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Sample records for electron donating protective

  1. Evaluation of Electron Donation as a Mechanism for the Stabilisation of Chalcogenate-Protected Gold Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Segala, Maximiliano; Schneider, Felipe S S; Caramori, Giovanni F; Parreira, Renato L T

    2016-10-05

    Models based on Au(111) face have been extensively used to describe self-assembled monolayers, as well nanoparticles and nanoclusters. However, for very small clusters (<2 nm), the chemisorption of ligands leads to surface reconstruction, making necessary the use of a more reliable model that is able to simulate the main electronic and geometrical features of these small systems. In this work, a simple model to describe the geometries and the metal-ligand bonding in chalcogenate-protected gold nanoclusters is proposed. Three different models with Aun(+) and [XCH3 ](-) (n=10, 15, 19, 22 and X=S, Se, Te) are used in this work. The obtained structures are in close agreement not only with the available crystallographic data, but also with much more expensive computational procedures, confirming that the proposed models are robust enough to describe the metal-ligand bonding. The results reveal that the Au-X distances are dependent on both the nature of the chalcogen and the coordination mode. The shortest Au-X distances are observed in the face-centred cubic mode, indicating that the central gold atom seems to play a role in determining the adsorption strength. The proposed models show unambiguously chalcogen→cluster σ-donation, as supported by energy decomposition analysis coupled with the natural orbitals for chemical valence and natural bond orbital analyses. In all cases, the metal-ligand interactions are characterised as being more covalent than electrostatic.

  2. The electron donating capacity of biochar is dramatically underestimated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prévoteau, Antonin; Ronsse, Frederik; Cid, Inés; Boeckx, Pascal; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-09-01

    Biochars have gathered considerable interest for agronomic and engineering applications. In addition to their high sorption ability, biochars have been shown to accept or donate considerable amounts of electrons to/from their environment via abiotic or microbial processes. Here, we measured the electron accepting (EAC) and electron donating (EDC) capacities of wood-based biochars pyrolyzed at three different highest treatment temperatures (HTTs: 400, 500, 600 °C) via hydrodynamic electrochemical techniques using a rotating disc electrode. EACs and EDCs varied with HTT in accordance with a previous report with a maximal EAC at 500 °C (0.4 mmol(e‑).gchar‑1) and a large decrease of EDC with HTT. However, while we monitored similar EAC values than in the preceding study, we show that the EDCs have been underestimated by at least 1 order of magnitude, up to 7 mmol(e‑).gchar‑1 for a HTT of 400 °C. We attribute this existing underestimation to unnoticed slow kinetics of electron transfer from biochars to the dissolved redox mediators used in the monitoring. The EDC of other soil organic constituents such as humic substances may also have been underestimated. These results imply that the redox properties of biochars may have a much bigger impact on soil biogeochemical processes than previously conjectured.

  3. The electron donating capacity of biochar is dramatically underestimated

    PubMed Central

    Prévoteau, Antonin; Ronsse, Frederik; Cid, Inés; Boeckx, Pascal; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-01-01

    Biochars have gathered considerable interest for agronomic and engineering applications. In addition to their high sorption ability, biochars have been shown to accept or donate considerable amounts of electrons to/from their environment via abiotic or microbial processes. Here, we measured the electron accepting (EAC) and electron donating (EDC) capacities of wood-based biochars pyrolyzed at three different highest treatment temperatures (HTTs: 400, 500, 600 °C) via hydrodynamic electrochemical techniques using a rotating disc electrode. EACs and EDCs varied with HTT in accordance with a previous report with a maximal EAC at 500 °C (0.4 mmol(e−).gchar−1) and a large decrease of EDC with HTT. However, while we monitored similar EAC values than in the preceding study, we show that the EDCs have been underestimated by at least 1 order of magnitude, up to 7 mmol(e−).gchar−1 for a HTT of 400 °C. We attribute this existing underestimation to unnoticed slow kinetics of electron transfer from biochars to the dissolved redox mediators used in the monitoring. The EDC of other soil organic constituents such as humic substances may also have been underestimated. These results imply that the redox properties of biochars may have a much bigger impact on soil biogeochemical processes than previously conjectured. PMID:27628746

  4. Hybrid [5]Radialenes with Bispyrroloheteroles: New Electron-Donating Units.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-09-14

    Bispyrroloheteroles have been synthesized to address their intrinsic structural, optical, and electrochemical properties. The X-ray crystal structures and calculated natural bond orbital (NBO) bond orders unambiguously demonstrated the existence of a two pyrrole-fused five-membered ring with short exocyclic C-C double bonds and long endocyclic C-C single bonds, supporting that the bispyrroloheteroles are rare examples of structurally characterized hybrid [5]radialenes. The bispyrroloheteroles were found to act as an electron-donating unit, which would be fascinating for the rational design of new charge-transporting and donor-acceptor photovoltaic materials as well as versatile charge-transfer complexes.

  5. Simultaneous electrochemical and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of carotenoids. Effect of electron donating and accepting substituents

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, A.S.; Khaled, M.; Kispert, L.D. )

    1994-08-11

    A series of substituted phenyl-7[prime]-apocarotenoids with varying electron donating and accepting substituents was examined by cyclic voltammogram (CV) and simultaneous electrochemical electron paramagnetic resonance (SEEPR). Carotenoids substituted with electron donating groups are more easily oxidized than those with electron accepting substituents. Comproportionation constants for the dication and the neutral species were measured by SEEPR techniques and by simulation of the CVs. The [Delta]H[sub pp] of the SEEPR spectrum of the cation radicals varies from 13.2 to 15.6 G, and the g factors are 2.0027 [+-] 0.0002. These EPR parameters suggest a polyene [pi]-cation radical structure. The CVs are calculated using DigiSim, a CV simulation program, and the proposed mechanism involves three electrode reactions and two homogeneous reactions. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Conductivity Modifications of Graphene by Electron Donative Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masujima, Hiroaki; Mori, Takehiko; Hayamizu, Yuhei

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has been studied for the application of transparent electrodes in flexible electrical devices with semiconductor organics. Control of the charge carrier density in graphene is crucial to reduce the contact resistance between graphene and the active layer of organic semiconductor. Chemical doping of graphene is an approach to change the carrier density, where the adsorbed organic molecules donate or accept electrons form graphene. While various acceptor organic molecules have been demonstrated so far, investigation about donor molecules is still poor. In this work, we have investigated doping effect in graphene field-effect transistors functionalized by organic donor molecules such as dibenzotetrathiafulvalene (DBTTF), hexamethyltetrathiafulvalene (HMTTF), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN), and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). Based on conductivity measurements of graphene transistors, the former three molecules do not have any significant effect to graphene transistors. However, TMPD shows effective n-type doping. The doping effect has a correlation with the level of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of each molecule, where TMPD has the highest HOMO level.

  7. Effect of Electron Donating Groups on Polyphenol-based Antioxidant Dendrimers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon Young; Nanah, Cyprien; Held, Rich; Clark, Amanda; Huynh, Uyen; Maraskine, Marina C.; Uzarski, Rebecca L.; McCracken, John; Sharma, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported the beneficial effects of antioxidants in human diseases. Among their biological effects, a majority of antioxidants scavenge reactive radicals in the body, thereby reducing oxidative stress that is associated with the pathogenesis of many diseases. Antioxidant dendrimers are a new class of potent antioxidant compounds reported recently. In this study, six polyphenol-based antioxidant dendrimers with or without electron donating groups (methoxy group) were synthesized in order to elucidate the influence of electron donating groups (EDG) on their antioxidant activities. Syringaldehyde (2 ortho methoxy groups), vanillin (1 ortho methoxy group), and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (0 methoxy group) were derivatized with propargylamine to form building blocks for the dendrimers. All the six dendrimers contain polyether cores, which were synthesized by attaching pentaerythritol and methyl α-D-glucopyranoside to in-house prepared spacer units. To prepare generation 1 antioxidant dendrimers, microwave energy and granulated metallic copper catalyst were used to link the cores and building blocks together via alkyne-azide 1,3-cycloaddition click chemistry. These reaction conditions resulted in high yields of the target dendrimers that were free from copper contamination. Based on DPPH antioxidant assay, antioxidant dendrimers decorated with syringaldehyde and vanillin exhibited over 70- and 170-fold increase in antioxidant activity compared to syringaldehyde and vanillin, respectively. The antioxidant activity of dendrimers increased with increasing number of EDG groups. Similar results were obtained when the dendrimers were used to protect DNA and human LDL against organic carbon and nitrogen-based free radicals. In addition, the antioxidant dendrimers did not show any pro-oxidant activity on DNA in the presence of physiological amounts of copper. Although the dendrimers showed potent antioxidant activities against carbon and nitrogen free radicals

  8. A BPTTF-based self-assembled electron-donating triangle capable of C60 binding.

    PubMed

    Goeb, Sébastien; Bivaud, Sébastien; Dron, Paul Ionut; Balandier, Jean-Yves; Chas, Marcos; Sallé, Marc

    2012-03-25

    A kinetically stable self-assembled redox-active triangle is isolated. The resulting electron-donating cavity, which incorporates three BPTTF units, exhibits a remarkable binding ability for electron-deficient C(60), supported by a favorable combination of structural and electronic features.

  9. Roles of conjugated double bonds in electron-donating capacity of sorghum grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron-donating and metal ion complexation ability of tannins play key roles as antioxidants and in mold/bird resistance. In this study, rapid, sensitive, and nondestructive fluorescence excitation-emission (EEM) spectrophotometry was utilized to correlate structural attributes of sorghum tannins...

  10. Electronic Tool for Distribution and Allocation of Heart on Donation and Transplantation in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Maqueda Tenorio, S E; Meixueiro Daza, L A; Maqueda Estrada, S

    2016-03-01

    In Mexico and globally, organs and/or tissues donated from deceased people are insufficient to cover the demand for transplants. In 2014, a rate of 3.6 organ donors per million in habitants was recorded; this is reflected in the transplants performed, including heart transplantation, with a rate of 0.4 per million population. According to the legal framework of Mexico, the National Transplant Center is responsible for coordinating National Subsystem of donation and transplantation, and one of its functions is to integrate and backup information regarding donation and transplantation through the National Transplant Registry System. In July 2015, 45 people were registered in the database of patients waiting for a heart transplant, of which 34.61% were female recipients and 65.39% male. Distribution and allocation processes are a key element to provide a fair distribution for those patients waiting for that organ; thus the creation of an electronic tool is proposed, one that aims to support the decision of the donation and/or transplants coordination committee by providing the necessary elements to make this process more efficient.

  11. Environment-sensitive fluorescent probe: a benzophosphole oxide with an electron-donating substituent.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Eriko; Wang, Chenguang; Fukazawa, Aiko; Taki, Masayasu; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Sasaki, Taeko; Ueda, Minako; Sasaki, Narie; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2015-04-07

    Electron-donating aryl groups were attached to electron-accepting benzophosphole skeletons. Among several derivatives thus prepared, one benzophosphole oxide was particularly interesting, as it retained high fluorescence quantum yields even in polar and protic solvents. This phosphole-based compound exhibited a drastic color change of its fluorescence spectrum as a function of the solvent polarity, while the absorption spectra remained virtually unchanged. Capitalizing on these features, this phosphole-based compound was used to stain adipocytes, in which the polarity of subcellular compartments could then be discriminated on the basis of the color change of the fluorescence emission.

  12. Platelet Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... donating platelets, can I still donate blood? What blood types should donate platelets? Can I donate plasma at ... Community Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Types Blood Components What Happens to Donated Blood Blood ...

  13. Cycloadditions of 1,2,3-Triazines Bearing C5-Electron Donating Substituents: Robust Pyrimidine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Glinkerman, Christopher M.; Boger, Dale L.

    2015-01-01

    The examination of the cycloaddition reactions of 1,2,3-triazines 17–19, bearing electron-donating substituents at C5, are described. Despite the noncomplementary 1,2,3-triazine C5 substituents, amidines were found to undergo a powerful cycloaddition to provide 2,5-disubstituted pyrimidines in excellent yields (42–99%; EDG = SMe > OMe > NHAc). Even select ynamines and enamines were capable of cycloadditions with 17, but not 18 or 19, to provide trisubstituted pyridines in modest yields (37–40% and 33% respectively). PMID:26172042

  14. On the possibility to accelerate the thermal isomerizations of overcrowded alkene-based rotary molecular motors with electron-donating or electron-withdrawing substituents.

    PubMed

    Oruganti, Baswanth; Durbeej, Bo

    2016-09-01

    We employ computational methods to investigate the possibility of using electron-donating or electron-withdrawing substituents to reduce the free-energy barriers of the thermal isomerizations that limit the rotational frequencies achievable by synthetic overcrowded alkene-based molecular motors. Choosing as reference systems one of the fastest motors known to date and two variants thereof, we consider six new motors obtained by introducing electron-donating methoxy and dimethylamino or electron-withdrawing nitro and cyano substituents in conjugation with the central olefinic bond connecting the two (stator and rotator) motor halves. Performing density functional theory calculations, we then show that electron-donating (but not electron-withdrawing) groups at the stator are able to reduce the already small barriers of the reference motors by up to 18 kJ mol(-1). This result outlines a possible strategy for improving the rotational frequencies of motors of this kind. Furthermore, exploring the origin of the catalytic effect, it is found that electron-donating groups exert a favorable steric influence on the thermal isomerizations, which is not manifested by electron-withdrawing groups. This finding suggests a new mechanism for controlling the critical steric interactions of these motors. Graphical Abstract The introduction of electron-donating groups in one of the fastest rotary molecular motors known to date is found to reduce the free-energy barriers of the thermal steps that limit the rotational frequencies by up to 18 kJ mol(-1).

  15. Unravelling the structural-electronic impact of arylamine electron-donating antennas on the performances of efficient ruthenium sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang-Chao; Kong, Fan-Tai; Ghadari, Rahim; Li, Zhao-Qian; Guo, Fu-Ling; Liu, Xue-Peng; Huang, Yang; Yu, Ting; Hayat, Tasawar; Dai, Song-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    We report a systematic research to understand the structural-electronic impact of the arylamine electron-donating antennas on the performances of the ruthenium complexes for dye-sensitized solar cells. Three ruthenium complexes functionalized with different arylamine electron-donating antennas (N,N-diethyl-aniline in RC-31, julolidine in RC-32 and N,N-dibenzyl-aniline in RC-36) are designed and synthesized. The photoelectric properties of RC dyes exhibit apparent discrepancy, which are ascribed to different structural nature and electronic delocalization ability of these arylamine electron-donating system. In conjunction with TiO2 microspheres photoanode and a typical coadsorbent DPA, the devices sensitized by RC-36 achieve the best conversion efficiency of 10.23%. The UV-Vis absorption, electrochemical measurement, incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency and transient absorption spectra confirm that the excellent performance of RC-36 is induced by synergistically structural-electronic impacts from enhanced absorption capacity and well-tuned electronic characteristics. These observations provide valuable insights into the molecular engineering methodology based on fine tuning structural-electronic impact of electron-donating antenna in efficient ruthenium sensitizers.

  16. Electron donation to the flavoprotein NifL, a redox-sensing transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Macheroux, P; Hill, S; Austin, S; Eydmann, T; Jones, T; Kim, S O; Poole, R; Dixon, R

    1998-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in response to oxygen in Azotobacter vinelandii is mediated by nitrogen fixation regulatory protein L (NifL), a regulatory flavoprotein that modulates the activity of the transcriptional activator nitrogen fixation regulatory protein A (NifA). CD spectra of purified NifL indicate that FAD is bound to NifL in an asymmetric environment and the protein is predominantly alpha-helical. The redox potential of NifL is -226 mV at pH 8 as determined by the enzymic reduction of NifL by xanthine oxidase/xanthine in the presence of appropriate mediators. The reduction of NifL by xanthine oxidase prevented NifL from acting as an inhibitor of NifA. In the absence of electron mediators NifL could also be reduced by Escherichia coli flavohaemoprotein (Hmp) with NADH as reductant. Hmp contains a globin-like domain with haem B as prosthetic group and an FAD-containing oxidoreductase module. The carboxyferrohaem form of Hmp was competent to reduce NifL, suggesting that electron donation to NifL originates from the flavin in Hmp rather than by direct electron transfer from the haem. Spinach ferredoxin:NAD(P) oxidoreductase, which adopts a folding similar to the FAD- and NAD-binding domains of Hmp, also reduced NifL with NADH as reductant. Re-oxidation of NifL occurs rapidly in the presence of air, raising the possibility that NifL might sense intracellular oxygen. We propose a physiological redox cycle in which the oxidation of NifL by oxygen and hence the activation of its inhibitory properties occurs rapidly, in contrast with the switch from the active to the reduced form of NifL, which occurs more slowly. PMID:9601070

  17. Tuning Hole and Electron Transfer from Photo-excited CdSe Quantum Dot to Phenol Derivatives: Effect of Electron Donating and Withdrawing Moiety.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Hirendra Nath; Debnath, Tushar; Sebastian, Deepa; Maiti, Sourav

    2017-03-27

    Charge transfer processes from photo-excited CdSe QDs to phenol derivatives with electron donating (4-methoxy) and electron withdrawing (4-nitro) moiety have been demonstrated by using steady state and time-resolved emission and femto-second transient absorption spectroscopy. Steady state and time-resolved emission studies suggest that in presence of both 4-nitro phenol (4NP) and 4-methoxy phenol (4MP) CdSe QDs luminescence gets quenched. Stern-Volmer analysis suggests both static and dynamic mechanisms are active for both the QD/phenol composites. Cyclic volatmetric analysis recommends that photo-excited CdSe QDs can donate electron to 4NP and hole to 4MP. To reconfirm both electron and hole transfer mechanism CdSe/CdS quasi type-II and CdSe/CdTe type-II core-shell NC were synthesized and the photoluminescence quenching were monitored in absence and in presence of both 4NP and 4MP where systematically hole and electron transfer were restricted. Our studies suggest that indeed electron and hole transfer take place from photo-excited CdSe to 4NP and 4MP respectively. To monitor the charge transfer dynamics in both the systems in early time scale, we have employed femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopic techniques. Both electron and hole transfer and charge recombination dynamics have been discussed and effect of electron donating and withdrawing group has been demonstrated.

  18. Organ Donation

    MedlinePlus

    Organ donation takes healthy organs and tissues from one person for transplantation into another. Experts say that the ... lungs Skin Bone and bone marrow Cornea Most organ and tissue donations occur after the donor has died. But some ...

  19. A biphenyl containing two electron-donating and two electron-accepting moieties: a rigid and small donor-acceptor-donor ladder system.

    PubMed

    Greulich, Tobias W; Suzuki, Naoya; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Fukazawa, Aiko; Yamaguchi, Eriko; Studer, Armido; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro

    2016-02-07

    Ladder π-conjugated materials and also push-pull systems belong to important classes of compounds for the development of organic electronic devices. In this communication, a novel π-conjugated material that unifies the properties of both of these classes is presented. The material comprises a rigid biphenyl framework, which bears two bridging electron-accepting phosphine oxide moieties as well as two electron-donating amino groups. The structure and photophysical properties of this compound are discussed and compared with those of a related system lacking the second P-moiety.

  20. [Body donation versus organ donation].

    PubMed

    Reis, Ria

    2010-01-01

    There appears to be a discrepancy between the oversupply of donated bodies 'for science' in anatomical institutions in the Netherlands and the shortage of donated organs. However, organ donation is not as straightforward as it seems, mainly because of its strict conditions, e.g. with respect to age and the required hospital setting of the dying. Since Dutch body donors are mainly elderly men, their attitudes to their body, death and science should be explored from a generational perspective.

  1. The Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction of Substituted Hemifullerenes with 1,3-Butadiene: Effect of Electron-Donating and Electron-Withdrawing Substituents.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Martha; Méndez, Francisco; Alonso, Julio A

    2016-02-12

    The Diels-Alder (DA) reaction provides an attractive route to increase the number of six member rings in substituted Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). The density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method has been used in this work to inquire if the substitution of H over the edge of triindenetriphenylene (pristine hemifullerene 1) and pentacyclopentacorannulene (pristine hemifullerene 2), could improve the DA cycloaddition reaction with 1,3-butadiene. The substituents tested include electron-donating (NH₂, OMe, OH, Me, i-Pr) and electron-withdrawing groups (F, COOH, CF₃, CHO, CN, NO₂). The electronic, kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the DA reactions of the substituted hemifullerenes with 1,3-butadiene have been analyzed. The most promising results were obtained for the NO₂ substituent; the activation energy barriers for reactions using this substituent were lower than the barriers for the pristine hemifullerenes. This leads us to expect that the cycloadditions to a starting fullerene fragment will be possible.

  2. [A quantum chemical study of pi-back-donation bond and Raman intensity of 1 sigma + electronic state of Pt-CO molecule].

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Xu, X; Ren, B; Cao, Z; Shi, P; Tian, Z

    2000-12-01

    The Raman spectroscopic properties of Pt-CO molecule have been investigated based on the electronic state 1 sigma + determined by the HF and B3LYP methods. The result shows that the calculated stretching vibrational frequencies of the Pt-C and C-O bonds depend on the method and the basis sets used. It indicates that it is important to adopt an appropriate method to describe pi-donation and pi-back-donation bond. The result of the differential Raman scattering cross section for the stretching vibrations of the Pt-C and C-O bond shows that the latter is significantly larger value compared to the former.

  3. Donating Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood transfusion. Blood donors — especially donors with certain blood types — are always in demand. Who Can Donate Blood? ... Natural Disasters: How to Help Blood Blood Transfusions Blood Types Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  4. Photophysical properties of a series of electron-donating and -withdrawing platinum acetylide two-photon chromophores.

    PubMed

    Haley, Joy E; Krein, Douglas M; Monahan, Jennifer L; Burke, Aaron R; McLean, Daniel G; Slagle, Jonathan E; Fratini, Albert; Cooper, Thomas M

    2011-01-27

    To explore spectroscopic structure-property relationships in platinum acetylides, we synthesized a series of complexes having the molecular formula trans-bis(tributylphosphine)-bis(4-((9,9-diethyl-7-ethynyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)ethynyl)-R)-platinum. The substituent, R = NH(2), OCH(3), N(phenyl)(2), t-butyl, CH(3), H, F, benzothiazole, CF(3), CN, and NO(2), was chosen for a systematic variation in electron-donating and -withdrawing properties as described by the Hammett parameter σ(p). UV/vis, fluorescence, and phosphorescence spectra, transient absorption spectra on the fs-ps time scale, and longer time scale flash photolysis on the ns time scale were collected. DFT and TDDFT calculations of the T(1) and S(1) energies were performed. The E(S) and E(T) values measured from linear spectra correlate well with the calculated results, giving evidence for the delocalized MLCT character of the S(1) state and confinement of the T(1) exciton on one ligand. The calculated T(1) state dipole moment ranges from 0.5 to 14 D, showing the polar, charge-transfer character of the T(1) state. The ultrafast absorption spectra have broad absorption bands from 575 to 675 nm and long wavelength contribution, which is shown from flash photolysis measurements to be from the T(1) state. The T(1) energy obtained from phosphorescence, the T(1)-T(n) transition energy obtained from flash photolysis measurements, and the triplet-state radiative rate constant are functions of the calculated spin density distribution on the ligand. The calculations show that the triplet exciton of chromophores with electron-withdrawing substituents is localized away from the central platinum atom, red-shifting the spectra and increasing the triplet-state lifetime. Electron-donating substituents have the opposite effect on the location of the triplet exciton, the spectra, and the triplet-state lifetime. The relation between the intersystem crossing rate constant and the S(1)-T(1) energy gap shows a Marcus relationship

  5. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals. 1. Electrochemical quantification of electron-donating and -accepting capacities of smectites.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Aeschbacher, Michael; Soltermann, Daniela; Voegelin, Andreas; Baeyens, Bart; Marques Fernandes, Maria; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Sander, Michael

    2012-09-04

    Clay minerals often contain redox-active structural iron that participates in electron transfer reactions with environmental pollutants, bacteria, and biological nutrients. Measuring the redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals using electrochemical approaches, however, has proven to be difficult due to a lack of reactivity between clay minerals and electrodes. Here, we overcome this limitation by using one-electron-transfer mediating compounds to facilitate electron transfer between structural Fe in clay minerals and a vitreous carbon working electrode in an electrochemical cell. Using this approach, the electron-accepting and -donating capacities (Q(EAC) and Q(EDC)) were quantified at applied potentials (E(H)) of -0.60 V and +0.61 V (vs SHE), respectively, for four natural Fe-bearing smectites (i.e., SWa-1, SWy-2, NAu-1, and NAu-2) having different total Fe contents (Fe(total) = 2.3 to 21.2 wt % Fe) and varied initial Fe(2+)/Fe(total) states. For every SWa-1 and SWy-2 sample, all the structural Fe was redox-active over the tested E(H) range, demonstrating reliable quantification of Fe content and redox state. Yet for NAu-1 and NAu-2, a significant fraction of the structural Fe was redox-inactive, which was attributed to Fe-rich smectites requiring more extreme E(H)-values to achieve complete Fe reduction and/or oxidation. The Q(EAC) and Q(EDC) values provided here can be used as benchmarks in future studies examining the extent of reduction and oxidation of Fe-bearing smectites.

  6. IMIDAZOLE-BASED IONIC LIQUIDS FOR USE IN POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS: EFFECT OF ELECTRON-WITHDRAWING AND ELECTRON-DONATING SUBSTITUENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E.; Fu, Y.; Kerr, J.

    2009-01-01

    Current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) require humidifi cation for acceptable proton conductivity. Development of a novel polymer that is conductive without a water-based proton carrier is desirable for use in automobiles. Imidazole (Im) is a possible replacement for water as a proton solvent; Im can be tethered to the polymer structure by means of covalent bonds, thereby providing a solid state proton conducting membrane where the solvating groups do not leach out of the fuel cell. These covalent bonds can alter the electron availability of the Im molecule. This study investigates the effects of electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents on the conductivity of Im complexed with methanesulfonic acid (MSA) in the form of ionic liquids. Due to the changes in the electronegativity of nitrogen, it is expected that 2-phenylimidazole (2-PhIm, electron-withdrawing) will exhibit increased conductivity compared to Im, while 2-methylimidazole (2-MeIm, electron-donating) will exhibit decreased conductivity. Three sets of ionic liquids were prepared at defi ned molar ratios: Im-MSA, 2-PhIm-MSA, and 2-MeIm- MSA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and 1H-NMR were used to characterize each complex. Impedance analysis was used to determine the conductivity of each complex. Both the 2-PhIm-MSA and 2-MeIm-MSA ionic liquids were found to be less conductive than the Im-MSA complex at base-rich compositions, but more conductive at acid-rich compositions. 1H-NMR data shows a downfi eld shift of the proton on nitrogen in 2-PhIm compared to Im, suggesting that other factors may diminish the electronic effects of the electron withdrawing group at base-rich compositions. Further studies examining these effects may well result in increased conductivity for Im-based complexes. Understanding the conductive properties of Im-derivatives due to electronic effects will help facilitate the development of a new electrolyte

  7. Types of Blood Donations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Double Red Cell Plasma Platelets Red Cells What blood donation type is best for me? **If you do not ... blood type, a whole blood donation is recommended** Blood Donation Types: Volunteer Donations The standard or most common type ...

  8. Superior Light-Harvesting Heteroleptic Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Electron-Donating Antennas for High Performance Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang-Chao; Kong, Fan-Tai; Li, Zhao-Qian; Pan, Jia-Hong; Liu, Xue-Peng; Guo, Fu-Ling; Zhou, Li; Huang, Yang; Yu, Ting; Dai, Song-Yuan

    2016-08-03

    Three heteroleptic polypyridyl ruthenium complexes, RC-41, RC-42, and RC-43, with efficient electron-donating antennas in the ancillary ligands were designed, synthesized, and characterized as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cell. All the RC dye sensitizers showed remarkable light-harvesting capacity and broadened absorption range. Significantly, RC-43 obtained the lower energy metal-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) band peaked at 557 nm with a high molar extinction coefficient of 27 400 M(-1) cm(-1). In conjunction with TiO2 photoanode of submicrospheres and iodide-based electrolytes, the DSSCs sensitizing with the RC sensitizers, achieved impressively high short-circuit current density (19.04 mA cm(-2) for RC-41, 19.83 mA cm(-2) for RC-42, and 20.21 mA cm(-2) for RC-43) and power conversion efficiency (10.07% for RC-41, 10.52% for RC-42, and 10.78% for RC-43). The superior performances of RC dye sensitizers were attributed to the enhanced light-harvesting capacity and incident-photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) caused by the introduction of electron-donating antennas in the ancillary ligands. The interfacial charge recombination/regeneration kinetics and electron lifetime were further evaluated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS). These data decisively revealed the dependences on the photovoltaic performance of ruthenium sensitizers incorporating electron-donating antennas.

  9. Protic N-Heterocyclic Carbene Versus Pyrazole: Rigorous Comparison of Proton- and Electron-Donating Abilities in a Pincer-Type Framework.

    PubMed

    Toda, Tatsuro; Yoshinari, Akihiro; Ikariya, Takao; Kuwata, Shigeki

    2016-11-07

    Evaluation of the acidity of proton-responsive ligands such as protic N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) bearing an NH-wingtip provides a key to understanding the metal-ligand cooperation in enzymatic and artificial catalysis. Here, we design a CNN pincer-type ruthenium complex 2 bearing protic NHC and isoelectronic pyrazole units in a symmetrical skeleton, to compare their acidities and electron-donating abilities. The synthesis is achieved by direct C-H metalation of 2-(imidazol-1-yl)-6-(pyrazol-3-yl)pyridine with [RuCl2 (PPh3 )3 ]. (15) N-Labeling experiments confirm that deprotonation of 2 occurs first at the pyrazole side, indicating clearly that the protic pyrazole is more acidic than the NHC group. The electrochemical measurements as well as derivatization to carbonyl complexes demonstrate that the protic NHC is more electron-donating than pyrazole in both protonated and deprotonated forms.

  10. Transient Palladadiphosphanylcarbenes: Singlet Carbenes with an “Inverse” Electronic Configuration (pπ2 instead of σ2) and Unusual Transannular Metal–Carbene Interactions (πC→pd Donation and σPd→C Back-donation)

    PubMed Central

    Vignolle, Joan; Gornitzka, Heinz; Maron, Laurent; Schoeller, Wolfgang W.; Bourissou, Didier; Bertrand, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Upon treatment with [PdCl(allyl)]2, asymmetrically substituted α, α′-diphosphanyl diazo compounds eliminate dinitrogen to afford C-chlorodiphosphanylmethanide complexes in high yields. In the presence of a chloride-abstracting agent, such as sodium tetraphenylborate, the C-chlorodiphosphanylmethanide complexes react with pyridine and trimethylphosphine, readily affording the corresponding nitrogen and phosphorus ylides. The postulated intermediate in this process, namely palladadiphosphanylcarbenes, could not be spectroscopically characterized, but their transient formation was chemically supported further by a Lewis base exchange reaction between pyridine and 4-dimethylaminopyridine. This hypothesis has also been substantiated by computing the corresponding dissociation energy using two model systems featuring methyl groups at the phosphorus. Of particular interest, density functional theory calculations reveal that these palladadiphosphanylcarbenes have a singlet ground state with an “inverse” pπ2 electronic configuration and a distorted geometry associated with unusual transannular metal–carbene interactions (πC→Pd donation and σPd→C back-donation). PMID:17243835

  11. Superoxide radical-mediated photocatalytic oxidation of phenolic compounds over Ag⁺/TiO₂: Influence of electron donating and withdrawing substituents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiadong; Xie, Yongbing; Han, Qingzhen; Cao, Hongbin; Wang, Yujiao; Nawaz, Faheem; Duan, Feng

    2016-03-05

    A comparative study was constructed to correlate the electronic property of the substituents with the degradation rates of phenolic compounds and their oxidation pathways under UV with Ag(+)/TiO2 suspensions. It was verified that a weak electron withdrawing substituent benefited photocatalytic oxidation the most, while an adverse impact appeared when a substituent was present with stronger electron donating or withdrawing ability. The addition of p-benzoquinone dramatically blocked the degradation, confirming superoxide radicals (O2(-)) as the dominant photooxidant, rather than hydroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen or positive holes, which was also independent of the substituent. Hammett relationship was established based on pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics, and it revealed two disparate reaction patterns between O2(-) and phenolic compounds, which was further verified by the quantum chemical computation on the frontier molecular orbitals and Mulliken charge distributions of O2(-) and phenolic compounds. It was found that electron donating group (EDG) substituted phenols were more likely nucleophilically attacked by O2(-), while O2(-) preferred to electrophilically assault electron withdrawing group (EWG) substituted phenols. Exceptionally, electrophilic and nucleophilic attack by O2(-) could simultaneously occur in p-chlorophenol degradation, consequently leading to its highest rate constant. Possible reactive positions on the phenolic compounds were also detailedly uncovered.

  12. Parallel electron donation pathways to cytochrome c(z) in the type I homodimeric photosynthetic reaction center complex of Chlorobium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Azai, Chihiro; Kondo, Toru; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-Oka, Hirozo

    2008-09-01

    We studied the regulation mechanism of electron donations from menaquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase and cytochrome c-554 to the type I homodimeric photosynthetic reaction center complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. We measured flash-induced absorption changes of multiple cytochromes in the membranes prepared from a mutant devoid of cytochrome c-554 or in the reconstituted membranes by exogenously adding cytochrome c-555 purified from Chlorobium limicola. The results indicated that the photo-oxidized cytochrome c(z) bound to the reaction center was rereduced rapidly by cytochrome c-555 as well as by the menaquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase and that cytochrome c-555 did not function as a shuttle-like electron carrier between the menaquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase and cytochrome c(z). It was also shown that the rereduction rate of cytochrome c(z) by cytochrome c-555 was as high as that by the menaquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase. The two electron-transfer pathways linked to sulfur metabolisms seem to function independently to donate electrons to the reaction center.

  13. Minimizing risk in anonymous egg donation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, K K; Simons, E G; Nair, S; Rimington, M R; Armar, N A

    2003-11-01

    Assisted conception carries with it known and putative medical and surgical risks. Exposing healthy women to these risks in order to harvest eggs for donation when a safer alternative exists is morally and ethically unacceptable. Egg sharing minimizes risk and provides a source of eggs for donation. Anonymity protects all parties involved and should not be removed.

  14. Blood donation before surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000367.htm Blood donation before surgery To use the sharing features ... vessels. Several sources of blood are described here. Blood From the Public (Volunteer Blood Donation) The most ...

  15. Combination of UV absorbance and electron donating capacity to assess degradation of micropollutants and formation of bromate during ozonation of wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kangmin; Salhi, Elisabeth; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-09-15

    In this study, the changes in UV absorbance at 254 nm (UVA254) and electron donating capacity (EDC) were investigated as surrogate indicators for assessing removal of micropollutants and bromate formation during ozonation of wastewater effluents. To measure the EDC, a novel method based on size exclusion chromatography followed by a post-column reaction was developed and calibrated against an existing electrochemical method. Low specific ozone doses led to a more efficient abatement of EDC than of UVA254. This was attributed to the abatement of phenolic moieties in the dissolved organic matter (DOM), which lose their EDC upon oxidation, but are partially transformed into quinones, which still absorb in the measured UV range. For higher specific ozone doses, the relative EDC abatement was lower than the relative UVA abatement, which can be explained by the oxidation of UV absorbing moieties (e.g. non-activated aromatic compounds), which contribute less to EDC. The abatement of the selected micropollutants (i.e., 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), carbamazepine (CBZ), atenolol (ATE), bezafibrate (BZF), ibuprofen (IBU), and p-chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA)) varied significantly depending on their reactivity with ozone in the examined specific ozone dose range of 0-1.45 mgO3/mgDOC. The decrease of EE2 and CBZ with high ozone reactivity was linearly proportional to the reduction of the relative residuals of UVA254 and EDC. The abatement of ATE, BZF, IBU, and pCBA with intermediate to low ozone reactivities was not significant in a first phase (UVA254/UVA254,0 = 1.00-0.70; EDC/EDC0 = 1.00-0.56) while their abatement was more efficient than the degradation of the relative residual UVA254 and much more noticeable than the degradation of the relative residual EDC in a second phase (UVA254/UVA254,0 = 0.70-0.25; EDC/EDC0 = 0.56-0.25) because the partially destroyed UV absorbing and electron donating DOM moieties become recalcitrant to ozone attack. Bromate formation was

  16. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tudoran, Cristian D. Dădârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-23

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a “sensor” or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  17. Guidelines for drug donations.

    PubMed Central

    Hogerzeil, H. V.; Couper, M. R.; Gray, R.

    1997-01-01

    Drug donations are usually given in response to acute emergencies, but they can also be part of development aid. Donations may be given directly by governments, by non-governmental organisations, as corporate donations (direct or through private voluntary organisations), or as private donations to single health facilities. Although there are legitimate differences between these donations, basic rules should apply to them all. This common core of "good donation practice" is the basis for new guidelines which have recently been issued by the World Health Organisation after consultation with all relevant United Nations agencies, the Red Cross, and other major international agencies active in humanitarian emergency relief. This article summarises the need for such guidelines, the development process, the core principles, and the guidelines themselves and gives practical advice to recipients and donor agencies. PMID:9116555

  18. Balancing Good Intentions: Protecting the Privacy of Electronic Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClanahan, Kitty

    2008-01-01

    Electronic information is a vital but complex component in the modern health care system, fueling ongoing efforts to develop a universal electronic health record infrastructure. This innovation creates a substantial tension between two desirable values: the increased quality and utility of patient medical records and the protection of the privacy…

  19. Red blood cells donate electrons to methylene blue mediated chemical reduction of methemoglobin compartmentalized in liposomes in blood.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiromi; Li, Bing; Lim, Wei Lee; Iga, Yumika

    2014-07-16

    Electron-energy-rich coenzymes in cells, NADH and NADPH, are re-energized repeatedly through the Embden-Meyerhof and pentose-phosphate glycolytic pathways, respectively. This study demonstrates extraction of their electron energies in red blood cells (RBCs) for in vivo extracellular chemical reactions using an electron mediator shuttling across the biomembrane. Hemoglobin-vesicles (HbVs) are an artificial oxygen carrier encapsulating purified and concentrated Hb solution in liposomes. Because of the absence of a metHb-reducing enzymatic system in HbV, HbO2 gradually autoxidizes to form metHb. Wistar rats received HbV suspension (10 mL/kg body weight) intravenously. At the metHb level of around 50%, methylene blue [MB(+); 3,7-bis(dimethylamino)phenothiazinium chloride] was injected. The level of metHb quickly decreased to around 16% in 40 min, remaining for more than 5 h. In vitro mixing of HbV/MB(+) with RBCs recreated the in vivo metHb reduction, but not with plasma. NAD(P)H levels in RBCs decreased after metHb reduction. The addition of glucose facilitated metHb reduction. Liposome-encapsulated NAD(P)H, a model of RBC, reduced metHb in HbV in the presence of MB(+). These results indicate that (i) NAD(P)H in RBCs reacts with MB(+) to convert it to leukomethylene blue (MBH); (ii) MB(+) and MBH shuttle freely between RBC and HbV across the hydrophobic lipid membranes; and (iii) MBH is transferred into HbV and reduces metHb in HbV. Four other electron mediators with appropriate redox potentials appeared to be as effective as MB(+) was, indicating the possibility for further optimization of electron mediators. We established an indirect enzymatic metHb reducing system for HbV using unlimited endogenous electrons created in RBCs in combination with an effective electron mediator that prolongs the functional lifespan of HbV in blood circulation.

  20. Fe nanoparticle tailored poly(N-methyl pyrrole) nanowire matrix: a CHEMFET study from the perspective of discrimination among electron donating analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, K.; Ghosh, P.; Rushi, A.; Mulchandani, A.; Shirsat, M.

    2015-03-01

    Back-gated chemically sensitive field effect transistor (CHEMFET) platforms have been developed with electrochemically synthesized poly(N-methyl pyrrole) nanowires by a templateless route. The nanowire matrix has been tailored with Fe nanoparticles to probe their effect in enhancing the sensing capabilities of the nanowire platform, and further to see if the inculcation of Fe nanoparticles is helpful to enhance the screening capability of the sensor among electron donating analytes. A noticeable difference in the sensing behaviour of the CHEMFET sensor was observed when it was exposed to three different analytes—ammonia, phosphine and carbon monoxide. FET transfer characteristics were instrumental in the corroboration of the experimental validations. The observations have been rationalized considering the simultaneous modulation of the work functions of Fe and polymeric material. The real time behaviour of the sensor shows that the sensor platform is readily capable of sensing the validated analytes at a ppb level of concentration with good response and recovery behaviour. The best response could be observed for ammonia with an Fe nanoparticle tailored polymeric matrix, with a sensitivity of ~31.58% and excellent linearity (R2 = 0.985) in a concentration window of 0.05 ppm to 1 ppm.

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Structural Analysis of Divalent N(I) Compounds and Identification of a New Electron-Donating Ligand.

    PubMed

    Bharatam, Prasad V; Arfeen, Minhajul; Patel, Neha; Jain, Priyanka; Bhatia, Sonam; Chakraborti, Asit K; Khullar, Sadhika; Gupta, Vijay; Mandal, Sanjay K

    2016-01-18

    The dative-bond representation (L→E) in compounds with main group elements (E) has triggered extensive debate in the recent past. The scope and limits of this nonclassical coordination bond warrant comprehensive exploration. Particularly compounds with (L→N←L')(+) arrangement are of special interest because of their therapeutic importance. This work reports the design and synthesis of novel chemical species with the general structural formula (L→N←L')(+) carrying the unusual ligand cyclohexa-2,5-diene-4-(diaminomethynyl)-1-ylidene. Four species belonging to the (L→N←L')(+) class carrying this unconventional ligand were synthesized. Quantum chemical and X-ray diffraction analyses showed that the electronic and geometric parameters are consistent with those of already reported divalent N(I) compounds. The molecular orbital analysis, geometric parameters, and spectral data clearly support the L→N and N←L' interactions in these species. The newly identified ligand has the properties of a reactive carbene and high nucleophilicity.

  2. Electronic Health Record in Italy and Personal Data Protection.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Silvio; Bellavista, Alessandro; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Zangara, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with the Italian Electronic Health Record (hereinafter EHR), recently introduced by Act 221/2012, with a specific focus on personal data protection. Privacy issues--e.g., informed consent, data processing, patients' rights and minors' will--are discussed within the framework of recent e-Health legislation, national Data Protection Code, the related Data Protection Authority pronouncements and EU law. The paper is aimed at discussing the problems arising from a complex, fragmentary and sometimes uncertain legal framework on e-Health.

  3. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching ... one or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use. NIH: ...

  4. [Pregnancy following oocyte donation].

    PubMed

    Boks, D E; Braat, D D

    1997-08-23

    Five women, aged 31, 26, 31, 34, and 28 years, became pregnant after oocyte donation and in-vitro fertilization. One was a carrier of Leber's optical atrophy, three had had an early menopause (in two because of chromosomal abnormalities), and one had had bilateral ovarian extirpation because of a cystadenoma and endometriosis. Three developed (pre-)eclampsia during pregnancy and one had a serious fluxus post partum. One twin died in utero, the other children were healthy. In the Netherlands in-vitro fertilization (with or without egg-donation) takes place up to the age of about 40. Regarding the high incidence of obstetrical complications in women under 40, raising the age limit could lead to even more pregnancy problems. Candidates for oocyte donation should be informed about these risks, furthermore they should not deliver at home.

  5. Blood and Bone Marrow Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... weeks before you feel fully recovered. Peripheral blood stem cell donation The risks of this type of stem ... ll be released from the hospital. Peripheral blood stem cell donation If blood stem cells are going to ...

  6. Controversies in kidney paired donation.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Sommer E; Montgomery, Robert A; Segev, Dorry L

    2012-07-01

    Kidney paired donation represented 10% of living kidney donation in the United States in 2011. National registries around the world and several separate registries in the United States arrange paired donations, although with significant variations in their practices. Concerns about ethical considerations, clinical advisability, and the quantitative effectiveness of these approaches in paired donation result in these variations. For instance, although donor travel can be burdensome and might discourage paired donation, it was nearly universal until convincing analysis showed that living donor kidneys can sustain many hours of cold ischemia time without adverse consequences. Opinions also differ about whether the last donor in a chain of paired donation transplants initiated by a nondirected donor should donate immediately to someone on the deceased donor wait-list (a domino or closed chain) or should be asked to wait some length of time and donate to start another sequence of paired donations later (an open chain); some argue that asking the donor to donate later may be coercive, and others focus on balancing the probability that the waiting donor withdraws versus the number of additional transplants if the chain can be continued. Other controversies in paired donation include simultaneous versus nonsimultaneous donor operations, whether to enroll compatible pairs, and interactions with desensitization protocols. Efforts to expand public awareness of and participation in paired donation are needed to generate more transplant opportunities.

  7. Lightning protection of full authority digital electronic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crofts, David

    1991-01-01

    Modern electronic systems are vulnerable to transient and they now provide safety critical functions such as full authority digital electronic control (FADEC) units for fly by wire aircraft. Of the traditional suppression technologies available diodes have gained the wider acceptance, however, they lack the current handling capacity to meet existing threat levels. The development of high speed fold back devices where, at a specified voltage, the off state resistance switches to a very low on state one has provided the equivalent to a semiconductor spark gap. The size of the technology enables it to be integrated into connectors of interconnection cables. To illustrate the performance the technology was developed to meet the Lightning Protection requirements for FADEC units within aeroengines. Work was also carried out to study switching behavior with the waveform 5, the 500 us, 10 kA pulse applied to cable assemblies. This test enabled all the switches in a connector to be fired simultaneously.

  8. Moving closer to understanding the risks of living kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies from the United States and Norway have suggested an unexpected 8- to 11-fold relative risk of ESRD after kidney donation, but a low long-term absolute risk. Abundant renal epidemiologic data predict that these studies have underestimated long-term risk. The 1% lifetime post-donation risk in the US study requires medical screening to predict ESRD in 96 of 100 candidates. This is particularly unlikely in the 30-35% of candidates under age 35, half of whose lifetime ESRD will occur after age 64. Many experts have attributed the increased relative risks in these studies to loss of GFR at donation, which ultimately means that high-normal pre-donation GFRs will reduce absolute post-donation risks. The 8- to 11-fold relative risks predict implausible risks of uninephrectomy in the general population, but lower estimates still result in very high risks for black donors. Young vs. older age, low vs. high-normal pre-donation GFRs, black race, and an increased relative risk of donation all predict highly variable individual risks, not a single "low" or "1%" risk as these studies suggest. A uniform, ethically defensible donor selection protocol would accept older donors with many minor medical abnormalities but protect from donation many currently acceptable younger, black, and/or low GFR candidates.

  9. Debate in embryo donation: embryo donation or both-gamete donation?

    PubMed

    Samani, Reza Omani; Moalem, Mohammad Reza Rezania; Merghati, Seyed Taha; Alizadeh, Leila

    2009-01-01

    So far, more than 2 million babies have been born worldwide through assisted reproduction technologies. For many couples, there is no treatment except by involving a third party. Recently, embryo donation law has been approved by Iran's parliament and now it is legal in Iran. But there is a misunderstanding regarding the source of embryos: they can be obtained from surplus frozen embryos of infertile couples or embryos can be made from donated spermatozoa and eggs from fertile married couples. Here in this paper we discuss ethical, religious and legal aspects of these two procedures and present the advantages and disadvantages of them. Meanwhile, the new term 'both-gamete donation' was defined for the procedure that is practised here instead of 'embryo donation'. In conclusion we can say: (i) Iranian law means only embryo donation and covers only surplus embryos from other infertile couples and not both-gamete donation; (ii) as gamete donation is practised in Iran upon decrees of clergy leaders, we have no law or legislation against both-gamete donation; (iii) there are many ethical, legal and religious questions about both-gamete donation to be answered; (iv) ethical and religious questions are fewer concerning embryo donation compared with both-gamete donation; and (v) embryo sharing is a good way for donation of fresh embryos.

  10. Congested ferrocenyl polyphosphanes bearing electron-donating or electron-withdrawing phosphanyl groups: assessment of metallocene conformation from NMR spin couplings and use in palladium-catalyzed chloroarenes activation.

    PubMed

    Mom, Sophal; Beaupérin, Matthieu; Roy, David; Royer, Sylviane; Amardeil, Régine; Cattey, Hélène; Doucet, Henri; Hierso, J-C

    2011-11-21

    The synthesis of novel substituted cyclopentadienyl salts that incorporate both a congested branched alkyl group (tert-butyl, (triphenyl)methyl, or tri(4-tert-butyl)phenylmethyl) and a phosphanyl group is reported. The introduction of either electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents (furyl, i-propyl, cyclohexyl, tert-butyl) on P atoms was generally achieved in high yield. The modular synthesis of ferrocenyl polyphosphanes from an assembly of these cyclopentadienyl salts was investigated, leading to the formation of new triphosphanes (denoted as 9-12) and diphosphanes (denoted as 14-16). The resulting phosphanes are not sensitive to air or moisture, even when electron-rich substituents are present. This set of polyphosphanes displays varied conformational features, which are discussed in the light of their multinuclear NMR characterization in solution and of the X-ray solid state structure of the representative triphosphane 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphanyl)-1'-(diisopropylphosphanyl)-3'-(triphenyl)methyl-4-tert-butyl ferrocene, 11. In particular, the existence of a range of significantly different nonbonded ("through-space", TS) spin-spin coupling constants between heteroannular P atoms, for the triphosphanes of this class, allowed their preferred conformation in solution to be appraised. The study evidences an unanticipated flexibility of the ferrocene platform, despite the presence of very congested tert-butyl and trityl groups. Herein, we show that, contrary to our first belief, the preferred conformation for the backbone of ferrocenyl polyphosphanes can not only depend on the hindrance of the groups decorating the cyclopentadienyl rings but is also a function of the substituents of the phosphanyl groups. The interest of these robust phosphanes as ligands was illustrated in palladium catalysis for the arylation of n-butyl furan with chloroarenes, using direct C-H activation of the heteroaromatic in the presence of low metal/ligand loadings (0.5-1.0 mol

  11. Knowledge and ethical perception regarding organ donation among medical students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the knowledge and ethical perception regarding organ donation amongst medical students in Karachi- Pakistan. Methods Data of this cross sectional study was collected by self administered questionnaire from MBBS students of Ziauddin University from 2010 to 2011. Sample size of 158 (83 First years and 75 Fourth years) were selected by convenient sampling and those students who were present and gave consent were included in the study. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results A total of 158 participants from Ziauddin Medical University filled out the questionnaire out of which 83(52.5%) were first years and 75(47.5%) were fourth year medical students. Mean age of sample was 20 ± 1.7. Majority of students were aware about organ donation with print and electronic media as the main source of information. 81.6% agreed that it was ethically correct to donate an organ. In the students’ opinion, most commonly donated organs and tissues were kidney, cornea, blood and platelet. Ideal candidates for donating organ were parents (81%). Regarding list of options for preference to receive an organ, most of the students agreed on young age group patients and persons with family. Willingness to donate was significantly associated with knowledge of allowance of organ donation in religion (P=0.000). Conclusion Both 1st year and 4th year students are aware of Organ Donation, but there is a significant lack of knowledge regarding the topic. PMID:24070261

  12. A systematic review and meta-analysis of antecedents of blood donation behavior and intentions.

    PubMed

    Bednall, Timothy C; Bove, Liliana L; Cheetham, Ali; Murray, Andrea L

    2013-11-01

    , minimizing the risk of adverse reactions and enacting re-recruitment policies for temporarily deferred donors will help protect future donation behavior. Implications of these findings for blood collection agencies and researchers are discussed.

  13. Ethical considerations in internet use of electronic protected health information.

    PubMed

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2012-03-01

    Caregivers, patients, and their family members are increasingly reliant on social network websites for storing, communicating, and referencing medical information. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule seeks balance by protecting the privacy of patients' health information and assuring that this information is available to those who need it to provide health care. Though federal and state governments have created laws and policies to safeguard patient privacy and confidentiality, the laws are inadequate against the rapid and innovative use of electronic health websites. As Internet use broadens access to information, health professionals must be aware that this information is not always secure. We must identify and reflect on medical ethics issues and be accountable for maintaining privacy for the patient.

  14. [Donation of bodies to science].

    PubMed

    Delmas, V

    2001-01-01

    Teaching and research in anatomy is mainly based on cadaveric dissection. Unclaimed bodies is no more the origin of cadavers, but body donation programs. The dissection is an important part in the anatomical curses of medical students and for anatomical research and special courses devoted to the surgeons. A body donation center was created in Paris in 1953 with the purpose of obtaining bodies for dissection. Donation is a clear will made by people free and informed. Donation is most often by altruism, conferrins life on another. Body donation is regulated by various act or reglementar text according to each country. One of the problem with the body gift is biological hazard, specially in research and clinical courses, but the rule is to consider unembalmed material as contaminated and to use all precautions with barrier for blood and bodily fluid. Body donation is one of the modern expression of solidarity.

  15. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2015-12-07

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  16. Socioeconomic implications of donation distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yajing; Guo, Jinzhong; Chen, Qinghua; Wang, Yougui

    2011-11-01

    Individual donation depends on personal wealth and individual willingness to donate. On the basis of a donation model proposed in our previous study, a simplified version of an individual donation model is derived by relaxing the restrictions of the maximum wealth in the economy. Thus, the whole distribution is determined by only two parameters. One of them relates to the exponent of the distribution of society wealth and the other refers to the donation amount of the kindest poorest person. The parameters reflect the degree of wealth inequality and the charitable enthusiasm of society, respectively. Using actual donation data, we develop a specific parameter estimation method combining linear regression and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistic to get the value of two socioeconomic indicators. Applications to Chinese individual donations in response to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake indicate a rising inequality in social wealth distribution in China. Also, more charitable enthusiasm is observed in the response to the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

  17. 32 CFR 553.6 - Donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Donations. 553.6 Section 553.6 National Defense... NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.6 Donations. (a) Policy. Under Department of the Army policy, proffered donations... for the donation or gift. (2) Delivery is made to the cemetery or to another point designated by...

  18. Potential donor segregation to promote blood donation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Santana, Josefa D; Beerli-Palacio, Asunción

    2008-04-01

    This work is set in the field of social marketing and more specifically in the context of blood donation. Its principal objective focuses on segregating potential donors by using the inhibitors or barriers to a blood donation behaviour as criteria. Moreover, an analysis of the predisposition to donate blood, the intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for donating blood, and the incentives that may stimulate their donation conduct was conducted for each of the four identified groups. The results reveal that the four segments differ significantly in their predisposition to donate, in their motivations and in the incentives that encourage them to donate blood.

  19. Donation of 'spare' fresh or frozen embryos to research: who decides that an embryo is 'spare' and how can we enhance the quality and protect the validity of consent?

    PubMed

    Scott, Rosamund; Williams, Clare; Ehrich, Kathryn; Farsides, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses elements of the legal process of consent to the donation of 'spare' embryos to research, including stem-cell research, and makes a recommendation intended to enhance the quality of that process, including on occasion by guarding against the invalidity of such consent. This is important in its own right and also so as to maximise the reproductive treatment options of couples engaged in in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment and to avoid possible harms to them. In Part 1, with reference to qualitative data from three UK IVF clinics, we explore the often delicate and contingent nature of what comes to be, for legal purposes, a 'spare' embryo. The way in which an embryo becomes 'spare', with its implications for the process of consent to donation to research, is not addressed in the relevant reports relating to or codes of practice governing the donation of embryos to research, which assume an unproblematic notion of the 'spare' embryo. Significantly, our analysis demonstrates that there is an important and previously unrecognised first stage in the donation of a 'spare' embryo to research, namely: consent to an embryo being 'spare' and so, at the same time, to its disuse in treatment. This is not explicitly covered by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFE) Act 1990, as amended by the HFE Act 2008. Having identified this important initial stage in the process of consent to the donation of a 'spare' embryo to research in conclusion to Part 1, in Part 2 we analyse the idea of consent to an embryo's disuse in treatment on the basis that it is 'spare' with reference to the legal elements of consent, namely information as to nature and purpose, capacity, and voluntariness. We argue that there are in fact three related consent processes in play, of which the principal one concerns consent to an embryo's disuse in treatment. If the quality of this first consent is compromised, in turn this will impact on the quality of the consent to the donation of

  20. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations.

    PubMed

    Traag, Vincent A

    2016-01-01

    Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50,000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find that the diffusion of donations is driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the viability of candidates, possibly opposing candidates in response to local support. Our findings suggest that theories of complex contagions need refinement and that political campaigns should target multiple communities.

  1. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find that the diffusion of donations is driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the viability of candidates, possibly opposing candidates in response to local support. Our findings suggest that theories of complex contagions need refinement and that political campaigns should target multiple communities. PMID:27077742

  2. 14 CFR 29.1316 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and electronic system that... after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system automatically recovers...

  3. 14 CFR 27.1316 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and electronic system that... after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system automatically recovers...

  4. 14 CFR 29.1316 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and electronic system that... after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system automatically recovers...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1316 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and electronic system that... after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system automatically recovers...

  6. 14 CFR 29.1316 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and electronic system that... after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system automatically recovers...

  7. 14 CFR 27.1316 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and electronic system that... after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system automatically recovers...

  8. How Should Privacy Be Protected in the Electronic Library?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balas, Janet L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses privacy issues related to electronic libraries. Highlights include finding guidance and information on the Web, including the American Library Association, Center for Democracy and Technology, and the Electronic Privacy Information Center; legal responsibilities in maintaining privacy rights of patrons who access the Internet; and…

  9. An Electronic Rationale for Observed Initiation Rates in Ruthenium-Mediated Olefin Metathesis: Charge Donation in Phosphine And N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Getty, K.; Delgado-Jaime, M.U.; Kennepohl, P.

    2009-06-01

    Ru K-edge XAS data indicate that second generation ruthenium-based olefin metathesis precatalysts (L = N-heterocyclic carbene) possess a more electron-deficient metal center than in the corresponding first generation species (L = tricyclohexylphosphine). This surprising effect is also observed from DFT calculations and provides a simple rationale for the slow phosphine dissociation kinetics previously noted for second-generation metathesis precatalysts.

  10. Alternative Living Kidney Donation Programs Boost Genetically Unrelated Donation

    PubMed Central

    Poldervaart, Rosalie A.; Laging, Mirjam; Royaards, Tessa; Kal-van Gestel, Judith A.; van Agteren, Madelon; de Klerk, Marry; Zuidema, Willij; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Roodnat, Joke I.

    2015-01-01

    Donor-recipient ABO and/or HLA incompatibility used to lead to donor decline. Development of alternative transplantation programs enabled transplantation of incompatible couples. How did that influence couple characteristics? Between 2000 and 2014, 1232 living donor transplantations have been performed. In conventional and ABO-incompatible transplantation the willing donor becomes an actual donor for the intended recipient. In kidney-exchange and domino-donation the donor donates indirectly to the intended recipient. The relationship between the donor and intended recipient was studied. There were 935 conventional and 297 alternative program transplantations. There were 66 ABO-incompatible, 68 domino-paired, 62 kidney-exchange, and 104 altruistic donor transplantations. Waiting list recipients (n = 101) were excluded as they did not bring a living donor. 1131 couples remained of whom 196 participated in alternative programs. Genetically unrelated donors (486) were primarily partners. Genetically related donors (645) were siblings, parents, children, and others. Compared to genetically related couples, almost three times as many genetically unrelated couples were incompatible and participated in alternative programs (P < 0.001). 62% of couples were genetically related in the conventional donation program versus 32% in alternative programs (P < 0.001). Patient and graft survival were not significantly different between recipient programs. Alternative donation programs increase the number of transplantations by enabling genetically unrelated donors to donate. PMID:26421181

  11. Does the position of the electron-donating nitrogen atom in the ring system influence the efficiency of a dye-sensitized solar cell? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Abul Kalam; Barik, Sunirmal; Das, Amitava; Ganguly, Bishwajit

    2016-06-01

    We have reported a number of new metal-free organic dyes (2-6) that have cyclic asymmetric benzotripyrrole derivatives as donor groups with peripheral nitrogen atoms in the ring, fluorine and thiophene groups as π-spacers, and a cyanoacrylic acid acceptor group. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations were employed to examine the influence of the position of the donor nitrogen atom and π-conjugation on solar cell performance. The calculated electron-injection driving force (ΔG inject), electron-regeneration driving force (ΔG regen), light-harvesting efficiency (LHE), dipole moment (μ normal), and number of electrons transferred (∆q) indicate that dyes 3, 4, and 6 have significantly higher efficiencies than reference dye 1, which exhibits high efficiency. We also extended our comparison to some other reported dyes, 7-9, which have a donor nitrogen atom in the middle of the ring system. The computed results suggest that dye 6 possesses a higher incident photon to current conversion efficiency (IPCE) than reported dyes 7-9. Thus, the use of donor groups with peripheral nitrogen atoms appears to lead to more efficient dyes than those in which the nitrogen atom is present in the middle of the donor ring system. Graphical Abstract The locations of the nitrogen atoms in the donor groups in the designed dye molecules have an important influence on DSSC efficiency.

  12. [Blood donation in urban areas].

    PubMed

    Charpentier, F

    2013-05-01

    Medical and technical developments increase the difficulty to provide sufficient safe blood for all patients in developed countries and their sociodemographic and societal changes. Sufficient national blood supply remains a reached, however still actual, challenge. Tomorrow is prepared today: the management of blood donation programs both in line with these developments and with social marketing strategies is one of the keys to success. If the main components of this organization are well known (mobile blood drives in various appropriate environments, and permanent blood donation centers) their proportions in the whole process must evolve and their contents require adaptations, especially for whole blood donation in urban areas. We have to focus on the people's way of life changes related to increasing urbanization of the society and prominent position taken by very large cities. This requires targeting several goals: to draw the attention of the potential blood-giving candidate, to get into position to collect him when he will decide it, to give meaning and recognition to his "sacrifice" (give time rather than donate blood) and to give him desire and opportunity to come back and donate one more time. In this strategy, permanent blood centers in urban areas have significant potential for whole blood collection, highlighted by the decrease of apheresis technology requirements. This potential requires profound changes in their location, conception and organization. The concept of Maison Du Don (MDD) reflects these changes.

  13. 76 FR 36863 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Systems Security Protection From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... configuration may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities resulting in intentional or...; Electronic Systems Security Protection From Unauthorized External Access AGENCY: Federal Aviation... architecture and connectivity capabilities of the airplane's computer systems and networks, which may...

  14. 76 FR 10529 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Systems Security Protection From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... systems and networks may result in security vulnerabilities to the airplane's systems. The applicable... may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities resulting in intentional or...; Electronic Systems Security Protection From Unauthorized External Access AGENCY: Federal...

  15. [Blood donation: a marketing perspective].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Silvia Terra; Rodrigues, Alziro César de Morais

    2005-01-01

    This paper emphasizes how marketing can make a difference in repeat donations by volunteer blood donors, since the greatest challenge for health institutions is to maintain and increase blood donation. In this context, understanding volunteer donors' motivations is highly important, and the studies reported here demonstrate that several variables are relevant to blood donation. The huge number of patients in need of blood transfusions and the lack of sufficient blood and blood products justify the interest in this study, considering both donors' and blood banks' perspectives. Moreover, recognition of the importance of actions and orientation for donors is fundamental for developing a marketing strategy. It is thus relevant for health institutions to identify donors' actual needs and wishes.

  16. 76 FR 33129 - Airworthiness Standards; Electrical and Electronic System Lightning Protection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... adopted regulatory text is consistent with that used in the High-Intensity Radio Frequency regulations... by establishing new lightning protection regulations for electrical and electronic systems installed on aircraft certificated under parts 23, 27, and 29, and revises lightning protection regulations...

  17. Human Mitochondrial Ferredoxin 1 (FDX1) and Ferredoxin 2 (FDX2) Both Bind Cysteine Desulfurase and Donate Electrons for Iron–Sulfur Cluster Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ferredoxins play an important role as an electron donor in iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster biosynthesis. Two ferredoxins, human mitochondrial ferredoxin 1 (FDX1) and human mitochondrial ferredoxin 2 (FDX2), are present in the matrix of human mitochondria. Conflicting results have been reported regarding their respective function in mitochondrial iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis. We report here biophysical studies of the interaction of these two ferredoxins with other proteins involved in mitochondrial iron–sulfur cluster assembly. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show that both FDX1 and FDX2 (in both their reduced and oxidized states) interact with the protein complex responsible for cluster assembly, which contains cysteine desulfurase (NFS1), ISD11 (also known as LYRM4), and acyl carrier protein (Acp). In all cases, ferredoxin residues close to the Fe–S cluster are involved in the interaction with this complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry results showed that FDX2 binds more tightly to the cysteine desulfurase complex than FDX1 does. The reduced form of each ferredoxin became oxidized in the presence of the cysteine desulfurase complex when l-cysteine was added, leading to its conversion to l-alanine and the generation of sulfide. In an in vitro reaction, the reduced form of each ferredoxin was found to support Fe–S cluster assembly on ISCU; the rate of cluster assembly was faster with FDX2 than with FDX1. Taken together, these results show that both FDX1 and FDX2 can function in Fe–S cluster assembly in vitro. PMID:28001042

  18. Human Mitochondrial Ferredoxin 1 (FDX1) and Ferredoxin 2 (FDX2) Both Bind Cysteine Desulfurase and Donate Electrons for Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Tonelli, Marco; Frederick, Ronnie O; Markley, John L

    2017-01-24

    Ferredoxins play an important role as an electron donor in iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biosynthesis. Two ferredoxins, human mitochondrial ferredoxin 1 (FDX1) and human mitochondrial ferredoxin 2 (FDX2), are present in the matrix of human mitochondria. Conflicting results have been reported regarding their respective function in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. We report here biophysical studies of the interaction of these two ferredoxins with other proteins involved in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show that both FDX1 and FDX2 (in both their reduced and oxidized states) interact with the protein complex responsible for cluster assembly, which contains cysteine desulfurase (NFS1), ISD11 (also known as LYRM4), and acyl carrier protein (Acp). In all cases, ferredoxin residues close to the Fe-S cluster are involved in the interaction with this complex. Isothermal titration calorimetry results showed that FDX2 binds more tightly to the cysteine desulfurase complex than FDX1 does. The reduced form of each ferredoxin became oxidized in the presence of the cysteine desulfurase complex when l-cysteine was added, leading to its conversion to l-alanine and the generation of sulfide. In an in vitro reaction, the reduced form of each ferredoxin was found to support Fe-S cluster assembly on ISCU; the rate of cluster assembly was faster with FDX2 than with FDX1. Taken together, these results show that both FDX1 and FDX2 can function in Fe-S cluster assembly in vitro.

  19. 14 CFR 23.1306 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Equipment General § 23.1306 Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and... affected during and after the time the airplane is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1306 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Equipment General § 23.1306 Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and... affected during and after the time the airplane is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1306 - Electrical and electronic system lightning protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electrical and electronic system lightning... Equipment General § 23.1306 Electrical and electronic system lightning protection. (a) Each electrical and... affected during and after the time the airplane is exposed to lightning; and (2) The system...

  2. FAQ: Blood Donation and Organ Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mosquito Surveillance Software Health Education Public Service Videos Blood Donation & Organ Transplant Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... get infected with West Nile virus by donating blood? No. You cannot get West Nile virus by ...

  3. 31 CFR 596.301 - Donation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 596.301 Donation. The term donation means a transfer made in the form of a gift or...

  4. 31 CFR 596.301 - Donation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 596.301 Donation. The term donation means a transfer made in the form of a gift or...

  5. Donation FAQs (Bone and Tissue Allografts)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is there a difference between tissue and organ donation? In general, organ donors must be brain dead, which is defined ... very limited cases (approximately 20,000 per year), organ donation occurs when mechanical support (i.e., ventilators) can ...

  6. Evaluation of Factors Limiting Corneal Donation.

    PubMed

    Röck, Daniel; Wude, Johanna; Yoeruek, Efdal; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Tobias

    2016-11-15

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to investigate factors limiting corneal donation at the University Hospital Tübingen. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively studied all hospital deaths from January 2012 to December 2015, considering each deceased patient as a potential corneal donor. During this period an ophthalmic resident managed corneal donor procurement on a full-time basis. Various factors limiting corneal donation were examined. RESULTS Among the 3412 deaths, 2937 (86.1%) displayed nonfulfillment of corneal donation. Consent for corneal donation was obtained in 475 cases (13.9%). The mean annual corneal donation rate was 13.9 donors per 100 deaths (range: 11.2-17.8). The leading causes of nonfulfillment of corneal donations were refusal to donate (49.8%, 1698 cases) and medical contraindications (23.6%, 805 cases). After next-of-kin interview of 2173 potential donors (109 potential donors were excluded because of logistical problems), willingness to participate in corneal donation was present in 475 cases (21.9%), whereas in 1698 cases (78.1%) corneal donation was refused. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed refusal to donate is the most important factor limiting corneal donation. It seems that increasing the knowledge of people about corneal donation through public education and media are necessary to address the corneal shortage.

  7. 17 CFR 256.426.1 - Donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Donations. 256.426.1 Section... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Income and Expense Accounts § 256.426.1 Donations. This account shall include all payments or donations for charitable, social or community welfare purposes....

  8. 48 CFR 245.609 - Donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Donations. 245.609 Section 245.609 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF... Inventory 245.609 Donations. Agencies may donate, with GSA approval and without expense to the United...

  9. Philippine law on donations of human organs.

    PubMed

    Ancog, Amelia C

    1992-09-01

    The Philippines "Organ Donation Act of 1991" updates the "1949 Act to legalize permissions to use human organs". Under the new legislation, each individual can donate all or any part of his body by way of legacy or will. The members of the family may also authorize such a donation in the absence of contrary intention by the decedent. Donations are only valid when made for therapy, research or medical education. International sharing of organs is recognized but subject to approval by the Department of Health. Regulations are about to be formulated in order to implement the Act which will be largely publicized to encourage donations.

  10. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

    2012-08-01

    Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and

  11. Medical equipment donations in Haiti: flaws in the donation process.

    PubMed

    Dzwonczyk, Roger; Riha, Chris

    2012-04-01

    The magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti on 12 January 2010 devastated the capital city of Port-au-Prince and the surrounding area. The area's hospitals suffered major structural damage and material losses. Project HOPE sought to rebuild the medical equipment and clinical engineering capacity of the country. A team of clinical engineers from the United States of America and Haiti conducted an inventory and assessment of medical equipment at seven public hospitals affected by the earthquake. The team found that only 28% of the equipment was working properly and in use for patient care; another 28% was working, but lay idle for technical reasons; 30% was not working, but repairable; and 14% was beyond repair. The proportion of equipment in each condition category was similar regardless of whether the equipment was present prior to the earthquake or was donated afterwards. This assessment points out the flaws that existed in the medical equipment donation process and reemphasizes the importance of the factors, as delineated by the World Health Organization more than a decade ago, that constitute a complete medical equipment donation.

  12. [Suitability of autologous blood donation before bone marrow donation].

    PubMed

    Gouëzec, H; Ferré, N; Hervé, F; Lapart, C; Leberre, C; Bernard, M; Dauriac, C; Nimubona, S

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the benefit of predeposite autologous blood donation (PAD) before bone marrow (BM) donation on transfusion requirements, haemoglobin concentrations (Hb) and the occurrence of adverse events (AE). We collected data retrospectively from 50 donors of BM with PAD from 2010 to 2014. An autologous transfusion (AT) was given to 50% of the donors (group 1). In the group 2, the products from PAD were not used. The total volume median of marrow harvested was 17.7 mL/k (range 12.3-21.4) in the group 1 and 13.3 mL/k (8.6-22.6) in the group 2. The female ratio was higher in the group 1 (60%) than in the group 2 (16%). Bone marrow harvest led to a decline in Hb (from PAD to first day after BM donation) by 2.9 g/dL (1.5-5.5) in the group 1 and by 3.5 g/dL (1.2-5) in the group 2. The post-harvest Hb (D+1) median was identical in the two groups: 10.9 g/dL (7.6-13.5) in the group 1 versus 11.5 g/dL (9.3-13.4) in the group 2. Six AE were reported in each group. In the group with AE, the median weight was lower: 58 k (50-71) versus 75 k (52-110); and the median total volume of marrow harvested was higher: 20.1 mL/k (9.9-21.4) versus 14.3 mL/k (8.6-22.6). All post-harvest Hb were ≥ 7.6g/dL. This study shows the high loss of Hb after BM donation but not enough to prove a blood transfusion in BM donors with median age of 36 years (16-62) and without comorbidity. The occurrence of AE (25% of BM donors) justifies a careful surveillance after the BM donation. The PAD should not be routinely offered to bone marrow donors.

  13. US organ donation breakthrough collaborative increases organ donation.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Teresa J; Wagner, Dennis; Chessare, John; Schall, Marie W; McBride, Virginia; Zampiello, Francis A; Perdue, Jade; O'Connor, Kevin; Lin, Monica J-Y; Burdick, James

    2008-01-01

    More than 92000 Americans are on waiting lists for organ transplants, and an average of 17 of them die each day while waiting. The US Organ Donation Breakthrough Collaborative (ODBC), which began in 2003 at the request of the Secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services, was a formal, concerted effort of the donation and transplantation community to bring about a major change to improve the organ donation system. The nationwide Collaborative was housed within a Health and Human Services agency, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Division of Transplantation, and included participation of the organ procurement organizations (OPOs) throughout the United States and the American hospitals with the largest organ-donor potential. HRSA leaders used the Breakthrough Series Collaborative method, originally developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, as the model for the intervention. Expert practitioners drawn from hospitals and OPOs that had already demonstrated their ability to achieve and sustain high organ donation rates were chosen as faculty for the collaborative and best practices were gleaned from their institutions. The number of organ donors in Collaborative hospitals increased 14.1% in the first year, a 70% greater increase than the 8.3% increase experienced by non-Collaborative hospitals. Moreover, the increased organ recovery continued into the post-Collaborative periods. Between October 2003 and September 2006, the number of total US organ donors increased 22.5%, an increase 4-fold greater than the 5.5% increase measured over the same number of years in the immediate pre-Collaborative period. The study did not involve a randomized design, but time-series analysis using statistical process control charts shows a highly significant discontinuity in the rate of increase in participating hospitals concurrent with the Collaborative program, and strongly suggests that the activities of the Collaborative were a major

  14. Obtaining consent for eye donation.

    PubMed

    Diamond, G A; Campion, M; Mussoline, J F; D'Amico, R A

    1987-02-15

    We prospectively studied 100 consecutive deaths at St. Vincent's Hospital and Medical Center in New York City for possible eye donation. Fifty-two patients were unsuitable mainly because of medical contraindications and age at death. Of the 48 suitable candidates, 21 pairs (44%) of eyes were obtained. Sixteen of the 42 eyes (38%) were used for transplantation. Projection of the number of corneas obtainable for transplant in New York City were calculated. The figures indicated that the three-month waiting list of the New York Eye-Bank for Sight Restoration, Inc., could be eradicated if hospitals were able to get seven donors from every 100 deaths suitable for donation, a rate only 16% of that realized in this study.

  15. The ethics of organ donation.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, G R

    1997-01-01

    As organ transplantation is physically possible within a tension between common biological properties and individual immunities, so it is ethically possible within a tension between individual personality in full integrity and the human community of which each member, social by nature, is an organic part. Ethical donation is by consent, explicit or presumed, spontaneously offered or procured by request. Altruism or commercial dealing is now a live issue in organ procurement, whether cadaveric or by live donation, related or unrelated. Attention is given to children in transplantation, and to new developments with fetal organs, neural tissue, bone marrow and xenografts. Given all that medical science and skill can now offer, patients are still free to decline.

  16. Lipaemic donations: truth and consequences.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    The problem of using material of unsuitable quality, including "nontransparent turbid milky plasma" or more simply "turbid plasma", for producing blood components is not trivial for several epidemiological, technical, analytical, clinical and economical reasons. With some exception, most national and international guidelines mandate that blood components should preferably not be produced from lipaemic donations. The origin of lipaemic blood is variegated, and includes physiological or paraphysiological causes and metabolic disorders, whereas a broad range of common diseases and drugs can also be associated with hypertriglyceridaemia. Overall, the frequency of lipaemic donations ranges between 0.31% and 0.35%, although sporadic reports have highlighted that the frequency might be much higher, up to 13%. Lipaemic donations pose two leading problems in transfusion medicine, that are interference during laboratory testing, and safety of producing blood components from hypertriglyceridaemic materials. While the former issue can be overcome by using chemical or mechanical methods, the clinical use of lipaemic blood for producing components remains an unresolved question. Transfusion medicine should thereby embark on a landmark effort to find a universal agreement of behaviours and harmonization of policies worldwide.

  17. Challenging the moral status of blood donation.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Paul C

    2014-12-01

    The World Health Organisation encourages that blood donation becomes voluntary and unremunerated, a system already operated in the UK. Drawing on public documents and videos, this paper argues that blood donation is regarded and presented as altruistic and supererogatory. In advertisements, donation is presented as something undertaken for the benefit of others, a matter attracting considerable gratitude from recipients and the collecting organisation. It is argued that regarding blood donation as an act of supererogation is wrongheaded, and an alternative account of blood donation as moral obligation is presented. Two arguments are offered in support of this position. First, the principle of beneficence, understood in a broad consequentialist framework obliges donation where the benefit to the recipient is large and the cost to the donor relatively small. This argument can be applied, with differing levels of normativity, to various acts of donation. Second, the wrongness of free riding requires individuals to contribute to collective systems from which they benefit. Alone and in combination these arguments present moral reasons for donation, recognised in communication strategies elsewhere. Research is required to evaluate the potential effects on donation of a campaign which presents blood donation as moral obligation, but of wider importance is the recognition that other-regarding considerations in relation to our own as well as others' health result in a range not only of choices but also of obligations.

  18. Marketing organ donation around the globe.

    PubMed

    Guy, B S; Aldridge, A

    2001-01-01

    Marketing to potential organ donors in different countries requires knowledge about religious beliefs and cultural norms that might influence the decision to donate. Because beliefs vary so widely from country to country, marketers need to consider whether a standardized or adaptive approach is suitable for marketing organ donation in different countries. This article takes a look at the variables that influence the decision to donate an organ and suggests marketing strategies that may work in various parts of the world.

  19. Giving ourselves: the ethics of anatomical donation.

    PubMed

    Gunderman, Richard B

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical appeals might anatomists, physicians, and other health professionals make to patients and family members for anatomical donation? Two models of giving, egoistic and liberal, merit close examination.

  20. Embryo donation in Iran: an ethical review.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Leila; Bagheri, Alireza

    2013-12-01

    Iran is the only Muslim country that has legislation on embryo donation, adopted in 2003. With an estimated 10-15% of couples in the country that are infertile, there are not any legal or religious barriers that prohibit an infertile couple from taking advantage of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs). Although all forms of ARTs available in Iran have been legitimized by religious authorities, there is a lack of legislation in all ARTs except embryo donation. By highlighting ethical issues in embryo donation, the paper presents a critical review of the Act of Embryo Donation in Iran. The paper argues that the Act does not provide enough safeguards for the future child and assurance for the safety of the donated embryos. It also does not restrict embryo donation to surplus embryos from infertile couples and is silent about the number of embryos that could be donated by each couple as well as the number of recipients for donated embryos by a couple. The Act is also silent about the issues of genetic linkage (nasab) and heritage which are challenging issues, especially in a conservative Islamic society. As a result, the future child may not inherit from their birth parents, as it is not required by the Act, or from the genetically related parents under the anonymity policy. Finally there is no standard national protocol or guidelines to evaluate the safety of the donated embryos. The paper concludes that despite its benefits, the Act lacks clarity, and it is subject to misunderstanding and confusion.

  1. Exploring Donation Decisions: Beliefs and Preferences for Organ Donation in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Melissa K.; White, Katherine M.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored common beliefs and preferences for posthumous and living organ donation in Australia where organ donation rates are low and little research exists. Content analysis of discussions revealed the advantage of prolonging/saving life whereas disadvantages differed according to donation context. A range of people/groups perceived to…

  2. Specific unwillingness to donate eyes: the impact of disfigurement, knowledge and procurement on corneal donation.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, M; Kerridge, I; Ankeny, R; Dobbins, T A; Billson, F

    2010-03-01

    Although willingness, attitudes and beliefs surrounding solid-organ donation have been extensively investigated, much less is known about corneal donation. Despite evidence that a substantial number of families who agree to multiorgan donation also specifically refuse corneal donation, it is unclear why this occurs and what can be done to increase rates of corneal donation. We conducted a survey of 371 Australian adults regarding their views on corneal donation. Although willingness to donate corneas generally reflected a person's willingness to donate all of one's organs, unwillingness to donate corneas appeared to be due to other factors. Specifically, decisions not to donate appear to be driven by a range of concerns surrounding disfigurement. The survey also provides eye banks with reassurance about the acceptability of whole globe procurement, and recognition that research into blindness is a highly valued part of corneal donation. Finally, the survey identifies that many individuals see benefit in having their family engaged in the decision-making process, suggesting that decisions about donation are more complex than a simple appeal to the autonomy of the deceased.

  3. Privacy preservation and information security protection for patients' portable electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu-Chou; Chu, Huei-Chung; Lien, Chung-Yueh; Hsiao, Chia-Hung; Kao, Tsair

    2009-09-01

    As patients face the possibility of copying and keeping their electronic health records (EHRs) through portable storage media, they will encounter new risks to the protection of their private information. In this study, we propose a method to preserve the privacy and security of patients' portable medical records in portable storage media to avoid any inappropriate or unintentional disclosure. Following HIPAA guidelines, the method is designed to protect, recover and verify patient's identifiers in portable EHRs. The results of this study show that our methods are effective in ensuring both information security and privacy preservation for patients through portable storage medium.

  4. Organ donation: a communitarian approach.

    PubMed

    Etzioni, Amitai

    2003-03-01

    Recently, various suggestions have been made to respond to the increasingly great shortage of organs by paying for them. Because of the undesirable side effects of such approaches (commodification, injustice, and costs), a communitarian approach should be tried first. A communitarian approach to the problem of organ shortage entails changing the moral culture so that members of society will recognize that donating one's organs, once they are no longer of use to the donor, is the moral (right) thing to do. This approach requires much greater and deeper efforts than sharing information and making public service announcements. It entails a moral dialogue, in which the public is engaged, leading to a change in what people expect from one another. Among the devices that could help change the moral culture are a public statement, endorsed by community members and leaders, that expresses the community sense that donation "is what a good person does" and a community-specific web page that lists those who have made the commitment. A change in law so that a person's wishes in the matter are recognized as final and binding are also desired. This position paper deals only with cadaver organs and not living donors.

  5. Understanding Australian families' organ donation decisions.

    PubMed

    Neate, S L; Marck, C H; Skinner, M; Dwyer, B; McGain, F; Weiland, T J; Hickey, B B; Jelinek, G A

    2015-01-01

    Numbers of deceased organ donors in Australia have increased, but rates of consent to donation remain at around 60%. Increasing family consent is a key target for the Australian Organ and Tissue Authority. Reasons for donation decisions have been reported in the international literature, but little is known of reasons for Australian families' decisions. Potential organ donors in four Melbourne hospitals were identified and 49 participants from 40 families (23 consenting and 17 non-consenting) were interviewed to understand reasons for consent decisions. Themes for consent to organ donation included that: donation was consistent with the deceased's explicit wishes or known values, the desire to help others or self-including themes of altruism, pragmatism, preventing others from being in the same position, consolation received from donation and aspects of the donation conversation and care that led families to believe donation was right for them. Themes for non-consent included: lack of knowledge of wishes; social, cultural and religious beliefs; factors related to the donation process and family exhaustion; and conversation factors where negative events influenced decisions. While reasons for consent were similar to those described in international literature, reasons for non-consent differed in that there was little emphasis on lack of trust of the medical profession, concerns regarding level of care provided to the potential donor, preserving the deceased's body, fears of body invasion or organ allocation fairness.

  6. Female College Students' Perceptions of Organ Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boland, Kathleen; Baker, Kerrie

    2010-01-01

    The current process of organ donation in the U.S. relies on the premise of altruism or voluntary consent. Yet, human organs available for donation and transplant do not meet current demands. The literature has suggested that college students, who represent a large group of potential healthy organ donors, often are not part of donor pools. Before…

  7. 49 CFR 24.108 - Donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Donations. 24.108 Section 24.108 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation UNIFORM RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AND REAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION FOR FEDERAL AND FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS Real Property Acquisition § 24.108 Donations. An owner whose...

  8. Giving Ourselves: The Ethics of Anatomical Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderman, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    In some European countries, such as Italy, medical education is threatened by a dearth of anatomical specimens. Such a shortage could spread to other nations, including the United States. This article addresses two ethical questions in body donation. Why might people choose to donate their bodies to education and science? What sorts of ethical…

  9. The Books in Bill Clinton's Donation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hongyang; Webb, T. D.

    2002-01-01

    Explains President Clinton's donation of books about the United States to the Peking University Library and compares it to a donation of Chinese books from the Peking University library to the library of Kapiolani Community College (Hawaii). Suggests appropriate directions for U.S.-China academic library cooperation and for international academic…

  10. [ELGA--the electronic health record in the light of data protection and data security].

    PubMed

    Ströher, Alexander; Honekamp, Wilfried

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of an electronic health record (ELGA) is a subject discussed for a long time in Austria. Another big step toward ELGA is made at the end of 2010 on the pilot project e-medication in three model regions; other projects should follow. In addition, projects of the ELGA structure are sped up on the part of the ELGA GmbH to install the base of a functioning electronic health record. Unfortunately, many of these initiatives take place, so to speak, secretly, so that in the consciousness of the general public - and that includes not only patients but also physicians and other healthcare providers - always concerns about protection and security of such a storage of health data arouse. In this article the bases of the planned act are discussed taking into account the data protection and data security.

  11. A WWW Implementation of National Recommendations for Protecting Electronic Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Halamka, John D.; Szolovits, Peter; Rind, David; Safran, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Abstract In March of 1997, the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences issued the report, “For the Record: Protecting Electronic Health Information.” Concluding that the current practices at the majority of health care facilities in the United States are insufficient, the Council delineated both technical and organizational approaches to protecting electronic health information. The Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center recently implemented a proof-of-concept, Web-based, cross-institutional medical record, CareWeb, which incorporates the NRC security and confidentiality recommendations. We report on our WWW implementation of the NRC recommendations and an initial evaluation of the balance between ease of use and confidentiality. PMID:9391933

  12. Electronic collimation and radiation protection in paediatric digital radiography: revival of the silver lining.

    PubMed

    Bomer, J; Wiersma-Deijl, L; Holscher, H C

    2013-10-01

    In digital radiography we are now able to electronically collimate images after acquisition. This may seem convenient in paediatric imaging, but we have to be aware that electronic collimation has two major downsides. Electronic collimation implicates that the original field size should have been smaller and the child has been exposed to unnecessary radiation. Also, by use of electronic collimation, potentially important information may be lost. The "silver lining", denoting the X-ray beam collimation, can serve as a useful radiation protection instrument to check for proper field size and detect unnecessary exposure. Furthermore, the silver lining confirms all exposed anatomy is shown in the final image, and thus may also serve as a quality assurance instrument as the patient has the right to all acquired information. Teaching Points • The ability to electronically collimate an image after acquisition may serve to enhance contrast in the region of interest. • The ability to electronically collimate an image after acquisition carries the risk of overexposure. • The ability to electronically collimate an image after acquisition carries the risk of losing important information. • The silver lining can serve as a quality control instrument for proper collimation. • The patient has the right to all information obtained during an X-ray examination.

  13. [Legal aspects of transplant and donation].

    PubMed

    Teijeira, R

    2006-01-01

    The Spanish model of organ and tissue donation enjoys great prestige in the world medical sphere and has been the object of study and imitation in different countries. Part of this success is due to the fact that since the year 1979 different legal norms have been enacted that have regulated and facilitated donation. The current legislation on the donation and transplant of organs and tissues is based on the principles of the gratuity and confidentiality of the donation, indicating the need for facilitating the formation of organisations at the level of the autonomous communities and at the national level. It also contains the requisites for donation of both live donors and deceased donors, establishing the norms for certification of death due to cardiorespiratory arrest and due to the irreversible cease of brain functions.

  14. Ovum donation: examining the new Israeli law.

    PubMed

    Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Pinchover, Zachary S; Lunenfeld, Eitan; Jotkowitz, Alan

    2011-11-01

    Ovum donation affords countless couples that under natural circumstances would not be able to produce offspring the ability to carry out natural pregnancies. With advancements in biotechnology including egg collection and in vitro fertilization (IVF), physicians can now successfully implant fertilized embryos. Due to Israel's tremendous involvement in IVF for its own citizens, the national laws that govern egg donation are of great importance. On September 5th 2010, the Israeli Parliament (Knesset) passed a law that allows young women between the ages of 21 and 35 to donate their eggs for paid financial compensation. The new law allows infertile women between the ages of 18 and 54 to request egg donation and IVF, which will partially be covered under state insurance plans. This article provides a description of the new Israeli law regulating ovum donation and the practical, moral and ethical debate surrounding the new system.

  15. A Low-Dose Electron Diffraction Assay for Protection of Protein Structure against Damage from Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massover, William H.

    2004-04-01

    A new assay using low-dose electron diffraction to measure the protection of protein structure against damage from drying is described. When thin single crystals of catalase are dried within water alone, low-dose electron diffraction yields no Bragg spots. Drying within an experimental aqueous solution that permits detection of diffraction spots thereby indicates a positive result, and the extent of these Bragg reflections into the high angle range gives a quantitative measure of the degree of protection. Bragg spots out to 3.7 3.9 [Angstrom capital A, ring] are recorded for drying within 100 mM solutions of the known structure-preserving sugars, sucrose, tannin, and trehalose. The ability of trehalose to maintain native protein structure during drying starts between 10 and 25 mM, and changes only slightly at concentrations above this threshold; with drying in 150-mM trehalose, catalase crystals yield diffraction spots out to 3.7 [Angstrom capital A, ring]. Drying within the organic nonsugar polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone gives Bragg spots to 4.0 [Angstrom capital A, ring]. This new assay should be useful to measure the unexamined structure-preserving capabilities of modified sugars, other nonsugars, and mixtures to identify which protective matrix maintains native protein structure to the greatest extent during drying; electron crystallography using that optimal matrix should yield protein structure at improved levels of high resolution.

  16. Columnar benzoperylene-hexa- and tetracarboxylic imides and esters: synthesis, mesophase stabilisation and observation of charge-transfer interactions between electron-donating esters and electron-accepting imides.

    PubMed

    Kelber, Julien; Achard, Marie-France; Garreau-de Bonneval, Bénédicte; Bock, Harald

    2011-07-11

    Benzo[ghi]perylene 1,2,4,5,10,11-hexacarboxylic trialkylimide and dialkylimido-dialkyl ester derivatives, displaying a thermodynamically stable hexagonal columnar liquid-crystalline phase at room temperature, have been obtained by the use of previously unexplored chiral racemic α-branched alkylimide functions. One of the trialkylimides described here is the first room temperature columnar solely oligo-alkylimide-substituted arene, and thus constitutes a prototype case of self-assembling organic acceptor materials. As the related hexacarboxylic hexaesters are found to exhibit only a weak tendency to form columnar mesophases, benzo[ghi]perylene 1,2,5,10-tetracarboxylic tetraalkyl esters have been synthesized by regioselective oxidative Diels-Alder addition of maleic anhydride to 3,10-dicyanoperylene, and a room temperature hexagonal columnar mesophase was obtained with branched alkyl chains. The acceptor-type electronic properties of the tri- and diimides have been found to be considerably more pronounced than those of the hexa- and tetracarboxylic esters, and to approach those of the prototype acceptor material C(60). The formation of bathochromically absorbing donor-acceptor complexes was observed with a di- or triimide as acceptor and a tetraester as donor, but not with a hexaester as donor. Exploiting the non-negligible differences in reduction and oxidation potentials between all four types of materials, the minimum HOMO energy difference necessary for charge-transfer-complex formation has been determined to lie between 0.29 and 0.35 eV.

  17. Crystal structure and electronic properties of a thiolate-protected Au24 nanocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anindita; Li, Tao; Li, Gao; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Zeng, Chenjie; Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Jin, Rongchao

    2014-05-01

    Solving the total structures of gold nanoclusters is of critical importance for understanding their electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Herein, we report the X-ray structure of a charge-neutral Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20 nanocluster. This structure features a bi-tetrahedral Au8 kernel protected by four tetrameric staple-like motifs. Electronic structure analysis is further carried out and the optical absorption spectrum is interpreted. The Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20, Au23(S-c-C6H11)16 and Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 nanoclusters constitute the first crystallographically characterized ``trio''.Solving the total structures of gold nanoclusters is of critical importance for understanding their electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Herein, we report the X-ray structure of a charge-neutral Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20 nanocluster. This structure features a bi-tetrahedral Au8 kernel protected by four tetrameric staple-like motifs. Electronic structure analysis is further carried out and the optical absorption spectrum is interpreted. The Au24(SCH2Ph-tBu)20, Au23(S-c-C6H11)16 and Au25(SCH2CH2Ph)18 nanoclusters constitute the first crystallographically characterized ``trio''. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and supporting Fig. S1-S3. CCDC NUMBER(1000102). For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01350f

  18. Just love in live organ donation.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Kristin

    2009-08-01

    Emotionally-related live organ donation is different from almost all other medical treatments in that a family member or, in some countries, a friend contributes with an organ or parts of an organ to the recipient. Furthermore, there is a long-acknowledged but not well-understood gender-imbalance in emotionally-related live kidney donation. This article argues for the benefit of the concept of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are engaged in a love relation. The concept of just love is helpful in the analysis of these live organ donations even if no statistical gender-imbalance prevails. It is particularly helpful, however, in the analysis of the gender-imbalance in live kidney donations if these donations are seen as a specific kind of care-work, if care-work is experienced as a labour one should perform out of love and if women still experience stronger pressures to engage in care-work than do men. The aim of the article is to present arguments for the need of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are engaged in a love relation. The aim is also to elaborate two criteria that need to be met in order for love to qualify as just and to highlight certain clinical implications.

  19. Organ donation by capital prisoners in China: reflections in Confucian ethics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingxu; Wang, Xueliang

    2010-04-01

    This article discusses the practice and development of organ donation by capital prisoners in China. It analyzes the issue of informed consent regarding organ donation from capital prisoners in light of Confucian ethics and expounds the point that under the influence of Confucianism, China is a country that attaches great importance to the role of the family in practicing informed consent in various areas, the area of organ donation from capital prisoners included. It argues that a proper form of organ donation from capital prisoners can be justified within the Confucian moral context in which the proper interests of capital prisoners and their families, the benefit of organ receptors, and a rightful order of society should all be appropriately considered. From the Confucian perspective, the act of donating organs from a capital prisoner must be decided by both the prisoner and his/her family (i.e., each side should hold a veto power), whereas such donation, in the proper circumstance protected by a rightful procedure, should be appreciated as a morally praiseworthy act of the prisoner who is willing to make the final effort to repent and correct his/her evil conduct and to leave something good to the world.

  20. Audit Report on "Protection of the Department of Energy's Unclassified Sensitive Electronic Information"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-01

    The Department of Energy and its contractors store and process massive quantities of sensitive information to accomplish national security, energy, science, and environmental missions. Sensitive unclassified data, such as personally identifiable information (PII), official use only, and unclassified controlled nuclear information require special handling and protection to prevent misuse of the information for inappropriate purposes. Industry experts have reported that more than 203 million personal privacy records have been lost or stolen over the past three years, including information maintained by corporations, educational institutions, and Federal agencies. The loss of personal and other sensitive information can result in substantial financial harm, embarrassment, and inconvenience to individuals and organizations. Therefore, strong protective measures, including data encryption, help protect against the unauthorized disclosure of sensitive information. Prior reports involving the loss of sensitive information have highlighted weaknesses in the Department's ability to protect sensitive data. Our report on Security Over Personally Identifiable Information (DOE/IG-0771, July 2007) disclosed that the Department had not fully implemented all measures recommended by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and required by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to protect PII, including failures to identify and encrypt PII maintained on information systems. Similarly, the Government Accountability Office recently reported that the Department had not yet installed encryption technology to protect sensitive data on the vast majority of laptop computers and handheld devices. Because of the potential for harm, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors adequately safeguarded sensitive electronic information. The Department had taken a number of steps to improve protection of PII. Our review, however, identified

  1. To donate or not donate, that is the question: an analysis of the critical factors of blood donation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jefferson Rodrigues; Sousa, Caissa Veloso E; Matos, Eliane Bragança de; Rezende, Leonardo Benedito Oliveira; Bueno, Natália Xavier; Dias, Álvaro Machado

    2016-08-01

    Currently, in Brazil, 1.78% of the population area blood donors, a level lower than the ideal one that, according to WHO, should be between 3% and 5% of the population. Following this scenario, the current study has a general goal of identifying and analyzing the main critical factors of the process of blood donation in the city of Belo Horizonte, MG, under the perception of donors, potential donors and non donors. A qualitative research approach was conducted, through twenty-four semi-structured interviews. The results highlight the lack of information in the various stages of the blood donation system. During the stages of donor recruitment and awareness, communication actions convey to society incomplete information about the donation process, discouraging future actions of donation. On the other hand, a lack of appreciation of the donation experience and the construction of social values associated with the donor prevent the multiplication of social behaviors for donation. The results of this study, found from theoretical framework outlined in this study, highlight the causes or critical factors that impede changes in behavior, incremental or radical, proposed by social marketing.

  2. 41 CFR 109-44.702 - Donations to public bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Donations to public... AND DISPOSAL 44-DONATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 44.7-Donations of Property to Public Bodies § 109-44.702 Donations to public bodies....

  3. 45 CFR 2544.115 - Who may offer a donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may offer a donation? 2544.115 Section 2544... COMMUNITY SERVICE SOLICITATION AND ACCEPTANCE OF DONATIONS § 2544.115 Who may offer a donation? Anyone... donation to the Corporation....

  4. 39 CFR 777.51 - Acceptance of donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acceptance of donations. 777.51 Section 777.51... ACQUISITION POLICIES Donations § 777.51 Acceptance of donations. Nothing in these regulations shall prevent a person from making a gift or donation of real property or any part thereof, or any interest therein,...

  5. 23 CFR 710.505 - Real property donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real property donations. 710.505 Section 710.505...-WAY AND REAL ESTATE Property Acquisition Alternatives § 710.505 Real property donations. (a) Donations..., whichever is greater. All donations of property received prior to the approval of the NEPA document...

  6. Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessy, Mary J.

    1992-01-01

    The Electron Microscopy Abrasion Analysis of Candidate Fabrics for Planetary Space Suit Protective Overgarment Application is in support of the Abrasion Resistance Materials Screening Test. The fundamental assumption made for the SEM abrasion analysis was that woven fabrics to be used as the outermost layer of the protective overgarment in the design of the future, planetary space suits perform best when new. It is the goal of this study to determine which of the candidate fabrics was abraded the least in the tumble test. The sample that was abraded the least will be identified at the end of the report as the primary candidate fabric for further investigation. In addition, this analysis will determine if the abrasion seen by the laboratory tumbled samples is representative of actual EVA Apollo abrasion.

  7. Public Opinion on Organ Donation After Death and Its Influence on Attitudes Toward Organ Donation.

    PubMed

    Aijing, Luo; Wenzhao, Xie; Wei, Wei; Qiquan, Wan; Xuantong, Deng

    2016-08-18

    BACKGROUND China officially launched a pilot program of organ donation after cardiac death to overcome the shortage of available organs since 2011. Voluntary organ donation by deceased citizens became the only source of transplant organs beginning January 1, 2015. To investigate public opinions on organ donation by deceased donors, and discuss the effect of these opinions on the willingness and attitude of the public regarding voluntary organ donation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We designed a questionnaire. The survey was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015 in Changsha City, and 417 valid questionnaires were recovered. RESULTS A total of 162 respondents explicitly expressed a willingness to donate organs, and 269 believed that the organ donors' relatives should be compensated. A total of 255 respondents thought it acceptable to complete the donation-consent form when receiving a driver's license. Among the respondents, 65.3% did not agree with the statement "My body is bestowed by my parents, and to donate my body parts would not display filial respect"; 88.9% agreed that "It is necessary to consider the willingness of my family"; 74.4% agreed that "Donated organs have not been fairly and appropriately used; the wealthy and celebrities have been favored"; and 61.4% agreed that "Organ donation laws and regulations are not well developed, and organ donations will result in unnecessary difficulties." More than 80% believed that organ donation and transplantation extend life. CONCLUSIONS Public opinions on organ donation after death are associated with various factors, including traditional values, religious beliefs, compensation mechanisms, donor registration, institutional credibility, and ideals.

  8. [Organs, tissues, and cells donation in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Treviño, María Guadalupe; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Transplants are one of the most important advances of modern medicine; in the last 50 years in our country there have been more than fifty thousand transplants, which makes it clear that this is one of the most sought-after medical practices not only in Mexico but worldwide. In life, it is possible for a person to donate a kidney, a lung or a liver segment. When brain death occurs it is possible for a person to donate kidneys, heart, liver, pancreas, intestines, lungs, blood, hematopoietic cells, bone marrow, bones, corneas, heart valves, tendons, and arteries. However, the culture of organ donation is not widespread among Mexicans, hence in our country there is not even 50 % of the number of donations recommended by WHO, which impacts the number of patients who are waiting for an organ or tissue, which causes many of them die before receiving them.

  9. [Cultural diversity in gamete and embryos donation].

    PubMed

    Epelboin, S

    2014-09-01

    Through gamete and embryo donation have successively emerged new ways of designing individuals who, in turn, have generated mutations in the concept of parenthood. A debate is open to the society, which often raises ideological cleavages. Indeed, donation practices mobilize the conflicting interests of donor of gametes, the recipient couple, child, whose origins are complex, although his filiation is legally clear. Its place in the family genealogy can be examined in relation to other societies, which admit plural concepts called "classificatory" kinship. They set up role partition between parents and educators. Setting anthropological perspective provides a broadening of the reflection to answer questions from the donation practices, including genealogical questions of revelation to the child of his conception, his incorporation in family and social group and the importance of compensation of donation.

  10. Pfizer donates drug to South Africa's poor.

    PubMed

    This article reports on Pfizer's AIDS drug donation to South Africa. The donated drug, Diflucan, treats cryptococcal meningitis, a lethal brain infection that occurs in one out of 10 HIV patients. Its daily dose in South Africa costs about US$15, far more than poor people can afford. The HIV and AIDS Treatment Action Campaign, an advocacy group, had lobbied New York-based Pfizer for a year to reduce the drug's price. The donation offered hope among activists that other pharmaceutical companies would follow suit and offer HIV- and AIDS-related drugs at a discount or for free. After the announcement of the donation, the group is now lobbying Glaxo Wellcome, maker of Zidovudine. The group is asking to make the drug available for free to reduce the risk of vertical transmission. Glaxo Wellcome, however, has no plans of offering Zidovudine for free, although the drug was offered 75% cheaper in developing nations.

  11. The challenges of social marketing of organ donation: news and entertainment coverage of donation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tyler R; Morgan, Susan E; Chewning, Lisa V

    2008-01-01

    While great strides have been made in persuading the public to become potential organ donors, actual behavior has not yet caught up with the nearly universally favorable attitudes the public expresses toward donation. This paper explores the issue by situating the social marketing of organ donation against a broader backdrop of entertainment and news media coverage of organ donation. Organ donation storylines are featured on broadcast television in medical and legal dramas, soap operas, and other television serials approximately four times per month (not including most cable networks), and feature storylines that promote myths and fears of the organ donation process. National news and other non-fictionalized coverage of organ donation are even more common, with stories appearing over twenty times a month on average. These stories tend to be one-dimensional and highly sensationalized in their coverage. The marketing of organ donation for entertainment essentially creates a counter-campaign to organ donation, with greater resources and reach than social marketers have access to. Understanding the broader environmental context of organ donation messages highlights the issues faced by social marketing campaigns in persuading the public to become potential donors.

  12. Intra-Family Gamete Donation: A Solution to Concerns Regarding Gamete Donation in China?

    PubMed

    Liao, Juhong; Devolder, Katrien

    2016-09-01

    Gamete donation from third parties is controversial in China as it severs blood ties, which are considered of utmost importance in Confucian tradition. In recent years, infertile couples are increasingly demonstrating a preference for the use of gametes donated by family members to conceive children-known as "intra-family gamete donation." The main advantage of intra-family gamete donation is that it maintains blood ties between children and both parents. To date there is no practice of intra-family gamete donation in China. In this paper, we investigate intra-family adoption in China in order to illustrate that intra-family gamete donation is consistent with Confucian tradition regarding the importance of maintaining blood ties within the family. There are several specific ethical issues raised by intra-family gamete donation. It may, for example, result in consanguinity and the semblance of incest, lead to confused family relationships, and raise concerns about possible coercion of familial donors. Confucian tradition provides a new approach to understand and deal with these ethical issues in a way that Western tradition does not. As a result, we suggest intra-family gamete donation could be an acceptable solution to the problem of infertility in China. However, further discussion and open debates on the ethical issues raised by intra-family gamete donation are needed in China.

  13. The design and implementation of the machine protection system for the Fermilab electron cooling facility

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, A.; Carmichael, L.; Carlson, K.; Crisp, J.; Goodwin, R.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The Fermilab Recycler ring employs an electron cooler to store and cool 8.9-GeV antiprotons. The cooler is based on a 4.3-MV, 0.1-A, DC electrostatic accelerator for which current losses have to remain low ({approx}10{sup -5}) in order to operate reliably. The Machine Protection System (MPS) has been designed to interrupt the beam in a matter of 1-2 {micro}s when losses higher than a safe limit are detected, either in the accelerator itself or in the beam lines. This paper highlights the various diagnostics, electronics and logic that the MPS relies upon to successfully ensure that no damage be sustained to the cooler or the Recycler ring.

  14. Electronic structure and optical properties of the thiolate-protected Au28(SMe)20 cluster.

    PubMed

    Knoppe, Stefan; Malola, Sami; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Bürgi, Thomas; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2013-10-10

    The recently reported crystal structure of the Au28(TBBT)20 cluster (TBBT: p-tert-butylbenzenethiolate) is analyzed with (time-dependent) density functional theory (TD-DFT). Bader charge analysis reveals a novel trimeric Au3(SR)4 binding motif. The cluster can be formulated as Au14(Au2(SR)3)4(Au3(SR)4)2. The electronic structure of the Au14(6+) core and the ligand-protected cluster were analyzed, and their stability can be explained by formation of distorted eight-electron superatoms. Optical absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were calculated and compared to the experiment. Assignment of handedness of the intrinsically chiral cluster is possible.

  15. Campaigning for Organ Donation at Mosques.

    PubMed

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2016-09-01

    There is a trend of recruiting faith leaders at mosques to overcome religious barriers to organ donation, and to increase donor registration among Muslims. Commentators have suggested that Muslims are not given enough information about organ donation in religious sermons or lectures delivered at mosques. Corrective actions have been recommended, such as funding campaigns to promote organ donation, and increasing the availability of organ donation information at mosques. These actions are recommended despite published literature expressing safety concerns (i.e., do no harm) in living and end-of-life organ donation. Living donors require life-long medical follow-up and treatment for complications that can appear years later. Scientific and medical controversies persist regarding the international guidelines for death determination in end-of-life donation. The medical criteria of death lack validation and can harm donors if surgical procurement is performed without general anesthesia and before biological death. In the moral code of Islam, the prevention of harm holds precedence over beneficence. Moral precepts described in the Quran encourage Muslims to be beneficent, but also to seek knowledge prior to making practical decisions. However, the Quran also contains passages that demand honesty and truthfulness when providing information to those who are seeking knowledge. Currently, information is limited to that which encourages donor registration. Campaigning for organ donation to congregations in mosques should adhere to the moral code of complete, rather than selective, disclosure of information. We recommend as a minimal standard the disclosure of risks, uncertainties, and controversies associated with the organ donation process.

  16. Brain death and organ donation of children.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ramiz Coşkun; Şahin, Şanlıay; Uysal-Yazıcı, Mutlu; Ayar, Ganime; Yakut, Halil İbrahim; Akman, Alkım Öden; Hirfanoğlu, İbrahim Murat; Kalkan, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to define the demographic characteristics, clinical features and outcome of patients with brain death, and to emphasize the importance of organ donation from children. Data for the period from September 2009 to October 2012 were collected retrospectively. Twenty children who were diagnosed as brain death were included. Data including demographics, major cause leading to brain death, duration of brain death evaluation, ancillary tests used to confirm brain death, complications and outcome, duration of hospitalization and organ donation were collected for statistical evaluation. The mean age was 6.2 years, and the male/female ratio 1.85. The major cause leading to brain death was most often traumatic brain injury, seen in 11 patients (55%). The mean duration of brain death evaluation was 6.7 and 1.7 days in Centers I and II respectively. The mean duration of hospitalization was 12.5 days. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used in 18 patients (90%). Complications included hyperglycemia in 13 cases and diabetes incipitus in 7 cases (65% and 35%, respectively). Mean duration of survival was 9.8 days. In Center I, one of the patients' parents gave consent to organ donation, while four parents in Center II agreed to organ donation. The study demonstrated that the duration of brain death evaluation was longer in Center I than in Center II (p<0.05). When both centers were compared, there was no significant difference in regard to obtaining consent for organ donation, survival after diagnosis of brain death and length of stay in the PICU (p>0.05). Early diagnosis of brain death and prompt evaluation of patients by ICU physicians once the diagnosis is taken into consideration will probably yield better organs and reduce costs. Training PICU physicians, nurses and organ donation coordinators, and increasing children's awareness of the need for organ donation via means of public communication may increase families' rate of agreement to organ donation in the future.

  17. Free blood donation mobile applications.

    PubMed

    Ouhbi, Sofia; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio; Idri, Ali; Pozo, José Rivera

    2015-05-01

    Blood donation (BD) is a noble act and mobile applications (apps) can help increase awareness about it. This paper analyzes and assesses the characteristics of free apps for BD as regards features and functionality. A search in Google Play, Apple Apps store, Blackberry App World and Windows Mobile App store was carried out to select 169 free BD apps from the 188 apps identified. The results presented in this paper show that the majority of the apps selected have been developed for the Android operating system. Moreover, most of the apps selected are available to help users search for donors. Few of the apps could not be installed and/or accessed. Of those that could be installed: half of them do not require any kind of authentication; a few of them are available in more than one language; half of them have a geographical restriction; around 60 % of them do not notify the user of BD events and requests; one, which is available for Android and iOS, can connect with a laboratory; around 45 % of them allow users to share information via social networks, and the majority of them do not provide BD recommendations. These results are used as a basis to provide app developers with certain recommendations. There is a need for better BD apps with more features in order to increase the number of volunteer donors.

  18. Transformation of organ donation in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Li; Gao, Xinpu; Wang, Haibo; Zhu, Youhua

    2015-04-01

    The organ donation system in China has far lagged behind international levels. Transformation of this situation began in July 2005. A complete organ donation system that ensures fairness, impartiality, transparency, and respect for life has now been developed. This system is composed of regulations and policies, an organizational structure, operational guidelines, organ procurement organizations, registration of donors and recipients, and an organ allocation system. Since March 2010, pilot trials on donation after circulatory death (DCD) have been carried out. In 4 years, organ donation has started in 25 of 32 provinces in the country. From 2010 to 2013, the ratio of DCD liver transplantation to total case numbers in China rose from 1.38% to 26.1%, whereas for kidney, the ratio were 0.59% and 24.6%, respectively. The total number of DCD in China has accumulated to 1564 cases, and 4243 organs were transplanted. To alleviate the further difficulties of donation, establishment of professional organ procurement organizations in transplant hospitals, legislation of brain death, and promulgation of legal guidelines on DCD will be the main targets of organ donation development in China.

  19. Protection by organic ions against DNA damage induced by low energy electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, A.; Zheng, Y.; Hunting, D.; Sanche, L.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that electrons below 15 eV induce strand breaks in DNA essentially via the formation of transient anions which decay by dissociative electron attachment (DEA) or into dissociative electronics states. The present article reports the results of a study on the influence of organic ions on this mechanism. tris and EDTA are incorporated at various concentrations within DNA films of different thicknesses. The amino group of tris molecules and the carboxylic acid function of ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) molecules together can be taken as simple model for the amino acids components of proteins, such as histones, which are intimately associated with the DNA of eukaryotic cells. The yield of single strand breaks induced by 10 eV electrons is found to decrease dramatically as a function of the number of organic ions/nucleotide. As few as 2 organic ions/nucleotide are sufficient to decrease the yield of single strand breaks by 70%. This effect is partly explained by an increase in multiple inelastic electrons scattering with film thickness but changes in the resonance parameters can also contribute to DNA protection. This can occur if the electron captures cross section and the lifetime of the transient anions (i.e., core-excited resonances) formed at 10 eV are reduced by the presence of organic ions within the grooves of DNA. Moreover, it is proposed that the tris molecules may participate in the repair of DNA anions [such as G(-H)-] induced by DEA on DNA bases.

  20. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-11-23

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy.

  1. Examination of an Electronic Patient Record Display Method to Protect Patient Information Privacy.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Yukari; Ota, Katsumasa

    2017-02-01

    Electronic patient records facilitate the provision of safe, high-quality medical care. However, because personnel can view almost all stored information, this study designed a display method using a mosaic blur (pixelation) to temporarily conceal information patients do not want shared. This study developed an electronic patient records display method for patient information that balanced the patient's desire for personal information protection against the need for information sharing among medical personnel. First, medical personnel were interviewed about the degree of information required for both individual duties and team-based care. Subsequently, they tested a mock display method that partially concealed information using a mosaic blur, and they were interviewed about the effectiveness of the display method that ensures patient privacy. Participants better understood patients' demand for confidentiality, suggesting increased awareness of patients' privacy protection. However, participants also indicated that temporary concealment of certain information was problematic. Other issues included the inconvenience of removing the mosaic blur to obtain required information and risk of insufficient information for medical care. Despite several issues with using a display method that temporarily conceals information according to patient privacy needs, medical personnel could accept this display method if information essential to medical safety remains accessible.

  2. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M.; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy. PMID:27886076

  3. Protection of dehydrated chicken meat by natural antioxidants as evaluated by electron spin resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nissen, L R; Månsson, L; Bertelsen, G; Huynh-Ba, T; Skibsted, L H

    2000-11-01

    Dehydrated chicken meat (a(w) = 0.20-0.35) made from mechanically deboned chicken necks can be protected against oxidative deterioration during storage by rosemary extract (at a sensory acceptable level of 1000 ppm, incorporated prior to drying). The efficiency of the rosemary extract was similar to that obtained by synthetic antioxidants in a reference product (70 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole and 70 ppm octyl gallate). Tea extract and coffee extract were less efficient than rosemary and synthetic antioxidants. Among the natural antioxidants tested, grape skin extract provided the least protection against oxidative changes in dehydrated chicken meat. Radicals in the product, quantified by direct measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry, developed similarly to headspace ethane, pentane, and hexanal, and to oxygen depletion both in unprotected and protected products. The ESR signal intensity and headspace hexanal both correlated with the sensory descriptor "rancidity" as evaluated by a trained sensory panel. Hexanal, as a secondary lipid oxidation product, showed an exponential dependence on the level of radicals in the product in agreement with a chain reaction mechanism for autoxidation, and direct ESR measurement may be used in quality control of dehydrated food products.

  4. Frequent Embolization in Peripheral Angioplasty: Detection with an Embolism Protection Device (Angio Guard) and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Claudius W. Pusich, Benjamin; Tepe, Gunnar; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Hahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Wilke; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.

    2003-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the deliverability and protection capabilities of an embolism protection filter in angioplasty of peripheral arteries. Methods: The Angioguard emboli capture guidewire system was applied in 11 patients with femoropopliteal lesions (6 stenoses, 3 occlusions, 2 controls).Data on lesion crossing, flow deceleration and macroembolization were recorded. Filter membranes were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: System delivery was successful in all patients. Primary lesion crossing was feasible in four of six stenoses; predilatation was required in two of six. Marked flow deceleration was recorded in six patients. Emboli next to the filter were detected in each patient with concentric plaques, but could not reliably be removed with the filter. Downstream macroembolization was also present in all patients with concentric stenoses, but in none with chronic occlusion. None of the patients had clinical signs of ischemia. SEM analysis demonstrated only small particles on control group filters and non-obliterating fibrinous conglomerates on filters used in chronic occlusion. Substantial obliteration was seen on several filters used in stenotic lesions. Conclusion:Microembolization of fibrin aggregates is a common incident in balloon angioplasty of femoropopliteal stenoses. Macroembolization occurred more frequently than previously reported. The use of embolism protection filters aided in the detection but not in the removal of larger emboli.

  5. Organ donation consanguinity or universality.

    PubMed

    Kishore, R R

    1996-01-01

    1. Neither the "Diseased Persons" nor the "Genetic Relations" provide an answer to "trading" in human body parts. 2. Live human body constitutes a vital source of supply of organs and tissues and the possibilities of optimum utilisation should be explored. 3. There is no scope for dogmatic postures and open-mindedness should be the approach while dealing with the issue of Organ Transplantation. 4. Society owes a duty to save the file of a dying man and in the event of failure to do so, it is absolutely immoral to interfere with his own arrangements by making unrealistic laws. No immorality is involved if an individual disposes of his spare body parts for a valid consideration to a needy person. 5. The scarcity needs to be urgently overcome otherwise unwarranted trade and crime are liable to thrive. 6. Families are not unconnected or antagonistic fragments of humanity. After thousands of years of continuous efforts the individuals on this earth have attained the stage of organic and functional integration. Atomisation of society on the basis of consanguineous proximities amounts to reversing this holistic trend. Organ transplantation is a functional expression of a highly evolved pursuit with inherent and intimate interaction in the form of organic exchange at the individual level, independent of consanguineous inducements or motivations. As such there is absolutely no scope for restricting organ donations by strangers. 7. Commercialisation should be curbed by making the enforcement agencies more efficient and not by depriving a needy person of his genuine requirements. Legislative craftsmanship lies in providing an answer without curtailing the freedom of the people.

  6. The Liverwort, Marchantia, Drives Alternative Electron Flow Using a Flavodiiron Protein to Protect PSI1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Shigeyuki; Sejima, Takehiro

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion efficiency of oxygen in the atmosphere, like that of CO2, is approximately 104 times greater than that in aqueous environments. Consequently, terrestrial photosynthetic organisms need mechanisms to protect against potential oxidative damage. The liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, a basal land plant, has habitats where it is exposed to both water and the atmosphere. Furthermore, like cyanobacteria, M. polymorpha has genes encoding flavodiiron proteins (FLV). In cyanobacteria, FLVs mediate oxygen-dependent alternative electron flow (AEF) to suppress the production of reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigated whether FLVs are required for the protection of photosynthesis in M. polymorpha. A mutant deficient in the FLV1 isozyme (ΔMpFlv1) sustained photooxidative damage to photosystem I (PSI) following repetitive short-saturation pulses of light. Compared with the wild type (Takaragaike-1), ΔMpFlv1 showed the same photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate but a lower electron transport rate during the induction phase of photosynthesis. Additionally, the reaction center chlorophyll in PSI, P700, was highly reduced in ΔMpFlv1 but not in Takaragaike-1. These results indicate that the gene product of MpFlv1 drives AEF to oxidize PSI, as in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, FLV-mediated AEF supports the production of a proton motive force to possibly induce the nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence and suppress electron transport in the cytochrome b6/f complex. After submerging the thalli, a decrease in photosystem II operating efficiency was observed, particularly in ΔMpFlv1, which implies that species living in these sorts of habitats require FLV-mediated AEF. PMID:28153920

  7. Integrating a Machine Protection System for High-Current Free Electron Lasers and Energy Recovery Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; James Coleman; Richard Evans; Al Grippo; Kevin Jordan

    2002-09-01

    A fully integrated Machine Protection System (MPS) is critical to efficient commissioning and safe operation of all high-current accelerators. The MPS needs to monitor the status of all devices that could enter the beam path, the beam loss monitors (BLMs), magnet settings, beam dump status, etc. This information is then presented to the electron source controller, which must limit the beam power or shut down the beam completely. The MPS for the energy recovery linac (ERL) at the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser [1] generates eight different power limits, or beam modes, which are passed to the drive laser pulse controller (DLPC) (photocathode source controller). These range from no beam to nearly 2 megawatts of electron beam power. Automatic masking is used for the BLMs during low-power modes when one might be using beam viewers. The system also reviews the setup for the two different beamlines, the IR path or the UV path, and will allow or disallow operations based on magnet settings and valve positions. This paper will describe the approach taken for the JLab 10-kW FEL. Additional details can be found on our website http://laser.jlab.org [2].

  8. The rate of anti-HIV seropositivity among donated cadavers: experience in a cadaver donation center.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Agthong, Sithiporn

    2002-01-01

    Cadavers are crucial for the medical education provided by medical schools. However, currently, donation is the only way to obtain cadavers for education in Thailand. Moreover, some traditional beliefs result in insufficient numbers of cadavers. Apart from finding donors, the occupational health of the workers in the cadaver donation center and the users, the medical students, residents, and staffs should be addressed. Screening for anti-HIV in donated organs is the current trend in transplantation medicine. Therefore, screening for anti-HIV in donated cadavers is useful. Here, we report the rate of anti-HIV seropositivity in cadavers in a 1-year period in our setting, the largest Thai Red Cross Society hospital. Of the total 84 cadavers received, two cadavers (2.4%) were anti-HIV seropositive. With the increasing rate of anti-HIV, screening for anti-HIV serology in donated cadavers for medical teaching is of great benefit.

  9. The Independent Living Donor Advocate: An Essential Role for Living Kidney Donation.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Karen C

    2014-01-01

    Prior to 2007, living kidney donors who donated a kidney to a person with chronic kidney disease were screened, educated, and cared for by the same healthcare team caring for the recipient of the transplant. The independent living donor advocate or advocate team was created out of the need to ensure that the rights of the person donating a kidney are protected, respected, and maintained. Transplant programs must now have an advocate or advocate team who is separate from the recipient healthcare team to provide objective support for the donor, without regard for the recipient, and avoid any perception of a conflict of interest between the donor and recipient.

  10. [Blood donation in foreign populations in Marseille].

    PubMed

    Duboz, Priscilla; Boëtsch, Gilles; Cunéo, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Blood donations by populations from the Maghreb and Sub-Saharan Africa are a public health necessity for reasons of genetic polymorphism. This article aims to determine whether blood donors' social characteristics ? i.e. greater socio-economic integration and a strong sense of citizenship ? constitute deterrents to blood donation among foreign populations. Results show that donors from the Maghreb and Sub-Saharan Africa are not better integrated than non-donors from the same areas. However, blood donors express a significantly greater sense of citizenship than non-donors. Donors from the Maghreb and Sub-Saharan Africa feel a greater sense of citizenship than non-donors from the same areas. The study of blood donation in these categories of population has two major implications. In biological terms, blood donation by foreign populations constitutes a response to transfusion needs. In cultural terms, blood donation is used by populations from the Maghreb and Sub-Saharan Africa as an active means of expressing their sense of citizenship.

  11. [Kidney donation by living donors. Surgical procedure].

    PubMed

    Baier, P K; Pisarski, P; Wimmenauer, S; Kirste, G

    1999-01-01

    The living donation of kidneys is gaining importance as a possible way to give a transplant to patients with terminal renal insufficiency. However we do not yet have experience with all the possibilities arising from this method. In particular, there is caution caused by the risks of the donor operation. In this context, the method is discussed according to the literature and our own experience of 89 living kidney donations. In our own practice with living donations, we have a success rate with 96% after 4 years and 82% after 16 years. We observed complications including wound infections (10.7%), haemorrhage, hernia and neurological complications (each 2.7%). When performed by specialists, the donor operation is safe and is a responsible alternative to the transplantation of cadaver kidneys, which opens up new possibilities in these times of organ shortage.

  12. [Blood donation: mechanic solidarity versus organic solidarity].

    PubMed

    Pereima, Rosane Suely May Rodrigues; Reibnitz, Kenya Schmidt; Martini, Jussara Gue; Nitschke, Rosane Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    The article offers a reflection of blood donation in an hemocenter of Santa Catarina, with a mechanic and organic solidarity approach. It discuss the way of life in contemporary globalization and the cult of speed in a context pervaded by uncertainties and adversities. People live in a fast world, making social interaction difficult, contributing to the weakening of values and attitudes that could improve the quality of life. Considering the difficulties of everyday contemporary society, concerning Brazilian hemotherapy history on blood donation, there is a perception that attitudes and values, such as solidarity, have been modifying in subtle ways with a background of current events. It searches for understanding of blood donation as mechanic and organic solidarity.

  13. Donation after circulatory death: burying the dead donor rule.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arias, David; Smith, Maxwell J; Lazar, Neil M

    2011-08-01

    Despite continuing controversies regarding the vital status of both brain-dead donors and individuals who undergo donation after circulatory death (DCD), respecting the dead donor rule (DDR) remains the standard moral framework for organ procurement. The DDR increases organ supply without jeopardizing trust in transplantation systems, reassuring society that donors will not experience harm during organ procurement. While the assumption that individuals cannot be harmed once they are dead is reasonable in the case of brain-dead protocols, we argue that the DDR is not an acceptable strategy to protect donors from harm in DCD protocols. We propose a threefold alternative to justify organ procurement practices: (1) ensuring that donors are sufficiently protected from harm; (2) ensuring that they are respected through informed consent; and (3) ensuring that society is fully informed of the inherently debatable nature of any criterion to declare death.

  14. Body donation in India: social awareness, willingness, and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Rokade, Shrikant A; Gaikawad, Anjana P

    2012-01-01

    With the attendant rise of the number of medical colleges in India over past few decades, the demand for cadavers used in medical education and research is growing. However, there is an insufficient supply of donated cadavers available for dissection. This study was undertaken to assess the general population's awareness of body donation programs and willingness to donate in the State of Maharashtra, India. The willingness of participants to donate was compared with age, gender, and education of the respondents. A total of 625 adult individuals from the State of Maharashtra participated in a survey composed of questions about age, sex, education, awareness of body donation programs, and willingness to donate. It was found that 90.9% of the medical colleges surveyed reported an inadequate supply of cadavers. Of the general population, 32.1% of respondents were aware of body donation, compared to 95.83% of health care professionals. However, only 19.5% of the general population and 44.9% of health care professionals were willing to donate their bodies for anatomical education. Younger age groups, males, graduates, and postgraduates were found more willing to donate their bodies. Organ donation was preferred over body donation. A lack of awareness about body donation was the main factor responsible for respondents' "no body donation" response in the general population, along with firm religious beliefs and customs, the fear that the donated body will not be treated with respect and dignity, and the unacceptability of the dissection of one's own body. To overcome the current shortage of donated cadavers, efforts should be undertaken to change the mindset of the wider Indian society toward body donation. The authors believe this is possible through awareness campaigns and that prospective donors' concerns should be addressed appropriately. Proper guidance and assistance regarding body donation should be easily available for potential donors.

  15. "The Tramp", a blood donation propagandist?

    PubMed

    Lefrère, J-J; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    The French pioneer for blood transfusion, who eventually organized the very early blood transfusion centers worldwide, went to imagine a scenario written in purpose for Charlie Chaplin, the unique character of "The Tramp" ("Charlot" in French). The movie Star was offered to feature a blood donation propagandist, and no longer the perpetual, well-known, "loser". This anecdote, besides being amusing, tells a lot on how Arnault Tzank encompassed all the difficulties in collecting blood enough to meet the demand, at all times; his proposal turns out to be extremely modern and questions nowadays marketing for blood donation.

  16. Blood Shortage Prompts Red Cross Call for Donations

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Blood Shortage Prompts Red Cross Call for Donations Says decline in donors seen over holidays To ... 2017 FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Blood donations to the American Red Cross have slumped recently, ...

  17. 50 CFR 12.36 - Donation or loan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... any time. (c) Wildlife and plants may be donated to individual American Indians for the practice of traditional American Indian religions. Any donation of the parts of bald or golden eagles to American...

  18. 50 CFR 12.36 - Donation or loan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... any time. (c) Wildlife and plants may be donated to individual American Indians for the practice of traditional American Indian religions. Any donation of the parts of bald or golden eagles to American...

  19. 78 FR 76728 - Charitable Donation Accounts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...The NCUA Board (Board) is issuing a final rule to amend its regulations to clarify that federal credit unions are authorized to create and fund a charitable donation account, a hybrid charitable and investment vehicle, as an activity incidental to the business for which the credit union is chartered, provided the account is primarily charitable in nature and meets other regulatory conditions......

  20. [Basic ethical aspects of living organ donation].

    PubMed

    Nagel, E; Mayer, J

    2003-06-01

    A characteristic feature of transplanting organs from living donors is that not only patients in need for treatment but also healthy individuals are submitted to medical interventions. Ethical considerations in this field have to deal with the question of property attributes of the human body and conflicts with traditional medical principles. Altruistic organ donation, appreciated by Christianity as a sign of charity, is indeed contradictory to the classic maxim of medical ethics "primum nihil nocere, " meaning "first of all, do not harm." The autonomous choice of a potential donor has to be balanced thoroughly against his personal physical and psychological risks. Apart from organ donation with altruistic motives, commercial incentives or payment for organ donation, which are increasingly under discussion in many nations, need profound ethical reflection. Organ selling does not lead to long-term economic benefit for individual donors in developing countries and is associated with a decline in health. A market system of organ sales would foster exploitation of the poor, and it is substantially doubtful whether autonomy and self determination are valid under circumstances of poverty and coercion. Commodification of the human body risks viewing persons as marketable objects. The human body,however, is an integral element of an individual's personality and not a resource to be removed. It is therefore fundamental that the social good of altruism is preserved as the major principle in organ donation.

  1. The Path to a $300-Million Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masterson, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    The first time Edward A. Snyder, dean of the University of Chicago's graduate business school, asked David G. Booth to donate money to name something on the campus, Mr. Booth said no. Five years later, the University's Graduate School of Business is named the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, after Mr. Booth gave what is valued as a…

  2. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  3. 38 CFR 38.603 - Gifts and donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gifts and donations. 38...) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.603 Gifts and donations. (a) Gifts and donations will be accepted only after it has been determined that the donor has a clear understanding...

  4. 12 CFR 701.25 - Charitable contributions and donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Charitable contributions and donations. 701.25... ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS § 701.25 Charitable contributions and donations. (a) A... directors must approve charitable contributions and/or donations, and the approval must be based on...

  5. 18 CFR 367.4261 - Account 426.1, Donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Account 426.1, Donations. 367.4261 Section 367.4261 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY..., Donations. This account must include all payments or donations for charitable, social or community...

  6. 48 CFR 31.205-8 - Contributions or donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contributions or donations. 31.205-8 Section 31.205-8 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Organizations 31.205-8 Contributions or donations. Contributions or donations, including cash, property...

  7. 42 CFR 433.66 - Permissible provider-related donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible provider-related donations. 433.66... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.66 Permissible provider-related donations. (a) General rule... provider-related donations without a reduction in FFP, only in accordance with the requirements of...

  8. 78 FR 3023 - Draft Policy on Donations, Fundraising, and Solicitation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service RIN 1018-AY36 Draft Policy on Donations, Fundraising, and Solicitation AGENCY..., and provides general guidance on fundraising by non-Federal entities on the Service's behalf. It also..., fundraising, and solicitation. While donations can be a means to further our mission, not all donations...

  9. 75 FR 17843 - National Donate Life Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8491 of April 1, 2010 National Donate Life Month, 2010 By the President of.... During National Donate Life Month, we honor donors who provide others with a second chance for a healthy... Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 2010 as National Donate Life Month....

  10. 78 FR 20217 - National Donate Life Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8950 of March 29, 2013 National Donate Life Month, 2013 By the President of... commitment to one another. During National Donate Life Month, we renew the call for organ and tissue donation... patients from getting life-saving care. Let us mark this month by rededicating ourselves to that...

  11. 23 CFR 710.505 - Real property donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-WAY AND REAL ESTATE Property Acquisition Alternatives § 710.505 Real property donations. (a) Donations of property being acquired. A non-governmental owner whose real property is required for a Federal... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Real property donations. 710.505 Section...

  12. 23 CFR 710.505 - Real property donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-WAY AND REAL ESTATE Property Acquisition Alternatives § 710.505 Real property donations. (a) Donations of property being acquired. A non-governmental owner whose real property is required for a Federal... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Real property donations. 710.505 Section...

  13. Does financial compensation for living kidney donation change willingness to donate?

    PubMed

    Gordon, E J; Patel, C H; Sohn, M-W; Hippen, B; Sherman, L A

    2015-01-01

    The potential use of financial compensation to increase living kidney donation rates remains controversial in potentially introducing undue inducement of vulnerable populations to donate. This cross-sectional study assessed amounts of financial compensation that would generate motivation and an undue inducement to donate to family/friends or strangers. Individuals leaving six Departments of Motor Vehicles were surveyed. Of the 210 participants who provided verbal consent (94% participation rate), respondents' willingness to donate would not change (70%), or would increase (29%) with compensation. Median lowest amounts of financial compensation for which participants would begin to consider donating a kidney were $5000 for family/friends, and $10,000 for strangers; respondents reporting $0 for family/friends (52%) or strangers (26%) were excluded from analysis. Median lowest amounts of financial compensation for which participants could no longer decline (perceive an undue inducement) were $50,000 for family/friends, and $100,000 for strangers; respondents reporting $0 for family/friends (44%) or strangers (23%) were excluded from analysis. The two most preferred forms of compensation included: direct payment of money (61%) and paid leave (21%). The two most preferred uses of compensation included: paying off debt (38%) and paying nonmedical expenses associated with the transplant (29%). Findings suggest tolerance for, but little practical impact of, financial compensation. Certain compensation amounts could motivate the public to donate without being perceived as an undue inducement.

  14. Mitochondrial donation and ‘the right to know’

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Reuven

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I examine two key arguments advanced by the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA) and the Nuffield Council justifying anonymous mitochondrial donation, even though the ‘right to know’ is recognised in standard gamete donation. I argue that the two arguments they offer, what I call the argument from genetic connection and the argument from personal characteristics, are unsuccessful. However, I provide additional reasons for why recognising the right to know in gamete donation but not in mitochondrial donation may be justified. I further argue that the status quo in the UK, which is to not recognise a right to know in mitochondrial donation, is provisionally acceptable. PMID:27542387

  15. Donor motivations, associated risks and ethical considerations of oocyte donation.

    PubMed

    Boutelle, Amy L

    2014-01-01

    Three decades after the first reported successful cases, oocyte donation continues to grow in popularity and regard as an established method to aid women in achieving their reproductive goals. As a result of the increased demand for donated oocytes, many young women in the U.S. volunteer to undergo complex medical procedures to donate their oocytes in return for financial compensation. To best care for these women before, during and after donation, it is important to explore donor characteristics and motivations, discuss the safety of the donation procedure and examine the ethical issues related to this process.

  16. Protection of DNA against low-energy electrons by amino acids: a first-principles molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bin; Smyth, Maeve; Kohanoff, Jorge

    2014-11-28

    Using first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the notion that amino acids can play a protective role when DNA is exposed to excess electrons produced by ionizing radiation. In this study we focus on the interaction of glycine with the DNA nucleobase thymine. We studied thymine-glycine dimers and a condensed phase model consisting of one thymine molecule solvated in amorphous glycine. Our results show that the amino acid acts as a protective agent for the nucleobase in two ways. If the excess electron is initially captured by the thymine, then a proton is transferred in a barrier-less way from a neighboring hydrogen-bonded glycine. This stabilizes the excess electron by reducing the net partial charge on the thymine. In the second mechanism the excess electron is captured by a glycine, which acts as a electron scavenger that prevents electron localization in DNA. Both these mechanisms introduce obstacles to further reactions of the excess electron within a DNA strand, e.g. by raising the free energy barrier associated with strand breaks.

  17. Willingness to Consider Non-Directed Kidney Donation.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, Diane B V; Kuntz, Kristin K

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether factors, including knowledge about living kidney donation or acquaintance with a donor or recipient, are related to willingness to consider donating a kidney. Participants were randomly assigned to read (n = 78) or not read (n = 71) educational materials regarding living donation. All participants then completed a living donation knowledge quiz, indicated whether they knew a donor or recipient, and indicated their support for living donation. Knowledge was not related to willingness to consider donation. Acquaintance with a living donor predicated greater willingness to act as a non-directed living donor, as did acquaintance with a transplant recipient. Decisions regarding whether to consider acting as a living organ donor may be related to whether a person is acquainted with an organ donor or a recipient. Emphasizing personal connections to transplant may lead to increased acceptance of living donation.

  18. A 15-year review of ABC, CBS, and NBC news coverage of organ donation: implications for organ donation campaigns.

    PubMed

    Quick, Brian L; Kim, Do Kyun; Meyer, Kevin

    2009-03-01

    This content analysis represents news coverage of organ donation from January 1990 to December 2005. Specifically, ABC, CBS, and NBC news broadcasts were examined to gain a greater understanding of organ donation coverage on TV. Overall this investigation revealed that organ donation received modest coverage (N = 1,507). Although the majority of coverage was positive, attention to the need for organs and the process of becoming a potential organ donor received modest exposure. In addition, non-living donor and living-donor donations received approximately equal coverage. Results are discussed with a focus on message design for practitioners and advocates of organ donation.

  19. The capacity for thermal protection of photosynthetic electron transport varies for different monoterpenes in Quercus ilex.

    PubMed

    Copolovici, Lucian O; Filella, Iolanda; Llusià, Joan; Niinemets, Ulo; Peñuelas, Josep

    2005-09-01

    Heat stress resistance of foliar photosynthetic apparatus was investigated in the Mediterranean monoterpene-emitting evergreen sclerophyll species Quercus ilex. Leaf feeding with fosmidomycin, which is a specific inhibitor of the chloroplastic isoprenoid synthesis pathway, essentially stopped monoterpene emission and resulted in the decrease of the optimum temperature of photosynthetic electron transport from approximately 38 degrees C to approximately 30 degrees C. The heat stress resistance was partly restored by fumigation with 4 to 5 nmol mol(-1) air concentrations of monoterpene alpha-pinene but not with fumigations with monoterpene alcohol alpha-terpineol. Analyses of monoterpene physicochemical characteristics demonstrated that alpha-pinene was primarily distributed to leaf gas and lipid phases, while alpha-terpineol was primarily distributed to leaf aqueous phase. Thus, for a common monoterpene uptake rate, alpha-terpineol is less efficient in stabilizing membrane liquid-crystalline structure and as an antioxidant in plant membranes. Furthermore, alpha-terpineol uptake rate (U) strongly decreased with increasing temperature, while the uptake rates of alpha-pinene increased with increasing temperature, providing a further explanation of the lower efficiency of thermal protection by alpha-terpineol. The temperature-dependent decrease of alpha-terpineol uptake was both due to decreases in stomatal conductance, g(w), and increased volatility of alpha-terpineol at higher temperature that decreased the monoterpene diffusion gradient between the ambient air (F(A)) and leaf (F(I); U = g(w)[F(A) - F(I)]). Model analyses suggested that alpha-pinene reacted within the leaf at higher temperatures, possibly within the lipid phase, thereby avoiding the decrease in diffusion gradient, F(A) - F(I). Thus, these data contribute to the hypothesis of the antioxidative protection of leaf membranes during heat stress by monoterpenes. These data further suggest that fumigation

  20. The Australian experience in organ donation--2003.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The Australian performance in deceased donor organ donation continues to languish near the bottom of the International ladder. This is despite a national expenditure on health 10% more than the average OECD country (dollars per capita) and the presence of active transplantation programs (heart, kidney, liver, lung and pancreas) with excellent success rates. The deceased donor rate has fallen from 14 donors pmp in 1989 to 9 at the present time and appears to be still falling. Living donors now outnumber deceased donors as a source of kidney transplants. Causes of the low deceased donor rate appear to include variable management of severe brain injury, shortage of ICU beds, lack of ICU priority to potential donors when beds are restricted, and a low family consent rate (50%) despite 83% of the public being willing to donate. Programs aimed at addressing these issues are planned and include additional funding for beds, improved identification of donors and a standard pathway for managing severe brain injury.

  1. Options for the disposal of unwanted donations.

    PubMed

    Cooper, E R

    1990-10-01

    Donations of biomedical books and journals frequently duplicate the holdings of a receiving library. A decision must then be made concerning the distribution of the material to other libraries that may need it. What options are available to the librarian? Are many volumes of valuable material destroyed each year because libraries lack the necessary staff, space, or money to distribute donated materials? Are libraries restricted in choice of methods for distribution or unaware of available options? A survey questionnaire was mailed to 150 health sciences libraries in the spring of 1988 to determine the various methods used to dispose of unwanted gift materials. A total of 113 responses was received (75% return rate). This paper reports the results and discusses some of the creative methods used by receiving libraries to place unneeded materials. Statistical comparisons are included for the methods used by academic, hospital, and other types of health sciences libraries.

  2. Donors' attitudes towards body donation for dissection.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R; Hurwitz, B

    1995-07-29

    We report a survey in the UK of potential whole-body donors for dissection. 218 people (age range 19-97 years) answered a postal questionnaire, giving information about themselves, their reasons for donation, attitudes towards the dead body, funeral preferences and medical giving and receiving. In addition to altruism, motives included the wish to avoid funeral ceremonies, to avoid waste, and in a few cases, to evade the expense of a funeral. 44% understood that their bodies would be used as teaching material, 42% for experiments. Whilst 69% believed in one or more supernatural phenomena, only 39% said they were religious. 69% requested cremation after dissection; 2% wanted to be buried. The notion of money incentives to promote donation was overwhelmingly rejected.

  3. [Future technological evolutions in blood donation qualification].

    PubMed

    Assal, Azzedine; Py, Jean-Yves; Corbi, Cécile; Barlet, Valérie; Roubinet, Francis; De Micco, Philippe

    2007-05-01

    In the past decades, blood donation screening contributed significantly to blood safety improvement, thanks to the increasing performances of serological and nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays, as well as the evolution of automated systems technology. The rapid pace of NAT development can be clearly seen to extend into the future. NAT for additional viruses as well as the use of new automated systems for individual donation or smaller mini-pool testing, with multiplex assays, is currently debated. However, few added benefit is expected for blood safety from such developments, while cost-effectiveness appears to be poor. The next step in laboratory automation will probably be the implementation of robotic pre- and post-analytical procedures. In this article we review the potential future evolutions of screening technologies in blood qualification platforms, particularly those derived from nanobiotechnologies. DNA microarrays, Lab-On-Chips, biosensors and nanoparticles (quantum dots) will probably play a major role in the coming decade.

  4. Options for the disposal of unwanted donations.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, E R

    1990-01-01

    Donations of biomedical books and journals frequently duplicate the holdings of a receiving library. A decision must then be made concerning the distribution of the material to other libraries that may need it. What options are available to the librarian? Are many volumes of valuable material destroyed each year because libraries lack the necessary staff, space, or money to distribute donated materials? Are libraries restricted in choice of methods for distribution or unaware of available options? A survey questionnaire was mailed to 150 health sciences libraries in the spring of 1988 to determine the various methods used to dispose of unwanted gift materials. A total of 113 responses was received (75% return rate). This paper reports the results and discusses some of the creative methods used by receiving libraries to place unneeded materials. Statistical comparisons are included for the methods used by academic, hospital, and other types of health sciences libraries. Images PMID:2224303

  5. Cadaveric & living organ donation. Asian experience.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The number of organ transplants performed in Asian countries during 2001 and 2002 are reported along with the present status of dialysis patients. Questionnaires were sent to key persons of each country where transplantation currently takes place. The total number of organ transplants is gradually decreasing, particularly those using cadaveric donors, while liver and lung transplantation using living donors are growing in Japan and Korea. Education and stimulation of the public is strongly requested to promote donation.

  6. Donate Food to Free Your Boss | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    For the third year in a row, NCI at Frederick is participating in the Feds Feed Families campaign, which aims to stock food banks during the summer when donations are often limited. The 2016 campaign runs through August 31. This year, the Office of Scientific Operations (OSO) has decided to send the campaign off with a twist. Rich Folkers, public affairs specialist, Office of Scientific Operations, came up with the idea for a "lock-in" event.

  7. [Marketing in the world of blood donation].

    PubMed

    Daigneault, Sylvie

    2007-05-01

    Public and non-profit organizations have long debated how marketing concepts and management styles apply to their sector of activity as they are largely derived from principles of consumerism and economic decision-making proper to the private sector. The arrival of marketing in the world of blood donation is no exception. The purpose of this article is to illustrate concretely how marketing techniques can contribute in achieving the objectives of a blood donation program: a marketing model that is adapted to the realities of blood donation in Quebec. Although types of marketing are as varied as the fields they are used in, the major marketing activities of this program fall under positioning, operational or relationship marketing. The process is presented in the form of a cycle that includes four major phases containing all marketing functions, that is, raising public awareness, acquiring a clientele, client retention and loyalty building, and establishing the relationship. Finally, the information and effective management of information are at the heart of the marketing process. In fact, research, understanding our customers and their expectations, and measuring our performance are essential for the success of any marketing initiative.

  8. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears.

  9. Can donated media placements reach intended audiences?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer; Polonec, Lindsey

    2013-09-01

    Donated media placements for public service announcements (PSAs) can be difficult to secure, and may not always reach intended audiences. Strategies used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) to obtain donated media placements include producing a diverse mix of high-quality PSAs, co-branding with state and tribal health agencies, securing celebrity involvement, monitoring media trends to identify new distribution opportunities, and strategically timing the release of PSAs. To investigate open-ended recall of PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, CDC conducted 12 focus groups in three U.S. cities with men and women either nearing age 50 years, when screening is recommended to begin, or aged 50-75 years who were not in compliance with screening guidelines. In most focus groups, multiple participants recalled exposure to PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, and most of these individuals reported having seen SFL PSAs on television, in transit stations, or on the sides of public buses. Some participants reported exposure to SFL PSAs without prompting from the moderator, as they explained how they learned about the disease. Several participants reported learning key campaign messages from PSAs, including that colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 years and screening can find polyps so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Donated media placements can reach and educate mass audiences, including millions of U.S. adults who have not been screened appropriately for colorectal cancer.

  10. An inventory of reasons for sperm donation in formal versus informal settings.

    PubMed

    Bossema, Ercolie R; Janssens, Pim M W; Treucker, Roswitha G L; Landwehr, Frieda; van Duinen, Kor; Nap, Annemiek W; Geenen, Rinie

    2014-03-01

    The shortage of sperm donors in formal settings (i.e., assisted reproduction clinics) and the availability of sperm donors in informal settings (such as through contacts on the internet) motivated us to investigate why men may prefer either a formal or an informal setting for sperm donation. Interviews with ten sperm donors and non-sperm donors yielded 55 reasons for sperm donation in the two settings. These reasons were categorized according to similarity by 14 sperm donors and non-sperm donors. These categorizations were then structured by means of hierarchical cluster analysis. Reasons favouring formal settings included being legally and physically protected, evading paternal feelings or social consequences, and having a simple, standardized procedure in terms of effort and finances. Reasons favouring informal settings related to engagement, the possibility to choose a recipient, lack of rules and regulations, having contact with the donor child, and having an (intimate) bond with the recipient. The overview of reasons identified may help potential sperm donors decide on whether to donate in a formal or informal setting, and may fuel discussions by professionals about the most appropriate conditions and legislation for sperm donation in formal settings.

  11. Ethical issues surrounding the use of images from donated cadavers in the anatomical sciences.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Jon; Callahan, David; Wee, Richman

    2016-01-01

    Body donor programs rely on the generosity and trust of the public to facilitate the provision of cadaver resources for anatomical education and research. The uptake and adoption of emerging technologies, including those allowing the acquisition and distribution of images, are becoming more widespread, including within anatomical science education. Images of cadavers are useful for research and education, and their supply and distribution have commercial potential for textbooks and online education. It is unclear whether the utilization of images of donated cadavers are congruent with donor expectations, societal norms and boundaries of established public understanding. Presently, no global "best practices" or standards exist, nor is there a common model requiring specific image-related consent from body donors. As ongoing success of body donation programs relies upon the ethical and institutional governance of body utilization to maintain trust and a positive relationship with potential donors and the community, discussions considering the potential impact of image misuse are important. This paper discusses the subject of images of donated cadavers, commenting on images in non-specific use, education, research, and commercial applications. It explores the role and significance of such images in the context of anatomical science and society, and discusses how misuse - including unconsented use - of images has the potential to affect donor program success, suggesting that informed consent is currently necessary for all images arising from donated cadavers. Its purpose is to encourage discussion to guide responsible utilization of cadaver images, while protecting the interests of body donors and the public.

  12. The national program for deceased organ donation in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiefu; Wang, Haibo; Fan, Sheung Tat; Zhao, Baige; Zhang, Zongjiu; Hao, Lina; Huo, Feng; Liu, Yongfeng

    2013-07-15

    China has developed a new national program for deceased-organ donation to address the need for organ transplantation in the country. The program adheres to the World Health Organization (WHO) guiding principles, is compliant with the Declaration of Istanbul, and respects the cultural and social values of the Chinese people. The experience of pilot trials conducted between 2010 and 2012 was evaluated to generate a comprehensive design of a national program of organ donation and transplantation for implementation throughout China. The legal framework for this program was established from a series of legislative steps since 2007. Accountable national committees have been established to oversee activities of organ donation and transplantation across the nation. The Ministry of Health (MOH) has accredited 164 organ transplant hospitals in China, each of which has an organ procurement organization (OPO) to conduct organ donation and organ recovery. National protocols for deceased-organ donation in China include category I (organ donation after brain death), category II (organ donation after circulatory death), and category III (organ donation after brain death followed by circulatory death). The China Organ Transplant Response System (COTRS) has been developed to allocate organs equitably and transparently. Scientific registries have been established to evaluate the performance of transplant centers and OPOs. China is in the process of implementing a new national program for deceased-organ donation. The program includes a unique approach of organ donation, China category III, which will be promulgated throughout China and is intended to gain widespread acceptance of Chinese society.

  13. The Consequences of Vagueness in Consent to Organ Donation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David M

    2016-12-28

    In this article I argue that vagueness concerning consent to post-mortem organ donation causes considerable harm in several ways. First, the information provided to most people registering as organ donors is very vague in terms of what is actually involved in donation. Second, the vagueness regarding consent to donation increases the distress of families of patients who are potential organ donors, both during and following the discussion about donation. Third, vagueness also increases the chances that the patient's intention to donate will not be fulfilled due to the family's distress. Fourth, the consequent reduction in the number of donated organs leads to avoidable deaths and increased suffering among potential recipients, and distresses them and their families. There are three strategies which could be used to reduce the harmful effects of this vagueness. First, recategorizing the reasons (commonly referred to as 'overrules' under the current system) given by families who refuse donation from registered donors would bring greater clarity to donation discussions. Second, people who wish to donate their organs should be encouraged to discuss their wishes in detail with their families, and to consider recording their wishes in other ways. Finally, the consent system for organ donation could be made more detailed, ensuring both that more information is provided to potential donors and that they have more flexibility in how their intentions are indicated; this last strategy, however, could have the disadvantage of discouraging some potential donors from registering.

  14. Individuals’ Decision to Co-Donate or Donate Alone: An Archival Study of Married Whole Body Donors in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Anteby, Michel; Garip, Filiz; Martorana, Paul V.; Lozanoff, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background Human cadavers are crucial to numerous aspects of health care, including initial and continuing training of medical doctors and advancement of medical research. Concerns have periodically been raised about the limited number of whole body donations. Little is known, however, about a unique form of donation, namely co-donations or instances when married individuals decide to register at the same time as their spouse as whole body donors. Our study aims to determine the extent of whole body co-donation and individual factors that might influence co-donation. Methods and Findings We reviewed all records of registrants to the University of Hawaii Medical School’s whole body donation program from 1967 through 2006 to identify married registrants. We then examined the 806 married individuals’ characteristics to understand their decision to register alone or with their spouse. We found that married individuals who registered at the same time as their spouse accounted for 38.2 percent of married registrants. Sex differences provided an initial lens to understand co-donation. Wives were more likely to co-donate than to register alone (p = 0.002). Moreover, registrants’ main occupational background had a significant effect on co-donations (p = 0.001). Married registrants (regardless of sex) in female-gendered occupations were more likely to co-donate than to donate alone (p = 0.014). Female-gendered occupations were defined as ones in which women represented more than 55 percent of the workforce (e.g., preschool teachers). Thus, variations in donors’ occupational backgrounds explained co-donation above and beyond sex differences. Conclusions Efforts to secure whole body donations have historically focused on individual donations regardless of donors’ marital status. More attention needs to be paid, however, to co-donations since they represent a non-trivial number of total donations. Also, targeted outreach efforts to male and female members

  15. Addressing Consent Issues in Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death.

    PubMed

    Overby, Kim J; Weinstein, Michael S; Fiester, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Given the widening gap between the number of individuals on transplant waiting lists and the availability of donated organs, as well as the recent plateau in donations based on neurological criteria (i.e., brain death), there has been a growing interest in expanding donation after circulatory determination of death. While the prevalence of this form of organ donation continues to increase, many thorny ethical issues remain, often creating moral distress in both clinicians and families. In this article, we address one of these issues, namely, the challenges surrounding patient and surrogate informed consent for donation after circulatory determination of death. First we discuss several general concerns regarding consent related to this form of organ donation, and then we address additional issues that are unique to three different patient categories: adult patients with medical decision-making capacity or potential capacity, adult patients who lack capacity, and pediatric patients.

  16. Awareness of Religious Leaders’ Fatwa and Willingness to Donate Organ

    PubMed Central

    Afzal Aghaee, M.; Dehghani, M.; Sadeghi, M.; Khaleghi, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is believed that religious leaders’ positive attitude towards organ donation can be an effective factor in Muslims’ inclination to donate organs. Objective: To assess the knowledge of freshmen students in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences about religious leaders’ fatwa on organ donation and its effect on their willingness to donate organs. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on 400 freshmen of various medical disciplines, selected using a simple random sampling in Mashhad, Iran. Data were collected by a valid and reliable researcher-made questionnaire. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 41.5% of the students were aware of religious authorities’ views on organ donation and 55.6% were willing to donate organs. Participants’ main reasons for lack of willingness to donate organs included the fear of organ donation before the brain death is confirmed (52%), unwillingness to disfigure their body (51%), and belief in the burial of organs (50%). The willingness to organ donation for students who were aware of religious leaders opinion was more than twice more than those who were not (OR: 2.56, 95% CI: 1.75–4.52). Also, female gender, the Shia religion and awareness of the correct definition of brain death were associated factors affecting the desire to donate organs, although their effects were not statistically significant on regression model. Conclusion: A considerable proportion of students were not aware of the religious leaders’ fatwa on organ donation. The most important factor for the desire to donate organs was the awareness of religious leaders’ fatwa. Therefore, it seems necessary that religious leaders’ fatwa be known to all by appropriate methods. PMID:26576261

  17. Donator acceptor map of psittacofulvins and anthocyanins: are they good antioxidant substances?

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2009-04-09

    Psittacofulvins represent an unusual class of pigments (noncarotenoid lipochromes), which are found only in the red, orange, and yellow plumage of parrots. Anthocyanins are flavonoids, and they are one of the primary types of colorants found in plants. Blue butterflies acquire blue and UV hues on their wings, owing to the presence of flavonoids. It is assumed that these natural pigments are valuable antioxidants because they are able to scavenge free radicals. The aim of this investigation is to rationalize the scavenging activity of psittacofulvins and anthocyanins, in terms of the one electron transfer mechanism, taking into account that to prevent oxidative stress, substances must either donate or accept electrons. Density functional approximation calculations are used to obtain ionization potentials, electron affinities, electrodonating, and electroaccepting power indexes. Taking these values, a donator acceptor map (DAM) was constructed, indicating that anthocyanins are good electron donors, whereas psittacofulvins are good electron acceptors. Anthocyanins and vitamins are antioxidants, whereas psittacofulvins and carotenoids are antireductants (oxidants). In terms of solvent effects, animal pigments (carotenoids, psittacofulvins, and anthocyanins) are much better electron acceptors in water than in either the gas phase or benzene. Solvent effects do not alter the electron donor capacity of vitamins, but anthocyanins become effective electron acceptors in water, rather than effective electron donors. The information presented here may also be valuable for the design and analysis of further experiments.

  18. 41 CFR 102-37.520 - What is the authority for public airport donations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for public airport donations? 102-37.520 Section 102-37.520 Public Contracts and Property Management... 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Airports § 102-37.520 What is the authority for public airport donations? The authority for public airport donations is 49 U.S.C. 47151. 49...

  19. 41 CFR 102-37.520 - What is the authority for public airport donations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for public airport donations? 102-37.520 Section 102-37.520 Public Contracts and Property Management... 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Airports § 102-37.520 What is the authority for public airport donations? The authority for public airport donations is 49 U.S.C. 47151. 49...

  20. 41 CFR 102-37.35 - Who handles the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who handles the donation...-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Provisions Donation Overview § 102-37.35 Who handles the donation of surplus property? (a) The SASPs handle the donation of most surplus property to eligible...

  1. 41 CFR 102-37.45 - How long is property available for donation screening?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... available for donation screening? 102-37.45 Section 102-37.45 Public Contracts and Property Management... 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Provisions Donation Overview § 102-37.45 How long is property available for donation screening? Entities authorized to participate in the donation program...

  2. 41 CFR 102-37.30 - When does property become available for donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... become available for donation? 102-37.30 Section 102-37.30 Public Contracts and Property Management... 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Provisions Donation Overview § 102-37.30 When does property become available for donation? Excess personal property becomes available for donation the...

  3. Financial compensation for deceased organ donation in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoliang; Fang, Qiang

    2013-06-01

    In March 2010, China launched a pilot programme of deceased donor organ donation in 10 provinces and cities. However, the deceased donor donation rate in China remains significantly lower than in Spain and other Western countries. In order to provide incentive for deceased donor organ donation, five pilot provinces and cities have subsequently launched a financial compensation policy. Financial compensation can be considered to include two main forms, the 'thank you' form and the 'help' form. The 'thank you' form is an expression of gratitude on behalf of the Red Cross Society of China for consenting to donation. The 'help' form is social welfare support for needy families.

  4. Altruism and reward: motivational compatibility in deceased organ donation.

    PubMed

    Voo, Teck Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Acts of helping others are often based on mixed motivations. Based on this claim, it has been argued that the use of a financial reward to incentivize organ donation is compatible with promoting altruism in organ donation. In its report Human Bodies: Donation for Medicine and Research, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics uses this argument to justify its suggestion to pilot a funeral payment scheme to incentivize people to register for deceased organ donation in the UK. In this article, I cast a sceptical eye on the above Nuffield report's argument that its proposed funeral payment scheme would prompt deceased organ donations that remain altruistic (as defined by and valued the report). Specifically, I illustrate how this scheme may prompt various forms of mixed motivations which would not satisfy the report's definition of altruism. Insofar as the scheme produces an expectation of the reward, it stands diametrical to promoting an 'altruistic perspective'. My minimal goal in this article is to argue that altruism is not motivationally compatible with reward as an incentive for donation. My broader goal is to argue that if a financial reward is used to incentivize organ donation, then we should recognize that the donation system is no longer aiming to promote altruism. Rewarded donation would not be altruistic but it may be ethical given a persistent organ shortage situation.

  5. Donation after cardiac death in abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reich, David J; Guy, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the field of donation after cardiac death, focusing on the history, ethicolegal issues, clinical outcomes, best practices, operative techniques, and emerging strategies to optimize utilization of this resource. Donation after cardiac death is one effective way to decrease the organ shortage and has contributed the largest recent increase in abdominal organ allografts. Currently, donation after cardiac death organs confer an increased risk of ischemic cholangiopathy after liver transplant and of delayed graft function after kidney transplant. As this field matures, risk factors for donation after cardiac death organ transplant will be further identified and clinical outcomes will improve as a result of protocol standardization and ongoing research.

  6. Can we create ethnically diverse skeletal collection from donated bodies?

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Understanding bone health is least invasively and most effectively done through studying skeletal remains that reflect the living populations who will benefit from the knowledge produced through research. Donated body collections that accurately represent modern populations are needed for osteological insights to be applied to clinical practices. However, even though the US is growing increasingly diverse, donated body collections still suffer from a lack of ethnic diversity. Most individuals who donate their whole-bodies after death are European-American. Reasons for a lack of ethnic diversity stem from past injustices and present religious norms. Increasing body donation among minorities in the US and abroad may be difficult.

  7. Organ donation: a significant marketing challenge.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Roberta N

    2007-01-01

    Unlike most health care markets, the organ donation market is one where patients are the marketers, prospective donors are the customers, and no payment is allowed in the exchange process. The assumption that altruistic behavior by donors would satisfy the need for organs has proven woefully untrue. As a result, those needing organs have resorted to relying on unwilling or impoverished donors, to having to promote themselves on websites which have achieved success for only small numbers of patients, or to waiting for organs which they may never receive. This remains a still unsolved marketing challenge.

  8. Incentives for organ donation: some ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Sells, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Objections to commerce in organs has not stopped the spread of such practice around the world. In most countries the gap between supply and demand for organs continues to increase. Kidneys from living donors are considered a valuable addition to the donor pool, and in a more acquisitive world, donor incentives are becoming thinkable, even acceptable. Current incentives for cadaver and living organ donation are reviewed from ethical and legal perspectives. A new principle of reimbursement for the living donor's risk and pain is defined and presented for debate.

  9. [The ethics of organ donation for transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, F V

    1994-01-01

    The new law 12/93, which regulates organ donation for transplantation in Portugal, is reviewed. The author emphasizes the importance of some legal improvements to allow a better fulfillment of the first principles of ethics that will rule the conflicts of interest between living and dead donors and recipients. Criticism is made of the interference that the Ministry of Health will have in the decision of doctors' and Medical Centres' competence. The importance given to economic reasons which stimulate political promotion and minimise ethical and professional reasons would become future factors of obstruction and backwardness.

  10. Characteristics of homosexual men who donate blood.

    PubMed

    Ross, M W; Drew, P A; Beal, R W

    1985-03-18

    A number of demographic, psychological, medical, immunological and haematological indices, as well as sexual practices and partner numbers, were investigated in 97 homosexual men in Adelaide. A comparison of blood donors with non-donors among these men showed that the donors were younger, spent more time in the homosexual subculture, maintained a stable blood-donation pattern, and were significantly less likely to have had a sexually transmitted disease. Donors contacted their sexual partners in non-anonymous settings more frequently than did non-donors.

  11. Inhaled nitric oxide for the brain dead donor with neurogenic pulmonary edema during anesthesia for organ donation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Sun; Lee, A-Ran; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, An Suk; Park, Soon Eun; Cho, Young Woo

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) in brain dead organ donors occurring after an acute central nervous system insult threatens organ preservation of potential organ donors and the outcome of organ donation. Hence the active and immediate management of NPE is critical. In this case, a 50-year-old male was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for organ donation. He was hypoxic due to NPE induced by spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage. Protective ventilatory management, intermittent recruitment maneuvers, and supportive treatment were maintained in the ICU and the operating room (OR). Despite this management, the hypoxemia worsened after the OR admission. So inhaled nitric oxide (NO) therapy was performed during the operation, and the hypoxic phenomena showed remarkable improvement. The organ retrieval was successfully completed. Therefore, NO inhalation can be helpful in the improvement of hypoxemia caused by NPE in brain dead organ donors during anesthesia for the organ donation. PMID:25237451

  12. Oocyte donation in patients without ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Devroey, P; Wisanto, A; Camus, M; Van Waesberghe, L; Bourgain, C; Liebaers, I; Van Steirteghem, A C

    1988-08-01

    The clinical, hormonal and cytogenetic findings in 36 women with primary ovarian failure, referred for oocyte or embryo donations are reported. Fifteen women were suffering from ovarian dysgenesis and 11 from premature menopause. Six of these 26 patients showed X-chromosome abnormalities. One patient had a Noonan syndrome. The remaining 10 had surgical menopause. The mean duration of their infertility was 6.5 +/- 3.2 years (+/- SD). All patients had elevated serum gonadotrophins within the menopausal range. Hypothalamic, pituitary and thyroid function were found to be intact. In one of the 15 ovarian biopsies on the patients with chromosomal competent ovarian failure, primordial follicles were found. Hysterosalpingograms revealed a normal uterine cavity in all patients. In view of oocyte donation, careful evaluation of the obstetric risk was mandatory in the six patients with X-chromosome aberrations and in the patient with the Noonan syndrome, because of their short stature and possible concomitant cardiovascular and renal disease. After substitution therapy with oestradiol valerate and natural progesterone, 13 pregnancies were established, seven patients delivered (one set of twins), eight healthy children were born, three pregnancies aborted and three pregnancies are progressing normally.

  13. Social and ethical issues in mitochondrial donation

    PubMed Central

    Dimond, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction or background The UK is at the forefront of mitochondrial science and is currently the only country in the world to legalize germ-line technologies involving mitochondrial donation. However, concerns have been raised about genetic modification and the ‘slippery slope’ to designer babies. Sources of data This review uses academic articles, newspaper reports and public documents. Areas of agreement Mitochondrial donation offers women with mitochondrial disease an opportunity to have healthy, genetically related children. Areas of controversy Key areas of disagreement include safety, the creation of three-parent babies, impact on identity, implications for society, definitions of genetic modification and reproductive choice. Growing points The UK government legalized the techniques in March 2015. Scientific and medical communities across the world followed the developments with interest. Areas timely for developing research It is expected that the first cohort of ‘three parent’ babies will be born in the UK in 2016. Their health and progress will be closely monitored. PMID:26351372

  14. Further HFEA restrictions on egg donation in the UK: two strikes and you're out!

    PubMed

    Sauer, Mark V

    2005-04-01

    The UK and Europe have lagged far behind the USA in the number of egg donation cycles performed over the past two decades. This disparity has been largely attributed to governmental restraints placed on the method within these locales, combined with the lack of regulation in the USA. Severely limiting donor compensation and requiring donors to be identified 18 years or more after their participation will undoubtedly lead to the demise of egg donation as the UK now knows it. Throwing more money at the problem, in the form of increased donor compensation, is unlikely to fix the shortage of participants that is to come. As already witnessed, increasing numbers of women and couples will probably seek treatment outside their native borders to escape the unreasonable demands placed upon their personal liberties by government. Regulation will promote 'reproductive tourism' as patients seek care in areas of the world where self-determination is protected by law.

  15. Optical and electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons upon adsorption of ligand-protected aluminum clusters.

    PubMed

    Gomes da Rocha, Claudia; Clayborne, P Andre; Koskinen, Pekka; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2014-02-28

    We have carried out first-principles calculations to investigate how the electronic and optical features of graphene nanoribbons are affected by the presence of atomic clusters. Aluminum clusters of different sizes and stabilized by organic ligands were deposited on graphene nanoribbons from which the energetic features of the adsorption plus electronic structure were treated within density-functional theory. Our results point out that, depending on their size and structure shape, the clusters perturb distinctively the electronic properties of the ribbons. We suggest that such selective response can be measured through optical means revealing that graphene nanoribbons can work as an efficient characterization medium of atomic clusters. In addition, we demonstrate that atomic clusters can fine-tune the electronic and spin-polarized states of graphene ribbons from which novel spin-filter devices could be designed.

  16. 76 FR 7546 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Prohibited Species Donation (PSD) Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ...; Prohibited Species Donation (PSD) Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA... currently approved information collection. A prohibited species donation (PSD) program for Pacific salmon.... Vessels and processing plants participating in the donation program voluntarily retain and process...

  17. IMPIPS: The Immune Protection-Inducing Protein Structure Concept in the Search for Steric-Electron and Topochemical Principles for Complete Fully-Protective Chemically Synthesised Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Bermúdez, Adriana; Alba, Martha Patricia; Vanegas, Magnolia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Poloche, Luis Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Determining immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) involves defining the stereo-electron and topochemical characteristics which are essential in MHC-p-TCR complex formation. Modified high activity binding peptides (mHABP) were thus synthesised to produce a large panel of IMPIPS measuring 26.5 ±3.5Å between the farthest atoms fitting into Pockets 1 to 9 of HLA-DRβ1* structures. They displayed a polyproline II-like (PPIIL) structure with their backbone O and N atoms orientated to establish H-bonds with specific residues from HLA-DRβ1*-peptide binding regions (PBR). Residues having specific charge and gauche+ orientation regarding p3χ1, p5χ2, and p7χ1 angles determined appropriate rotamer orientation for perfectly fitting into the TCR to induce an appropriate immune response. Immunological assays in Aotus monkeys involving IMPIPS mixtures led to promising results; taken together with the aforementioned physicochemical principles, non-interfering, long-lasting, protection-inducing, multi-epitope, multistage, minimal subunit-based chemically-synthesised peptides can be designed against diseases scourging humankind. PMID:25879751

  18. Ear length and kidney function decline after kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Katavetin, Pisut; Watanatorn, Salin; Townamchai, Natavudh; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat

    2016-11-01

    The preservation of kidney function after kidney donation depends on the kidney reserve - the potential of the remaining kidney to boost their function after loss of the other kidney. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, size and shape of the external ears are examined to evaluate the person's kidney health. We hypothesized that ear size might be a practical yet overlooked marker of kidney reserve. Fifty kidney transplantation donors were participated in this study. The length and width of both ears of all participants were measured during one of the post-donation visits. Pre-donation serum creatinine and post-donation serum creatinine as well as other relevant parameters (age, sex, weight, height, etc.) of the participants were extracted from medical records. The estimated GFR was calculated from serum creatinine, age and sex using the CKD-EPI equation. Ear length negatively associated with %GFR decline after kidney donation. For every 1 cm increase in ear length, it was associated with 5.7% less GFR decline after kidney donation (95% Confidence Interval 0.2 to 11.3, P = 0.04). Ear width, as well as age, sex, body weight, height, body mass index, and pre-donation eGFR did not significantly associate with the GFR decline. Our findings support the notion of Traditional Chinese Medicine that ear morphology may be associated with kidney health and suggest that ear length might be a useful predictor of kidney function decline after kidney donation.

  19. Using Standardized Patients to Educate Medical Students about Organ Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas Hugh; Anker, Ashley E.; Soriano, Rainier; Friedman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Medical students at Mount Sinai School of Medicine participated in an intervention designed to promote knowledge and improved communication skills related to cadaveric organ donation. The intervention required students to interact with a standardized patient for approximately 10 minutes and respond to questions posed about organ donation in a…

  20. An Empirical Exploration of Selected Policy Options in Organ Donation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klenow, Daniel J.; Youngs, George A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Presents findings from a mail survey of 414 persons regarding organ transplantation and donation policy issues. Gauged three measures of support for organ donation: donor card commitment, required request of next-of-kin support, and weak presumed consent support. High levels of support exist for organ donor cards and the next-of-kin law. Little…

  1. Age modulates attitudes to whole body donation among medical students.

    PubMed

    Perry, Gary F; Ettarh, Raj R

    2009-01-01

    Managing a whole body donor program is necessary for facilitating a traditional dissection-based anatomy curriculum in medicine and health sciences. Factors which influence body donations to medical science can therefore affect dissection-based anatomy teaching. In order to determine whether age influences the attitudes of medical students to donations, this study surveyed, by Likert-type questionnaires, first-year graduate-entry medical students attending a dissection-based anatomy course. In contrast to attitudes among younger traditional-entry medical students, initial support for whole body donation by an unrelated stranger (83.8%), a family member (43.2%) or by the respondent (40.5%) did not decrease among graduate-entry medical students after exposure to dissection although there was a significant shift in strength of support for donation by stranger. This suggests that older medical students do not readily modify their pre-established attitudes to the idea of whole body donation after exposure and experience with dissection. Initial ambivalence among respondents to the idea of donation by family member was followed by opposition to this type of donation. These findings demonstrate that age modulates the influences on a priori attitudes to whole body donation that exposure to dissection causes in younger medical students.

  2. Body Donation after Death: The Mental Setup of Educated People

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aniruddha; Mandal, Shyamash

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Without dissection of cadavers teaching and learning of anatomy is nearly difficult; there remains a gap between the practical knowledge and the gathered theoretical knowledge. But there is a scarcity in the availability of the donated bodies for the sake of medical education. On the other hand a large number of people in our country are in waiting list for organ transplantation which could be overcome by deceased organ donation. Aim Aim of the study was to evaluate the awareness regarding body donation after death. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among medical students, engineering students and doctors in Indian population. Total 300 participants were answered the questionnaire providing information about the knowledge and attitude towards body and organ donation. Result 46.33% of entire study group had strongly positive attitude about cadaveric organ donation and 17% had no idea about this. 18% of total participants were unwilling for body donation after death. Conclusion The present study has been done elaborately to find out the different barriers for body or organ donation. It is clear from the study that though there is high level of awareness, nobody has filled up the pledge form till now. It indicates that there is a gap between the knowledge and motivation for organ and body donation after death which has to be overcome by proper guidance and education. Media and other voluntary organisations could take an important role for this purpose. PMID:26266106

  3. Characterizing donation behavior from psychophysiological indices of narrative experience

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Kelly A.; Stone, Bradly T.; Stikic, Maja; Johnson, Robin R.; Berka, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Research on narrative persuasion has yet to investigate whether this process influences behavior. The current study explored whether: (1) a narrative could persuade participants to donate to a charity, a prosocial, behavioral decision; (2) psychophysiological metrics can delineate the differences between donation/non-donation behaviors; and (3) donation behavior can be correlated with measures of psychophysiology, self-reported reactions to the narrative, and intrinsic characteristics. Participants (n = 49) completed personality/disposition questionnaires, viewed one of two versions of a narrative while EEG and ECG were recorded, completed a questionnaire regarding their reactions to the narrative, and were given an opportunity to donate to a charity related to the themes of the narrative. Results showed that: (1) 34.7% of participants donated; (2) psychophysiological metrics successfully delineated between donation behaviors and the effects of narrative version; and (3) psychophysiology and reactions to the narrative were better able to explain the variance (88 and 65%, respectively) in the amount donated than all 3 metrics combined as well as any metric alone. These findings demonstrate the promise of narrative persuasion for influencing prosocial, behavioral decisions. Our results also illustrate the utility of the previously stated metrics for understanding and possibly even manipulating behaviors resulting from narrative persuasion. PMID:26379488

  4. Indian ICU nurses' perceptions of and attitudes towards organ donation.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmi, Poreddi; Nagarajaiah; Ramachandra; Math, Suresh Bada

    Nurses play a significant role in identifying and securing potential organ donors in the clinical environment. Research among Indian nurses related to organ donation is sparse. The present study aimed to investigate nurses' attitudes towards organ donation. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was carried out among nurses (n=184) at a tertiary care centre. Data were collected through self-report questionnaire. A majority (81%) of the respondents were 'willing to sign the card' for organ donation; however, only 3.8% (n=7) of them actually 'signed the organ donation card'. There were significant associations found between intentions to sign the organ donation card and gender (x2=5.852; p<0.054), religion (x2=40.175; p<0.000), and experience caring for brain-dead patients (x2=22.790; p<0.001). The researchers strongly suggest continuing education for nurses to enhance skills and knowledge, as well as sensitivity to cultural, ethical, social, and religious issues, and advocacy in the area of organ donation. Furthermore, nurse administrators must take the initiative to develop guidelines clarifying the role of nurses in the organ donation and transplantation process to promote organ donation and improve rates.

  5. 31 CFR 585.522 - Donations of medical supplies authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Donations of medical supplies authorized. 585.522 Section 585.522 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations, and Statements of Licensing Policy § 585.522 Donations...

  6. 32 CFR 644.495 - Donation to a public body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Donation to a public body. 644.495 Section 644.495 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Land) § 644.495 Donation to a public body. A public body, as defined by GSA for this purpose, means...

  7. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494 Section 644.494 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be...

  8. 77 FR 20495 - National Donate Life Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8792 of April 2, 2012 National Donate Life Month, 2012 By the President of... national character. During National Donate Life Month, we reflect on that essential quality and recommit to... families across our country. This month, we renew our commitment to addressing this urgent public...

  9. Directed organ donation: is the donor the owner?

    PubMed

    Cronin, Antonia J; Price, David

    2008-09-01

    The issue of directed donation of organs from deceased donors for transplantation has recently risen to the fore, given greater significance by the relatively stagnant rate of deceased donor donation in the UK. Although its status and legitimacy is explicitly recognized across the USA, elsewhere a more cautious, if not entirely negative, stance has been taken. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the Human Tissue Act 2004, and in Scotland the Human Tissue (Scotland) Act 2006, are both silent in this regard. Although so-called conditional donation, donation to (or perhaps withheld from) a specific class, has been outlawed as a product of guidance issued by the Secretary of State for Health issued in the wake of the controversial incident occurring in the North of England in 1998, its intended application to 'directed' donation is less certain.Directed and conditional donations challenge the traditional construct of altruistic donation and impartial (equitable) allocation in a very immediate and striking fashion. They implicitly raise important questions as to whether the body or parts of the body are capable of being owned, and by whom. This paper attempts to explore the notion of donor ownership of body parts and its implications for both directed and conditional donation.

  10. 7 CFR 250.30 - State processing of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... receipt, disposal, and inventory of donated foods in accordance with § 250.16; (H) Submit processing... forth in the original USDA procurement specification and, in the case of concentrated skim milk replacing donated nonfat dry milk, determine if the concentrated skim milk contains the amount of...

  11. 7 CFR 250.30 - State processing of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... receipt, disposal, and inventory of donated foods in accordance with § 250.16; (H) Submit processing... forth in the original USDA procurement specification and, in the case of concentrated skim milk replacing donated nonfat dry milk, determine if the concentrated skim milk contains the amount of...

  12. 7 CFR 250.30 - State processing of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... receipt, disposal, and inventory of donated foods in accordance with § 250.16; (H) Submit processing... forth in the original USDA procurement specification and, in the case of concentrated skim milk replacing donated nonfat dry milk, determine if the concentrated skim milk contains the amount of...

  13. 7 CFR 250.30 - State processing of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... receipt, disposal, and inventory of donated foods in accordance with § 250.16; (H) Submit processing... forth in the original USDA procurement specification and, in the case of concentrated skim milk replacing donated nonfat dry milk, determine if the concentrated skim milk contains the amount of...

  14. Directed organ donation: is the donor the owner?

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Antonia J; Price, David

    2010-01-01

    The issue of directed donation of organs from deceased donors for transplantation has recently risen to the fore, given greater significance by the relatively stagnant rate of deceased donor donation in the UK. Although its status and legitimacy is explicitly recognized across the USA, elsewhere a more cautious, if not entirely negative, stance has been taken. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the Human Tissue Act 2004, and in Scotland the Human Tissue (Scotland) Act 2006, are both silent in this regard. Although so-called conditional donation, donation to (or perhaps withheld from) a specific class, has been outlawed as a product of guidance issued by the Secretary of State for Health issued in the wake of the controversial incident occurring in the North of England in 1998, its intended application to ‘directed’ donation is less certain. Directed and conditional donations challenge the traditional construct of altruistic donation and impartial (equitable) allocation in a very immediate and striking fashion. They implicitly raise important questions as to whether the body or parts of the body are capable of being owned, and by whom. This paper attempts to explore the notion of donor ownership of body parts and its implications for both directed and conditional donation. PMID:20890462

  15. Voluntary Body Donation: The Gift that Lives on Forever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritha, S.; Rao, M. Vittoo; Sumangala; Supriya, G.; Kumar, Praveen

    2012-10-01

    Body donation is a gracious act, Shankarcharaya firmly believed in concept of Body Donation or Organ Donation and said Iddham sharirum paropakarum i.e. the body is for use of others and death is not the end, it is the beginning. Anatomy is important basic subject for medicalstudents, both U.G. & P.G. Best method of Anatomy learning is by dissection on human cadavers, which remains principle teaching tool. Human cadavers for purpose of study are a scarcity with mushrooming of medical institutions in this country. Unclaimed bodies are no more origin of cadavers. Whole Body donation is the need of the hour. A Voluntary Body Donation is defined as the act of giving oneís Body after death for Medical research and education. In this article a survey was done in S.V.S. Medical & Dental Colleges Faculty members and medical exhibition visitors which include lawyers, engineers, teachers and others during the year of 2010. The body donation including organ donation and various factors such as age, religion, culture and donorís attitude are discussed. Body donation provides the students and medical researchers with unparalleled opportunities to study the human body. Computers nor books cannot totally replace body dissection in learning the anatomy.

  16. Body Donation in India: Social Awareness, Willingness, and Associated Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokade, Shrikant A.; Gaikawad, Anjana P.

    2012-01-01

    With the attendant rise of the number of medical colleges in India over past few decades, the demand for cadavers used in medical education and research is growing. However, there is an insufficient supply of donated cadavers available for dissection. This study was undertaken to assess the general population's awareness of body donation programs…

  17. Organ donation and Islam-challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan

    2012-09-15

    The issue of organ donation in Islam has been debated for decades, with most religious authorities sanctioning both living-organ and deceased-organ donation. However, disquiet among the Islamic community on the compatibility of organ donation with their faith remains, especially in relation to deceased-organ donation. This remains a topical, controversial, and challenging component of organ procurement at both local and international levels. In this article, I will explore Islamic arguments both for and against organ donation, in the context of both living-donor and deceased-donor models. By discussing both practical and philosophical perspectives, the aim is to facilitate discussion on how best to achieve consensus on this issue by driving the debate forward in an open and all-encompassing manner. Although every attempt should be made to achieve consensus among key Muslim opinion makers (individuals, authorities, and institutions), encouraging personalized decision making by intellectual effort should be the goal to achieve genuine informed consent.

  18. Blood donations, iron stores, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, Giancarlo; Chen, Honglei; Wing, Al; Ascherio, Alberto

    2006-06-01

    Iron overload and systemic iron stores may be important in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). We therefore examined the association between blood donations, which reduce body iron stores, and risk of PD in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a large cohort investigation of U.S. men. Our hypothesis was that blood donation reduces the risk of PD by lowering systemic iron stores. Although the number of blood donations was inversely related to the ferritin levels in a subsample of the study population, no association was found between the number of blood donations and risk of PD (P for trend = 0.6). Unexpectedly, the risk of PD was higher among men who reported recent multiple blood donations (P for trend = 0.05). The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that reduced systemic iron stores lower the risk of PD.

  19. Potential law reform for Australia's organ donation system.

    PubMed

    Halls, Alexandra

    2012-12-01

    Australia's current organ donation rates are very low, particularly in comparison to several European countries such as Spain and Austria. Many Australians wait for many years to receive organs that they desperately need, and many die while waiting. Australia's current organ donation system is based on express consent, with intending donors registering that intent at the Australian Organ Donation Registry. However, given that organs can only be donated in certain circumstances, this system is proving to be inadequate. This article compares the current express consent (or "opt-in") system and the presumed consent (or "opt-out") system used in the European countries that have significantly higher donation rates. It suggests reforms to Australian legislation to change the current system to that of presumed consent, and considers whether it is likely to work in Australian society.

  20. DOE Fire Protection Handbook, Volume II. Fire effects and electrical and electronic equipment

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-18

    Electrical and electronic equipment, including computers, are used at critical facilities throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). Hughes Associates, Inc. was tasked to evaluate the potential thermal and nonthermal effects of a fire on the electrical and electronic equipment and methods to analyze, evaluate, and assist in controlling the potential effects. This report is a result of a literature review and analysis on the effects of fire on electrical equipment. It is directed at three objectives: (1) Provide a state-of-the-art review and analysis of thermal and nonthermal damage to electrical and electronic equipment; (2) Develop a procedure for estimating thermal and nonthermal damage considerations using current knowledge; and (3) Develop an R&D/T&E program to fill gaps in the current knowledge needed to further perfect the procedure. The literature review was performed utilizing existing electronic databases. Sources searched included scientific and engineering databases including Dialog, NTIS, SciSearch and NIST BFRL literature. Incorporated in the analysis is unpublished literature and conversations with members of the ASTM E-5.21, Smoke Corrosivity, and researchers in the electronics field. This report does not consider the effects of fire suppression systems or efforts. Further analysis of the potential impact is required in the future.

  1. Coordinating Electron Transport Chains to an Electron Donor.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Carmen; Wolf, Maximilian; Joly, Damien; Delgado, Juan Luis; Guldi, Dirk M; Martín, Nazario

    2015-10-16

    Two electron transport chains (2 and 3) featuring two fullerenes with different electron acceptor strengths have been synthesized, characterized, and coordinated to a light harvesting/electron donating zinc porphyrin. Electrochemical assays corroborate the redox gradients along the designed electron transport chains, and complementary absorption and fluorescence titrations prove the assembly of ZnP-2 and ZnP-3 hybrids.

  2. On the impacts of traditional Chinese culture on organ donation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yu

    2013-04-01

    This article examines the impact of traditional Chinese culture on organ donation from the perspective of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism. In each of these cultural systems, it appears that there are some particular sayings or remarks that are often taken in modern Chinese society to be contrary to organ donation, especially cadaveric organ donation. However, this article argues that the central concerns of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism are "great love," "ren," and "dao," which can be reasonably interpreted to support organ donation. The author understands that each cultural system, in order to play its cultural function, must have its central concerns as well as relevant ritual practices (li) that incarnate its religious and ethical commitments. That is, each plays a general cultural role, which influences organ donation in particular not merely through abstract or general ethical principles and teachings, but through a combination of ethical teachings and the forming of particular ritual practices. This article contends that the primary reason Chinese individuals fail to donate sufficient cadaveric organs for transplantation is not because particular remarks or sayings from each of these systems appear to conflict with donation. Neither is it that the central concerns of these systems cannot support cadaveric donation. Rather, it is that modern Chinese individuals have failed to develop and secure relevant ritual practices that support the central concerns of organ transplantation. The article concludes that in order to promote more donations, there is a need to form relevant ritual practices supporting organ donation in conformity with the central concerns of these cultural systems.

  3. HIV, HCV, HBV and syphilis rate of positive donations among blood donations in Mali: lower rates among volunteer blood donors.

    PubMed

    Diarra, A; Kouriba, B; Baby, M; Murphy, E; Lefrere, J-J

    2009-01-01

    Good data on background seroprevalence of major transfusion transmitted infections is lacking in Mali. We gathered data on the rate of positive donations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and syphilis among blood donations in Mali for calendar year 2007. Donations with repeatedly reactive results on screening enzyme immunoassay (EIA) were considered to be seropositive. Rate of positive donations per blood unit collected was 2.6% for HIV, 3.3% for HCV, 13.9% for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and 0.3% for syphilis. For HIV, HBsAg and syphilis, rate of positive donations was significantly (p<0.001) higher among donations from replacement donors than those from volunteer donors, while HCV rate of positive donations was similar in the two groups. Rate of positive donations was also significantly (p<0.0001) lower in blood units from regular than from first-time donors. These data reinforce WHO recommendations for increasing the number of regular, volunteer blood donors in Africa.

  4. A Confirmatory Analysis of the Organ Donation Readiness Index: Measuring the Potential for Organ Donations among African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Christopher; Tamburlin, Judith

    2004-01-01

    The need for transplant exceeds the number of available organs. Antigen compatible organs are particularly scarce for African Americans because of their proportionately lower rate of donations. This study presents a measure of organ donation readiness. Examination of the factor structure and a test of weak invariance were conducted on…

  5. Structural damage reduction in protected gold clusters by electron diffraction methods.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Eduardo; Ponce, Arturo; Santiago, Ulises; Alducin, Diego; Benitez-Lara, Alfredo; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The present work explores electron diffraction methods for studying the structure of metallic clusters stabilized with thiol groups, which are susceptible to structural damage caused by electron beam irradiation. There is a compromise between the electron dose used and the size of the clusters since they have small interaction volume with electrons and as a consequence weak reflections in the diffraction patterns. The common approach of recording individual clusters using nanobeam diffraction has the problem of an increased current density. Dosage can be reduced with the use of a smaller condenser aperture and a higher condenser lens excitation, but even with those set ups collection times tend to be high. For that reason, the methods reported herein collects in a faster way diffraction patterns through the scanning across the clusters under nanobeam diffraction mode. In this way, we are able to collect a map of diffraction patterns, in areas with dispersed clusters, with short exposure times (milliseconds) using a high sensitive CMOS camera. When these maps are compared with their theoretical counterparts, oscillations of the clusters can be observed. The stability of the patterns acquired demonstrates that our methods provide a systematic and precise way to unveil the structure of atomic clusters without extensive detrimental damage of their crystallinity.

  6. Thin-film encapsulation of organic electronic devices based on vacuum evaporated lithium fluoride as protective buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yingquan; Ding, Sihan; Wen, Zhanwei; Xu, Sunan; Lv, Wenli; Xu, Ziqiang; Yang, Yuhuan; Wang, Ying; Wei, Yi; Tang, Ying

    2017-03-01

    Encapsulation is indispensable for organic thin-film electronic devices to ensure reliable operation and long-term stability. For thin-film encapsulating organic electronic devices, insulating polymers and inorganic metal oxides thin films are widely used. However, spin-coating of insulating polymers directly on organic electronic devices may destroy or introduce unwanted impurities in the underlying organic active layers. And also, sputtering of inorganic metal oxides may damage the underlying organic semiconductors. Here, we demonstrated that by utilizing vacuum evaporated lithium fluoride (LiF) as protective buffer layer, spin-coated insulating polymer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and sputtered inorganic material Er2O3, can be successfully applied for thin film encapsulation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-based organic diodes. By encapsulating with LiF/PVA/LiF trilayer and LiF/Er2O3 bilayer films, the device lifetime improvements of 10 and 15 times can be achieved. These methods should be applicable for thin-film encapsulation of all kinds of organic electronic devices. Moisture-induced hole trapping, and Al top electrode oxidation are suggest to be the origins of current decay for the LiF/PVA/LiF trilayer and LiF/Er2O3 bilayer films encapsulated devices, respectively.

  7. Improvements for international medicine donations: a review of the World Health Organization Guidelines for Medicine Donations, 3rd edition.

    PubMed

    Cañigueral-Vila, Nuria; Chen, Jennifer C; Frenkel-Rorden, Lindsey; Laing, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Some humanitarian and development organizations respond to major natural disasters and emergencies by donating medicines. Many provide medicines on a routine basis to support health systems, particularly those run by Faith-Based Organizations. Although such donations can provide essential medicines to populations in great need, inappropriate donations also take place, with burdensome consequences. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed the interagency Guidelines for Medicine Donations for use by donors and recipients in the context of emergency aid and international development assistance. Although comprehensive in nature and transferable to various emergency situations, adjustments to both content and formatting would improve this resource. Recommendations for the next version of these guidelines include: specific wording and consistent formatting; definition of who is a recipient, clear distinction between acute and long-term emergencies, and proper donation procedures pertaining to each; inclusion of visual aides such as flowcharts, checklists, and photos; and improving the citations system.

  8. Psycholegal issues in sibling bone marrow donation.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Victoria

    1992-01-01

    The only hope of survival for children with a number of life-threatening illnesses is a successful bone marrow transplant (BMT). Unlike the treatment source for most therapies, the raw material for transplant therapy comes from a human being. Although many BMTs are autologous, utilizing the patient's own bone marrow, a large percentage of childhood BMTs rely on bone marrow from children or adolescents who are biological siblings to the sick child. Medical and legal systems are confronted with a dilemma when healthy children are needed to undergo minimally risky, yet somewhat painful, procedures for the benefit of their critically ill siblings. This article reviews legal issues involved in sibling bone marrow donation and psychological research that is relevant to those issues. The article concludes with proposed directions for future psycholegal research and a discussion of ethical issues that are not amenable to empirical investigation.

  9. Citrate anticoagulation: Are blood donors donating bone?

    PubMed

    Bialkowski, Walter; Bruhn, Roberta; Edgren, Gustaf; Papanek, Paula

    2016-10-01

    An estimated 2.4 million volunteer apheresis blood donation procedures were performed in the United States in 2010, and increases in the proportion of transfused blood products derived from apheresis blood collections have been consistently reported. Anticoagulation is required during apheresis and is achieved with citrate. Donor exposure to citrate causes an acute physiological response to maintain serum mineral homeostasis. Some data are available on the sequelae of this acute response in the days and weeks following exposure, raising questions about bone mineral density in regular apheresis donors. New research is emerging that addresses the potential long-term health outcomes of repeated citrate exposure. This article reviews the acute physiological response to citrate anticoagulation in volunteer blood donors, presents contrasting perspectives on the potential effects of citrate exposure on bone density, and identifies key knowledge gaps in our understanding of long-term health outcomes in apheresis donors. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:459-463, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Umbilical cord blood donation: public or private?

    PubMed

    Ballen, K K; Verter, F; Kurtzberg, J

    2015-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a graft source for patients with malignant or genetic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but who do not have an appropriately HLA-matched family or volunteer unrelated adult donor. Starting in the 1990s, unrelated UCB banks were established, accepting donations from term deliveries and storing UCB units for public use. An estimated 730 000 UCB units have been donated and stored to date and ~35 000 UCB transplants have been performed worldwide. Over the past 20 years, private and family banks have grown rapidly, storing ~4 million UCB units for a particular patient or family, usually charging an up-front and yearly storage fee; therefore, these banks are able to be financially sustainable without releasing UCB units. Private banks are not obligated to fulfill the same regulatory requirements of the public banks. The public banks have released ~30 times more UCB units for therapy. Some countries have transitioned to an integrated banking model, a hybrid of public and family banking. Today, pregnant women, their families, obstetrical providers and pediatricians are faced with multiple choices about the disposition of their newborn's cord blood. In this commentary, we review the progress of UCB banking technology; we also analyze the current data on pediatric and adult unrelated UCB, including the recent expansion of interest in transplantation for hemoglobinopathies, and discuss emerging studies on the use of autologous UCB for neurologic diseases and regenerative medicine. We will review worldwide approaches to UCB banking, ethical considerations, criteria for public and family banking, integrated banking ideas and future strategies for UCB banking.

  11. Family discussions about organ donation: how the media influences opinions about donation decisions.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Susan E; Harrison, Tyler R; Long, Shawn D; Afifi, Walid A; Stephenson, Michael T; Stephenson, Michael S; Reichert, Tom

    2005-10-01

    In this study, 78 family pair dyads (spouses, parent-child pairs, or siblings) were brought into an interaction laboratory set up like a living room. After being briefed on the study, family members discussed a series of eight questions about their thoughts and opinions about organ donation. Thematic analysis of the thousands of pages of transcripts revealed that family members believe that they receive important information about organ donation through the media. Unfortunately, the most influential information came from sensationalistic, negative media portrayals. The myths that seem to be the most actively referenced by the media include premature declaration of death, the transference of personality traits from donor to recipient, a US black market for organs, corruption in the medical community, and corruption in the organ allocation system (which allows celebrities to get transplants first). Although these are not the only myths that the generally public holds to be true, the media is a powerful source of support for these particular myths. Therefore, such myths must be countered effectively if greater consent for organ donation is to be attained.

  12. Control of surface charges by radicals as a principle of antistatic polymers protecting electronic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Baytekin, H Tarik; Baytekin, Bilge; Hermans, Thomas M; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2013-09-20

    Even minute quantities of electric charge accumulating on polymer surfaces can cause shocks, explosions, and multibillion-dollar losses to electronic circuitry. This paper demonstrates that to remove static electricity, it is not at all necessary to "target" the charges themselves. Instead, the way to discharge a polymer is to remove radicals from its surface. These radicals colocalize with and stabilize the charges; when they are scavenged, the surfaces discharge rapidly. This radical-charge interplay allows for controlling static electricity by doping common polymers with small amounts of radical-scavenging molecules, including the familiar vitamin E. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by rendering common polymers dust-mitigating and also by using them as coatings that prevent the failure of electronic circuitry.

  13. Psychosocial variables associated with willingness to donate organs.

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, B E; Spanos, N P

    1989-01-01

    Questionnaires were administered to 108 university psychology students to investigate attitudes and behaviour related to organ donation. Three groups (committed, uncommitted and opposed) were identified. A multivariate analysis of variance showed that, compared with uncommitted donors, committed donors felt better informed about organ donation, had discussed donation more often with family members and knew more people who had signed donor cards. The subjects in the opposed group and those in the uncommitted group cited different reasons for not signing a donor card. Empathy, religious beliefs and attitudes about death did not affect willingness to donate. Analyses of the interaction between willingness to donate one's own organs and willingness to donate those of a family member revealed a monotonic increase in willingness to donate the organs of a family member as the type of recipient became more personally relevant. Our findings indicate that when health care professionals request donor organs the potential recipients must be presented to the potential donors in a personally relevant manner. Educational programs must be developed to train medical personnel in how to effectively ask for organs without coercing the potential donor or invading the privacy of the potential recipient. PMID:2731099

  14. Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of the Donation and Use of Human Biological Samples for Research: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Chris; McDaid, Lisa M; Hilton, Shona

    2015-01-01

    Human biological samples (biosamples) are increasingly important in diagnosing, treating and measuring the prevalence of illnesses. For the gay and bisexual population, biosample research is particularly important for measuring the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). By determining people's understandings of, and attitudes towards, the donation and use of biosamples, researchers can design studies to maximise acceptability and participation. In this study we examine gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 46 gay and bisexual men aged between 18 and 63 recruited in commercial gay scene venues in two Scottish cities. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Most men interviewed seemed to have given little prior consideration to the issues. Participants were largely supportive of donating tissue for medical research purposes, and often favourable towards samples being stored, reused and shared. Support was often conditional, with common concerns related to: informed consent; the protection of anonymity and confidentiality; the right to withdraw from research; and ownership of samples. Many participants were in favour of the storage and reuse of samples, but expressed concerns related to data security and potential misuse of samples, particularly by commercial organisations. The sensitivity of tissue collection varied between tissue types and collection contexts. Blood, urine, semen and bowel tissue were commonly identified as sensitive, and donating saliva and as unlikely to cause discomfort. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth study of gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. While most men in this study were supportive of donating tissue for research, some clear areas of concern were identified. We suggest that these minority concerns should be accounted for to develop

  15. Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation: Reducing Financial Barriers to Live Kidney Donation--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Tushla, Lara; Rudow, Dianne LaPointe; Milton, Jennifer; Rodrigue, James R; Schold, Jesse D; Hays, Rebecca

    2015-09-04

    Live-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is the best treatment for eligible people with late-stage kidney disease. Despite this, living kidney donation rates have declined in the United States in recent years. A potential source of this decline is the financial impact on potential and actual living kidney donors (LKDs). Recent evidence indicates that the economic climate may be associated with the decline in LDKT and that there are nontrivial financial ramifications for some LKDs. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation's Live Donor Community of Practice convened a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation. The conference included transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders (with the financial support of 10 other organizations) and sought to identify best practices, knowledge gaps, and opportunities pertaining to living kidney donation. This workgroup was tasked with exploring systemic and financial barriers to living kidney donation. The workgroup reviewed literature that assessed the financial effect of living kidney donation, analyzed employment and insurance factors, discussed international models for addressing direct and indirect costs faced by LKDs, and summarized current available resources. The workgroup developed the following series of recommendations to reduce financial and systemic barriers and achieve financial neutrality for LKDs: (1) allocate resources for standardized reimbursement of LKDs' lost wages and incidental costs; (2) pass legislation to offer employment and insurability protections to LKDs; (3) create an LKD financial toolkit to provide standardized, vetted education to donors and providers about options to maximize donor coverage and minimize financial effect within the current climate; and (4) promote further research to identify systemic barriers to living donation and LDKT to ensure the creation of mitigation strategies.

  16. [Living organ donation vs. cadaveric donation - study of liver transplanted children and their families].

    PubMed

    Schulz, K H; Hofmann, C; Sander, K; Edsen, S; Burdelski, M; Koch, U; Rogiers, X

    2001-12-01

    There is only scarce information on the quality of life of child recipients of liver transplants and their families. Particularly children with a living related graft and their families never have been compared to children who received a cadaveric graft and their families. We investigated the following issues in our study: How do parents and children from participating families rate their strain, their quality of life and their relationships within their family? Do families with a living - related donor differ from those with a cadaveric donor? What do living donors and their partners think about the donation retrospectively? The study was conducted with 106 participants from 50 families (42 mothers, 40 fathers, and 24 children older than 6 years). In 20 of these families, a living transplantation had been performed. Participants were interviewed and asked to fill out several questionnaires. School-aged children with a liver transplant show good social integration among their peers and in school. The child's disease, however, has a great impact on the family. Family members show a reduction in social contact, and an increase in marital crises, and problematic relations amongst siblings. Families in which a cadaveric graft was performed, are less satisfied with life, and show more symptoms of exhaustion. Every family studied possessed or acquired - a high degree of internal or external coping resources. Living - related donors tried hard to obtain an understanding of the medical context. The partner, rather than the donor himself, feels anxious before the donation. The limited time available for the decision to donate is not perceived by the donors to be critical. Ten percent of living donors feel "a little" that their health is affected. The decision to donate is supported "strongly" or "very strongly" by the partners in 80 % of the cases. A possible strain on the child through the expectation of gratitude by the donor is stated by 20 %. All of the donors agree

  17. Jewish medical ethics: monetary compensation for donating kidneys.

    PubMed

    Grazi, Richard V; Wolowelsky, Joel B

    2004-03-01

    The Israel Health Ministry is preparing legislation that would allow a person to receive monetary compensation in exchange for donating a kidney for a lifesaving transplant. Such a bill would be the first of its kind, and would seem to establish a policy that is in contrast with both existing international professional ethics and major Christian and Islamic religious ethics. In an attempt to investigate the extent to which such a bill would be consistent with traditional Jewish ethics, we reviewed the opinions of major traditional Jewish ethicists/halakhists, with emphasis on contemporary opinions, and found that compensating an organ donor for his or her time, discomfort, inconvenience, and recovery is fully consistent with traditional Jewish law and ethics. While non-altruistic sale of kidneys might be theoretically ethical from a Jewish perspective, ultimately its ethical status is inextricably connected to solving a series of pragmatic issues, such as creating a system that insures that potential vendors/donors are properly informed and not exploited, controlling and supervising medical screening and support of the donors to insure that their health is not permanently endangered, protecting minors and incompetents, and regulating payments so that they reasonably reflect compensation for pain and suffering.

  18. Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Di; Song, Le; Zhang, Xiong; Kajiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-02-14

    In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission.

  19. [Latin program for organ donation: the intensivists are networking].

    PubMed

    Revelly, J-P; Heidegger, C-P; Eckert, P; Moretti, D; Chevrolet, J-C; Chioléro, R

    2008-12-10

    The new Swiss federal law on organ and transplantation strengthens the responsibilities of the intensive care units. In Italian and French speaking parts of Switzerland, the Programme Latin pour le Don d'Organe (PLDO) has been launched to foster a wider collaboration between intensivists and donation coordinators. The PLDO aims at optimising knowledge and expertise in organ donation through improvements in identification, notification and management of organ donors and their next of kin. The PLDO dispenses education to all professionals involved. Such organisation should allow increasing the number of organs available, while improving healthcare professionals experience and next of kin emotion throughout the donation process.

  20. Cell-level battery charge/discharge protection system. [electronic control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, R. L.; Imamura, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes three design approaches to individual cell monitoring and control for sealed secondary battery cells. One technique involves a modular strap-on single cell protector which contains all the electronics required for monitoring cell voltage, responding to external commands, and forming a bypass circuit for the cell. A second technique, the multiplexed cell protector, uses common circuitry to monitor and control each cell in a battery pack. The third technique, the computerized cell protector, by replacing the hard-wired logic of the multiplexed cell protector with a microprocessor, achieves greatest control flexibility and inherent computational capability with a minimum parts count implementation.

  1. Development of electronic textiles for U.S. military protective clothing systems.

    PubMed

    Winterhalter, Carole; Teverovsky, Justyna; Wilson, Patricia; Slade, Jeremiah; Farell, Brian; Horowitz, Wendy; Tierney, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the development of a wearable electronic network that provides data and power transport. A materials and manufacturing survey was conducted to determine the best performing and most durable materials to withstand the rigors of textile manufacturing and potential military use. Narrow woven technology was selected as the most appropriate manufacturing method. A working wearable narrow fabric version of the Universal Serial Bus (USB) was successfully developed and fabricated as well as related wearable connectors. Military products developed include a personal area network and body borne antenna.

  2. Semiclassical electron transport at the edge of a two-dimensional topological insulator: Interplay of protected and unprotected modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, E.; Skvortsov, M. A.; Ostrovsky, P. M.

    2016-03-01

    We study electron transport at the edge of a generic disordered two-dimensional topological insulator, where some channels are topologically protected from backscattering. Assuming the total number of channels is large, we consider the edge as a quasi-one-dimensional quantum wire and describe it in terms of a nonlinear sigma model with a topological term. Neglecting localization effects, we calculate the average distribution function of transmission probabilities as a function of the sample length. We mainly focus on the two experimentally relevant cases: a junction between two quantum Hall (QH) states with different filling factors (unitary class) and a relatively thick quantum well exhibiting quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect (symplectic class). In a QH sample, the presence of topologically protected modes leads to a strong suppression of diffusion in the other channels already at scales much shorter than the localization length. On the semiclassical level, this is accompanied by the formation of a gap in the spectrum of transmission probabilities close to unit transmission, thereby suppressing shot noise and conductance fluctuations. In the case of a QSH system, there is at most one topologically protected edge channel leading to weaker transport effects. In order to describe `topological' suppression of nearly perfect transparencies, we develop an exact mapping of the semiclassical limit of the one-dimensional sigma model onto a zero-dimensional sigma model of a different symmetry class, allowing us to identify the distribution of transmission probabilities with the average spectral density of a certain random-matrix ensemble. We extend our results to other symmetry classes with topologically protected edges in two dimensions.

  3. Effects of cadmium on the activities of photosystems of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and the protective role of cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) shows high toxicity to aquatic microalgae. Many studies showed that Cd inhibited activities of photosystem II (PSII) but the effects of heavy metals on photosystem I (PSI) and cyclic electron flow (CEF) were still controversial and unclear. The effects of CdCl2 on the activities of PSI, PSII and CEF in Chlorella pyrenoidosa was measured simultaneously in the present study. In presence of 200μM of Cd, ultrastructure of some cells was strongly modified. Cd exposure led to decrease of the activities of photosynthetic oxygen evolution and respiration. PSII was more sensitive to Cd treatment than PSI. Cd treatment showed significant inhibition on the photochemical quantum yield and electron transport rate of PSII. Cd increased the quantum yield of non-light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, indicating the damage of PSII. The activity of PSI showed tolerance to Cd treatment with concentration less than 100μM in the experiment. Linear electron flow (LEF) made significant contribution to the photochemical quantum yield of PSI of the untreated cells, but decreased with increasing Cd concentration. The contribution of CEF to the yield of PSI increased with increasing Cd concentration. The activation of CEF after exposure to Cd played an essential role for the protection of PSI.

  4. Role of Religion in Organ Donation-Development of the United Kingdom Faith and Organ Donation Action Plan.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, G; Neuberger, J

    2016-04-01

    At a national policy level, the United Kingdom is at the forefront of recognizing the role of faith and its impact on organ donation. This is demonstrated by the recommendations of the Organ Donation Taskforce, National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines on organ donation, All-Party Parliamentary Kidney Group, and National Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Taskforce Alliance. Evidence to date shows that further thought is required to ensure the active engagement of faith communities with organ donation in the UK. The "Taking Organ Transplantation to 2020" strategy was launched in July 2013 by National Health Service Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) in collaboration with the Department of Health and Welsh, Scottish, and Northern Irish governments and seeks to increase the number of people, from all sections of the UK's multiethnic and multifaith population, who consent to and authorize organ donation in their life. NHSBT seeks to work in partnership with faith leaders and this culminated in a Faith and Organ Donation Summit. Faith leaders highlight that there is a need for engagement at both national and local levels concerning organ donation as well as diagnosis and definition of death.

  5. 48 CFR 45.604-2 - Abandonment, destruction, or donation of surplus property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., or donation of surplus property. 45.604-2 Section 45.604-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Disposal 45.604-2 Abandonment, destruction, or donation of surplus property. (a) Plant clearance officers... the costs incident to donation. (d) Before abandoning, destroying, or donating surplus property,...

  6. 48 CFR 45.603 - Abandonment, destruction or donation of excess personal property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or donation of excess personal property. 45.603 Section 45.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Disposal 45.603 Abandonment, destruction or donation of excess personal property. (a) Plant clearance... any of the costs incident to a donation. (d)(1) Before abandoning, destroying, or donating...

  7. 41 CFR 102-37.125 - What are some donations that do not require GSA's approval?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are some donations... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Holding Agency § 102-37.125 What are some donations that do not require GSA's approval? (a) Some donations of surplus property that do not require...

  8. 41 CFR 102-37.40 - What type of surplus property is available for donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... property is available for donation? 102-37.40 Section 102-37.40 Public Contracts and Property Management... 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Provisions Donation Overview § 102-37.40 What type of surplus property is available for donation? All surplus property (including property held...

  9. 45 CFR 2544.150 - How will accepted donations be recorded and used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How will accepted donations be recorded and used... FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SOLICITATION AND ACCEPTANCE OF DONATIONS § 2544.150 How will accepted donations be recorded and used? (a) All accepted donations of money and other property will...

  10. 41 CFR 102-37.565 - What is the authority for donations to public bodies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for donations to public bodies? 102-37.565 Section 102-37.565 Public Contracts and Property Management... 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Bodies in Lieu of Abandonment/Destruction § 102-37.565 What is the authority for donations to public bodies? Section 527 of title 40,...

  11. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  12. 41 CFR 109-44.701 - Findings justifying donation to public bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... donation to public bodies. 109-44.701 Section 109-44.701 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 44-DONATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 44.7-Donations of Property to Public Bodies § 109-44.701 Findings justifying donation to public bodies. The Director, Office of Administrative Services...

  13. 41 CFR 101-42.304 - Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... donation of certain hazardous materials. 101-42.304 Section 101-42.304 Public Contracts and Property....3-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.304 Special requirements for donation of certain hazardous materials. Special donation requirements for specific...

  14. 41 CFR 102-37.580 - Who is responsible for costs associated with the donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... costs associated with the donation? 102-37.580 Section 102-37.580 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Bodies in Lieu of Abandonment/Destruction § 102-37.580 Who is responsible for costs associated with the donation? The recipient public...

  15. 45 CFR 2544.135 - How should an offer of a donation be made?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How should an offer of a donation be made? 2544... NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SOLICITATION AND ACCEPTANCE OF DONATIONS § 2544.135 How should an offer of a donation be made? (a) In general, an offer of donation should be made by providing a letter of tender...

  16. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bloodtransfusionanddonation.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  17. Experiencing organ donation: feelings of relatives after consent1

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marli Elisa Nascimento; Bittencourt, Zélia Zilda Lourenço de Camargo; Boin, Ilka de Fátima Santana Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify experiences and feelings on the organ donation process, from the perspective of a relative of an organ donor in a transplant unit. Method: this was exploratory research using a qualitative approach, performed with seven family members of different organ donors, selected by a lottery. Sociodemographic data and the experiences regarding the donation process were collected through semi-structured interviews. The language material was transcribed and submitted to content analysis. Results: poor sensitivity of the medical staff communicating the relative's brain death - the potential donor - and the lack of socio-emotional support prior to the situation experienced by the family was highlighted by participants. Conclusions: the study identified the need to provide social-emotional support for families facing the experience of the organ donation process. From these findings, other care and management practices in health must be discussed to impact the strengthening of the family ties, post-donation, as well as the organ procurement indexes. PMID:26487140

  18. Intensive care medicine and organ donation: exploring the last frontiers?

    PubMed

    Escudero, D; Otero, J

    2015-01-01

    The main, universal problem for transplantation is organ scarcity. The gap between offer and demand grows wider every year and causes many patients in waiting list to die. In Spain, 90% of transplants are done with organs taken from patients deceased in brain death but this has a limited potential. In order to diminish organ shortage, alternative strategies such as donations from living donors, expanded criteria donors or donation after circulatory death, have been developed. Nevertheless, these types of donors also have their limitations and so are not able to satisfy current organ demand. It is necessary to reduce family denial and to raise donation in brain death thus generalizing, among other strategies, non-therapeutic elective ventilation. As intensive care doctors, cornerstone to the national donation programme, we must consolidate our commitment with society and organ transplantation. We must contribute with the values proper to our specialization and try to reach self-sufficiency by rising organ obtainment.

  19. Human fronto–mesolimbic networks guide decisions about charitable donation

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Jorge; Krueger, Frank; Zahn, Roland; Pardini, Matteo; de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Grafman, Jordan

    2006-01-01

    Humans often sacrifice material benefits to endorse or to oppose societal causes based on moral beliefs. Charitable donation behavior, which has been the target of recent experimental economics studies, is an outstanding contemporary manifestation of this ability. Yet the neural bases of this unique aspect of human altruism, which extends beyond interpersonal interactions, remain obscure. In this article, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants anonymously donated to or opposed real charitable organizations related to major societal causes. We show that the mesolimbic reward system is engaged by donations in the same way as when monetary rewards are obtained. Furthermore, medial orbitofrontal–subgenual and lateral orbitofrontal areas, which also play key roles in more primitive mechanisms of social attachment and aversion, specifically mediate decisions to donate or to oppose societal causes. Remarkably, more anterior sectors of the prefrontal cortex are distinctively recruited when altruistic choices prevail over selfish material interests. PMID:17030808

  20. Understanding selective refusal of eye donation. Identity, beauty, and interpersonal relationships.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Mitchell; Kerridge, Ian

    2014-03-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most common form of organ transplantation performed globally. However, of all organs, eyes have the highest rate of refusal of donation. This study explored the reasons why individuals decide whether or not to donate corneas. Twenty-one individuals were interviewed who had made a donation decision (13 refused corneal donation and eight consented). Analysis was performed using Grounded Theory. Refusal of corneal donation was related to concerns about disfigurement and the role of eyes in memory and communication. The request for donation therefore raised concerns about a potential adverse change in the ongoing relationship with the deceased, even in death. For those who refused donation, these concerns overshadowed awareness of need or benefit of transplantation. Adjusting the donation message to be more congruent with the real, lived experience of corneal donation may to some extent "prepare" individuals when the donation question is raised.

  1. Development of electronic textiles to support networks, communications, and medical applications in future U.S. military protective clothing systems.

    PubMed

    Winterhalter, Carole A; Teverovsky, Justyna; Wilson, Patricia; Slade, Jeremiah; Horowitz, Wendy; Tierney, Edward; Sharma, Vikram

    2005-09-01

    The focus of this paper is on the development of textile-based wearable electronics that can be integrated into military protective clothing. A materials and manufacturing survey was conducted to determine the best performing and most durable materials to withstand the rigors of textile manufacturing and potential military use. Narrow woven technology was selected as one of the most promising textile manufacturing methods. A working wearable narrow fabric version of the Universal Serial Bus (USB), as well as a radiating conductor, were successfully developed and fabricated. A circular knit T-shirt with an integrated spiral bus was also developed. Military products developed include components of a personal area network providing data and power transport, and a body-borne antenna integrated into a load-bearing vest.

  2. American Society for Reproductive Medicine: defining embryo donation.

    PubMed

    2009-12-01

    Building families through adoption of children has been supported by human society throughout history. Building families through reproductive donation of surplus embryos, in contrast, has become an option only since the dawn of assisted reproductive technologies. The ethical appropriateness of patients donating embryos to other patients for family building, or for research, including stem cell research, is well established and has been affirmed by this body and many others.

  3. Gay man launches suit over refusal to accept blood donation.

    PubMed

    Garmaise, David

    2006-04-01

    Adrian Lomaga, a McGill law student who is gay, is suing Héma-Québec because it refuses to accept his blood donation. Héma-Québec, which is the blood collection agency for the province, imposes a lifetime ban on blood donations from men who have had sex with another man even once since 1977. The Canadian Blood Services has the same policy.

  4. Donor identification 'kills gamete donation'? A response.

    PubMed

    Allan, Sonia

    2012-12-01

    Two Australian government inquiries have recently called for the release of information to donor-conceived people about their gamete donors. A national inquiry, recommended 'as a matter of priority' that uniform legislation to be passed nationwide. A state-based inquiry argued that all donor-conceived people should have access to information and called for the enactment of retrospective legislation that would override donor anonymity. This paper responds to an opinion piece published in Human Reproduction in October 2012 by Professor Pennings in which he criticized such recommendations and questioned the motives of people that advocate for information release. I answer the arguments of Pennings, and argue that all parties affected by donor conception should be considered, and a compromise reached. The contact veto system is one such compromise. I discuss the education and support services recommended by the Victorian government and question Pennings' assertions that legislation enabling information release will lead to a decrease in gamete donation. Finally, I rebut Pennings' assertion that there is a 'hidden agenda' behind the call for information release. There is no such agenda in my work. If there is from others, then it is their discriminatory views that need to be addressed, not the move toward openness and honesty or the call for information by donor-conceived people.

  5. A semantic framework to protect the privacy of electronic health records with non-numerical attributes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Sergio; Sánchez, David; Valls, Aida

    2013-04-01

    Structured patient data like Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are a valuable source for clinical research. However, the sensitive nature of such information requires some anonymisation procedure to be applied before releasing the data to third parties. Several studies have shown that the removal of identifying attributes, like the Social Security Number, is not enough to obtain an anonymous data file, since unique combinations of other attributes as for example, rare diagnoses and personalised treatments, may lead to patient's identity disclosure. To tackle this problem, Statistical Disclosure Control (SDC) methods have been proposed to mask sensitive attributes while preserving, up to a certain degree, the utility of anonymised data. Most of these methods focus on continuous-scale numerical data. Considering that part of the clinical data found in EHRs is expressed with non-numerical attributes as for example, diagnoses, symptoms, procedures, etc., their application to EHRs produces far from optimal results. In this paper, we propose a general framework to enable the accurate application of SDC methods to non-numerical clinical data, with a focus on the preservation of semantics. To do so, we exploit structured medical knowledge bases like SNOMED CT to propose semantically-grounded operators to compare, aggregate and sort non-numerical terms. Our framework has been applied to several well-known SDC methods and evaluated using a real clinical dataset with non-numerical attributes. Results show that the exploitation of medical semantics produces anonymised datasets that better preserve the utility of EHRs.

  6. EFFECTS OF MESSAGE FRAMING AND EXEMPLARS ON PROMOTING ORGAN DONATION.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yu-Hung; Chang, Wen-Te

    2015-12-01

    People in many countries are unwilling to donate organs. Drawing on previous research regarding the use of message framing and the theory of exemplification promoting intentions to donate organs, this study examined messaging strategies. This study used a 2 × 2 between-subjects factorial design to examine the joint effects of gain/loss frames and statistical/exemplar appeals on the intentions of 189 Taiwanese college students (108 women, 81 men; age range = 19-24 yr., M = 21.6, SD = 2.9) regarding organ donation. Each participant was randomly assigned to read one of four versions of an organ donation promotional message and then to complete a questionnaire. The analysis of variance showed a significant interaction between the two factors. Loss-exemplar messages elicited significantly more positive intentions toward donation than did loss-statistical messages. There was no significant difference between the statistical and exemplar appeals observed under the gain-framed condition. The practical implications of developing effective organ donation promotional materials and the limitations of this study are discussed.

  7. Human body donation programs in Sri Lanka: Buddhist perspectives.

    PubMed

    Subasinghe, Sandeepani Kanchana; Jones, D Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Considerable attention is being given to the availability of bodies for anatomical education. This raises the question of the manner in which they are obtained, that is, whether they are unclaimed or donated. With increasing emphasis upon the ethical desirability of using body bequests, the spotlight tends to be focused on those countries with factors that militate against donations. However, little attention has been paid to cultures where donations are readily available. One such country is Sri Lanka where the majority of the Buddhist population follows Theravada Buddhism. Within this context, the expectation is that donations will be given selflessly without expecting anything in return. This is because donation of one's body has blessings for a better outcome now and in the afterlife. The ceremonies to honor donors are outlined, including details of the "Pirith Ceremony." The relevance for other cultures of these features of body donation is discussed paying especial attention to the meaning of altruism and consent, and justification for the anonymization of cadavers. The degree to which anatomy is integrated into the surrounding culture also emerges as significant.

  8. Donation to disaster relief campaigns: underlying social cognitive factors exposed.

    PubMed

    Oosterhof, Liesbeth; Heuvelman, Ard; Peters, Oscar

    2009-05-01

    A number of very serious natural disasters have put an enormous pressure on relief organizations in the last few years. The present study exposes underlying social cognitive factors for donation to relief campaigns. A causal model was constructed, based on social cognitive theory, research on attitudes, and the impact of media exposure. The aim was to expand and improve an already existing model by Cheung and Chan [Cheung, C. K., & Chan, C. M. (2000). Social-cognitive factors of donating money to charity, with special attention to an international relief organisation. Evaluation and Program Planning, 23, 241-253]. The expanded model showed a better fit. Furthermore, the expanded model explained two-thirds of the variance of the intention to donate to a disaster relief campaign. The greatest predictor of the intention to donate proved to be "Past donation to disaster relief campaigns." The factor "News exposure" was indicated to be a valuable additional factor, as it had a significant direct effect on "Awareness of a disaster relief campaign" and was the only factor that had a total effect on all other factors, including "Intention to donate to a disaster relief campaign."

  9. [Blood donation: Representations and issues associated with blood product collection].

    PubMed

    Loquier, B; Zegierman, A; Pelletier, B

    2015-08-01

    In order to answer to its aim of standardised self-sufficiency, the Établissement français du sang (main French national platform for blood donation) needs to know well the donors, what moves them, what motivates them, and the meaning that they give to their action. This knowledge allows the EFS to better understand the different sensitivities among donors, and therefore to improve the strategy regarding loyalty or/and newcomers. In this paper we follow, without attempting to be fully exhaustive, the evolution of the research regarding blood donation. The aim is to highlight the role played by social and historical representations regarding donation in general. In a given community, its norms, and its values influence both the image of donors as well as the meaning attached to the act itself of donation. Moreover, these norms have also influenced the way that research has tried to analyse this topic. The initial studies conducted in this field tried generally to understand the meaning and the symbolism attached to the act of blood donation. Later on, researchers started to focus on the assessment of notions such as generosity, and then solidarity. Nowadays, research is more focused on describing the population that gives blood. They are more scrutinised through their socio-demographic traits (who they are) than through the specific study of how they donate, the reasons behind the decision to act and the notion of satisfaction.

  10. OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: deceased organ donation.

    PubMed

    Israni, A K; Zaun, D; Rosendale, J D; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2014-01-01

    The status of deceased organ donation is assessed using several metrics, including donation/conversion rate (how often at least one organ is recovered for transplant from an eligible death), organ yield (ratio of observed/expected numbers of organs transplanted), and rate of organs discarded (number of organs discarded divided by the number of organs recovered for transplant). The 2012 donation/conversion rate was 72.5. eligible donors per 100 eligible deaths, slightly lower than the 2011 rate but higher than in previous years. The 2011-2012 yield ratio varied by donation service area from 0.91 (fewer organs transplanted per donor than expected) to 1.09 (more than expected), and also varied for specific organs. The mean number of organs transplanted per donor in 2012 was 3.02, lower than in 2011 and 2010; this number varied by donation service area from 2.04 to 3.76. The number of organs discarded is calculated by subtracting the number of organs transplanted from the number recovered for transplant; this number is used to calculate the discard rate. The discard rate in 2012 for all organs combined was 0.14 per recovered organ, slightly higher than in 2011 and 2011; it varied by donation service area and organ type.

  11. Student attitudes to whole body donation are influenced by dissection.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Kevin C; Ettarh, Raj R

    2008-01-01

    Given the important role that anatomical dissection plays in the shaping of medical student attitudes to life and death, these attitudes have not been evaluated in the context of whole body donation for medical science. First year students of anatomy in an Irish university medical school were surveyed by questionnaire before and after the initial dissection and again after 9 weeks of anatomical dissection. Analysis of student responses to the idea of whole body donation by an unrelated stranger, a family member, or by the respondent showed that a priori attitudes to donation by a stranger did not change with exposure to dissection. However, student opposition to donation by a family member was evident immediately after the initial dissection and was sustained throughout the duration of this study. Support for the idea of donating their bodies to medical science decreased significantly among respondents after exposure to dissection (31.5% before dissection, 19.6% after dissecting for 9 weeks) but not to levels reported in the general population in other studies. This study demonstrates that where dissection forms a part of anatomy teaching, students expect to learn anatomy by dissecting donors whom they do not know. As a potential donor population, students are reluctant to become emotionally involved in the donation process and are unwilling to become donors themselves.

  12. Opto-electronic Properties of Monolayer-Protected Clusters of Au functionalized with a New Fluorescent Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kountz, Thomas; Thanthirige, Viraj; Reber, Keith; Devadas, Mary Sajini

    Metal nanoclusters are the focus of intense study due to their interesting optical, electronic, and catalytic properties; specifically gold clusters. The applications of gold monolayer-protected clusters (MPCs) are being researched by a series of optical spectroscopic and voltammetric analyses to determine core size, atom-level composition, charge states, and optical/electrical properties. Understanding these fundamental properties is critical for both expansion of applications and creation of new MPCs. The purpose of this study is to expand the applications of gold MPCs, with the attachment of a new coumarin surface ligand - synthesized specifically for this experiment. Our focus in this research is on quantum clusters - specifically Au25(C6S)18. This MPC is researched particularly because of its inherent stability being a magic number cluster. It is created by means of a modified Burst-Schiffrin method. The applications that are influenced include but are not limited to: catalytic activity, solar energy conversion, size-tunable florescence, sensors, and optical electronics.

  13. What motivates men to offer sperm donation via the internet?

    PubMed

    Woestenburg, Nicolette O M; Winter, Heinrich B; Janssens, Pim M W

    2015-09-04

    To investigate why men offer sperm donation via the internet, a questionnaire was disseminated via 39 Dutch-language websites thought to be visited by potential sperm donors. Nine internet donors completed the survey, men who typically knew the women they were donating to. Their responses were compared with those of a control group of 35 general sperm bank donors who were recruited using flyers in Dutch sperm banks, and who were typically unaware of the identity of the eventual recipients. The findings shed light on the motives and attitudes of internet donors. Both groups of donors indicated that their primary motivation for donating was altruism (>80% of all respondents). However, internet donors had a more pronounced desire to procreate than sperm bank donors (6 out of 9, i.e. 66 vs. 22%, respectively) and more often felt that they had good genes they wished to pass on (5 out of 9, i.e. 55 vs. 31%, respectively). The main reason internet donors gave for donating via the internet was that they wanted to know the prospective parents and be kept up to date on the progress of the offspring conceived from their donations. This distinguishes them significantly from sperm bank donors. A further finding was that they were not prompted to avoid the formal donation circuit for which, by law in the Netherlands, pregnancies resulting from donations have to be registered in a central database. This study is subject to several, in some cases inevitable, limitations, but it provides an interesting starting point that future studies can seek to confirm and extend.

  14. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOEpatents

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  15. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOEpatents

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1993-01-01

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  16. Factors Associated with Repeat Blood Donation at the Northern Zone Blood Transfusion Centre in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mauka, Wilhellmuss I; Mahande, Michael J; Msuya, Sia E; Philemon, Rune N

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with repeat blood donation. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study carried out among blood donors aged 18-65 years in northern Tanzania. The questionnaire was administered among 454 participants through the phone. Results. Of the 454 participants, the proportion of repeat donation was 63.9%. In the backward logistic regression analysis, the significant predictors were living in Arusha which had lower odds of repeat donation compared to those living in Kilimanjaro. Knowledge of time interval between donations increased odds of repeating donations. High intention increased odds of repeat donation compared to low intention. Altruistic score had minor effect on increasing odds of repeating donation. Conclusion. Repeat blood donation is affected by proximity of donating site, awareness of the blood donation interval, intention to donate, and experience on previous donation. We recommend continuous education concerning blood donors and donation among health workers and society as a whole; this will create awareness on motivational factors for repeat donations.

  17. Bio-orthogonal "click-and-release" donation of caged carbonyl sulfide (COS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

    PubMed

    Steiger, Andrea K; Yang, Yang; Royzen, Maksim; Pluth, Michael D

    2017-01-24

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biomolecule with high therapeutic potential. Here we leverage the inverse-electron demand Diels-Alder (IEDDA) click reaction between a thiocarbamate-functionalized trans-cyclooctene and a tetrazine to deliver carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is quickly converted to H2S by the uniquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), thus providing a new strategy for bio-orthogonal COS/H2S donation.

  18. Effect of plasma donation and blood donation on aerobic and anaerobic responses in exhaustive, severe-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Hill, David W; Vingren, Jakob L; Burdette, Samantha D

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate and delayed effects of plasma donation and blood donation on responses in exhaustive, severe-intensity exercise. Nineteen young men and women performed exhaustive cycle ergometer tests at ∼3.3 W·kg(-1) before and then 2 h, 2 days, and 7 days after withdrawal of either 8-10 mL·kg(-1) (∼700 mL) of plasma (n = 10) or 1 unit (450 mL) of whole blood (n = 9). Time to exhaustion was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after the removal of plasma (-11% after 2 h) and after the removal of blood (-19% after 2 h and -7% after 2 days). Maximal oxygen uptake (.VO(2max)) was not affected by plasma donation, but .VO(2max) was reduced following blood withdrawal (-15% after 2 h, -10% after 2 days, and -7% after 7 days) presumably because of effects on blood volume, total haemoglobin content, and haemoglobin concentration. The kinetics of the oxygen uptake (.VO2) response was not affected by either intervention. Two measures of anaerobic capacity, postexercise blood lactate concentration, and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit were reduced (-14%, -15%, respectively) 2 h after plasma donation, but neither was affected by blood donation. Removal of plasma and removal of blood have different effects on blood constituency, on the .VO2 response, and on performance. Plasma donation appears to affect exercise performance because of reduced anaerobic capacity, whereas blood donation affects performance because of lowered .VO(2max).

  19. Philosophy of organ donation: Review of ethical facets

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna R

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation ethics is a philosophy that incorporates systematizing, defending and advocating concepts of right and wrong conduct related to organ donation. As the demand for organs increases, it is essential to ensure that new and innovative laws, policies and strategies of increasing organ supply are bioethical and are founded on the principles of altruism and utilitarianism. In the field of organ transplantation, role of altruism and medical ethics values are significant to the welfare of the society. This article reviews several fundamental ethical principles, prevailing organ donation consent laws, incentives and policies related to the field of transplantation. The Ethical and Policy Considerations in Organ Donation after Circulatory Determination of Death outline criteria for death and organ retrieval. Presumed consent laws prevalent mostly in European countries maintain that the default choice of an individual would be to donate organs unless opted otherwise. Explicit consent laws require organ donation to be proactively affirmed with state registries. The Declaration of Istanbul outlines principles against organ trafficking and transplant tourism. World Health Organization’s Guiding Principles on Human Cell, Tissue and Organ Transplantation aim at ensuring transparency in organ procurement and allocation. The ethics of financial incentives and non-financial incentives such as incorporation of non-medical criteria in organ priority allocation have also been reviewed in detail. PMID:26131406

  20. OPTN/SRTR 2013 Annual Data Report: deceased organ donation.

    PubMed

    Israni, A K; Zaun, D A; Rosendale, J D; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2015-01-01

    The status of deceased organ donation is assessed using metrics such as donation/conversation rate, organ yield, and rate of organs recovered for transplant and not transplanted. These metrics are based on eligible deaths (brain death of a person aged 70 years or younger) as well as on actual donors. The 9132 eligible deaths reported in 2013 represented a slight increase over 2012. The donation/conversion rate was 71.3 eligible donors per 100 eligible deaths, a slight decline from 2012, and varied by donation service area from 50.0 to 87.0. The number of organs recovered per donor, 3.55, also varied by donation service area, from 2.79 to 4.10. The mean number of organs transplanted per donor was 3.08 in 2013, slightly higher than 3.02 in 2012. The mean observed/expected organ yield ratio for kidneys varied from 0.86 to 1.18; for pancreata, from 0.29 to 2.59; for livers, from 0.69 to 1.17; for hearts, from 0.68 to 1.41; and for lungs, from 0.33 to 1.41. The rate of organs recovered for transplant and not transplanted in 2013 for all organs combined was 0.13 per recovered organ, slightly lower than the rate of 0.14 in 2012.

  1. Philosophy of organ donation: Review of ethical facets.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Aparna R

    2015-06-24

    Transplantation ethics is a philosophy that incorporates systematizing, defending and advocating concepts of right and wrong conduct related to organ donation. As the demand for organs increases, it is essential to ensure that new and innovative laws, policies and strategies of increasing organ supply are bioethical and are founded on the principles of altruism and utilitarianism. In the field of organ transplantation, role of altruism and medical ethics values are significant to the welfare of the society. This article reviews several fundamental ethical principles, prevailing organ donation consent laws, incentives and policies related to the field of transplantation. The Ethical and Policy Considerations in Organ Donation after Circulatory Determination of Death outline criteria for death and organ retrieval. Presumed consent laws prevalent mostly in European countries maintain that the default choice of an individual would be to donate organs unless opted otherwise. Explicit consent laws require organ donation to be proactively affirmed with state registries. The Declaration of Istanbul outlines principles against organ trafficking and transplant tourism. World Health Organization's Guiding Principles on Human Cell, Tissue and Organ Transplantation aim at ensuring transparency in organ procurement and allocation. The ethics of financial incentives and non-financial incentives such as incorporation of non-medical criteria in organ priority allocation have also been reviewed in detail.

  2. A proposal for an anonymous living organ donation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Rittner, Christian K; Besold, Andrea; Wandel, Evelyn

    2003-03-01

    In Germany, living organ donation of paired and usually not regenerating organs is restricted by law to related individuals, as well as persons who 'obviously entertain an especially intimate personal relationship'. When this law was adopted in 1997, the intention of the legislator was to guarantee the free will of the donor and to exclude any trade of organs. Since then the transplantation of cadaveric organs has not increased. Additional organs were donated from living donors. However, for a number of reasons only a limited array of transplantation centers use living organ donation as a supply facing a steadily increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure. Living organ donation raises a variety of medical, ethical and legal questions. Although transplantation is a generally accepted therapeutic approach for impaired organ function, doctors do not promote it actively. Prospective donor-recipient pairs use the information obtained via internet and other sources before they contact the clinician. Doctors are hesitant to operate a healthy individual for allowing her or him to profit from this organ loss only emotionally or in an altruistic sense. Often a complex relationship between donor and recipient, as well as tissue incompatibility (ABO, HLA) may be additional reasons to restrain from carrying out living organ transplantation. To improve the chances for good organ function and better life quality of the patients we here propose a model for anonymous living organ donation with special reference to kidney transplantation.

  3. Organ donation in China: current status, challenges, and future development.

    PubMed

    Sui, Weiguo; Zheng, Can; Yang, Ming; Dai, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Development of effective immunosuppressive agents and advances in surgical practice are the main reasons for the success of transplantation in China. In some key areas such as liver, lung, and kidney transplants, Chinese transplant success rates are similar to the rates in developed countries. Organ donation also has developed rapidly. However, China is facing a serious organ shortage that restricts clinical treatment and medical research. This shortage is due to imperfect laws and improper management of organ donation, as well as Chinese traditional ethics. Finding an efficient way to make the number of donated organs keep pace with the need for organ transplants and to optimize allocation of organ resources is a long-term and arduous task. In some ways, Chinese organ donation nowadays is constrained more by legal issues than by medical issues. The current status of and challenges facing organ donation in China are analyzed with respect to ethics, management, laws, and policy, and the future development of transplantation in China is discussed.

  4. Registered bone marrow donors' views on bodily donations.

    PubMed

    Sanner, M A

    1997-01-01

    The attitudes of 463 potential bone marrow donors toward blood donation, kidney donation in life, organ donation after death, autopsy, and donation of the whole body for anatomic dissection were surveyed, using a questionnaire that had previously been employed for assessing the attitudes of the public. The response rate was 96%. Three quarters of the respondents were blood donors and recruited via the blood center. The proportion that accepted the procedures varied between 24% for anatomic dissection and 97% for autopsy. Differences were small between individuals with positive attitudes and individuals who had also actively taken steps to activate these attitudes. Compared with the public, the bone marrow donors were more positive to all kinds of bodily donations. The conclusion is that if one is prepared to give from the body in life, one is also prepared to give after death. The results may indicate less death anxiety and fear of physical injury, and less fear of chaos either with or without altruism compared to the public.

  5. A critical size for emergence of nonbulk electronic and geometric structures in dodecanethiolate-protected Au clusters.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Yuichi; Nakazaki, Tafu; Malola, Sami; Takano, Shinjiro; Niihori, Yoshiki; Kurashige, Wataru; Yamazoe, Seiji; Tsukuda, Tatsuya; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2015-01-28

    We report on how the transition from the bulk structure to the cluster-specific structure occurs in n-dodecanethiolate-protected gold clusters, Au(n)(SC12)m. To elucidate this transition, we isolated a series of Au(n)(SC12)m in the n range from 38 to ∼520, containing five newly identified or newly isolated clusters, Au104(SC12)45, Au(∼226)(SC12)(∼76), Au(∼253)(SC12)(∼90), Au(∼356)(SC12)(∼112), and Au(∼520)(SC12)(∼130), using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Low-temperature optical absorption spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that the Au cores of Au144(SC12)60 and smaller clusters have molecular-like electronic structures and non-fcc geometric structures, whereas the structures of the Au cores of larger clusters resemble those of the bulk gold. A new structure model is proposed for Au104(SC12)45 based on combined approach between experiments and DFT calculations.

  6. An Analysis of Organ Donation Policy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ghazi; Iftikhar, Sadia

    2016-05-02

    There is currently an organ shortage crisis in the United States. This paper analyzes the magnitude of the problem, the organ procurement programs in other developed countries as compared to the US, and discusses the changes that can be made to address this problem. With the opt-in or explicit-consent method currently practiced in the US, less that one third of the population consents to organ donation. In order to narrow the gap between the demand and supply of organs, steps need to be taken to improve the organ procurement infrastructure. The public needs to be educated about the dire need, the benefits and risks in organ donation, and living vs. deceased donation. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-05.asp, free with no login].

  7. The debate in Chile on organ donation revisited.

    PubMed

    Kottow Lang, Miguel Hugo

    2016-08-29

    The worldwide scarcity of cadaveric organs for transplants is on the rise, due in part to extended medical indications and longevity of chronic patients with organic insufficiencies. Chile has an extremely low donor rate of 6.7 per million. Although consent is presumed by law, and recently amended to include a “reciprocity principle”, nearly four million persons have expressed in writing their unwillingness to donate and, of those remaining, 53% of families have rejected donating the organs of their deceased. New proposals are urgently needed, even if some of them have previously been rejected: nonmaterial incentives, partial donations and unveiling anonymity to enhance personal ties between donors and recipients. Transparency, information and assistance are to be reinforced in order to regain trust in transplant procedures.

  8. Kidney organ donation: developing family practice initiatives to reverse inertia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation is associated with greater long term survival rates and improved quality of life compared with dialysis. Continuous growth in the number of patients with kidney failure has not been matched by an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplantation. This leads to long waiting lists, higher treatment costs and negative health outcomes. Discussion Misunderstandings, public uncertainty and issues of trust in the medical system, that limit willingness to be registered as a potential donor, could be addressed by community dissemination of information and new family practice initiatives that respond to individuals' personal beliefs and concerns regarding organ donation and transplantation. Summary Tackling both personal and public inertia on organ donation is important for any community oriented kidney donation campaign. PMID:20478042

  9. The Indian Ocean tsunami and private donations to NGOs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwan; Nunnenkamp, Peter; Bagchi, Chandreyee

    2016-10-01

    Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are widely believed to raise their flag in humanitarian hotspots with a strong media presence in order to attract higher private donations. We assess this hypothesis by comparing the changes in donations between US-based NGOs with and without aid operations in the four countries most affected by the tsunami in the Indian Ocean in 2004. Simple before-after comparisons tend to support the hypothesis that 'flying the flag' helps attract higher private donations. However, performing a difference-in-difference-in-differences (DDD) approach, we find only weak indications that private donors systematically and strongly preferred NGOs with operations in the region. Extended specifications of the baseline regressions reveal that our major findings are robust. NGO heterogeneity matters in some respects, but the DDD results hold when accounting for proxies of the NGOs' reputation and experience.

  10. Thanking and reciprocating under the New Zealand organ donation system.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Rhonda

    2012-05-01

    Organ donation and transplantation has been extensively addressed in the biomedical and bioethics literature in relation to debates around organ allocation and procurement strategies, and concerns about consent, coercion and commodification. This article addresses the topic sociologically, drawing on data from face-to-face in-depth interviews undertaken between 2008 and 2010 with organ and tissue recipients, anonymous altruistic donors and donor family members to discuss questions of reciprocity and intercorporeality that arise in the course of tissue exchange. In particular, the article examines the place of anonymity protocol for organ donors and transplantation recipients in New Zealand and their responses to conventions and scripts surrounding this rule. The article concludes by calling for discussion to re-examine anonymity protocol and rituals around organ donation and transplantation, citing lessons from gamete donation policies and recent law in New Zealand as productive for thinking through matters of personhood and identity relating to organ transfer.

  11. Normative consent and presumed consent for organ donation: a critique.

    PubMed

    Potts, Michael; Verheijde, Joseph L; Rady, Mohamed Y; Evans, David W

    2010-08-01

    Ben Saunders claims that actual consent is not necessary for organ donation due to 'normative consent', a concept he borrows from David Estlund. Combining normative consent with Peter Singer's 'greater moral evil principle', Saunders argues that it is immoral for an individual to refuse consent to donate his or her organs. If a presumed consent policy were thus adopted, it would be morally legitimate to remove organs from individuals whose wishes concerning donation are not known. This paper disputes Saunders' arguments. First, if death caused by the absence of organ transplant is the operational premise, then, there is nothing of comparable moral precedence under which a person is not obligated to donate. Saunders' use of Singer's principle produces a duty to donate in almost all circumstances. However, this premise is based on a flawed interpretation of cause and effect between organ availability and death. Second, given growing moral and scientific agreement that the organ donors in heart-beating and non-heart-beating procurement protocols are not dead when their organs are surgically removed, it is not at all clear that people have a duty to consent to their lives being taken for their organs. Third, Saunders' claim that there can be good reasons for refusing consent clashes with his claim that there is a moral obligation for everyone to donate their organs. Saunders' argument is more consistent with a conclusion of 'mandatory consent'. Finally, it is argued that Saunders' policy, if put into place, would be totalitarian in scope and would therefore be inconsistent with the freedom required for a democratic society.

  12. Professional education and hospital development for organ donation.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, N; Konaka, S; Kato, O; Ashikari, J

    2012-05-01

    Because of the strict Organ Transplantation Act, only 81 brain dead (BD) organ donations had been performed in Japan for 13 years since 1997. The Act was revised on July 17, 2010, allowing, organs to be donated after BD with consent from the family, if the subject had not denied organ donation previously. This act has lead to an expectation of a 6-7-fold increase in BD donation. The 82 organ procurement coordinators (OPC) in Japan include 32 belonging to the Japanese Organ Network (JOT) and the others to each administrative division. JOT has guideline manuals of standard roles and procedures of OPC during organ procurement from BD and cardiac death donors. To manage the increased organ donations after the revision of the act, we have modified the education system. First, we modified the guideline manuals for OPC to correspond to the revised Transplant Act and governmental guidelines. Second, all OPC gathered in a meeting room to learn the new organ procurement system to deal with the revised Transplant Act and guidelines. Third, a special education program for 2 months was provided for the 10 newcomers. Last, the practical training in each donor case for newcomers was performed by older OPC. Topics of the education program were the revised transplant act and guidelines, family approach to organ donation, BD diagnosis, donor evaluation and management, organ procurement and preservation, allocation system, hospital development and family care. In the future, each OPC will be divided into special categories, such as the donor family OPC, the donor management OPC, and the operating room OPC. Therefore, we need to construct separate special education programs for each category.

  13. Oocyte donation for reproduction and research cloning--the perils of commodification and the need for European and international regulation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ingrid

    2006-01-01

    The demand for women's egg cells is increasing and is leading to reproductive tourism and transnational oocyte trafficking. The article considers the regulatory landscape of oocyte donation in Europe and analyses different types, particularly whether oocytes are provided within or outside of the IVF context, and whether anonymity of the donor is legally possible or not. The bifurcation between different purposes of egg extraction, particularly the challenges raised by ova demands for cloning research (SCNT) are highlighted. In emphasizing the need for supranational regulation, nine rules for supranational minimum standards are proposed to protect both donor interests and the public good. A particular focus is directed to the commodification of oocytes with regard to the European principle of non-commercial, voluntary and altruistic donation.

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.1020 - Are public bodies ever required to pay the disposal costs associated with donated property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Abandonment, Destruction, or Donation to Public... with donated property? Yes, any public body receiving donated improvements on land or related personal... cleaning up of the premises. Abandonment and Destruction...

  15. When Opportunity Knocks Twice: Dual Living Kidney Donation, Autonomy and the Public Interest

    PubMed Central

    Huxtable, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Living kidney transplantation offers the best treatment in terms of life‐expectancy and quality of life for those with end‐stage renal disease. The long‐term risks of living donor nephrectomy, although real, are very small, with evidence of good medium‐term outcomes. Who should be entitled to donate, and in which circumstances, is nevertheless a live question. We explore the ethical dimensions of a request by an individual to donate both of their kidneys during life: ‘dual living kidney donation’. Our ethical analysis is tethered to a hypothetical case study in which a father asks to donate a kidney to each of his twin boys. We explore the autonomy of the protagonists, alongside different dimensions of the public interest, such as the need to protect not only the recipients, but also the donor and even the wider community. Whilst acknowledging objections to ‘dual‐donation’, not least by reference to the harms that the donor might be expected to endure, we suggest there is a prima facie case for permitting this, provided that both donor and recipients are willing and that due attention is paid to such considerations as the autonomy and welfare of all parties, as well as to the wider ramifications of acting on such a request. We argue for broader interpretations of the concepts of autonomy and welfare, recognizing the importance of relationships and the relevance of more than merely physical well‐being. Equipped with such a holistic assessment, we suggest there is a prima facie case for allowing ‘dual living kidney donation’. PMID:26194324

  16. Recommendations for donation after circulatory death kidney transplantation in Europe.

    PubMed

    van Heurn, L W Ernest; Talbot, David; Nicholson, Michael L; Akhtar, Mohammed Z; Sanchez-Fructuoso, Ana I; Weekers, Laurent; Barrou, Benoit

    2016-07-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors provides an invaluable source for kidneys for transplantation. Over the last decade, we have observed a substantial increase in the number of DCD kidneys, particularly within Europe. We provide an overview of risk factors associated with DCD kidney function and survival and formulate recommendations from the sixth international conference on organ donation in Paris, for best-practice guidelines. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Ovid Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. Topics are discussed, including donor selection, organ procurement, organ preservation, recipient selection and transplant management.

  17. Increasing organ donation by presumed consent and allocation priority: Chile

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chile, a middle-income country, recently joined Israel and Singapore as the world’s only countries to require reciprocity as a precondition for organ transplantation. The Chilean reform includes opt-out provisions designed to foster donation and priority for organ transplantation for registered people. Although the reform has had serious difficulties in achieving its mission, it can be reviewed by other countries that seek to address the serious shortage of organs. As increased organ donation can substantially enhance or save more lives, the effect on organ availability due to incentives arising from rules of preference should not be underestimated. PMID:25767299

  18. Clinical skin banking: II. Stimulating sources for organ donation.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J C; Ninnemann, J L; Wachtel, T L; Frank, H A

    1980-12-01

    Donor source stimulation for a regional skin bank is discussed, emphasizing the importance of coordination with other organ donor programs, centralization of a public information and donor identifying communication system, exploitation of regional legislative precedents which facilitate organ donation, and finally, identification of health professional and related groups with a common interest in matters associated with rational planning for the time of death. The specific problem associated with skin donation, namely, a sensitive description of the technical details of skin harvest, is also considered.

  19. Increasing organ donation by presumed consent and allocation priority: Chile.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Fajuri, Alejandra

    2015-03-01

    Chile, a middle-income country, recently joined Israel and Singapore as the world's only countries to require reciprocity as a precondition for organ transplantation. The Chilean reform includes opt-out provisions designed to foster donation and priority for organ transplantation for registered people. Although the reform has had serious difficulties in achieving its mission, it can be reviewed by other countries that seek to address the serious shortage of organs. As increased organ donation can substantially enhance or save more lives, the effect on organ availability due to incentives arising from rules of preference should not be underestimated.

  20. The effects of wearing a costume on charitable donations.

    PubMed

    Osbaldiston, Richard; De Boer, Brittany

    2011-02-01

    Although research has shown a general trend that people dressed in neat or professional clothes elicit more helping behavior from other people than when dressed in casual or sloppy clothes, no research has examined the effects of wearing a costume on helping behavior. In this experiment, confederates dressed either in a Santa suit or in street clothes as they volunteered for the Salvation Army as bell-ringers in front of retail stores. The hypothesis that donations would be greater while wearing the Santa suit was not supported by the data; the Santa suit and the street clothes elicited equal amounts of donations.

  1. Pilot explores organ donation in the ED--challenges raised.

    PubMed

    2010-06-01

    A pilot program for ED organ donation at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)--Presbyterian Hospital is seeking much-needed organs, while maintaining optimal medical care for the living and avoiding potential conflicts of interest. Separate teams are involved with organ donation and with patient care, creating a "firewall" to prevent conflicts of interest. After failed CPR, a minimum of two minutes of no-CPR time is allowed to pass after death is pronounced to be certain there is no occult cardiac activity. Infusions of cold fluids are used to give enough time for the transplant surgeon to arrive and determine if any organs can be procured.

  2. 75 FR 873 - Extramural Support Reimbursement of Travel and Subsistence Expenses Toward Living Organ Donation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Extramural Support Reimbursement of Travel... providing reimbursement of travel and subsistence expenses for certain individuals donating their organs... reimbursement for qualifying travel and subsistence expenses related to live organ donation. The...

  3. How Research on Charitable Giving Can Inform Strategies to Promote Human Milk Donations to Milk Banks.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jack; Keim, Sarah A

    2015-08-01

    Many hospitalized preterm infants do not exclusively receive mother's own milk, so milk from another mother may be sought. Previous research indicated that just 1% of US women who express breast milk actually donate it for another family. Therefore, strategies to boost donation rates should be identified. We draw upon the experimental literature on charitable giving of monetary donations to offer 6 strategies to promote breast milk donations to milk banks in North America. These strategies include (1) highlighting a potential identifiable recipient of donated breast milk as opposed to highlighting groups of potential recipients; (2) emphasizing similarities between the potential donor and potential beneficiaries; (3) emphasizing similarities between the potential donor and previous donors; (4) using negative arousal to promote donations; (5) emphasizing the self-interest of those asking for breast milk donations; and (6) highlighting the specific effect of breast milk donations. Potential limitations of these strategies are discussed.

  4. Lower Consent Rates for Organ Donation Found among Racial and Ethnic Minorities and Older Donors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Computers and Medical Informatics Children's Health Aging Women's Health Full Research Reports ... about the organ donation process, the definition of brain death, the potential for donation to help others, ...

  5. Presumed consent for organ preservation in uncontrolled donation after cardiac death in the United States: a public policy with serious consequences.

    PubMed

    Verheijde, Joseph L; Rady, Mohamed Y; McGregor, Joan

    2009-09-22

    and the absence of protection of individual autonomy, for the sake of maximizing procurement opportunities, have placed the current organ-donation system of opting-in in great jeopardy. Equally as important, current policies enabling and enhancing organ procurement practices, pose challenges to the constitutional rights of individuals in a pluralistic society as these policies are founded on flawed medical standards for declaring death.

  6. Presumed consent for organ preservation in uncontrolled donation after cardiac death in the United States: a public policy with serious consequences

    PubMed Central

    Verheijde, Joseph L; Rady, Mohamed Y; McGregor, Joan

    2009-01-01

    and the absence of protection of individual autonomy, for the sake of maximizing procurement opportunities, have placed the current organ-donation system of opting-in in great jeopardy. Equally as important, current policies enabling and enhancing organ procurement practices, pose challenges to the constitutional rights of individuals in a pluralistic society as these policies are founded on flawed medical standards for declaring death. PMID:19772617

  7. Enclosure Requirements to Protect Personnel from Spinning Rotor Frailures at the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, John W

    2007-08-01

    Performance evaluation of electric motors is a major function of the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC). Normally these motors have a fixed wire-wound stator and a rotating rotor, which may have conductors embedded in a ferromagnetic core (induction motors), magnets mounted on the surface of the ferromagnetic core with a thin metal or composite cylinder or ring to hold them in place, or magnets embedded in the ferromagnetic core. Most of the work currently involves the last two permanent magnet (PM) configurations. Although the stator of a radial-gap motor can absorb energy from many of the fragments ejected from the rotor during operation, the stator of an axial-gap motor is not positioned to provide significant protection. The housing of each motor can also absorb some of the energy. The most conservative approach, however, is to assume that all fragments from the rotor must be contained by a protective enclosure. An ideal enclosure is transparent. Manufacturers of such plastics as Lexan, Tuffak, and Cyrolon sell different variations of transparent enclosure material. Lexan is a polycarbonate sheet. Lexgard{reg_sign} is a penetration resistant material made by layering polycarbonate material between pieces of ordinary glass. A fragment striking a sheet of enclosure material will pierce the surface layer, but the layered polycarbonate-glass material is able to absorb the fragment's energy before it completes penetration. Tuffak{reg_sign} is Lexan polycarbonate. Cyrolon{reg_sign} bullet resistant material is acrylic sheet. The ability of the enclosure to stop a fragment depends on its thickness as well as the penetration capability of the fragment; for example, a lead fragment has much less penetrating capability than a steel fragment. Enclosure thicknesses are commercially available to provide several levels of protection. These levels depend on the momentum of the fragments and have been evaluated for some common types of ammunition

  8. Patent Donations: Making Use of the Gift of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talnack, G. Marie

    2010-01-01

    The lines between basic and applied research and the sectors of the U.S. economy responsible for each type have begun to blur. No better case for the blurring of these lines and the benefits of technology transfer among research institutions can be provided than the recent phenomenon of corporate patent donations to non-profit research…

  9. Organ donation and transplantation within the Zulu culture.

    PubMed

    Bhengu, B R; Uys, H H M

    2004-08-01

    Greater knowledge and technological advancement in the field of transplantation has increased the demand for organ donation beyond the supply of organs, especially among the black communities. This imbalance arises from the few sources of organs, limitations on the techniques of organ retrieval, disparities in the allocation of organs and socio-cultural factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which Zulu cultural norms and social structures influence an individual's decision to donate an organ or to undergo transplantation. A qualitative approach using an ethno-nursing method was selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a transplant co-ordinator representing the professional sector, with traditional healers and religious leaders representing the folk sector, and with the general public representing the popular sector of the health care system. Both urban and rural settings were used. Conclusions arrived at showed that knowledge was lacking among Zulu speaking people about organ donation and transplantation and misconceptions about the topic were related to Zulu life patterns, beliefs about death, burial and life hereafter, and values and social structures. Recommendations with regard to the promotion of organ donation and transplantation among Zulu speaking people were made based on culture-sensitive and culture-congruent principles.

  10. [Theoretical approach to motivating people for voluntary blood donation].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, D; Sindjidj, M; Budisin, Z

    1996-01-01

    The study points to the experience of a considerable number of authors and to our own experience in the use of sociopsychological theories and personal approaches to the motivation of people for voluntary blood donation. The experience in the following theories is described: personal norms and contribution of responsibility to oneself, economic theory, modelling theory, theory of reasonable action and contribution theory.

  11. Paid Living Donation and Growth of Deceased Donor Programs.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Nasrollah

    2016-06-01

    Limited organ availability in all countries has stimulated discussion about incentives to increase donation. Since 1988, Iran has operated the only government-sponsored paid living donor (LD) kidney transplant program. This article reviews aspects of the Living Unrelated Donor program and development of deceased donation in Iran. Available evidence indicates that in the partially regulated Iranian Model, the direct negotiation between donors and recipients fosters direct monetary relationship with no safeguards against mutual exploitation. Brokers, the black market and transplant tourism exist, and the waiting list has not been eliminated. Through comparison between the large deceased donor program in Shiraz and other centers in Iran, this article explores the association between paid donation and the development of a deceased donor program. Shiraz progressively eliminated paid donor transplants such that by 2011, 85% of kidney transplants in Shiraz compared with 27% across the rest of Iran's other centers were from deceased donors. Among 26 centers, Shiraz undertakes the largest number of deceased donor kidney transplants, most liver transplants, and all pancreas transplants. In conclusion, although many patients with end stage renal disease have received transplants through the paid living donation, the Iranian Model now has serious flaws and is potentially inhibiting substantial growth in deceased donor organ transplants in Iran.

  12. Declining frequency of blood donation among elites in Maiduguri, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S G; Gamas, M G; Kagu, M B

    2006-09-01

    This study evaluated the causes of declining frequency of voluntary blood donations among educated elites as seen at the blood bank of University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Nigeria, over the last decade. The number of blood units received from educated elite donors during a 10-year period (1995-2004) at the blood bank were determined and expressed as percentages of total donations collected annually. The reasons for elite donor default were obtained through the use of questionnaires filled by defaulting donors. The proportion of educated elite donations steadily fell from 28% in 1995 to 7% in 2004. Reasons for defaulting from voluntary blood donations included fear for HIV screening in 86.7% of respondents, economic hardship/poor nourishment in 50.6% of respondents, changed address/logistic difficulties in 4.8% of respondents and ill health in 2.4% of respondents. Therefore, the steady fall in the proportion of elite donors over the years was mainly due to fear of HIV screening coupled with economic difficulties. Hence, there is the need to review our donor campaign strategy with respect to predonation counseling for HIV, initiate regular haematinics supplementation for donors and introduce sustainable mobile donor clinic services for distant donors. Further more, there is the need for a functional national blood transfusion service in Nigeria.

  13. 7 CFR 226.5 - Donation of commodities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Donation of commodities. 226.5 Section 226.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Assistance to States § 226.5...

  14. Do Specialized MBA Programs Cultivate Alumni Relationships and Donations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer Wiggins; Thomas, Veronica; Peck, Joann

    2010-01-01

    A recent trend among universities shifts from traditional MBA programs to specialized MBA offerings. Specialized programs are believed to cultivate stronger relationships with students, which lead to stronger alumni relationships and increased donations. This research tests this empirically by examining relationship perceptions and donation…

  15. 76 FR 18631 - National Donate Life Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Americans have always been a... Life Month, we reflect on an important opportunity to aid others--bestowing the gift of life through... proclaim April 2011 as National Donate Life Month. I call upon health care professionals,...

  16. 50 CFR 679.26 - Prohibited Species Donation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... locations to hunger relief agencies, food bank networks, or food bank distributors, including arrangements... ensure that fish donated under this program will be distributed to hunger relief agencies, food bank... bylaws showing that the purpose of the applicant includes providing food resources to hunger...

  17. 50 CFR 679.26 - Prohibited Species Donation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... locations to hunger relief agencies, food bank networks, or food bank distributors, including arrangements... ensure that fish donated under this program will be distributed to hunger relief agencies, food bank... bylaws showing that the purpose of the applicant includes providing food resources to hunger...

  18. Organ Donation and Elective Ventilation: A Necessary Strategy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Organ transplantation is the sole treatment to improve or save the life of patients with final-stage organ failure. The shortage of available organs for transplantation constitutes a universal problem, estimating that 10% of patients on waiting lists die. Brain death is an undesirable result; nevertheless, it has beneficial side-effects since it is the most frequent source of organs for transplantation. However, this phenomenon is relatively uncommon and has a limited potential. One of the options that focuses on increasing organ donation is to admit patients with catastrophic brain injuries (with a high probability of brain death and nontreatable) to the Intensive Care Unit, with the only purpose of donation. To perform elective nontherapeutic ventilation (ENTV), a patient's anticipated willingness to donate organs and/or explicit acceptance by his/her relatives is required. This process should focus exclusively on those patients with catastrophic brain injuries and imminent risk of death which, due to its acute damage, are not considered treatable. This article defends ENTV as an effective strategy to improve donation rate, analyzing its ethical and legal basis. PMID:28182115

  19. Zoroastrians Support Oocyte and Embryo Donation Program for Infertile Couples

    PubMed Central

    Halvaei, Iman; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Ghasemi-Esmailabad, Saeed; Nabi, Ali; Shamsi, Farimah

    2014-01-01

    Background The main goal was to evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of Zoroastrians living in Iran towards oocyte donation (OD) and embryo donation (ED) program. Methods This cross sectional study consisted of 318 Zoroastrians (n=175 for OD and n=143 for ED) of both sexes. The questionnaire form comprised two parts of general demographic characteristics of the participants and twenty multiple-choice questions about attitude and knowledge of participants towards OD and ED. For statistical analysis, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of data generated from ED and OD groups. Results Majority of the participants supported OD (69.7%) and ED (71.3%) for infertile patients. In addition, 40% and 42% preferred donation program (OD and ED, respectively), compared to adoption. About 60% of the respondents believed that the donors have no right to find the child and claim it as their own. In addition, more than half of the respondents thought that the recipients of oocyte/embryo should never know the name and address of the donors. More than half of the participants did not know whether their religion accepts donation program or not. Approximately, 80% of respondents supported psychological counseling for both donors and recipients. Moreover, about 56% of the participants necessitated the advertisement on OD/ED program in the mass media. Conclusion Our preliminary data showed that Zoroastrians supported both OD and ED program equally for infertile couples. PMID:25473631

  20. Organ Donation and Elective Ventilation: A Necessary Strategy.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Dolores; Otero, Jesus; Menéndez de León, Begoña; Perez-Basterrechea, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Organ transplantation is the sole treatment to improve or save the life of patients with final-stage organ failure. The shortage of available organs for transplantation constitutes a universal problem, estimating that 10% of patients on waiting lists die. Brain death is an undesirable result; nevertheless, it has beneficial side-effects since it is the most frequent source of organs for transplantation. However, this phenomenon is relatively uncommon and has a limited potential. One of the options that focuses on increasing organ donation is to admit patients with catastrophic brain injuries (with a high probability of brain death and nontreatable) to the Intensive Care Unit, with the only purpose of donation. To perform elective nontherapeutic ventilation (ENTV), a patient's anticipated willingness to donate organs and/or explicit acceptance by his/her relatives is required. This process should focus exclusively on those patients with catastrophic brain injuries and imminent risk of death which, due to its acute damage, are not considered treatable. This article defends ENTV as an effective strategy to improve donation rate, analyzing its ethical and legal basis.

  1. Student Attitudes to Whole Body Donation Are Influenced by Dissection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kevin C.; Ettarh, Raj R.

    2008-01-01

    Given the important role that anatomical dissection plays in the shaping of medical student attitudes to life and death, these attitudes have not been evaluated in the context of whole body donation for medical science. First year students of anatomy in an Irish university medical school were surveyed by questionnaire before and after the initial…

  2. Age Modulates Attitudes to Whole Body Donation among Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Gary F.; Ettarh, Raj R.

    2009-01-01

    Managing a whole body donor program is necessary for facilitating a traditional dissection-based anatomy curriculum in medicine and health sciences. Factors which influence body donations to medical science can therefore affect dissection-based anatomy teaching. In order to determine whether age influences the attitudes of medical students to…

  3. Attitudes to Cadaveric Organ Donation in Irish Preclinical Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kevin C.; Ettarh, Rajunor R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a worldwide shortage of organs for transplantation. It has been shown that the attitude of healthcare professionals can improve the rates of organ donation, and that educational programs aimed at improving both attitudes and knowledge base of professionals can have positive outcomes. Although there has been research carried out on this…

  4. Kidney paired donation: a plea for a Swiss National Programme.

    PubMed

    Hadaya, Karine; Fehr, Thomas; Rüsi, Barbara; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Jean, Villard; Ferrari, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Growing incidence of end-stage renal disease, shortage of kidneys from deceased donors and a better outcome for recipients of kidneys from living donor have led many centres worldwide to favour living donor kidney transplantation programmes. Although criteria for living donation have greatly evolved in recent years with acceptance of related and unrelated donors, an immunological incompatibility, either due to ABO incompatibility and/or to positive cross-match, between a living donor and the intended recipient, could impede up to 40% of such procedures. To avoid refusal of willing and healthy living donors, a number of strategies have emerged to overcome immunological incompatibilities. Kidney paired donation is the safest way for such patients to undergo kidney transplantation. Implemented with success in many countries either as national or multiple regional independent programmes, it could include simple exchanges between any number of incompatible pairs, incorporate compatible pairs and non-directed donors (NDDs) to start a chain of compatible transplantations, lead to acceptance of ABO-incompatible matching, and integrate desensitising protocols. Incorporating all variations of kidney paired donation, the Australian programme has been able to facilitate kidney transplantation in 49% of registered incompatible pairs. This review is a plea for implementing a national kidney paired donation programme in Switzerland.

  5. Nonsimultaneous chains and dominos in kidney- paired donation-revisited.

    PubMed

    Ashlagi, I; Gilchrist, D S; Roth, A E; Rees, M A

    2011-05-01

    Since 2008, kidney exchange in America has grown in part from the incorporation of nondirected donors in transplant chains rather than simple exchanges. It is controversial whether these chains should be performed simultaneously 'domino-paired donation', (DPD) or nonsimultaneously 'nonsimultaneous extended altruistic donor, chains (NEAD). NEAD chains create 'bridge donors' whose incompatible recipients receive kidneys before the bridge donor donates, and so risk reneging by bridge donors, but offer the opportunity to create more transplants by overcoming logistical barriers inherent in simultaneous chains. Gentry et al. simulated whether DPD or NEAD chains would produce more transplants when chain segment length was limited to three transplants, and reported that DPD performed at least as well as NEAD chains. As this finding contrasts with the experience of several groups involved in kidney-paired donation, we performed simulations that allowed for longer chain segments and used actual patient data from the Alliance for Paired Donation. When chain segments of 4-6 transplants are allowed in the simulations, NEAD chains produce more transplants than DPD. Our simulations showed not only more transplants as chain length increased, but also that NEAD chains produced more transplants for highly sensitized and blood type O recipients.

  6. Impact of Single-Centre Kidney Paired Donation Transplantation to Increase the Donor Pool in India.

    PubMed

    Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu V; Shah, Pankaj R; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Rizvi, Sayyed J; Pal, Bipin C; Shah, Priyadarshini S; Modi, Manisha P; Butala, Beena P; Wakhare, Pavan S; Varyani, Umesh T; Shinde, Saiprasad G; Ghodela, Vijay A; Kasat, Govind S; Patil, Mayur V; Patel, Jaideep C; Kumar, Deepk P; Trivedi, Varsha B; Patel, Minaxi H; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2017-03-20

    In a living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) dominated transplant programme, kidney paired donation (KPD) may be a cost-effective and valid alternative strategy to increase LDKT in countries with limited resources where deceased donation kidney transplantation (DDKT) is in the initial stages. Here, we report our experience of 300 single-centre KPD transplantations to increase LDKT in India. Between January 2000 and July 2016, 3616 LDKT and 561 DDKT were performed at our transplantation centre, 300 (8.3%) using KPD. The reasons for joining KPD among transplanted patients were ABO incompatibility (n=222), positive cross match (n=59) and better matching (n=19). A total of 124 two-way (n=248), 14 three-way (n=42), one 4-way (n=4) and one 6-way exchange (n=6) yielded 300 KPD transplants. Death-censored graft and patient survival were 96% (n=288) and 83.3% (n=250), respectively. The mean serum creatinine was 1.3 mg/dl at a follow-up of 3±3 years. We credit the success of our KPD programme to maintaining a registry of incompatible pairs, counselling on KPD, a high-volume LDKT programme and teamwork. KPD is legal, cost effective and rapidly growing for facilitating LDKT with incompatible donors. This study provides large-scale evidence for the expansion of single-centre LDKT via KPD when national programmes do not exist. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of Children's Positive Self-Perceptions on Donating Behavior in a Naturalistic Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holte, Carol S.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the effects of self-perceptions on the donating behavior of 43 fourth-grade students who had two opportunities to donate gum to another class. Students who received feedback after the first donation period indicating that they were particularly generous subsequently gave more than children in the control group. (JAC)

  8. Attitudes toward organ donation among waitlisted transplant patients: results of a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Merola, Jonathan; Pei, Kevin Y; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Gan, Geliang; Deng, Yanhong; Mulligan, David C; Davis, Kimberly A

    2016-11-01

    Organ shortage remains a major barrier to transplantation. While many efforts have focused on educating the general population regarding donation, few studies have examined knowledge regarding donation and donor registration rates among waitlisted candidates. We aimed to determine waitlisted patients' willingness to donate, elucidate attitudes surrounding organ allocation, and identify barriers to donation. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to assess demographics, knowledge regarding organ donation, and attitudes regarding the allocation process. Responses from 225 of 579 (39%) waitlisted patients were collected. Seventy-one respondents (32%) were registered donors, while 64 patients (28%) noted no interest in participating in donation. A total of 19% of respondents felt their medical treatment would change by being a donor, while 86 patients (38%) felt their condition precluded them from donation. Forty patients (18%) felt they should be prioritized on the waitlist if they agreed to donate. A minority of patients (28%) reported discussion of organ donation with their physician. Waitlisted candidates constitute a population of willing, although often unregistered, organ donors. Moreover, many endorse misconceptions regarding the allocation process and their donation eligibility. In a population for which transplantation is not always possible, education is needed regarding organ donation among waitlisted patients, as this may enhance donation rates.

  9. 7 CFR 250.51 - Crediting for, and use of, donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES-FOOD DISTRIBUTION DONATION OF FOODS... Foods in Contracts With Food Service Management Companies § 250.51 Crediting for, and use of, donated... service management company must credit the recipient agency for the value of all donated foods...

  10. 7 CFR 250.52 - Storage and inventory management of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES-FOOD DISTRIBUTION DONATION OF... Donated Foods in Contracts With Food Service Management Companies § 250.52 Storage and inventory management of donated foods. (a) General requirements. The food service management company must meet...

  11. 36 CFR 1256.30 - How do I obtain access to donated historical materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I obtain access to donated historical materials? 1256.30 Section 1256.30 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL... MATERIALS Access to Donated Historical Materials § 1256.30 How do I obtain access to donated...

  12. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of...

  13. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6... provision by nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons of in-kind donations of medicine,...

  14. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of...

  15. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6... provision by nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons of in-kind donations of medicine,...

  16. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6... provision by nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons of in-kind donations of medicine,...

  17. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of medicine, medical...

  18. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of...

  19. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of medicine, medical...

  20. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of medicine, medical...

  1. 41 CFR 102-37.90 - What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.90 Section 102-37.90 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Services Administration (GSA) § 102-37.90 What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? The General Services...

  2. 41 CFR 102-37.90 - What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.90 Section 102-37.90 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Services Administration (GSA) § 102-37.90 What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? The General Services...

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes, Practices, and Factors Associated with Voluntary Blood Donation among University Students in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Elias, Elionora; Mauka, Wilhellmuss; Philemon, Rune N; Damian, Damian J; Mahande, Michael J; Msuya, Sia E

    2016-01-01

    Background. Understanding the knowledge and awareness of blood donation among potential blood donors in the population, like young people, and the associated attitudes and practices is important. Methodology. This was a cross-sectional study whereby a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from the consenting participants. Results. A total of 422 participants were enrolled. Their mean age was 24.2 (SD 3.6) years. Of the 422, 30% have ever donated blood. 55% of those who had ever donated were repeated blood donors. Majority of the participants (93%) had positive attitudes towards blood donation and 88% were willing to donate in the future. Factors that were significantly associated with ever donating blood were male gender, knowing a person who has donated blood, knowledge of the amount of blood donated, willingness to donate in the future, and not expecting any postdonation reward. Discussion. High awareness, positive attitude, and high intention to donate in the future should be used to underscore the need to educate the young people on the value of blood donation in saving lives and to give them correct information on overall requirements for blood donation.

  4. 7 CFR 250.58 - Ordering donated foods and their provision to school food authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... donated foods. The distributing agency orders donated foods through a Web-based system called the... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ordering donated foods and their provision to school food authorities. 250.58 Section 250.58 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  5. 7 CFR 250.58 - Ordering donated foods and their provision to school food authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... donated foods. The distributing agency orders donated foods through a Web-based system called the... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ordering donated foods and their provision to school food authorities. 250.58 Section 250.58 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  6. 7 CFR 250.58 - Ordering donated foods and their provision to school food authorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... donated foods. The distributing agency orders donated foods through a Web-based system called the... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ordering donated foods and their provision to school food authorities. 250.58 Section 250.58 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of...

  7. Improving Safe Blood Donation in Nigeria: The Roles of the Mass Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oriji, Christian Chigozi

    2015-01-01

    The study discusses improving safe blood donation in Nigeria and the roles of the mass media in achieving same in Nigerian hospitals. In this regard, it answers the questions: What is blood? What is blood donation? And is safe blood donation adequate in Nigeria? Beyond the relevant answers given on the above questions, it also explains the roles…

  8. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6... provision by nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons of in-kind donations of medicine,...

  9. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine....515 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of...

  10. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of...

  11. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of medicine, medical...

  12. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006, nongovernmental organizations that are U.S. persons are authorized to provide in-kind donations of...

  13. 41 CFR 102-37.90 - What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? 102-37.90 Section 102-37.90 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Services Administration (GSA) § 102-37.90 What are GSA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property? The General Services...

  14. Social Donation and University Development: A Comparative Analysis between China's and America's Endowment for Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gong-li, Luo; Xuan-liang, Yang; Huai-zu, Li

    2006-01-01

    Social donation is a means for individuals, government organizations, and non-government organizations (NGOs) to provide public products and services for society. Seeking social donation is vital in the improvement of the university. This paper probes into the relationship between social donation and university development by comparing social…

  15. 44 CFR 206.6 - Donation or loan of Federal equipment and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Donation or loan of Federal... Donation or loan of Federal equipment and supplies. (a) In any major disaster or emergency, the... governments for use and distribution by them for the purposes of the Stafford Act. (b) A donation or loan...

  16. 41 CFR 102-41.170 - Is unclaimed personal property available for donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... property available for donation? 102-41.170 Section 102-41.170 Public Contracts and Property Management... Personal Property § 102-41.170 Is unclaimed personal property available for donation? No, unclaimed personal property is not available for donation because reimbursement at fair market value is required....

  17. 48 CFR 52.226-6 - Promoting excess food donation to nonprofit organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... donation to nonprofit organizations. 52.226-6 Section 52.226-6 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.226-6 Promoting excess food donation to nonprofit organizations. As prescribed in 26.404, insert the following clause: PROMOTING EXCESS FOOD DONATION TO NONPROFIT...

  18. 41 CFR 101-42.302 - Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... donation of hazardous materials. 101-42.302 Section 101-42.302 Public Contracts and Property Management...-Donation of Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.302 Responsibilities for donation of hazardous materials. (a) Holding agencies. Holding agencies shall be responsible for...

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes, Practices, and Factors Associated with Voluntary Blood Donation among University Students in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Elionora; Philemon, Rune N.; Damian, Damian J.; Msuya, Sia E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Understanding the knowledge and awareness of blood donation among potential blood donors in the population, like young people, and the associated attitudes and practices is important. Methodology. This was a cross-sectional study whereby a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from the consenting participants. Results. A total of 422 participants were enrolled. Their mean age was 24.2 (SD 3.6) years. Of the 422, 30% have ever donated blood. 55% of those who had ever donated were repeated blood donors. Majority of the participants (93%) had positive attitudes towards blood donation and 88% were willing to donate in the future. Factors that were significantly associated with ever donating blood were male gender, knowing a person who has donated blood, knowledge of the amount of blood donated, willingness to donate in the future, and not expecting any postdonation reward. Discussion. High awareness, positive attitude, and high intention to donate in the future should be used to underscore the need to educate the young people on the value of blood donation in saving lives and to give them correct information on overall requirements for blood donation. PMID:28070449

  20. Awareness and beliefs towards organ donation in chronic kidney disease patients in western India.

    PubMed

    Balwani, Manish R; Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu; Shah, Pankaj R; Goswami, Jitendra; Ghule, Pravin; Shah, Maulin; Gattani, Vipul; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is a wide discrepancy between demand for and availability of donor organs for organ transplantation. There is no study on awareness about organ donation in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in India. Objectives: To study the awareness and beliefs towards organ donation in CKD patients on hemodialysis in western India. Patients and Methods: Authors conducted a cross sectional study among 85 CKD patients to evaluate knowledge about and attitude towards organ donation at a tertiary hospital. Results: Age of respondents ranged from 15 to 75 years. All were aware of term organ donation and cadaver donation. About 47% of people heard about organ donation through hospital or from doctor. Strikingly, radio was not the source of information to any of the respondents, despite radio being one of the most common medium of mass communication. Almost one third of patients were unaware about any legislation regarding organ donation. All respondents felt that organs should go to the needy irrespective of their religion. About 70% feel that medical colleges should make decisions about organ donation in case of unclaimed dead bodies. About 31.76% believe that there is a danger that donated organs could be misused, abused or misappropriated. Conclusion: Our study shows about 31.76% of our participants believe that there is a danger that donated organs could be misused, abused or misappropriated. There seems to be paucity of information and awareness regarding organ donation among CKD patients. Mass media, religious and political leaders may be involved to maximize awareness about organ donation.

  1. Voices of Donors: Case Reports of Body Donation in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Hei Yeung; Ng, Kwok Sing; Ma, Sin Kwan; Chan, Chi Hung; Ng, Sheung Wah; Tipoe, George L.; Chan, Lap Ki

    2012-01-01

    Body donation is important for medical education and academic research. However, it is relatively rare in Hong Kong when compared with many Western countries. Comprehensive research has been performed on the motivation for body donation in Western countries; however, there is still insufficient research on body donation in Hong Kong to provide…

  2. Motivations for Deceased Organ Donation Among Volunteers in China: A Qualitative Research Study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhike; Liu, Shan; Yan, Jin; Liu, Jia

    2016-06-09

    BACKGROUND To align with guiding principles on human organ and tissue transplantation published by the World Health Organization (WHO), the Red Cross Society of China (RCSC) launched a new nationwide organ donation program in 2010 to recruit organ donation volunteers. Despite severe shortage of donated organs, there is a very low rate of volunteering for organ donation among the Chinese population (only 0.03 donors per million population) in the national program. Motivating organ donation is the key to the success of organ transplantation in China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Semi-structured 45- to 60-min interviews were conducted among 34 volunteers. Data analysis was performed with Nvivo 8.0 software. RESULTS Six motivations for organ donation were identified: helping others/altruism, fulfilling long-cherished wishes, reducing the burdens, making the best use of everything, giving back to society, and life extension. Factors affecting the motivation of organ donation among volunteers in China included traditional values, personal experiences, role model effect, family support, and problems in the donation system. Possible strategies to improve organ donation included fostering a scientific concept of the body and death, focusing donation promotion efforts on certain groups, and simplifying the process of organ donation. CONCLUSIONS There are multiple reasons for Chinese people to register for organ donation, with helping others as the central motivation.

  3. Evaluation of the Willingness for Cadaveric Donation in Greece: A Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halou, Heidi; Chalkias, Athanasios; Mystrioti, Dimitra; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Vasileiou, Panagiotis V.S.; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of body donation for medical education and the advancement of medical science, cadaveric donation remains suboptimal worldwide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the willingness of body donation in Greece and determine the characteristics of donors. This cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted from January…

  4. Imagining the Impact of Different Consent Systems on Organ Donation: The Decisions of Next of Kin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppen, Remco; Friele, Roland D.; Gevers, Sjef K. M.; Van Der Zee, Jouke

    2010-01-01

    Next of kin play an important role in organ donation. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which explicitness of consent to organ donation by the deceased impacts the likelihood that next of kin will agree to organ donation of the deceased by using hypothetical cases. Results indicate that that people say they are more willing to…

  5. 31 CFR 585.521 - Donations of food to relieve human suffering authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Donations of food to relieve human... Donations of food to relieve human suffering authorized. (a) Specific licenses may be issued on a case-by-case basis to permit exportation to the FRY (S&M) of donated food intended to relieve human...

  6. 7 CFR 3015.55 - Valuation of donated equipment, buildings, and land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Valuation of donated equipment, buildings, and land...-Sharing or Matching § 3015.55 Valuation of donated equipment, buildings, and land. When a third party donates equipment, buildings or land, and the title is given to the recipient, the treatment of...

  7. 7 CFR 3015.55 - Valuation of donated equipment, buildings, and land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Valuation of donated equipment, buildings, and land...-Sharing or Matching § 3015.55 Valuation of donated equipment, buildings, and land. When a third party donates equipment, buildings or land, and the title is given to the recipient, the treatment of...

  8. Evaluation of an educational, theater-based intervention on attitudes toward organ donation in Risaralda, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Juliana; Gómez, Sandra; Guerra, Alvaro; Lucumí, Leidy; Romero, César

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The shortage of organs for transplantation is a worldwide problem and the main cause is the refusal of family members to donate. Consent to donate is influenced by many factors and educational interventions are strongly recommended. Objective: To evaluate the impact of an educational, theaterbased strategy on the attitudes toward organ donation. Methods: This study employed an intervention using theater as the central tool. The impact of this intervention on the intention to donate was assessed through a controlled, prospective, nonrandomized designed study. The sample consisted of 1,038 people. All the participants answered a survey that asked about sex, age and intent to donate. Afterward, one portion of the sample was exposed to the play, The Gift of Life, and a subsequent discussion forum that was guided by experts. The same survey was administered again after the intervention. Results: Before the intervention, donation attitudes were positive in 68.3% of the responses, negative in 6.8% and uncertain in 24.9%. Females showed a greater intent to donate while age had no apparent influence on the donation decision. Those exposed to the intervention were found to be more likely to donate and show a favorable change in attitude toward donation than those who were not exposed to the intervention. Conclusion: An educational intervention using theater is an effective tool to generate a short-term change in the intent to donate. Educational strategies should be employed to increase the rates of organ donation. PMID:24892320

  9. A profile of Australian adults who have discussed their posthumous organ donation wishes with family members.

    PubMed

    Newton, Joshua D; Burney, Sue; Hay, Margaret; Ewing, Michael T

    2010-07-01

    Next of kin who are aware of the deceased's organ donation wishes usually will honor those wishes, while next of kin who are unaware of these wishes typically withhold consent for posthumous donation. Encouraging individuals to communicate or register their organ donation wishes is therefore important. Using a sample of 409 participants, the current study sought to develop a profile of Australian adults who had communicated their organ donation wishes to family members. Christian participants and those who had a higher income were more likely to have communicated their donation wishes. Conversely, participants were less likely to have communicated their donation wishes if they were unregistered and undecided/opposed to organ donation, unregistered but willing to donate, or fearful of death. Finally, whether participants had communicated, registered, or communicated and registered their donation wishes was associated with their age, religion, attitude toward organ donation, and recall of media content about organ donation. Messages encouraging the communication of organ donation wishes to family members should therefore be targeted toward those individuals who are most likely to be receptive toward enacting this behavior.

  10. 42 CFR 433.67 - Limitations on level of FFP for permissible provider-related donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provider-related donations. 433.67 Section 433.67 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION... permissible provider-related donations. (a)(1) Limitations on bona fide donations. There are no limitations...

  11. Legal and ethical aspects of organ donation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Sunil

    2009-07-01

    The legislation called the Transplantation of Human Organ Act (THO) was passed in India in 1994 to streamline organ donation and transplantation activities. Broadly, the act accepted brain death as a form of death and made the sale of organs a punishable offence. With the acceptance of brain death, it became possible to not only undertake kidney transplantations but also start other solid organ transplants like liver, heart, lungs, and pancreas. Despite the THO legislation, organ commerce and kidney scandals are regularly reported in the Indian media. In most instances, the implementation of the law has been flawed and more often than once its provisions have been abused. Parallel to the living related and unrelated donation program, the deceased donation program has slowly evolved in a few states. In approximately one-third of all liver transplants, the organs have come from the deceased donor program as have all the hearts and pancreas transplants. In these states, a few hospitals along with committed NGOs have kept the momentum of the deceased donor program. The MOHAN Foundation (NGO based in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh) has facilitated 400 of the 1,300 deceased organ transplants performed in the country over the last 14 years. To overcome organ shortage, developed countries are re-looking at the ethics of unrelated programs and there seems to be a move towards making this an acceptable legal alternative. The supply of deceased donors in these countries has peaked and there has been no further increase over the last few years. India is currently having a deceased donation rate of 0.05 to 0.08 per million population. We need to find a solution on how we can utilize the potentially large pool of trauma-related brain deaths for organ donation. This year in the state of Tamil Nadu, the Government has passed seven special orders. These orders are expected to streamline the activity of deceased donors and help increase their numbers. Recently, on July 30, 2008, the

  12. Legal and ethical aspects of organ donation and transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    The legislation called the Transplantation of Human Organ Act (THO) was passed in India in 1994 to streamline organ donation and transplantation activities. Broadly, the act accepted brain death as a form of death and made the sale of organs a punishable offence. With the acceptance of brain death, it became possible to not only undertake kidney transplantations but also start other solid organ transplants like liver, heart, lungs, and pancreas. Despite the THO legislation, organ commerce and kidney scandals are regularly reported in the Indian media. In most instances, the implementation of the law has been flawed and more often than once its provisions have been abused. Parallel to the living related and unrelated donation program, the deceased donation program has slowly evolved in a few states. In approximately one-third of all liver transplants, the organs have come from the deceased donor program as have all the hearts and pancreas transplants. In these states, a few hospitals along with committed NGOs have kept the momentum of the deceased donor program. The MOHAN Foundation (NGO based in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh) has facilitated 400 of the 1,300 deceased organ transplants performed in the country over the last 14 years. To overcome organ shortage, developed countries are re-looking at the ethics of unrelated programs and there seems to be a move towards making this an acceptable legal alternative. The supply of deceased donors in these countries has peaked and there has been no further increase over the last few years. India is currently having a deceased donation rate of 0.05 to 0.08 per million population. We need to find a solution on how we can utilize the potentially large pool of trauma-related brain deaths for organ donation. This year in the state of Tamil Nadu, the Government has passed seven special orders. These orders are expected to streamline the activity of deceased donors and help increase their numbers. Recently, on July 30, 2008, the

  13. Gay and Bisexual Men’s Perceptions of the Donation and Use of Human Biological Samples for Research: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Human biological samples (biosamples) are increasingly important in diagnosing, treating and measuring the prevalence of illnesses. For the gay and bisexual population, biosample research is particularly important for measuring the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). By determining people’s understandings of, and attitudes towards, the donation and use of biosamples, researchers can design studies to maximise acceptability and participation. In this study we examine gay and bisexual men’s attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 46 gay and bisexual men aged between 18 and 63 recruited in commercial gay scene venues in two Scottish cities. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Most men interviewed seemed to have given little prior consideration to the issues. Participants were largely supportive of donating tissue for medical research purposes, and often favourable towards samples being stored, reused and shared. Support was often conditional, with common concerns related to: informed consent; the protection of anonymity and confidentiality; the right to withdraw from research; and ownership of samples. Many participants were in favour of the storage and reuse of samples, but expressed concerns related to data security and potential misuse of samples, particularly by commercial organisations. The sensitivity of tissue collection varied between tissue types and collection contexts. Blood, urine, semen and bowel tissue were commonly identified as sensitive, and donating saliva and as unlikely to cause discomfort. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth study of gay and bisexual men’s attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. While most men in this study were supportive of donating tissue for research, some clear areas of concern were identified. We suggest that these minority concerns should be accounted for to develop

  14. From the Superatom Model to a Diverse Array of Super-Elements: A Systematic Study of Dopant Influence on the Electronic Structure of Thiolate-Protected Gold Clusters.

    PubMed

    Schacht, Julia; Gaston, Nicola

    2016-10-18

    The electronic properties of doped thiolate-protected gold clusters are often referred to as tunable, but their study to date, conducted at different levels of theory, does not allow a systematic evaluation of this claim. Here, using density functional theory, the applicability of the superatomic model to these clusters is critically evaluated, and related to the degree of structural distortion and electronic inhomogeneity in the differently doped clusters, with dopant atoms Pd, Pt, Cu, and Ag. The effect of electron number is systematically evaluated by varying the charge on the overall cluster, and the nominal number of delocalized electrons, employed in the superatomic model, is compared to the numbers obtained from Bader analysis of individual atomic charges. We find that the superatomic model is highly applicable to all of these clusters, and is able to predict and explain the changing electronic structure as a function of charge. However, significant perturbations of the model arise due to doping, due to distortions of the core structure of the Au13 [RS(AuSR)2 ]6(-) cluster. In addition, analysis of the electronic structure indicates that the superatomic character is distributed further across the ligand shell in the case of the doped clusters, which may have implications for the self-assembly of these clusters into materials. The prediction of appropriate clusters for such superatomic solids relies critically on such quantitative analysis of the tunability of the electronic structure.

  15. Randomised, Double Blind, Controlled Trial of the Provision of Information about the Benefits of Organ Donation during a Family Donation Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Aranha, Sarah; Pilcher, David V.; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is unclear how much information should be provided to families of potential organ donors about the benefits of organ donation. Whilst this information is material to the donation decision, it may also be perceived as coercive. Methods Randomised, double blind, controlled trial in which community members watched one of two videos of a simulated organ donation conversation that differed only in the amount of information provided about the benefits of donation. Participants then completed a questionnaire about the adequacy of the information provided and the degree to which they felt the doctor was trying to convince the family member to say yes to donation. Results There was a wide variability in what participants considered was the “right” amount of information about organ donation. Those who watched the conversation that included information about the benefits of donation were more likely to feel that the information provided to the family was sufficient. They were more likely to report that the doctor was trying to convince the family member to say yes to donation, yet were no more likely to feel uncomfortable or to feel that the doctor was uncaring or cared more about transplant recipients than he did for the patient and their family. Conclusions This study suggests that community members are comfortable with health care staff providing information to family members that may be influential in supporting them to give consent for donation. PMID:27322832

  16. The rapid assessment of hospital procurement barriers in donation: assessing hospitals for change.

    PubMed

    Siminoff, Laura A; Marshall, Heather M

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of the hospital environment is integral to improving the organ donation process in healthcare organizations. This paper introduces a novel approach to the assessment and improvement of donation processes: the Rapid Assessment of hospital Procurement barriers in Donation (RAPiD). The RAPiD is a qualitative needs assessment tool for identifying barriers to donor identification and referral, and family requests for donation. Improving the donation process has become a national priority and can potentially save or improve the lives of thousands of Americans each year. The RAPID yields a rich description of the hospital environment that is readily translated into action-oriented recommendations for change.

  17. Cyclic electron flow may provide some protection against PSII photoinhibition in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Essemine, Jemaa; Xiao, Yi; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-04-01

    Previously we have shown that a quick down-regulation in PSI activity compares to that of PSII following short-term heat stress for two rice groups including C4023 and Q4149, studied herein. These accessions were identified to have different natural capacities in driving cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI; i.e., low CEF (lcef) and high CEF (hcef) for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these two lines have different mechanisms of protecting photosystem II from photodamage under heat stress. We observed a stepwise alteration in the shape of Chl a fluorescence induction (OJIP) with increasing temperature treatment. The effect of 44°C treatment on the damping in Chl a fluorescence was more pronounced in C4023 than in Q4149. Likewise, we noted a disruption in the I-step, a decline in the Fv due to a strong damping in the Fm, and a slight increase in the F0. Normalized data demonstrated that the I-step seems more susceptible to 44°C in C4023 than in Q4149. We also measured the redox states of plastocyanin (PC) and P700 by monitoring the transmission changes at 820nm (I820), and observed a disturbance in the oxidation/reduction kinetics of PC and P700. The decline in the amplitude of their oxidation was shown to be about 29% and 13% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The electropotential component (Δφ) of ms-DLE appeared more sensitive to temperature stress than the chemical component (ΔpH), and the impact of heat was more evident and drastic in C4023 than in Q4149. Under heat stress, we noticed a concomitant decline in the primary photochemistry of PSII as well as in both the membrane energization process and the lumen protonation for both accessions, and it is evident that heat affects these parameters more in C4023 than in Q4149. All these data suggest that higher CET can confer higher photoprotection to PSII in rice lines, which can be a desirable trait during rice breeding, especially in the context of a "warming

  18. Attitudes toward organ donation among personnel from the University Hospital of Rabat.

    PubMed

    Flayou, Kaoutar; Kouam, Nada; Miara, H; Raoundi, O; Ouzeddoun, Naima; Benamar, Loubna; Bayahia, Rabiaa; Rhou, Hakima

    2016-01-01

    The medical staff could play a major role in promoting for organ donation. The aim of our study was to assess the attitudes of the medical staff toward organ donation. It is a prospective study conducted over a period of six months. A questionnaire was distributed and explained to the medical staff in our institute. Fifteen questions were designed to include four main themes: sociodemographic information, attitude toward organ donation, perceived knowledge about organ donation, and reasons for refusal or acceptance of organ donation. Among the 245 respondents, 36.3% had prior knowledge about organ transplantation, 31.8% knew about the law of organ donation, 43.2% had already donated blood sometimes, 65.7% expressed their consent to organ donation during their lifetime, and 82.8% expressed their agreement to donation after their death. The grounds for refusal were generally: a misunderstanding of risks, desire for respect of corpse. The religious and the ethical motive were present too as a ground for decision making. The medical staff is the key for organ donation. To promote organ transplantation, personnel should be well informed about ethical, moral, and religious dimensions of organ donation and transplantation.

  19. Organ and tissue donation: a survey of nurse's knowledge and educational needs in an adult ITU.

    PubMed

    Collins, Timothy J

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey that was undertaken to assess nurses' knowledge and educational needs towards organ donation within one adult general intensive care unit. The survey consists of 31 registered nurses who completed a confidential questionnaire that aimed to assess their existing knowledge and deficits in organ and tissue donation. The survey highlights the sample lacked confidence in approaching relatives for donation consent, deficits in brain stem death testing and donor criteria. It was also apparent that a significant number of nurses could not identify which tissues can be donated and the contraindications for tissue donation. A majority of the sample stated their knowledge of donation issues would improve if an educational programme were developed on organ donation. This is further supported by previous work by [Bidigare S, Oermann M, 1991. Attitudes and knowledge of nurses regarding organ procurement. Heart & lung 1:20-3; Smith-Brew S, Yanai L, 1996. The organ donation process through a review of the literature. Part 1. Accident & emergency nursing 4:5-11; Roark D, 2000. Overhauling the organ donation system. Am J Nurs 6:44-9] who suggest that educational programmes covering donation issues should enhance nurses' knowledge and confidence in the organ donation process and ultimately increase the number of potential donors.

  20. Understanding the Role of Clergy in African American Organ and Tissue Donation Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Jacob Arriola, Kimberly R.; Perryman, Jennie P.; Doldren, Michelle A.; Warren, Carmen M.; Robinson, Dana H. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe and understand the attitudes, beliefs, and experiences towards organ and tissue donation among African American clergy in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The secondary objective is to understand what messages clergy are providing to their parishioners relative to organ and tissue donation, and what their perceived role is in donation education. Design A qualitative study in which African American clergy (n = 26) participated in four focus groups. Results African American clergy, though generally supportive of organ and tissue donation in principle, have serious reservations about donation due to perceived inequalities in the donation and transplantation system. The clergy did not personally hold religious concerns about donation, but expressed that these concerns were a major barrier to donation among their parishioners. None of the clergy knew the written position that their religion took on donation; they acknowledged the need for more education for them and their parishioners on this topic. They also felt that as religious leaders, they could play an important role in promoting organ and tissue donation among African American parishioners. Conclusions African American clergy and religious leaders may play an important role towards improving willingness to donate among African American parishioners, but more education and advocacy is needed to prepare them for this role. PMID:17978944

  1. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Motivations towards Blood Donation among King Abdulaziz Medical City Population.

    PubMed

    Alfouzan, Najd

    2014-01-01

    Background. Blood donation is remarkably safe medical procedure. However, attitudes, beliefs, and level of knowledge may affect it. Objectives. To measure the level of knowledge regarding blood donation, find out positive and negative attitudes, identify the obstacles, and suggest some motivational factors. Methodology. A cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC). Participants were selected by convenient nonrandom sampling technique. A self-created questionnaire was used for data collection. Results. The study included 349 individuals. About 45.8% of the participants claimed that they have a history of blood donation. Reported causes for not donating blood were blood donation not crossing their mind (52.4%), no time for donation (45%), and difficulty in accessing blood donation center (41.3%). Reported motivating factors for donating blood were one day off (81.4%), mobile blood donation caravans in public areas (79.1%), token gifts (31.5%), and finally paying money (18.9%). Conclusion. People in the age group 31-50 years, males, higher education and military were more likely to donate blood as well as People who showed higher knowledge level and positive attitude towards blood donation. More educational programs to increase the awareness in specific targeted populations and also to focus on some motivational factors are recommended.

  2. An overview of the roles and responsibilities of Chinese medical colleges in body donation programs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqing; Xiao, Ming; Gu, Mufeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Jin, Jianliang; Ding, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    The use of human tissue is critical for gross anatomy education in the health professions. Chinese medical colleges have faced a shortage of anatomical specimens over the past decade. While body donation plays an important role in overcoming this gap, this practice has only recently been introduced in China, and the donation rate is relatively low and fraught with a number of difficulties. In the past, traditional Chinese culture focused on preserving the human body intact, which often limited body donation. In recent years, the public has become more open toward body donation. At Nanjing Medical University, only 20 bodies were donated in 2001. After the university became involved in an organized body donation program, this number increased to 70 donated bodies per year (2007 to 2012). This article describes and reviews Chinese medical colleges as a special case study among body donation programs, particularly in terms of the multiple responsibilities and roles that such institutions must assume in the course of adopting these programs. Medical colleges in China must serve as advocates, coordinators, builders, managers, educators, and beneficiaries in undertaking body donation programs. It is important for medical colleges to recognize these pluripotent roles and educate the public in order to promote body donation programs. This case study may also effectively guide and encourage Chinese medical colleges in refining their own body donation programs in the future.

  3. Understanding the Relationship between Knowledge and African Americans’ Donation Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Jacob Arriola, Kimberly R.; Robinson, Dana H. Z.; Perryman, Jennie P.; Thompson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To explore the association between different types of knowledge related to donation and transplantation and the expression of donation intentions via one’s driver’s license, a donor card, or sharing one’s wishes with family. Methods Cross-sectional data were gathered via self-administered questionnaire from 425 Black adults, age 18 years and older who were recruited from nine churches in a large metropolitan area in the southeast United States. Results Results indicate that knowledge of the allocation system and experiential knowledge of a transplant recipient are associated with donation intentions after controlling for age, gender, and highest level of education. However, the following types of knowledge were unrelated to donation intentions: donation-related statistics (including an understanding of African Americans’ overrepresentation among those in need), the donation process, the process for determining medical suitability, and religious institutions’ support for donation. Conclusions Findings suggest that the relationship between donation-related knowledge and donation intentions is complex and may depend on the specific type of knowledge being measured. Practice Implications Knowledge of the allocation system and experiential knowledge of a recipient may be critical aspects of the donation decision-making process. Research findings suggest the need for an educational approach that seeks to improve the specific types of knowledge that are most strongly associated with donation intentions. PMID:17988820

  4. Pathological characteristics of liver allografts from donation after brain death followed by cardiac death in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Wang, Dong-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Zhao; Zhang, Long-Juan; Wang, Hao-Chen; Li, Zhuo-Hui; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Tao; Cai, Chang-Jie; Ju, Wei-Qiang; Ma, Yi; Guo, Zhi-Yong; He, Xiao-Shun

    2014-10-01

    Donation after brain death followed by circulatory death (DBCD) is a unique practice in China. The aim of this study was to define the pathologic characteristics of DBCD liver allografts in a porcine model. Fifteen male pigs (25-30 kg) were allocated randomly into donation after brain death (DBD), donation after circulatory death (DCD) and DBCD groups. Brain death was induced by augmenting intracranial pressure. Circulatory death was induced by withdrawal of life support in DBCD group and by venous injection of 40 mL 10% potassium chloride in DCD group. The donor livers were perfused in situ and kept in cold storage for 4 h. Liver tissue and common bile duct samples were collected for hematoxylin and eosin staining, TUNEL testing and electron microscopic examination. Spot necrosis was found in hepatic parenchyma of DBD and DBCD groups, while a large area of necrosis was shown in DCD group. The apoptosis rate of hepatocytes in DBD [(0.56±0.30)%] and DBCD [(0.50 ± 0.11)%] groups was much lower than that in DCD group [(3.78±0.33)%] (P<0.05). And there was no significant difference between DBD group and DBCD group (P>0.05)). The structures of bile duct were intact in both DBD and DBCD groups, while the biliary epithelium was totally damaged in DCD group. Under electron microscope, the DBD hepatocytes were characterized by intact cell membrane, well-organized endoplasmic reticulum, mild mitochondria edema and abundant glycogens. Broken cell membrane, mild inflammatory cell infiltration and sinusoidal epithelium edema, as well as reduced glycogen volume, were found in the DBCD hepatocytes. The DCD hepatocytes had more profound cell organelle injury and much less glycogen storage. In conclusion, the preservation injury of DBCD liver allografts is much less severe than that of un-controlled DCD, but more severe than that of DBD liver allografts under electron microscope, which might reflect post-transplant liver function to some extent.

  5. Comparing outcomes of donation after cardiac death versus donation after brain death in liver transplant recipients with hepatitis C: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Malcolm; Croome, Kris; Janik, Toni; Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto; Chandok, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation (LT) using organs donated after cardiac death (DCD) is increasing due, in large part, to a shortage of organs. The outcome of using DCD organs in recipients with hepatits C virus (HCV) infection remains unclear due to the limited experience and number of publications addressing this issue. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of DCD versus donation after brain death (DBD) in HCV-positive patients undergoing LT. METHODS: Studies comparing DCD versus DBD LT in HCV-positive patients were identified based on systematic searches of seven electronic databases and multiple sources of gray literature. RESULTS: The search identified 58 citations, including three studies, with 324 patients meeting eligibility criteria. The use of DCD livers was associated with a significantly higher risk of primary nonfunction (RR 5.49 [95% CI 1.53 to 19.64]; P=0.009; I2=0%), while not associated with a significantly different patient survival (RR 0.89 [95% CI 0.37 to 2.11]; P=0.79; I2=51%), graft survival (RR 0.40 [95% CI 0.14 to 1.11]; P=0.08; I2=34%), rate of recurrence of severe HCV infection (RR 2.74 [95% CI 0.36 to 20.92]; P=0.33; I2=84%), retransplantation or liver disease-related death (RR 1.79 [95% CI 0.66 to 4.84]; P=0.25; I2=44%), and biliary complications. CONCLUSIONS: While the literature and quality of studies assessing DCD versus DBD grafts are limited, there was significantly more primary nonfunction and a trend toward decreased graft survival, but no significant difference in biliary complications or recipient mortality rates between DCD and DBD LT in patients with HCV infection. There is insufficient literature on the topic to draw any definitive conclusions. PMID:24288695

  6. [Can one authorize oocyte donation in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg?].

    PubMed

    Arendt, J

    2012-01-01

    In the case of early ovary extinction, the only way to have a child is either adoption or egg/embryo reception by donation. To day, egg donation is prohibited in Luxembourg by ministerial decision in 2003. Germ cell donation is part of artificial reproductive therapy. Oocyte donation, in particular, needs to be done by IVF treatment, which makes it more complicated then sperm donation What makes it more difficult is the fact that there are no oocyte bank yet. Today, prohibition encourages procreative tourism what only wealthy people can afford. Although donation programs are well established many questions arise about egg donation such as refunds, divulging information, women's age limit, health insurance participation.

  7. Organ Donation in the 50+ Age Demographic: Survey Results on Decision Rationale and Information Preferences.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Alexander; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Myer, Kevin A; Mullins, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    The rate of organ donation by older potential donors is significantly declining even though recent studies show positive clinical outcomes with organs transplanted from older donors. This study examined the 50+ age demographic to identify the rationale for donation decisions, preferred media methods of donation information delivery, and responsiveness to an age-tailored donation message. Results from 579 surveys, 87% from the 50+ age demographic, found respondents prone to self-select themselves as medically ineligible based on current medication and health status, even though they might be medically suitable donors. Their incentive to pursue additional information on donation is limited except when motivated by personal accounts within their families and communities. In addition, even when computer literate, they continue to favor the printed or spoken word for donation information delivery. The results suggest an opportunity for those working with older adults to develop more personalized, localized donation education programs targeting this age demographic.

  8. A Tale of Two Cities: Financing Two Voucher Programs for Substance Abusers Through Community Donations

    PubMed Central

    Amass, Leslie; Kamien, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Voucher-based reinforcement therapy (VBRT) is an effective drug abuse treatment, but the cost of VBRT rewards has limited its dissemination. Obtaining VBRT incentives through donations may be one way to overcome this barrier. Two direct mail campaigns solicited donations for use in VBRT for pregnant, postpartum, and parenting drug users in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and in Los Angeles, California. In Toronto, 19% of those contacted over 2 months donated $8,000 ($4,000/month) of goods and services. In Los Angeles, nearly 26% of those contacted over 34 months donated $161,000 ($4,472/month) of goods and services. Maintaining voucher programs by soliciting donations is feasible and sustainable. The methods in this article can serve as a guide for successful donation solicitation campaigns. Donations offer an alternative for obtaining VBRT rewards for substance abuse treatment and may increase its dissemination. PMID:15122959

  9. Voluntary Blood Donation among Students - A Cross-Sectional Study on Knowledge and Practice vs. Attitude

    PubMed Central

    Pehlajani, Nand K.; Sinha, Mithilesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The factors influencing blood donation decisions are varied and complex and one’s attitude can influence this decision. Aim To find the factors affecting the knowledge and practice of blood donation among college students and their attitude towards the same. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among 399 college going students using convenience sampling from medical, nursing and engineering colleges in Bhubaneswar city, where blood donation camps were to be held. Data was collected through self-administered questionnaires and, analysed in SPSS Version 20.0. Results Knowledge regarding blood donation was adequate among 228 (57.1%) of the students and, 221 (55.4%) students had donated blood. Knowledge was significantly better among female students, medical stream and in those whose parents were in non-medical jobs; whereas blood donation had been done significantly more by male, non-medical stream students and by those whose parents were in medical field. Most common reason for donating blood was a sense of social responsibility and most common reason of non-donation was fear of the procedure. An 85% of the students were of the view that they would donate blood if asked. Students suggested that small incentives like certificates and arranging transport for blood donation would make it easier to donate. Conclusion Just over half of the students had adequate knowledge about blood donation and similar percentage had donated blood. There is this large pool of safe blood in college going students who are willing, but not tapped as source of blood donation. PMID:27891345

  10. 41 CFR 102-37.540 - What is the authority for donations to the American National Red Cross?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for donations to the American National Red Cross? 102-37.540 Section 102-37.540 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to the American National Red Cross § 102-37.540 What is the authority for donations to the American National Red Cross? Section...

  11. 41 CFR 102-37.530 - What are FAA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property to public airports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities in the donation of surplus property to public airports? 102-37.530 Section 102-37.530 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Airports § 102-37.530 What are FAA's responsibilities in the donation of surplus property to public airports?...

  12. 41 CFR 102-37.50 - What is the general process for requesting surplus property for donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... process for requesting surplus property for donation? 102-37.50 Section 102-37.50 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Provisions Donation Overview § 102-37.50 What is the general process for requesting surplus property for donation? The process...

  13. 41 CFR 102-37.465 - May a SASP modify or release any of the terms and conditions of donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... release any of the terms and conditions of donation? 102-37.465 Section 102-37.465 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Agencies, Service... SASP modify or release any of the terms and conditions of donation? You may alter or grant...

  14. 41 CFR 102-37.460 - What special terms and conditions apply to the donation of aircraft and vessels?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conditions apply to the donation of aircraft and vessels? 102-37.460 Section 102-37.460 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Agencies, Service...-37.460 What special terms and conditions apply to the donation of aircraft and vessels? The...

  15. 41 CFR 102-42.130 - Are there special requirements for the donation of gifts and decorations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for the donation of gifts and decorations? 102-42.130 Section 102-42.130 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.130 Are there special requirements for the donation...

  16. 41 CFR 102-37.575 - Is there a special form for holding agencies to process donations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for holding agencies to process donations? 102-37.575 Section 102-37.575 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Donations to Public Bodies in Lieu of Abandonment/Destruction § 102-37.575 Is there a special form for holding agencies to process donations? There is...

  17. 45 CFR 2544.130 - How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... solicit or accept a donation? 2544.130 Section 2544.130 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... DONATIONS § 2544.130 How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation? (a) The Corporation will solicit and accept a donation only for the purpose of furthering the mission and goals of...

  18. 41 CFR 102-37.80 - What happens to surplus property that isn't transferred for donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... property that isn't transferred for donation? 102-37.80 Section 102-37.80 Public Contracts and Property... PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Provisions Donation Overview § 102-37.80 What happens to surplus property that isn't transferred for donation? Surplus property not transferred...

  19. 41 CFR 102-37.55 - Who pays for transportation and other costs associated with a donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... transportation and other costs associated with a donation? 102-37.55 Section 102-37.55 Public Contracts and... REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 37-DONATION OF SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY General Provisions Donation Overview § 102-37.55 Who pays for transportation and other costs associated with a donation? The...

  20. 36 CFR 1256.32 - How do I request access to restricted information in donated historical materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... restricted information in donated historical materials? 1256.32 Section 1256.32 Parks, Forests, and Public... DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Access to Donated Historical Materials § 1256.32 How do I request access to restricted information in donated historical materials? (a) At Presidential libraries and regional...

  1. Standardized deceased donor kidney donation rates in the UK reveal marked regional variation and highlight the potential for increasing kidney donation: a prospective cohort study†

    PubMed Central

    Summers, D. M.; Johnson, R. J.; Hudson, A. J.; Collett, D.; Murphy, P.; Watson, C. J. E.; Neuberger, J. M.; Bradley, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The UK has implemented a national strategy for organ donation that includes a centrally coordinated network of specialist nurses in organ donation embedded in all intensive care units and a national organ retrieval service for deceased organ donors. We aimed to determine whether despite the national approach to donation there is significant regional variation in deceased donor kidney donation rates. Methods The UK prospective audit of deaths in critical care was analysed for a cohort of patients who died in critical care between April 2010 and December 2011. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the factors associated with kidney donation. The logistic regression model was then used to produce risk-adjusted funnel plots describing the regional variation in donation rates. Results Of the 27 482 patients who died in a critical care setting, 1528 (5.5%) became kidney donors. Factors found to influence donation rates significantly were: type of critical care [e.g. neurointensive vs general intensive care: OR 1.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34–1.75, P<0.0001], patient ethnicity (e.g. ‘Asian’ vs ‘white’: OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.11–0.26, P<0.0001), age (e.g. age >69 vs age 18–39 yr: OR 0.2, 0.15–0.25, P<0.0001), and cause of death [e.g. ‘other’ (excluding ‘stroke’ and ‘trauma’) vs ‘trauma’: OR 0.04, 95% CI 0.03–0.05, P<0.0001]. Despite correction for these variables, kidney donation rates for the 20 UK kidney donor regions showed marked variation. The overall standardized donation rate ranged from 3.2 to 7.5%. Four regions had donation rates of >2 standard deviations (sd) from the mean (two below and two above). Regional variation was most marked for donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidney donors with 9 of the 20 regions demonstrating donation rates of >2 sd from the mean (5 below and 4 above). Conclusions The marked regional variation in kidney donation rates observed in this cohort after adjustment for

  2. Terahertz Dynamics of a Topologically Protected State: Quantum Hall Effect Plateaus near the Cyclotron Resonance of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas.

    PubMed

    Stier, A V; Ellis, C T; Kwon, J; Xing, H; Zhang, H; Eason, D; Strasser, G; Morimoto, T; Aoki, H; Zeng, H; McCombe, B D; Cerne, J

    2015-12-11

    We measure the Hall conductivity of a two-dimensional electron gas formed at a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction in the terahertz regime close to the cyclotron resonance frequency using highly sensitive Faraday rotation measurements. The sample is electrically gated, allowing the electron density to be changed continuously by more than a factor of 3. We observe clear plateaulike and steplike features in the Faraday rotation angle vs electron density and magnetic field (Landau-level filling factor) even at fields or frequencies very close to cyclotron resonance absorption. These features are the high frequency manifestation of quantum Hall plateaus-a signature of topologically protected edge states. We observe both odd and even filling factor plateaus and explore the temperature dependence of these plateaus. Although dynamical scaling theory begins to break down in the frequency region of our measurements, we find good agreement with theory.

  3. The default option: Why a system of presumed consent may be effective at increasing rates of organ donation.

    PubMed

    Rockloff, Matthew; Hanley, Christine

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, general sentiment towards organ donation is somewhat positive, but actual donation rates languish amongst the poorest in the western world. Even for registered organ donors, the Australian system mandates obtaining family consent for posthumous donation; making non-donation the default option. A telephone survey in Central Queensland, Australia (n=1289), investigated people's confidence regarding their decision on whether to donate organs of a deceased family member; whether or not they had discussed donation with their family; and their support for an opt-out (presumed consent) system of donation. In accord with our expectations, each of these factors independently predicted the wishes of respondents to donate their own organs. The results suggest that promoting organ donation as the default option may improve rates of public acceptance for organ donations and consequently save lives.

  4. How France launched its donation after cardiac death program.

    PubMed

    Antoine, C; Mourey, F; Prada-Bordenave, E

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of the literature and results presented at the 6th International Conference, donation after cardio-circulatory death provides a significant, practical, additional high quality source of transplantable organs. The vast majority of DCD are 'controlled' Maastricht category III donors. In 2010, the parliamentary information mission on the revision of the bioethics laws invited the Intensive Care Societies to debate and to make recommendations to implement controlled donation after circulatory death. They came to the conclusion that such retrieval is possible in France and insisted on the medical criteria that frame it: the writing of the medical procedures, the ethical aspects and the delay. The major recommendations of the ethics committees were firstly, The WLST decision is independent of the possibility of organ donation; secondly, the strict respect of "The dead donor and organ transplantation rule" and the updated national guidance for the WLST; thirdly, the drafting of a nationally agreed protocol defining the mandatory conditions to determine death and to perform procurement and transplantation. Organ donation after WLST will be authorised only in pilot centres with a locally agreed WLST policy including external second opinion and written transcript of the WLST decision, experienced intensive care staff, a local organ procurement coordination team familiar with DBD and DCD protocols and only in hospitals authorised for organ procurement. It is important to have an optimal and standardized national guidance to limit the known risk factors of graft failure (donor and recipient choice, warm and cold ischemia time), to increase acceptance by medical community and civil society and to improve results and allow more powerful analysis.

  5. [The direct donation of human milk in neonatology].

    PubMed

    Buffin, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    The superiority of human milk over its substitutes is no longer questioned, especially for the feeding of premature babies or newborns hospitalised in neonatology. Milk banks organise the collection, conservation, treatement and distribution of human milk. The objective is however to encourage the direct donation of raw milk, avoiding the need for freezing and pasteurisation, in order to preserve its properties as best as possible.

  6. Living kidney donation and masked nationalism in Israel.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Miran

    2016-12-13

    This paper draws attention to a current trend of masked conditional-nationalist living kidney donation in Israel, to which the local transplant system has been turning a blind eye. The paper seeks to make the international transplant and bioethics communities aware of this disturbing trend. It also explains why it is wrong and suggests how to tackle it. Finally, it calls on the Israeli system to bring the practice to a halt for the benefit of all parties involved.

  7. Organ Donation European Quality System: ODEQUS project methodology.

    PubMed

    Manyalich, M; Guasch, X; Gomez, M P; Páez, G; Teixeira, L

    2013-01-01

    Differences in the number of organ donors among hospitals cannot be explained only by the number of intensive care unit beds used or neurologic patients treated. The figures obtained are influenced by the organizational structure of the donation process and how efficient it is. The Organ Donation European Quality System (ODEQUS) is a 3-year project (from October 2010 to September 2013) co-financed by the European Agency for Health and Consumers (EAHC20091108) which aims to define a methodology to evaluate organ procurement performance at the hospital level. ODEQUS's specific objectives are to identify quality criteria and to develop quality indicators in three types of organ donation (after brain death, after cardiac death, and living donation). Those tools will be useful for hospitals' self-assessment as well as for developing an international auditing model. A consortium has been established involving 14 associated partners from Austria, Croatia, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, as well as five collaborating partners from Greece, Hungary, Malta, Slovenia, and Turkey. The project has been established in three steps: 1) Design of a survey about the use of quality tools in a wide sample of European hospitals; 2) Development of quality criteria and quality indicators by the project experts. The main fields considered have been organizational structures, clinical procedures, and outcomes; and 3) Elaboration of an evaluation system to test the quality indicators in 11 European hospitals. Two types of training have been designed and performed: one concerns the development of quality criteria and quality indicators, whereas another is focused on how to use evaluation tools. Following this methodology, the project has so far identified 131 quality criteria and developed 31 quality indicators. Currently, the quality indicators are being tested in 11 selected hospitals.

  8. Non-heart beating organ donation. A case study.

    PubMed

    Stirling, John

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this case study is to discuss the clinical management of a non-heart beating organ donor. This case study will concentrate in particular on the clinical assessment of the potential donor patient undertaken by the donor transplant coordinator (DTC) and the donation process up to the time of transplantation. The author will also describe the differences between heart beating and non-heart beating donors and discuss how transplantation can benefit renal recipient patients.

  9. Organ Donation After Euthanasia: A Dutch Practical Manual.

    PubMed

    Bollen, J; de Jongh, W; Hagenaars, J; van Dijk, G; Ten Hoopen, R; Ysebaert, D; Ijzermans, J; van Heurn, E; van Mook, W

    2016-07-01

    Many physicians and patients do not realize that it is legally and medically possible to donate organs after euthanasia. The combination of euthanasia and organ donation is not a common practice, often limited by the patient's underlying pathology, but nevertheless has been performed >40 times in Belgium and the Netherlands since 2005. In anticipation of patients' requests for organ donation after euthanasia and contributing to awareness of the possibility of this combination among general practitioners and medical specialists, the Maastricht University Medical Center and the Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam have developed a multidisciplinary practical manual in which the organizational steps regarding this combined procedure are described and explained. This practical manual lists the various criteria to fulfill and the rules and regulations the different stakeholders involved need to comply with to meet all due diligence requirements. Although an ethicist was involved in writing this paper, this report is not specifically meant to comprehensively address the ethical issues surrounding the topic. This paper is focused on the operational aspects of the protocol.

  10. Compensated living kidney donation: a plea for pragmatism.

    PubMed

    Omar, Faisal; Tufveson, Gunnar; Welin, Stellan

    2010-03-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most efficacious and cost-effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. However, the treatment's accessibility is limited by a chronic shortage of transplantable kidneys, resulting in the death of numerous patients worldwide as they wait for a kidney to become available. Despite the implementation of various measures the disparity between supply and needs continues to grow. This paper begins with a look at the current treatment options, including various sources of transplantable kidneys, for end-stage renal disease. We propose, in accordance with others, the introduction of compensated kidney donation as a means of addressing the current shortage. We briefly outline some of the advantages of this proposal, and then turn to examine several of the ethical arguments usually marshaled against it in a bid to demonstrate that this proposal indeed passes the ethics test. Using available data of public opinions on compensated donation, we illustrate that public support for such a program would be adequate enough that we can realistically eliminate the transplant waiting list if compensation is introduced. We urge a pragmatic approach going forward; altruism in living kidney donation is important, but altruism only is an unsuccessful doctrine.

  11. Kidney donation after circulatory death (DCD): state of the art.

    PubMed

    Summers, Dominic M; Watson, Christopher J E; Pettigrew, Gavin J; Johnson, Rachel J; Collett, David; Neuberger, James M; Bradley, J Andrew

    2015-08-01

    The use of kidneys from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors has the potential to markedly increase kidney transplants performed. However, this potential is not being realized because of concerns that DCD kidneys are inferior to those from donation after brain-death (DBD) donors. The United Kingdom has developed a large and successful controlled DCD kidney transplant program that has allowed for a substantial increase in kidney transplant numbers. Here we describe recent trends in DCD kidney donor activity in the United Kingdom, outline aspects of the donation process, and describe donor selection and allocation of DCD kidneys. Previous UK Transplant Registry analyses have shown that while DCD kidneys are more susceptible to cold ischemic injury and have a higher incidence of delayed graft function, short- and medium-term transplant outcomes are similar in recipients of kidneys from DCD and DBD donors. We present an updated, extended UK registry analysis showing that longer-term transplant outcomes in DCD donor kidneys are also similar to those for DBD donor kidneys, and that transplant outcomes for kidneys from expanded-criteria DCD donors are no less favorable than for expanded-criteria DBD donors. Accordingly, the selection criteria for use of kidneys from DCD donors should be the same as those used for DBD donors. The UK experience suggests that wider international development of DCD kidney transplantation programs will help address the global shortage of deceased donor kidneys for transplantation.

  12. Living kidney donation: the importance of public education.

    PubMed

    Tumin, Makmor; Rasiah, Rajah; Noh, Abdillah; Satar, NurulHuda Mohd; Chong, Chin-Sieng; Lim, Soo-Kun; Ng, Kok-Peng

    2014-04-01

    A sample of Malaysians in the Klang Valley indicating their decision on becoming unrelated living kidney donors was surveyed regarding huge amounts of financial incentives to be rewarded to them. From the 1310 respondents, 72.1% said "no" on becoming a living donor. The reason "I don't think humans can live with only one kidney" scored the highest (35.6%), and from the 27.9% of the respondents who are willing to donate their organ with the right financial incentive, most of the respondents picked the reasons "I want to do something noble in life" (50%), and monetary reason scored the lowest (6.2%), indicating that financial incentive is not a major reason guiding individuals' decision on becoming living donors. We suggest that the government should put priority at targeting public education to raise the understanding on the risk, safety and the quality of life of donation and transplantation, and improving the public trust on the donation and the surgical methods to carry out transplantation.

  13. Tissue donation to biobanks: a review of sociological studies.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Wendy; Forsyth, Rowena; Kerridge, Ian

    2011-07-01

    Collections of human tissue (biobanks) are thought to be an essential resource for biomedical research. Biobanks have, however, been a source of debate in both bioethics and sociology. In recent years this theorising has been supplemented with empirical research, including a significant body of qualitative research, into donors' experiences and attitudes. To date, this literature has not been synthesised. We report the findings of a review of qualitative literature regarding the ways in which lay people construct and experience the process of donation to biobanks. Our aim was to determine what the qualitative research literature tells us about the process of donating to biobanks, and how this can enrich existing insights from quantitative research and from theoretical sociology and bioethics. Qualitative research shows that donation to biobanks is a complex process shaped by donors' embeddedness in a number of social contexts; by complex relations of trust in biomedicine; and by the ambiguous status of human tissue. While these findings are theoretically and practically useful, current sociological theorising is very general. A more detailed and nuanced 'sociology of biobanking' is needed, and this might be best achieved by exploring specific theoretical questions in a variety of biobanking settings.

  14. Reverse traffic: intersecting inequalities in human egg donation.

    PubMed

    Nahman, Michal

    2011-11-01

    The paper examines a case of cross-border reproductive care that happens in reverse by looking at Israeli--Romanian transnational ova traffic. The state of Israel claims to have the most IVF clinics per capita in the world, some of the highest success rates in the use of assisted reproductive technology, very liberal regulation of these technologies and the most heavily subsidized IVF in the world. This support and the government's demographic policies are designed to encourage the growth of the Jewish population in its demographic race against Palestinians. Yet transnational egg donation is very costly and reimbursement to patients a slow and involved process. Hence, while transnational ova donation is increasing in Israel, only a few can afford to participate in this border crossing. Further, new laws are meant to forbid cross-religious donation in Israel, hardening the borders of the Jewish State. Romanian ova donors are part of the global majority, exploited by markets' incursions into new niches in bodies. The history of Romanian oppression of women's reproduction makes today's women willing to undergo invasive treatment for very little compensation, even when there is the possibility of injury. This paper documents reverse traffic reproduction, which maintains, rather than addresses, inequalities.

  15. Marseillevirus-like virus recovered from blood donated by asymptomatic humans.

    PubMed

    Popgeorgiev, Nikolay; Boyer, Mickaël; Fancello, Laura; Monteil, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Rivet, Romain; Nappez, Claude; Azza, Said; Chiaroni, Jacques; Raoult, Didier; Desnues, Christelle

    2013-10-01

    The study of the human virome is still in its infancy, especially with regard to the viral content of the blood of people who are apparently disease free. In this study, the genome of a new giant virus that is related to the amoeba-infecting pathogen Marseillevirus was recovered from donated blood, using high-throughput sequencing. Viral antigens were identified by an immunoconversion assay. The virus was visualized with transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization and was grown in human T lymphocytes. Specific antibody reactions were used to identify viral proteins in blood specimens from polymerase chain reactive-positive donors. Finally, we tested 20 blood specimens from additional donors. Three had antibodies directed against this virus, and 2 had circulating viral DNA. This study shows that giant viruses, which are missed by the use of ultrafilters, are part of the human blood virome. The putative pathogenic role of giant viruses in humans remains undefined.

  16. Predictors of general discomfort, limitations in activities of daily living and intention of a second donation in unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donation.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Jang, J H; Min, H J; Jang, H I; Nah, J H; Lyu, C J; Han, K-S; Won, J H; Lee, Y-H; Chong, S Y; Mun, Y C; Lee, W S; Kim, S J; Kim, I

    2017-02-01

    We performed a retrospective study of 1868 consecutive unrelated donors to predict the risk factors related to general discomfort, limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) and intention of a second donation in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) donation. General discomfort and limitations in ADLs were assessed by numerical measurement (scores of 0-10) and donor's intention of a second donation by yes or no reply. The post-donation questionnaires were completed within 48 h after HSC collection and at 1 week, 4 weeks, and 4 months thereafter. Predictors of general discomfort included female sex (P<0.0001), bone marrow (BM) collection (P<0.0001) or PBSC collection through a central line (CL; P=0.0349), 2-day collection (P=0.0150) and negative or undetermined intention of a second donation on day 1 (P<0.0001). Predictors of limitations in ADLs included age group of 30-39 years (P=0.0046), female sex (P<0.0001), BM collection (P<0.0001) or PBSC collection through a CL (P<0.0001) and negative or undetermined intention of a second donation on day 1 (P<0.0001). The only predictor of positive intention of a second donation was male sex (P=0.0007). Age, sex and collection method and period should be considered risk factors when unrelated HSC donation is performed.

  17. Organ donation on Web 2.0: content and audience analysis of organ donation videos on YouTube.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yan

    2010-04-01

    This study examines the content of and audience response to organ donation videos on YouTube, a Web 2.0 platform, with framing theory. Positive frames were identified in both video content and audience comments. Analysis revealed a reciprocity relationship between media frames and audience frames. Videos covered content categories such as kidney, liver, organ donation registration process, and youth. Videos were favorably rated. No significant differences were found between videos produced by organizations and individuals in the United States and those produced in other countries. The findings provide insight into how new communication technologies are shaping health communication in ways that differ from traditional media. The implications of Web 2.0, characterized by user-generated content and interactivity, for health communication and health campaign practice are discussed.

  18. Regional Differences in Communication Process and Outcomes of Requests for Solid Organ Donation.

    PubMed

    Traino, H M; Molisani, A J; Siminoff, L A

    2016-12-16

    Although federal mandate prohibits the allocation of solid organs for transplantation based on "accidents of geography," geographic variation of transplantable organs is well documented. This study explores regional differences in communication in requests for organ donation. Administrative data from nine partnering organ procurement organizations and interview data from 1339 family decision makers (FDMs) were compared across eight geographically distinct US donor service areas (DSAs). Authorization for organ donation ranged from 60.4% to 98.1% across DSAs. FDMs from the three regions with the lowest authorization rates reported the lowest levels of satisfaction with the time spent discussing donation and with the request process, discussion of the least donation-related topics, the highest levels of pressure to donate, and the least comfort with the donation decision. Organ procurement organization region predicted authorization (odds ratios ranged from 8.14 to 0.24), as did time spent discussing donation (OR = 2.11), the number of donation-related topics discussed (OR = 1.14), and requesters' communication skill (OR = 1.14). Standardized training for organ donation request staff is needed to ensure the highest quality communication during requests, optimize rates of family authorization to donation in all regions, and increase the supply of organs available for transplantation.

  19. A focused educational program after religious services to improve organ donation in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Salim, Ali; Bery, Cherisse; Ley, Eric J; Schulman, Danielle; Navarro, Sonia; Zheng, Ling; Chan, Linda S

    2012-01-01

    Religion is an important determinant in Hispanic Americans (HA) becoming organ donors as HA often believe religion forbids donation. We investigated the effect of an educational program targeting HA organ donation in places of worship. A prospective observational study was conducted at four Catholic churches with a high percentage of HA. A 45-min "culturally sensitive" educational program, conducted in Spanish, was implemented. Organ donation awareness, knowledge, perception, and beliefs, as well as the intent to become an organ donor, were measured before and after the intervention. Differences between before and after the intervention were analyzed. A total of 182 surveys were conducted before and 159 surveys were conducted after the educational program. A significant increase was observed in organ donation knowledge (54% vs. 70%, p<0.0001), perception (43% vs. 58%, p<0.0001), and beliefs (50% vs. 60%, p=0.0001). However, no significant difference was found in the willingness to discuss donation with family, intent-to-donate, or registering to donate after the intervention. This study demonstrates that a focused educational program in places of worship can significantly improve HA knowledge, perceptions, and beliefs regarding organ donation. Further work is needed to understand why intent-to-donate does not increase despite the increase in organ donation awareness.

  20. Knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Ballala, Kirthinath; Shetty, Avinash; Malpe, Surekha Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary body donation has become an important source of cadavers for anatomical study and education. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a medical institute in India. A cross sectional study was conducted at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, India, among medical doctors. Data was collected from consenting individuals in the age group of 25-65 years by convenience sampling method. A semi-structured, pretested, questionnaire designed to assess KAP regarding whole body donation was provided to the study population (n = 106); 97 individuals returned the completed questionnaire. Results showed that 8% of the medical professionals were unaware of the term body donation and 85% believed that donated bodies were misused. A large proportion of the respondents did not know about the authority that oversaw body donation, or its criteria for accepting donated bodies and diseases for which bodies were screened before acceptance. Only 22% of polled physicians were willing to donate their bodies for medical education, but 68% expected the public to do the same. While only 7% had already registered their own names for body donation, 64% were not aware of any known person having registered and 72% indicated that their decision would not be influenced even if they knew of friends who had registered. These results suggest that educating medical students and professionals regarding the altruistic act of body donation is as important as educating the general public.

  1. Attitudes of Australian chiropractic students toward whole body donation: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Michelle; Marten, Mathew; Stewart, Ella; Serafin, Stanley; Štrkalj, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Cadavers play an important role in anatomy education. In Australia, bodies for anatomy education are acquired only through donations. To gain insight into educational dynamics in an anatomy laboratory as well as to facilitate body donation programs and thanksgiving ceremonies, it is important to understand students' attitudes toward body donation. In this cross-sectional study, the attitudes of Macquarie University's first, second, and fifth year chiropractic students toward body donation were investigated. Macquarie University chiropractic students have a four semester long anatomy program, which includes cadaver-based instruction on prosected specimens. A questionnaire was used to record respondents' demographics and attitudes toward body donation: personal, by a relative, and by a stranger. It was found that ethnicity and religion affect attitudes toward body donation, with Australian students being more willing to donate a stranger's body and atheists and agnostics being more willing to donate in general. Furthermore, willingness to donate one's own or a family member's body decreases as year of study increases, suggesting a possible negative impact of exposure to cadavers in the anatomy laboratory. This was only true, however, after controlling for age. Thus, the impact of viewing and handling prosected specimens, which is the norm in anatomy classes in Australia, may not be as strong as dissecting cadavers. It is suggested that anatomists and educators prepare students for cadaver-based instruction as well as exhibit sensitivity to cultural differences in how students approach working with cadavers, when informing different communities about body donation programs and in devising thanksgiving ceremonies.

  2. Factors Associated With Medical and Nursing Students' Willingness to Donate Organs.

    PubMed

    Tumin, Makmor; Tafran, Khaled; Tang, Li Yoong; Chong, Mei Chan; Mohd Jaafar, Noor Ismawati; Mohd Satar, NurulHuda; Abdullah, Nurhidayah

    2016-03-01

    Malaysia suffers from a chronic shortage of human organs for transplantation. Medical and nursing students (MaNS) are future health professionals and thus their attitude toward organ donation is vital for driving national donation rates. This study investigates MaNS' willingness to donate organs upon death and the factors influencing their willingness. A cross-sectional design was used with a sample of 500 students (264 medical and 236 nursing) at the University of Malaya. A self-administrated questionnaire was used. The responses were analyzed by using descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression. Of all respondents, 278 (55.6%) were willing to donate organs upon death, while the remaining 222 (44.4%) were unwilling to donate. Only 44 (8.8%) had donor cards. The multiple logistic regression revealed that the minorities ethnic group was more willing to donate organs than Malay respondents (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.98, P = 0.010). In addition, medical students were more willing to donate than nursing students (aOR = 2.53, P = 0.000). Respondents who have a family member with a donor card were more willing to donate than respondents who do not (aOR = 3.48, P = 0.006). MaNS who believed that their religion permits deceased donation were more willing to donate than their counterparts (aOR = 4.96, P = 0.000). Household income and sex were not significant predictors of MaNS' willingness to donate organs upon death. MaNS have moderate willingness, but low commitment toward deceased organ donation. Strategies for improving MaNS' attitude should better educate them on organ donation, targeting the most the Malay and nursing students, and should consider the influence of family attitude and religious permissibility on MaNS' willingness.

  3. Knowledge of Kidney Donation Among Care Givers in Two Tertiary Hospitals in Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adejumo, Oluseyi A; Solarin, Adaobi U; Abiodun, Moses T; Akinbodewa, Ayodeji A

    2016-09-22

    One of the major challenges of kidney transplantation is shortage of kidney donors. Care givers (CGs) are potential kidney donors, but the majority of them are unwilling to donate due to inadequate knowledge on kidney donation. This study evaluated the knowledge of kidney donation and its determinants among CGs in two tertiary hospitals in Southwest Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study that was carried out in the Kidney Care Centre (KCC), Ondo and Babcock University Teaching Hospital (BUTH), Ilishan-Remo using a self-administered pretested questionnaire that assessed knowledge of kidney donation and its determinants. Pvalue of <0.05 was taken as significant. A total of 244 respondents participated in the study. The majority were below 40 years, married, and female. The proportion of respondents with adequate knowledge of kidney donation was 63.4%. More respondents from BUTH compared to KCC had adequate knowledge of kidney donation (80% vs. 46.7%, P ≤ 0.001). Similarly, the mean knowledge score was higher in respondents from BUTH (P ≤ 0.001). Factors that determined knowledge of kidney donation were female gender (AOR: 3.43, 95% CI: 1.25-9.40, P = 0.02) and social class (AOR: 1.22, 95% CI: 0.50-2.95, P ≤ 0.001). There was positive correlation between knowledge of kidney donation among the respondents from both hospitals and their willingness to donate kidneys (r = 0.439, P ≤ 0.001). Knowledge of kidney donation was better among BUTH's respondents. Gender and social class were predictors of knowledge of kidney donation. Improving knowledge of kidney donation may improve willingness to donate among the public.

  4. Changing Patterns of Organ Donation: Brain Dead Donors Are Not Being Lost by Donation After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Helen M; Glazier, Alexandra K; Delmonico, Francis L

    2016-02-01

    The clinical characteristics of all New England Organ Bank (NEOB) donors after circulatory death (DCD) donors were analyzed between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2014. During that 5-year period, there were 494 authorized medically suitable potential DCDs that the NEOB evaluated, constituting more than 30% of deceased donors coordinated annually by the NEOB. From the cohort of 494 authorized potential DCDs, 331 (67%) became actual DCD, 82 (17%) were attempted as a DCD but did not progress to donation, and 81 (16%) transitioned to an actual donor after brain death (DBD). Two hundred seventy-six organs were transplanted from the 81 donors that transitioned from DCD to actual DBD, including 24 heart, 70 liver, 12 single and 14 bilateral lung, and 12 pancreas transplants. When patients with devastating brain injury admitted to the intensive care units are registered donors, the Organ Procurement Organization staff should share the patient's donation decision with the health care team and the patient's family, as early as possible after the comfort measures only discussion has been initiated. The experience of the NEOB becomes an important reference of the successful implementation of DCD that enables an expansion of deceased donation (inclusive of DBD).

  5. Forced organ donation: the presumed consent to organ donation laws of the various states and the United States Constitution.

    PubMed

    Powhida, A

    1999-01-01

    The issues presented in this Comment pertain to whether there are substantive limits imposed by the Fourteenth Amendment upon the state legislatures which would defeat the recent, tentative steps of many states to pass laws authorizing presumed consent to organ donation. The final and perhaps least effective presumed consent law creates a presumption of consent to organ donation. The potential organ donor makes the choice whether to donate or not during his lifetime. This form of the presumed consent law would probably have the least impact on increasing the number of available donor organs. It permitted the coroner to harvest the eyes and corneas of deceased individuals if the coroner was unaware of objections from either the decedent or the family of the decedent. Presumed consent statutes should be found unconstitutional because they infringe upon a family's property interest in a deceased relative's corpse. However, due to the family's property interest in a relative's deceased body, as set forth in the next section, the result is that presumed consent statutes are unconstitutional. In order to find the presumed consent law unconstitutional, the Court would have to find that either: (a) the Fourteenth Amendment's liberty component included the family's right to determine what happens to a relative's body after death, or (b) that the property component included a vested state law property interest in the dead body.

  6. For and against Organ Donation and Transplantation: Intricate Facilitators and Barriers in Organ Donation Perceived by German Nurses and Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Beate; Paal, Piret; Frick, Eckhard; Forsberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background. Significant facilitators and barriers to organ donation and transplantation remain in the general public and even in health professionals. Negative attitudes of HPs have been identified as the most significant barrier to actual ODT. The purpose of this paper was hence to investigate to what extent HPs (physicians and nurses) experience such facilitators and barriers in ODT and to what extent they are intercorrelated. We thus combined single causes to circumscribed factors of respective barriers and facilitators and analyzed them for differences regarding profession, gender, spiritual/religious self-categorization, and self-estimated knowledge of ODT and their mutual interaction. Methods. By the use of questionnaires we investigated intricate facilitators and barriers to organ donation experienced by HPs (n = 175; 73% nurses, 27% physicians) in around ten wards at the University Hospital of Munich. Results. Our study confirms a general high agreement with the importance of ODT. Nevertheless, we identified both facilitators and barriers in the following fields: (1) knowledge of ODT and willingness to donate own organs, (2) ethical delicacies in ODT, (3) stressors to handle ODT in the hospital, and (4) individual beliefs and self-estimated religion/spirituality. Conclusion. Attention to the intricacy of stressors and barriers in HPs continues to be a high priority focus for the availability of donor organs. PMID:27597891

  7. The watching-eyes phenomenon and blood donation: Does exposure to pictures of eyes increase blood donation by young adults?

    PubMed

    Sénémeaud, Cécile; Sanrey, Camille; Callé, Nathalie; Plainfossé, Candice; Belhaire, Alexandra; Georget, Patrice

    2016-11-14

    This study examined the effectiveness of exposure to a "watching-eyes image" in increasing blood donation rates among young people, a segment of the population that is particularly underrepresented among blood donors. Participants were 454 first-year university students, each of who was given a blood-donation flyer at the beginning of a lecture. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions depending on whether the flyer they received bore a picture of eyes (experimental condition) or a neutral picture (control condition). We recorded the numbers of participants who promised to give blood and who actually gave blood during the blood drive. Results show that the number of people who gave blood was significantly higher in the experimental condition than in the control condition. These findings provide the first evidence of the effectiveness of the watching-eyes strategy in encouraging young people to give blood. We discuss the processes underlying the "watching-eyes effect" with respect to blood donation.

  8. Oral Administration of Electron-Beam Inactivated Rhodococcus equi Failed to Protect Foals against Intrabronchial Infection with Live, Virulent R. equi

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Joana N.; Cohen, Noah D.; Bordin, Angela I.; Brake, Courtney N.; Giguère, Steeve; Coleman, Michelle C.; Alaniz, Robert C.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Mwangi, Waithaka; Pillai, Suresh D.

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no licensed vaccine that protects foals against Rhodococcus equi–induced pneumonia. Oral administration of live, virulent R. equi to neonatal foals has been demonstrated to protect against subsequent intrabronchial challenge with virulent R. equi. Electron beam (eBeam)-inactivated R. equi are structurally intact and have been demonstrated to be immunogenic when administered orally to neonatal foals. Thus, we investigated whether eBeam inactivated R. equi could protect foals against developing pneumonia after experimental infection with live, virulent R. equi. Foals (n = 8) were vaccinated by gavaging with eBeam-inactivated R. equi at ages 2, 7, and 14 days, or gavaged with equal volume of saline solution (n = 4), and subsequently infected intrabronchially with live, virulent R. equi at age 21 days. The proportion of vaccinated foals that developed pneumonia following challenge was similar among the vaccinated (7/8; 88%) and unvaccinated foals (3/4; 75%). This vaccination regimen did not appear to be strongly immunogenic in foals. Alternative dosing regimens or routes of administration need further investigation and may prove to be immunogenic and protective. PMID:26828865

  9. Oral Administration of Electron-Beam Inactivated Rhodococcus equi Failed to Protect Foals against Intrabronchial Infection with Live, Virulent R. equi.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Joana N; Cohen, Noah D; Bordin, Angela I; Brake, Courtney N; Giguère, Steeve; Coleman, Michelle C; Alaniz, Robert C; Lawhon, Sara D; Mwangi, Waithaka; Pillai, Suresh D

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no licensed vaccine that protects foals against Rhodococcus equi-induced pneumonia. Oral administration of live, virulent R. equi to neonatal foals has been demonstrated to protect against subsequent intrabronchial challenge with virulent R. equi. Electron beam (eBeam)-inactivated R. equi are structurally intact and have been demonstrated to be immunogenic when administered orally to neonatal foals. Thus, we investigated whether eBeam inactivated R. equi could protect foals against developing pneumonia after experimental infection with live, virulent R. equi. Foals (n = 8) were vaccinated by gavaging with eBeam-inactivated R. equi at ages 2, 7, and 14 days, or gavaged with equal volume of saline solution (n = 4), and subsequently infected intrabronchially with live, virulent R. equi at age 21 days. The proportion of vaccinated foals that developed pneumonia following challenge was similar among the vaccinated (7/8; 88%) and unvaccinated foals (3/4; 75%). This vaccination regimen did not appear to be strongly immunogenic in foals. Alternative dosing regimens or routes of administration need further investigation and may prove to be immunogenic and protective.

  10. Toward a more stable blood supply: charitable incentives, donation rates, and the experience of September 11.

    PubMed

    Sass, Reuben G

    2013-01-01

    Although excess blood collection has characterized U.S. national disasters, most dramatically in the case of September 11, periodic shortages of blood have recurred for decades. In response, I propose a new model of medical philanthropy, one that specifically uses charitable contributions to health care as blood donation incentives. I explain how the surge in blood donations following 9/11 was both transient and disaster-specific, failing to foster a greater continuing commitment to donate blood. This underscores the importance of considering blood donation incentives. I defend charitable incentives as an alternative to financial incentives, which I contend would further extend neoliberal market values into health care. I explain my model's potential appeal to private foundations or public-private partnerships as a means for expanding both the pool of blood donors and the prosocial benefit of each act of blood donation. Finally I link my analysis to the empirical literature on blood donation incentives.

  11. New classification of donation after circulatory death donors definitions and terminology.

    PubMed

    Thuong, Marie; Ruiz, Angel; Evrard, Patrick; Kuiper, Michael; Boffa, Catherine; Akhtar, Mohammed Z; Neuberger, James; Ploeg, Rutger

    2016-07-01

    In the face of a crisis in organ donation, the transplant community are increasingly utilizing donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors. Over the last 10 years, with the increasing usage of DCD donors, we have seen the introduction in a number of new terms and definitions. We report the results of the 6th International Conference in Organ Donation held in Paris in 2013 and report a consensus agreement of an established expert European Working Group on the definitions and terminology regarding DCD donation, including refinement of the Maastricht definitions. This document forms part of a special series where recommendations are presented for uncontrolled and controlled DCD donation and organ specific guidelines for kidney, pancreas, liver and lung transplantation. An expert panel formed a consensus on definitions and terms aiming to establish consistent usage of terms in DCD donation.

  12. Identification of a Patient Population Previously Not Considered for Organ Donation.

    PubMed

    Barrois, Brad

    2016-09-26

    For the foreseeable future, more individuals will need a kidney than there are kidneys available for transplant. This is not a new issue, and it is one that will not likely be solved anytime soon. While recent initiatives have focused on efficiently allocating kidneys in order to maximize supply, a shortage will remain.  Currently, organs are made available for transplant through three different processes: donation after brain death declaration (BD), donation after circulatory death (DCD), and living donation (one healthy individual donates to a person in need). The objective of this article is to discuss the possibility of a fourth option in imminent death single kidney donation (IDSKD) and its potential effects on the future of donation and transplantation. During our study, IDSKD had the potential to increase the number of kidneys transplanted in our service area by approximately 5%.

  13. In situ bioremediation of nitrate and perchlorate in vadose zone soil for groundwater protection using gaseous electron donor injection technology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Patrick J; Trute, Mary M

    2006-12-01

    When present in the vadose zone, potentially toxic nitrate and perchlorate anions can be persistent sources of groundwater contamination. Gaseous electron donor injection technology (GEDIT), an anaerobic variation of petroleum hydrocarbon bioventing, involves injecting electron donor gases, such as hydrogen or ethyl acetate, into the vadose zone, to stimulate biodegradation of nitrate and perchlorate. Laboratory microcosm studies demonstrated that hydrogen and ethanol promoted nitrate and perchlorate reduction in vadose zone soil and that moisture content was an important factor. Column studies demonstrated that transport of particular electron donors varied significantly; ethyl acetate and butyraldehyde were transported more rapidly than butyl acetate and ethanol. Nitrate removal in the column studies, up to 100%, was best promoted by ethyl acetate. Up to 39% perchlorate removal was achieved with ethanol and was limited by insufficient incubation time. The results demonstrate that GEDIT is a promising remediation technology warranting further validation.

  14. Fabrication of layered nanostructures by successive electron beam induced deposition with two precursors: protective capping of metallic iron structures.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Papp, C; Kronast, F; Gray, A X; Balke, B; Cramm, S; Fadley, C S; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-11-25

    We report on the stepwise generation of layered nanostructures via electron beam induced deposition (EBID) using organometallic precursor molecules in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). In a first step a metallic iron line structure was produced using iron pentacarbonyl; in a second step this nanostructure was then locally capped with a 2-3 nm thin titanium oxide-containing film fabricated from titanium tetraisopropoxide. The chemical composition of the deposited layers was analyzed by spatially resolved Auger electron spectroscopy. With spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe L₃ edge, it was demonstrated that the thin capping layer prevents the iron structure from oxidation upon exposure to air.

  15. Binding of BAL 31 RNA polymerase to PM2 DNA as determined by electron microscopy and protection against restriction endonuclease cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, P; Susaeta, M; González, B; Yudelevich, A

    1988-01-01

    Specific binding sites of BAL 31 RNA polymerase on PM2 DNA have been mapped by protection against HincII and HindIII cleavage and by observation of enzyme-DNA complexes by electron microscopy. Nine specific binding sites were observed at map units 0.19, 0.20, 0.28, 0.54, 0.63, 0.65, 0.71, 0.72, and 0.75 by the first method. All these sites were confirmed by electron microscopy which, in addition, revealed another site at 0.05 map unit. Published nucleotide sequences of the region surrounding sites at 0.71 and 0.75 map units show the presence of consensus sequences for procaryotic promoters. Images PMID:2843687

  16. Limiting financial disincentives in live organ donation: a rational solution to the kidney shortage.

    PubMed

    Gaston, R S; Danovitch, G M; Epstein, R A; Kahn, J P; Matas, A J; Schnitzler, M A

    2006-11-01

    Availability of kidney transplantation is limited by an inadequate supply of organs, with no apparent remedy on the immediate horizon and increasing reliance on living donors (LDs). While some have advocated financial remuneration to stimulate donation, the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA) of 1984 expressly forbids the offer of 'valuable consideration.' However, recent developments indicate some fluidity in the definition of valuable consideration while evolving international standards highlight deficiencies (particularly regarding long-term care and follow-up) in the current American system. Recognizing that substantial financial and physical disincentives exist for LDs, we propose a policy change that offers the potential to enhance organ availability as well as address concerns regarding long-term care. Donors assume much greater risk than is widely acknowledged, risk that can be approximated for the purpose of determining appropriate compensation. Our proposal offsets donor risk via a package of specific benefits (life insurance, health insurance and a small amount of cash) to minimize hazard and ensure donor interests are protected after as well as before nephrectomy. It will fund medical follow-up and enable data collection so that long-term risk can be accurately assessed. The proposal should be cost effective with only a small increase in the number of LDs, and the net benefit will become greater if removal of disincentives stimulates even further growth. As importantly, by directly linking compensation to risk, we believe it preserves the essence of kidney donation as a gift, consistent with NOTA and implementable in the United States without altering current legal statutes.

  17. Cultural acceptability and personal willingness of Iranian students toward cadaveric donation.

    PubMed

    Abbasi Asl, Jamal; Nikzad, Hossein; Taherian, Aliakbar; Atlasi, Mohammad Ali; Naderian, Homayoun; Mousavi, Gholamabbas; Kashani, Milad Motalebi; Omidi, Abdollah

    2017-03-01

    Cadaver dissection stands as a crucial component in medical curricula around the world, although computer-based multimedia programs have been introduced in order to replace the need for cadaver donations. Due to a decrease in the number of unclaimed bodies and rather few donations, there is an insufficient number of cadavers for anatomical studies in Iran. This study was carried out to evaluate medical students' awareness and willingness regarding body donation in Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. In this study, a questionnaire was designed to focus on the cultural acceptability and personal willingness to donate one's body after death. Students from the university's anatomy classes (n = 331) participated in this study. Seventy-seven percent of the students expressed their agreement toward the idea of utilizing body donation services, though only 25.4% of participants were willing to donate their own bodies. None of the demographic factors were associated with cultural acceptability or personal willingness towards body donation. These findings indicated that besides "payment", other factors were associated with students' willingness to become donors. All factors of awareness except "previous awareness of organization" were associated with cultural acceptability. In this study, students suggested that encouraging people to register for body donation using mass media (25.6%) and teaching students to respect cadavers in the dissection environment (24.8%) were the best solutions for addressing the lack of cadavers. These findings indicated that a lack of awareness about body donation might be the main factor responsible for unwillingness towards body donation; therefore, improving the public's awareness and addressing the willingness of students regarding body donation may help overcome the current lack of donated cadavers. Anat Sci Educ 10: 120-126. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  18. Whole body donation for medical science: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Boulware, L Ebony; Ratner, Lloyd E; Cooper, Lisa A; LaVeist, Thomas A; Powe, Neil R

    2004-10-01

    Although cadaveric whole-body donation for the purposes of medical science is extremely important for medical education, the number of persons who choose to donate remains low. We assessed persons' willingness to consider whole body donation in a standardized telephone survey of Maryland households, identified using random digit dialing. In multivariable analyses, we assessed the independent relation of sociodemographics and attitudinal factors to willingness to consider donation, and we determined the amount of variation in willingness to consider donation among the study population that could be explained by these factors. Of 385 participants (84% of randomized homes), 49% reported they would consider whole body donation. In bivariate analysis, younger age, African-American race/ethnicity, less education and income, greater number of dependents, marital status, and attitudes about religion/spirituality, trust in hospitals, and income, gender, and racial/ethnic discrimination in hospitals were statistically significantly associated with 40-70% less odds of willingness to consider donation. After adjustment, persons of African-American race/ethnicity, less education, and those agreeing with the statements, "Rich patients receive better care at hospitals than poor patients," and "White patients receive better care at hospitals than other racial or ethnic groups," had 40-60% less odds of willingness to consider donation when compared to their counterparts. Respondents' race/ethnicity and education contributed most to willingness to consider donation. We conclude that demographic and attitudinal factors are strongly related to willingness to consider whole body donation. Efforts to enhance donation should seek to identify ways in which potential barriers to donation can be addressed by health professionals.

  19. Electron shuttles in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuya; Manefield, Mike; Lee, Matthew; Kouzuma, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    Electron-shuttling compounds (electron shuttles [ESs], or redox mediators) are essential components in intracellular electron transfer, while microbes also utilize self-produced and naturally present ESs for extracellular electron transfer. These compounds assist in microbial energy metabolism by facilitating electron transfer between microbes, from electron-donating substances to microbes, and/or from microbes to electron-accepting substances. Artificially supplemented ESs can create new routes of electron flow in the microbial energy metabolism, thereby opening up new possibilities for the application of microbes to biotechnology processes. Typical examples of such processes include halogenated-organics bioremediation, azo-dye decolorization, and microbial fuel cells. Herein we suggest that ESs can be applied widely to create new microbial biotechnology processes.

  20. From hesitation to appreciation: the transformation of a single, local donation-nurse project into an established organ-donation service.

    PubMed

    Gyllström Krekula, Linda; Malenicka, Silvia; Nydahl, Anders; Tibell, Annika

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluates the transition from a local project to promote organ donation to a permanent county-based donation service inspired by the Spanish model. To address the problem of declining donation rates, a project with one donation-specialized nurse (DOSS) was initiated at a single neuro-intensive care unit. This project was later expanded into a permanent on-call service consisting of seven DOSSes, covering a large urban county. During the different periods (before, during project and during permanent service), the DOSS function's effect on donation rates was significant, and the number of eligible donors that became actual donors increased from 37% to 73% and 74%, respectively. The effect on family vetoes was as prominent with a decrease from 34% to 8% and 14%. The staff appreciation of the DOSS function was also evident during the periods; all areas included in the questionnaire (family care, donor care and staff support) have improved greatly owing to the DOSS. The transition from a single, local donation-nurse project, to an on-call service with several DOSSes covering a large urban county was a success considering the donation rates as well as the staff's appreciation. Hence, organizational models from abroad can be adjusted and successfully adopted.

  1. Factors associated with positive attitude towards blood donation among medical students.

    PubMed

    Gazibara, Tatjana; Kovacevic, Nikolina; Maric, Gorica; Kurtagic, Ilma; Nurkovic, Selmina; Kisic-Tepavcevic, Darija; Pekmezovic, Tatjana

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess attitudes and practice of blood donation among medical students. Medical students were recruited at Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade, Serbia. Of 973 students, 38.4% of freshmen and 41.4% of final year students have donated blood (χ(2) = 0.918, p = 0.186). Blood donors had significantly more positive attitude towards some aspects of blood donation. Being female, residing in a city other than the capital and previous blood donation experience were independent predictors of positive attitude towards being a blood donor to an unknown person. Efforts are required to augment blood donor pool among future physicians.

  2. Influence factors for successful corneal donation among Chinese adults: data from Nanjing between 2001 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Xun; Liu, Qing-Huai

    2014-01-01

    AIM To investigate the factors that may influence the successful corneal donation among adults in China. METHODS This retrospective study was conducted in 2012. The eligible participants were all the adults registered in Nanjing Red Cross Eye Bank to donate their corneas after death during the period of 2001 and 2012. Multivariate logistic regression models were applied to investigate the influence factors for successful donation, the outcome events. RESULTS Totally, 210 of 328 (64.0%) registered potential donors successfully donated their corneas after death. The mean (SD) age at registration was 64.7 (12.5) for all participants, with 65.5 (10.1) and 63.2 (15.8) for successful and unsuccessful donors, respectively. With multivariate logistic regression analysis, five factors, the willingness of donation, age, education level, residence area, and cause of death were identified to be associated with successful corneal donation. CONCLUSION The willingness of donation and some socio-demographic factors might substantially affect their successful donation after death for people who registered to donate corneas. PMID:25540751

  3. 7 CFR 250.14 - Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES-FOOD DISTRIBUTION DONATION OF... against theft, spoilage and other loss; (3) Maintain foods at proper storage temperatures; (4)...

  4. Generation Y and Blood Donation: The Impact of Altruistic Help in a Darwiportunistic Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Summary This article focuses on the members of Generation Y and their willingness to offer voluntary (unpaid) blood donations. Using statistics from various sources, a three-stage model is developed to explain blood donation behaviour especially of this generation. It consists of i) developing altruism, ii) raising the willingness to donate blood, and iii) activating actual blood donation behaviour. Members of Generation Y live in a Darwinistic society. They also to some degree act opportunistically, but not in contradiction to altruism. For that reason, the article positions itself in the theoretical framework of Darwi-portunism and derives practical suggestions as well as implications for research. PMID:21048826

  5. Prosocial Motivation and Blood Donations: A Survey of the Empirical Literature.

    PubMed

    Goette, Lorenz; Stutzer, Alois; Frey, Beat M

    2010-06-01

    Recent shortages in the supply of blood donations have renewed the interest in how blood donations can be increased temporarily. We survey the evidence on the role of financial and other incentives in eliciting blood donations among donors who are normally willing to donate pro bono. We present the predictions from different empirical/psychological-based theories, with some predicting that incentives are effective while others predict that incentives may undermine prosocial motivation. The evidence suggests that incentives work relatively well in settings in which donors are relatively anonymous, but evidence indicates also that when image concerns become important, incentives may be counterproductive as donors do not want to be seen as greedy.

  6. Analysis of knowledge of the general population and health professionals on organ donation after cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Bedenko, Ramon Correa; Nisihara, Renato; Yokoi, Douglas Shun; Candido, Vinícius de Mello; Galina, Ismael; Moriguchi, Rafael Massayuki; Ceulemans, Nico; Salvalaggio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the knowledge and acceptance of the public and professionals working in intensive care units regarding organ donation after cardiac death. Methods The three hospitals with the most brain death notifications in Curitiba were selected, and two groups of respondents were established for application of the same questionnaire: the general public (i.e., visitors of patients in intensive care units) and health professionals working in the same intensive care unit. The questionnaire contained questions concerning demographics, intention to donate organs and knowledge of current legislation regarding brain death and donation after cardiac death. Results In total, 543 questionnaires were collected, including 442 from family members and 101 from health professionals. There was a predominance of women and Catholics in both groups. More females intended to donate. Health professionals performed better in the knowledge comparison. The intention to donate organs was significantly higher in the health professionals group (p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the intention to donate in terms of education level or income. There was a greater acceptance of donation after uncontrolled cardiac death among Catholics than among evangelicals (p < 0.001). Conclusion Most of the general population intended to donate, with greater intentions expressed by females. Education and income did not affect the decision. The type of transplant that used a donation after uncontrolled cardiac death was not well accepted in the study population, indicating the need for more clarification for its use in our setting. PMID:27626950

  7. Opportunities not taken: successes and shortcomings in the Institute of Medicine's report on organ donation.

    PubMed

    Das, K K; Lerner, B H

    2007-04-01

    The Institute of Medicine's recent report, Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action, studies the current problems facing organ donation in the USA, making suggestions for quality improvement and analyzing various proposals of incentivized donation and presumed consent (PC). Although the report deals with the donation of several solid organs, this mini review examines the findings from the perspective of kidney transplantation. The committee's recommendations to move from circulatory to neurologic criteria for cadaveric donation and to increase opportunities for donor decision making are prudent. We agree with the committee's arguments against providing incentives for donation because of the inherent distributional inequalities and imperfect information; the intrinsic difficulties in establishing market equilibrium for such heterogeneous and perishable goods; the implied commoditization of the human body; and the inadequate data regarding the long-term risks of living donation. However, we question the committee's firm opposition to PC, especially given recent data from 22 European countries showing a 25-30% increase in organ supply attributable to a PC policy. If this simple change in the default position on donation has the potential to increase organ supply, decrease the need for living donation, reduce the burden on grieving families, maintain familial authority over the deceased, and respect patient autonomy, at least a pilot program of PC seems warranted.

  8. 77 FR 10756 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Opinions and Perspectives About the Current Blood Donation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... population. Three research aims drive this study's protocols to provide valuable evidence on the motivations... in confidential qualitative telephone interviews to identify their reasons for donating or wanting...

  9. 77 FR 35408 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Opinions and Perspectives About the Current Blood Donation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... population. Three research aims drive this study's protocols to provide valuable evidence on the motivations... in confidential qualitative telephone interviews to identify their reasons for donating or wanting...

  10. Organ donation after circulatory death in a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, S; Treasure, E; Silvester, W; Opdam, H; Warrillow, S J; Jones, D

    2016-07-01

    Although organ transplantation is well established for end-stage organ failure, many patients die on waiting lists due to insufficient donor numbers. Recently, there has been renewed interest in donation after circulatory death (DCD). In a retrospective observational study we reviewed the screening of patients considered for DCD between March 2007 and December 2012 in our hospital. Overall, 148 patients were screened, 17 of whom were transferred from other hospitals. Ninety-three patients were excluded (53 immediately and 40 after review by donation staff). The 55 DCD patients were younger than those excluded (P=0.007) and they died from hypoxic brain injury (43.6%), intraparenchymal haemorrhage (21.8%) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (14.5%). Antemortem heparin administration and bronchoscopy occurred in 50/53 (94.3%) and 22/55 (40%) of cases, respectively. Forty-eight patients died within 90 minutes and proceeded to donation surgery. Associations with not dying in 90 minutes included spontaneous ventilation mode (P=0.022), absence of noradrenaline infusion (P=0.051) and higher PaO2:FiO2 ratio (P=0.052). The number of brain dead donors did not decrease over the study period. The time interval between admission and death was longer for DCD than for the 45 brain dead donors (5 [3-11] versus 2 [2-3] days; P<0.001), and 95 additional patients received organ transplants due to DCD. Introducing a DCD program can increase potential organ donors without reducing brain dead donors. Antemortem investigations appear to be acceptable to relatives when included in the consent process.

  11. Opinion Toward Living Liver Donation of Hospital Personnel From Units Related to Organ Donation and Transplantation: A Multicenter Study From Spain and Latin-America

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Antonio; Lopez Navas, Ana; Ayala Garcia, Marco Antonio; Sebastian, Jose; Abdo Cuza, Anselmo; Martinez Alarcon, Laura; Ramirez, Ector Jaime; Munoz, Gerardo; Palacios, Gerardo; Suarez Lopez, Juliette; Castellanos, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Beatriz; Martinez, Miguel Angel; Diaz, Ernesto; Ramirez, Pablo; Parrilla, Pascual

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hospital personnel of services related to donation and transplantation process play a fundamental role in the development of transplantation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the attitude toward living liver donation (LLD) among hospital personnel from services related to donation and transplantation in hospital centers in Spain and Latin America. Materials and Methods: Eight hospitals within the “International Donor Collaborative Project” were selected, three in Spain, three in Mexico and two in Cuba. The study was performed in transplant-related services, using a randomized sample, which was stratified by the type of service and job category. Results: In total, 878 workers were surveyed of which 82% (n = 720) were in favor of related LLD, 10% (n = 90) were against and 8% (n = 68) undecided. Attitudes toward related LLD were more favorable in the following groups: the Latin Americans (86% in favor vs. 77% among the Spanish; P = 0.007); younger people (37 vs. 40 years, P = 0.002); those in favor of either deceased donation (P < 0.001) or living kidney donation (P < 0.001); those who believed that they might need a transplant in the future (P < 0.001); those who would accept a liver from a living donor (P < 0.001); those who discussed the subject of donation and transplantation with their families (P = 0.040); and those whose partner was in favor of donation and transplantation (P = 0.044). Conclusions: Personnel from donation and transplantation-related units had a favorable attitude toward LLD. This attitude was not affected by psychosocial factors, although it was influenced by factors directly and indirectly related to the donation and transplantation process. PMID:25737727

  12. Expanding the donor pool: donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Shafii, Alexis E; Mason, David P

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is the definitive treatment of patients with end-stage lung disease. Availability of donor lungs remains the primary limitation and leads to substantial wait-list mortality. Efforts to expand the donor pool have included a resurgence of interest in the use of donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. Unique in its physiology, lung viability seems more tolerant to the variable durations of ischemia that occur in DCD donors. Initial experience with DCD LTx is promising and, in combination with ex vivo lung perfusion systems, seems a valuable opportunity to expand the lung donor pool.

  13. Protection des ions organiques contre les dommages induits a l'ADN par les electrons de basse energie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Ariane

    Il a ete demontre que les electrons de basse energie (EBE) peuvent induire des cassures simple brin (CSB) a l'ADN, via la formation d'anions transitoires qui decroissent par attachement dissociatif, ou dans d'autres etats electroniques dissociatifs menant a la fragmentation. Afin d'effectuer une etude complete des effets des electrons de basse energie sur la matiere biologique, il est necessaire de comprendre leur mecanismes d'interaction non seulement avec l'ADN, mais avec les constituants de son environnement. Les histones sont une composante importante de l'environnement moleculaire de l'ADN. Leur charge positive leur permet de s'associer aux groupements phosphate anionique de l'ADN. Le role principal de ces proteines basiques consiste a organiser l'ADN et l'empaqueter afin de former la chromatine. Les cations sont une autre composante importante de la cellule; ils jouent un role dans la stabilisation de la conformation B de l'ADN in vitro par leurs interactions avec les petits et grands sillons de l'ADN, ainsi qu'avec le groupement phosphate charge negativement. Avec les histones, ils participent egalement a la compaction de l'ADN pour former la chromatine. Cette etude a pour but de comprendre comment la presence d'ions organiques (sous forme de Tris et d'EDTA) a proximite de l'ADN modifie le rendement de cassures simple brin induit par les electrons de basse energie. Le Tris et l'EDTA ont-ete choisis comme objet d'etude, puisqu'en solution, ils forment le tampon standard pour solubiliser l'ADN dans les experiences in vitro (10mM Tris, 1mM EDTA). De plus, la molecule Tris possede un groupement amine alors que l'EDTA possede 4 groupements carboxyliques. Ensembles, ils peuvent se comporter comme un modele simple pour les acides amines. Le ratio molaire de 10 :1 de Tris par rapport a l'EDTA a pour but d'imiter le comportement des histones qui sont riches en arginine et lysine, acides amines possedant un groupement amine charge positivement additionnel. Des films d

  14. Mixed ion/electron-conductive protective soft nanomatter-based conformal surface modification of lithium-ion battery cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Hoon; Kim, Ju-Myung; Lee, Chang Kee; Lee, Sang-Young

    2014-10-01

    Understanding and control of interfacial phenomena between electrode material and liquid electrolytes are of major scientific importance for boosting development of high-performance lithium ion batteries with reliable electrochemical/safety attributes. Here, as an innovative surface engineering approach to address the interfacial issues, a new concept of mixed ion/electron-conductive soft nanomatter-based conformal surface modification of the cathode material is presented. The soft nanomatter is comprised of an electron conductive carbonaceous (C) substance embedded in an ion conductive polyimide (PI) nanothin compliant film. In addition to its structural uniqueness, the newly proposed surface modification benefits from a simple fabrication process. The PI/carbon soft nanomatter is directly synthesized on LiCoO2 surface via one-pot thermal treatment of polyamic acid (=PI precursor) and sucrose (=carbon source) mixture, where the LiCoO2 powders are chosen as a model system to explore the feasibility of this surface engineering strategy. The resulting PI/carbon coating layer facilitates electronic conduction and also suppresses unwanted side reactions arising from the cathode material-liquid electrolyte interface. These synergistic coating effects of the multifunctional PI/carbon soft nanomatter significantly improve high-voltage cell performance and also mitigate interfacial exothermic reaction between cathode material and liquid electrolyte.

  15. A hybrid digital-signature and zero-watermarking approach for authentication and protection of sensitive electronic documents.

    PubMed

    Tayan, Omar; Kabir, Muhammad N; Alginahi, Yasser M

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problems and threats associated with verification of integrity, proof of authenticity, tamper detection, and copyright protection for digital-text content. Such issues were largely addressed in the literature for images, audio, and video, with only a few papers addressing the challenge of sensitive plain-text media under known constraints. Specifically, with text as the predominant online communication medium, it becomes crucial that techniques are deployed to protect such information. A number of digital-signature, hashing, and watermarking schemes have been proposed that essentially bind source data or embed invisible data in a cover media to achieve its goal. While many such complex schemes with resource redundancies are sufficient in offline and less-sensitive texts, this paper proposes a hybrid approach based on zero-watermarking and digital-signature-like manipulations for sensitive text documents in order to achieve content originality and integrity verification without physically modifying the cover text in anyway. The proposed algorithm was implemented and shown to be robust against undetected content modifications and is capable of confirming proof of originality whilst detecting and locating deliberate/nondeliberate tampering. Additionally, enhancements in resource utilisation and reduced redundancies were achieved in comparison to traditional encryption-based approaches. Finally, analysis and remarks are made about the current state of the art, and future research issues are discussed under the given constraints.

  16. A Hybrid Digital-Signature and Zero-Watermarking Approach for Authentication and Protection of Sensitive Electronic Documents

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Muhammad N.; Alginahi, Yasser M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the problems and threats associated with verification of integrity, proof of authenticity, tamper detection, and copyright protection for digital-text content. Such issues were largely addressed in the literature for images, audio, and video, with only a few papers addressing the challenge of sensitive plain-text media under known constraints. Specifically, with text as the predominant online communication medium, it becomes crucial that techniques are deployed to protect such information. A number of digital-signature, hashing, and watermarking schemes have been proposed that essentially bind source data or embed invisible data in a cover media to achieve its goal. While many such complex schemes with resource redundancies are sufficient in offline and less-sensitive texts, this paper proposes a hybrid approach based on zero-watermarking and digital-signature-like manipulations for sensitive text documents in order to achieve content originality and integrity verification without physically modifying the cover text in anyway. The proposed algorithm was implemented and shown to be robust against undetected content modifications and is capable of confirming proof of originality whilst detecting and locating deliberate/nondeliberate tampering. Additionally, enhancements in resource utilisation and reduced redundancies were achieved in comparison to traditional encryption-based approaches. Finally, analysis and remarks are made about the current state of the art, and future research issues are discussed under the given constraints. PMID:25254247

  17. Knowledge and Attitude towards Organ Donation among Males in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Altraif, I H; Al Sebayel, M I; Nondo, H

    1996-01-01

    Organ transplant programs are increasing in Saudi Arabia with the major barrier to transplantation being a shortage of organs. The majority of Saudi Nationals are reluctant and unwilling to donate or consent for donation. This study was undertaken to determine the knowledge and attitude towards organ donation among males in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was distributed to 223 men attending the out-patient department of the National Guard Hospital, Riyadh. A total of 205 (92%) individuals answered the questionnaire. Of them, 187 (91%) were Saudis and 18 (9%) were non-Saudis. A total of 187 (88%) had heard about organ donation of whom 80 (43%) each, had acquired this knowledge through television or radio, 16 (8%) through newspaper and magazines, seven (4%) through friends and relatives, and four (2%) through health-care workers. Of the 205 study subjects, 88 (43%) claimed they understood the concept of brain-death, 96 (47%) did not, and 19 (10%) did not respond to this question. One hundred and thirty-eight (67%) were willing to donate, and 156 (76%) were willing to receive an organ. One hundred and fifteen (56%) believed that Islam permits people to donate organs, five (2%) thought Islam does not permit organ donation, 64 (31%) gave a "don't know" answer and 21 (11%) did not attempt to answer the question. In addition, 41 (20%) thought organ donation disfigures the body. In conclusion although 67% of the respondents in this survey were willing to donate, there was a significant lack of knowledge and misconception with regard to Islamic support to, and the mutilating effects of, organ donation. Public educational programs and other measures addressing these issues may help in increasing the rate of organ donation among Saudis.

  18. Risk Factors Associated with Increased Morbidity in Living Liver Donation

    PubMed Central

    Candido, Helry L.; da Fonseca, Eduardo A.; Feier, Flávia H.; Pugliese, Renata; Benavides, Marcel A.; Silva, Enis D.; Gordon, Karina; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Canet, Jaume; Chapchap, Paulo; Neto, Joao Seda

    2015-01-01

    Living donor liver donation (LDLD) is an alternative to cadaveric liver donation. We aimed at identifying risk factors and developing a score for prediction of postoperative complications (POCs) after LDLD in donors. This is a retrospective cohort study in 688 donors between June 1995 and February 2014 at Hospital Sírio-Libanês and A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, in São Paulo, Brazil. Primary outcome was POC graded ≥III according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Left lateral segment (LLS), left lobe (LL), and right lobe resections (RL) were conducted in 492 (71.4%), 109 (15.8%), and 87 (12.6%) donors, respectively. In total, 43 (6.2%) developed POCs, which were more common after RL than LLS and LL (14/87 (16.1%) versus 23/492 (4.5%) and 6/109 (5.5%), resp., p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that RL resection (OR: 2.81, 95% CI: 1.32 to 3.01; p = 0.008), smoking status (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.35 to 7.56; p = 0.012), and blood transfusion (OR: 3.15, 95% CI: 1.45 to 6.84; p = 0.004) were independently associated with POCs. RL resection, intraoperative blood transfusion, and smoking were associated with increased risk for POCs in donors. PMID:26788361

  19. Risk Factors Associated with Increased Morbidity in Living Liver Donation.

    PubMed

    Candido, Helry L; da Fonseca, Eduardo A; Feier, Flávia H; Pugliese, Renata; Benavides, Marcel A; Silva, Enis D; Gordon, Karina; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Canet, Jaume; Chapchap, Paulo; Neto, Joao Seda

    2015-01-01

    Living donor liver donation (LDLD) is an alternative to cadaveric liver donation. We aimed at identifying risk factors and developing a score for prediction of postoperative complications (POCs) after LDLD in donors. This is a retrospective cohort study in 688 donors between June 1995 and February 2014 at Hospital Sírio-Libanês and A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, in São Paulo, Brazil. Primary outcome was POC graded ≥III according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Left lateral segment (LLS), left lobe (LL), and right lobe resections (RL) were conducted in 492 (71.4%), 109 (15.8%), and 87 (12.6%) donors, respectively. In total, 43 (6.2%) developed POCs, which were more common after RL than LLS and LL (14/87 (16.1%) versus 23/492 (4.5%) and 6/109 (5.5%), resp., p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that RL resection (OR: 2.81, 95% CI: 1.32 to 3.01; p = 0.008), smoking status (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.35 to 7.56; p = 0.012), and blood transfusion (OR: 3.15, 95% CI: 1.45 to 6.84; p = 0.004) were independently associated with POCs. RL resection, intraoperative blood transfusion, and smoking were associated with increased risk for POCs in donors.

  20. Acknowledging tissue donation: Human cadaveric specimens in musculoskeletal research.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Andreas; Heinze, Anne-Kathrin; Hendrix, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Human cadaveric specimens are an important resource for research, particularly in biomechanical studies, but their use also raises ethical questions and cannot simply be taken for granted. It was asked how much information authors publishing musculoskeletal research actually give about such specimens and about how they were acquired. The aim was to formulate recommendations on how this reporting might be improved. Relevant articles published between 2009 and 2012 in four North American or European journals were scanned for information regarding the characteristics of the human specimens used, their institutional source and the ethical or legal context of their acquisition. While the majority of articles report biological characteristics of specimens (sex, age at death, preservation method), only 40% of articles refer to body donation, only 23% report the institution that provided specimens, and only 17% refer to some kind of formalized approval of their research. There were regional and journal-to-journal differences. No standard for reporting studies involving human specimens could be detected. It is suggested that such a standard be developed by researchers and editors. Information on the source of specimens and on the ethical or legal basis should be regularly reported to acknowledge this unique research resource and to preserve the good relationship between researchers and the communities, that provide the required specimens by body donation and upon which researchers depend.

  1. Complications related to blood donation: A multicenter study of the prevalence and influencing factors in voluntary blood donation camps in Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajat Kumar; Periyavan, Sundar; Dhanya, Rakesh; Parmar, Lalith G.; Sedai, Amit; Ankita, Kumari; Vaish, Arpit; Sharma, Ritesh; Gowda, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Complications associated with blood donation significantly lower odds of subsequent donations. The aim of the study is to assess the prevalence of complications related to blood donation, identify the influencing factors, and come up with suggestions for minimizing discomfort to donors and making outdoor voluntary blood donation camps safer. Materials and Methods: This study covered 181 blood donation camps organized by Sankalp India Foundation where 16 blood banks participated from 01-04-2011 to 01-08-2014 in Karnataka. Uniform protocols for donor selection, predonation preparation, counseling, postdonation care, and refreshments were used. The postdonation complications were recorded on a form immediately, after they were observed. Results: We observed 995 (3.2%) complications in 30,928 whole blood donations. Of these 884 (2.86%) mild, 77 (0.25%) moderate, and 5 (0.02%) severe complications were observed. Local symptoms (blood outside vessels, pain, and allergy) contributed 1.0%, and generalized symptoms (vasovagal reaction) contributed 2.2% to all the complications. Conclusion: We observed 322 complications for every 10,000 donations. Since 27 out of every 10000 experience moderate and severe complication, the readiness to manage complications is crucial. Women donors, young donors, and donors with a lower weight are at a significantly greater risk of experiencing complications, highlighting the need for specific guidelines for the management of higher risk donor groups. Complications varied significantly between various blood banks. Predonation hydration was effective in limiting complications with generalized symptoms. We recommend a robust donor hemovigilance program for voluntary blood donation for monitoring complications and enable assessment of effectiveness and implementation of appropriate interventions. PMID:27011671

  2. 42 CFR 410.55 - Services related to kidney donations: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services related to kidney donations: Conditions... Services § 410.55 Services related to kidney donations: Conditions. Medicare Part B pays for medical and other health services covered under this subpart that are furnished in connection with a kidney...

  3. 42 CFR 410.55 - Services related to kidney donations: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services related to kidney donations: Conditions... Services § 410.55 Services related to kidney donations: Conditions. Medicare Part B pays for medical and other health services covered under this subpart that are furnished in connection with a kidney...

  4. 42 CFR 410.55 - Services related to kidney donations: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services related to kidney donations: Conditions... Services § 410.55 Services related to kidney donations: Conditions. Medicare Part B pays for medical and other health services covered under this subpart that are furnished in connection with a kidney...

  5. 42 CFR 410.55 - Services related to kidney donations: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services related to kidney donations: Conditions... Services § 410.55 Services related to kidney donations: Conditions. Medicare Part B pays for medical and other health services covered under this subpart that are furnished in connection with a kidney...

  6. 42 CFR 410.55 - Services related to kidney donations: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services related to kidney donations: Conditions... Services § 410.55 Services related to kidney donations: Conditions. Medicare Part B pays for medical and other health services covered under this subpart that are furnished in connection with a kidney...

  7. 7 CFR 250.13 - Distribution and control of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Distribution and control of donated foods. 250.13 Section 250.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION... Operating Provisions § 250.13 Distribution and control of donated foods. (a) Availability and use of...

  8. 7 CFR 250.13 - Distribution and control of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Distribution and control of donated foods. 250.13 Section 250.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION... Operating Provisions § 250.13 Distribution and control of donated foods. (a) Availability and use of...

  9. 78 FR 65688 - Recovery Policy, RP9525.2, Donated Resources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Recovery Policy, RP9525.2, Donated Resources AGENCY: Federal... accepting comments on Recovery Policy RP9525.2, Donated Resources. DATES: Comments must be received by... Recovery Directorate policies are consistent with current laws and regulations. The proposed...

  10. Attitude Toward Death, Fear of Being Declared Dead Too Soon, and Donation of Organs After Death.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessing, Dick J.; Elffers, Henk

    1987-01-01

    Describes a study of willingness to donate organs for transplantation after death based on Weyant's cost-benefit model for altruistic behavior. Two death anxieties (the attitude toward death and the fear of being declared dead too soon) were introduced to help explain the discrepancy between attitudes and behavior in the matter of organ donation.…

  11. Abandoning the dead donor rule? A national survey of public views on death and organ donation

    PubMed Central

    Nair-Collins, Michael; Green, Sydney R; Sutin, Angelina R

    2015-01-01

    Brain dead organ donors are the principal source of transplantable organs. However, it is controversial whether brain death is the same as biological death. Therefore, it is unclear whether organ removal in brain death is consistent with the ‘dead donor rule’, which states that organ removal must not cause death. Our aim was to evaluate the public's opinion about organ removal if explicitly described as causing the death of a donor in irreversible apneic coma. We conducted a cross-sectional internet survey of the American public (n=1096). Questionnaire domains included opinions about a hypothetical scenario of organ removal described as causing the death of a patient in irreversible coma, and items measuring willingness to donate organs after death. Some 71% of the sample agreed that it should be legal for patients to donate organs in the scenario described and 67% agreed that they would want to donate organs in a similar situation. Of the 85% of the sample who agreed that they were willing to donate organs after death, 76% agreed that they would donate in the scenario of irreversible coma with organ removal causing death. There appears to be public support for organ donation in a scenario explicitly described as violating the dead donor rule. Further, most but not all people who would agree to donate when organ removal is described as occurring after death would also agree to donate when organ removal is described as causing death in irreversible coma. PMID:25260779

  12. Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with abnormal neural mechanism during charitable donation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dongtao; Wang, Kangcheng; Shen, Yimo; Du, Xue; Li, Wenfu; Dupuis-Roy, Nicolas; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin

    2013-10-30

    Previous studies suggested that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) might be associated with dysfunctional reward processing. At present, little is known about the neural mechanisms of reward-related processing during a charitable donation task in trauma survivors who do not go on to develop PTSD. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural basis of charitable donation in non-PTSD survivors of the Sichuan earthquake. Results showed that activations in the striatum of trauma survivors were reduced in both the low donation (donated a small amount to the Red Cross) and the high donation conditions (donated a large amount to the Red Cross) compared with the healthy controls. Furthermore, the trauma survivors also exhibited less activity in the insula than the healthy controls in the high donation condition. These findings suggest that abnormal reward-related activations might be associated with dysfunctions in the reward pathway of trauma survivors. Also, we discuss the possibility that traumatic experiences attenuate the reactivity of reward-related brain areas to positive emotions (as induced by advantageous donations).

  13. Factors influencing the family consent rate for organ donation in the UK.

    PubMed

    Hulme, W; Allen, J; Manara, A R; Murphy, P G; Gardiner, D; Poppitt, E

    2016-09-01

    The refusal rate for organ donation in the UK is 42%, among the highest in Europe. We extracted data on every family approach for donation in UK ICUs or Emergency Departments between 1st April 2012 and 30th September 2013, and performed multiple logistic regression to identify modifiable factors associated with consent. Complete data were available for 4703 of 4899 approaches during the study period. Consent for donation after brain death was 68.9%, and for donation after circulatory death 56.5% (p < 0.0001). Patient ethnicity, knowledge of a patient's wishes and involvement of a specialist nurse in organ donation in the approach were strongly associated with consent (p < 0.0001). The impact of the specialist nurse was stronger for donation after circulatory death than for donation after brain death, even after accounting for the impact of prior knowledge of patients' wishes. Involvement of the specialist nurse in the approach, encouraging family discussions about donation wishes and promotion of the organ donor register are key strategies to increase UK consent rates, and are supported by this study.

  14. Increasing Donations to Supermarket Food-Bank Bins Using Proximal Prompts

    PubMed Central

    Farrimond, Samantha J; Leland, Louis S

    2006-01-01

    There has been little research into interventions to increase participation in donating items to food-bank bins. In New Zealand, there has been an increased demand from food banks (Stewart, 2002). This study demonstrated that point-of-sale prompts can be an effective method of increasing donations to a supermarket food-bank bin. PMID:16813047

  15. 3 CFR 8642 - Proclamation 8642 of March 31, 2011. National Donate Life Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... donors. As a result, people lose their lives each day while waiting. When each donation can touch dozens... registry. Individuals can register online or through the registration or renewal process for a driver’s license or identification card. When considering organ donation, Americans should consult their...

  16. 7 CFR 250.14 - Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (iv) All initial data regarding the cost of the current warehousing and distribution system and the... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods... General Operating Provisions § 250.14 Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods....

  17. 7 CFR 250.14 - Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (iv) All initial data regarding the cost of the current warehousing and distribution system and the... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods... General Operating Provisions § 250.14 Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods....

  18. 7 CFR 250.14 - Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... (iv) All initial data regarding the cost of the current warehousing and distribution system and the... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods... General Operating Provisions § 250.14 Warehousing, distribution and storage of donated foods....

  19. Knowledge and attitudes about deceased donor organ donation in Filipinos: a qualitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Albright, C L; Glanz, K; Wong, L; Dela Cruz, M R; Abe, L; Sagayadoro, T L

    2005-12-01

    Fewer ethnic minorities, especially Asian-Americans, become organ donors. There are cultural, religious, and personal barriers to becoming a designated organ donor. Factors that promote or inhibit organ donation in Asians, especially Filipinos, are not well understood. We conducted a series of focus groups to identify barriers and facilitators to organ donation (deceased donor) among Filipinos. Six focus groups were conducted with church members, adolescents, nurses, physicians, organ recipients, and organ donor families. The mean age of adult participants (n = 57) was 52.3 +/- 15 years, 83% were Catholic, and 72% were female. A qualitative theme analysis methodology identified dominant themes related to organ donation in the participants. The major themes were: awareness of organ donation (38%), family beliefs (25%), religion/spirituality (10%), attitude/emotions (10%), personal experience with organ donation (8%), health profession (6%), and cultural issues (3%). Seventy-five percent of the comments about awareness reflected a positive awareness of cultural issues regarding organ donation, and the rest reflected a lack of awareness or misconceptions. Almost every theme was mentioned in all six focus groups. Understanding a specific ethnic group's knowledge, attitudes, and cultural beliefs regarding organ donation is important in the development of educational campaigns to encourage organ donation in ethnic minority populations.

  20. Living kidney donors--a prospective study of quality of life before and after kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Márcia Fátima Faraldo Martinez; Andrade, Luis Gustavo M; Carvalho, Maria Fernanda C

    2013-01-01

    Although the safety of living kidney donation has been well established, prospective studies examining the physical and psychosocial aspects of the donor's quality of life are still scarce. Thus, the purpose of this prospective work was to assess the quality of life of 50 consecutive donors before and after kidney transplantation. All donors were asked to respond to both a donor questionnaire and the short-form 36-item health survey (SF-36). Interviews were individually conducted before, three months after, and over one yr after transplantation. Donation was considered a positive experience by all patients and had no impact on any physical or psychosocial aspect of the donor's life. Improved self-esteem and better quality of life after donation were reported in 52% of the cases. All donors would donate again and encouraged donation. SF-36 data indicated improvement in post-donation mental and physical scores among living donors closely related to recipient. Overall, most donors had a positive experience, felt no changes in quality of life, experienced enhanced self-esteem, would donate again, and recommended donation.