths through the firn allow recovery of a smoothed representation of the density profile. This density model is characterized by three parameters: surface density and two decay lengths for porosity, each operating over a different density range. Our results suggest that the stepped-frequency radar used here can accurately recover differences in two-way traveltime and produce useful estimates of the density profile. In a test of the method performed at Summit station in Greenland, the recovered density-depth profile agreed with independent density measurements from an ice core and a neutron probe to within 6% root-mean-square error.

  14. A temporally and spatially resolved electron density diagnostic method for the edge plasma based on Stark broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, A.; Martin, E. H.; Shannon, S. C.; Isler, R. C.; Caughman, J. B. O.

    2016-11-01

    An electron density diagnostic (≥1010 cm-3) capable of high temporal (ms) and spatial (mm) resolution is currently under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The diagnostic is based on measuring the Stark broadened, Doppler-free spectral line profile of the n = 6-2 hydrogen Balmer series transition. The profile is then fit to a fully quantum mechanical model including the appropriate electric and magnetic field operators. The quasi-static approach used to calculate the Doppler-free spectral line profile is outlined here and the results from the model are presented for H-δ spectra for electron densities of 1010-1013 cm-3. The profile shows complex behavior due to the interaction between the magnetic substates of the atom.

  15. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to study temporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium sustained in two different configurations, (i) diffuse filament discharge between two spherical electrodes, and (ii) surface discharge over plane quartz surface. In the diffuse filament discharge, the experimental results are compared with the predictions of a 2D plasma fluid model. Electron densities are put on an absolute scale using pure rotational Raman spectra in nitrogen, taken without the plasma, for calibration. In the diffuse filament discharge, electron density and electron temperature increase rapidly after breakdown, peaking at n e  ≈  3.5 · 1015 cm-3 and T e  ≈  4.0 eV. After the primary discharge pulse, both electron density and electron temperature decrease (to n e ~ 1014 cm-3 over ~1 µs and to T e ~ 0.5 eV over ~200 ns), with a brief transient rise produced by the secondary discharge pulse. At the present conditions, the dominant recombination mechanism is dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular ions, \\text{He}2+ . In the afterglow, the electron temperature does not relax to gas temperature, due to superelastic collisions. Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) inferred from the Thomson scattering spectra are nearly Maxwellian, which is expected at high ionization fractions, when the shape of EEDF is controlled primarily by electron-electron collisions. The kinetic model predictions agree well with the temporal trends detected in the experiment, although peak electron temperature and electron density are overpredicted. Heavy species temperature predicted during the discharge and the early afterglow remains low and does not exceed T  =  400 K, due to relatively slow quenching of metastable He* atoms in two-body and three-body processes. In the surface discharge, peak electron density and electron temperature are n e  ≈  3 · 1014 cm3 and T e

  16. Dopant Profiling of III-V Nanostructures for Electronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alexandra Caroline

    2011-12-01

    utilized to investigate the intrinsic electron transport properties as a function of nanowire radius. From C-V characterization, the densities of thermally-activated fixed charges and trap states on the surface of as-grown (unpassivated) nanowires are investigated to allow the accurate measurement of the gate oxide capacitance. This allows the direct assessment of the electron field-effect mobility. The field-effect mobility is found to monotonically decrease as the radius is reduced to sub-10 nm, with the low temperature transport data highlighting the impact of surface roughness scattering on the mobility degradation for smaller radius nanowires. Next, the electrical properties of the InAs XOI transistors are studied, showing the critical role of quantum confinement in the transport properties of ultrathin XOI layers. Following the investigation of the electrical properties of undoped InAs nanostructures, post-growth, surface doping processes for InAs nanostructures are addressed. Nanoscale, sulfur doping of InAs planar substrates with high dopant areal dose and uniformity by using a self-limiting monolayer doping approach is demonstrated as a means to create ultrashallow junctions. From transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), a dopant profile abruptness of ˜3.5 nm/decade is observed without significant lattice damage. The n+/ p+ junctions fabricated using this doping method exhibit negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior, demonstrating the utility of this approach for device fabrication with high electrically active sulfur concentrations of ˜8x1018 cm-3. Next, a gas phase doping approach for InAs nanowires and ultrathin XOI layers using zinc is demonstrated as an effective means for enabling post-growth dopant profiling of nanostructures. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated by the fabrication of gated diodes and p-MOSFETs. Electrically active zinc concentrations of ˜1x1019 cm-3 are achieved which is

  17. Equation satisfied by the energy-density functional for electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that the electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy-density functional V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}] satisfies the equationV{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]-V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}]={integral}d{sup 3}r({delta}V{sub ee}{sup {gamma}}[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}]/{delta}{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r))[{rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r)-{rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r)], where {rho}{sub N}{sup 1}(r) and {rho}{sub N-1}{sup {gamma}}(r) are N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential of the N-electron system at coupling strength {gamma}.

  18. A rocket radiobeacon experiment on the electron concentration profile measurements in the bottomside of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, V. M.; Lvova, G. P.; Guliaeva, T. L.; Pakhomov, S. V.; Glotov, A. P.

    The possibility of measuring the electron density profile in the height interval 70-110 km with a two-frequency coherent transmitter set mounted on a 'small' geophysical rocket of type M-100 is investigated. Results are presented of measurements using the phase Doppler method carried out at middle latitudes in May 1979 and February 1980. Good consistency of the profiles measured for the D and E regions of the ionosphere with those of IRI is not always obtained, even when the correct helio and geophysic conditions of the experiments are given for calculations with IRI.

  19. Density and capacitance profiles and edge effects in a two-dimensional charge layer on a dielectric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, Ravi

    1987-04-01

    The density and capacitance profiles and edge effects in a two-dimensional (2D) layer of electrons held on a liquid helium surface between two horizontal plates of a parallel-plate capacitor are studied by solving Laplace's equation on a computer. An effective length for experimental cells is defined to take into account nonuniform charge density and capacitance near the edges of the cells. The profiles and edge effects are studied as a function of charge density on the helium surface, helium depth inside the cell, repelling voltages on guard electrodes around the capacitor plates, and the frequency of excitation. The results should be useful in designing cells for experiments and better analyzing the results of measurements.

  20. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, M.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.

    2016-11-01

    In the prior C-2 experiment, electron density was measured using a two-color 6-chord CO2/HeNe interferometer. Analysis shows that high-frequency common mode phase noise can be reduced by a factor of 3 by constructing a reference chord. In the system upgrade from C-2 to C-2U a 4-chord far-infrared laser interferometer was developed, which demonstrated superior sensitivity (1 × 1016 m-2 at >1 MHz bandwidth) and solved the under spatial sampling issue of the C-2 interferometer system. Improved density-profile measurement results are presented in this paper, including evidence of fast-ion modified density profile and stabilization of the n = 1 plasma wobble mode.

  1. Advanced applications of reduced density matrices in electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Adam Eric

    This dissertation describes several applications of reduced density matrices (RDMs) in electronic structure theory. RDM methods are a valuable addition to the library of electronic structure theories because they reduce a many-electron problem to the space of just two electrons without approximation. New theoretical and computational avenues enabled by the two-electron RDM (2-RDM) have already shown substantial progress in calculating atomic and molecular energies and properties with an eye toward predictive chemistry. More than simply accurate calculations, RDM methods entail a paradigm shift in quantum chemistry. While one-electron approaches are conceptually easy to understand, the importance of the 2-RDM quantifies the centrality of a two-body framework. The 2-RDM facilitates a two-electron interpretation of quantum mechanics that will undoubtedly lead to a greater understanding of electron correlation. Two applications presented in the dissertation center around near-exact evaluation of the 2-RDM in chemical systems without the many-electron wave function, but approach the problem from different angles. The first applies variational 2-RDM theory to a model quantum dot; the second attempts non-variational determination of the 2-RDM in open-shell atomic and molecular systems using an extension of the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrodinger equation (ACSE). An example reaction is presented to demonstrate how energies computed with the 2-RDM can facilitate an understanding of chemical reactivity. A third application uses the one-electron RDM (1-RDM) as a tool for understanding molecular conductivity. In this case, the 1-RDM is valuable because it integrates out many extraneous degrees of freedom from metal baths, simplifying the electron transport problem but retaining enough information to predict the dependence of current on applied voltage. The results are competitive with other conductivity theories, including a dominant scattering-based understanding, but

  2. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1988-04-01

    Large diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1-5-microsec electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, approximately 300,000 A/sq cm sq rad has been consistently measured. To obtain this high-current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between about 1600 and 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure 10 to the -6th to -10 to the -5th Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  3. Rocket-borne measurements of electron temperature and density with the Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Widholm, M.; Lessard, M. R.; Riley, P.; Heavisides, J.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Determining electron temperature in the ionosphere is a fundamentally important measurement for space science. Obtaining measurements of electron temperatures at high altitudes (>700 km) is difficult because of limitations on ground-based radar and classic spacecraft instrumentation. In light of these limitations, the rocket-borne Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer (ERPA) was developed to allow for accurate in situ measurement of ionospheric electron temperature with a simple and low-resource instrument. The compact ERPA, a traditional retarding potential analyzer with multiple baffle collimators, allows for a straightforward calculation of electron temperature. Since its first mission in 2004, it has amassed significant flight heritage and obtained data used in multiple studies investigating a myriad of phenomena related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In addition to highlighting the scientific contributions of the ERPA instrument, this paper outlines its theory and operation, the methodology used to obtain electron temperature measurements, and a comparative study suggesting that the ERPA can also provide electron density measurements.

  4. Quasi-classical theory of electronic flux density in electronically adiabatic molecular processes.

    PubMed

    Diestler, D J

    2012-11-26

    The standard Born-Oppenheimer (BO) description of electronically adiabatic molecular processes predicts a vanishing electronic flux density (EFD). A previously proposed "coupled-channels" theory permits the extraction of the EFD from the BO wave function for one-electron diatomic systems, but attempts at generalization to many-electron polyatomic systems are frustrated by technical barriers. An alternative "quasi-classical" approach, which eliminates the explicit quantum dynamics of the electrons within a classical framework, yet retains the quantum character of the nuclear motion, appears capable of yielding EFDs for arbitrarily complex systems. Quasi-classical formulas for the EFD in simple systems agree with corresponding coupled-channels formulas. Results of the application of the new quasi-classical formula for the EFD to a model triatomic system indicate the potential of the quasi-classical scheme to elucidate the dynamical role of electrons in electronically adiabatic processes in more complex multiparticle systems.

  5. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 107 cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 1011 cm-2. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  6. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  7. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-15

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature T{sub e} is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain T{sub e} by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature T{sub e} obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures T{sub eff} derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  8. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-01

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature Te is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain Te by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature Te obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures Teff derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  9. Electron density of states of Fe-based superconductors: Quantum trajectory Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashurnikov, V. A.; Krasavin, A. V.; Zhumagulov, Ya. V.

    2016-03-01

    The spectral and total electron densities of states in two-dimensional FeAs clusters, which simulate iron-based superconductors, have been calculated using the generalized quantum Monte Carlo algorithm within the full two-orbital model. Spectra have been reconstructed by solving the integral equation relating the Matsubara Green's function and spectral density by the method combining the gradient descent and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations have been performed for clusters with dimensions up to 10 × 10 FeAs cells. The profiles of the Fermi surface for the entire Brillouin zone have been presented in the quasiparticle approximation. Data for the total density of states near the Fermi level have been obtained. The effect of the interaction parameter, size of the cluster, and temperature on the spectrum of excitations has been studied.

  10. Carrier Density Profiling of Ultra-Shallow Junction Layers Through Corrected C-V Plotting

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, James; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Dimitrova, Tatiana; Timans, Paul; Gelpey, Jeff; McCoy, Steve; Lerch, Wilfried; Paul, Silke; Bolze, Detlef

    2008-11-03

    The aim of this report is to present and justify a new approach for carrier density profiling in ultra-shallow junction (USJ) layer. This new approach is based on a capacitance measurement model, which takes series impedance, shunt resistance and the presence of a boron skin on the USJ layer into account. It allows us to extract the depletion layer capacitances in the USJ layer from C-V plotting more accurately and hence to obtain better carrier density profiles. Based on this new approach the carrier density profiles of different USJ layers with and without halo-style implants are obtained and discussed.

  11. Deriving large electron temperatures and small electron densities with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Philippe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Holmberg, Mika; Lewis, Geraint; Schippers, Patricia; Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Gurnett, Donald; Coates, Andrew; Dandouras, Iannis; Waite, Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Langmuir Probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigate the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), and manage to reproduce the observations with a reasonable precision through empirical and theoretical methods. Conversely, the modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). We finally show that a significant influence of the energetic electrons (larger than the contribution of thermal ions) is also expected in various plasma environments of the Solar System, such as at Jupiter (i.e near Ganymede, Europa, Callisto and Io), or even at Earth (in the plasmasheet, the magnetosheath or in plasma cavities). Large electron temperatures and small electron densities could potentially be derived in these environments, which may be of interest for Langmuir Probes in the Earth magnetosphere or onboard the future JUICE mission at Jupiter.

  12. Density Profiles of Liquid/Vapor Interfaces Away from Their Critical Points

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Wei; Kim, Doseok; Vaknin, David

    2014-06-12

    We examine the applicability of various model profiles for the liquid/vapor interface by X-ray reflectivities on water and ethanol and their mixtures at room temperature. Analysis of the X-ray reflecivities using various density profiles shows an error-function like profile is the most adequate within experimental error. Our findings, together with recent observations from simulation studies on liquid surfaces, strongly suggest that the capillary-wave dynamics shapes the interfacial density profile in terms of the error function.

  13. Density fitting for three-electron integrals in explicitly correlated electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, James C.; Manby, Frederick R.

    2014-01-28

    The principal challenge in using explicitly correlated wavefunctions for molecules is the evaluation of nonfactorizable integrals over the coordinates of three or more electrons. Immense progress was made in tackling this problem through the introduction of a single-particle resolution of the identity. Decompositions of sufficient accuracy can be achieved, but only with large auxiliary basis sets. Density fitting is an alternative integral approximation scheme, which has proven to be very reliable for two-electron integrals. Here, we extend density fitting to the treatment of all three-electron integrals that appear at the MP2-F12/3*A level of theory. We demonstrate that the convergence of energies with respect to auxiliary basis size is much more rapid with density fitting than with the traditional resolution-of-the-identity approach.

  14. Real-time electron density measurements from Cotton-Mouton effect in JET machine

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M.; Boboc, A.; Zabeo, L.

    2008-10-15

    Real-time density profile measurements are essential for advanced fusion tokamak operation and interferometry is a proven method for this task. Nevertheless, as a consequence of edge localized modes, pellet injections, fast density increases, or disruptions, the interferometer is subject to fringe jumps, which produce loss of the signal preventing reliable use of the measured density in a real-time feedback controller. An alternative method to measure the density is polarimetry based on the Cotton-Mouton effect, which is proportional to the line-integrated electron density. A new analysis approach has been implemented and tested to verify the reliability of the Cotton-Mouton measurements for a wide range of plasma parameters and to compare the density evaluated from polarimetry with that from interferometry. The density measurements based on polarimetry are going to be integrated in the real-time control system of JET since the difference with the interferometry is within one fringe for more than 90% of the cases.

  15. Reduced density matrix approach to calculation of electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Jiang, Shidong; Nayakkankuppam, Madhu; Overton, Michael L.; Percus, Jerome K.

    1998-11-01

    The possibility of using the one-body and two-body reduced density matrices, rather than the many-body wavefunction, as the fundamental object of study for electronic structure calculations was actively explored in the 1960's and 1970's [1]-[3], but interest has waned since. In this approach the calculation of ground-state properties is reduced to a linear optimization problem subject to the representability conditions for the density matrices, which are a mixture of linear equalities and bounds on eigenvalues. We will review this approach, present a new family of representability conditions, and discuss our experience in using present-day methods for semi-definite programming for this application. [1] A. J. Coleman: Structure of fermion density matrices. Rev. Mod. Phys. 35 (1963) 668--689. [2] Claude Garrod and Jerome K. Percus: Reduction of the N-particle variational problem. J. Math. Phys. 5 (1964) 1756--1776. [3] M. Rosina and C. Garrod: The variational calculation of reduced density matrices. J. Comput. Phys. 18 (1975) 300--310.

  16. Dimmable electronic ballasts by variable power density modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borekci, Selim; Kesler, Selami

    2014-11-01

    Dimming can be accomplished commonly by switching frequency and pulse density modulation techniques and a variable inductor. In this study, a variable power density modulation (VPDM) control technique is proposed for dimming applications. A fluorescent lamp is operated in several states to meet the desired lamp power in a modulation period. The proposed technique has the same advantages of magnetic dimming topologies have. In addition, a unique and flexible control technique can be achieved. A prototype dimmable electronic ballast is built and experiments related to it have been conducted. As a result, a 36WT8 fluorescent lamp can be driven for a desired lamp power from several alternatives without modulating the switching frequency.

  17. Experimental Investigation of m=1 Diocotron Mode Growth at Low Electron Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen F. Paul; Kyle Morrison; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-08-21

    Previous experiments on the Electron Diffusion Gauge showed that the diocotron mode damping increases with higher neutral gas filling pressure. Yet the energy dissipated from a rotating plasma by collisions with neutrals is predicted to excite the mode. To resolve this, experiments have been conducted to examine the coupling between expansion and the m=1 diocotron mode. Results from recent experiments have shown interesting phenomena: (1) The degree and sensitivity of mode growth is observed to be strongly dependent on filament conditions. Mode growth rates of nearly 20 sec{sup -1} have been observed even with negligible resistive drive. Specifically, at low filament bias voltages (and correspondingly low electron densities {approx}1-2 x 10{sup 7} electrons/cm), the mode growth is very sensitive to the heating voltage across the filament, even though changes in filament heating voltage barely affect the plasma expansion, the plasma density profile, the filament emission, or the resulting electron density. (2) At low neutral gas pressure (<10{sup -9} Torr), the diocotron mode growth rate increases with neutral pressure. However, the growth rate is several orders of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions.

  18. Momentum distribution function of the electron gas at metallic densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yasutami; Yasuhara, H.

    1991-10-01

    The momentum distribution function n(k) of the electron gas is calculated in the effective-potential-expansion method at metallic densities. The recently established self-consistency relation between n(k) and the correlation energy [Y. Takada and T. Kita, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 25 (1991)] is employed to check the accuracy of our results. This check shows that the effective-potential-expansion method provides probably the exact and at least more accurate results of n(k) than all the other methods that have given n(k) thus far.

  19. Evidence for a continuous, power law, electron density irregularity spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronyn, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral form of the irregularities in electron density that cause interplanetary scintillation (IPS) of small angular diameter radio sources is discussed. The intensity scintillation technique always yields an irregularity scale size, which is of the order of the first Fresnel zone for the wavelength at which the observations are taken. This includes not only the radio wavelength measurements of the structure of the interplanetary medium, but also radio wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the ionosphere and interstellar medium, and optical wavelength measurements of the irregularity structure of the atmosphere.

  20. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hsu, Y. W.; Jiang, G. S.; Chen, W. H.; Liu, W. T.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fang, H. K.

    2015-08-15

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T{sub e} in low frequency mode and N{sub e} in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f{sub UHR}). The instrument which is named “TeNeP” can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  1. Charge density waves in strongly correlated electron systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Choe, Jesse; Morosan, E

    2016-08-01

    Strong electron correlations are at the heart of many physical phenomena of current interest to the condensed matter community. Here we present a survey of the mechanisms underlying such correlations in charge density wave (CDW) systems, including the current theoretical understanding and experimental evidence for CDW transitions. The focus is on emergent phenomena that result as CDWs interact with other charge or spin states, such as magnetism and superconductivity. In addition to reviewing the CDW mechanisms in 1D, 2D, and 3D systems, we pay particular attention to the prevalence of this state in two particular classes of compounds, the high temperature superconductors (cuprates) and the layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The possibilities for quantum criticality resulting from the competition between magnetic fluctuations and electronic instabilities (CDW, unconventional superconductivity) are also discussed. PMID:27376547

  2. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Hsu, Y W; Jiang, G S; Chen, W H; Cheng, C Z; Fang, H K; Liu, W T

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T(e) in low frequency mode and N(e) in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f(UHR)). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode. PMID:26329217

  3. Charge density waves in strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Choe, Jesse; Morosan, E.

    2016-08-01

    Strong electron correlations are at the heart of many physical phenomena of current interest to the condensed matter community. Here we present a survey of the mechanisms underlying such correlations in charge density wave (CDW) systems, including the current theoretical understanding and experimental evidence for CDW transitions. The focus is on emergent phenomena that result as CDWs interact with other charge or spin states, such as magnetism and superconductivity. In addition to reviewing the CDW mechanisms in 1D, 2D, and 3D systems, we pay particular attention to the prevalence of this state in two particular classes of compounds, the high temperature superconductors (cuprates) and the layered transition metal dichalcogenides. The possibilities for quantum criticality resulting from the competition between magnetic fluctuations and electronic instabilities (CDW, unconventional superconductivity) are also discussed.

  4. Electron temperature and density probe for small aeronomy satellites.

    PubMed

    Oyama, K-I; Hsu, Y W; Jiang, G S; Chen, W H; Cheng, C Z; Fang, H K; Liu, W T

    2015-08-01

    A compact and low power consumption instrument for measuring the electron density and temperature in the ionosphere has been developed by modifying the previously developed Electron Temperature Probe (ETP). A circuit block which controls frequency of the sinusoidal signal is added to the ETP so that the instrument can measure both T(e) in low frequency mode and N(e) in high frequency mode from the floating potential shift of the electrode. The floating potential shift shows a minimum at the upper hybrid resonance frequency (f(UHR)). The instrument which is named "TeNeP" can be used for tiny satellites which do not have enough conductive surface area for conventional DC Langmuir probe measurements. The instrument also eliminates the serious problems associated with the contamination of satellite surface as well as the sensor electrode.

  5. The effective density of randomly moving electrons and related characteristics of materials with degenerate electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenskis, V.

    2014-04-01

    Interpretation of the conductivity of metals, of superconductors in the normal state and of semiconductors with highly degenerate electron gas remains a significant issue if consideration is based on the classical statistics. This study is addressed to the characterization of the effective density of randomly moving electrons and to the evaluation of carrier diffusion coefficient, mobility, and other parameters by generalization of the widely published experimental results. The generalized expressions have been derived for various kinetic parameters attributed to the non-degenerate and degenerate electron gas, by analyzing a random motion of the single type carriers in homogeneous materials. The values of the most important kinetic parameters for different metals are also systematized and discussed. It has been proved that Einstein's relation between the diffusion coefficient and the drift mobility of electrons is held for any level of degeneracy if the effective density of randomly moving carriers is properly taken into account.

  6. Dependence of the outer density profiles of halos on their mass accretion rate

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2014-07-01

    We present a systematic study of the density profiles of ΛCDM halos, focusing on the outer regions, 0.1 < r/R {sub vir} < 9. We show that the median and mean profiles of halo samples of a given peak height exhibit significant deviations from the universal analytic profiles discussed previously in the literature, such as the Navarro-Frenk-White and Einasto profiles, at radii r ≳ 0.5R {sub 200m}. In particular, at these radii the logarithmic slope of the median density profiles of massive or rapidly accreting halos steepens more sharply than predicted. The steepest slope of the profiles occurs at r ≈ R {sub 200m}, and its absolute value increases with increasing peak height or mass accretion rate, reaching slopes of –4 and steeper. Importantly, we find that the outermost density profiles at r ≳ R {sub 200m} are remarkably self-similar when radii are rescaled by R {sub 200m}. This self-similarity indicates that radii defined with respect to the mean density are preferred for describing the structure and evolution of the outer profiles. However, the inner density profiles are most self-similar when radii are rescaled by R {sub 200c}. We propose a new fitting formula that describes the median and mean profiles of halo samples selected by their peak height or mass accretion rate with accuracy ≲ 10% at all radii, redshifts, and masses we studied, r ≲ 9R {sub vir}, 0 < z < 6, and M {sub vir} > 1.7 × 10{sup 10} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}. We discuss observational signatures of the profile features described above and show that the steepening of the outer profile should be detectable in future weak-lensing analyses of massive clusters. Such observations could be used to estimate the mass accretion rate of cluster halos.

  7. High current density sheet-like electron beam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow-Miller, Cora; Korevaar, Eric; Schuster, John

    Sheet electron beams are very desirable for coupling to the evanescent waves in small millimeter wave slow-wave circuits to achieve higher powers. In particular, they are critical for operation of the free-electron-laser-like Orotron. The program was a systematic effort to establish a solid technology base for such a sheet-like electron emitter system that will facilitate the detailed studies of beam propagation stability. Specifically, the effort involved the design and test of a novel electron gun using Lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) as the thermionic cathode material. Three sets of experiments were performed to measure beam propagation as a function of collector current, beam voltage, and heating power. The design demonstrated its reliability by delivering 386.5 hours of operation throughout the weeks of experimentation. In addition, the cathode survived two venting and pump down cycles without being poisoned or losing its emission characteristics. A current density of 10.7 A/sq cm. was measured while operating at 50 W of ohmic heating power. Preliminary results indicate that the nearby presence of a metal plate can stabilize the beam.

  8. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency f{sub p} to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both f{sub p} and 2 f{sub p} radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in f{sub p} than 2 f{sub p} emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  9. Production of Fine Structures in Type III Solar Radio Bursts Due to Turbulent Density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency fp to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both fp and 2 fp radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in fp than 2 fp emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 fp radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 fp radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  10. Radial gradients of phase space density in the inner electron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    While the outer radiation belt (3.5 < L < 8.0) is highly variable with respect to geomagnetic activity, the inner radiation belt (1.2 < L< 2.0) is relatively stable. Less attention has been paid to the inner electron belt in recent years. It has been generally accepted that the equilibrium structure of radiation belt electrons is explained by the slow inward radial diffusion from a source in the outer belt and losses by Coulomb collision and wave-particle interaction. In this study, we examine this well accepted theory using the radial profiles of the phase space density (PSD), inferred from in situ measurements made by three different satellites: S3-3, CRRES, and POLAR. Our results show that electron PSD in the inner electron belt has a clear prominent local peak and negative radial gradient in the outer portion of the inner zone, i.e., decreasing PSD with increasingL-value. A likely explanation for the peaks in PSD is acceleration due to energy diffusion produced by lightning-generated and anthropogenic whistlers. These results indicate that either additional local acceleration mechanism is responsible for the formation of the inner electron belt or inner electron belt is formed by sporadic injections of electrons into the inner zone. The currently well accepted model of slow diffusion and losses will be further examined by the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission.

  11. Self-similarity and universality of void density profiles in simulation and SDSS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadathur, S.; Hotchkiss, S.; Diego, J. M.; Iliev, I. T.; Gottlöber, S.; Watson, W. A.; Yepes, G.

    2015-06-01

    The stacked density profile of cosmic voids in the galaxy distribution provides an important tool for the use of voids for precision cosmology. We study the density profiles of voids identified using the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. We compare different methods for reconstructing density profiles scaled by the void radius and show that the most commonly used method based on counts in shells and simple averaging is statistically flawed as it underestimates the density in void interiors. We provide two alternative methods that do not suffer from this effect; one based on Voronoi tessellations is also easily able to account from artefacts due to finite survey boundaries and so is more suitable when comparing simulation data to observation. Using this method, we show that the most robust voids in simulation are exactly self-similar, meaning that their average rescaled profile does not depend on the void size. Within the range of our simulation, we also find no redshift dependence of the mean profile. Comparison of the profiles obtained from simulated and real voids shows an excellent match. The mean profiles of real voids also show a universal behaviour over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, number densities and redshifts. This points to a fundamental property of the voids found by the watershed algorithm, which can be exploited in future studies of voids.

  12. Non-stationary self-focusing of intense laser beam in plasma using ramp density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Habibi, M.; Ghamari, F.

    2011-10-15

    The non-stationary self-focusing of high intense laser beam in under-dense plasma with upward increasing density ramp is investigated. The obtained results show that slowly increasing plasma density ramp is very important in enhancing laser self-focusing. Also, the spot size oscillations of laser beam in front and rear of the pulse for two different density profiles are shown. We have selected density profiles that already were used by Sadighi-Bonabi et al.[Phys. Plasmas 16, 083105 (2009)]. Ramp density profile causes the laser beam to become more focused and penetrations deeps into the plasma by reduction of diffraction effects. Our computations show more reliable results in comparison to the previous works.

  13. Dymalloy: A composite substrate for high power density electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Colella, N.J.; Makowiecki, D.; Davidson, H.L.

    1995-06-29

    High power density electronic components such as fast microprocessors and power semiconductors must operate below the maximum rated device junction temperature to ensure reliability. function temperatures are determined by the amount of heat generated and the thermal resistance from junction to the ambient thermal environment. Two of the Largest contributions to this thermal resistance are the die attach interface and the package base. A decrease in these resistances can allow increased component packing density in MCMs, reduction of heat sink volume in tightly packed systems, enable the use of higher performance circuit components, and improve reliability. The substrate for high power density devices is the primary thermal link between the junctions and the heat sink. Present high power multichip modules and single chip packages use substrate materials such as silicon nitride or copper tungsten that have thermal conductivity in the range of 200 W/mK. We have developed Dymalloy, a copper-diamond composite, that has a thermal conductivity of 420 W/mK and an adjustable coefficient of thermal expansion, nominally 5.5 ppm/C at 25 C, compatible with silicon and gallium arsenide. Because of the matched coefficient of thermal expansion it is possible to use low thermal resistance hard die attach methods. Dymalloy is a composite material made using micron size Type I diamond powder that has a published thermal conductivity of 600 to 1000 W/mK in a metal matrix that has a thermal conductivity of 350 W/mK. The region of chemical bonding between the matrix material and diamond is limited to approximately 1000 A to maintain a high effective thermal conductivity for the composite. The material may be fabricated in near net shapes. Besides having exceptional thermal properties, the mechanical properties of this material also make it an attractive candidate as an electronic component substrate material.

  14. Direct and quantitative comparison of pixelated density profiles to high resolution X-ray reflectivity data.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenter, Paul; Lee, S. S.; Skelton, A A; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    A method for comparing pixelated density profiles (e.g. obtained from molecular dynamics or other computational techniques) with experimental X-ray reflectivity data both directly and quantitatively is described. The conditions under which such a comparison can be made quantitatively (e.g. with errors <1%) are determined theoretically by comparing calculated structure factors for an intrinsic continuous density profile with those obtained from density profiles that have been binned into regular spatial increments. The accuracy of the X-ray reflectivity calculations for binned density profiles is defined in terms of the inter-relationships between resolution of the X-ray reflectivity data (i.e. its range in momentum transfer), the chosen bin size and the width of the intrinsic density profile. These factors play a similar role in the application of any structure-factor calculations that involve the use of pixelated density profiles, such as those obtained from iterative phasing algorithms for inverting structures from X-ray reflectivity and coherent diffraction imaging data. Finally, it is shown how simulations of a quartz water interface can be embedded into an exact description of the bulk phases (including the substrate crystal and the fluid water, below and above the actual interface) to quantitatively reproduce the experimental reflectivity data of a solid liquid interface.

  15. Surface electron density models for accurate ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-06-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF) is a valuable methodology to study the interaction of atomic particles with metal surfaces. This method, in which the effect of low-energy electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations is treated within the local density friction approximation (LDFA) [Juaristi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 116102 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.116102], can provide an accurate description of both e-h pair and phonon excitations. In practice, its applicability becomes a complicated task in those situations of substantial surface atoms displacements because the LDFA requires the knowledge at each integration step of the bare surface electron density. In this work, we propose three different methods of calculating on-the-fly the electron density of the distorted surface and we discuss their suitability under typical surface distortions. The investigated methods are used in AIMDEF simulations for three illustrative adsorption cases, namely, dissociated H2 on Pd(100), N on Ag(111), and N2 on Fe(110). Our AIMDEF calculations performed with the three approaches highlight the importance of going beyond the frozen surface density to accurately describe the energy released into e-h pair excitations in case of large surface atom displacements.

  16. Numerical solutions of sheath structures in front of an electron-emitting electrode immersed in a low-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Din, Alif

    2013-09-15

    The exact theoretical expressions involved in the formation of sheath in front of an electron emitting electrode immersed in a low-density plasma have been derived. The potential profile in the sheath region has been calculated for subcritical, critical, and supercritical emissions. The potential profiles of critical and supercritical emissions reveals that we must take into account a small, instead of zero, electric field at the sheath edge to satisfy the boundary conditions used to integrate the Poisson's equation. The I-V curves for critical emission shows that only high values of plasma-electron to emitted-electron temperature ratio can meet the floating potential of the emissive electrode. A one-dimensional fluid like model is assumed for ions, while the electron species are treated as kinetic. The distribution of emitted-electron from the electrode is assumed to be half Maxwellian. The plasma-electron enters the sheath region at sheath edge with half Maxwellian velocity distribution, while the reflected ones have cut-off velocity distribution due to the absorption of super thermal electrons by the electrode. The effect of varying emitted-electron current on the sheath structure has been studied with the help of a parameter G (the ratio of emitted-electron to plasma-electron densities)

  17. EVIDENCE FOR GENTLY SLOPING PLASMA DENSITY PROFILES IN THE DEEP CORONA: TYPE III OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lobzin, V. V.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.; Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.; Gorgutsa, R. V.; Fomichev, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency f{sub p} and near its harmonic 2f{sub p} by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration being about 1-3 s. In the present paper, 37 well-defined coronal type III radio bursts (25-450 MHz) are analyzed. The results obtained substantiate an earlier statement that the dependence of the central frequency of the emission on time can be fitted to a power-law model, f(t) {proportional_to} (t - t{sub 0}){sup -{alpha}}, where {alpha} can be as low as 1. In the case of negligible plasma acceleration and conical flow, it means that the electron number density within about 1 solar radius above the photosphere will decrease as r {sup -2}, like in the solar wind. For the data set chosen, the index {alpha} varies in the range from 0.2 to 7 or bigger, with mean and median values of 1.2 and 0.5, respectively. A surprisingly large fraction of events, 84%, have {alpha} {<=} 1.2. These results provide strong evidence that in the type III source regions the electron number density scales as n(r) {proportional_to} (r - r{sub 0}){sup -{beta}}, with minimum, mean, and median {beta} = 2{alpha} of 0.4, 2.4, and 1.0, respectively. Hence, the typical density profiles are more gently sloping than those given by existing empirical coronal models. Several events are found with a wind-like dependence of burst frequency on time. Smaller power-law indices could result from the effects of non-conical geometry of the plasma flow tubes, deceleration of coronal plasma, and/or the curvature of the magnetic field lines. The last effect is shown to be too weak to explain such low power-law indices. A strong tendency is found for bursts from the same group to have similar power-law indices, thereby favoring the hypothesis that they are usually produced by the same source

  18. Determination of the electrostatic potential and electron density of silicon using convergent-beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoichiro; Tsuda, Kenji; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    2008-09-01

    A structure-analysis method using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) developed by Tsuda et al. [Tsuda & Tanaka (1999), Acta Cryst. A55, 939-954; Tsuda, Ogata, Takagi, Hashimoto & Tanaka (2002), Acta Cryst. A58, 514-525] has been applied to the determination of the electrostatic potential and electron density of crystalline silicon. CBED patterns recorded at nine different incidences are simultaneously used to improve the accuracy of the refinement. The Debye-Waller factor and low-order structure factors of silicon have been successfully refined only using CBED data. The electrostatic potential and electron-density distribution have been reconstructed from the refined parameters. The latter clearly shows the bonding electrons between the nearest neighbor atoms. The obtained results are compared with the results of other CBED and recent X-ray diffraction experiments. The influence of the number of refined low-order structure factors on the electron density is discussed. The effect of the reduction of experimental data points on the accuracy of the refined parameters is also examined.

  19. Extracting electron transfer coupling elements from constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2006-10-01

    Constrained density functional theory (DFT) is a useful tool for studying electron transfer (ET) reactions. It can straightforwardly construct the charge-localized diabatic states and give a direct measure of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. In this work, a method is presented for calculating the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) based on constrained DFT. This method completely avoids the use of ground-state DFT energies because they are known to irrationally predict fractional electron transfer in many cases. Instead it makes use of the constrained DFT energies and the Kohn-Sham wave functions for the diabatic states in a careful way. Test calculations on the Zn2+ and the benzene-Cl atom systems show that the new prescription yields reasonable agreement with the standard generalized Mulliken-Hush method. We then proceed to produce the diabatic and adiabatic potential energy curves along the reaction pathway for intervalence ET in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q) anion. While the unconstrained DFT curve has no reaction barrier and gives Hab≈17kcal /mol, which qualitatively disagrees with experimental results, the Hab calculated from constrained DFT is about 3kcal /mol and the generated ground state has a barrier height of 1.70kcal/mol, successfully predicting (Q-TTF-Q)- to be a class II mixed-valence compound.

  20. Dayside electron density structures organised by the Martian crustal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieval, C.; Wild, J. A.; Morgan, D. D.; Andrews, D. J.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) onboard Mars Express is able to detect remotely the Martian topside electron densities down to the main ionospheric peak. In the ionospheric mode it transmits a sequence of pulses in the frequency range 0.1 to 5.5 MHz and measures the delay of reception of the reflected signals returned by the ionospheric plasma layers below the spacecraft. Previous studies using MARSIS have investigated localized electron density structures in the dayside Martian ionosphere, located in areas of typically near-vertical or oblique orientation of the Martian crustal magnetic fields. These crustal fields are remnants of the now extinct global Martian dipole magnetic field, with the strongest fields in the Southern hemisphere reaching up to |B| > 200 nT at altitudes of 400 km. These density structures are often detected as apparent upwellings above the surrounding ideally horizontally stratified ionosphere. Previous studies searched the density structures at a fixed sounding frequency of 1.9 MHz (equivalent to a plasma density of 4.47·104 cm-3), which is a typical frequency at which they are detected. In addition, these studies did not account for the signal dispersion due to the propagation through the ionosphere, which causes larger time delays for receiving the radar echoes, and therefore an underestimation of the altitude of these structures. In the present work we propose to use a statistical dataset of such density structures detected on the dayside of Mars by MARSIS in areas of oblique crustal fields, to determine the interval of densities for which the structures are found to make apparent upwellings. Then we use the corresponding electron density profiles corrected for signal dispersion, to determine the real altitudes of the density structures, their vertical extent and their plasma scale heights compared to the surrounding ionosphere. These new informations give critical hints for uncovering their origins

  1. Evidence of water molecules--a statistical evaluation of water molecules based on electron density.

    PubMed

    Nittinger, Eva; Schneider, Nadine; Lange, Gudrun; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-04-27

    Water molecules play important roles in many biological processes, especially when mediating protein-ligand interactions. Dehydration and the hydrophobic effect are of central importance for estimating binding affinities. Due to the specific geometric characteristics of hydrogen bond functions of water molecules, meaning two acceptor and two donor functions in a tetrahedral arrangement, they have to be modeled accurately. Despite many attempts in the past years, accurate prediction of water molecules-structurally as well as energetically-remains a grand challenge. One reason is certainly the lack of experimental data, since energetic contributions of water molecules can only be measured indirectly. However, on the structural side, the electron density clearly shows the positions of stable water molecules. This information has the potential to improve models on water structure and energy in proteins and protein interfaces. On the basis of a high-resolution subset of the Protein Data Bank, we have conducted an extensive statistical analysis of 2.3 million water molecules, discriminating those water molecules that are well resolved and those without much evidence of electron density. In order to perform this classification, we introduce a new measurement of electron density around an individual atom enabling the automatic quantification of experimental support. On the basis of this measurement, we present an analysis of water molecules with a detailed profile of geometric and structural features. This data, which is freely available, can be applied to not only modeling and validation of new water models in structural biology but also in molecular design.

  2. RR Lyrae in XSTPS: The halo density profile in the north galactic cap

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, L.; Smith, M. C.; Yuan, H.-B.; Liu, X.-W.; Zhang, H.-H.; Zhao, H.-B.; Yao, J.-S. E-mail: msmith@shao.ac.cn

    2014-06-20

    We present a catalog of RR Lyrae stars (RRLs) observed by the Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey (XSTPS). The area we consider is located in the north Galactic cap, covering ≈376.75 deg{sup 2} at α ≈ 150° and δ ≈ 27° down to a magnitude limit of i ≈ 19. Using the variability information afforded by the multi-epoch nature of our XSTPS data, combined with colors from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we are able to identify candidate RRLs. We find 318 candidates, derive distances to them, and estimate the detection efficiency. The majority of our candidates have more than 12 observations, and for these we are able to calculate periods. These also allow us to estimate our contamination level, which we predict is between 30% and 40%. Finally, we use the sample to probe the halo density profile in the 9-49 kpc range and find that it can be well fitted by a double power law. We find good agreement between this model and the models derived for the south Galactic cap using the Watkins et al. and Sesar et al. RRL data sets, after accounting for possible contamination in our data set from Sagittarius stream members. We consider non-spherical double power-law models of the halo density profile and again find agreement with literature data sets, although we have limited power to constrain the flattening due to our small survey area. Much tighter constraints will be placed by current and future wide-area surveys, most notably ESA's astrometric Gaia mission. Our analysis demonstrates that surveys with a limited number of epochs can effectively be mined for RRLs. Our complete sample is provided as accompanying online material; as an example the first few entries of each electronic table are shown in the text.

  3. The influence of third-order interactions on the density profile of associating hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D.; Sokolowski, S.; Zagorski, R.; Trokhymchuk, A.

    Canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations and the non-uniform Percus-Yevick (NPY) equation for the local density are used to study the influence of surface mediated thirdorder interactions on the adsorption of associating hard spheres on a hard wall. A comparison of the NPY density profiles with the computer simulations data indicates that this approximation predicts the fluid structure reasonably well.

  4. Electron density and temperature in the solar corona from multifrequency radio imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, C.; Chambe, G.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The 2D images obtained through rotational aperture synthesis with the Nançay Radioheliograph are suitable for quantitative exploitation. First results are presented. Aims: We study the variations of the quiet corona in brightness and size during an 8-year period and derive electron density and temperature in the corona. Methods: Images at 6 frequencies between 150 and 450 MHz for 183 quiet days between 2004 and 2011 were used. Measurements of the brightness temperature Tb beyond the limb allowed coronal density models to be derived in both EW and NS radial directions, with a weak dependence on the electron temperature. The total ranges in the heliocentric distance r are 1.15-1.60 R⊙ (EW) and 1.0-1.4 R⊙ (NS). The agreement between results from different frequencies, in the ranges of r where there is overlapping shows the robustness of the method. The electron temperature, in turn, can be derived from the comparison of the observed mean spectra on the disk with those predicted through transfer calculations from the density models derived from limb observations. Results: The widths of the brightness profiles that were averaged yearly have minima at cycle minimum (2008-2009). These minima are more pronounced for EW profiles than for NS ones. The derived yearly-averaged density models along equatorial and polar diameters are consistent with isothermal and hydrostatic models. They are characterized by their density value n0 extrapolated down to the base of the corona and their scale-height temperature TH. Changes in n0 and TH with solar cycle are given for equatorial and polar regions. The kinetic temperature Te of electrons in the corona (~0.62 MK) is found to be significantly less than TH (~1.5 MK). This implies an ion temperature Ti ~ 2.2 MK. Conclusions: The yearly-averaged variations of these models are less than the dispersion between models derived from other techniques, such as white light and EUV observations, partly because these two techniques

  5. Acceleration of electrons generated during ionization of a gas by a nearly flat profile laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal

    2009-09-15

    A scheme of acceleration of electrons generated during ionization of krypton by nearly flat radial and nearly flat temporal laser pulse profiles has been suggested. The energy spectrum of the electrons suggests that energy of the electrons is higher for a nearly flat temporal profile than that for a nearly flat radial profile. The suppression of scattering of the electrons is better for a nearly flat radial profile than that for a nearly flat temporal profile. The energy of the electrons increases, scattering decreases, and beam quality improves with an increase in flatness of radial and temporal profiles.

  6. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J

    2016-01-01

    A technical basis for peak reactivity boiling water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) methods was recently generated, and the technical basis for extended BWR BUC is now being developed. In this paper, a number of effects related to extended BWR BUC are analyzed, including three major operational effects in BWRs: the coolant density axial distribution, the use of control blades during operation, and the axial burnup profile. Specifically, uniform axial moderator density profiles are analyzed and compared to previous results and an additional temporal fidelity study combing moderator density profiles for three different fuel assemblies is presented. Realistic control blade histories and cask criticality results are compared to previously generated constructed control blade histories. Finally, a preliminary study of the axial burnup profile is provided.

  7. Electron densities and energies of a guided argon streamer in argon and air environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, S.; Hofmann, S.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we report the temporally and spatially resolved electron densities and mean energies of a guided argon streamer in ambient argon and air obtained by Thomson laser scattering. The plasma is driven by a positive monopolar 3.5 kV pulse, with a pulse width of 500 ns and a frequency of 5 kHz which is synchronized with the high repetition rate laser system. This configuration enables us to use the spatial and temporal stability of the guided streamer to accumulate a multitude of laser/plasma shots by a triple grating spectrometer equipped with an ICCD camera and to determine the electron parameters. We found a strong initial ne-overshoot with a maximum of 7 × 1019 m-3 and a mean electron energy of 4.5 eV. This maximum is followed by a fast decay toward the streamer channel. Moreover, a 2D distribution of the electron density is obtained which exhibits a peculiar mushroom-like shape of the streamer head with a diameter significantly larger than that of the emission profile. A correlation of the width of the streamer head with the expected pre-ionization channel is found.

  8. Electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons: A density functional investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep Sharma, Hitesh

    2015-05-15

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on graphene nano ribbons (GNRs) to investigate the electronic properties as a function of chirality, size and hydrogenation on the edges. The calculations were performed on GNRs with armchair and zigzag configurations with 28, 34, 36, 40, 50, 56, 62, 66 carbon atoms. The structural stability of AGNR and ZGNR increases with the size of nanoribbon where as hydrogenation of GNR tends to lowers their structural stability. All GNRs considered have shown semiconducting behavior with HOMO-LUMO gap decreasing with the increase in the GNR size. The hydrogenation of GNR decreases its HOMO-LUMO gap significantly. The results are in agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  9. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  10. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  11. Deconvolution-based correction of alkali beam emission spectroscopy density profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Pokol, G.; Refy, D.; Por, G.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Schweinzer, J.

    2009-08-15

    A deconvolution-based correction method of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) density profile measurement is demonstrated by its application to simulated measurements of the COMPASS and TEXTOR tokamaks. If the line of sight is far from tangential to the flux surfaces, and the beam width is comparable to the scale length on which the light profile varies, the observation may cause an undesired smoothing of the light profile, resulting in a non-negligible underestimation of the calculated density profile. This effect can be reduced significantly by the emission reconstruction method, which gives an estimate of the emissivity along the beam axis from the measured light profile, taking the finite beam width and the properties of the measurement into account in terms of the transfer function of the observation. Characteristics and magnitude of the mentioned systematic error and its reduction by the introduced method are studied by means of the comprehensive alkali BES simulation code RENATE.

  12. Plasmaspheric Electron Densities and Plasmashere-Ionosphere Coupling Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, Janos; Cherneva, Nina; Shevtsov, Boris; Sannikov, Dmitry; Ferencz, Csaba; Koronczay, David

    The Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer Network (AWDANet) is able to detect and analyze whistlers in quasi-realtime and can provide equatorial electron density data. The plasmaspheric electron densities and ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling fluxes are key parameters for plasmasphere models in Space Weather related investigations, particularly in modeling charged particle accelerations and losses in Radiation Belts. The global AWDANet [1] detects millions of whistlers in a year. The system has been recently completed with automatic analyzer capability in PLASMON (http://plasmon.elte.hu) project. It is based on a recently developed whistler inversion model [2], that opened the way for an automated process of whistler analysis, not only for single whistler events but for complex analysis of multiple-path propagation whistler groups [3]. In this paper we present the results of quasi-real-time runs processing whistlers from quiet and disturb periods from Karymshina station (Kamchatka, Russia). Refilling rates, that are not yet known in details are also presented for the various periods. 1.Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, L. Bodnár, D. Hamar, and P. Steinbach (2008), Automatic whistler detector and analyzer system: Automatic whistler detector, J. Geophys. Res., 113, A12201, doi:10.1029/2008JA013467. 2. Lichtenberger, J. (2009), A new whistler inversion method, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A07222, doi:10.1029/2008JA013799. 3. Lichtenberger, J., C. Ferencz, D. Hamar, P. Steinbach, C. J. Rodger, M. A. Clilverd, and A. B. Collier (2010), Automatic Whistler Detector and Analyzer system: Implementation of the analyzer algorithm, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A12214, doi:10.1029/2010JA015931.

  13. Electronic density fluctuation associated to coherent plasmon excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasoni, Juana; Segui, Silvina; Arista, Nestor

    2011-10-01

    In this work we analyze, in the frame of the coherent states, the fluctuation of the electronic collective modes associated with the wake potential generated by an external particle of charge Ze. This perturbation is described as coherent states of plasmons spatially localized in an average distance of the order of the velocity of the projectile divided by the plasmon frequency of the material. One of the most important features is that in all the cases, for different trajectories of the external particle, and for different structures of the material, the fluctuations are not negligible. In particular, we observe that due to the importance of the surface in nanostructured materials, the fluctuation of density is very sensitive to their geometry and composition, fact that must have taken into account for the nanodevices designs. In this work we analyze, in the frame of the coherent states, the fluctuation of the electronic collective modes associated with the wake potential generated by an external particle of charge Ze. This perturbation is described as coherent states of plasmons spatially localized in an average distance of the order of the velocity of the projectile divided by the plasmon frequency of the material. One of the most important features is that in all the cases, for different trajectories of the external particle, and for different structures of the material, the fluctuations are not negligible. In particular, we observe that due to the importance of the surface in nanostructured materials, the fluctuation of density is very sensitive to their geometry and composition, fact that must have taken into account for the nanodevices designs. Acknowledgements to CNEA and CONICET, Argentina.

  14. Electron correlation in solids via density embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chen, Weibing; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2014-08-07

    Density matrix embedding theory [G. Knizia and G. K.-L. Chan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 186404 (2012)] and density embedding theory [I. W. Bulik, G. E. Scuseria, and J. Dukelsky, Phys. Rev. B 89, 035140 (2014)] have recently been introduced for model lattice Hamiltonians and molecular systems. In the present work, the formalism is extended to the ab initio description of infinite systems. An appropriate definition of the impurity Hamiltonian for such systems is presented and demonstrated in cases of 1, 2, and 3 dimensions, using coupled cluster theory as the impurity solver. Additionally, we discuss the challenges related to disentanglement of fragment and bath states. The current approach yields results comparable to coupled cluster calculations of infinite systems even when using a single unit cell as the fragment. The theory is formulated in the basis of Wannier functions but it does not require separate localization of unoccupied bands. The embedding scheme presented here is a promising way of employing highly accurate electronic structure methods for extended systems at a fraction of their original computational cost.

  15. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: application to electronic energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Berkelbach, Timothy C; Markland, Thomas E; Reichman, David R

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  16. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  17. In-flight Density Profiles and Areal Density Non-uniformities of ICF Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, Riccardo

    2014-10-01

    Implosion efficiency depends on keeping the in-flight ablator and fuel as close as possible to spherical at all times while maintaining the required implosion velocity and in-flight aspect ratio. Asymmetries and areal density non-uniformities seeded by time-dependent drive variations and target imperfections grow in time as the capsule implodes, with growth rates that are amplified by instabilities. One way to diagnose them is by imaging the self-emission from the implosion core. However this technique, besides only providing direct information of the shape of the hot emission region at final assembly, presents complications due to competition between emission gradients and reabsorption. Time resolved radiographic imaging, being insensitive to this effect, is therefore an important tool for diagnosing the ablator and the shell in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. Experiments aimed at measuring the density, areal density and areal density asymmetries of the shell in ICF implosions have been performed using two different radiography techniques on the National Ignition Facility. We will report the results from both 1D and 2D geometries using slit and pinhole imaging coupled to area backlighting and as close as 150 ps to peak compression. We will focus in particular on comparisons of the in-flight shell thicknesses and ablation front scale lengths between low- and high-adiabat implosions, and the perturbations on areal density seeded both by time dependent drive asymmetries and by the membranes used to hold the capsule within the hohlraum in indirect drive ICF targets. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Measurement of the electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qing; Zhang Guixin; Wang Liming; Wang Xinxin; Wang Shumin; Chen Yan

    2009-11-16

    The electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure was measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The electron density is on the order of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3}, one order higher than that deduced from the Stark broadening of spectral lines, and increases with the increase in the microwave power. The spatial distribution of the electron density was obtained. The highest electron density locates at the symmetrical axis of the plasma torch and decreases radially. It was found that the electron density fluctuates within a range of 0.3 with the time under the same experimental conditions.

  19. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Congsen; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2015-02-15

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude.

  20. Reconstruction of edge density profiles on Large Helical Device using ultrashort-pulse reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yuya; Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Kawahata, Kazuo; Nagayama, Yoshio; Hojo, Hitoshi

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has been expected to be one of the key diagnostics to measure density profiles. We have applied an ultrashort-pulse reflectometry (USPR) system to Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science. Wide frequency band system is required to obtain wide density profile since an incident wave is reflected at the density layer corresponding to its cutoff frequency. The reflectometry utilizes an impulse with less than 30 ps pulse width as a source. Since the bandwidth of an impulse has an inverse relation to the pulse width, we can cover the frequency range of micro- to millimeter waves (18-40 GHz) with a single source. The density profiles can be reconstructed by collecting time-of-flight (TOF) signals for each frequency component of an impulse reflected from the corresponding cutoff layer. We utilize the signal record analysis (SRA) method to reconstruct the density profiles from the TOF signal. The effectiveness of the SRA method for the profile reconstruction is confirmed by a simulation study of the USPR using a finite-difference time domain method.

  1. The effect of baryons on the inner density profiles of rich clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Matthieu; Frenk, Carlos S.; Bower, Richard G.; Theuns, Tom; Trayford, James; Crain, Robert A.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaye, Joop; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; McCarthy, I. G.

    2015-09-01

    We use the `Evolution and assembly of galaxies and their environments' (EAGLE) cosmological simulation to investigate the effect of baryons on the density profiles of rich galaxy clusters. We focus on EAGLE clusters with M200 > 1014 M⊙ of which we have six examples. The central brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the simulation have steep stellar density profiles, ρ*(r) ∝ r-3. Stars dominate the mass density for r < 10 kpc, and, as a result, the total mass density profiles are steeper than the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, in remarkable agreement with observations. The dark matter halo itself closely follows the NFW form at all resolved radii (r ≳ 3.0 kpc). The EAGLE BCGs have similar surface brightness and line-of-sight velocity dispersion profiles as the BCGs in the sample of Newman et al., which have the most detailed measurements currently available. After subtracting the contribution of the stars to the central density, Newman et al. infer significantly shallower slopes than the NFW value, in contradiction with the EAGLE results. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy, and conclude that an inconsistency between the kinematical model adopted by Newman et al. for their BCGs, which assumes isotropic stellar orbits, and the kinematical structure of the EAGLE BCGs, in which the orbital stellar anisotropy varies with radius and tends to be radially biased, could explain at least part of the discrepancy.

  2. Transverse profile of the electron beam for the RHIC electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Luo, Y.; Miller, T.; Tan, Y.; Thieberger, P.; Montag, C.; Pikin, A. I.

    2015-07-10

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for both the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.

  3. Transverse profile of the electron beam for the RHIC electron lenses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Costanzo, M.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Luo, Y.; Miller, T.; Tan, Y.; Thieberger, P.; et al

    2015-07-10

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at the two interaction points IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are constructing two electron lenses (e-lenses) that we plan to install in the interaction region IR10. Before installing them, the electron gun, collector, instrumentation were tested and the electron beam properties were qualified on an electron lens test bench. We will present the test results and discuss our measurement of the electron beam current and of the electron gun perveance. We achieved a maximum current of 1 A with 5 kV energy for bothmore » the pulsed- and the DC-beam (which is a long turn-by-turn pulse beam). We measured beam transverse profiles with an Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) screen and pinhole detector, and compared those to simulated beam profiles. Measurements of the pulsed electron beam stability were obtained by measuring the modulator voltage.« less

  4. Upgrading electron temperature and electron density diagnostic diagrams of forbidden line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proxauf, B.; Öttl, S.; Kimeswenger, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Diagnostic diagrams of forbidden lines have been a useful tool for observers for many decades now. They are used to obtain information on the basic physical properties of thin gaseous nebulae. Some diagnostic diagrams are in wavelength domains that were difficult to apply either due to missing wavelength coverage or the low resolution of older spectrographs. Furthermore, most of the diagrams were calculated using just the species involved as a single atom gas, although several are affected by well-known fluorescence mechanisms as well. Additionally, the atomic data have improved up to the present time. Aims: The aim of this work is to recalculate well-known, but also sparsely used, unnoted diagnostics diagrams. The new diagrams provide observers with modern, easy-to-use recipes for determining electron temperature and densities. Methods: The new diagnostic diagrams were calculated using large grids of parameter space in the photoionization code CLOUDY. For a given basic parameter (e.g., electron density or temperature), the solutions with cooling-heating-equilibrium were chosen to derive the diagnostic diagrams. Empirical numerical functions were fitted to provide formulas usable in, e.g., data reduction pipelines. Results: The resulting diagrams differ significantly from those used up to now and will improve thermodynamic calculations. To our knowledge, detailed, directly applicable fit formulas are given for the first time, leading to the calculation of electron temperature or density from the line ratios.

  5. The Influence of Energetic Electrons on the Cassini Langmuir Probe at Saturn : Deriving Large Electron Temperatures and Small Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.; Holmberg, M.; Lewis, G.; Schippers, P.; Thomsen, M. F.; Rochel Grimald, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Langmuir probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigated the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), showing that both the DC level and slope of the I-V curve are modified. The influence of energetic electrons may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept that is important for spacecraft charging studies. Estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface are obtained without using laboratory measurements. Empirical and theoretical methods were developed to reproduce the influence of the energetic electrons with a reasonable precision. Conversely, this modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). The understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions JUICE at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, or even the probes in the Earth magnetosphere.

  6. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  7. Profiles of electron temperature and Bz along Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Nakamura, R.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    We study the electron temperature distribution and the structure of the current sheet along the magnetotail using simultaneous observations from THEMIS spacecraft. We perform a statistical study of 40 crossings of the current sheet when the three spacecraft THB, THC, and THD were distributed along the tail in the vicinity of midnight with coordinates XB \\in [-30 RE, -20 RE], XC \\in [-20 RE, -15 RE], and XD ~ -10 RE. We obtain profiles of the average electron temperature \\mlab Te\\mrab and the average magnetic field \\mlab Bz\\mrab along the tail. Electron temperature and \\mlab Bz\\mrab increase towards the Earth with almost the same rates (i.e., ratio \\mlab Te\\mrab/\\mlab Bz\\mrab ≈ 2 keV/7 nT is approximately constant along the tail). We also use statistics of 102 crossings of the current sheet from THB and THC to estimate dependence of Te and Bz distributions on geomagnetic activity. The ratio \\mlab Te \\mrab/\\mlab Bz\\mrab depends on geomagnetic activity only slightly. Additionally we demonstrate that anisotropy of the electron temperature \\mlab T∥/T⊥\\mrab ≈ 1.1 is almost constant along the tail for X \\in [-30 RE, -10 RE].

  8. A neural network based error correction method for radio occultation electron density retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Cuong; Juang, Jyh-Ching

    2015-12-01

    Abel inversion techniques have been widely employed to retrieve electron density profiles (EDPs) from radio occultation (RO) measurements, which are available by observing Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites from low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellites. It is well known that the ordinary Abel inversion might introduce errors in the retrieval of EDPs when the spherical symmetry assumption is violated. The error, however, is case-dependent; therefore it is desirable to associate an error index or correction coefficient with respect to each retrieved EDP. Several error indices have been proposed but they only deal with electron density at the F2 peak and suffer from some drawbacks. In this paper we propose an artificial neural network (ANN) based error correction method for EDPs obtained by the ordinary Abel inversion. The ANN is first trained to learn the relationship between vertical total electron content (TEC) measurements and retrieval errors at the F2 peak, 220 km and 110 km altitudes; correction coefficients are then estimated to correct the retrieved EDPs at these three altitudes. Experiments using the NeQuick2 model and real FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC RO geometry show that the proposed method outperforms existing ones. Real incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory and the global TEC map provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS) are also used to valid the proposed method.

  9. Diagnosis of gas temperature, electron temperature, and electron density in helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Zhengshi; Zhang Guanjun; Shao Xianjun; Zhang Zenghui

    2012-07-15

    The optical emission spectra of helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are captured with a three grating spectrometer. The grating primary spectrum covers the whole wavelength range from 200 nm to 900 nm, with the overlapped grating secondary spectrum appearing from 500 nm to 900 nm, which has a higher resolution than that of the grating primary spectrum. So the grating secondary spectrum of OH (A{sup 2}{Sigma} {sup +}({upsilon} Prime = 0) {yields} X{sup 2}{Pi}({upsilon} Double-Prime = 0)) is employed to calculate the gas temperature (T{sub g}) of helium APPJ. Moreover, the electron temperature (T{sub e}) is deduced from the Maxwellian electron energy distribution combining with T{sub g}, and the electron density (n{sub e}) is extracted from the plasma absorbed power. The results are helpful for understanding the physical property of APPJs.

  10. Resolving the outer density profile of dark matter halo in Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirihara, Takanobu; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao

    2013-08-01

    Large-scale faint structure detected by the recent observations in the halo of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) provides an attractive window to explore the structure of outer cold dark matter (CDM) halo in M31. Using an N-body simulation of the interaction between an accreting satellite galaxy and M31, we investigate the mass-density profile of the CDM halo. We find the sufficient condition of the outer density profile of CDM halo in M31 to reproduce the Andromeda giant stream and the shells at the east and west sides of M31. The result indicates that the density profile of the outer dark matter halo of M31 is a steeper than the prediction of the theory of the structure formation based on the CDM model.

  11. An electron beam profile instrument based on FBGs.

    PubMed

    Sporea, Dan; Stăncălie, Andrei; Becherescu, Nicu; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Along with the dose rate and the total irradiation dose measurements, the knowledge of the beam localization and the beam profile/energy distribution in the beam are parameters of interest for charged particle accelerator installations when they are used in scientific investigations, industrial applications or medical treatments. The transverse profile of the beam, its position, its centroid location, and its focus or flatness depend on the instrument operating conditions or on the beam exit setup. Proof-of-concept of a new type of charged particle beam diagnostics based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) was demonstrated. Its operating principle relies on the measurement of the peak wavelength changes for an array of FBG sensors as function of the temperature following the exposure to an electron beam. Periodically, the sensor irradiation is stopped and the FBG are force cooled to a reference temperature with which the temperature influencing each sensor during beam exposure is compared. Commercially available FBGs, and FBGs written in radiation resistant optical fibers, were tested under electron beam irradiation in order to study their possible use in this application. PMID:25157554

  12. An electron beam profile instrument based on FBGs.

    PubMed

    Sporea, Dan; Stăncălie, Andrei; Becherescu, Nicu; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred

    2014-08-25

    Along with the dose rate and the total irradiation dose measurements, the knowledge of the beam localization and the beam profile/energy distribution in the beam are parameters of interest for charged particle accelerator installations when they are used in scientific investigations, industrial applications or medical treatments. The transverse profile of the beam, its position, its centroid location, and its focus or flatness depend on the instrument operating conditions or on the beam exit setup. Proof-of-concept of a new type of charged particle beam diagnostics based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) was demonstrated. Its operating principle relies on the measurement of the peak wavelength changes for an array of FBG sensors as function of the temperature following the exposure to an electron beam. Periodically, the sensor irradiation is stopped and the FBG are force cooled to a reference temperature with which the temperature influencing each sensor during beam exposure is compared. Commercially available FBGs, and FBGs written in radiation resistant optical fibers, were tested under electron beam irradiation in order to study their possible use in this application.

  13. An Electron Beam Profile Instrument Based on FBGs

    PubMed Central

    Sporea, Dan; Stăncălie, Andrei; Becherescu, Nicu; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Along with the dose rate and the total irradiation dose measurements, the knowledge of the beam localization and the beam profile/energy distribution in the beam are parameters of interest for charged particle accelerator installations when they are used in scientific investigations, industrial applications or medical treatments. The transverse profile of the beam, its position, its centroid location, and its focus or flatness depend on the instrument operating conditions or on the beam exit setup. Proof-of-concept of a new type of charged particle beam diagnostics based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) was demonstrated. Its operating principle relies on the measurement of the peak wavelength changes for an array of FBG sensors as function of the temperature following the exposure to an electron beam. Periodically, the sensor irradiation is stopped and the FBG are force cooled to a reference temperature with which the temperature influencing each sensor during beam exposure is compared. Commercially available FBGs, and FBGs written in radiation resistant optical fibers, were tested under electron beam irradiation in order to study their possible use in this application. PMID:25157554

  14. Visualising the electron density structure of blobs and studying its possible effect on neutral turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cal, E.; The TJ-II Team

    2016-10-01

    The electron density n e of turbulent coherent structures (blobs) has been measured at the edge plasma of the TJ-II stellarator using the helium line ratio technique. A spectroscopic high-speed camera set-up allowed 2D imaging of n e with spatial resolutions of a few millimetres and exposure times down to 15 µs. The turbulent plasma density structures have been compared with the raw helium emission structures, which in principle should be similar due to the expected relation between both, and although generally positive (negative) emission structures correspond to n e blobs (holes), we see that the shape is different and that in some cases there is even no correspondence at all. A possible explanation could be that the neutral distribution, which relates the intensity emission with the n e, varies on the same spatio-temporal scale as the plasma turbulence. This would be the case if the local n e variations of blobs and holes regulated the neutral density through ionisation, making it also turbulent within our experimental frequency (<100 kHz) and spatial scale (>1 cm). To study this point we simulate the neutrals with a simple transport model to reconstruct the corresponding measured emission profiles using the experimentally obtained n e and T e radial profiles. We do this for two cases: one where the neutral distribution is stationary and another where the atoms respond to the measured n e blob and get locally depleted through ionisation. Comparing the simulated and experimental emission profiles and looking at the characteristic ionisation times we find clear indications that point to the fact that slow thermal neutrals could react to the plasma fluctuations in the 10-100 kHz frequency range, also becoming turbulent.

  15. Compton profiles and electronic structure of monoclinic zinc and cadmium tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, B. S.; Heda, N. L.; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    We report the first ever Compton scattering study of ZnWO4 and CdWO4 using 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer at momentum resolution of 0.34 a.u. To compare the experimental Compton profiles, we have also deduced the momentum densities using density functional theory (DFT) within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) methods. It is seen that the experimental Compton profiles of both the tungstates give a better agreement with LCAO-DFT calculations within generalized gradient approximation (GGA) employing Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation energies than other approximations included in the present work. Further, energy bands, density of states (DOS) and band gaps have also been calculated using LCAO-DFT-GGA-PBE scheme and full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. Both the computational schemes show a semiconducting nature of both the tungstates, with a direct band gap at Y point of Brillouin zone. Further, a relative nature of bonding on equal-valence-electron-density scale shows more covalent character in ZnWO4 than CdWO4 which reconciles with the conclusions drawn using integrated DOS and Mulliken's population data.

  16. Measurements of core electron temperature and density fluctuations in DIII-D and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Austin, M. E.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; Makowski, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    For the first time, profiles (0.3<{rho}<0.9) of electron temperature and density fluctuations in a tokamak have been measured simultaneously and the results compared to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Electron temperature and density fluctuations measured in neutral beam-heated, sawtooth-free low confinement mode (L-mode) plasmas in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] are found to be similar in frequency and normalized amplitude, with amplitude increasing with radius. The measured radial profile of two fluctuation fields allows for a new and rigorous comparison with gyrokinetic results. Nonlinear gyrokinetic flux-tube simulations predict that electron temperature and density fluctuations have similar normalized amplitudes in L-mode. At {rho}=0.5, simulation results match experimental heat diffusivities and density fluctuation amplitude, but overestimate electron temperature fluctuation amplitude and particle diffusivity. In contrast, simulations at {rho}=0.75 do not match either the experimentally derived transport properties or the measured fluctuation levels.

  17. Spectroscopic study of temperature and density spatial profiles and mix in implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S. W.; Haynes, D. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2008-10-22

    New techniques of x-ray spectroscopy have been developed to extract the temperature and density spatial structure of implosion cores. Results from an emissivity analysis, which neglects optical depth effects, compare well with the independent results of an intensity analysis used in the low optical depth limit. The intensity analysis has also been applied in its full form, in which case density spatial profiles demonstrate significant opacity effects. The emissivity and intensity analyses were combined to infer the spatial profile of mixing between shell and fuel material. This experimentally-derived information on mix is compared with predictions from two standard theoretical mix models.

  18. THE DENSITY PROFILES OF MASSIVE, RELAXED GALAXY CLUSTERS. I. THE TOTAL DENSITY OVER THREE DECADES IN RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso; Sand, David J.; Nipoti, Carlo; Richard, Johan; Jullo, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Clusters of galaxies are excellent locations to probe the distribution of baryons and dark matter (DM) over a wide range of scales. We study a sample of seven massive (M {sub 200} = 0.4-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M {sub Sun }), relaxed galaxy clusters with centrally located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at z = 0.2-0.3. Using the observational tools of strong and weak gravitational lensing, combined with resolved stellar kinematics within the BCG, we measure the total radial density profile, comprising both dark and baryonic matter, over scales of {approx_equal} 3-3000 kpc. We present Keck spectroscopy yielding seven new spectroscopic redshifts of multiply imaged sources and extended stellar velocity dispersion profiles of the BCGs. Lensing-derived mass profiles typically agree with independent X-ray estimates within {approx_equal} 15%, suggesting that departures from hydrostatic equilibrium are small and that the clusters in our sample (except A383) are not strongly elongated or compressed along the line of sight. The inner logarithmic slope {gamma}{sub tot} of the total density profile measured over r/r {sub 200} = 0.003-0.03, where {rho}{sub tot}{proportional_to}r{sup -{gamma}{sub t}{sub o}{sub t}}, is found to be nearly universal, with a mean ({gamma}{sub tot}) = 1.16 {+-} 0.05(random){sup +0.05} {sub -0.07} (systematic) and an intrinsic scatter {sigma}{sub {gamma}} < 0.13 (68% confidence). This is further supported by the very homogeneous shape of the observed velocity dispersion profiles, which are mutually consistent after a simple scaling. Remarkably, this slope agrees closely with high-resolution numerical simulations that contain only DM, despite the significant contribution of stellar mass on the scales we probe. The Navarro-Frenk-White profile characteristic of collisionless cold DM is a better description of the total mass density at radii {approx}> 5-10 kpc than that of DM alone. Hydrodynamical simulations that include baryons, cooling, and

  19. Nonsingular Density Profiles of Dark Matter Halos and Strong Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da-Ming

    2005-08-01

    We use the statistics of strong gravitational lenses to investigate whether mass profiles with a flat density core are supported. The probability for lensing by halos modeled by a nonsingular truncated isothermal sphere (NTIS) with image separations greater than a certain value (ranging from 0" to 10") is calculated. NTIS is an analytical model for the postcollapse equilibrium structure of virialized objects derived by Shapiro, Iliev, & Raga. This profile has a soft core and matches quite well with the mass profiles of dark matter-dominated dwarf galaxies deduced from their observed rotation curves. It also agrees well with the NFW (Navarro-Frenk-White) profile at all radii outside of a few NTIS core radii. Unfortunately, comparing the results with those for singular lensing halos (NFW and SIS + NFW) and strong lensing observations, the probabilities for lensing by NTIS halos are far too low. As this result is valid for any other nonsingular density profile (with a large core radius), we conclude that nonsingular density profiles (with a large core radius) for CDM halos are ruled out by statistics of strong gravitational lenses.

  20. X-Mode Frequency Modulated Density Profile Reflectometer on EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongyang; Liu, Ahdi; Li, Hong; Li, Bin; Zhou, Chu; Zhang, Xiaohui; Hu, Jianqiang; Xie, Jinlin; Liu, Wandong; Yu, Changxuan

    2013-09-01

    An extraordinary-mode (X-mode) frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) profile reflectometer has been built on EAST. In the reflectometer, continuous waves with frequency sweeping from 12.5 GHz to 18 GHz were generated through a Hyperabrupt Tuned-varactor Oscillator (HTO) source and a four times active multiplier was used to increase the frequency to V-band (50 GHz to 72 GHz). The polarization of horn lens antenna is perpendicular to the magnetic field line at the edge plasmas. According to the V-band frequency range and polarization, the system cover density range from 0.5 × 1019m-3 to 3.0 × 1019m-3 (when toroidal magnetic field is 1.8 T), with time resolution of 12.5 ~ 50 μs. The density profile could be calculated by assuming the edge profile through an empirical equation. The maximum spatial error deduced by the method is about 4 cm. This reflectometer has been successfully applied in 2010 autumn EAST campaign, the temporal evolution of density profiles was acquired during the low confinement mode to high confinement mode transition. The density pedestal of EAST Tokamak was observed and the top value and gradient of the density pedestal were estimated.

  1. NIHAO - IV: core creation and destruction in dark matter density profiles across cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollet, Edouard; Macciò, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Stinson, Greg S.; Wang, Liang; Penzo, Camilla; Gutcke, Thales A.; Buck, Tobias; Kang, Xi; Brook, Chris; Di Cintio, Arianna; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2016-03-01

    We use the NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of Hundred Astrophysical Objects) cosmological simulations to investigate the effects of baryonic physics on the time evolution of dark matter central density profiles. The sample is made of ≈70 independent high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation and covers a wide mass range: 1010 ≲ Mhalo/M⊙ ≲ 1012, i.e. from dwarfs to L⋆. We confirm previous results on the dependence of the inner dark matter density slope, α, on the ratio between stellar-to-halo mass, Mstar/Mhalo. We show that this relation holds approximately at all redshifts (with an intrinsic scatter of ˜0.18 in α measured between 1 and 2 per cent of the virial radius). This implies that in practically all haloes the shape of their inner density profile changes quite substantially over cosmic time, as they grow in stellar and total mass. Thus, depending on their final Mstar/Mhalo ratio, haloes can either form and keep a substantial density core (Rcore ˜ 1 kpc), or form and then destroy the core and recontract the halo, going back to a cuspy profile, which is even steeper than cold-dark-matter predictions for massive galaxies (1012 M⊙). We show that results from the NIHAO suite are in good agreement with recent observational measurements of α in dwarf galaxies. Overall our results suggest that the notion of a universal density profile for dark matter haloes is no longer valid in the presence of galaxy formation.

  2. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in extreme ultra-violet induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2014-07-01

    We measured the electron density in an extreme ultra-violet (EUV) induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The measured electron density just after the EUV pulse is 2.6 × 1016 m-3. This is in good agreement with a theoretical prediction from photo-ionization, which yields a density of 4.5 × 1016 m-3. After the EUV pulse the density slightly increases due to electron impact ionization. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds.

  3. Electron density measurement of cesium seeded negative ion source by surface wave probe

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Ikeda, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Shibuya, M.; Sato, M.; Sekiguchi, H.; Komada, S.; Kondo, T.; Hayashi, H.; Asano, E.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2012-02-15

    Electron density measurements of a large-scaled negative ion source were carried out with a surface wave probe. By comparison of the electron densities determined with the surface wave probe and a Langmuir probe, it was confirmed that the surface wave probe is highly available for diagnostic of the electron density in H{sup -} ion sources. In addition, it was found that the ratio of the electron density to the H{sup -} ion density dramatically decreases with increase of a bias voltage and the H{sup -} ions become dominant negative particles at the bias voltage of more than 6 V.

  4. NMR profiling of quantum electron solids in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, L.; Rhone, T. D.; Shibata, N.; Muraki, K.

    2014-09-01

    When the motion of electrons is restricted to a plane under a perpendicular magnetic field, a variety of quantum phases emerge at low temperatures, the properties of which are dictated by the Coulomb interaction and its interplay with disorder. At very strong magnetic field, the sequence of fractional quantum Hall liquid phases terminates in an insulating phase, which is widely believed to be due to the solidification of electrons into domains possessing Wigner crystal order. The existence of such Wigner crystal domains is signalled by the emergence of microwave pinning-mode resonances, which reflect the mechanical properties characteristic of a solid. However, the most direct manifestation of the broken translational symmetry accompanying the solidification--the spatial modulation of particles' probability amplitudes--has not been observed yet. Here, we demonstrate that nuclear magnetic resonance provides a direct probe of the density topography of electron solids in the integer and fractional quantum Hall regimes. The data uncover quantum and thermal fluctuations of lattice electrons resolved on the nanometre scale. Our results pave the way to studies of other exotic phases with non-trivial spatial spin/charge order.

  5. Modeling of free electronic state density in hydrogenic plasmas based on nearest neighbor approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2014-07-15

    Most conventional atomic models in a plasma do not treat the effect of the plasma on the free-electron state density. Using a nearest neighbor approximation, the state densities in hydrogenic plasmas for both bound and free electrons were evaluated and the effect of the plasma on the atomic model (especially for the state density of the free electron) was studied. The model evaluates the electron-state densities using the potential distribution formed by the superposition of the Coulomb potentials of two ions. The potential from one ion perturbs the electronic state density on the other. Using this new model, one can evaluate the free-state density without making any ad-hoc assumptions. The resulting contours of the average ionization degree, given as a function of the plasma temperature and density, are shifted slightly to lower temperatures because of the effect of the increasing free-state density.

  6. Tokamak plasma self-organization and the possibility to have the peaked density profile in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumova, K. A.; Andreev, V. F.; Kislov, A. Ya.; Kirneva, N. A.; Lysenko, S. E.; Pavlov, Yu. D.; Shafranov, T. V.; T-10 Team; Donné, A. J. H.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Spakman, G. W.; Jaspers, R.; TEXTOR Team; Kantor, M.; Walsh, M.

    2009-06-01

    The self-organization of a tokamak plasma is a fundamental turbulent plasma phenomenon, which leads to the formation of a self-consistent pressure profile. This phenomenon has been investigated in several tokamaks with different methods of heating. It is shown that the normalized pressure profile has a universal shape for a wide class of tokamaks and regimes, if the normalized radius ρ = r/(IpR/κB)1/2 is used. The consequences of this phenomenon for low aspect ratio tokamaks, the optimal deposition of additional heating, fast velocity of heat/cold pulse propagation and the possibility of obtaining a peaked density profile in ITER are discussed.

  7. Effects of Mean Flow Profiles on Instability of a Low-Density Gas Jet Injected into a High-Density Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedantam, Nanda Kishore

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the mean flow profiles on the instability characteristics in the near-injector region of low-density gas jets injected into high-density ambient gas mediums. To achieve this, a linear temporal stability analysis and a spatio-temporal stability analysis of a low-density round gas jet injected vertically upwards into a high-density ambient gas were performed by assuming three different sets of mean velocity and density profiles. The flow was assumed to be isothermal and locally parallel. Viscous and diffusive effects were ignored. The mean flow parameters were represented as the sum of the mean value and a small normal-mode fluctuation. A second order differential equation governing the pressure disturbance amplitude was derived from the basic conservation equations. The first set of mean velocity and density profiles assumed were those used by Monkewitz and Sohn for investigating absolute instability in hot jets. The second set of velocity and density profiles assumed for this study were the ones used by Lawson. And the third set of mean profiles included a parabolic velocity profile and a hyperbolic tangent density profile. The effects of the inhomogeneous shear layer and the Froude number (signifying the effects of gravity) on the temporal and spatio-temporal results for each set of mean profiles were delineated. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  8. PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars: Ice particles and their effect on ambient electron densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Rapp, Markus

    2013-11-01

    It is now well understood that the occurrence of PMSE is closely connected to the presence of ice particles. These ice particles modify the ambient electron density by electron attachment which occasionally leads to large electron density depletions which have also been called ‘biteouts’. There has been some debate in the literature regarding the relative depth of such depletions which is usually expressed by the parameter Λ=|ZA|NA/ne. Here, |ZA|NA is the charge number density of ice particles and ne is the electron density. In this paper, we present, for the first time, the statistical distribution of Λ using measurements with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars. Based on 25 h of simultaneous observations, we derived a total of 757 Λ values based on 15 min of data each. In each of these cases, PMSE were observed with the EISCAT VHF-radar but not with the UHF-radar and the UHF-measurement were hence used to determine the electron density profile. From these 757 cases, there are 699 cases with Λ⪡1, and only 33 cases with Λ>0.5 (21 cases with Λ>1). A correlation analysis of Λ versus PMSE volume reflectivities further reveals that there is no strong dependence between the two parameters. This is in accordance with current PMSE-theory based on turbulence in combination with a large Schmidt-number. The maxima of Λ from each profile show a negative relationship with the undisturbed electron densities deduced at the same altitudes. This reveals that the variability of Λ mainly depends on the variability of the electron densities. In addition, variations of aerosol number densities may also play a role. Although part of the observations were conducted during the HF heating experiments, the so-called overshoot effects did not significantly bias our statistical results. In order to avoid missing biteouts because of a superposition of coherent and incoherent scatter in the UHF-data, we finally calculated spectral parameters n by applying a simple fit to auto

  9. Absolute measurement of electron-cloud density in a positively charged particle beam.

    PubMed

    Kireeff Covo, Michel; Molvik, Arthur W; Friedman, Alex; Vay, Jean-Luc; Seidl, Peter A; Logan, Grant; Baca, David; Vujic, Jasmina L

    2006-08-01

    Clouds of stray electrons are ubiquitous in particle accelerators and frequently limit the performance of storage rings. Earlier measurements of electron energy distribution and flux to the walls provided only a relative electron-cloud density. We have measured electron accumulation using ions expelled by the beam. The ion energy distribution maps the depressed beam potential and gives the dynamic cloud density. Clearing electrode current reveals the static background cloud density, allowing the first absolute measurement of the time-dependent electron-cloud density during the beam pulse.

  10. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, L.E.

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/.

  11. Implementing and Improving Automated Electronic Tumor Molecular Profiling.

    PubMed

    Rioth, Matthew J; Staggs, David B; Hackett, Lauren; Haberman, Erich; Tod, Mike; Levy, Mia; Warner, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Oncology practice increasingly requires the use of molecular profiling of tumors to inform the use of targeted therapeutics. However, many oncologists use third-party laboratories to perform tumor genomic testing, and these laboratories may not have electronic interfaces with the provider's electronic medical record (EMR) system. The resultant reporting mechanisms, such as plain-paper faxing, can reduce report fidelity, slow down reporting procedures for a physician's practice, and make reports less accessible. Vanderbilt University Medical Center and its genomic laboratory testing partner have collaborated to create an automated electronic reporting system that incorporates genetic testing results directly into the clinical EMR. This system was iteratively tested, and causes of failure were discovered and addressed. Most errors were attributable to data entry or typographical errors that made reports unable to be linked to the correct patient in the EMR. By providing direct feedback to providers, we were able to significantly decrease the rate of transmission errors (from 6.29% to 3.84%; P < .001). The results and lessons of 1 year of using the system and transmitting 832 tumor genomic testing reports are reported. PMID:26813927

  12. MIRI: A multichannel far-infrared laser interferometer for electron density measurements on TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Anderson, H.M.; Chouinard, R.; Foote, V.S.; Ma, C.H.; Clifton, B.J.

    1987-07-01

    A ten-channel far-infrared laser interferometer which is routinely used to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the electron density profile on the TFTR tokamak is described and representative results are presented. This system has been designed for remote operation in the very hostile environment of a fusion reactor. The possible expansion of the system to include polarimetric measurements is briefly outlined. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Possible cause of enhancement of electron temperature in high electron density region in the dayside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto

    2016-07-01

    When neutral atmosphere is ionized by solar EUV, energetic electrons named photoelectrons are emitted. The photoelectrons are primary heat source of electrons in the ionosphere in the daytime. The heating rate of electron by photoelectron is proportion to 0.97 power of electron density (Ne) while the heated electron is cooled through the Column collision with ions, the rate of which rate is square of Ne. Therefore, electron temperature (Te) decreases and approach ion temperature (Ti) with increase of Ne. Ions are also cooled through the collision with neutral spices. Finally, these temperatures (Te, Ti and Tn) show very similar values in high Ne region. However, Te enhancement with increase of Ne is found in the satellite observation at 600 km in the daytime ionosphere [Kakinami et al., 2011]. Similar Ti variation is also found around the magnetic dip equator [Kakinami et al., 2014]. One possible cause of the enhancement of Te is enhacement of Tn with increase Ne because both Ne and Tn increase with increase of solar irradiance flux, F10.7 [Lei et al., 2007]. However, since such the enhancements of Te are seen in any F10.7, it is hard to explain the phenomenon. In this paper, we present correlation between Te (Ti) and Ne obtained by the Incoherent Scatter radar at Jicamarca. The similar correlation, namely positive correlation of Te (Ti) with Ne in high Ne region are found above 300 km. Using the observations and Tn and neutral density calculated with MSIS, the Column collision cooling with ions, and inelastic collision cooling with neutral spices for electron are shown. The heat conduction along the magnetic field line is also estimated by using IRI model. Using these information, we discuss possible cause of the enhancement of Te in the high Ne region. References Kakinami et al. (2011), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016905. Kakinami et al. (2014), J. Geophys. Res., 119, doi:10.1002/2014JA020302. Lei et al.(2007), J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2006JA012041.

  14. Comparing two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing through an atomic electronic structure computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man-Hong, Zhang

    2016-05-01

    By performing the electronic structure computation of a Si atom, we compare two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing in the literature. One was proposed by Johnson and implemented in the well-known VASP code. The other was given by Eyert. We solve the Kohn-Sham equation by using a conventional outward/inward integration of the differential equation and then connect two parts of solutions at the classical turning points, which is different from the method of the matrix eigenvalue solution as used in the VASP code. Compared to Johnson’s algorithm, the one proposed by Eyert needs fewer total iteration numbers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61176080).

  15. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-01

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φp, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λD. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, Vb. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ωpi ≪ ω ≪ ωpe, where ωpi is the ion plasma frequency and ωpe is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Zac) and Im(Zac) are available from Γ. When Re(Zac) is plotted versus Vb, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φp [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Zac) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φp. As ne decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Zac) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Zac) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Zac).

  16. Dynamics of bulk electron heating and ionization in solid density plasmas driven by ultra-short relativistic laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L. G.; Kluge, T.; Cowan, T. E.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of bulk heating and ionization is investigated both in simulations and theory, which determines the crucial plasma parameters such as plasma temperature and density in ultra-short relativistic laser-solid target interactions. During laser-plasma interactions, the solid density plasma absorbs a fraction of laser energy and converts it into kinetic energy of electrons. A portion of the electrons with relativistic kinetic energy goes through the solid density plasma and transfers energy into the bulk electrons, which results in bulk electron heating. The bulk electron heating is finally translated into the processes of bulk collisional ionization inside the solid target. A simple model based on the Ohmic heating mechanism indicates that the local and temporal profile of bulk return current is essential to determine the temporal evolution of bulk electron temperature. A series of particle-in-cell simulations showing the local heating model is robust in the cases of target with a preplasma and without a preplasma. Predicting the bulk electron heating is then benefit for understanding the collisional ionization dynamics inside the solid targets. The connection of the heating and ionization inside the solid target is further studied using Thomas-Fermi model.

  17. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beth, A.; Garnier, P.; Toublanc, D.; Dandouras, I.; Mazelle, C.

    2016-03-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities compared with the pure gravity case (i.e. the Chamberlain profiles), in particular at noon and midnight. We finally show the existence of an exopause that appears naturally as the external limit for bounded particles, above which all particles are escaping.

  18. Experimental profile evolution of a high-density field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Ruden, E. L.; Zhang, Shouyin; Intrator, T. P.; Wurden, G. A.

    2006-12-15

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) gains angular momentum over time, eventually resulting in an n=2 rotational instability (invariant under rotation by {pi}) terminating confinement. To study this, a laser interferometer probes the time history of line integrated plasma density along eight chords of the high-density ({approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) field-reversed configuration experiment with a liner. Abel and tomographic inversions provide density profiles during the FRC's azimuthally symmetric phase, and over a period when the rotational mode has saturated and rotates with a roughly fixed profile, respectively. During the latter part of the symmetric phase, the FRC approximates a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium, allowing the axial magnetic-field profile to be calculated from pressure balance. Basic FRC properties such as temperature and poloidal flux are then inferred. The subsequent two-dimensional n=2 density profiles provide angular momentum information needed to set bounds on prior values of the stability relevant parameter {alpha} (rotational to ion diamagnetic drift frequency ratio), in addition to a view of plasma kinematics useful for benchmarking plasma models of higher order than MHD.

  19. Electronic Properties of ZnO: Band Structure and Directional Compton Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Dhaka, M. S.; Kothari, R. K.; Joshi, K. B.; Sharma, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The electronic band structure and directional Compton profiles (DCPs) of ZnO are studied in this work. Calculations are performed considering a set of three schemes based on density functional theory (DFT), the Hartree-Fock (HF) method, and a hybrid scheme. All band structures predict direct bandgaps. The best agreement with experiment is, however, shown by the hybrid scheme. The three schemes are also applied to compute DCPs along [100], [110], and [001] directions. These are compared with measurements made on single crystals of ZnO employing a 59.54 keV gamma-ray Compton spectrometer. Calculations overestimate the momentum density in the low-momentum region while underestimate the anisotropies. Positions of extremes in anisotropies deduced from calculations are well reproduced by the measured anisotropies in some cases. Within the experimental limits, the DCPs from the HF method are in better agreement with the measurements compared with DFT.

  20. Mass, velocity anisotropy, and pseudo phase-space density profiles of Abell 2142

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, E.; Biviano, A.; Mamon, G. A.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: We aim to compute the mass and velocity anisotropy profiles of Abell 2142 and, from there, the pseudo phase-space density profile Q(r) and the density slope - velocity anisotropy β - γ relation, and then to compare them with theoretical expectations. Methods: The mass profiles were obtained by using three techniques based on member galaxy kinematics, namely the caustic method, the method of dispersion-kurtosis, and MAMPOSSt. Through the inversion of the Jeans equation, it was possible to compute the velocity anisotropy profiles. Results: The mass profiles, as well as the virial values of mass and radius, computed with the different techniques agree with one another and with the estimates coming from X-ray and weak lensing studies. A combined mass profile is obtained by averaging the lensing, X-ray, and kinematics determinations. The cluster mass profile is well fitted by an NFW profile with c = 4.0 ± 0.5. The population of red and blue galaxies appear to have a different velocity anisotropy configuration, since red galaxies are almost isotropic, while blue galaxies are radially anisotropic, with a weak dependence on radius. The Q(r) profile for the red galaxy population agrees with the theoretical results found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that any bias, relative to the dark matter particles, in velocity dispersion of the red component is independent of radius. The β - γ relation for red galaxies matches the theoretical relation only in the inner region. The deviations might be due to the use of galaxies as tracers of the gravitational potential, unlike the non-collisional tracer used in the theoretical relation.

  1. Evaluation and correction of the IRI2016 topside ionospheric electron density model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sicheng; Huang, Sixun; Fang, Hanxian; Wang, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The international reference ionosphere (IRI) is the internationally recommended empirical model. The IRI2016 is now the latest version, and it includes three options for the prediction of topside electron density profiles: IRI2001, a correction of IRI2001 (IRI2001corr), and NeQuick model. In the paper, we use the Arecibo, Jicamarca, and Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar observed topside electron density data ranging from year 2001 to 2014 to assess the prediction capabilities of these three model options. The results show that the NeQuick model outputs perform best at these areas from the point view of relative difference distribution, followed by the IRI2001corr model, and the IRI2001 option is worst. To further improve the performance of NeQuick and IRI2001corr options, the correction factors are introduced in their model formulation and are determined by the least squares estimation technique. Compared with the original models, the corrected models perform in average better, especially at low and medium solar activities.

  2. Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometer electron density diagnostic for laser and pulsed power high energy density plasma experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I.; Theobald, W.; Bromage, J.; Regan, S. P.; Klein, S. R.; Munoz-Cordoves, G.; et al

    2016-04-21

    Talbot-Lau X-ray Deflectometry has been developed as an electron density diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas. The technique can deliver x-ray refraction, attenuation, elemental composition, and scatter information from a single Moiré image. An 8 keV Talbot-Lau interferometer was deployed using laser and x-pinch backlighters. Grating survival and electron density mapping was demonstrated for 25-29 J, 8-30 ps laser pulses using copper foil targets. Moire pattern formation and grating survival was also observed using a copper x-pinch driven at 400 kA, ~1 kA/ns. Lastly, these results demonstrate the potential of TXD as an electron density diagnostic for HED plasmas.

  3. An ISEE/Whistler model of equatorial electron density in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Anderson, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to an empirical model of equatorial electron density in the magnetosphere covering the L range 2.25-8. Although the model is primarily intended for application to the local time interval 00-15 MLT, a way to extend the model to the 15-24-MLT period is presented. The model describes, in piecewise fashion, the 'saturated' plasmasphere, the region of steep plasmapause gradients, and the plasma trough. Within the plasmasphere the model profile can be expressed as logne - Sigma-xi, where x1 = -0.3145L + 3.9043 is the principal or 'reference' term, and additional terms account for: a solar cycle variation with a peak at solar maximum; an annual variation with a December maximum; and a semiannual variation with equinoctial maxima.

  4. Spatially resolved electron density and electron energy distribution function in Ar magnetron plasmas used for sputter-deposition of ZnO-based thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Gangwar, R. K.; Morel, S.; Stafford, L.

    2015-11-15

    Langmuir probe and trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy were used to analyze the spatial structure of the electron density and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a cylindrical Ar magnetron plasma reactor used for sputter-deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While a typical Bessel (zero order) diffusion profile was observed along the radial direction for the number density of charged particles at 21 cm from the ZnO target, a significant rise of these populations with respect to the Bessel function was seen in the center of the reactor at 4 cm from the magnetron surface. As for the EEDF, it was found to transform from a more or less Maxwellian far from the target to a two-temperature Maxwellian with a depletion of high-energy electrons where magnetic field confinement effects become important. No significant change in the behavior of the electron density and EEDF across a wide range of pressures (5–100 mTorr) and self-bias voltages (115–300 V) was observed during magnetron sputtering of Zn, ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets. This indicates that sputtering of Zn, In, and O atoms do not play a very significant role on the electron particle balance and electron heating dynamics, at least over the range of experimental conditions investigated.

  5. Comparison study between coherent echoes at VHF range and electron density estimated by Ionosphere Model for Auroral Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Takanori; Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Tanaka, Yoshi; Nishimura, Koji; Sato, Kaoru; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Kohma, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Polar Mesosphere Winter Echo (PMWE) is known as back scatter echo from 55 to 85 km in the mesosphere, and it has been observed by MST and IS radar in polar region during non-summer period. Since density of free electrons as scatterer is low in the dark mesosphere during winter, it is suggested that PMWE requires strong ionization of neutral atmosphere associated with Energetic Particles Precipitations (EPPs) during Solar Proton Events [Kirkwood et al., 2002] or during geomagnetically disturbed periods [Nishiyama et al., 2015]. However, studies on relationship between occurrence of PMWE and background electron density has been limited yet [Lübken et al., 2006], partly because the PMWE occurrence rate is known to be quite low (2.9%) [Zeller et al., 2006]. The PANSY (Program of the Antarctic Syowa MST/IS) radar, which is the largest MST radar in Antarctica, observed many PMWE events since it has started mesosphere observations in June 2012. We established an application method of the PANSY radar as riometer, which makes it possible to estimate Cosmic Noise Absorptions (CNA) as proxy of relative variations on background electron density. In addition, electron density profiles from 60 to 150 km altitude are calculated by Ionospheric Model for the Auroral Zone (IMAZ) [McKinnell and Friedrich, 2007] and CNA estimated by the PANSY radar. In this presentation, we would like to focus on strong PMWE during two big geomagnetic storm events, St. Patrick's Day and the Summer Solstice 2015 Event, in order to compare observed PMWE characteristics to model background electron density. On March 19 and 22, recovery phase of St. Patrick's Day Storm, sudden PMWE intensification was detected near 60 km by the PANSY radar. At the same time, strong Cosmic Noise Absorptions (CNA) of 0.8 dB and 1.0 dB were measured, respectively. However, calculated electron density profiles did not show high electron density at the altitude where the PMWE intensification were observed. On June 22, the

  6. Deuterium density profile determination at JET using a neutron camera and a neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, J. Castegnetti, G.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C.; Giacomelli, L.

    2014-11-15

    In this work we estimate the fuel ion density profile in deuterium plasmas at JET, using the JET neutron camera, the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR, and fusion reactivities modeled by the transport code TRANSP. The framework has been tested using synthetic data, which showed that the density profile could be reconstructed with an average accuracy of the order of 10 %. The method has also been applied to neutron measurements from a neutral beam heated JET discharge, which gave n{sub d}/n{sub e} ≈ 0.6 ± 0.3 in the plasma core and n{sub d}/n{sub e} ≈ 0.4 ± 0.3 towards the edge. Correction factors for detector efficiencies, neutron attenuation, and back-scattering are not yet included in the analysis; future work will aim at refining the estimated density.

  7. Radial Profiles of Plasma Electron Characteristics in a Low-Power Arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codron, Douglas; Nawaz, Anuscheh

    2013-01-01

    Since 1960, the Arc Jet Complex at NASA Ames Research Center has been a source of long-duration, high-enthalpy flow for materials testing with application to the thermal protection of aerospace vehicle components. From their inception the facilities have played an integral role supporting many of NASA's space flight programs and numerous DoD projects. In recent years advancements in computational fluid dynamics (CFO) have made the resultant models a valuable tool for assessing and predicting performance, however, the inherent limitation of models to compensate for a dissociated, transitionally high temperature nonequilibrated flowfield have made further measurements necessary. The use of electrostatic probe diagnostics within similarly harsh plasma environments in previous studies have been met with much success. In this study, the use of a single Langmuir probe was implemented to characterize the plasma parameters of interest as they vary radially within a large volume of the plume. Classical Langmuir probe theory was applied to achieve first order estimates of the heavy particle temperature, the ratio T(sub i)/T(sub e), and the ionization fraction. As expected, both the electron temperature and electron density measurements show a dependence on radial distance from the plume centerline, with electron density profiles showing the largest dependence. This paper aims to validate and strengthen modeling work conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center by measuring the critical plasma parameters (electron temperature, electron density, and plasma potential) within the arc plume of a subscale arc jet. These parameters are intended to give physical insight into the flow characteristics while providing the necessary boundary conditions to validate full scale simulations.

  8. Disks in a narrow channel jammed by gravity and centrifuge: profiles of pressure, mass density and entropy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Liu, Dan; Ballnus, Benjamin; Karbach, Michael; Müller, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    This work investigates jammed granular matter under conditions that produce heterogeneous mass distributions on a mesoscopic scale. We consider a system of identical disks that are confined to a narrow channel, open at one end and closed off at the other end. The disks are jammed by the local pressure in a gravitational field or centrifuge. All surfaces are hard and frictionless. We calculate the profiles of pressure, mass density and entropy density on a mesoscopic length scale under the assumption that the jammed states are produced by random agitations of uniform intensity along the channel. These profiles exhibit trends and features governed by the balancing of position-dependent forces and potential energies. The analysis employs a method of configurational statistics that uses interlinking two-disk tiles as the fundamental degrees of freedom. Configurational statistics weighs the probabilities of tiles according to competing potential energies associated with gravity and centrifugation. Amendments account for the effects of the marginal stability of some tiles due to competing forces.

  9. Measurement of electron density in complex plasmas of the PK-3 plus apparatus on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Yasuaki; Adachi, Satoshi

    2011-07-01

    Dust particles in discharge are often levitated in a sheath region rather than in bulk plasma under gravitational conditions (on Earth). Gravity compresses dust clouds, and the gravitational force restricts the motion of the dust particles. Microgravity gives the plasmas, including dust particles, so-called complex (dusty) plasmas, where dust particles are embedded in a completely charge-neutral region of the bulk plasma. The dust cloud, as an uncompressed strongly-coupled Coulomb system, corresponds to an atomic model with physical phenomena, e.g., crystallization, phase transition, and so on. Since the phenomena are tightly connected to plasma states expressed by plasma parameters, it is significant to estimate the plasma parameters, such as electron density and temperature. The present work shows the electron density measured by the frequency shift probe in the apparatus for microgravity experiments currently boarding on the International Space Station (PK-3 plus). The frequency shift probe measurement gave electron density in the order of 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} as a typical value in the apparatus, and demonstrated the detection of electrons in plasmas with dust particles. The spatial distribution profile of the electron density obtained in this measurement presents an aspect for the void formation of dust clouds under microgravity.

  10. Temporal survey of electron number density and electron temperature in the exhaust of a megawatt MPD-Arc thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, C. J.; Rose, J. R.; Sigman, D. R.

    1971-01-01

    Temporal and radial profiles are obtained 30 cm downstream from the anode for two peak arc currents (11.2 kA and 20 kA) and for various auxiliary magnetic fields (0, 1.0 T, and 2.0T) using the Thomson scattering technique. Average density and temperature are relatively constant for over 100 microseconds with significant fluctuations. Radial profiles obtained are relatively flat for 4 cm from the axis. Compared to earlier 20 cm data, the exhaust density has decreased significantly, the average temperature (4.6 eV) has not changed, and the density hole with an auxiliary magnetic field has enlarged.

  11. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn, Judith D.

    2007-01-01

    An automated ligand-fitting procedure is applied to (F{sub o} − F{sub c})exp(iϕ{sub c}) difference density for 200 commonly found ligands from macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank to identify ligands from density maps. A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F{sub o} − F{sub c})exp(iϕ{sub c}) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  12. Comparison of the calculated and experimental data of the extracted electron beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I. A.; Povolná, A.; Stuchebrov, S. G.; Naumenko, G. A.

    2015-10-01

    The current commercial use of electron accelerators grows in research, industry, medical diagnosis and treatment. Due to this fact, the creation of a model describing the electron beam profile and shape is an actual task. The model of the TPU microtron extracted electron beam created in the program “Computer Laboratory (PCLab)” is described and compared with experimental results in this article. The value of the internal electron beam divergence determination is illustrated. The experimental data of the electron beam profiles at the selected distances from the output window are analysed and compared with the simulation data. The simulation data of the electron beam profiles are shown.

  13. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  14. Outer density profiles of 19 Galactic globular clusters from deep and wide-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Gieles, Mark; Sollima, Antonio; Koposov, Sergey; Martínez-Delgado, David; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Using deep photometric data from Wide Field Camera at the Isaac Newton Telescope and Wide Field Imager at the ESO 2.2-m telescope we measure the outer number density profiles of 19 stellar clusters located in the inner region of the Milky Way halo (within a Galactocentric distance range of 10-30 kpc) in order to assess the impact of internal and external dynamical processes on the spatial distribution of stars. Adopting power-law fitting templates, with index -γ in the outer region, we find that the clusters in our sample can be divided in two groups: a group of massive clusters (≥105 M⊙) that has relatively flat profiles with 2.5 < γ < 4, and a group of low-mass clusters (≤105 M⊙), with steep profiles (γ > 4) and clear signatures of interaction with the Galactic tidal field. We refer to these two groups as 'tidally unaffected' and 'tidally affected', respectively. Our results also show a clear trend between the slope of the outer parts and the half-mass density of these systems, which suggests that the outer density profiles may retain key information on the dominant processes driving the dynamical evolution of globular clusters.

  15. Transport analysis and modelling of the evolution of hollow density profiles plasmas in JET and implication for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocchi, B.; Bourdelle, C.; Angioni, C.; Imbeaux, F.; Loarte, A.; Maslov, M.; Contributors, JET

    2015-11-01

    The density evolution during the transient phase just after the L-H transition is investigated using theoretical transport models. Cases characterized by core densities which evolve in longer timescales than the edge densities, leading to hollow density profiles (R/{{L}n}=-R\

  16. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations.

    PubMed

    Terwilliger, Thomas C; Adams, Paul D; Moriarty, Nigel W; Cohn, Judith D

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F(o) - F(c))exp(i(phi)c) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  17. Steepened inner density profiles of group galaxies via interactions: an N-body analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobke, Benjamin M.; King, Lindsay J.; Fellhauer, Michael

    2007-06-01

    We continue to see a range of values for the Hubble constant obtained from gravitationally lensed multiple image time-delays when assuming an isothermal lens despite a robust value from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) key project (72 +/- 8 kms-1 Mpc-1). One explanation is that there is a variation in Hubble constant values due to a fundamental heterogeneity in lens galaxies present in groups, that is, central galaxies with a high dark matter surface density, and satellite galaxies with a possibly stripped halo, low dark matter surface density, and a more centrally concentrated matter distribution. Our goal is to see if a variety of group interactions between the most-massive group members can result in significant changes in the galaxy density profiles over the scale probed by strong lensing (<~15 kpc). While stripping of the outer parts of the halo can be expected, the impact on inner regions where the luminous component is important is less clear in the context of lensing, though still crucial, as a steepened density profile within this inner region allows these lens systems to be consistent with current HST/Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) estimates on H0. We employ the particle-mesh code SUPERBOX to carry out the group interaction simulations. An important advantage of using such a code is that it implements a fast, low-storage fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm allowing simulations with millions of particles on desk-top machines. We simulate interactions between group members, comparing the density profile for the satellite before and after interaction for the mass range of 1011 to 1013Msolar. Our investigations show a significant steepening of the density profile in the region of ~5-20 kpc, i.e. that which dominates strong lensing in lens galaxies. This effect is independent of the initial mass-to-light ratio. Additionally, the steepening in the inner region is transient in nature, with consecutive interactions returning the profile to an

  18. The ESO nearby Abell cluster survey. VII. Galaxy density profiles of rich clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Mazure, A.; Katgert, P.; Biviano, A.

    1998-08-01

    We have analyzed the projected galaxy distributions in a subset of the ENACS cluster sample, viz. in those 77 clusters that have z < 0.1 and R_ACO >= 1 and for which ENACS and COSMOS data are available. For 20 % of these, the distribution of galaxies in the COSMOS catalogue does not allow a reliable centre position to be determined. For the other 62 clusters, we first determined the centre and elongation of the galaxy distribution. Subsequently, we made Maximum-Likelihood fits to the distribution of COSMOS galaxies for 4 theoretical profiles, two with `cores' (generalized King- and Hubble-profiles) and two with `cusps' (generalized Navarro, Frenk and White, or NFW, and de Vaucouleurs profiles). We obtain average core radii (or characteristic radii for the profiles without core) of 128, 189, 292 and 1582 kpc for fits with King, Hubble, NFW and de Vaucouleurs profiles respectively, with dispersions around these average values of 88, 116, 191 and 771 kpc. The surface density of background galaxies is about 4 10(-5) gals arcsec(-2) (with a spread of about 2 10(-5) ), and there is very good agreement between the values found for the 4 profiles. There is also very good agreement on the outer logarithmic slope of the projected galaxy distribution, which is that for the non-generalized King- and Hubble-profile (i.e. beta_ {King} = beta_ {Hubble} = 1, with the corresponding values for the two other model-profiles). We use the Likelihood ratio to investigate whether the observations are significantly better described by profiles with cusps or by profiles with cores. Taking the King and NFW profiles as `model' of either class, we find that about 75 % of the clusters are better fit by the King profile than by the NFW profile. However, for the individual clusters the preference for the King profile is rarely significant at a confidence level of more than 90 %. When we limit ourselves to the central regions it appears that the signifance increases drastically, with 65 % of the

  19. High-energy-density electron beam from interaction of two successive laser pulses with subcritical-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Yu, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Murakami, M.; Zepf, M.; Rykovanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that a narrow electron beam with high energy and charge density can be generated in a subcritical-density plasma by two consecutive laser pulses. Although the first laser pulse dissipates rapidly, the second pulse can propagate for a long distance in the thin wake channel created by the first pulse and can further accelerate the preaccelerated electrons therein. Given that the second pulse also self-focuses, the resulting electron beam has a narrow waist and high charge and energy densities. Such beams are useful for enhancing the target-back space-charge field in target normal sheath acceleration of ions and bremsstrahlung sources, among others.

  20. Dwarf galaxy dark matter density profiles inferred from stellar and gas kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Joshua J.; Simon, Joshua D.; Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Bender, Ralf; Thomas, Jens; Van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Van de Ven, Glenn; Barentine, John C.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Swaters, R. A. E-mail: jja439@gmail.com

    2014-07-01

    We present new constraints on the density profiles of dark matter (DM) halos in seven nearby dwarf galaxies from measurements of their integrated stellar light and gas kinematics. The gas kinematics of low-mass galaxies frequently suggest that they contain constant density DM cores, while N-body simulations instead predict a cuspy profile. We present a data set of high-resolution integral-field spectroscopy on seven galaxies and measure the stellar and gas kinematics simultaneously. Using Jeans modeling on our full sample, we examine whether gas kinematics in general produce shallower density profiles than are derived from the stars. Although two of the seven galaxies show some localized differences in their rotation curves between the two tracers, estimates of the central logarithmic slope of the DM density profile, γ, are generally robust. The mean and standard deviation of the logarithmic slope for the population are γ = 0.67 ± 0.10 when measured in the stars and γ = 0.58 ± 0.24 when measured in the gas. We also find that the halos are not under-concentrated at the radii of half their maximum velocities. Finally, we search for correlations of the DM density profile with stellar velocity anisotropy and other baryonic properties. Two popular mechanisms to explain cored DM halos are an exotic DM component or feedback models that strongly couple the energy of supernovae into repeatedly driving out gas and dynamically heating the DM halos. While such models do not yet have falsifiable predictions that we can measure, we investigate correlations that may eventually be used to test models. We do not find a secondary parameter that strongly correlates with the central DM density slope, but we do find some weak correlations. The central DM density slope weakly correlates with the abundance of α elements in the stellar population, anti-correlates with H I fraction, and anti-correlates with vertical orbital anisotropy. We expect, if anything, the opposite of these

  1. Laser wavefront analyzer for imploding plasma density and current profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Prasad, R.R.; Campbell, K.; Coleman, P.; Krishnan, M.; Weber, B.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Mosher, D.

    2004-10-01

    The laser wavefront analyzer (LWA) consists of a polarized laser beam pulse that traverses an imploding z-pinch, and a microlens array that focuses the laser beam into a large number (10{sup 4}) of very tiny spots. LWA image analysis determines the refractive bending angles (due to density gradients) and Faraday rotation angles (due to the magnetic field-density integral) throughout the plasma cross section. Electron density and current distributions are derived from LWA data in an imploding gas-puff z-pinch plasma.

  2. Density matrix embedding theory for interacting electron-phonon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhoefer, Barbara; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2016-08-01

    We describe the extension of the density matrix embedding theory framework to coupled interacting fermion-boson systems. This provides a frequency-independent, entanglement embedding formalism to treat bulk fermion-boson problems. We illustrate the concepts within the context of the one-dimensional Hubbard-Holstein model, where the phonon bath states are obtained from the Schmidt decomposition of a self-consistently adjusted coherent state. We benchmark our results against accurate density matrix renormalization group calculations.

  3. TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES: ENHANCED TRANSFORMATION INTO DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Mayer, Lucio

    2013-02-20

    According to the tidal stirring model, late type, rotationally supported dwarfs resembling present day dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies can transform into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) via interactions with Milky-Way-sized hosts. We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate for the first time how tidal stirring depends on the dark matter (DM) density distribution in the central stellar region of the progenitor disky dwarf. Specifically, we explore various asymptotic inner slopes {gamma} of the dwarf DM density profiles ({rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}). For a given orbit inside the primary galaxy, rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in DM halos with core-like distributions ({gamma} = 0.2) and mild density cusps ({gamma} = 0.6) demonstrate a substantially enhanced likelihood and efficiency of transformation into dSphs compared to their counterparts with steeper DM density profiles ({gamma} = 1). Such shallow DM distributions are akin to those of observed dIrrs highlighting tidal stirring as a plausible model for the Local Group (LG) morphology-density relation. When {gamma} < 1, a single pericentric passage can induce dSph formation and disky dwarfs on low-eccentricity or large-pericenter orbits are able to transform; these new results allow tidal stirring to explain virtually all known dSphs across a wide range of distances from their hosts. A subset of disky dwarfs initially embedded in DM halos with shallow density profiles are eventually disrupted by the primary; those that survive as dSphs are generally on orbits with lower eccentricities and/or larger pericenters compared to those of typical cold dark matter satellites. The latter could explain the peculiar orbits of several LG dSphs such as Fornax, Leo I, Tucana, and Cetus.

  4. Density matrix renormalization group with efficient dynamical electron correlation through range separation

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan Knecht, Stefan; Reiher, Markus; Kielberg, Jesper Skau; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-06-14

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems.

  5. Viking Doppler noise used to determine the radial dependence of electron density in the extended corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.; Wackley, J. A.; Rockwell, S. T.; Kwan, M.

    1977-01-01

    The common form for radial dependence of electron density in the extended corona is given. By assuming proportionality between Doppler noise and integrated signal path electron density, Viking Doppler noise can be used to solve for a numerical value of X.

  6. Density domains of a photo-excited electron gas on liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monarkha, Yu. P.

    2016-06-01

    The Coulombic effect on the stability range of the photo-excited electron gas on liquid helium is shown to favor formation of domains of different densities. Domains appear to eliminate or greatly reduce regions with negative conductivity. An analysis of the density domain structure allows explaining remarkable observations reported recently for the photo-excited electron gas.

  7. Multichannel microwave interferometer with an antenna switching system for electron density measurement in a laboratory plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Mase, Atsushi; Nishida, Yasushi; Cheng, C. Z.

    2014-02-15

    This study presents a simple and powerful technique for multichannel measurements of the density profile in laboratory plasmas by microwave interferometry. This technique uses electromechanical microwave switches to temporally switch the connection between multiple receiver antennas and one phase-detection circuit. Using this method, the phase information detected at different positions is rearranged into a time series that can be acquired from a minimum number of data acquisition channels (e.g., two channels in the case of quadrature detection). Our successfully developed multichannel microwave interferometer that uses the antenna switching method was applied to measure the radial electron density profiles in a magnetized plasma experiment. The advantage of the proposed method is its compactness and scalability to multidimensional measurement systems at low cost.

  8. Materials for high-density electronic packaging and interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Electronic packaging and interconnections are the elements that today limit the ultimate performance of advanced electronic systems. Materials in use today and those becoming available are critically examined to ascertain what actions are needed for U.S. industry to compete favorably in the world market for advanced electronics. Materials and processes are discussed in terms of the final properties achievable and systems design compatibility. Weak points in the domestic industrial capability, including technical, industrial philosophy, and political, are identified. Recommendations are presented for actions that could help U.S. industry regain its former leadership position in advanced semiconductor systems production.

  9. Determining electron temperature and density in a hydrogen microwave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Gicquel, Alix; Hassouni, Khaled; Lefebvre, Michel

    1993-01-01

    A three-temperature thermo-chemical model is developed for analyzing the chemical composition and energy states of a hydrogen microwave plasma used for studying diamond deposition. The chemical and energy exchange rate coefficients are determined from cross section data, assuming Maxwellian velocity distributions for electrons. The model is reduced to a zero-dimensional problem to solve for the electron temperature and ion mole fraction, using measured vibrational and rotational temperatures. The calculations indicate that the electron temperature may be determined to within a few percent error even though the uncertainty in dissociation fraction is many times larger.

  10. Opto-Curling Probe for Simultaneous Monitoring of Optical Emission and Electron Density in Reactive Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo

    2013-05-01

    An advanced robust probe called opto-curling probe (OCP) is presented, which enables the simultaneous monitoring of electron density and optical emission of reactive plasma. The electron density is obtained from the microwave resonance frequency of a small antenna set on the probe surface while the optical emission spectra are observed through an optical fiber tip located at the probe surface. The ratio of the measured optical emission intensity to the electron density readily provides the radical density without relying on actinometry. The usefulness of OCP was experimentally demonstrated in the oxygen plasma cleaning of a carbonized wall with endpoint detection.

  11. Graphics processing unit-assisted density profile calculations in the KSTAR reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seong-Heon; Oh, Dong Keun

    2014-11-01

    Wavelet transform (WT) is widely used in signal processing. The frequency modulation reflectometer in the KSTAR applies this technique to get the phase information from the mixer output measurements. Since WT is a time consuming process, it is difficult to calculate the density profile in real time. The data analysis time, however, can be significantly reduced by the use of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), with its powerful computing capability, in WT. A bottle neck in the KSTAR data processing exists in the data input and output (IO) process between the CPU and its peripheral devices. In this paper, the details of the WT implementation assisted by a GPU in the KSTAR reflectometer are presented and the consequent performance improvement is reported. The real time density profile calculation from the reflectometer measurements is also discussed.

  12. Graphics processing unit-assisted density profile calculations in the KSTAR reflectometer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seong-Heon; Oh, Dong Keun

    2014-11-01

    Wavelet transform (WT) is widely used in signal processing. The frequency modulation reflectometer in the KSTAR applies this technique to get the phase information from the mixer output measurements. Since WT is a time consuming process, it is difficult to calculate the density profile in real time. The data analysis time, however, can be significantly reduced by the use of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), with its powerful computing capability, in WT. A bottle neck in the KSTAR data processing exists in the data input and output (IO) process between the CPU and its peripheral devices. In this paper, the details of the WT implementation assisted by a GPU in the KSTAR reflectometer are presented and the consequent performance improvement is reported. The real time density profile calculation from the reflectometer measurements is also discussed. PMID:25430234

  13. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam.

  14. Reconstruction of NSTX midplane neutral density profiles from visible imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Scotti, F.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Raman, R.

    2015-08-01

    The experimental determination of neutral densities in tokamak plasmas from line radiation is only accurate in the narrow region in which both the excitation rate and neutral density are significant. We describe an alternative procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code to invert light emission data obtained from a tangentially viewing camera, yielding absolute radial profiles of deuterium atoms and molecules at midplane. That the neutral source in these simulations can be adequately characterized as a uniform flux at the vacuum vessel wall is demonstrated by the similarity of the shapes of the simulated and observed brightness profiles. A second test is obtained by comparing the resulting neutral pressures at the vessel walls with data from midplane micro-ion gauges. We also show that the simulated camera image is insensitive to variations in the spatial distribution of the neutral source.

  15. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  16. Time delay occultation data of the Helios spacecraft for probing the electron density distribution in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edenhofer, P.; Lueneburg, E.; Esposito, P. B.; Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Hansen, R. T.; Hansen, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    S-band time delay measurements were collected from the spacecraft Helios A and B during three solar occultations in 1975/76 within heliocentric distances of about 3 and 215 earth radius in terms of range, Doppler frequency shift, and electron content. Characteristic features of measurement and data processing are described. Typical data sets are discussed to probe the electron density distribution near the sun (west and east limb as well) including the outer and extended corona. Steady-state and dynamical aspects of the solar corona are presented and compared with earth-bound-K-coronagraph measurements. Using a weighted least squares estimation, parameters of an average coronal electron density profile are derived in a preliminary analysis to yield electron densities at r = 3, 65, 215 earth radius. Transient phenomena are discussed and a velocity of propagation v is nearly equal to 900 km/s is determined for plasma ejecta from a solar flare observed during an extraordinary set of Helios B electron content measurements.

  17. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2006-01-15

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10{sup -4} Pa Xe (3.3x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) to 1.1x10{sup -3} Pa Xe (8.4x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures.

  18. MultiDark simulations: the story of dark matter halo concentrations and density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Yepes, Gustavo; Gottlöber, Stefan; Prada, Francisco; Heß, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Predicting structural properties of dark matter haloes is one of the fundamental goals of modern cosmology. We use the suite of MultiDark cosmological simulations to study the evolution of dark matter halo density profiles, concentrations, and velocity anisotropies. We find that in order to understand the structure of dark matter haloes and to make 1-2 per cent accurate predictions for density profiles, one needs to realize that halo concentration is more complex than the ratio of the virial radius to the core radius in the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. For massive haloes, the average density profile is far from the NFW shape and the concentration is defined by both the core radius and the shape parameter α in the Einasto approximation. We show that haloes progress through three stages of evolution. They start as rare density peaks and experience fast and nearly radial infall that brings mass closer to the centre, producing a highly concentrated halo. Here, the halo concentration increases with increasing halo mass and the concentration is defined by the α parameter with a nearly constant core radius. Later haloes slide into the plateau regime where the accretion becomes less radial, but frequent mergers still affect even the central region. At this stage, the concentration does not depend on halo mass. Once the rate of accretion and merging slows down, haloes move into the domain of declining concentration-mass relation because new accretion piles up mass close to the virial radius while the core radius is staying constant. Accurate analytical fits are provided.

  19. Laser driven terahertz generation in hot plasma with step density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj Jeong, Young Uk; Tripathi, Vipin Kumar

    2015-06-15

    An analytical formalism of terahertz (THz) radiation generation by beating of two lasers in a hot plasma with step density profile is developed. The lasers propagate obliquely to plasma surface normal, and the nonlinearity arises through the ponderomotive force. The THz is emitted in the specular reflection direction, and the yield is enhanced due to coupling with the Langmuir wave when the plasma frequency is close to THz frequency. The power conversion efficiency maximizes at an optimum angle of incidence.

  20. Spectroscopic determination of temperature and density spatial profiles and mix in indirect-drive implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S. W.; Haynes, D. A.; Kyrala, G.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2007-11-15

    In the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF), work has been consistently progressing in the past decade toward a more fundamental understanding of the plasma conditions in ICF implosion cores. The research presented here represents a substantial evolution in the ability to diagnose plasma temperatures and densities, along with characteristics of mixing between fuel and shell materials. Mixing is a vital property to study and quantify, since it can significantly affect implosion quality. We employ a number of new spectroscopic techniques that allow us to probe these important quantities. The first technique developed is an emissivity analysis, which uses the emissivity ratio of the optically thin Ly{beta} and He{beta} lines to spectroscopically extract temperature profiles, followed by the solution of emissivity equations to infer density profiles. The second technique, an intensity analysis, models the radiation transport through the implosion core. The nature of the intensity analysis allows us to use an optically thick line, the Ly{alpha}, to extract information on mixing near the core edge. With this work, it is now possible to extract directly from experimental data not only detailed temperature and density maps of the core, but also spatial mixing profiles.

  1. High density electronic circuit and process for making

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, William P.

    1999-01-01

    High density circuits with posts that protrude beyond one surface of a substrate to provide easy mounting of devices such as integrated circuits. The posts also provide stress relief to accommodate differential thermal expansion. The process allows high interconnect density with fewer alignment restrictions and less wasted circuit area than previous processes. The resulting substrates can be test platforms for die testing and for multi-chip module substrate testing. The test platform can contain active components and emulate realistic operational conditions, replacing shorts/opens net testing.

  2. High density electronic circuit and process for making

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, W.P.

    1999-06-29

    High density circuits with posts that protrude beyond one surface of a substrate to provide easy mounting of devices such as integrated circuits are disclosed. The posts also provide stress relief to accommodate differential thermal expansion. The process allows high interconnect density with fewer alignment restrictions and less wasted circuit area than previous processes. The resulting substrates can be test platforms for die testing and for multi-chip module substrate testing. The test platform can contain active components and emulate realistic operational conditions, replacing shorts/opens net testing. 8 figs.

  3. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adli, E.; Gessner, S. J.; Corde, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Bjerke, H. H.

    2015-02-09

    We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design allows for measuring large beam sizes, with large photon yield per beam charge and excellent signal linearity with beam charge. Furthermore, the profile monitor signal is independent of the particle energy for ultrarelativistic particles. Different design and parameter considerations are discussed. A Cherenkov light-based profile monitor has been installed at the FACET User Facility at SLAC. Finally, we report on the measured performance of this profile monitor.

  4. Longitudinal and Hemispheric Variations of Nighttime E-Layer Electron Density in the Auroral Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, X.; Wang, W.; Dou, X.; Burns, A. G.; Yue, X.

    2014-12-01

    The longitudinal patterns of nighttime E layer electron density in the auroral zone are analyzed in both hemispheres using COSMIC observation under quiet and solar minimum conditions. These l patterns are compared with the variations of particle precipitating energy flux from TIMED/GUVI under similar geophysical conditions, and also the solar radiation source of the auroral E layer are discussed. Our main conclusions are: (1) the nighttime maximum E-layer electron density presents pronounced longitudinal variations in the auroral zone, which depends on seasons and hemispheres. In local winter of both hemispheres and in northern equinox, maximum electron density is located in most western sectors within magnetic longitudes of 120-360°E. In local summer of both hemispheres and in southern equinox, greater the electron density occurs in a wide longitudinal sector centered at 0°E. (2) Hemispheric asymmetry occurs in auroral E layer electron density in all seasons, including equinox. In local winter, the maximum density of the northern hemisphere is much higher than that of southern hemisphere. In equinox, the longitudinal patterns of the electron density are out of phase between the two hemispheres. (3) The effects of the auroral precipitation are dominant in building the E layer electron density in the auroral zone for all seasons, except in southern summer in sector of 300-90°E MLON, where strong solar radiation takes place.

  5. Surface Dependent Electron and Negative Ion Density in Inductively Coupled Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Hamilton, T.W.; Hebner, G.A.; Jarecki, R.L.; Nichols, C.A.

    1999-01-18

    Electron and negative ion density have been measured in a modfied Applied Materials DPS metal etch chamber using gas mixtures of BCl{sub 3}, Cl{sub 2} and Ar. Measurements were performed for four dflerent substrate types to examine the influence of surface material on the bulk plasma properties; aluminurq alumina, photoresist and 50 percent patterned aluminum / photoresist. Electron densities in the Cl{sub 2} / BCl{sub 3} mixtures varied from 0.25 to 4 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Photodetachment measurements of the negative ion density indicate that the negative ion density was smaller than the electron density and that the electron to negative ion density ratio varied between 1 and 6. The presence of photoresist had a dominant intluence on the electron and negative ion density compared to alumina and aluminum surfaces. In most cases, the electron density above wafers covered with photoresist was a factor of two lower while the negative ion density was a factor of two higher than the aluminum or alumina surfaces.

  6. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C.A.

    1987-12-13

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) cathodes operated at 10 kV produced 1-5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq. cm. Normalized beam brightness was consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB/sub 6/ cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approx 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron-bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less-demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  7. Stellar density profile and mass of the Milky Way bulge from VVV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, E.; Zoccali, M.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Minniti, D.; Alonso-García, J.; Marchetti, E.; Hempel, M.; Renzini, A.; Rejkuba, M.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first stellar density profile of the Milky Way bulge that reaches latitude b = 0°. The profile was derived by counting red clump stars within the colour-magnitude diagram that was constructed using the new PSF-fitting photometry from VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) survey data. The new stellar density map covers the area between | l | ≤ 10° and | b | ≤ 4.5° with unprecedented accuracy, allowing the stellar kinematics from the Giraffe Inner Bulge Spectroscopic Survey (GIBS) to be linked to the stellar mass density distribution. In particular, the location of the central velocity-dispersion peak from GIBS matches a high over-density in the VVV star count map. By scaling the total luminosity function (LF) obtained from all VVV fields to the LF from Zoccali et al.(2003), we obtain the first fully empirical estimate of the mass in stars and in remnants of the Galactic bulge. Within (| b | < 9.5°, | l | < 10°), the Milky Way bulge stellar mass is 2.0 ± 0.3 × 1010M⊙. Based on observations taken within the ESO/VISTA Public Survey VVV under the programme ID 179.B-2002 (PI: Minniti).

  8. Thermodynamics, contact, and density profiles of the repulsive Gaudin-Yang model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PâÅ£u, Ovidiu I.; Klümper, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We address the problem of computing the thermodynamic properties of the repulsive one-dimensional two-component Fermi gas with contact interaction, also known as the Gaudin-Yang model. Using a specific lattice embedding and the quantum transfer matrix we derive an exact system of only two nonlinear integral equations for the thermodynamics of the homogeneous model which is valid for all temperatures and values of the chemical potential, magnetic field, and coupling strength. This system allows for an easy and extremely accurate calculation of thermodynamic properties circumventing the difficulties associated with the truncation of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz system of equations. We present extensive results for the densities, polarization, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, interaction energy, Tan contact, and local correlation function of opposite spins. Our results show that at low and intermediate temperatures the experimentally accessible contact is a nonmonotonic function of the coupling strength. As a function of the temperature the contact presents a pronounced local minimum in the Tonks-Girardeau regime which signals an abrupt change of the momentum distribution in a small interval of temperature. The density profiles of the system in the presence of a harmonic trapping potential are computed using the exact solution of the homogeneous model coupled with the local density approximation. We find that at finite temperature the density profile presents a double shell structure (partially polarized center and fully polarized wings) only when the polarization in the center of the trap is above a critical value which is monotonically increasing with temperature.

  9. High-energy-density electron jet generation from an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, T. P. Shao, F. Q.; Zou, D. B.; Ge, Z. Y.; Zhang, G. B.; Wang, W. Q.; Li, X. H.; Liu, J. X.; Ouyang, J. M.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Wang, J. W.; Wong, A. Y.

    2015-01-14

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we propose a scheme for strong coupling of a petawatt laser with an opening gold cone filled with near-critical-density plasmas. When relevant parameters are properly chosen, most laser energy can be fully deposited inside the cone with only 10% leaving the tip opening. Due to the asymmetric ponderomotive acceleration by the strongly decayed laser pulse, high-energy-density electrons with net laser energy gain are accumulated inside the cone, which then stream out of the tip opening continuously, like a jet. The jet electrons are fully relativistic, with speeds around 0.98−0.998 c and densities at 10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} level. The jet can keep for a long time over 200 fs, which may have diverse applications in practice.

  10. Tidal Stirring of Satellites with Shallow Density Profiles Prevents Them from Being Too Big to Fail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomozeiu, Mihai; Mayer, Lucio; Quinn, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The “too big to fail” problem is revisited by studying the tidal evolution of populations of dwarf satellites with different density profiles. The high-resolution cosmological ΛCDM “ErisMod” set of simulations is used. These simulations can model both the stellar and dark matter components of the satellites, and their evolution under the action of the tides of a Milky Way (MW)-sized host halo at a force resolution better than 10 pc. The stronger tidal mass loss and re-shaping of the mass distribution induced in satellites with γ = 0.6 dark matter density distributions, as those resulting from the effect of feedback in hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxy formation, are sufficient to bring the circular velocity profiles in agreement with the kinematics of MW’s dSphs. In contrast, in simulations in which the satellites retain cusps at z = 0 there are several “massive failures” with circular velocities in excess of the observational constraints. Various sources of deviations in the conventionally adopted relation between the circular velocity at the half-light radius and the one-dimensional line of sight velocity dispersions are found. Such deviations are caused by the response of circular velocity profiles to tidal effects, which also varies depending on the initially assumed inner density profile and by the complexity of the stellar kinematics, which include residual rotation and anisotropy. In addition, tidal effects naturally induce large deviations in the stellar mass–halo mass relation for halo masses below 109 M ⊙, preventing any reliable application of the abundance matching technique to dwarf galaxy satellites.

  11. Radiation Damped Profiles of Extremely High Column Density Neutral Hydrogen : Implications of Cosmic Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2016-09-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line-of-sight mainly affects the far off-center region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line-center can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half maximum) as an effective line-width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N HI ≲ 1021 cm-2, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7% errors. However, as the local column density reaches N HI ˜ 1022.3 cm-2, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10% overestimation in the red wing and a 20% underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  12. Electron density measurement of inductively coupled plasmas by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Ayumi; Kurose, Tomoko; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Reymond, Vivien; Kitahara, Hideaki; Takano, Keisuke; Hangyo, Masanori; Tani, Masahiko

    2011-10-01

    The electron densities of argon inductively coupled plasmas were measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). At a low pressure, the electron densities were also measured with a Langmuir-type double probe and the validity of THz-TDS electron-density measurement in a plasma has been corroborated. As the input radio-frequency (RF) power increases, the plasma density and gas temperature increase, which makes the probe measurement less reliable or even impossible, due to the large heat load to the probe surface. On the contrary, the THz-TDS measurement is unaffected by the gas temperature and becomes more reliable due to the higher electron density at higher input power for plasma generation.

  13. Fast Thermal Helium Beam diagnostic for measurements of edge electron profiles and fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, M. Scarin, P.; Cavazzana, R.; Carraro, L.; Grando, L.; Taliercio, C.; Franchin, L.; Tiso, A.

    2015-12-15

    The edge of fusion experiments is a region where strong gradients develop, together with the presence of strong fluctuations due to turbulence. The thermal helium beam diagnostic developed for the RFX-mod experiment allows the measurements with a single diagnostic of both low frequency time evolution of the edge radial profiles of electron density and temperature (tens of hertz), and the high frequency fluctuations (hundreds of kHz). To maximize the collected light, the three HeI lines necessary to be measured for the evaluation of n{sub e} and T{sub e} are separated with a spectrograph, and multianode photomultipliers are used as light detectors. The paper describes the diagnostic setup, with the interface hardware with the machine and the optical layout, and the characterization of its performances.

  14. Fast Thermal Helium Beam diagnostic for measurements of edge electron profiles and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Agostini, M; Scarin, P; Cavazzana, R; Carraro, L; Grando, L; Taliercio, C; Franchin, L; Tiso, A

    2015-12-01

    The edge of fusion experiments is a region where strong gradients develop, together with the presence of strong fluctuations due to turbulence. The thermal helium beam diagnostic developed for the RFX-mod experiment allows the measurements with a single diagnostic of both low frequency time evolution of the edge radial profiles of electron density and temperature (tens of hertz), and the high frequency fluctuations (hundreds of kHz). To maximize the collected light, the three HeI lines necessary to be measured for the evaluation of n(e) and T(e) are separated with a spectrograph, and multianode photomultipliers are used as light detectors. The paper describes the diagnostic setup, with the interface hardware with the machine and the optical layout, and the characterization of its performances. PMID:26724033

  15. Modern Possibilities for Calculating Some Properties of Molecules and Crystals from the Experimental Electron Density

    SciTech Connect

    Stash, A.I.; Tsirelson, V.G.

    2005-03-01

    Methods for calculating some properties of molecules and crystals from the electron density reconstructed from a precise X-ray diffraction experiment using the multipole model are considered. These properties include, on the one hand, the characteristics of the electron density and the inner-crystal electrostatic field and, on the other hand, the local electronic energies (kinetic, potential, total), the exchange energy density, the electron-pair localization function, the localized-orbital locator, the effective crystal potential, and others. It is shown that the integration of these characteristics over pseudoatomic volumes bounded by the surfaces of the zero flux of the electron density gradient makes it possible to characterize directly from an experiment the properties of molecules and crystals in terms of the atomic contributions. The computer program WinXPRO2004, realizing these possibilities, is briefly described.

  16. Density measurement of thin layers by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jürgen; Ramm, Jürgen; Gemming, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    A method to measure the density of thin layers is presented which utilizes electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques within a transmission electron microscope. The method is based on the acquisition of energy filtered images in the low loss region as well as of an element distribution map using core loss edges. After correction of multiple inelastic scattering effects, the intensity of the element distribution map is proportional to density and thickness. The dependence of the intensities of images with low energy loss electrons on the density is different from that. This difference allows the calculation of the relative density pixel by pixel and to determine lateral density gradients or fluctuations in thin films without relying on a constant specimen thickness. The method is demonstrated at thin carbon layers produced with density gradients.

  17. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  18. Electron density topography based model to explore N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blockers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, Snehal V.; Joshi, Kaustubh A.

    2016-03-01

    The dwell time of a molecule in a voltage dependent NMDA receptor channel is an important factor in defining its activity as channel blocker. A model has been designed, based on quantum chemical descriptors like geometrical parameters, charge distribution, electron density topography and global reactivity descriptors, to shed lights on the dwell time of a channel blocker. Structure and charge distribution studies indicate polarization of molecules with the electron density located at the core of the molecule. Electron density topography reveals ring critical point (ρrcp), emerging as a signature parameter to understand the dwell time of a channel blocker molecule.

  19. Optimal design of reflectometer density profile measurements using a radar systems approach (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, E.J.; Kim, K.W.; Peebles, W.A.; Rhodes, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Reflectometry is an attractive and versatile diagnostic technique that can address a wide range of measurement needs on fusion devices. However, progress in the area of profile measurement has been hampered by the lack of a well-understood basis for the optimum design and implementation of such systems. Such a design basis is provided by the realization that reflectometer systems utilized for density profile measurements are in fact specialized forms of radar systems. In this article five criteria are introduced by which reflectometer systems can be systematically designed for optimal performance: range resolution, spatial sampling, turbulence immunity, bandwidth optimization, and the need for adaptive data processing. Many of these criteria are familiar from radar systems analysis, and are applicable to reflectometry after allowance is made for differences stemming from the nature of the plasma target. These criteria are utilized to critically evaluate current reflectometer density profile techniques and indicate improvements that can impact current and next step devices, such as ITER.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2008-03-25

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  1. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  2. Cherenkov Light-based Beam Profiling for Ultrarelativistic Electron Beams

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adli, E.; Gessner, S. J.; Corde, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Bjerke, H. H.

    2015-02-09

    We describe a beam profile monitor design based on Cherenkov light emitted from a charged particle beam in an air gap. The main components of the profile monitor are silicon wafers used to reflect Cherenkov light onto a camera lens system. The design allows for measuring large beam sizes, with large photon yield per beam charge and excellent signal linearity with beam charge. Furthermore, the profile monitor signal is independent of the particle energy for ultrarelativistic particles. Different design and parameter considerations are discussed. A Cherenkov light-based profile monitor has been installed at the FACET User Facility at SLAC. Finally,more » we report on the measured performance of this profile monitor.« less

  3. Profiles of the He I 23P-33D line at high densities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büscher, S.; Glenzer, S.; Wrubel, T.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1995-08-01

    The authors report on measurements of Stark profiles of the He I 23P-33D transition at λ = 587.6 nm performed in a plasma of the gas-liner pinch discharge. The line shape and peak shift have been measured at densities in the range of ne = 0.5-2.5×1018cm-3 and temperatures of kB, T = 4-5.5 eV and compared with theoretical calculations using several approximations. The plasma parameters were determined independently by Thomson scattering. For higher densities the width of the He I 23P-33D transition grows nonlinearly with increasing density, and the shift of the line center shows a change of the sign from a blue to a red shift. For lower densities the Stark width and shift are excellently predicted by the calculations, but, as expected, for higher densities the agreement becomes worse, especially for the shift, when the validity range of the approximations is exceeded.

  4. Density Profile Evolution Diagnostics for RMF driven FRCs on STX and TCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votroubek, G. R.; Slough, J.; Crawford, E. A.

    1998-11-01

    RMF penetration dependence on density is currently being investigated at RPPL. Two time resolved density diagnostics have been designed, and are being applied to STX and TCS. The first density measurement will use laser interferometry to look at the phase difference induced by the plasma along a beam of laser light. We use a diode pumped cw Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.06 μ in a double pass Mach-Zehnder setup. A pulsed electro-optical phase modulator (EOM) provides reference phase information and an automated data reduction program is used for direct evaluation of line averaged density. On STX, the interferometer views end-on with easily varied radial position. The second diagnostic is an array of filtered continuum emission detectors. It employs a 3" ball lens, 3mm plastic optical fibers, and large area photodiodes for maximum throughput. The change in phase in the interferometer caused by plasma is proportional to the integral of n dl, while light emission is proportional to the integral of n^2 dl. We will use appropriate interferometer data to calibrate the continuum array. After the emission array data is processed through a tomographic inversion, we will have time resolved radial density profiles. Hardware, layout, and preliminary experimental data for both systems will be presented. Supported by USDOE.

  5. Testing the gas mass density profile of galaxy clusters with distance duality relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, assuming the validity of distance duality relation, η = DL(z)(1 + z)-2/DA(z) = 1, where DA(z) and DL(z) are the angular and the luminosity distance, respectively, we explore two kinds of gas mass density profiles of clusters: the isothermal β model and the non-isothermal double-β model. In our analysis, performed on 38 massive galaxy clusters observed by Chandra (within the redshift range of 0.14 < z < 0.89), we use two types of cluster gas mass fraction data corresponding to different mass density profiles fitted to the X-ray data. Using two general parameterizations of η(z) (phenomenologically allowing for distance duality violation), we find that the non-isothermal double-β model agrees better with the distance duality relation, while the isothermal β model tends to be marginally incompatible with the Etherington theorem at 68.3 per cent confidence level (CL). However, current accuracy of the data does not allow to distinguish between the two models for the gas-density distribution at a significant level.

  6. Density profile in thin films of polybutadiene on silicon oxide substrates: a TOF-NR study.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, E Tilo; Sepe, Alessandro; Haese-Seiller, Martin; Moulin, Jean-François; Papadakis, Christine M

    2013-08-27

    We have investigated thin films from fully deuterated polybutadiene (PB-d6) on silicon substrates with the aim of detecting and characterizing a possible interphase in the polymer film near the substrate using time-of-flight neutron reflectometry (TOF-NR). As substrates, thermally oxidized silicon wafers were either used as such or they were coated with triethylethoxysilyl modified 1,2-PB prior to deposition of the PB-d6 film. TOF-NR reveals that, for both substrates, the scattering length density (SLD) of the PB films decreases near the solid interface. The reduction of SLD is converted to an excess fraction of free volume. To further verify the existence of the interphase in PB-d6, we attempt to model the TOF-NR curves with density profiles which do not feature an interphase. These density profiles do not describe the TOF-NR curves adequately. We conclude that, near the solid interface, an interphase having an SLD lower than the bulk of the film is present. PMID:23941468

  7. Association of lipid profile with bone mineral density in postmenopausal women in Yazd province

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri-Anari, Akram; Mortezaii-Shoroki, Zahra; Modarresi, Mozhgan; Dehghan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low bone mass is a major health problem in postmenopausal women. There is no general agreement regarding relationship between serum level of lipids and bone mineral density. Objective: This study was carried out to investigate the association between lipid profile and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women in Yazd, Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 170 women aged between 50 and 70 years old with menopause for at least one year from Yazd, Iran, between March 2013 to September 2013. Association of lipid profile and BMD were measured in all study participants. Results: Among our participants 73 cases had lumbar osteoporosis, 17 cases had femoral osteoporosis and 80 cases did n’t have osteoporosis. After controlling for body mass index, there were no correlations between serum level of lipids and bone mineral density of femur and lumbar bones. Conclusion: No significant association between serum level of lipids and BMD of femur and lumbar was found in postmenopausal women. PMID:27738662

  8. Electron density estimations derived from spacecraft potential measurements on Cluster in tenuous plasma regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, A.; Lybekk, B.; André, M.; Eriksson, A.; Masson, A.; Mozer, F. S.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; DéCréAu, P. M. E.; Dandouras, I.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fazakerley, A.; Taylor, M.; Paschmann, G.; Svenes, K. R.; Torkar, K.; Whipple, E.

    2008-07-01

    Spacecraft potential measurements by the EFW electric field experiment on the Cluster satellites can be used to obtain plasma density estimates in regions barely accessible to other type of plasma experiments. Direct calibrations of the plasma density as a function of the measured potential difference between the spacecraft and the probes can be carried out in the solar wind, the magnetosheath, and the plasmashere by the use of CIS ion density and WHISPER electron density measurements. The spacecraft photoelectron characteristic (photoelectrons escaping to the plasma in current balance with collected ambient electrons) can be calculated from knowledge of the electron current to the spacecraft based on plasma density and electron temperature data from the above mentioned experiments and can be extended to more positive spacecraft potentials by CIS ion and the PEACE electron experiments in the plasma sheet. This characteristic enables determination of the electron density as a function of spacecraft potential over the polar caps and in the lobes of the magnetosphere, regions where other experiments on Cluster have intrinsic limitations. Data from 2001 to 2006 reveal that the photoelectron characteristics of the Cluster spacecraft as well as the electric field probes vary with the solar cycle and solar activity. The consequences for plasma density measurements are addressed. Typical examples are presented to demonstrate the use of this technique in a polar cap/lobe plasma.

  9. Electron density changes in the nighttime D region due to heating by very-low-frequency transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Juan V.; Inan, Umran S.

    1994-01-01

    Modification of the nighttime D region electron density (N(sub e)) due to heating by very-low-frequency (VLF) transmitters is investigated theoretically using a four-species model of the ion chemistry. The effects of a 100 kW, a 265 kW, and a 1000 kW VLF transmitter are calculated for three ambient N(sub e) profiles. Results indicate that N(sub e) is reduced by up to 26% at approximately 80 km altitude over a 1000 kW transmitter.

  10. Effect of trapped electrons on soliton propagation in a plasma having a density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Farah; Stroth, Ulrich

    2009-03-01

    A Korteweg-deVries equation with an additional term due to the density gradient is obtained using reductive perturbation technique in an unmagnetized plasma having a density gradient, finite temperature ions, and two-temperature nonisothermal (trapped) electrons. This equation is solved to get the solitary wave solution using sine-cosine method. The phase velocity, soliton amplitude, and width are examined under the effect of electron and ion temperatures and their concentrations. The effect of ion (electron) temperature is found to be more significant in the presence of larger (smaller) number of trapped electrons in the plasma.

  11. Effect of trapped electrons on soliton propagation in a plasma having a density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Farah; Stroth, Ulrich

    2009-03-15

    A Korteweg-deVries equation with an additional term due to the density gradient is obtained using reductive perturbation technique in an unmagnetized plasma having a density gradient, finite temperature ions, and two-temperature nonisothermal (trapped) electrons. This equation is solved to get the solitary wave solution using sine-cosine method. The phase velocity, soliton amplitude, and width are examined under the effect of electron and ion temperatures and their concentrations. The effect of ion (electron) temperature is found to be more significant in the presence of larger (smaller) number of trapped electrons in the plasma.

  12. Density-functional electronic structure of PuCoGa5

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P

    2004-06-03

    Density-functional electronic-structure calculations for PuCoGa{sub 5} are performed to address the possibility of magnetic interactions in this high-temperature superconductor. Within an itinerant 5f-electron picture, cohesion and crystallographic parameters compares favorably with experiment, whereas only when spin and orbital interactions are accounted for the calculated electronic density of states agrees with photoemission spectra. This fact suggests that spin and orbital correlations are important for a correct description of the PuCoGa{sub 5} electronic structure and may play a role in an unconventional mechanism for superconductivity.

  13. Explaining the high electron density observed during T57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snowden, Darci; Smith, Mike; Jimson, Theo

    2016-06-01

    Previous work (e.g. Snowden et al. 2014) showed that energy deposition rates in Titan's atmosphere due to the precipitation of magnetospheric electrons and ions are small compared to the energy flux due to solar EUV. However, some of these results relied on energy flux rates at Titan's exobase calculated from Voyager 1 data or data from a small number of Cassini flybys. Cassini has shown that the plasma environment around Titan is extremely variable and that the Voyager 1 conditions are not characteristic of an average plasma environment. Therefore, we further investigate the issue using particle tracing simulations for ions and a two stream model for electrons in combination with a 3D model of Titan's induced magnetosphere. We find that energy deposition and ionization rates in Titan's atmosphere do not only depend on the upstream energy distribution of magnetospheric plasma near Titan (e.g. plasma sheet or lobe-like), but also on the characteristics of Titan's Alfven wing structure and the strength of the induced field. Surprisingly, we find that the energy deposition and ionization rates in Titan upper atmosphere may be higher when Titan is in Saturn's magnetospheric lobes due reduced shielding of magnetospheric ions. Our simulations confirm that the globally averaged energy deposition rates due to magnetospheric particles are smaller than solar radiation.

  14. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-21

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound. PMID:27208927

  15. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-01

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  16. Transport simulations of ITER with broad density profiles and high radiative fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1995-08-01

    Special versions of the 1.5-D BALDUR predictive transport code are used to explore the confinement in the ignited ITER EDA by self-consistent calculations. The code computes 2-D equilibria and solves 1-D transport equations in the bulk and scrape-off layer with empirical transport coefficients for the ohmic, L and ELMy H mode regimes. The emphasis is on scenarios with flat density profiles and high, fixed radiative power in the main chamber due to the seeded impurities argon and neon. It is shown that self-sustained steady state thermonuclear burn is achieved for 370 s and is compatible with the flat density profiles and strong radiative cooling. The necessary local energy and particle transport are presented. In the argon and neon scenarios, the required radiation corrected energy confinement times are 4.1 and 3.5 s, respectively, which are achievable according to the ITER ELMy H mode scaling. The advantage of neon originates from its smaller radiative loss within the separatrix of 37% of the total radiation in the main chamber, compared with 60% in the case of argon. A significant radiative loss from the confinement zone, mainly by bremsstrahlung, cannot be avoided. It raises the required energy confinement time and is the price to be paid for reduction of the divertor heat load by radiative cooling in the main chamber. In steady state, a helium fraction of 5% is computed. The fractions of helium, argon and neon and the resulting fuel dilution are considerably lower than with peaked density profiles

  17. Electron density diagnostics in the 10-100 A interval for a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.; Mason, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Electron density measurements from spectral-line diagnostics are reported for a solar flare on July 13, 1982, 1627 UT. The spectrogram, covering the 10-95 A interval, contained usable lines of helium-like ions C V, N VI, O VII, and Ne IX which are formed over the temperature interval 0.7-3.5 x 10 to the 6th K. In addition, spectral-line ratios of Si IX, Fe XIV, and Ca XV were compared with new theoretical estimates of their electron density sensitivity to obtain additional electron density diagnostics. An electron density of 3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm was obtained. The comparison of these results from helium-like and other ions gives confidence in the utility of these tools for solar coronal analysis and will lead to a fuller understanding of the phenomena observed in this flare.

  18. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  19. Electron Density Measurements in UV-Preionized XeCl and CO2 Laser Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Sato, Saburo; Goto, Tatsumi

    1989-11-01

    A Langmuir probe technique has been used to measure electron densities and temperatures in UV-preionized XeCl excimer and CO2 laser gas mixtures in a laser tube. For this experiment, only pin electrodes (preionization sparks) were operated with no discharge between the main electrodes. The measured electron densities were about 108 cm-3 in both the excimer and CO2 laser gases, compared with 1010 cm-3 in pure He gas. The electron density was found to increase due to the proximity of the main electrodes. The coefficients of absorption for excimer and CO2 laser gas were obtained from the characteristics of the electron densities vs the distance from the UV source. Based on the absorption coefficient for XeCl, 0.9 cm-1 atm-1, we propose pin-electrode arrangements for spatially uniform preionization.

  20. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  1. Automated Determination of Electron Density from Electric Field Measurements on the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri; Kurth, William

    2016-04-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurement made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, fuhr, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detection. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  2. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, I. S.; Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Kurth, W. S.

    2016-05-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made on board NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, fuhr, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  3. Analysis of electronic component failures using high-density radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohig, W.D.; Potter, T.J.

    1991-11-01

    The exceptional resolution and nondestructive nature of microfocus radiography has proven to be extremely useful in the diagnosis of electronic component failures, particularly when the components are contained in sealed or encapsulated assemblies. An epoxy-encapsulated NTC thermistor and an epitaxial silicon P-N junction photodetector are examples of discrete devices in which the cause of failure was correctly hypothesized directly from a radiographic image. Subsequent destructive physical examinations confirmed the initial hypothesis and established the underlying cause in each case. The problem in a vacuum switch tube which failed to function was apparent in the radiographic image, but the underlying cause was not clear. However, radiography also showed that the position of a flat cable in the assembly could contribute to failure, an observation which resulted in a change in manufacturing procedure. In each of these instances, microradiography played a key role in decisions concerning the root cause of failure, product viability, and corrective action. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Contact condition for the density profiles in spherical and cylindrical double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre-Alcantara, Whasington; Henderson, Douglas; Bari Bhuiyan, Lutful

    2015-11-01

    Exact sum rules involving the contact values of the density profiles and bulk osmotic pressure in spherical and cylindrical electric double layers are formulated. When the radius of curvature in these systems tends to infinity, the contact conditions reduce to the well-known contact condition in planar double layer due to Henderson, Blum, and Lebowitz (1979). However, unlike the latter relation, the contact conditions in the non-planar geometries are non-local, and require for their implementation full knowledge of the electrode-ion singlet distribution functions.

  5. Development of internal magnetic probe for current density profile measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, J. W.; Jung, B. K.; Chung, K. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    An internal magnetic probe using Hall sensors to measure a current density profile directly with perturbation of less than 10% to the plasma current is successfully operated for the first time in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). An appropriate Hall sensor is chosen to produce sufficient signals for VEST magnetic field while maintaining the small size of 10 mm in outer diameter. Temperature around the Hall sensor in a typical VEST plasma is regulated by blown air of 2 bars. First measurement of 60 kA VEST ohmic discharge shows a reasonable agreement with the total plasma current measured by Rogowski coil in VEST.

  6. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ellingson, E.; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  7. Reflectometry: A Reliable And Sensitive Plasma Diagnostic For Density Profile And Turbulence Measurements On Tore-Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Sabot, R.; Clairet, F.; Giacalone, J. C.; Molina, D.; Sirinelli, A.; Vermare, L.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    2006-01-15

    A set of four reflectometers has been installed on Tore-Supra to measure the density profiles and the properties of density fluctuations with good spatial resolution. Fast swept X-mode reflectometers covering the range 50 to 155 GHz provide reliable and accurate measurements of the whole density profile from the edge on the outer side up to the core on the high field side even during large and fast profile evolution. Precise evaluation of the density profile is crucial for particle transport studies. A particular feature, a local peaking, has been observed in the core during ohmic discharge. Density fluctuations are measured with three different techniques. The classical fixed frequency method looks at large scale fluctuations (kr < 3 cm-1) . It measures the radial profile of fluctuations and can detect density perturbation associated to high frequency modes. A new method has been validated to measure the radial profile of small scale density fluctuations from fast FM-CW phase reflected signal. This method could also retrieve the radial wavenumber spectrum. The last method Doppler reflectometry is based on back scattering. It measures the poloidal rotation and fluctuations amplitude at different poloidal wave numbers (3 < k{theta} < 20 cm-1). This collection of diagnostics achieves complementary measurements from the low to the high field side of the discharge and from large to small scale.

  8. Jovian plasma sheet density profile from low-frequency radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, H. O.; Ladreiter, H. P.; Leblanc, Y.; Jones, D.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-04-01

    By using planetary radio astronomy (PRA), plasma wave system (PWS), and magnetometer (MAG) data from Voyager 1 and 2 (V1 and V2), essential features of the nightside Jovian plasma sheet are derived, and the density gradient of the corotating plasma structure in the middle Jovian magnetosphere is calculated. The PRA experiment gives information about the plasma wave polarization. The density profile of the plasma sheet is determined using the hinge point position of the plasma disk derived from MAG data, and the low-frequency cutoffs observed at three frequencies (562 Hz, 1 kHz, and 1.78 kHz) from the PWS experiment. It is shown that the hinge point position varies with the solar wind ram pressure.

  9. Study of the stability of Z-pinch implosions with different initial density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Batrakov, A. V.; Baksht, R. B.

    2014-05-15

    Stability of metal-puff Z pinches was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out on a facility producing a load current up to 450 kA with a rise time of 450 ns. In a metal-puff Z pinch, the plasma shell is produced due to evaporation of the electrode material during the operation of a vacuum arc. In the experiment to be reported, a single-shell and a shell-on-jet pinch load with magnesium electrodes were used. Two-dimensional, 3 ns gated, visible-light images were taken at different times during the implosion. When the shell was formed from a collimated plasma flow with small radial divergence, Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability typical of gas-puff implosions was recorded. The RT instability was completely suppressed in a mode where the initial density distribution of the shell approached a tailored density profile [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996)].

  10. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-01

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well. PMID:26342360

  11. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  12. Equatorial F-region electron densities over a solar cycle: Comparisons between observations and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, Amanda P.

    Incoherent scatter radar observations at Jicamarca, Peru, from 1964 to the present, are used to study the seasonal and solar cycle variations in the daily equatorial ionospheric plasma density profiles for select hours. The peak density, peak layer heights, and layer thickness are dependent on solar activity which is determined by F10.7 cm flux. There are large variations in the daily plasma density profiles for each season and solar flux. The peak plasma densities are largest for December solstice (southern hemisphere summer), and smallest for June solstice (southern hemisphere winter). The changes in the peak height, bottomside density, and topside density are dependent on seasonal and on temporal variations in the equatorial F-region vertical plasma drifts at Jicamarca. Geomagnetic disturbance affects primarily the topside F-region density layer. The average quiet-time seasonal profiles were compared with the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), the Fully Analytic Ionospheric Model (FAIM), and the Parameterized Real-time Ionospheric Specification Model (PRISM) for similar time, season, and solar activity. The IRI is particularly good at representing the peak density for all seasons and all levels of solar activity; however, the model does not reproduce well the observed variations of the peak heights and layer thickness with season and solar flux. FAIM gives a good estimate of the peak density during winter and equinox, and a rate of increase in peak layer height with flux comparable to the data for all seasons. The FAIM layer thickness fits to the data are better than those of the IRI. However, they do not reproduce the data for high solar activity. PRISM gives a good fit to the data for all parameters except day and evening topside profiles. The layer thickness calculated from this model also gives the best representation of the experiment results.

  13. Plasma Shape and Current Density Profile Control in Advanced Tokamak Operating Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenyu

    The need for new sources of energy is expected to become a critical problem within the next few decades. Nuclear fusion has sufficient energy density to potentially supply the world population with its increasing energy demands. The tokamak is a magnetic confinement device used to achieve controlled fusion reactions. Experimental fusion technology has now reached a level where tokamaks are able to produce about as much energy as is expended in heating the fusion fuel. The next step towards the realization of a nuclear fusion tokamak power plant is ITER, which will be capable of exploring advanced tokamak (AT) modes, characterized by a high fusion gain and plasma stability. The extreme requirements of the advanced modes motivates researchers to improve the modeling of the plasma response as well as the design of feedback controllers. This dissertation focuses on several magnetic and kinetic control problems, including the plasma current, position and shape control, and data-driven and first-principles-driven modeling and control of plasma current density profile and the normalized plasma pressure ratio betaN. The plasma is confined within the vacuum vessel by an external electromagnetic field, produced primarily by toroidal and poloidal field coils. The outermost closed plasma surface or plasma boundary is referred to as the shape of the plasma. A central characteristic of AT plasma regimes is an extreme elongated shape. The equilibrium among the electromagnetic forces acting on an elongated plasma is unstable. Moreover, the tokamak performance is improved if the plasma is located in close proximity to the torus wall, which guarantees an efficient use of available volume. As a consequence, feedback control of the plasma position and shape is necessary. In this dissertation, an Hinfinity-based, multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) controller for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is developed, which is used to control the plasma position, shape, and X

  14. Pressure Support in Galaxy Disks: Impact on Rotation Curves and Dark Matter Density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne M.

    2010-09-01

    Rotation curves constrain a galaxy's underlying mass density profile, under the assumption that the observed rotation produces a centripetal force that exactly balances the inward force of gravity. However, most rotation curves are measured using emission lines from gas, which can experience additional forces due to pressure. In realistic galaxy disks, the gas pressure declines with radius, providing additional radial support to the disk. The measured tangential rotation speed will therefore tend to lag the true circular velocity of a test particle. The gas pressure is dominated by turbulence, and we evaluate its likely amplitude from recent estimates of the gas velocity dispersion and surface density. We show that where the amplitude of the rotation curve is comparable to the characteristic velocities of the interstellar turbulence, pressure support may lead to underestimates of the mass density of the underlying dark matter halo and the inner slope of its density profile. These effects may be significant for galaxies with rotation speeds lsim75 km s-1 but are unlikely to be significant in higher-mass galaxies. We find that pressure support can be sustained over long timescales, because any reduction in support due to the conversion of gas into stars is compensated for by an inward flow of gas. However, we point to many uncertainties in assessing the importance of pressure support in real or simulated galaxies. Thus, while pressure support may help to alleviate possible tensions between rotation curve observations and ΛCDM on kiloparsec scales, it should not be viewed as a definitive solution at this time.

  15. PRESSURE SUPPORT IN GALAXY DISKS: IMPACT ON ROTATION CURVES AND DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Stilp, Adrienne M. E-mail: adrienne@astro.washington.ed

    2010-09-20

    Rotation curves constrain a galaxy's underlying mass density profile, under the assumption that the observed rotation produces a centripetal force that exactly balances the inward force of gravity. However, most rotation curves are measured using emission lines from gas, which can experience additional forces due to pressure. In realistic galaxy disks, the gas pressure declines with radius, providing additional radial support to the disk. The measured tangential rotation speed will therefore tend to lag the true circular velocity of a test particle. The gas pressure is dominated by turbulence, and we evaluate its likely amplitude from recent estimates of the gas velocity dispersion and surface density. We show that where the amplitude of the rotation curve is comparable to the characteristic velocities of the interstellar turbulence, pressure support may lead to underestimates of the mass density of the underlying dark matter halo and the inner slope of its density profile. These effects may be significant for galaxies with rotation speeds {approx}<75 km s{sup -1} but are unlikely to be significant in higher-mass galaxies. We find that pressure support can be sustained over long timescales, because any reduction in support due to the conversion of gas into stars is compensated for by an inward flow of gas. However, we point to many uncertainties in assessing the importance of pressure support in real or simulated galaxies. Thus, while pressure support may help to alleviate possible tensions between rotation curve observations and {Lambda}CDM on kiloparsec scales, it should not be viewed as a definitive solution at this time.

  16. A LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars: average profiles, dispersion measures, flux densities, and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Keane, E. F.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Malofeev, V. M.; Sobey, C.; Breton, R. P.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Karastergiou, A.; Michilli, D.; Osłowski, S.; Sanidas, S.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Zarka, P.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Serylak, M.; Bell, M. E.; Broderick, J. W.; Eislöffel, J.; Markoff, S.; Rowlinson, A.

    2016-06-01

    We present first results from a LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars. The census includes almost all such pulsars known (194 sources) at declinations Dec > 8° and Galactic latitudes |Gb| > 3°, regardless of their expected flux densities and scattering times. Each pulsar was observed for ≥20 min in the contiguous frequency range of 110-188 MHz. Full-Stokes data were recorded. We present the dispersion measures, flux densities, and calibrated total intensity profiles for the 158 pulsars detected in the sample. The median uncertainty in census dispersion measures (1.5 × 10-3 pc cm-3) is ten times smaller, on average, than in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. We combined census flux densities with those in the literature and fitted the resulting broadband spectra with single or broken power-law functions. For 48 census pulsars such fits are being published for the first time. Typically, thechoice between single and broken power-laws, as well as the location of the spectral break, were highly influenced by the spectral coverage of the available flux density measurements. In particular, the inclusion of measurements below 100 MHz appears essential for investigating the low-frequency turnover in the spectra for most of the census pulsars. For several pulsars, we compared the spectral indices from different works and found the typical spread of values to be within 0.5-1.5, suggesting a prevailing underestimation of spectral index errors in the literature. The census observations yielded some unexpected individual source results, as we describe in the paper. Lastly, we will provide this unique sample of wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles via the European Pulsar Network Database. Tables B.1-B.4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A134

  17. A new Langmuir probe concept for rapid sampling of space plasma electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, K. S.; Pedersen, A.; Moen, J. I.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we describe a new Langmuir probe concept that was invented for the in situ investigation of HF radar backscatter irregularities, with the capability to measure absolute electron density at a resolution sufficient to resolve the finest conceivable structure in an ionospheric plasma. The instrument consists of two or more fixed-bias cylindrical Langmuir probes whose radius is small compared to the Debye length. With this configuration, it is possible to acquire absolute electron density measurements independent of electron temperature and rocket/satellite potential. The system was flown on the ICI-2 sounding rocket to investigate the plasma irregularities which cause HF backscatter. It had a sampling rate of more than 5 kHz and successfully measured structures down to the scale of one electron gyro radius. The system can easily be adapted for any ionospheric rocket or satellite, and provides high-quality measurements of electron density at any desired resolution.

  18. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Zhao, S. F.; Yuan, G. P.

    2015-04-01

    Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than -0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere), which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne-Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple parameters helps to

  19. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Hubertus J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractional occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Finally, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.

  20. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hubertus J. J. van Dam

    2016-05-23

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractionalmore » occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Lastly, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.« less

  1. Puzzling outer-density profile of the dark matter halo in the Andromeda galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirihara, Takanobu; Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao

    2014-12-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology, which is the standard theory of the structure formation in the universe, predicts that the outer density profile of dark matter halos decreases with the cube of distance from the center. However, so far not much effort has been expended in examining this hypothesis. In the halo of the Andromeda galaxy (M 31), large-scale stellar structures detected by the recent observations provide a potentially suitable window to investigate the mass-density distribution of the dark matter halo. We explore the density structure of the dark matter halo in M 31 using an N-body simulation of the interaction between an accreting satellite galaxy and M 31. To reproduce the Andromeda Giant Southern Stream and the stellar shells at the east and west sides of M 31, we find the sufficient condition for the power-law index α of the outer density distribution of the dark matter halo. The best-fitting parameter is α = -3.7, which is steeper than the CDM prediction.

  2. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  3. Automated Determination of Electron Density from Electric Field Measurements on the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, I. S.; Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present an algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurement made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. It accomplishes this by using feedforward neural networks to automatically infer the upper hybrid resonance frequency, 𝑓𝑢h𝑟, from plasma wave measurement, which is then used to determine the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detection (Kurth et al. [JGR, 2014]). We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm, as well as the resulting electron number density distribution. Resulting densities are compared with the densities obtained by Kurth et al. [JGR, 2014] and also to the empirical plasmasphere and trough density model of Sheeley et al. [JGR, 2001]. The analysis of the conditions, under which densities obtained by the proposed method differ significantly from the model of Sheeley et al. [JGR, 2001], is presented. Finally, we discuss the dependence of the electron number density on magnetic activity (Kp) and magnetic local time.

  4. Path integrals for electronic densities, reactivity indices, and localization functions in quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V

    2009-11-10

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr's quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions - all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems.

  5. Path Integrals for Electronic Densities, Reactivity Indices, and Localization Functions in Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2009-01-01

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr’s quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions – all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems. PMID:20087467

  6. Insight into the Binding Mode of Agonists of the Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor from Calculated Electron Densities

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michael E; Gutbrod, Oliver; Matthiesen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are among the most prominent and most economically important insecticide targets. Thus, an understanding of the modes of binding of respective agonists is important for the design of specific compounds with favorable vertebrate profiles. In the case of nAChRs, the lack of available high-resolution X-ray structures leaves theoretical considerations as the only viable option. Starting from classical homology and docking approaches, binding mode hypotheses are created for five agonists of the nAChR, covering insecticides in the main group 4 of the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (IRAC) mode of action (MoA) classification, namely, neonicotinoids, nicotine, sulfoxaflor, and butenolides. To better understand these binding modes, the topologies of calculated electron densities of small-model systems are analyzed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The theoretically obtained modes of binding are very much in line with the biology-driven IRAC MoA classification of the investigated ligands. PMID:26175091

  7. Tomographic Reconstruction of Electron Density from Visible Light Emission Diagnostics on a Translated FRC Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votroubek, George R.; Slough, John; Crawford, Edward

    1999-11-01

    Visible light emission detector arrays have been set up on the TCS and STX experiments at RPPL. Light collected by the system is filtered through a pair of Kodak\\copyright Wratten^TM gel filters in order to look at time resolved Bremsstrahlung radiation emitted at wavelengths between 500-600 nm and attenuate line emission from D_α and D_β. The emission data ( ~ int n^2\\:dl) will be correlated with a 10.6 μm CO2 interferometer ( ~ int n\\:dl) to relate the emission to calibrated units of electron density. The array of chordal information is then processed through a method of tomographic inversion in order to get radial profile information of the translated FRC, and will eventually be used to examine RMF sustained FRCs. This data can then be compared to MOQUI , a full 2D MHD code, results. Experimental setup, hardware, and data will be presented. Supported by USDOE. www.aa.washington.edu/AERP/RPPL.

  8. A new method for determining the plasma electron density using optical frequency comb interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki Tojo, Hiroshi; Sasao, Hajime; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-15

    A new method of plasma electron density measurement using interferometric phases (fractional fringes) of an optical frequency comb interferometer is proposed. Using the characteristics of the optical frequency comb laser, high density measurement can be achieved without fringe counting errors. Simulations show that the short wavelength and wide wavelength range of the laser source and low noise in interferometric phases measurements are effective to reduce ambiguity of measured density.

  9. Thermodiffusion of high-density electron-hole plasmas in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, G.; Maier, G.; Forchel, A.; Laurich, B.; Sanwald, H.; Schmid, W.

    1981-12-21

    The spatial distributions of temperature and density in electron-hole plasmas in surface-excited semiconductors are investigated with use of linear irreversible thermodynamics and a microscopic plasma theory. Above a certain threshold the density distribution is dominated by a characteristic density, which increases with temperature. Experimental results for Ge, unstressed Si, and Si under high uniaxial stress are in agreement with the theory.

  10. Numerical studies of electron acceleration behind self-modulating proton beam in plasma with a density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, A.; Lotov, K.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-09-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1015cm-3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project-the proof-of-principle experiment on proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CERN.

  11. Electron density measurements in a pulse-repetitive microwave discharge in air

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, M.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.; Herring, G. C.; Exton, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a technique for absolute measurements of electron density in pulse-repetitive microwave discharges in air. The technique is based on the time-resolved absolute intensity of a nitrogen spectral band belonging to the Second Positive System, the kinetic model and the detailed particle balance of the N{sub 2}C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu} = 0) state. This new approach bridges the gap between two existing electron density measurement methods (Langmuir probe and Stark broadening). The electron density is obtained from the time-dependent rate equation for the population of N{sub 2}C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu} = 0) using recorded waveforms of the absolute C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{yields}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} (0-0) band intensity, the forward and reflected microwave power density. Measured electron density waveforms using numerical and approximated analytical methods are presented for the case of pulse repetitive planar surface microwave discharge at the aperture of a horn antenna covered with alumina ceramic plate. The discharge was generated in air at 11.8 Torr with a X-band microwave generator using 3.5 {mu}s microwave pulses at peak power of 210 kW. In this case, we were able to time resolve the electron density within a single 3.5 {mu}s pulse. We obtained (9.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the peak and (5.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the pulse-average electron density. The technique presents a convenient, non-intrusive diagnostic method for local, time-defined measurements of electron density in short duration discharges near atmospheric pressures.

  12. X-ray reflectivity theory for determining the density profile of a liquid under nanometre confinement.

    PubMed

    Perret, Edith; Nygård, Kim; Satapathy, Dillip K; Balmer, Tobias E; Bunk, Oliver; Heuberger, Manfred; van der Veen, J Friso

    2010-07-01

    An X-ray reflectivity theory on the determination of the density profile of a molecular liquid under nanometre confinement is presented. The confinement geometry acts like an X-ray interferometer, which consists of two opposing atomically flat single-crystal mica membranes with an intervening thin liquid film of variable thickness. The X-rays reflected from the parallel crystal planes (of known structure) and the layered liquid in between them (of unknown structure) interfere with one another, making X-ray reflectivity highly sensitive to the liquid's density profile along the confinement direction. An expression for the reflected intensity as a function of momentum transfer is given. The total structure factor intensity for the liquid-filled confinement device is derived as a sum of contributions from the inner and outer crystal terminations. The method presented readily distinguishes the confined liquid from the liquid adsorbed on the outer mica surfaces. It is illustrated for the molecular liquid tetrakis(trimethyl)siloxysilane, confined by two mica surfaces at a distance of 8.6 nm.

  13. First density profile measurements using frequency modulation of the continuous wave reflectometry on JET.

    PubMed

    Meneses, L; Cupido, L; Sirinelli, A; Manso, M E

    2008-10-01

    We present the main design options and implementation of an X-mode reflectometer developed and successfully installed at JET using an innovative approach. It aims to prove the viability of measuring density profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution using broadband reflectometry operating in long and complex transmission lines. It probes the plasma with magnetic fields between 2.4 and 3.0 T using the V band [approximately (0-1.4)x10(19) m(-3)]. The first experimental results show the high sensitivity of the diagnostic when measuring changes in the plasma density profile occurring ITER relevant regimes, such as ELMy H-modes. The successful demonstration of this concept motivated the upgrade of the JET frequency modulation of the continuous wave (FMCW) reflectometry diagnostic, to probe both the edge and core. This new system is essential to prove the viability of using the FMCW reflectometry technique to probe the plasma in next step devices, such as ITER, since they share the same waveguide complexity. PMID:19068528

  14. Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profiling.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Mattsson, Cecilia; Andersson, Eni; Hellström, Cecilia; Uhlen, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Ayoglu, Burcu; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-25

    High-density protein microarrays of recombinant human protein fragments, representing 12,412 unique Ensembl Gene IDs, have here been produced and explored. These protein microarrays were used to analyse antibody off-target interactions, as well as for profiling the human autoantibody repertoire in plasma against the antigens represented by the protein fragments. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies produced within the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) were analysed on microarrays of three different sizes, ranging from 384 antigens to 21,120 antigens, for evaluation of the antibody validation criteria in the HPA. Plasma samples from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients were also screened in order to explore the feasibility of these arrays for broad-scale profiling of autoantibody reactivity. Furthermore, analysis on these near proteome-wide microarrays was complemented with analysis on HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarrays. The HPA recombinant protein microarray with 21,120 antigens and the HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarray are currently the largest protein microarray platforms available to date. The results on these arrays show that the Human Protein Atlas antibodies have few off-target interactions if the antibody validation criteria are kept stringent and demonstrate that the HPA-produced high-density recombinant protein fragment microarrays allow for a high-throughput analysis of plasma for identification of possible autoantibody targets in the context of various autoimmune conditions. PMID:26417875

  15. Generation of High-Density Electrons Based on Plasma Grating Induced Bragg Diffraction in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Liping; Li Wenxue; Wang Yongdong; Lu Xin; Ding Liang'en; Zeng Heping

    2011-08-26

    Efficient nonlinear Bragg diffraction was observed as an intense infrared femtosecond pulse was focused on a plasma grating induced by interference between two ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulses in air. The preformed electrons inside the plasma grating were accelerated by subsequent intense infrared laser pulses, inducing further collisional ionization and significantly enhancing the local electron density.

  16. Peculiarities in velocity dispersion and surface density profiles of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küpper, Andreas H. W.; Kroupa, Pavel; Baumgardt, Holger; Heggie, Douglas C.

    2010-10-01

    Based on our recent work on tidal tails of star clusters we investigate star clusters of a few 104Msolar by means of velocity dispersion profiles and surface density profiles. We use a comprehensive set of N-body computations of star clusters on various orbits within a realistic tidal field to study the evolution of these profiles with time, and ongoing cluster dissolution. From the velocity dispersion profiles we find that the population of potential escapers, i.e. energetically unbound stars inside the Jacobi radius, dominates clusters at radii above about 50 per cent of the Jacobi radius. Beyond 70 per cent of the Jacobi radius nearly all stars are energetically unbound. The velocity dispersion therefore significantly deviates from the predictions of simple equilibrium models in this regime. We furthermore argue that for this reason this part of a cluster cannot be used to detect a dark matter halo or deviations from the Newtonian gravity. By fitting templates to about 104 computed surface density profiles we estimate the accuracy which can be achieved in reconstructing the Jacobi radius of a cluster in this way. We find that the template of King works well for extended clusters on nearly circular orbits, but shows significant flaws in the case of eccentric cluster orbits. This we fix by extending this template with three more free parameters. Our template can reconstruct the tidal radius over all fitted ranges with an accuracy of about 10 per cent, and is especially useful in the case of cluster data with a wide radial coverage and for clusters showing significant extra-tidal stellar populations. No other template that we have tried can yield comparable results over this range of cluster conditions. All templates fail to reconstruct tidal parameters of concentrated clusters, however. Moreover, we find that the bulk of a cluster adjusts to the mean tidal field which it experiences and not to the tidal field at perigalacticon as has often been assumed in other

  17. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10-6) and 282 without density

  18. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10(-4)), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10(-6)) and 282 without density

  19. Density matrix description of laser-induced hot electron mediated photodesorption of NO from Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfrank, Peter; Baer, Roi; Kosloff, Ronnie

    1994-12-01

    Based on the numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation for dissipative systems, the photodesorption dynamics of NO/Pt(111) are studied. Dissipative terms are used to describe the quenching of electronically excited states on the metal, electronic dephasing and the indirect (hot-electron mediated) excitation processes in the DIMET and DIET limits. Norm and energy flow, desorption probabilities and density time-of-flight spectra are computed.

  20. Dispersion relations of electron density fluctuations in a Hall thruster plasma, observed by collective light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsikata, S.; Pisarev, V.; Gresillon, D. M.; Lemoine, N.

    2009-03-15

    Kinetic models and numerical simulations of E-vectorxB-vector plasma discharges predict microfluctuations at the scales of the electron cyclotron drift radius and the ion plasma frequency. With the help of a specially designed collective scattering device, the first experimental observations of small-scale electron density fluctuations inside the plasma volume are obtained, and observed in the expected ranges of spatial and time scales. The anisotropy, dispersion relations, form factor, amplitude, and spatial distribution of these electron density fluctuations are described and compared to theoretical expectations.