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Sample records for electron impact collision

  1. Electron-impact excitation of Sc II: collision strengths and effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.

    2012-08-01

    Accurate fine-structure atomic data for the Fe-peak elements are essential for interpreting astronomical spectra. There is a severe paucity of data available for Sc II, highlighted by the fact that no collision strengths are readily available for this ion. We present electron-impact excitation collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for Sc II. The collision strengths were calculated for all 3916 transitions amongst 89 jj levels (arising from the 3d4s, 3d2, 4s2, 3d4p, 4s4p, 3d5s, 3d4d, 3d5p, 4p2 and 3d4f configurations), resulting in a 944 coupled channel problem. The R-matrix package RMATRXII was utilized, along with the transformation code FINE and the external region code PSTGF, to calculate the collision strengths for a range of incident electron energies in the 0 to 8.3 Rydberg region. Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths were then produced for 27 temperatures lying within the astrophysically significant range of 30 to 105 K. The collision strengths and effective collision strengths were produced for two different target models. The purpose was to systematically examine the effect of including open 3p correlation terms into the configuration interaction expansion for the wavefunction. The first model consisted of all 36 CI terms that could be generated with the 3p core closed. The second model incorporated an additional six configurations which allowed for single-electron excitations from within the 3p core. Comparisons are made between the two models and the results of Bautista et al., obtained by private communication. It is concluded that the first model produced the most reliable set of collision and effective collision strengths for use in astrophysical and plasma applications.

  2. Electron impact excitation collision strengths for extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe VII

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O. E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu

    2014-06-10

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p {sup 6}3d {sup 2} and excited 3p {sup 5}3d {sup 3}, 3p {sup 6}3d4l, 3p {sup 6}3d5s, and 3p {sup 6}3d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft and Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  3. Electron Impact Excitation Collision Strengths for Extreme Ultraviolet Lines of Fe VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2014-06-01

    Extensive calculations have been performed for electron impact excitation collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the Fe VII extreme ultraviolet lines of astrophysical importance. The collision strengths for fine-structure transitions are calculated in the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach. The target wavefunctions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The close-coupling expansion includes 189 fine-structure levels of Fe VII belonging to terms of the ground 3p 63d 2 and excited 3p 53d 3, 3p 63d4l, 3p 63d5s, and 3p 63d5p configurations. The effective collision strengths are determined from the electron excitation collision strengths by integration over a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. The effective collision strengths are provided for 17766 fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures from 104 to 107 K. Our results normally agree with the previous R-matrix frame-transformation calculations by Witthoeft & Badnell. However, there are important differences for some transitions with the previous calculations. The corrections to the previous results are mainly due to more extensive expansions for the Fe VII target states.

  4. TRANSITION PROBABILITIES AND COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cl III

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2012-10-15

    We report transition probabilities and effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of the astrophysically important Cl III ion. The collision strengths are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals is employed for an accurate description of the target wave functions. The 68 fine-structure levels belonging to the 32 LS states of 3s {sup 2}3p{sup 3}, 3s3p{sup 4}, 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}3d, 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}4s, and 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}4p configurations are included in the close-coupling expansion. The effective collision strengths are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities, and those are tabulated for all 2278 possible fine-structure transitions at electron temperatures in the range from 5000 to 1,000,000 K. Our results are compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Overall, we reached a good agreement with the 23 state calculation of Ramsbottom et al., but some discrepancies are seen for some transitions.

  5. Electron impact collision strengths in Si IX, Si X, and Si XI

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Guiyun; Zhao Gang . E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn; Zeng Jiaolong

    2007-05-15

    Electron impact collision strengths among 560 levels of Si IX, 320 levels of Si X, and 350 levels of Si XI have been calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code of Gu [M.F. Gu, Astrophys. J. 582 (2003) 1241]. Collision strengths {omega} at 10 scattered electron energies, namely 10, 50, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 eV, are reported. Assuming a Maxwellian energy distribution, effective collision strengths Y are obtained on a finer electron temperature grid of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 MK, which covers the typical temperature range of astrophysical hot plasmas. Additionally, radiative rates A and weighted oscillator strengths gf are given for the more probable transitions among these levels. Comparisons of our results with available predictions reported in earlier literature are made and the accuracy of the data is assessed. Most transitions exhibit a good agreement, but large differences in gf appear for a few cases, which are due to the different configuration interactions included in different theoretical calculations. For excitations among levels of the ground and lower excited configurations, large discrepancies of Y may have resulted from the consideration of resonance effects in earlier works.

  6. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Farley

    2010-08-19

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N≥3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N=0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  7. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths and theoretical line intensities for transitions in S III

    SciTech Connect

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log T{sub e} (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2}, 3s3p {sup 3}, 3s {sup 2}3p3d, 3s {sup 2}3p4s, 3s {sup 2}3p4p, and 3s {sup 2}3p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  8. Electron-impact Excitation Collision Strengths and Theoretical Line Intensities for Transitions in S III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Hudson, C. E.; Keenan, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present Maxwellian-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of S III over a wide range of electron temperatures of astrophysical importance, log Te (K) = 3.0-6.0. The calculation incorporates 53 fine-structure levels arising from the six configurations—3s 23p 2, 3s3p 3, 3s 23p3d, 3s 23p4s, 3s 23p4p, and 3s 23p4d—giving rise to 1378 individual lines and is undertaken using the recently developed RMATRX II plus FINE95 suite of codes. A detailed comparison is made with a previous R-matrix calculation and significant differences are found for some transitions. The atomic data are subsequently incorporated into the modeling code CLOUDY to generate line intensities for a range of plasma parameters, with emphasis on allowed ultraviolet extreme-ultraviolet emission lines detected from the Io plasma torus. Electron density-sensitive line ratios are calculated with the present atomic data and compared with those from CHIANTI v7.1, as well as with Io plasma torus spectra obtained by Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer. The present line intensities are found to agree well with the observational results and provide a noticeable improvement on the values predicted by CHIANTI.

  9. Electron-impact excitation of Ni II. Collision strengths and effective collision strengths for low-lying fine-structure forbidden transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2010-04-01

    Context. Considerable demand exists for electron excitation data for ion{Ni}{ii}, since lines from this abundant ion are observed in a wide variety of laboratory and astrophysical spectra. The accurate theoretical determination of these data can present a significant challenge however, due to complications arising from the presence of an open 3d-shell in the description of the target ion. Aims: In this work we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of ion{Ni}{ii}. Attention is concentrated on the 153 forbidden fine-structure transitions between the energetically lowest 18 levels of ion{Ni}{ii}. Effective collision strengths have been evaluated at 27 individual electron temperatures ranging from 30-100 000 K. To our knowledge this is the most extensive theoretical collisional study carried out on this ion to date. Methods: The parallel R-matrix package RMATRX II has recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects. This suite of codes has been utilised in the present work in conjunction with PSTGF to evaluate collision strengths and effective collision strengths for all of the low-lying forbidden fine-structure transitions. The following basis configurations were included in the target model - 3d9, 3d84s, 3d84p, 3d74s2 and 3d74s4p - giving rise to a sophisticated 295 jj-level, 1930 coupled channel scattering problem. Results: Comprehensive comparisons are made between the present collisional data and those obtained from earlier theoretical evaluations. While the effective collision strengths agree well for some transitions, significant discrepancies exist for others. Table 2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/513/A55

  10. Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in Ar II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Henry, Ronald J. W.

    1996-01-01

    We have calculated collision strengths for electron impact excitation of inelastic transitions in Ar II using the R-matrix method in two independent nine- and 19-state close-coupling approximations. In the nine-state calculation the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 5)2p(sup 0), 3S(sup 3)p(sup 6)S-2, 3p(sup 4)(P-3)4s(sup 2)P, 3p(sup 4)(P-3)3d(sup 2)P, 3p(sup 4)(D-1)4s(sup 2)D, 3p(sup 4)(P-3)3d(sup 2)D, 3p(sup 4)(S-1)4s(sup 2)S, 3p(sup 4)(D-1)3d(sup 2)S and 3p(sup 4)(D-1)4d(sup 2)S states are included, while in the 19-state calculation these states plus an additional ten states 3p(sup 4)(P-3)3d(sup 2)F, 3p(sup 4)(P-3)4p(sup 2)D(sup 0), 2p(sup 0), 2S(sup 0), 3p(sup 4)(D-1)4p(sup 2)P(sup 0), 2D(sup O), 2F(sup 0), 3p(sup 4)(D-1)3d(sup 2)D, p-2 and 3p(sup 4)(S-1)4p(sup 2)P(sup 0) are considered. These target states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wavefunctions which yield excitation energies and oscillator strengths that are generally in good agreement with the available most accurate calculations and the experimental values. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are included in the calculation. The effective collision strengths are obtained assuming a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies which are tabulated over the temperature range (0.5-20) x 10(exp 4) K.

  11. Electron-impact Excitation of Ni II: Effective Collision Strengths for Optically Allowed Fine-structure Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of Ni II. Attention is expressly concentrated on the optically allowed fine-structure transitions between the 3d 9, 3d 84s, and 3d 74s 2 even parity levels and the 3d 84p and 3d 74s 4p odd parity levels. The parallel RMATRXII R-matrix package has been recently extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic fine-structure effects. This suite of codes has been utilized in conjunction with the parallel PSTGF and PSTGICF programs in order to compute converged total collision strengths for the allowed transitions with which this study is concerned. All 113 LS terms identified with the 3d 9, 3d 84s, 3d 74s 2, 3d 84p, and 3d 74s 4p basis configurations were included in the target wavefunction representation, giving rise to a sophisticated 295 jj-level, 1930 coupled channel scattering complex. Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths have been computed at 30 individual electron temperatures ranging from 30 to 1,000,000 K. This range comfortably encompasses all temperatures significant to astrophysical and plasma applications. The convergence of the collision strengths is exhaustively investigated and comparisons are made with previous theoretical works, where significant discrepancies exist for the majority of transitions. We conclude that intrinsic in achieving converged collision strengths and thus effective collision strengths for the allowed transitions is the combined inclusion of contributions from the (N + 1) partial waves extending to a total angular momentum value of L = 50 and further contributions from even higher partial waves accomplished by employing a "top-up" procedure.

  12. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    ionization of fixed in space deuterium molecules / T. Weber ... [et al.]. Coherence and intramolecular scattering in molecular photoionization / U. Becker. Experimental observation of interatomic coulombic decay in neon dimers / T. Jahnke ... [et al.]. Ionization by short UV laser pulses: secondary ATI peaks of the electron spectrum / V. D. Rodríguez, E. Cormier and R. Gayet. Molecular frame photoemission in photoionization of H[symbol] and D[symbol]: the role of dissociation on autoionization of the Q[symbol] and Q[symbol] doubly excited states / D. Dowek, M. Lebech and J. C. Houver. 3p photoemission of 3d transition metals - atoms, molecules and clusters / M. Martins -- Collisions involving electrons. Spin-resolved collisions of electrons with atoms and molecules / G. F. Hanne. Calculation of ionization and excitation processes using the convergent close-coupling method / D. V. Fursa, I. Bray and A. T. Stelbovics. The B-spline R-matrix method for electron and photon collisions with atoms and ions / O. Zatsarinny and K. Bartschat. Absolute angle-differential cross sections for excitation of neon atoms electrons of energy 16.6-19.2 eV / M. Allan ... [et al.]. Studies of QED and nuclear size effects with highly charged ions in an EBIT / J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia ... [et al.]. Recombination of astrophysically relevant ions: Be-like C, N, and O / M. Fogle ... [et al.]. Dissociation and excitation of molecules and molecular ions by electron impact / A. E. Orel and J. Royal state-selective X-ray study of the radiative recombination of U[symbol] ions with cooling electrons / M. Pajek ... [et al.]. Electron collisions with trapped, metastable helium / L. J. Uhlmann ... [et al.]. Non-dipole effects in electron and photon impact ionization / N. L. S. Martin. Electron driven processes in atmospheric behaviour / L. Campbell, M. J. Brunger and P. J. 0. Teubner. Calculation of excitation and ionization for electron-molecule collisions at intermediate energies / J. D. Gorfinkiel

  13. Electron Collisions with Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with hydrogen fluoride. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature, recommended values of the cross sections are determined, as far as possible.

  14. Effective Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated electron collisional excitation strengths for all electric dipole forbidden, semi-forbidden, and allowed transitions among the lowest 17 LS states 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 2) P-3, D-1, S-1, 3s3p(exp 3)S-5(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), S-3(exp 0), D-1(exp 0), 3S(exp 2)3p3d D-1(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), and 3S(exp 2)3p4S P-3(exp 0), P-l(exp 0) of S III using the R-matrix method. These S m states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that yield excited state energies in close agreement with recent laboratory measurements. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are explicitly included in the scattering calculation. The effective collision strengths are determined assuming Maxwellian distribution of electron energies. These are listed over a wide temperature range ([0.5-10] x 10(exp 4) K) and compared, where possible, with other available calculations. Subject headings: atomic data - atomic processes

  15. State-selective electron capture in {sup 3}He{sup 2+} + He collisions at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, M.; Otranto, S.; Focke, P.

    2011-01-15

    In this work we have measured single-electron capture in collisions of {sup 3}He{sup 2+} projectiles incident on a helium target for energies of 13.3-100 keV/amu with the cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy setup implemented at the Centro Atomico Bariloche. State-selective single-capture cross sections were measured as a function of the impact energy. They were found to agree with previous existing data from the Frankfurt group, starting at the impact energy of 60 keV/amu; as well as with recent data, at 7.5 keV/amu, from the Lanzhou group. The present experimental results are also contrasted to the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method with dynamical screening.

  16. Destabilization of a cylindrically confined electron cloud by impact ionization of background neutrals: 2D3v PIC simulation with Monte-Carlo-collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we have investigated, through simulation, the process of destabilization of a cylindrically confined electron cloud due to the presence of a single species of neutral atoms, Ar in the background of the trap at a pressure relevant to experiments. The destabilization occurs because of a gradual accumulation of Ar+ in the cloud by the electron-impact ionization of the background neutrals. The trapped ions gradually collectively form a sizeable ion cloud which engages in a rotational two-stream instability (the ion resonance instability) with the electron cloud. The instability excites a growing fundamental diocotron mode on both components of the mixed non-neutral cloud. With the help of a set of numerical diagnostics, we have investigated the nonlinear evolution of the excited fundamental mode under the combined influence of two ongoing processes viz, (i) the changing electron and ion populations caused by electron impact ionization of the background Ar, and also by the radial loss of both charged species to the grounded trap wall at later stages and (ii) the elastic scattering of electrons and ions that make non-ionizing collisions with the background neutrals. The 2D collisionless dynamics of the instability has been simulated using a 2D Particle-in-Cell code operating on a Cartesian grid laid out on the cylindrical trap's cross-section, and the 3D ionizing and non-ionizing collisions between charged particles and background neutrals have been simulated using the technique of Monte-Carlo-Collisions.

  17. Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

  18. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  19. Electron impact excitation of Mg VIII . Collision strengths, transition probabilities and theoretical EUV and soft X-ray line intensities for Mg VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieve, M. F. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Keenan, F. P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Mg viii emission lines are observed in a range of astronomical objects such as the Sun, other cool stars and in the coronal line region of Seyfert galaxies. Under coronal conditions Mg viii emits strongly in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray spectral regions which makes it an ideal ion for plasma diagnostics. Aims: Two theoretical atomic models, consisting of 125 fine structure levels, are developed for the Mg viii ion. The 125 levels arise from the 2s22p, 2s2p2, 2p3, 2s23s, 2s23p, 2s23d, 2s2p3s, 2s2p3p, 2s2p3d, 2p23s, 2p23p and 2p23d configurations. Electron impact excitation collision strengths and radiative transition probabilities are calculated for both Mg viii models, compared with existing data, and the best model selected to generate a set of theoretical emission line intensities. The EUV lines, covering 312-790 Å, are compared with existing solar spectra (SERTS-89 and SUMER), while the soft X-ray transitions (69-97 Å) are examined for potential density diagnostic line ratios and also compared with the limited available solar and stellar observational data. Methods: The R-matrix codes Breit-Pauli RMATRXI and RMATRXII are utilised, along with the PSTGF code, to calculate the collision strengths for two Mg viii models. Collision strengths are averaged over a Maxwellian distribution to produce the corresponding effective collision strengths for use in astrophysical applications. Transition probabilities are also calculated using the CIV3 atomic structure code. The best data are then incorporated into the modelling code CLOUDY and line intensities generated for a range of electron temperatures and densities appropriate to solar and stellar coronal plasmas. Results: The present effective collision strengths are compared with two previous calculations. Good levels of agreement are found with the most recent, but there are large differences with the other for forbidden transitions. The resulting line intensities compare favourably with the

  20. Applications of cross sections for electron-molecule collision processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The role of electron-molecule collision cross sections is discussed for the study of the ionospheric and auroral processes in planetary atmospheres and of discharge-pumped lasers. These two areas emphasize the importance of further theoretical and experimental studies concerning electron-impact processes. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs. (WRF)

  1. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  2. Molecular Dissociation Induced by Electron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Andreas

    2009-05-01

    Free electrons can efficiently break molecules or molecular ions in low-energy collisions by the processes of dissociative recombination or attachment. These processes make slow electrons efficient chemical agents in many environments. For dissociative recombination, in particular, studies of the underlying reaction paths and mechanisms have become possible on a uniquely elementary level in recent years both for theory and experiment. On the experimental side, collisions can be prepared at resolved collision energies down to the meV (10 Kelvin) level, increasingly gaining control also over the initial molecular quantum level, and individual events are detected and kinematically analyzed by fast-beam coincidence fragment imaging. Experiments are reported from the ion cooler ring TSR in Heidelberg. Stored beams of molecular ions cooled in their external and internal degrees of freedom are collinearly merged with intense and cold electron beams from cryogenic GaAs photocathodes, recently shown to yield fast cooling of the center-of-mass motion also for heavy and correspondingly slow molecular ion beams. To reconstruct the molecular fragmentation events multiparticle imaging can now be used systematically with collision energies set a wide range, especially aiming at specific electron capture resonances. Thus, for CF^+ it is found that the electronic state of the C fragment (^3P or ^1D) switches resonantly when the collision energy is changed by only a small fraction. As a new powerful tool, an energy-sensitive multi-strip surface-barrier detector (EMU) has been set up to measure with near-unity efficiency the masses of all fragments together with their hit positions in high-multiplicity events. Among many uses, this device allows internal molecular excitations to be derived for individual chemical channels in polyatomic fragmentation. New results will be presented in particular on the breakup of the hydronium ion (D3O^+).

  3. Quantum multiscattering interferences in collision-induced coherent electron emission from diatomic molecules by swift ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueny, H.; Hansen, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    In the intramolecular scattering process, the interference between the rescattered electron waves emanating from each atomic center gives rise to additional oscillations superimposed on the Young-type oscillatory structure in the observed electron intensity. Here we explore numerically this behavior for coherent electron emission from the dimer Rb2 + by fast-moving highly charged ions, which is achieved by solving the two-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Well-defined modulations with higher frequency are observed in the momentum distribution of the ejected electron, which are well reproduced by additional quantitative calculations based on the third-order Born series. This demonstrates without ambiguity the dynamic interference induced by multiple scattering paths of the electron prior to emission. Furthermore, the dependence of the phenomenon on the emission direction of the electron and the orientation of the molecular axis also is investigated. The phenomenon is not specific to Rb2 + as investigated in the present study, but is broadly applicable to other systems with sufficiently large internuclear distances, thus opening new prospects for the investigation of electron emission process from large systems.

  4. Dynamics of electronically inelastic collisions from 3D Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; de Pujo, P.; Sublemontier, O.; Visticot, J.; Berlande, J.; Cuvellier, J.; Gustavsson, T.; Mestdagh, J.; Meynadier, P. ); Lee, Y.T. )

    1991-11-25

    Flux-velocity contour maps were obtained for the inelastic collision process Ba({sup 1}{ital P}{sub 1})+O{sub 2}N{sub 2}{r arrow}Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2})+O{sub 2}N{sub 2} from Doppler scans of scattered Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2}) taken over a range of probe laser directions in a crossed-beam experiment. Collision with O{sub 2} resulted in sharply forward scattered Ba({sup 3}{ital P}{sub 2}), with efficient conversion of inital electronic energy into O{sub 2} internal energy and little momentum transfer. Collision with N{sub 2} was dominated by wide-angle scattering with most of the available electronic energy appearing in product translation. The results suggest the importance of large-impact-parameter collisions and a near-resonant energy transfer in the case of O{sub 2}, while for N{sub 2} close collisions dominate despite the presence of an analogous near-resonant channel. The results represent the first direct experimental demonstration of a near-resonant quenching process.

  5. Progress in Computational Electron-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, Tn

    1997-10-01

    The past few years have witnessed tremendous progress in the development of sophisticated ab initio methods for treating collisions of slow electrons with isolated small molecules. Researchers in this area have benefited greatly from advances in computer technology; indeed, the advent of parallel computers has made it possible to carry out calculations at a level of sophistication inconceivable a decade ago. But bigger and faster computers are only part of the picture. Even with today's computers, the practical need to study electron collisions with the kinds of complex molecules and fragments encountered in real-world plasma processing environments is taxing present methods beyond their current capabilities. Since extrapolation of existing methods to handle increasingly larger targets will ultimately fail as it would require computational resources beyond any imagined, continued progress must also be linked to new theoretical developments. Some of the techniques recently introduced to address these problems will be discussed and illustrated with examples of electron-molecule collision calculations we have carried out on some fairly complex target gases encountered in processing plasmas. Electron-molecule scattering continues to pose many formidable theoretical and computational challenges. I will touch on some of the outstanding open questions.

  6. Electron-atom collisions in a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Philip H. G.; Flannery, M. R.

    1991-05-01

    Cross sections tor the 1S-2S and 1S-2P 0 transitions in laser assisted e-H(1S) collisions are calculated in both the multichannel eikonal and the Born-wave treatments as a function of impact energy and laser field intensity and phase. The laser considered is a monotonic, plane polarized CO 2 laser (photon energy = 0.117 eV), with the polarization direction parallel to the initial projectile velocity. Floquet dressing of the hydrogen atom in the soft-photon weak-field limit reveals a concise description of the laser assisted electron-atom collision. This model also links the microscopic detail of the individual collisions with the macroscopic considerations of experimental analysis.

  7. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  8. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with the acetylene (HCCH) molecule. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2016.

  9. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  10. Collision rates for electron excitation of Mg V lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.; Sossah, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: Transition probabilities and electron impact excitation collision strengths and rates for astrophysically important lines in Mg V are reported. The 86 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p4, 2s2p5, 2p6, 2s22p33s, 2s22p33p and 2s22p33d configurations are included in our calculations. The effective collision strengths are presented as a function of electron temperature for solar and other astrophysical applications. Methods: The collision strengths have been calculated using the B-splineBreit-Pauli R-matrixmethod for all fine-structure transitions among the 86 levels. The one-body mass, Darwin and spin-orbit relativistic effects are included in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian in the scattering calculations. The one-body and two-body relativistic operators are included in the multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations of transition probabilities. Several sets of non-orthogonal spectroscopic and correlation radial orbitals are used to obtain accurate description of Mg V 86 levels and to represent the scattering functions. Results: The calculated excitation energies are in very good agreement with experiment and represents an improvement over the previous calculations. The present collision strengths show good agreement with the previously available R-matrix and distorted-wave calculations. The oscillator strengths for E1 transitions normally compare very well with previous calculations. The thermally averaged collision strengths are obtained by integrating total resonant and non-resonant collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies and these are presented over the temperature range log 10Te = 3.2-6.0 K. Tables 1-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/574/A87

  11. PREFACE: XXV International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Uwe; Moshammer, Robert; Mokler, Paul; Ullrich, Joachim

    2007-07-01

    The XXVth ICPEAC in Freiburg marked a notable anniversary in collision physics: half a century ago the first conference in the series of International Conferences on the Physics of Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) was held in New York (1958). Since then, the development of electronic and atomic collision physics has seen tremendous progress. Starting during a time, when this field was regarded as somehow out-of-date, certainly not being in the main stream compared to particle and high-energy physics, it has expanded in a rather exceptional and unforeseen way. Over the years the original scope on electronic, atomic and heavy-ion collision physics was extended substantially to include upcoming expanding fields like synchrotron-radiation and strong-field laser-based atomic and molecular physics giving rise to a change of name to 'Photonic', Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) being used for the first time for the ICPEAC in Santa Fee in 2001. Nowadays, the ICPEAC has opened its agenda even more widely to other fields of atomic and molecular physics, such as interactions with clusters, bio-molecules and surfaces, to cold collisions, coherent control, femto- and attosecond physics and, with the Freiburg conference, to the application of free-electron lasers in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime, a field of potentially huge future impact in essentially all areas of science. In this larger context the XXVth ICPEAC in Freiburg with more than 800 participants set new standards. Representatives from all fields of Atomic, Molecular and Photon-based science came together and had very fruitful, inter-disciplinary discussions. This new forum of collision-based AMP physics will serve as a showcase example of future conferences, bridging not only the gap between different fields of collision physics but also, equally important, between different continents and cultures. The next ICPEAC is going to take place in Kalamazoo in North America, the one after that

  12. Electron collisions with Fe-peak elements: Fe V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Norrington, P. H.; Hibbert, A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.; Burke, V. M.; Noble, C. J.

    2006-05-01

    Lines of Fe^+ -- Fe^6+ ions appear in the UV spectra of O-type stars. Accurate assessments of the relevant abundances of heavy elements and their ions can be obtained from the comparison of the observed spectra with synthetic NLTE spectra, if the atomic data for electron and photon interaction processes are known with sufficient accuracy. Electron-impact excitation collision strengths for the Fe-peak element Fe^4+ are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the R-matrix suite of codes PRMAT. Eighty LS - coupled states arising from the 3d^4, 3d^34s and 3d^34p configurations of Fe^4+ are retained in our calculations. Accurate multi-configuration interaction target and scattering wavefunctions are used with the aid of 3p^2 ->3d^2 two-electron promotions and a n=4 basis set. Effective collision strengths for optically forbidden transitions in the 3d^4 manifold, which are extremely important in the analysis of lines in the Fe^4+ spectra, are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution for the electron temperature. The present results when compared to previous investigations for temperatures below 100,000 Kelvin show an enhancement of a factor of two. Further details will be presented at the meeting.

  13. Electron collisions with Fe-peak elements: Fe IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Hibbert, A.; Scott, M. P.; Noble, C. J.; Burke, V. M.; Burke, P. G.

    2006-02-01

    Electron-impact excitation collision strengths of the Fe-peak element Fe IV are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the parallel R-matrix program PRMAT. One hundred and eight LS - coupled states arising from the 3d^5, 3d^44s and 3d^44p configurations of Fe IV, are retained in the present calculations. Accurate multi-configuration target wavefunctions are employed with the aid of 3p2 → 3d2 electron promotions and a overline4d correlation orbital. The effective collision strengths required in the analysis of astrophysically important lines in the Fe IV spectra, are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths for a wide range of incident electron energies, over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities. Results are tabulated for forbidden transitions between the 3d^5, 3d^44s and the 3d^44p manifolds for electron temperatures (Te in degrees Kelvin) in the range 3.3 ≤ Log Te ≤ 6.0 that are applicable to many laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The present results provide new results for forbidden lines in the Fe IV spectrum studied here.

  14. Fast electrons from electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kull, H.-J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-ion collisions in the presence of a strong laser field lead to a distribution of fast electrons with maximum energy Emax=(k0+2v0)2/2(a.u.), where k0 is the impact and v0 the quiver velocity of the electron. The energy spectrum is calculated by two approaches: (1) The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is numerically solved for wave packet scattering from a one-dimensional softcore Coulomb potential. Multiphoton energy spectra are obtained demonstrating a separation of the energy spectrum into an exponential distribution for transmission and a plateau distribution for reflection. (2) The energy spectrum is analytically calculated in the framework of classical instantaneous Coulomb collisions with random impact parameters and random phases of the laser field. An exact solution for the energy spectrum is obtained from which the fraction of fast electrons in the plateau region can be estimated.

  15. Electron Collisions - Looking Back and Looking Forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConkey, J. William

    2004-05-01

    For almost a century, ever since the pioneering experiments of Franck and Hertz provided one of the foundation stones of the emerging quantum theory, electron scattering has been a versatile tool for diagnosing atomic and molecular structure and interactions. Electron collisions with a wide variety of targets have proved to be fundamental to our understanding of such diverse topics as planetary atmosphere processes, low and high temperature plasma physics, lasers and radiation chemistry. They undergird the efficient operation of a multitude of practical devices and industrial processes. This talk will provide a flavor of what has happened in this field, particularly over the past half-century. It will illustrate some of the current developments and and suggest what might be fruitful areas of research in the future.

  16. Study On Electron Collisions With Zn-like W Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, A.; Pais, V.; Totolici, M. C.; Stancalie, V.

    2008-04-07

    The present work gives new refined results for electron impact excitation rates and collision strengths for transitions of type [Ar]3d{sup 10}4snl->[Ar]3d{sup 10}4sn';l', n, n' = 4,5, and {delta}J = 0,l in Zn-like W ion. We have examined the position and widths of the resonant states of type ls{sup 2}2s2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4s{sup 2}nl. Autoionizing states can radically alter the low temperature behavior of collision rates, and are a major contributor to opacity. Preliminary results for Auger rates are presented. Hartree-Fock calculations have been carried out followed by a configuration interaction (CI) in intermediate coupling using the suite of Cowan's codes.

  17. Recent theoretical results on electron-polyatomic molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, C.W.

    1994-03-01

    Until recently, the principal barrier to the accurate theoretical description of electronic collisions with polyatomic molecules was the computational problem of scattering by a nonlocal, arbitrarily asymmetric potential. Effective numerical techniques capable of solving this variety of potential scattering problem for electronic collisions have now matured, and the first applications of methods for treating many-body aspects of collisions of electrons with polyatomic molecules have begun to appear in the literature. The past two years have seen the appearance of a large collection of calculations on electron-polyatomic collisions which compare favorably with experimental determinations. In addition to the dramatic developments in methods which explicitly exploit the methods of quantum chemistry to treat the effects of electron correlation, polarization, etc., parameter-free model potential methods for electronically elastic collisions have also evolved markedly in recent years. Progress in both electronically elastic and inelastic processes is reviewed briefly.

  18. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  19. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Carbon Monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2015-03-15

    Cross section data are collected and reviewed for electron collisions with carbon monoxide. Collision processes included are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational and electronic states, ionization, and dissociation. For each process, recommended values of the cross sections are presented, when possible. The literature has been surveyed through to the end of 2013.

  20. Electron Collisions with Fe-peak elements: Fe IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Hibbert, A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.; Sunderland, A. G.; Noble, C. J.; Burke, V. M.; Pindzola, M.

    2004-05-01

    Highly correlated configuration interaction (CI) wavefunctions are being used in studies of electron impact excitation of Fe IV, using the close-coupling approximation with the R-matrix method. The PRMAT-II parallel code is used to perform the calculations. All 108 LS-coupled states from the 3d^5, 3d^44s and 3d^44p manifolds of Fe IV are included in our cross section calculations. Effective collision strengths are determined by averaging over a Maxwellian temperature distribution for the electrons. At low temperatures, preliminary results have indicated a further enhancement over those rates determined using the above basic configuration set. We attribute this to the use of elaborate correlated CI target wavefunctions determined by two-electron promotions from the 3p^63d^5 manifold and inclusion of a 4d correlation orbital. Converged calculations are in progress and rates will be presented for forbidden transitions within the 3d^5 manifold.

  1. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  2. Will Allis Prize Talk: Electron Collisions - Experiment, Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules represent one of the very early topics of quantum mechanics. In spite of the field's maturity, a number of recent developments in detector technology (e.g., the ``reaction microscope'' or the ``magnetic-angle changer'') and the rapid increase in computational resources have resulted in significant progress in the measurement, understanding, and theoretical/computational description of few-body Coulomb problems. Close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists worldwide continue to produce high-quality benchmark data, which allow for thoroughly testing and further developing a variety of theoretical approaches. As a result, it has now become possible to reliably calculate the vast amount of atomic data needed for detailed modelling of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres, the interpretation of astrophysical data, optimizing the energy transport in reactive plasmas, and many other topics - including light-driven processes, in which electrons are produced by continuous or short-pulse ultra-intense electromagnetic radiation. In this talk, I will highlight some of the recent developments that have had a major impact on the field. This will be followed by showcasing examples, in which accurate electron collision data enabled applications in fields beyond traditional AMO physics. Finally, open problems and challenges for the future will be outlined. I am very grateful for fruitful scientific collaborations with many colleagues, and the long-term financial support by the NSF through the Theoretical AMO and Computational Physics programs, as well as supercomputer resources through TeraGrid and XSEDE.

  3. Electron-Electron Interaction in Ion-Atom Collisions Studied by Projectile State-Resolved Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Do-Hyung

    1990-01-01

    . The measured eeE and eeI cross sections showed threshold effects and are compared with an IA treatment, where electron-impact excitation and ionization cross sections were folded with the momentum distribution (Compton profile) of the target electrons. The extracted electron-electron cross sections can be provided as alternative data to free-electron-ion collisions for processes where K-shell excitation or ionization is involved. Dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections can be complemented with the RTEA measurement.

  4. Computation of electron diode characteristics by monte carlo method including effect of collisions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, C. M.

    1964-01-01

    Consistent field Monte Carlo method calculation for collision effect on electron-ion diode characteristics and for hard sphere electron- neutral collision effect for monoenergetic- thermionic emission

  5. Influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on electron-ion collision in two-component semiclassical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-01-15

    The influence of quantum diffraction and shielding on the electron-ion collision process is investigated in two-component semiclassical plasmas. The eikonal method and micropotential taking into account the quantum diffraction and shielding are used to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the collision energy, density parameter, Debye length, electron de Broglie wavelength, and the impact parameter. The result shows that the quantum diffraction and shielding effects suppress the eikonal scattering phase shift as well as the differential eikonal collision cross section, especially, in small-impact parameter regions. It is also shown that the quantum shielding effect on the eikonal collision cross section is more important in low-collision energies. In addition, it is found that the eikonal collision cross section increases with an increase in the density parameter. The variations of the eikonal cross section due to the quantum diffraction and shielding effects are also discussed.

  6. Time-of-Flight Experiments in Molecular Motion and Electron-Atom Collision Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Denis P.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Describes a set of experiments for an undergraduate laboratory which demonstrates the relationship between velocity, mass, and temperature in a gas. The experimental method involves time-of-flight measurements on atoms excited to metastable states by electron impact. Effects resulting from recoil in the electron-atom collision can also be…

  7. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene.

    PubMed

    da Costa, R F; Varella, M T do N; Lima, M A P; Bettega, M H F

    2013-05-21

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π∗ anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ∗ shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π∗ resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004)]. The existence of the σ∗ shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998)] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π∗ molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  8. Low-energy electron collisions with thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Lima, M. A. P.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2013-05-01

    We report on elastic integral, momentum transfer, and differential cross sections for collisions of low-energy electrons with thiophene molecules. The scattering calculations presented here used the Schwinger multichannel method and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies ranging from 0.5 eV to 6 eV. We found shape resonances related to the formation of two long-lived π* anion states. These resonant structures are centered at the energies of 1.00 eV (2.85 eV) and 2.82 eV (5.00 eV) in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) approximation and belong to the B1 and A2 symmetries of the C2v point group, respectively. Our results also suggest the existence of a σ* shape resonance in the B2 symmetry with a strong d-wave character, located at around 2.78 eV (5.50 eV) as obtained in the static-exchange plus polarization (static-exchange) calculation. It is worth to mention that the results obtained at the static-exchange plus polarization level of approximation for the two π* resonances are in good agreement with the electron transmission spectroscopy results of 1.15 eV and 2.63 eV measured by Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004), 10.1021/jp048759a]. The existence of the σ* shape resonance is in agreement with the observations of Dezarnaud-Dandiney et al. [J. Phys. B 31, L497 (1998), 10.1088/0953-4075/31/11/004] based on the electron transmission spectra of dimethyl(poly)sulphides. A comparison among the resonances of thiophene with those of pyrrole and furan is also performed and, altogether, the resonance spectra obtained for these molecules point out that electron attachment to π* molecular orbitals is a general feature displayed by these five-membered heterocyclic compounds.

  9. R-matrix calculations of electron molecule collision data for plasma models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Models of low-pressure plasma require electron collision cross sections for many processes. For transient molecular species, almost none of these data are available from laboratory measurements so theory has to be the chosen means of providing the necessary information. The R-matrix method is a well-established fully quantal procedure for computing low-energy electron-collision cross sections. The R-matrix calculations using the UK Molecular R-matrix codes (UKRMol), which are run by the Quantemol-N expert system, are being employed to provide a wide range of collision cross sections. These are augmented by use of suitable high-energy approximations, such as BEB for ionisation, and a novel procedure to give branching ratios for the fragmentation pattern following electron impact ionisation and electron impact dissociation. Examples, such as recently generated complete cross section sets for the molecules NF, NF and NF, will be given at the meeting.

  10. Electron loss of fast projectiles in collisions with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, V. I.; Makarov, D. N.; Rakhimov, Kh. Yu.

    2011-07-15

    The single- and multiple-electron loss of fast highly charged projectiles in collisions with neutral molecules is studied within the framework of a nonperturbative approach. The cross sections for single-, double-, and triple-electron losses are calculated for the collision system Fe{sup q+}{yields}N{sub 2} (q=24, 25, 26) at the collision energies 10, 100, and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The effects caused by the collision multiplicity and the orientation of the axis of the target molecule are treated. It is shown that the collision multiplicity effect leads to considerable differences for the cases of perpendicular and parallel orientations of the molecular axes with respect to the direction of the projectile motion, while for chaotic orientation such an effect is negligible.

  11. Cross section database for carbon atoms and ions: Electron-impact ionization, excitation, and charge exchange in collisions with hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Suno, Hiroya . E-mail: suno@jamstec.go.jp; Kato, Takako

    2006-07-15

    A database has been constructed consisting of the recommended cross sections for electron-impact excitation and ionization of carbon atoms and ions C, C{sup +}-C{sup 5+}, asl as for charge exchange processes between carbon ions C{sup +}-C{sup 6+} and hydrogen atoms. We have collected a large amount of theoretical and experimental cross section data from the literature, and have critically assessed their accuracy. The recommended cross sections, the best values for use, are expressed in the form of simple analytical functions. These are also presented in graphical form.

  12. Fast electrons from electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kull, H.-J.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    2005-06-15

    Electron-ion collisions in the presence of a strong laser field lead to a distribution of fast electrons with maximum energy E{sub max}=(k{sub 0}+2v{sub 0}){sup 2}/2(a.u.), where k{sub 0} is the impact and v{sub 0} the quiver velocity of the electron. The energy spectrum is calculated by two approaches: (1) The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is numerically solved for wave packet scattering from a one-dimensional softcore Coulomb potential. Multiphoton energy spectra are obtained demonstrating a separation of the energy spectrum into an exponential distribution for transmission and a plateau distribution for reflection. (2) The energy spectrum is analytically calculated in the framework of classical instantaneous Coulomb collisions with random impact parameters and random phases of the laser field. An exact solution for the energy spectrum is obtained from which the fraction of fast electrons in the plateau region can be estimated.

  13. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Threshold electron attachment and electron impact ionization involving oxygen dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreil, J.; Ruf, M.-W.; Hotop, H.; Ettischer, I.; Buck, U.

    1998-12-01

    Using two different crossed-beams machines we have carried out the first quantitative study of threshold electron attachment and electron impact-induced ionization and fragmentation involving oxygen dimers (O 2) 2. In the electron attachment experiment we study electron transfer from state-selected Ar **(20d) Rydberg atoms to O 2 molecules and dimers in a skimmed supersonic beam at variable nozzle temperatures ( T0) and stagnation pressures ( p0). The relative dimer density is determined through measurements of Penning ionization by metastable Ne *(3s 3P2,0) atoms and used to estimate the absolute cross-section for O 2- formation in collisions of Ar **(20d) Rydberg atoms with O 2 dimers to be nearly 10 -17 m 2, almost four orders of magnitude larger than that for O 2- formation in collisions of Ar **(20d) Rydberg atoms with O 2 monomers. The fragmentation of the oxygen cluster beam is quantitatively characterized by the transverse helium beam scattering method which allows us to spatially separate different clusters. It is shown that in 70 eV electron impact of (O 2) 2 only 3.6(4)% of the dimers are detected as dimer ions (O 2) 2+. In additional experiments involving SF 6 clusters we show that SF 6 dimers fragment nearly completely upon 70 eV electron impact, yielding SF 5+ ions (probability for (SF 6)·SF 5+ production at most 0.3%).

  15. Experimental techniques for cross-section measurements. [for electron impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Register, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to electron collision phenomena which can be studied under single-collision conditions at low and intermediate electron impact energies, ranging from threshold to a few hundred eV, using gas phase molecular targets. Several of the experimental methods discussed were first developed and applied to atoms, but are equally applicable to molecules with minor modifications in the interpretation of the data, due to the greater complexity of molecular systems.

  16. Experimental apparatus for measurements of electron impact excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafyatis, G. P.; Kohl, J. L.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    An ion beam apparatus for the absolute measurement of collision cross sections in singly and multiply charged ions is described. An inclined electron and ion beams arrangement is used. Emitted photons from the decay of collision produced excited states are collected by a mirror and imaged onto a photomultiplier. Absolute measurements of the electron impact excitation of the 2s-2p transition in C(3+) were used to demonstrate the reliability of the apparatus.

  17. Electron-Ion collisions in relativistically strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Balakin, A. A.

    2008-04-15

    Electron-ion collisions in relativistically strong electromagnetic fields are considered. Analytical and numerical analyses both show that all qualitative effects characteristic of collisions in nonrelativistic strong fields [1-3] occur at relativistic intensities of an electromagnetic wave as well. Expressions for Joule plasma heating and for the energy distributions of fast particles are derived from simple analytic considerations and are confirmed by numerical simulations. It is found, in particular, that, due to the relativistic increase in the mass of a scattered electron, Joule heating in ultrarelativistic fields becomes more intense as the field amplitude grows.

  18. Collisions of low-energy electrons with cyclohexane

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2014-12-28

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by cyclohexane (c-C{sub 6}H{sub 12}). We employed the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations, for impact energies up to 30 eV. We compare our calculated integral cross section with experimental total cross sections available in the literature. We also compare our calculated differential cross sections (DCSs) with experimental results for benzene and experimental and theoretical results for 1,4-dioxane, in order to investigate the similarities between those molecules under electron collisions. Although benzene is a cyclic six-carbon molecule, as cyclohexane, we found that the differential cross sections of the latter are more similar to those of 1,4-dioxane than those of benzene. These similarities suggest that the geometry may play an important role in the behavior of the DCSs of these molecules. Our integral cross section displays a broad structure at around 8.5 eV, in agreement with the total cross section experimental data of 8 eV and vibrational excitation data of 7.5 eV. The present integral cross section also shows the presence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum at around 0.12 eV. In general, our integral cross section shows a qualitative agreement with the experimental total cross section.

  19. Effects of external field on elastic electron-ion collision in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Sang-Chul; Jung, Young-Dae

    2008-12-01

    The field effects on elastic electron-ion collision are investigated in a plasma with the presence of the external field. The eikonal method and effective interaction potential including the far-field term caused by the external field is employed to obtain the eikonal phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the field strength, external frequency, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy and Debye length. The result shows that the effect of the external field on the eikonal cross section is given by the second-order eikonal phase. In addition, the external field effects suppress the eikonal cross section as well as eikonal phase for the elastic electron-ion collision. The eikonal phase and cross section are found to be increased with an increase of the frequency of the external field. It is also shown that the eikonal cross section increases with an increase of the thermal energy and Debye length.

  20. Inelastic collisions of positrons with one-valence-electron targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed Assad

    1990-01-01

    The total elastic and positronium formation cross sections of the inelastic collisions between positrons and various one-valence-electron atoms, (namely hydrogen, lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium), and one-valence-electron ions, (namely hydrogen-like, lithium-like and alkaline-earth positive ions) are determined using an elaborate modified coupled-static approximation. Special attention is devoted to the behavior of the Ps cross sections at the energy regions lying above the Ps formation thresholds.

  1. Electron transport in EBT in the low collision frequency limit

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, D.E.

    1984-06-01

    A variational principle formulation is used to calculate the electron neoclassical transport coefficients in a bumpy torus for the low collisionality regime. The electron radial drift is calculated as a function of the plasma position and the poloidal electric field which is determined self-consistently. A bounce-averaged differential collision operator is used and the results are compared to previous treatments using a BGK operator.

  2. Theoretical investigation of the electron capture and loss processes in the collisions of He2+ + Ne.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuhai; Wang, Feng; Jiao, Yalong; Su, Wenyong; Wang, Jianguo; Gou, Bingcong

    2013-08-28

    Based on the time-dependent density functional theory, a method is developed to study ion-atom collision dynamics, which self-consistently couples the quantum mechanical description of electron dynamics with the classical treatment of the ion motion. Employing real-time and real-space method, the coordinate space translation technique is introduced to allow one to focus on the region of target or projectile depending on the actual concerned process. The benchmark calculations are performed for the collisions of He(2+) + Ne, and the time evolution of electron density distribution is monitored, which provides interesting details of the interaction dynamics between the electrons and ion cores. The cross sections of single and many electron capture and loss have been calculated in the energy range of 1-1000 keV/amu, and the results show a good agreement with the available experiments over a wide range of impact energies.

  3. Surface impacts and collisions of particle-laden nanodrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koplik, Joel

    2015-08-01

    The surface impact and collisions of particle-laden nanodrops are studied using molecular dynamics computer simulations. The drops are composed of Lennard-Jones dimers and the particles are rigid spherical sections of a cubic lattice, with radii about 11 nm and 0.6 nm, respectively. Uniform suspensions of 21% and 42% particle concentrations and particle-coated drops are studied, and their behavior is compared to that of pure fluid drops of the same size. The relative velocities studied span the transition to splashing, and both wetting/miscible and non-wetting/immiscible cases are considered. Impacts normal to the surface and head-on collisions are studied and compared. In surface impact, the behavior of low-density suspensions and liquid marble drops is qualitatively similar to that of pure liquid, while the concentrated drops are solid-like on impact. Collisions produce a splash only at velocities significantly higher than in impact, but the resulting drop morphology shows a similar dependence on solid concentration as in impact. In all cases, the collision or impact produces a strong local enhancement in the kinetic energy density and temperature but not in the particle or potential energy densities. Mixing of the two colliding species is not enhanced by collisions, unless the velocity is so high as to cause drop disintegration.

  4. Semiclassical theory of electronically nonadiabatic transitions in molecular collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, K. S.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    An introductory account of the semiclassical theory of the S-matrix for molecular collision processes is presented, with special emphasis on electronically nonadiabatic transitions. This theory is based on the incorporation of classical mechanics with quantum superposition, and in practice makes use of the analytic continuation of classical mechanics into the complex space of time domain. The relevant concepts of molecular scattering theory and related dynamical models are described and the formalism is developed and illustrated with simple examples - collinear collision of the A+BC type. The theory is then extended to include the effects of laser-induced nonadiabatic transitions. Two bound continuum processes collisional ionization and collision-induced emission also amenable to the same general semiclassical treatment are discussed.

  5. Collision rates and impact velocities in the Main Asteroid Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farinella, Paolo; Davis, Donald R.

    1992-01-01

    Wetherill's (1967) algorithm is presently used to compute the mutual collision probabilities and impact velocities of a set of 682 asteroids with large-than-50-km radius representative of a bias-free sample of asteroid orbits. While collision probabilities are nearly independent of eccentricities, a significant decrease is associated with larger inclinations. Collisional velocities grow steeply with orbital eccentricity and inclination, but with curiously small variation across the asteroid belt. Family asteroids are noted to undergo collisions with other family members 2-3 times more often than with nonmembers.

  6. Ionization and Electron Emission of Heavy Ion - Collisions: the Argon-Krypton Collision System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarcone, Michael Joseph, Jr.

    The Ar-Kr collision system has been studied by examining the charge states of the scattered ions together with the energies of the emitted electrons. The charge state data show that there are increases in the average scattered charge state at distances of closest approach that correspond well with internuclear distances for which the molecular orbital model^1 predicts electron promotions of krypton and argon electrons to occur. The electron data show a well resolved Auger peak between 150 -200 eV superimposed on an exponentially decreasing background of continuum electrons. Doppler shifts identify the Auger peak as originating from the argon collision partner. Ion -electron coincidence experiments exhibit the same peak and link it to a specific distance of closest approach. The threshold for this L-Auger electron production falls between 0.2 and 0.3 a.u., agreeing well with molecular orbital predictions. ftn^1Fano U. and W. Lichten, Phys. Rev. Lett., 14, 627 1965.

  7. Relativistic collision rate calculations for electron-air interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1992-12-16

    The most recent data available on differential cross sections for electron-air interactions are used to calculate the avalanche, momentum transfer, and energy loss rates that enter into the fluid equations. Data for the important elastic, inelastic, and ionizing processes are generally available out to electron energies of 1--10 kev. Prescriptions for extending these cross sections to the relativistic regime are presented. The angular dependence of the cross sections is included where data is available as is the doubly differential cross section for ionizing collisions. The collision rates are computed by taking moments of the Boltzmann collision integrals with the assumption that the electron momentum distribution function is given by the Juettner distribution function which satisfies the relativistic H- theorem and which reduces to the familiar Maxwellian velocity distribution in the nonrelativistic regime. The distribution function is parameterized in terms of the electron density, mean momentum, and thermal energy and the rates are therefore computed on a two-dimensional grid as a function of mean kinetic energy and thermal energy.

  8. Relativistic collision rate calculations for electron-air interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1993-12-01

    The most recent data available on differential cross sections for electron-air interactions are used to calculate the avalanche, momentum transfer, and energy loss rates that enter into the fluid equations. Data for the important elastic, inelastic, and ionizing processes are generally available out to electron energies of 1--10 keV. Prescriptions for extending these cross sections to the relativistic regime are presented. The angular dependence of the cross sections is included where data are available as is the doubly differential cross section for ionizing collisions. The collision rates are computed by taking moments of the Boltzmann collision integrals with the assumption that the electron momentum distribution function is given by the Juettner distribution function which satisfies the relativistic H- theorem and which reduces to the familiar Maxwellian velocity distribution in the nonrelativistic regime. The distribution function is parameterized in terms of the electron density, mean momentum, and thermal energy and the rates are therefore computed on a two dimensional grid as a function of mean kinetic energy and thermal energy.

  9. Electronic excitation of ground state atoms by collision with heavy gas particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1993-01-01

    Most of the important chemical reactions which occur in the very high temperature air produced around space vehicles as they enter the atmosphere were investigated both experimentally and theoretically, to some extent at least. One remaining reaction about which little is known, and which could be quite important at the extremely high temperatures that will be produced by the class of space vehicles now contemplated - such as the AOTV - is the excitation of bound electron states due to collisions between heavy gas particles. Rates of electronic excitation due to free electron collisions are known to be very rapid, but because these collisions quickly equilibrate the free and bound electron energy, the approach to full equilibrium with the heavy particle kinetic energy will depend primarily on the much slower process of bound electron excitation in heavy particle collisions and the subsequent rapid transfer to free electron energy. This may be the dominant mechanism leading to full equilibrium in the gas once the dissociation process has depleted the molecular states so the transfer between molecular vibrational energy and free electron energy is no longer available as a channel for equilibration of free electron and heavy particle kinetic energies. Two mechanisms seem probable in electronic excitation by heavy particle impact. One of these is the collision excitation and deexcitation of higher electronic states which are Rydberg like. A report, entitled 'Semi-Classical Theory of Electronic Excitation Rates', was submitted previously. This presented analytic expressions for the transition probabilities, assuming that the interaction potential is an exponential repulsion with a perturbation ripple due to the dipole-induced dipole effect in the case of neutral-neutral collisions, and to the ion-dipole interaction in the case of ion-neutral collisions. However the above may be, there is little doubt that excitation of ground state species by collision occurs at the

  10. Electron Transfer-Induced Fragmentation in (Bio)Molecules by Atom-Molecule Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; da Silva, Filipe Ferreira; Gómez-Tejedor, Gustavo García

    Ion-pair formation to gas phase molecules induced by electron transfer has been studied by investigating the products of collisions between fast potassium atoms and target molecules using a crossed molecular-beam technique. The negative ions formed in such collisions are TOF mass analysed. As far as (bio)molecules are concerned, TOF mass spectra at different collision energies reveal interesting anionic patterns with reduced fragmentation at lower impact energies. In the unimolecular decomposition of the temporary negative ion (TNI), complex internal rearrangement may involve the cleavage and formation of new bonds. In this chapter we report some of the recent achievements in negative ion formation of some polyatomic molecules with the special attention to biological relevant targets.

  11. Influence of electron-ion collisions on Buneman instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostomyan, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    Buneman instability (BI) [1] has been found to play a role in many scenarios in space physics and geophysics. It has also been invoked to explain many phenomena in the earth ionosphere [2] and in the solar chromosphere [3]. In double-layer and collisionless shock physics the same instability has been found responsible in formation of nonlinear structures [4]. In situations where an electron beam enters plasma, like in the fast ignition scenario for inertial fusion [5], Buneman modes are excited and play essential role [6]. BI is caused by motion of plasma electrons against ions. However, up to now investigations on BI did not take into account influence collisions in plasma (for quantum case a paper has recently appeared [7]). Influence of collisions may be very important especially in dense fully ionized plasma with long distance character of interaction. Particularly collisions lead to energy dissipation with an array of ensuing effects e.g. change of the instability physical nature to that of dissipative type [8]. Due to role of BI in various processes in space (and laboratory) plasma necessity of the consideration is long overdue. Absence of investigations on a problem along with its importance may be explained by its complexity only. For given case correct consideration should be based on solution of transport equation with collisional term. In fully ionized plasma correct description of collisions is given by Landau collision integral (LCI) [9]. This is very complex formation. It greatly complicates transport equation and actually makes it intractable. Since its formulation in 1936, there is very little literature on solution of the transport equation with LCI. Almost all successful attempts to accommodate influence of collisions on various processes in plasma are based on BGK model [10]. This model is much simpler. However in fully ionized plasma usage LCI is more appropriate as it is designed for system with long distance character of particle interaction

  12. Reply to Origin of fast electrons' from slow atomic collisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Baragiola, R.A. ); Alonso, E.V. ); Oliva, A.; Bonanno, A.; Xu, F. )

    1993-08-01

    We show reasons why negative ions cannot contribute significantly to our observation of fast electrons in slow atomic collisions [Phys. Rev. 45, 5286 (1992)]. We point out that the opposite suggestion by Yasui [preceding Comment, Phys. Rev. A 48, 1711 (1993)] results from multiple errors in his analysis, including inadequate consideration of energy conservation, the use of nonapplicable data from the literature, neglect of decay in flight of metastable negative ions, nonconsideration of detection efficiency, and the inconsistent fit of experimental data.

  13. Vacuum birefringence in high-energy laser-electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Elkina, N.

    2016-12-01

    Real photon-photon scattering is a long-predicted phenomenon that is being searched for in experiment in the form of a birefringent vacuum at optical and x-ray frequencies. We present results of calculations and numerical simulations for a scenario to measure this effect using multi-MeV photons generated in the collision of electrons with a laser pulse. We find that the birefringence of the vacuum should be measurable using experimental parameters attainable in the near future.

  14. Collisions of Electrons with Atomic Oxygen: Current Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. V.; Kanik, I.; Tayal, S. S.

    2005-01-01

    In 1990, two significant reviews of electron-atomic-oxygen collision processes were published. Since that time, a large volume of both experimental and theoretical research into these processes has occurred. These data are reviewed and recommendations regarding existing data sets and future research in this area are made. Attention is given to the challenges associated with handling atomic oxygen in terms of both experiment and theory.

  15. General theory of electron detachment in negative ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis a general theory of electron detachment in slow collisions of negative ions with atoms is presented. The theory is based upon a semiclassical close-coupling framework, following the work of Taylor and Delos. The Schrodinger equation is reduced, under certain assumptions, to a non-denumerably infinite set of coupled equations. A new method for solving these equations is developed that is more general than the methods used by Taylor and Delos. A zero-order approximation of the solution is applied to the case of H-(D-) on Ne collisions, the results are compared with the experimental data, and good agreement between theory and experiment, particularly with regard to the isotope effect, is found. A first-order approximation of the solution is proved to be very close to the exact solution, and it is applied to the case of H-(D-) on He collisions. Quadratic and quartic approximations are used for the energy gap ..delta..(t) to calculate, among other things, the survival probability and electron energy spectrum. There are some interesting results of the electron energy spectrum which have not yet been observed in experiments.

  16. Excitation of hydrogen atoms in collisions with helium atoms: the role of electron–electron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frémont, F.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Cross sections for producing H(nl) excited state atoms in H(1s) + He(1s2) collisions are calculated using the CTMC method, at impact energies ranging from 20 eV to 100 keV. The role of the electron correlation is studied. In the first step, the interactions between each pair of the three electrons are neglected. This leads to disagreement of the calculated total cross section for producing H(2l) atoms with previous experimental and theoretical results. In a second step, the electron–electron interaction is taken into account in a rigorous way, that is, in the form of the pure Coulomb potential. To make sure that the He target is stable before the collision, phenomenological potentials for the electron–helium-nucleus interactions that simulate the Heisenberg principle are included in addition to the Coulomb potential. The excitation cross section calculated in the frame of this model is in remarkable agreement with previous data in the range between 200 eV and 5 keV. At other energies, discrepancies are revealed, but only by a factor of less than 2 at high energies. The present results show the decisive role of the electron–electron interaction during collisions. In addition, they demonstrate the ability of classical mechanics to take into account the effects of the electron correlation.

  17. Convoy electron production in heavy-ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.; Breinig, M.; Brandt, W.; Laubert, R.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of the sharp v vector/sub e/ approx. = v vector cusps observed in the velocity spectrum of convoy electrons (v vector/sub e/) ejected in heavy ion-solid collisions in the ion velocity range (v vector) 6 to 18 au are compared to the properties of analogous cusps observed in binary electron capture to the continuum (ECC) and electron loss to the continuum (ELC) collisions in gases. Apart from a skew toward v vector/sub e/ > v vector, the v-independent convoy distributions observed are very similar to those for ELC and the cusp widths are the same in both cases. While the shape of convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, v, and of target material, yields in polycrystalline targets (C, Al, Ag, Au) exhibit a strong dependence on Z and v. Coincidence experiments in which convoy electrons are allocated according to emergent ion charge-state q/sub e/ show a surprising independence of q/sub e/, mirroring the unweighted statistical emergent charge-state fraction. Coincidence experiments of O/sup 6 +/ /sup 7 +/ /sup 8 +/ ions traversing < 110 > and < 100 > channels in Au show a strong yield suppression and a dependence of yield on the channel chosen. Interpretation of these observations, comparisons to convoy production studies using protons, and a discussion of remaining puzzles is given. The history of ECC, ELC, and wake-riding models of convoy electron production is also reviewed.

  18. Convergent Close-Coupling Approach to Electron-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Igor; Stelbovics, Andris

    2007-01-01

    It was with great pleasure and honour to accept the invitation to make a presentation at the symposium celebrating the life-long work of Aaron Temkin and Richard Drachman. The work of Aaron Temkin was particularly influential on our own during the development of the CCC method for electron-atom collisions. There are a number of key problems that need to be dealt with when developing a general computational approach to such collisions. Traditionally, the electron energy range was subdivided into the low, intermediate, and high energies. At the low energies only a finite number of channels are open and variational or close-coupling techniques could be used to obtain accurate results. At high energies an infinite number of discrete channels and the target continuum are open, but perturbative techniques are able to yield accurate results. However, at the intermediate energies perturbative techniques fail and computational approaches need to be found for treating the infinite number of open channels. In addition, there are also problems associated with the identical nature of electrons and the difficulty of implementing the boundary conditions for ionization processes. The beauty of the Temkin-Poet model of electron-hydrogen scattering is that it simplifies the full computational problem by neglecting any non-zero orbital angular momenta in the partial-wave expansion, without loosing the complexity associated with the above-mentioned problems. The unique nature of the problem allowed for accurate solution leading to benchmark results which could then be used to test the much more general approaches to electron-atom collision problems. The immense value of the Temkin-Poet model is readily summarised by the fact that the initial papers of Temkin and Poet have been collectively cited around 250 times to date and are still being cited in present times. Many of the citations came from our own work during the course of the development of the CCC method, which we now describe.

  19. Total cross sections of electron and positron collisions with C3F8 and C3H8 molecules and differential elastic and vibrational excitation cross sections by electron impact on these molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tachibana, Yoshio; Kitajima, Masashi; Sueoka, Osamu; Takaki, Hideki; Hamada, Akira; Kimura, Mineo

    1999-03-01

    Total cross sections for electron (e-) and positron (e+) scattering from C3H8 and C3F8 have been measured from 0.8 to 600 eV and 0.7 to 600 eV, respectively. We have also investigated differential elastic cross sections by electron impact from 2.0 to 200 eV, and compared them with the present theoretical results. For e- scattering from C3H8, the cross sections are found to be larger by a factor of 2 than those of e+ scattering below 20-30 eV. They show a large peak at 8 eV due to a shape resonance and a shoulderlike structure in the region of 20-40 eV. For e- scattering from C3F8, the cross sections are again larger by at least a factor of 2 than those of e+ scattering below 50 eV, and they have two peaks at 4 and 8 eV, followed by a broad peak in the region of 20-40 eV. Some small structures overlie the broad hump. Both e- and e+ impact cross sections for C3H8 and C3F8 quickly approach each other beyond 200 eV. From the differential cross section study, we have been able to provide more detailed information on shape resonances, and also we have carried out some analysis of resonances in vibrational excitation results. In general, the total and integrated elastic cross sections are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement.

  20. Electron emission in collisions between atoms and dressed projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present theoretical results for electron emission in collisions between helium atoms and dressed projectiles at high energies. Double-differential cross sections (DDCSs) as a function of the emitted electron energies and angles are calculated. In our study we have applied the three-body formalism using the three-Coulomb wave (3CW-3B) model. The interaction between the dressed projectile and the active electron in the target has been approximated by a model potential having both a long-range Coulomb potential part and a short-range part. However, the active electron in the target has been treated as hydrogenic. We have also studied the projectile charge state dependence of the DDCS. Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental data as well as other theoretical calculations. The comparison shows a good agreement between the present calculations and the measurements. The obtained results are also compatible with other theoretical findings.

  1. Single and multiple electron removal and fragmentation in collisions of protons with water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyás, L.; Egri, S.; Ghavaminia, H.; Igarashi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Single and multiple electron removal processes (capture and ionization) in proton-H2O collisions have been investigated applying the continuum distorted wave with eikonal initial-state model within the framework of independent electron approach. Probabilities and cross sections for electron capture are derived from the same quantities evaluated for ionization using the continuity of transition quantities across the ionization threshold. Dissociation and fragmentation cross sections for the H2Oq + (q =1 -3) ions have been evaluated by considering branching ratios that include the effect of multiple electron removal transitions. The results are compared with experimental and other theoretical data in the range of impact energies from 30 kev to 5 MeV. Generally, the evaluated cross sections and fragmentation yields show good agreement with experiments at impact energies above 100-150 keV.

  2. Cross sections for electron collisions with dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugohara, R. T.; Homem, M. G. P.; Iga, I.; de Souza, G. L. C.; Machado, L. E.; Ferraz, J. R.; dos Santos, A. S.; Brescansin, L. M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Lee, M. T.

    2013-08-01

    We report a joint theoretical-experimental investigation of electron collision with dimethyl ether (DME) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Experimental absolute differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic e--DME scattering are reported in the 100-1000 eV energy range. Our measurements were performed using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry. The angular distribution of the scattered electrons was converted to absolute cross section using the relative flow technique. Theoretically, elastic differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections, as well as the grand-total and total absorption cross sections for electron collision with DME are calculated in the 1-1000 eV energy range. A single-center-expansion technique combined with the Padé approximant method is used in our calculations. A comparison between the present experimental and theoretical data shows very good agreement. Moreover, comparison with theoretical and experimental data for e--ethanol (an isomer of DME) scattering shows interesting isomeric effects.

  3. Effects of target plasma electron-electron collisions on correlated motion of fragmented protons.

    PubMed

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the present work is to examined the effects of plasma target electron-electron collisions on H2 + protons traversing it. Specifically, the target is deuterium in a plasma state with temperature Te=10 eV and density n=10(23) cm(-3), and proton velocities are vp=vth, vp=2vth, and vp=3vth, where vth is the electron thermal velocity of the target plasma. Proton interactions with plasma electrons are treated by means of the dielectric formalism. The interactions among close protons through plasma electronic medium are called vicinage forces. It is checked that these forces always screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H2 + ion decreasing their relative distance. They also align the interproton vector along the motion direction, and increase the energy loss of the two protons at early dwell times while for longer times the energy loss tends to the value of two isolated protons. Nevertheless, vicinage forces and effects are modified by the target electron collisions. These collisions enhance the calculated self-stopping and vicinage forces over the collisionless results. Regarding proton correlated motion, when these collisions are included, the interproton vector along the motion direction overaligns at slower proton velocities (vp=vth) and misaligns for faster ones (vp=2vth, vp=3vth). They also contribute to a great extend to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H2 + ion. This later effect is more significant in reducing projectile velocity.

  4. Single electrons from heavy-flavor decays in collisions at.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-01-27

    The invariant differential cross section for inclusive electron production in p+p collisions at [FORMULA: SEE TEXT] has been measured by the PHENIX experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider over the transverse momentum range 0.4electron spectrum from semileptonic decays of hadrons carrying heavy flavor, i.e., charm quarks or, at high , bottom quarks, is determined via three independent methods. The resulting electron spectrum from heavy-flavor decays is compared to recent leading and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The total cross section of charm quark-antiquark pair production is determined to be [FORMULA: SEE TEXT].

  5. Electron Impact Excitation Of Ti XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2012-05-01

    Emission lines of Ti XIX are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Ti XIX on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Ti XIX. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3l, 2p3l, 2s4l, and 2p4l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel calculations have also been performed with the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) of Gu, so that all atomic parameters can be rigorously assessed for accuracy.

  6. Electron impact exctation of Al X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Kanti; Keenan, Francis

    2013-05-01

    Emission lines of Al ions, including Al X, are important for the modeling and diagnostics of lasing, fusion and astrophysical plasmas, for which atomic data are required for a variety of parameters, such as energy levels, radiative rates (A- values), and excitation rates or equivalently the effective collision strengths (Υ), which are obtained from the electron impact collision strengths (Ω). Experimentally, energy levels are available for Al X on the NIST website, but there is paucity for accurate collisional atomic data. Therefore, here we report a complete set of results (namely energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths) for all transitions among the lowest 98 levels of Al X. These levels belong to the (1s2) 2s2, 2s2p, 2p2, 2s3 l, 2p3 l, 2s4 l, and 2p4 l configurations. Finally, we also report the A- values for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1), and magnetic quadrupole (M2), because these are also required for plasma modeling. For our calculations of wavefunctions, we have adopted the fully relativistic GRASP code, and for the calculations of Ω, the Dirac atomic R-matrix code (DARC) of PH Norrington and IP Grant. Additionally, parallel ca

  7. Electron Impact Exciation of Fe IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, Swaraj; Zatsarinny, Oleg

    2015-05-01

    Transition probabilities and electron impact excitation collision strengths and rates for astrophysically important extreme ultraviolet lines of Fe IX are calculated. The 322 fine-structure levels of the 3s2 3p6 , 3s2 3p5 3 d , 3 s 3p6 3 d , 3s2 3p5 4 s , and 3s2 3p4 3d2 configurations are included in our calculations. The collision strengths have been calculated using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method for all fine-structure transitions among the 322 levels. The mass, Darwin, and spin-orbit relativistic effects are included in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian in the scattering calculation. The one-body and two-body relativistic operators are included in the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock calculations of transition probabilities. Several sets of non-orthogonal spectroscopic and correlation radial orbitals are used to obtain accurate description of Fe IX levels and to represent the scattering functions. The calculated excitation energies are in very good agreement with experiment and represents an improvement over the previous calculations. The present collision strengths show reasonable agreement with the previously available R-matrix and distorted-wave calculations. This research is supported by NASA grant from the Solar and Heliophysics Program.

  8. Nonlinear regime of electrostatic waves propagation in presence of electron-electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2015-04-01

    The effects are presented of including electron-electron collisions in self-consistent Eulerian simulations of electrostatic wave propagation in nonlinear regime. The electron-electron collisions are approximately modeled through the full three-dimensional Dougherty collisional operator [J. P. Dougherty, Phys. Fluids 7, 1788 (1964)]; this allows the elimination of unphysical byproducts due to reduced dimensionality in velocity space. The effects of non-zero collisionality are discussed in the nonlinear regime of the symmetric bump-on-tail instability and in the propagation of the so-called kinetic electrostatic electron nonlinear (KEEN) waves [T. W. Johnston et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042105 (2009)]. For both cases, it is shown how collisions work to destroy the phase-space structures created by particle trapping effects and to damp the wave amplitude, as the system returns to the thermal equilibrium. In particular, for the case of the KEEN waves, once collisions have smoothed out the trapped particle population which sustains the KEEN fluctuations, additional oscillations at the Langmuir frequency are observed on the fundamental electric field spectral component, whose amplitude decays in time at the usual collisionless linear Landau damping rate.

  9. Electron collisions with the CH2O-H2O complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, T. C.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2009-12-01

    We report cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the CH2O-H2O complex. We employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange-polarization approximations for energies from 0.1 to 20 eV. We considered four different hydrogen-bonded structures for the complex that were generated by classical Monte Carlo simulations. Our aim is to investigate the effect of the water molecule on the π∗ shape resonance of formaldehyde. Previous studies reported a π∗ shape resonance for CH2O at around 1 eV. The resonance positions of the complexes appear at lower energies in all cases due to the mutual polarization between the two molecules. This indicates that the presence of water may favor dissociation by electron impact and may lead to an important effect on strand breaking in wet DNA by electron impact.

  10. Rotational And Rovibrational Energy Transfer In Electron Collisions With Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Air flows around a hypervelocity reentry vehicle undergo dissociation, rovibrational excitation and ionization. More specifically the air, initially 80% N2 and 20% O2, in the shock layer consists of species such as N, O, N2, O2, NO, N+, O+, N+, O+, NO+ and 2 free electrons. It was pointed out in multi temperature models'' that the temperature of the rotational energy modes and the gas-kinetic translational temperature are quickly equilibrated by a few collisions and rise rapidly to high temperatures as 50000K before falling off to equilibrium value of 10000K. Contrary, the electronic and vibrational temperatures state energy distributions remain low (less than 15000K) because of the slow equilibration. Electron vibrational energy transfer is thought to play a crucial role in such a ionizing flow regime since chemical reaction rates and dissociation depend strongly on the vibrational temperatures. Modeling of these flowfields in principle require the rovibrational excitation and de-excitation cross section data for average electron energies from threshold up to several eV (leV=11605.4 K). In this lecture we focus on theoretical description of rotational effects i.e. energy transfer of electrons to molecules such that the molecular rotational (vojo goes to voj) or vibrational and rotational (v(sub 0)j(sub 0) goes to vj) states are changed. Excitation and de-excitation of electronic states was discussed in a previous talk at this conference.

  11. Electron excitation after plasmon decay in proton-aluminum collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bocan, G.; Miraglia, J.E.

    2003-03-01

    When a projectile travels inside a metal, it interacts with the electron gas, producing both binary and collective excitations (plasmons). Within the nearly-free-electron-gas scheme, Roesler and co-workers showed that plasmons decay in first order and a conduction electron is emitted (interband transition). Working within the frame of atomic collisions, we develop a simple model to describe this decay. The first-order Born expansion is used to approximate the electron wave functions. The influence of the lattice potential on the excited electron is considered in the calculations in order to balance the momentum-conservation equation. It gives contributions associated with sites of the reciprocal lattice. The potential expansion coefficients are obtained following Animalu and co-workers [Philos. Mag. 9, 451 (1964)]. First- and second-differential spectra (in energy and angle) are analyzed discriminating contributions due to different lattice momenta. In all cases, contributions due to binary excitations of the valence electrons and inner-shell ionization are presented to establish a comparison.

  12. Electron collisions with the CH2O-H2O complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, T. C.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.

    2009-11-01

    In this conference we will present cross sections for elastic electron collisions with the CH2O-H2O complex bonded through hydrogen bond. We will investigate electron collisions with different structures of this complex which were obtained by Classical Monte Carlo simulations. This work would help in understanding the hole of water in the dissociative electron attachment in biological molecules.

  13. Electrostatic ion beam trap for electron collision studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heber, O.; Witte, P.D.; Diner, A.; Bhushan, K.G.; Strasser, D.; Toker, Y.; Rappaport, M.L.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Altstein, N.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a system combining an ion beam trap and a low energy electron target in which the interaction between electrons and vibrationally cold molecular ions and clusters can be studied. The entire system uses only electrostatic fields for both trapping and focusing, thus being able to store particles without a mass limit. Preliminary results for the electron impact neutralization of C{sub 2}{sup -} ions and aluminum clusters are presented.

  14. Absorption effects in electron-sulfur-dioxide collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Santos, A. S. dos; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Souza, G. L. C. de; Homem, M. G. P.; Michelin, S. E.; Brescansin, L. M.

    2011-09-15

    A joint experimental-theoretical study on electron-SO{sub 2} collisions in the low and intermediate energy range is reported. More specifically, experimental elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections in absolute scale are measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range using the relative-flow technique. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections as well as grand-total and total absorption cross sections are also presented in the 1-1000 eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics, whereas the Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations. Comparison of the present results is made with the theoretical and experimental results available in the literature.

  15. Coordinate space translation technique for simulation of electronic process in the ion-atom collision.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Hong, Xuhai; Wang, Jian; Kim, Kwang S

    2011-04-21

    Recently we developed a theoretical model of ion-atom collisions, which was made on the basis of a time-dependent density functional theory description of the electron dynamics and a classical treatment of the heavy particle motion. Taking advantage of the real-space grid method, we introduce a "coordinate space translation" technique to allow one to focus on a certain space of interest such as the region around the projectile or the target. Benchmark calculations are given for collisions between proton and oxygen over a wide range of impact energy. To extract the probability of charge transfer, the formulation of Lüdde and Dreizler [J. Phys. B 16, 3973 (1983)] has been generalized to ensemble-averaging application in the particular case of O((3)P). Charge transfer total cross sections are calculated, showing fairly good agreements between experimental data and present theoretical results.

  16. Target electron ionization in Li2+-Li collisions: A multi-electron perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śpiewanowski, M. D.; Gulyás, L.; Horbatsch, M.; Kirchner, T.

    2015-05-01

    The recent development of the magneto-optical trap reaction-microscope has opened a new chapter for detailed investigations of charged-particle collisions from alkali atoms. It was shown that energy-differential cross sections for ionization from the outer-shell in O8+-Li collisions at 1500 keV/amu can be readily explained with the single-active-electron approximation. Understanding of K-shell ionization, however, requires incorporating many-electron effects. An ionization-excitation process was found to play an important role. We present a theoretical study of target electron removal in Li2+-Li collisions at 2290 keV/amu. The results indicate that in outer-shell ionization a single-electron process plays the dominant part. However, the K-shell ionization results are more difficult to interpret. On one hand, we find only weak contributions from multi-electron processes. On the other hand, a large discrepancy between experimental and single-particle theoretical results indicate that multi-electron processes involving ionization from the outer shell may be important for a complete understanding of the process. Work supported by NSERC, Canada and the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund.

  17. Breit-Pauli oscillator strengths and electron excitation collision strengths for Si VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: Oscillator strengths and electron impact excitation collision strengths for transitions between the 68 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p3, 2s2p4, 2p5, 2s22p23s, 2s22p23p, 2s22p23d and 2s2p33s configurations in Si VIII are calculated. Thermally averaged collision strengths are presented as a function of electron temperature for application to solar and other astrophysical plasmas. Methods: The collision strengths have been calculated using the B-splineBreit-Pauli R-matrixmethod for allowed and forbidden transitions in Si VIII. The relativistic effects have been incorporated through mass, Darwin and spin-orbit one-body operators in the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian in the scattering calculation, while in the calculation of oscillator strengths the one-body and two-body relativistic operators are included. Flexible non-orthogonal sets of spectroscopic and correlation radial functions are used to obtain accurate description of Si VIII levels and to represent the scattering functions. The 68 fine-structure levels of the 2s22p3, 2s2p4, 2p5, 2s22p23s, 2s22p23p, 2s22p23d and 2s2p33s configurations have been considered in both the radiative and scattering calculations. The present scattering calculations are more extensive than previous ones, leading to a total 2278 transitions between fine-structure levels. Results: The calculated excitation energies are in excellent agreement with experiment and represent an improvement over the previous calculations. The present collision strengths show reasonable agreement with the previously available R-matrix and distorted-wave calculations. The oscillator strengths for E1 transitions normally compare very well with previous calculations. The effective collision strengths are obtained by integrating total resonant and non-resonant collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies and these are presented over a wide temperature range from 104 to 4.0 × 106 K. Tables 1-4 are only available in electronic form at

  18. Single and double electron capture in p-He and α-He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaddar, S.; Halder, S.; Mondal, A.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.; Das, T. K.

    2017-03-01

    The differential and total cross sections for both single and double electron capture in collisions of {{{H}}}+ and He2+ with ground state helium atom have been studied by means of the four-body model of target continuum distorted wave (TCDW-4B) approximation in the energy range from 30 to 1000 keV amu–1. In this model, distortion in the final channel related to the Coulomb continuum states of the active electron(s) in the field of residual target ion are included. The calculations are based on the independent electron model. The present computed results are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical results. Total cross sections are found to be in good agreement with the measurements. We have also analysed differential cross sections (DCS) for both single and double electron capture in the collision of proton and α-particles with helium atoms at different projectile energies. The present DCS data exhibits the typical steeply decreasing dependence on the projectile scattering angles, but neither oscillating structures characteristic of interference effects nor peaks reminiscent of the Thomas peak are observed at different projectile energies. The obtained results for the DCS into the ground state are compared with the experimental data and overall a satisfactory agreement has been found. Finally we have also studied the variation of double to single capture differential cross-section ratios with projectile scattering angles at different impact energies.

  19. Single electron transfer in He+-He+ collision and production of helium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizan, Shima; Fathi, Reza; Shojaei, Farideh

    2017-02-01

    The four body Born distorted wave (BDW-4B) approximation with correct boundary condition is used for single electron transfer in He+-He+ collision. The post and prior total cross sections are obtained in the energy range 10-1000 keV/amu and the post-prior discrepancy is estimated. The sensitivity of the results with respect to the choice of the final helium-like ground state wave function is evaluated through two different wave functions. The importance of the dynamic electron correlations is tested as a function of impact energy. Additional experimental data at higher impact energies is needed for a better assessment of the validity of the present theory.

  20. Electron Impact Fragmentation of CH4 Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Oguri, Kazuhiro; Makochekanwa, Casten; Kitajima, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    Absolute electron-molecule impact dissociation cross sections are of interest in many fields of physics and chemistry, plasma etching of microelectronic devices and other industrial applications. However, experimental data on these cross sections is scarce mainly because of the difficulties involved in measuring neutral fragments [1]. Electron impact dissociation of CH4 molecules into the CH3 radicals have been investigated over the energy range 15.0 to 37.0 eV. The experimental procedure involves a dual-electron-beam in a two-stage collision system in conjunction with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). This is similar to the threshold-ionization mass spectrometry method [2]. Significant differences, in magnitude up to four times at 100 eV, exist between the only available absolute measurements by Sugai et al. [2] and Moore et al. [3]. Our data shows very close agreement with the Moore et al. data, which which show reasonable consistency with the available CH4 total dissociation data by Winters [3]. [1] L. S. Polak and D. I. Slovetsky, Int. J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 8, 257 (1976). [2] H. Sugai, H. Toyoda and T. Nakano, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 30, 2912 (1991). [3] H. F. Winters, J. Chem. Phys. 63, 3462 (1975).

  1. Electron-impact excitation of Ne4+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, D. C.; Badnell, N. R.

    2000-10-01

    We present the results of extensive close-coupling calculations of electron-impact excitation of the C-like ion, Ne4+. We first compare effective collision strengths determined from a 20-level Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculation with those obtained from a 20-level intermediate-coupling frame transformation (ICFT) R-matrix calculation. The ICFT method was also employed to perform two much larger calculations; we compare the effective collision strengths determined from these calculations with each other and with those obtained from the 20-level calculations in order to assess the effects of increasing both the size of the configuration-interaction expansion of the target and the size of the close-coupling expansion. Our final calculation, with 130 terms and 261 levels in the configuration-interaction expansion of the target and 66 terms and 138 levels in the close-coupling expansion, provides improved data for excitation between the levels of the 2s22p2, 2s2p3 and 2p4 configurations and the first close-coupling results for excitation to the levels of the 2s22p3ℓ configurations in Ne4+.

  2. Single- and Multiple-Electron Removal Processes in Proton-Water Vapor Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Kirchner, Tom; Horbatsch, Marko; Jürgen Lüdde, Hans

    2012-06-01

    Charge-state correlated cross sections for single- and multiple-electron removal processes due to capture and ionization in proton-H2O collisions are calculated by using the non-perturbative basis generator method adapted for ion-molecule collisions [1]. Orbital-specific cross sections for vacancy production are evaluated using this method to predict the yields of charged fragments (H2O^+, OH^+, H^+, O^+) according to branching ratios known to be valid at high impact energies. At intermediate and low energies, we obtain fragmentation results on the basis of predicted multi-electron removal cross sections, and explain most of the available experimental data [2]. The cross sections for charge transfer and for ionization are also compared with recent multi-center classical-trajectory Monte Carlo calculations [3] for impact energies from 20keV to several MeV. [4pt] [1] H.J. L"udde et al, Phys. Rev. A 80, 060702(R) (2009)[0pt] [2] M. Murakami et al, to be submitted to Phys. Rev. A (2012)[0pt] [3] C. Illescas et al, Phys. Rev. A 83, 052704 (2011)

  3. Employment Impact of Electronic Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecker, Daniel E.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic business is stimulating employment in some sectors across industries, such as computer-related and customer service occupations, and diminishing employment in others, such as administrative support and marketing/sales. Similarly, employment impacts will vary by industry. (Contains 56 notes and references.) (SK)

  4. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases: Electron Collisions - Experiment, Theory, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules represent one of the very early topics of quantum mechanics. In spite of the field's maturity, a number of recent developments in detector technology (e.g., the ``reaction microscope'' or the ``magnetic-angle changer'') and the rapid increase in computational resources have resulted in significant progress in the measurement, understanding, and theoretical/computational description of few-body Coulomb problems. Close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists worldwide continue to produce high-quality benchmark data, which allow for thoroughly testing and further developing a variety of theoretical approaches. As a result, it has now become possible to reliably calculate the vast amount of atomic data needed for detailed modelling of the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres, the interpretation of astrophysical data, optimizing the energy transport in reactive plasmas, and many other topics - including light-driven processes, in which electrons are produced by continuous or short-pulse ultra-intense electromagnetic radiation. I will highlight some of the recent developments that have had a major impact on the field. This will be followed by showcasing examples, in which accurate electron collision data enabled applications in fields beyond traditional AMO physics. Finally, open problems and challenges for the future will be outlined. I am very grateful for fruitful scientific collaborations with many colleagues, and the long-term financial support by the NSF through the Theoretical AMO and Computational Physics programs, as well as supercomputer resources through TeraGrid and XSEDE.

  5. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen elastic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Makhoute, A.

    2004-06-01

    We study the effects of the relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions. We begin by considering the case when no radiation is present. This is necessary in order to check the consistency of our calculations and we then carry out the calculations using the relativistic Dirac-Volkov states. It turns out that a simple formal analogy links the analytical expressions of the unpolarized differential cross section without laser and the unpolarized differential cross section in the presence of a laser field.

  6. Inelastic collisions of the uracil molecules with electrons.

    PubMed

    Shafranyosh, I I; Sukhoviya, M I

    2012-11-14

    Ionization and excitation of the uracil molecules by electron impact is investigated. Production of positive ions of uracil molecules (nucleic acid base) was studied using a crossed electron and molecular beam technique. The method developed by the authors enabled the molecular beam intensity to be measured and the electron dependences and the absolute values of the total cross sections of production of both positive ions to be determined. It is shown that the total positive uracil ion production cross section reaches its maximal value of (1.0 ± 0.1) × 10(-15) cm(2) at the 95 eV electron energy. Dissociative ionization cross sections were also determined. The luminescence spectra of isolated uracil molecules in the wavelength range of 200-500 nm under the influence of slow electrons are obtained. In the spectrum, more than 20 spectral bands and lines at 100 eV electron energy are observed. It is shown that the uracil radiation spectrum is formed by the processes of molecules dissociative excitation, dissociative excitation with ionization, excitation of electronic levels of the initial molecule and molecular ion.

  7. Improved atomic data for electron-transport predictions by the codes TIGER and TIGERP. I. Inner-shell ionization by electron collision

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, J.M.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The inner-shell ionization data for electron-target collisions now in use in the TIGER and TIGERP electron-transport codes are extracted and compared with other data for these processes. The TIGER cross sections for K-shell ionization by electron collisions are found to be seriously in error for large-Z targets and incident electron energies greater than 1 MeV. A series of TIGER and TIGERP runs were carried out with and without improved K-shell electron ionization cross section data replacing that now in use. The relative importance of electron-impact and photon ionization of the various subshells was also extracted from these runs. In general, photon ionization dominated in the examples studied so the sensitivity of many predicted properties to errors in the electron-impact subshell ionization data was not large. However, some differences were found and, as all possible applications were not covered in this study, it is recommended that these electron-impact data now in TIGER and TIGERP be replaced. Cross section data for the processes under study are reviewed and those that are most suitable for this application are identified. 19 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Collision lifetimes and impact statistics of near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottke, W. F., Jr.; Nolan, M. C.; Greenberg, R.

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the lifetimes of Near-Earth asteroids (NEA's) by directly computing the collision probabilities with other asteroids and with the terrestrial planets. We compare these to the dynamical lifetimes, and to collisional lifetimes assumed by other workers. We discuss the implications of the differences. The lifetimes of NEA's are important because, along with the statistics of craters on the Earth and Moon, they help us to compute the number of NEA's and the rate at which new NEA's are brought to the vicinity of the Earth. Assuming that the NEA population is in steady-state, the lifetimes determine the flux of new bodies needed to replenish the population. Earlier estimates of the lifetimes ignored (or incompletely accounted for) the differences in the velocities of asteroids as they move in their orbits, so our results differ from (for example) Greenberg and Chapman (1983, Icarus 55, 455) and Wetherill (1988, Icarus 76, 1) by factors of 2 to 10. We have computed the collision rates and relative velocities of NEA's with each other, the main-belt asteroids, and the terrestrial planets, using the corrected method described by Bottke et. al. (1992, GRL, in press). We find that NEA's typically have shorter collisional lifetimes than do main-belt asteroids of the same size, due to their high eccentricities, which typically give them aphelia in the main belt. Consequently, they spend a great deal of time in the main belt, and are moving much slower than the bodies around them, making them 'sitting ducks' for impacts with other asteroids. They cross the paths of many objects, and their typical collision velocities are much higher (10-15 km/s) than the collision velocities (5 km/s) among objects within the main belt. These factors combine to give them substantially shorter lifetimes than had been previously estimated.

  9. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  10. Measurement of electron-impact excitation in boronlike carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafyatis, G. P.; Kohl, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    The cross section for the electron-impact excitation of C(+) (2s2 2p 2P0)-(2s2p2 2D) is measured in a colliding-beams apparatus for several collision energies near the threshold for the process. A cross section of (1.1 + or - 0.3) x 10 to the -16th sq cm at threshold is found. Reasonable agreement is found with close-coupling calculations.

  11. Electron Capture Processes Following Collisions of He^2+ Ions with Molecular Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Haija, O.

    2005-05-01

    Energy-gain spectra, absolute state-selective and total cross sections have been measured for single-electron capture processes in collisions of He^2+ ions with O2, H2O, CO2, N2, and NH3 at impact energies between 100 eV and 1600 eV and scattering angles between 0^o and 6^o using the translational energy-gain spectroscopy (TES) technique. As apparent from the translational energy-gain measurements, single-electron capture (SEC) from O2 and H2O proceeds by both dissociative and non-dissociative channels, whereas for N2 and CO2 only dissociative SEC has been observed. However, for NH3 the non-dissociative SEC channel is found to be predominantly populated. Total cross sections have also been compared with available measurements and theoretical calculations based on Landua-Zener model and Demkov model.

  12. Electron Impact Excitation of Ti XVIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jia Yong; Zeng, Jiao Long; Zhao, Gang; Bari, Muhanmmud Abbas; Zhang, Jie

    2005-10-01

    Two different methods were used to calculate the collision strengths of boron-like titanium. One was a close-coupling way using the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC) of P. H. Norrington and I. P. Grant (private communication), and the other was based on a relativistic distorted-wave (RDW) approximation with a Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) by Gu (2003). For DARC, the lowest 125 fine-structure levels belonging to the (1s2) 2s22p, 2s2p2, 2p3, 2s23l, 2s2p3l, and 2p23l (l=s, p, and d) configurations were included in the calculations. The target model space encompassed the lowest 15 levels, and all 105Δn=0 transitions together with 40 partial waves were included in calculations of the collision strengths. For FAC, the configuration interactions included in the calculations of atomic structure and excitation were among the same configurations of DARC. The collision strengths for all 125 levels were calculated at 10 scattered electron energies (10-10000eV). The effective collision strengths, obtained after integrating the collision strengths of two codes over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies, were also calculated for the electron temperatures in the range (50-500eV). For application to spectral modeling or diagnostics, we report a complete set of data for the energy levels, radiative rates, and effective collision strengths (only FAC) for all transitions.

  13. Comprehensive comparison of collision induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Molina, Henrik; Matthiesen, Rune; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-07-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a recently introduced mass spectrometric technique which has proven to be an excellent tool for the elucidation of labile post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation of serine and threonine residues. However, unlike collision induced dissociation (CID), which has been studied for decades, the intricacies of ETD-based fragmentation have not yet been firmly established or systematically addressed. In this analysis, we have systematically compared the CID and ETD fragmentation patterns for the large majority of the peptides that do not contain such labile modifications. Using a standard 48 protein mix, we were able to measure false-positive rates for the experiments and also assess a large number of peptides for a detailed comparison of CID and ETD fragmentation pattern. Analysis of approximately 19,000 peptides derived from both standard proteins and complex protein samples revealed that (i) CID identified 50% more peptides than ETD; (ii) ETD resulted in approximately 20% increase in amino acid sequence coverage over CID; and (iii) combining CID and ETD fragmentation increased the sequence coverage for an average tryptic peptide to 92%. Interestingly, our analysis revealed that nearly 60% of all ETD-identified peptides carried two positive charges, which is in sharp contrast to what has been generally accepted. We also present a novel strategy for automatic validation of peptide assignments based on identification of a peptide by consecutive CID and ETD fragmentation in an alternating mode.

  14. Two active-electron classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods for ion-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F.; Errea, L. F.; Pons, B.

    2009-10-15

    We introduce two active-electron classical trajectory Monte Carlo models for ion-He collisions, in which the electron-electron force is smoothed using a Gaussian kernel approximation for the pointwise classical particles. A first model uses independent pairs of Gaussian electrons, while a second one employs time-dependent mean-field theory to define an averaged electron-electron repulsion force. These models are implemented for prototypical p+He collisions and the results are compared to available experimental and theoretical data.

  15. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  16. PREFACE: XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orel, Ann; Starace, Anthony F.; Nikolić, Dragan; Berrah, Nora; Gorczyca, Thomas W.; Kamber, Emanuel Y.; Tanis, John A.

    2009-12-01

    The XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held on the campus of Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo during 22-28 July 2009. Kalamazoo, the home of a major state university amid pleasant surroundings, was a delightful place for the conference. The 473 scientific participants, 111 of whom were students, had many fruitful discussions and exchanges that contributed to the success of the conference. Participants from 43 countries made the conference truly international in scope. The 590 abstracts that were presented on the first four days formed the heart of the conference and provided ample opportunity for discussion. This change, allowing the conference to end with invited talks, was a departure from the format used at previous ICPEAC gatherings in which the conferences ended with a poster session. The abstracts were split almost equally between the three main conference areas, i.e., photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions, and the posters were distributed across the days of the conference so that approximately equal numbers of abstracts in the different areas were scheduled for each day. Of the total number of presented abstracts, 517 of these are included in this proceedings volume, the first time that abstracts have been published by ICPEAC. There were 5 plenary lectures covering the different areas of the conference: Paul Corkum (University of Ottawa) talked on attosecond physics with atoms and molecules, Serge Haroche (Collège de France) on non-destructive photon counting, Toshiyuki Azuma (Tokyo Metropolitan University) on resonant coherent excitation of highly-charged ions in crystals, Eva Lindroth (Stockholm University) on atomic structure effects, and Alfred Müller (Justus Liebig University) on resonance phenomena in electron- and photon-ion collisions. Two speakers gave very illuminating public lectures that drew many people from the local area, as well as conference participants: Patricia Dehmer

  17. Electron Impact Ionization of the Rare Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Birgit

    2008-10-01

    Detailed information about the electron impact ionization process can be obtained from fully differential cross section measurements, in which the ionized electron is detected in coincidence with the outgoing scattered projectile electron. Incident and outgoing electron momenta are completely determined in these measurements. A considerable body of experimental and theoretical data exists for H and He targets, and the level of agreement between theory and experiment for these simple atoms is exceptional. However, there are still significant discrepancies between theory and experiment in the case of ionization of more complex atomic targets such as the heavier rare gas atoms. In this talk I will present recent measurements and theoretical predictions of fully differential cross sections for ionization of a range of rare gas targets: He, Ne, Ar and Xe. The talk will concentrate primarily on experiments which have been performed by two experimental groups, our group in Australia [1-3] and that of Lahmam-Bennani [3-5] in France. The experimental conditions span two different kinematic regimes, one with intermediate incident electron energy and low ejected electron energy, and the other with higher incident electron energy, and ejected electron energies which correspond to large energy transfer in the collision process. All experiments have been performed in a coplanar asymmetric configuration in which the scattered electron is detected at a small forward scattering angle. The experimental apparatus used in Australia is of quite different design to that in France, and I will present the results of an experiment in which the two groups have collaborated to produce data under identical kinematic conditions and for the same targets, using these two very different experimental approaches. This comprehensive set of experimental data has provided an interesting challenge to theory, and I will discuss the state of play with regard to the alignment between curent state

  18. Dirac R-matrix calculation for electron-impact excitation of S xiii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Liang, G. Y.; Bari, M. A.; Zhao, G.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Sulfur emission lines in the soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet regions are observed in a variety of laboratory and astrophysical spectra. But accurate electron impact excitation data for S xiii for state-of-the-art NLTE spectral models are scarce. Aims: We calculated electron-impact excitation collision strengths and effective collision strengths of S xiii for transitions among the lowest-lying 98 fine-structure states 1s22lnl' corresponding to principal quantum numbers n = 2,3,4. The effective collision strengths for these transitions were computed over a wide temperature range (log 10Te (K) = 4.53-7.53) for various astrophysical plasma conditions. Methods: We used the fully-relativistic parallel Dirac R-matrix code to calculate collision strengths. To generate target wavefunctions and energy levels for scattering calculations, we employed the GRASP0 multi-configuration Dirac-Fock code for states up to n = 5. Results: The wavefunctions are generated from 27 configurations - 1s22lnl'(n = 2,3,4,5) - giving rise to 166 jj energy levels. The collision and effective collision strengths among the lowest 98 fine-structure levels are compared with the previous theoretical calculations. The collision strengths for most transitions agree well at higher incident electron energies. Conclusions: The resonant contributions to effective collision strengths are most dominant at lower temperatures.

  19. Theorectical Studies of Excitation in Low-Energy Electron-Polyatomic Molecule Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, T N; McCurdy, C W; Isaacs, W A; Orel, A E; Meyer, H D

    2001-08-13

    This paper focuses on the channeling of energy from electronic to nuclear degrees of freedom in electron-polyatomic molecule collisions. We examine the feasibility of attacking the full scattering problem, both the fixed-nuclei electronic problem and the post-collision nuclear dynamics, entirely from first principles. The electron-CO{sub 2} system is presented as an example. We study resonant vibrational excitation, showing how a6 initio, fixed-nuclei electronic cross sections can provide the necessary input for a multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear vibrational dynamics.

  20. Collisions of low-energy electrons with formamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2010-06-01

    We present integral and momentum transfer cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by formamide (HCONH2) from 1 to 12 eV. To calculate the cross sections we employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange-polarization approximations. We found a π* shape resonance belonging to the A″ symmetry which is located at around 4.5 eV in the static-exchange approximation, and at around 2.5 eV in the static-exchange-polarization approximation. This result is in close agreement with the observations of Seydou [Eur. Phys. J. DEPJDF61434-606010.1140/epjd/e2005-00089-5 35, 199 (2005)] which reported the value of 2.05 eV to the vertical electron attachment energy, and is lower than the value of 3.77 eV computed by Goumans [J. Chem. Theory Comp.JPCBFK1549-961810.1021/ct800379h 5, 217 (2009)]. We carried out additional minimal basis set electronic structure calculations to help in the interpretation of our results. Our results support the conclusions of Goumans , namely, that this resonance may initiate the indirect dissociation mechanism of formamide by electron impact.

  1. Recent measurements concerning uranium hexafluoride-electron collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Srivastava, S.; Williams, W.; Cartwright, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Scattering of electrons by UF6 molecules was studied at impact energies ranging from 5 to 100 eV and momentum transfer, elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections were determined. The measurements also yielded spectroscopic information which made possible to extend the optical absorption cross sections from 2000 angstroms to 435 angstroms. It was found that UF6 is a very strong absorber in the vacuum UV region. No transitions were found to lie below the onset of the optically detected 3.0 eV feature.

  2. Collision Strengths for Electron Collisional Excitation of S II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in S II are calculated using the R-matrix method in a 19-state (3s(sup 2)3p(sup 3)(sup 4)S(sup o), (sup 2)D(sup o), (sup 2)p(sup o), 3s3p(sup 4)(sup 4)P, (sup 2)D, (sup 2)S, 3S(sup 2)3p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F, (sup 4)D, (sup 2)F, (sup 4)P, 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2)4p(sup 2)S(s o), (sup 4)D(sup o), (sup 4)P(sup o), (sup 2)D(sup o), (sup 4)S(sup o), (sup 2)P(sup o)) close-coupling approximation. These target states are represented by extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that give excitation energies and oscillator strengths that are usually in good agreement with the experimental values and the available accurate calculations. The present results for collision strengths are in very good agreement with the recent merged beams energy loss measurement of Liao et al. and agree reasonably well with the 18-state R-matrix calculation of Ramsbottom, Bell, & Stafford, but show significant differences from the 12-state R-matrix calculation of Cai & Pradhan.

  3. Ringing After a High-Energy Collision: Ambipolar Oscillations During Impact Plasma Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    High-velocity impacts on the Moon and other airless bodies deliver energy and material to the lunar surface and exosphere. The target and i mpactor material may become vaporized and ionized to form a collision al plasma that expands outward and eventually becomes collisionless. In the present work, kinetic simulations of the later collision less stage of impact plasma expansion are performed. Attention is paid to characterizing "ambipolar oscillations" in which thermodynamic distur bances propagate outward to generate "ringing" within the expanding e lectron cloud, which could radiate an electromagnetic signature of lo cal plasma conditions. The process is not unlike a beam-plasma intera ction, with the perturbing electron population in the present case ac ting as a highly thermal "beam" that resonates along the expanding de nsity gradient. Understanding the electromagnetic aspects of impact p lasma expansion could provide insight into the lasting effects of nat ural, impact-generated currents on airless surfaces and charging haza rds to human exploration infrastructure and instrumentation.

  4. Computational Study of Electron-Molecule Collisions Related to Low-Temperature Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1997-10-01

    Computational study of electron-molecule collisions not only complements experimental measurements, but can also be used to investigate processes not readily accessible experimentally. A number of ab initio computational methods are available for this type of calculations. Here we describe a recently developed technique, the finite element Z-matrix method. Analogous to the R-matrix method, it partitions the space into regions and employs real matrix elements. However, unlike the implementation of the R-matrix method commonly used in atomic and molecular physics,(C. J. Gillan, J. Tennyson, and P. G. Burke, Chapter 10 in Computational Methods for Electron-Molecule Collisions), W. M. Huo and F. A. Gianturco, Editors, Plenum, New York (1995), p. 239. the Z-matrix method is fully variational.(D. Brown and J. C. Light, J. Chem. Phys. 101), 3723 (1994). In the present implementation, a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians is used to represent the continuum electron, thus offering full flexibility without imposing fixed boundary conditions. Numerical examples include the electron-impact dissociation of N2 via the metastable A^3Σ_u^+ state, a process which may be important in the lower thermosphere, and the dissociation of the CF radical, a process of interest to plasma etching. To understand the dissociation pathways, large scale quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for all target states which dissociate to the lowest five limits in the case of N_2, and to the lowest two limits in the case of CF. For N_2, the structural calculations clearly show the preference for predissociation if the initial state is the ground X^1Σ_g^+ state, but direct dissociation appears to be preferable if the initial state is the A^3Σ_u^+ state. Multi-configuration SCF target functions are used in the collisional calculation,

  5. Electron collisions with the CH{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O complex

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T. C.; Lima, M. A. P.; Canuto, S.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2009-12-15

    We report cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with the CH{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}O complex. We employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange-polarization approximations for energies from 0.1 to 20 eV. We considered four different hydrogen-bonded structures for the complex that were generated by classical Monte Carlo simulations. Our aim is to investigate the effect of the water molecule on the pi* shape resonance of formaldehyde. Previous studies reported a pi* shape resonance for CH{sub 2}O at around 1 eV. The resonance positions of the complexes appear at lower energies in all cases due to the mutual polarization between the two molecules. This indicates that the presence of water may favor dissociation by electron impact and may lead to an important effect on strand breaking in wet DNA by electron impact.

  6. Momentum spectra for single and double electron ionization of He in relativistic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, C. J.; Olson, R. E.; Schmitt, W.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    1997-11-01

    The complete momentum spectra for single and double ionization of He by 1-GeV/u (β=0.88) U92+ have been investigated using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo method corrected for the relativistic projectile. The 1/r12 electron-electron interaction has been included in the post-collision region for double ionization to incorporate the effects of both the nuclear-electron and electron-electron ionizing interactions, and to access the effects of electron correlation in the electron spectra. Experimental measurements were able to determine the longitudinal momentum spectra for single ionization; these observations are in accordance with the theoretical predictions for the three-body momentum balance between projectile, recoil ion, and ionized electron. In particular, the Lorentz contraction of the Coulomb interaction of the projectile manifests itself in the decrease of the post-collision interaction of the projectile with the electron and recoil ion, causing them to recoil back-to-back as in the case for a short electromagnetic pulse. This feature is clearly displayed in both the theoretical and experimental longitudinal momentum spectra, and by comparing to calculations that are performed at the same collision speed but do not include the relativistic potentials. Moreover, collision plane spectra of the three particles demonstrate that the momenta of the recoil ion and ionized electron are preferentially equal, and opposite, to each other. The electron spectra for double ionization show that the inclusion of the electron-electron interaction in the post-collision regime partitions the combined ionization momentum of the electrons so that the electrons are preferentially emitted in opposite azimuthal angles to one another. This is in contrast to calculations made assuming independent electrons.

  7. Low-energy electron collisions with quasi-two electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Bray, Igor; Fursa, Dmitry

    2003-10-01

    We have recently investigated elastic electron scattering from quasi-two electron targets such as Mg, Zn, and Hg. Accurate total and momentum-transfer cross sections for these processes are of interest both for modelling transport processes in various lighting applications [1] and for the fundamental understanding of collision processes in magneto-optical traps and Bose-Einstein condensates [2]. To our big surprise, we found that a convergent description of these collisions within the close-coupling formalism is by no means trivial, since the theoretical results for the scattering lengths and the low-energy p-wave shape resonances, studied experimentally a long time ago [3], depend in a very sensitive way on the details of the numerical model. [1] G.G. Lister, in Low Temperature Plasma Physics (eds. R. Hippler, S. Pfau, M. Schmidt and K.H. Schoenbach), Wiley (New York, 2002) [2] K. Bartschat and H.R. Sadeghpour, J. Phys. B. 36 (2003) L9 [3] P.D. Burrow, J.A. Michejda and J. Comer, J. Phys. B. 9 (1976) 3225

  8. Pathways for nonsequential and sequential fragmentation of CO2 3 + investigated by electron collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Shen, Zhenjie; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Pan, Yi; Lau, Kai-Chung; Chen, Xiangjun

    2015-05-01

    We report nonsequential and sequential fragmentation dynamics of CO2 3 + investigated by electron collision at an impact energy of 500 eV. The dissociation mechanisms are clearly distinguished by combined use of the Dalitz plot together with momentum correlation spectra. The angular distributions and kinetic-energy releases (KERs) of different fragmentation processes are obtained. The dissociation channels of higher excited states of the CO2 3 + molecular ion are opened, which are quite different from the previous studies of heavy-ion collision [N. Neumann, D. Hant, L. Ph. H. Schmidt, J. Titze, T. Jahnke, A. Czasch, M. S. Schöffler, K. Kreidi, O. Jagutzki, H. Schmidt-Böcking, and R. Dörner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 103201 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.103201] and intense laser field [C. Wu, C. Wu, D. Song, H. Su, Y. Yang, Z. Wu, X. Liu, H. Liu, M. Li, Y. Deng, Y. Liu, L.-Y. Peng, H. Jiang, and Q. Gong, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 103601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.103601]. By analyzing KERs together with the help of potential-energy curves exploration at the multireference configuration interaction level, we conclude that the sequential fragmentation occurs in the 2Π ,4Π , and 2Σ+ states of the CO2 3 + ion. The bond length and bond angle are also determined based on the linear fragmentation, indicating that electron impact fragmentation is a potential method to precisely reconstruct the geometry of neutral molecules.

  9. PREFACE: XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. D.; van der Hart, H. W.; McCann, J. F.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2012-11-01

    The XXVII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held at Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland, 27 July - 2 August 2011. Members of the Local Organising Committee were drawn from the School of Mathematics and Physics of Queen's University Belfast, the School of Physical Sciences at Dublin City University, the School of Physics at University College Dublin and the Department of Experimental Physics at the National University of Ireland, Maynooth. The Conference was attended by 566 participants with contributions from 54 countries. The meeting attracted 786 contributed papers for presentation in the poster sessions. The conference included 20 Special Reports selected from the contributed papers, and these are included in part 1 of this volume. During the meeting a total of 65 Progress Reports were also presented, and the authors invited to submit written versions of their talks (see Part 1). Of the total number of contributed papers, 663 are included as refereed abstracts in parts 2 to 15 of this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Part 1 of this volume includes detailed write-ups of the majority of plenary lectures, progress reports and special reports, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting, and is additionally published in hard-copy as the Conference Proceedings. There were 5 plenary lectures given by Margaret Murnane on Ultrafast processes in atomic dynamics; Chris Greene on Few-body highly-correlated dynamics; Michael Allan on Electron-molecule collisions; Yasunori Yamazaki on Antiproton and positron collisions and Thomas Stöhlker on Relativistic ion collisions. Ian Spielman, winner of the IUPAP Young Scientist Prize for 2011, gave a special lecture entitled Modifying interatomic interactions using Raman coupling: a tale of slowly colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. In addition an evening public lecture by Mike Baillie on How precise tree-ring dating raises issues concerning the

  10. Close-coupling calculations of fine-structure excitation of Ne II due to H and electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Wang, Qianxia; Loch, Stuart; Pindzola, Michael; Schultz, David R.; Buenker, Robert; McLaughlin, Brendan; Ballance, Connor

    2016-06-01

    Fine-structure transitions within the ground term of ions and neutral atoms dominate the cooling in a variety of molecular regions and also provide important density and temperature diagnostics. While fine-structure rates due to electron collisions have been studied for many systems, data are generally sparse for elements larger than oxygen, at low temperatures, and for collisions due to heavy particles. We provide rate coefficients for H collisions for the first time. The calculations were performed using the quantum molecular-orbital close-coupling approach and the elastic approximation. The heavy-particle collisions use new potential energies for the lowest-lying NeH+ states computed with the MRDCI method. The focus of the electron-impact calculations is to provide fine-structure excitation rate coefficients down to 10 K. We compare with previous calculations at higher temperatures (Griffin et al. 2001), and use a range of calculations to provide an estimate of the uncertainty on our recommended rate coefficients. A brief discussion of astrophysical applications is also provided.Griffin, D.C., et al., 2001, J. Phys. B, 34, 4401This work partially supported by NASA grant No. NNX15AE47G.

  11. A split-step method to include electron-electron collisions via Monte Carlo in multiple rate equation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthmacher, Klaus; Molberg, Andreas K.; Rethfeld, Bärbel; Gulley, Jeremy R.

    2016-10-01

    A split-step numerical method for calculating ultrafast free-electron dynamics in dielectrics is introduced. The two split steps, independently programmed in C++11 and FORTRAN 2003, are interfaced via the presented open source wrapper. The first step solves a deterministic extended multi-rate equation for the ionization, electron-phonon collisions, and single photon absorption by free-carriers. The second step is stochastic and models electron-electron collisions using Monte-Carlo techniques. This combination of deterministic and stochastic approaches is a unique and efficient method of calculating the nonlinear dynamics of 3D materials exposed to high intensity ultrashort pulses. Results from simulations solving the proposed model demonstrate how electron-electron scattering relaxes the non-equilibrium electron distribution on the femtosecond time scale.

  12. Impact fracture experiments simulating interstellar grain-grain collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann; Chang, Sherwood; Dickinson, J. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Oxide and silicate grains condensing during the early phases of the formation of the solar system or in the outflow of stars are exposed to high partial pressures of the low-z elements H, C, N and O and their simple gaseous compounds. Though refractory minerals are nominally anhydrous and non-carbonate, if they crystallize in the presence of H2O, N2 and CO or CO2 gases, they dissolve traces of the gaseous components. The question arises: How does the presence of dissolved gases or gas components manifest itself when grain-grain collisions occur. What are the gases emitted when grains are shattered during a collision event. Researchers report on fracture experiments in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, approximately less than 10 to the -8th power mbar) designed to measure (by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer, QMS, with microns to ms time resolution) the emission of gases and vapors during and after impact (up to 1.5 sec). Two terrestrial materials were chosen which represent structural and compositional extremes: olivine (San Carlos, AZ), a densely packed Mg-Fe(2+) silicate from the upper mantle, available as 6 to 12 mm single crystals, and obsidian (Oregon), a structurally open, alkaline-SiO2-rich volcanic glass. In the olivine crystals OH- groups have been identified spectroscopically, as well as H2 molecules. Obsidian is a water-rich glass containing OH- besides H2O molecules. Olivine from the mantle often contains CO2, either as CO2-rich fluid in fluid inclusions or structurally dissolved or both. By analogy to synthetic glasses CO2 in the obsidian may be present in form of CO2 molecules in voids of molecular dimensions, or as carbonate anions, CO3(2-). No organic molecules have been detected spectroscopically in either material. Results indicate that refractory oxide/silicates which contain dissolved traces of the H2O and CO/CO2 components but no spectroscopically detectable traces of organics may release complex H-C-O (possibly H-C-N-O) molecules upon fracture

  13. Electron impact excitation of Si II and Fe XIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-01-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates, lifetimes, collision strengths and effective collision strengths are calculated for two important Al-like ions, namely Si II and Fe XIV. For Si II, the lowest 56 levels of the 3s23p, 3s3p2 3p3 3s23d, 3s3p3d, 3s24l and 3s25l configurations are included, whereas for Fe XIV additional 80 levels of 3p23d, 3s3d2 and 3p3d2 are considered, but not of 3s2 5l. For the determination of atomic structure GRASP has been adopted and radiative rates are calculated for all E1, E2, Ml and M2 transitions. Electron impact excitation collision strengths are calculated with the DARC code, over a wide energy range, and resonances are resolved in a fine energy mesh to determine effective collision strengths over a wide range of temperatures. Extensive comparisons are made for all atomic parameters with available theoretical and experimental data, and the accuracy of the present results is assessed. Energy levels are estimated to be accurate to ~1% and all other parameters to be better than 20%.

  14. Few electron transitions in atomic collisions. Final report, September 1, 1992--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, J.

    1997-04-01

    During the past three years we have evaluated probabilities and cross sections for few and multiple electron transitions in atomic collisions. Our studies included interactions of atoms and molecules with incident protons, bare ions, electrons, positrons, anti-protons, ions carrying electrons and photons. We also: studied the inter-relation between collisions with charged particles and collisions involving various processes with photons. This work has complemented various studies of collisions of atoms with charged particles and with photons as well as more general efforts to understand the nature of multi-electron systems. Our aim has been to begin with relatively simple two electron systems and to focus on fast processes in which there is too little time for complicated processes to occur. We have used a variety of computational techniques, but we emphasize those appropriate for fast collisions in which we hope to obtain insight into the physical nature of the process itself. We generally considered systems in which experimental data was available.

  15. Low energy electron collision parameters for modeling auroral/dayglow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Charles P.

    2011-10-01

    From the tenuous atmospheres of Pluto and Triton to the higher pressure atmospheres of Earth and Titan, electron-collisions with molecular nitrogen continue to warrant attention. The airglow emissions of N2 from the atmospheres of Earth and planetary satellites have been extensively observed. Accurate, consistent cross section data is a necessity for accurate models of how upper atmospheres behave. This enables determinations of solar energy inputs and atmospheric expansion and contraction, which influences satellite orbits for instance. Recent work by Lean et al., Stevens et al., and Kato et al. appear to substantiate our e-+N2 excitation and emission work (e.g., Johnson et al., Malone et al., Young et al. and references therein). Recently, we have focused on the near-threshold-to-peak region of N2 with the goal of providing low energy collision parameters of the X1Σg+ and E3Σg+ transitions for modeling auroral and dayglow phenomena in these N2-rich atmospheres. The Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) emissions, from A3Σu+ transitions, are `bellwether' measurements for diurnal Terrestrial Space Weather variations. However, near-threshold cross section data is still lacking for the a1Πg state, as well as the `slow-cascade' a'1Σu- and w1Δu contributors to LBH emissions. In addition, Vegard-Kaplan (VK) emissions, from the B3Πg transitions, recently observed in Titan's thermosphere, require further improved monoenergetic laboratory measurements. New electron energy-loss measurements, along with direct excitation (integral) cross sections, are presented for excitation of the lower states of N2, with finely-spaced impact energy increments in the threshold-to-peak region. Our recent work, including vibrationally resolved excitation, addresses these atmospheric data needs. Support from NASA's PATM, NSF-RUI, and NSF-Aeronomy programs are gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Impact characteristics of a vehicle population in low speed front to rear collisions.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naoya; Simms, Ciaran K; Wood, Denis P

    2015-06-01

    Rear impact collisions are mostly low severity, but carry a very high societal cost due to reported symptoms of whiplash and related soft tissue injuries. Given the difficulty in physiological measurement of damage in whiplash patients, there is a significant need to assess rear impact severity on the basis of vehicle damage. This paper presents fundamental impact equations on the basis of an equivalent single vehicle to rigid barrier collision in order to predict relationships between impact speed, maximum dynamic crush, mean and peak acceleration, time to common velocity and vehicle stiffness. These are then applied in regression analysis of published staged low speed rear impact tests. The equivalent mean and peak accelerations are linear functions of the collision closing speed, while the time to common velocity is independent of the collision closing speed. Furthermore, the time to common velocity can be used as a surrogate measure of the normalized vehicle stiffness, which provides opportunity for future accident reconstruction.

  17. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Kaushik; Chatterjee, Prasanta Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-10-15

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  18. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. It is shown that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  19. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    DOE PAGES

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; ...

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Importantmore » swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.« less

  20. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  1. Influence of renormalization shielding on the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-04-15

    The renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom are investigated in dense partially ionized plasmas. The effective projectile-target interaction Hamiltonian and the semiclassical trajectory method are employed to obtain the transition amplitude as well as the ionization probability as functions of the impact parameter, the collision energy, and the renormalization parameter. It is found that the renormalization shielding effect suppresses the transition amplitude for the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas. It is also found that the renormalization effect suppresses the differential ionization cross section in the peak impact parameter region. In addition, it is found that the influence of renormalization shielding on the ionization cross section decreases with an increase of the relative collision energy. The variations of the renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization cross section are also discussed.

  2. Quasimolecular electron promotion beyond the 1 s σ and 2 p π channels in slow collisions of H e2 + and He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Schöffler, M.; Goihl, C.; Jahnke, T.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Dörner, R.

    2016-11-01

    The electron emission pattern of transfer ionization in collisions of H e2 + with He was investigated for impact velocities between 0.53 a.u. and 0.77 a.u. (7 keV/u-15 keV/u) employing recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy. This process is known to be dominated by the promotion of the 2 p π quasimolecular orbital into the continuum which results in banana-shaped areas of high electron momentum densities in the collision plane extending from the target to the projectile in velocity space. Asymmetries are explained by a coherent superposition of the 1 s σ channel of quasimolecular promotion with the 2 p π channel. Here we report on additional contributions from channels of higher angular momentum which emerge at the smaller impact velocities. They show up as highly structured electron emission patterns in the plane perpendicular to the direction of impact.

  3. On The Effect of Electron Collisions in the Excitation of Cometary HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Amy J.; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Schloerb, F. Peter; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2004-01-01

    The electron-HCN collision rate for the excitation of rotational transitions of the HCN molecule is evaluated in comets C/1995 01 (Hale-Bopp) and C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). Based on theoretical models of the cometary atmosphere, we show that collisions with electrons can provide a significant excitation mechanism for rotational transitions in the HCN molecule. Computed values of the cross section sigma(sub e-HCN) can be as high as 1.3 x cm2, more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the commonly assumed HCN-H2O cross section. For the ground rotational transitions of HCN, the electron-HCN collision rate is found to exceed the HCN-H2O collision rate at distances greater than 3000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 1000 km from that of Hyakutake. Collisional excitation processes dominate over radiative excitation processes up to a distance of 160,000 km from the cometary nucleus of Hale-Bopp and 50,000 km from that of Hyakutake. Excitation models that neglect electron collisions can underestimate the HCN gas production rates by as much as a factor of 2.

  4. A New Apparatus for Studies of Low Energy Electron Collisions with Nucleotide Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duron, Jessica; Hargreaves, Leigh

    Low-energy electrons, the most copiously produced by-product of radiation cancer therapy, have been shown to be a strong driver of DNA damage in living cells [1]. Quantitative data describing these collisions are presently rare due to technological challenges in performing electron scattering measurements from the nucleobases, e.g. uracil, thymine, guanine, etc. These challenges include the low-vapor pressure of commercial samples (which are powders at room temperature), and the difficulty in making accurate flow measurements from heated gas sources, required to establish the absolute scale of the measured data. Based on techniques pioneered in positron collision physics [2], a new apparatus is presently undergoing commissioning at the California State University Fullerton, which aims to address these issues. We will make the first cross-section measurements for slow (E0 < 30eV) electron collisions with nucleotides. We will report design parameters and ongoing progress in the commissioning of this new experiment.

  5. Enhanced production of low energy electrons by alpha particle impact.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Keun; Titze, Jasmin; Schöffler, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Waitz, Markus; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Sann, Hendrik; Meckel, Moritz; Stuck, Christian; Lenz, Ute; Odenweller, Matthias; Neumann, Nadine; Schössler, Sven; Ullmann-Pfleger, Klaus; Ulrich, Birte; Fraga, Rui Costa; Petridis, Nikos; Metz, Daniel; Jung, Annika; Grisenti, Robert; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Schmidt, Lothar; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2011-07-19

    Radiation damage to living tissue stems not only from primary ionizing particles but to a substantial fraction from the dissociative attachment of secondary electrons with energies below the ionization threshold. We show that the emission yield of those low energy electrons increases dramatically in ion-atom collisions depending on whether or not the target atoms are isolated or embedded in an environment. Only when the atom that has been ionized and excited by the primary particle impact is in immediate proximity of another atom is a fragmentation route known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) enabled. This leads to the emission of a low energy electron. Over the past decade ICD was explored in several experiments following photoionization. Most recent results show its observation even in water clusters. Here we show the quantitative role of ICD for the production of low energy electrons by ion impact, thus approaching a scenario closer to that of radiation damage by alpha particles: We choose ion energies on the maximum of the Bragg peak where energy is most efficiently deposited in tissue. We compare the electron production after colliding He(+) ions on isolated Ne atoms and on Ne dimers (Ne(2)). In the latter case the Ne atom impacted is surrounded by a most simple environment already opening ICD as a deexcitation channel. As a consequence, we find a dramatically enhanced low energy electron yield. The results suggest that ICD may have a significant influence on cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  6. Exact analytical solutions of continuity equation for electron beams precipitating in Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranskis, R. R.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2014-06-10

    The original continuity equation (CE) used for the interpretation of the power law energy spectra of beam electrons in flares was written and solved for an electron beam flux while ignoring an additional free term with an electron density. In order to remedy this omission, the original CE for electron flux, considering beam's energy losses in Coulomb collisions, was first differentiated by the two independent variables: depth and energy leading to partial differential equation for an electron beam density instead of flux with the additional free term. The analytical solution of this partial differential continuity equation (PDCE) is obtained by using the method of characteristics. This solution is further used to derive analytical expressions for mean electron spectra for Coulomb collisions and to carry out numeric calculations of hard X-ray (HXR) photon spectra for beams with different parameters. The solutions revealed a significant departure of electron densities at lower energies from the original results derived from the CE for the flux obtained for Coulomb collisions. This departure is caused by the additional exponential term that appeared in the updated solutions for electron differential density leading to its faster decrease at lower energies (below 100 keV) with every precipitation depth similar to the results obtained with numerical Fokker-Planck solutions. The effects of these updated solutions for electron densities on mean electron spectra and HXR photon spectra are also discussed.

  7. Cylindrical and spherical soliton collision of electron-acoustic waves in non-Maxwellian plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.; Moslem, W. M.; Elghmaz, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    Generation of quasielastic electron-acoustic (EA) waves head-on collision are investigated in non-planar (cylindrical/spherical) plasma composed of cold electrons fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. The cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations describing two bidirectional EA waves are derived and solved analytically. Numerical investigation have shown that only positive electron-acoustic (EA) structures can propagate and collide. The analytical phase shift |Δ A | due to the non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons is different from the Maxwellian case. Both the hot-to-cold electron number density ratio α and nonthermal parameter β have opposite effect on the phase shift behavior. The phase shift of the spherical EA waves is smaller than the cylindrical case, which indicates that the former is more stable for collision. The relevance of the present study to EA waves propagating in the Earth's auroral zone is highlighted.

  8. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  9. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  10. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    PubMed Central

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology–based society. PMID:27317740

  11. Electron Impact of Laser Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-14

    In one apparatus a pulsed electron gun with less than 500 p sec cut off is used * to excite atoms or molecules contained in a gas cell . Time resolved...E can be further complicated by accidental coincidences. These occur when the clock is started and stopped by electrons and photons from different...to study the angular distribution of scattered electrons and will be referred to as electron-beam-gas- cell and crossed electron-beam-gas-beam

  12. Standard line broadening impact theory for hydrogen including penetrating collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, S.; Poquérusse, A.

    2005-10-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in the emission spectra from high-density plasmas, as manifested by a number of experiments. At these high densities short range (small impact parameter) interactions become important and these cannot be adequately handled by the standard theory, whose predictions depend on some cutoffs, necessary to preserve unitarity, the long range approximation, and to ensure the validity of a semiclassical picture. Very recently, as a result of a debate concerning the broadening of isolated ion lines, the importance of penetration of bound electron wave functions by plasma electrons has been realized. By softening the interaction, penetration makes perturbative treatments more valid. The penetration effect has now been included analytically into the standard theory. It turns out that the integrations may be done in closed form in terms of the modified Bessel functions K0 and K1 . This work develops the new theory and applies it to experimental measurements.

  13. Classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes resonance effects in electronic-vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, Ann E.; Ali, Dominic P.; Miller, William H.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper, a classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes is applied to E → V energy transfer in a collinear system, A + BC (v = 1) → A* + BC (v = 0), resembling Br-H2. Finally, the model, which treats electronic as well as translational, rotational, and vibrational degrees of freedom by classical mechanics, describes the resonance features in this process reasonably well.

  14. The contribution of electron collisions to rotational excitations of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in comet Halley during the Giotto spacecraft encounter. In the case of the O(sub 00) yields 1(sub 11) rotational transition, the e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus. Thus, the rotational temperature of the water molecule in the intermediate coma may be controlled by collisions with electrons rather than with neutral collisions, and the rotational temperature retrieved from high resolution infrared spectra of water in comet Halley may reflect electron temperatures rather than neutral gas temperature in the intermediate coma.

  15. Many-electron aspects of molecular promotion in ion-atom collisions - Production of core-excited states of Li in Li/+/-He collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elston, S. B.; Vane, C. R.; Schumann, S.

    1979-01-01

    Production of core-excited autoionizing states of neutral Li having configurations of the form 1snln(prime)l(prime) has been observed over the impact-energy range from 10-50 keV. Although the results for production of all such states is remarkably consistent with a quasi-molecular-excitation model proposed by Stolterfoht and Leithaeuser (1976), production of individual lines in the observed spectra exhibits collision-velocity dependencies indicative of considerably more complex processes, including processes which appear to be inherently two-electron in nature. Excitation functions are presented for (1s2s/2/)/2/S, 1s(2s2p/3/P)/2/P, 1s(2s2p/1/P)/2/P, and (1s2p/2/)/2/D core-excited state of Li and for total core excitation.

  16. Electron capture in collisions of S with H{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.B.; Stancil, P.C.; Gu, J.-P.; Liebermann, H.-P.; Funke, P.; Buenker, R.J.; Kimura, M.

    2005-06-15

    Within the framework of a fully quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) theory, charge transfer has been studied for collisions of S with H{sup +}. The multireference single- and double-excitation configuration-interaction method was utilized to evaluate the adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements for the SH{sup +} system. Cross sections and rate coefficients are presented for S({sup 3}P,{sup 1}D)+H{sup +}{yields}S{sup +}({sup 4}S{sup 0},{sup 2}D{sup 0},{sup 2}P{sup 0})+H with relative collision energies between 0.1 meV/u and 10 keV/u and temperatures between 10 K and 2.0x10{sup 6} K. The investigation shows that the charge-transfer process is dominated by S({sup 3}P)+H{sup +}{yields}S{sup +}({sup 2}P{sup 0})+H and that the cross sections and rate coefficients vary by orders of magnitude over the energy and temperature range considered. The current rate coefficients are in disagreement with the often adopted value of 1.30x10{sup -9} cm{sup 3}/s at low temperatures, and two orders of magnitude smaller than a previous estimate at T=10{sup 4} K, for the process S({sup 3}P)+H{sup +}{yields}S{sup +}({sup 2}D{sup 0},{sup 2}P{sup 0})+H. We also performed semiclassical close-coupling calculations, which give cross sections in excellent agreement agreement with the QMOCC results for energies above 30 eV/u. Application of the results to astrophysical environments is briefly discussed.

  17. a Study of Low Energy Electron-Molecule and Ion - Collisions Using Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollars, Byron George

    Low energy collisions between Rydberg atoms and neutral molecules have been investigated over a wide range of principal quantum numbers n, and for several different neutral targets. The results have been used to validate the free-electron, independent particle model of Rydberg atom collisions. Comparison between theory and experiment show that at large values of n, ionization of Rb(nS,nD) Rydberg atoms in the reaction: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). Rb(nS,nD) + SF(,6) (--->) Rb('+) = SF(,6)('-) (1). (TABLE ENDS). proceeds by electron transfer from the Rydberg atom to the SF(,6) molecule. The rate constants measured for this reaction are much the same as for the attachment of free, low-energy electrons to SF(,6). Thus, Rydberg collision studies can provide information about low-energy free electron interactions. Studies of the rate constants for free ion production in the reaction: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). K(nD) + SF(,6) (--->) K('+) + SF(,6)('-) (2). (TABLE ENDS). showed these to decrease sharply at smaller n, falling far below the value expected on the basis of Rydberg electron attachment to SF(,6). This behavior is attributed not to breakdown of the free-electron model, but to post -attachment electrostatic interactions between the product ions, which are formed closer to each other at lower n. Model calculations that take this electrostatic interaction into account confirm this prediction. Other Rydberg atom collision processes, such as: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). K(nD) + O(,2) (--->) K('+) + O(,2)('-) (3). K(nD) + H(,2)O (--->) KH(,2)O('+) + e('-) (4). (TABLE ENDS). have been studied, as they require both the Rydberg ion core and electron to participate in the collision. Since O(,2)('-) ions formed by free electron attachment have short lifetimes against autodetachment, the observation of long-lived O(,2)('-) reaction product suggests that the K('+) core ion plays a role in stabilizing the excited O(,2)('-) ions formed by Rydberg electron attachment. Stable

  18. Projectile and Target Contributions to the Continuous Electron Spectra from 150 keV/u C+ + He, Ne Collisions; Multiple Ionization and Multiple Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulik, B.; Kövér, Á.; Ricz, S.; Koncz, Cs.; Tökesi, K.; Víkor, Gy.; Chesnel, J.-Y.; Stolterfoht, N.; Berényi, D.

    Double differential cross sections in the 20-550 eV energy range and in the full angular range of 0°-180° for electron emission were measured by the impact of 150 keV/u C+ ions on He and Ne atoms. An unexpected, broad structure around 300 eV electron energy has been observed at backward emission angles relative to the beam direction. Our CTMC calculations support the hypothesis that the new structure is due to double scattering of the target electrons on the screened fields of the projectile and the target. According to the present impact-parameter Born calculations, the average degree of ionization is about 50% for C++ Ne collisions, i.e., a multiple ionized system is created in the collision.

  19. Calculation of resonance effects in low-energy electron-water collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccarreta, Chiara

    Electron collisions with water are very important for the understanding of radiation damage in biological system, atmospheric processes, masers, etc. These collisions can result in the rotational, vibrational and/or electronic excitation of the molecule but they can also induce fragmentation. Specifically, low-energy electrons can produce fragmentation via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and electronic excitation into dissociative states. Experimental work on water break-up has focused on dissociative attachment. More recently measurements of ground state OH production via electron impact have been performed (Harb et al. 2001) showing the different contributions of DEA and dissociative excitation. Few theoretical studies on the resonance curves for DEA of water are available (Haxton et al. 2004a). Among them, one has been carried out taking into account a single dissociative coordinate (Gorfinkiel et al. 2002), the assumption being that dissociation results in the formation of H and OH. The discrepancy between the theoretical results and the experimental measurements of Harb et al. (2001) suggest that full three-dimensional studies are needed. The i-matrix method and the i-matrix polyatomic code (Morgan et al. 1998) is used to treat the electronic part of the process. We have performed fixed-nuclei calculations for 840 geometries of H2O. These were obtained by varying the internal nuclear coordinates of the molecule, using 8 different angles and 14 different OH intemuclear distances. Following Gorfinkiel et al. (2002), we have incorporated nine target states in the close-coupling expansion and calculated cross sections for electronic excitation into the first 4 excited states as a function of geometry. In accordance with previous calculations and experiments (Belie et al. 1981) we found three Feshbach resonances below the ionisation threshold. In C2v symmetry these resonances are labelled 2B, 2A and 2B2. The DEA process is likely to proceed via these

  20. Heavy-Rydberg ion-pair formation in Rydberg atom collisions: Probing dissociative electron attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael; Buathong, Sitti; Dunning, F. Barry

    2015-05-01

    While electron transfer in Rydberg atom collisions with attaching targets forms a valuable technique with which to create heavy-Rydberg ion pairs to examine their properties, we demonstrate here that measurements of their velocity distributions can also provide insights into the behavior of the excited intermediates formed through initial electron transfer. The experimental results are analyzed with the aid of a Monte Carlo collision code that models the details of electron transfer reactions. Results for a variety of targets are presented that demonstrate the use of this approach to examine the dynamics of dissociative electron attachment, the lifetimes of the intermediates created, and the channels by which they decay. Research supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation under Grant C-0734.

  1. Quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, T G; Ridgers, C P; Kirk, J G; Bell, A R

    2014-01-10

    It is possible using current high-intensity laser facilities to reach the quantum radiation reaction regime for energetic electrons. An experiment using a wakefield accelerator to drive GeV electrons into a counterpropagating laser pulse would demonstrate the increase in the yield of high-energy photons caused by the stochastic nature of quantum synchrotron emission: we show that a beam of 10(9) 1 GeV electrons colliding with a 30 fs laser pulse of intensity 10(22)  W cm(-2) will emit 6300 photons with energy greater than 700 MeV, 60× the number predicted by classical theory.

  2. Low energy electron collisions in SiF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Nagpal, R.; Garscadden, A.; Liptak, D.

    1995-07-01

    Electron drift velocities in SiF{sub 4}-Ar mixtures have been measured using a pulsed-Townsend type drift tube. A set of momentum transfer, vibrational excitation, dissociation, attachment, and ionization cross sections of electron scattering in SiF{sub 4} from 0-50 eV is presented. The cross section set has been determined by the swarm analyses of electron transport data in pure SiF{sub 4}, in conjunction with the data in SiF{sub 4}-Ar mixtures.

  3. Computational Study of Electron-Molecule Collisions Related to Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Computational study of electron-molecule collisions not only complements experimental measurements, but can also be used to investigate processes not readily accessible experimentally. A number of ab initio computational methods are available for these types of calculations. Here we describe a recently developed technique, the finite element Z-matrix method, Analogous to the R-matrix, method, it partitions the space into regions and employs real matrix elements. However, unlike the implementation of the R-matrix method commonly used in atomic and molecular physics, the Z-matrix method is fully variational. In the present implementation, a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians is used to represent the continuum electron, thus offering full flexibility without imposing fixed boundary conditions. Numerical examples include the electron-impact dissociation of N2 via the metastable A3Su+ state, a process which may be important in the lower thermosphere, and the dissociation of the CF radical, a process of interest to plasma etching. To understand the dissociation pathways, large scale quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for all target states which dissociate to the lowest five limits in the case of N2, and to the lowest two limits in the case of CF. For N2, the structural calculations clearly show the preference for predissociation if the initial state is the ground X1 Sg+ state, but direct dissociation appears to be preferable if the initial state is the A3Su+ state. Multi-configuration SCF target functions are used in the collisional calculation.

  4. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  5. QED and electron collisions in the super strong fields of K-shell actinide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-01-25

    Atomic physics of high-Z, heavy ions is very different from that encountered in low-Z or medium-Z ions. The reason is the ultra strong nuclear field found only in the heaviest ions. The highest-Z atomic systems available to physical investigation, the actinides, therefore, offer rich new physics that cannot be studied any other way. This ranges from new dominating forces in electron-ion collisions to tests of fundamental theories. A measurement of the two-loop Lamb shift in uranium is by many considered to be the ''holy grail'' of high-field QED tests of atomic systems. Such measurements have been attempted at heavy-ion accelerator facilities but have yet to succeed because of the difficulty to make measurements with the required accuracy. Also, electron collisions behave very differently in such tightly bound systems. The magnetic interaction between the ion and the incoming free electron (the so-called generalized Breit interaction) is essentially non-existent in collisions involving low and medium-Z ions. This interaction is therefore missing in essentially all electron collision codes. But in heavy, highly charged ions like uranium, the generalized Breit interaction readily is the dominant force, changing electron collision cross sections by a factor of two. This has never been experimentally observed. In fact, no K-shell emission spectrum of any heavy high-Z ion higher than krypton (Z=36) has ever been recorded from a collisional source. By studying the heaviest actinides such fundamental science can be extended to regimes where the highest precision tests can be made.

  6. Effect of electron collisions on transport coefficients induced by the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.; Tahraoui, A.; Bendib, K.; Mohammed El Hadj, K.; Hueller, S.

    2005-03-01

    The transport coefficients of fully ionized plasmas under the influence of a high-frequency electric field are derived solving numerically the electron Fokker-Planck equation using a perturbation method, parametrized as a function of the electron mean-free-path {lambda}{sub ei} compared to the spatial scales L. The isotropic and anisotropic contributions of the inverse bremsstrahlung heating are considered. Electron-electron collision terms are kept in the analysis, which allows us to consider with sufficient accuracy to describe plasmas with arbitrary atomic number Z. Practical numerical fits of the transport coefficients are proposed as functions of Z and the collisionality parameter {lambda}{sub ei}/L.

  7. Effects of target plasma electron-electron collisions on correlated motion of fragmented H{sub 2}{sup +} protons

    SciTech Connect

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2006-02-15

    The objective of the present work is to examined the effects of plasma target electron-electron collisions on H{sub 2}{sup +} protons traversing it. Specifically, the target is deuterium in a plasma state with temperature T{sub e}=10 eV and density n=10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}, and proton velocities are v{sub p}=v{sub th}, v{sub p}=2v{sub th}, and v{sub p}=3v{sub th}, where v{sub th} is the electron thermal velocity of the target plasma. Proton interactions with plasma electrons are treated by means of the dielectric formalism. The interactions among close protons through plasma electronic medium are called vicinage forces. It is checked that these forces always screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H{sub 2}{sup +} ion decreasing their relative distance. They also align the interproton vector along the motion direction, and increase the energy loss of the two protons at early dwell times while for longer times the energy loss tends to the value of two isolated protons. Nevertheless, vicinage forces and effects are modified by the target electron collisions. These collisions enhance the calculated self-stopping and vicinage forces over the collisionless results. Regarding proton correlated motion, when these collisions are included, the interproton vector along the motion direction overaligns at slower proton velocities (v{sub p}=v{sub th}) and misaligns for faster ones (v{sub p}=2v{sub th}, v{sub p}=3v{sub th}). They also contribute to a great extend to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H{sub 2}{sup +} ion. This later effect is more significant in reducing projectile velocity.

  8. Fragmentation dynamics of carbonyl sulfide in collision with 500 eV electron.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhenjie; Wang, Enliang; Gong, Maomao; Shan, Xu; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-21

    The fragmentation dynamics of OCS(q+) (q = 2, 3, 4) induced by electron collision at an impact energy of 500 eV is studied. By using the momentum imaging technique, the three dimensional momentum vectors of all the fragments are obtained, which enables us to analyse both the kinetic energy release and the momentum correlations for a certain fragmentation channel. Up to fifteen dissociation channels are analyzed including six, five, and four channels for two-body, and incomplete and complete three-body Coulomb fragmentations. For three-body dissociation, the fragmentation mechanisms are investigated with the help of Dalitz plot and Newton diagram. It is found that the sequential fragmentation involves in OCS(2+)→O+C(+)+S(+) with S(+) emitted first and in OCS(3+)→O(+)+C(+)+S(+) with O-C and C-S bonds breaking first. The remaining channels, however, always dissociate through a concerted mechanism. The relative intensities of the channels are also presented in this work.

  9. Fragmentation dynamics of carbonyl sulfide in collision with 500 eV electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhenjie; Wang, Enliang; Gong, Maomao; Shan, Xu; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    The fragmentation dynamics of OCSq+ (q = 2, 3, 4) induced by electron collision at an impact energy of 500 eV is studied. By using the momentum imaging technique, the three dimensional momentum vectors of all the fragments are obtained, which enables us to analyse both the kinetic energy release and the momentum correlations for a certain fragmentation channel. Up to fifteen dissociation channels are analyzed including six, five, and four channels for two-body, and incomplete and complete three-body Coulomb fragmentations. For three-body dissociation, the fragmentation mechanisms are investigated with the help of Dalitz plot and Newton diagram. It is found that the sequential fragmentation involves in OCS2+→O+C++S+withS+ emitted first and in OCS3 +→O++C++S+ with O-C and C-S bonds breaking first. The remaining channels, however, always dissociate through a concerted mechanism. The relative intensities of the channels are also presented in this work.

  10. Effect of electron-nuclei interaction on internuclear motions in slow ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2015-10-01

    The electron-nuclei interaction affects the internuclear motion in slow ion-atom collisions, which in turn affects theoretical results for the cross sections of various collision processes. The results are especially sensitive to the details of the internuclear dynamics in the presence of a strong isotope effect on the cross sections, as is the case, e.g., for the charge transfer in low-energy collisions of He2+ with H, D, and T. By considering this system as an example, we show that internuclear trajectories defined by the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential in the entrance collision channel, which effectively accounts for the electron-nuclei interaction, are in much better agreement with trajectories obtained in the ab initio electron-nuclear dynamics approach [R. Cabrera-Trujillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 012715 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.012715] than the corresponding Coulomb trajectories. We also show that the use of the BO trajectory instead of the Coulomb trajectory in the calculations of the charge-transfer cross sections within the adiabatic approach improves the agreement of the results with ab initio calculations.

  11. Fluorescence of dissociating fragments from supersonic jet-electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Smilgys, Russell V.; Lobue, James M.; Schiffman, Aram P.; Novick, Stewart E.

    1985-05-01

    Supersonically cooled jets of nitrogen, methane, ethane, cyclopropane, and azomethane are crossed with collimated streams of electrons. The CH (B 2Σ - → X 2Π) spectra resulting from the electron-induced dissociation of CH 4, C 2H 6, and CH 2) 3 can be fit with rotation temperatures between 4000 and 6000 K for an electron energy of 100 eV. Flourescence spectra of N 2+ (B 2Σ w+ → X 2Π) from the dissociative ionization of azomethane yield a rotational temperature of =8×10 3 K; from ionization of molecular nitrogen the rotational temperature of B 2Σ w+ N 2+ is 45 K. Mechanisms for these various processes are discussed.

  12. Relevance of Electron-Molecule Collision Data for Engineering Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    Innumerable applications have resulted from the application of gaseous electronics to engineering purposes, from the mundane tube lights and neon signs to its rejuvenated version of compact fluorescent bulbs, gas lasers, plasma TV among others. Research data, both experimental and theoretical, from this area continue to be used for engineering purposes. Engineers often look for qualitative similarities in the various properties of interest as a function of electron energy or some other parameters which are easy to measure and relate to practical situations. These aspects are dealt with in the paper.

  13. Exit charge state dependence of convoy electron production in heavy-ion solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Huelskoetter, H.P.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Sellin, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dependence of the yield of convoy electrons emitted near the forward direction in collisions involving fast ions and thin solid targets on the emergent projectile charge state is presented and described in terms of primary electron loss events in the solid. The data include a large array of projectiles, projectile energies and charge states, as well as targets ranging in thickness from the non-equilibrium well into the equilibrium thickness region. The description presented is consistent with other experimental and theoretical results indicating that the convoy electron production is closely linked to the ELC process observed in binary ion-atom collisions, with the dominant contribution to the convoy yield stemming from excited states of the projectiles. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Bound-free electron-positron pair production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şengül, M. Y.; Güçlü, M. C.; Fritzsche, S.

    2009-10-01

    The bound-free electron-positron pair production is considered for relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, cross sections are calculated for the pair production with the simultaneous capture of the electron into the 1s ground state of one of the ions and for energies that are relevant for the relativistic heavy ion collider and the large hadron colliders. In the framework of perturbation theory, we applied Monte Carlo integration techniques to compute the lowest-order Feynman diagrams amplitudes by using Darwin wave functions for the bound states of the electrons and Sommerfeld-Maue wave functions for the continuum states of the positrons. Calculations were performed especially for the collision of Au+Au at 100 GeV/nucleon and Pb+Pb at 3400 GeV/nucleon.

  15. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  16. Benchmarking electronic-state excitation cross sections for electron-N{sub 2} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ohkawa, Mizuha; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Campbell, Laurence; Brunger, Michael J.

    2010-04-15

    We report differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the a {sup 1{Pi}}{sub g}, C {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}, E {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +}, a{sup ''} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +}, b {sup 1{Pi}}{sub u}, c{sub 3} {sup 1{Pi}}{sub u}, o{sub 3} {sup 1{Pi}}{sub u}, b{sup '} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}, c{sub 4}{sup '} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}, G {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}, and F {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u} electronic states in N{sub 2}. The incident electron energies are 20, 30, and 40 eV, while the scattered electron angles are 10 deg. and 20 deg. These kinematic conditions were specifically targeted in order to try and shed new light on the worrying discrepancies that exist in the literature for the a {sup 1{Pi}}{sub g}, C {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}, E {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +}, and a{sup ''} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +} cross sections, and in general the present measurements confirm that those from the more recent results of the University of California, Fullerton, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory [M. A. Khakoo, P. V. Johnson, I. Ozkay, P. Yan, S. Trajmar, and I. Kanik, Phys. Rev. A 71, 062703 (2005); C. P. Malone, P. V. Johnson, I. Kanik, B. Ajdari, and M. A. Khakoo, Phys. Rev. A 79, 032704 (2009)] are reliable. In addition, we provide a rigorous cross-check for the remaining seven electronic states, where the only recent comprehensive study is from Khakoo and colleagues [Phys. Rev. A 77, 012704 (2008)]. Here, however, some of those cross sections are confirmed and others are not, suggesting that further work is still needed.

  17. Long- and short-lived electrons with anomalously high collision rates in laser-ionized gases.

    PubMed

    Kampfrath, Tobias; Gericke, Dirk O; Perfetti, Luca; Tegeder, Petra; Wolf, Martin; Frischkorn, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Ultrashort broadband terahertz pulses are applied to probe the electron dynamics of gaseous Ar and O2 following ionization by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The conductivity in the plasma center is extracted by a modified Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approach. It exhibits a nearly perfect Drude-like spectral shape and yields the temporal evolution of the free-electron density and collision rate. While the electron density in the Ar plasma remains nearly constant during the first 200ps after generation, it decays much faster in O2 due to dissociative recombination which is only possible in molecular plasmas. Adding a small amount of the electron scavenger SF6 to Ar reduces the electron lifetime in the plasma dramatically and allows us to determine the electron temperature to about 20,000K . Furthermore, anomalously high, metal-like electron collision rates of up to 25THz are found. Kinetic plasma theory substantially underestimates these rates pointing towards additional and more complex processes randomizing the total electronic momentum. Our results are relevant to both lightning control and generation of terahertz radiation by intense laser pulses in gases.

  18. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Ions Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, Swaraj S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research grant was to calculate accurate oscillator strengths and electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in atomic species of relevance to Planetary Atmospheres. Large scale configuration-interaction atomic structure calculations have been performed to obtain oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the fine-structure levels and R-matrix method has been used in the calculations of electron-ion collision cross sections of C II, S I, S II, S III, and Ar II. A number of strong features due to ions of sulfur have been detected in the spectra of Jupiter satellite Io. The electron excitation cross sections for the C II and S II transitions are studied in collaboration with the experimental atomic physics group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There is excellent agreement between experiment and theory which provide an accurate and broad-base test of the ability of theoretical methods used in the calculation of atomic processes. Specifically, research problems have been investigated for: electron impact excitation cross sections of C II: electron impact excitation cross sections of S III; energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions in S III; collision strengths for electron collisional excitation of S II; electron impact excitation of inelastic transitions in Ar II; oscillator strengths of fine-structure transitions in neutral sulfur; cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons from atomic nitrogen; and excitation of atomic ions by electron impact.

  19. Electron emission and energy loss in grazing collisions of protons with insulator surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gravielle, M. S.; Miraglia, J. E.; Aldazabal, I.; Aumayr, F.; Lederer, S.; Winter, H.

    2007-07-15

    Electron emission from LiF, KCl, and KI crystal surfaces during grazing collisions of swift protons is studied using a first-order distorted-wave formalism. Owing to the localized character of the electronic structure of these surfaces, we propose a model that allows us to describe the process as a sequence of atomic transitions from different target ions. Experimental results are presented for electron emission from LiF and KI and energy loss from KI surfaces. Calculations show reasonable agreement with these experimental data. The role played by the charge of the incident particle is also investigated.

  20. Complete data acquisition and analysis system for low-energy electron-molecule collision studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Pamir; Nandi, Dhananjay

    2015-09-01

    A complete data acquisition system has been developed that can work with any personal computer irrespective of the operating system installed on it. The software can be used in low and intermediate electron-energy collision studies with ground-state molecules in gas phase using a combination of RS-232, GPIB, and USB-interfaced devices. Various tabletop instruments and nuclear instrumentation module (NIM) -based electronics have been interfaced and have communicated with the software, which is based on LabVIEW. This is tested with dissociative electron attachment (DEA) and polar dissociation studies to oxygen molecule and successfully used in a DEA study of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

  1. Distortion effects in electron excitation of hydrogen atoms by impact of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, C.A.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    Electron excitation from the fundamental state of hydrogen atoms by impact of bare ions is studied at intermediate and high collision velocities. Total cross sections for final {ital np} states by impact of protons, alpha particles, and He{sup +} ions are calculated using the symmetric eikonal approximation and compared with experimental data. This comparison supports the existence of distortion effects recently predicted by Bugacov and co-workers [Phys. Rev. A {bold 47}, 1052 (1993)]. The validity of scaling laws is analyzed.

  2. Vlasov Simulation of the Effects of Collisions on the Damping of Electron Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Jeff; Berger, Richard; Chapman, Thomas; Brunner, Stephan; Tran, T.

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic simulation of two dimensional plasma waves through direct discretization of the Vlasov equation may be particularly attractive for situations where minimal numerical fluctuation levels are desired, such as when measuring growth rates of plasma wave instabilities. In many cases collisional effects can be important to the evolution of plasma waves because they both set a minimum damping rate for plasma waves and can scatter particles out of resonance through pitch angle scattering. Here we present Vlasov simulations of evolving electron plasma waves (EPWs) in plasmas of varying collisionality. We consider first the effects of electron-ion pitch angle collisions on the frequency and damping, Landau and collisional, of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates. In addition, the wave phase velocities are extracted from the simulation results and compared with theory. For this study we use the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. We then discuss extensions of the collision operator to include thermalization. Discretization of these collision operators using 4th order accurate conservative finite-differencing will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the LDRD program at LLNL under project tracking code 15-ERD-038.

  3. Electron removal from H0(n) in fast collisions with multiply charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Meyer, F. W.

    1982-09-01

    The cross sections for electron removal from highly excited (n=9-24) hydrogen atoms in fast collisions with multiply charged (q=1-5) N, O, and Ar ions were investigated in an ion-atom crossed-beams experiment. The ion-atom collisions occurred inside a deflector where a moderate electrostatic field of up to 1.8 kV/cm was applied. The range of collision velocity (vc) investigated is vc=1.0v1-2.0v1, where v1=2.2×108 cm/s is the Bohr velocity. The electron-removal cross section was found to be independent of ion species for a given q and vc, to increase as q2 for a given vc, and to decrease as v-2c for a given q. These q and vc dependences of the experimental cross section are in accord with classical Coulomb ionization theories. The experimental n dependence of the cross section differs significantly from the theoretically predicted dependence, but the difference can be accounted for if we assume the presence of the external electric field in the collision volume reduces the ionization energy.

  4. Electron-impact double ionization of magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M.J.; El-Marji, B.; Doering, J.P.; Moore, J.H.; Coplan, M.A.; Cooper, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Electron-impact double-ionization cross sections differential in the angles of the two ejected electrons have been measured at impact energies of 422 and 1052 eV. The energies of the ejected electrons were fixed at 100 eV each. The cross sections are very different at the two incident energies. At 1052 eV the ejected electrons are preferentially found in the forward direction with respect to the incident beam. At 422 eV they are found in the forward and backward directions with approximately equal probability. The 422-eV cross sections are largest when the incident-electron and ejected-electron momentum vectors lie in a common plane. The observations are discussed in the context of several models for double ionization. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Energy levels, transition probabilities, and electron impact excitations for La XXX

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, J.Y. . E-mail: jyzhong@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2006-09-15

    energy levels, spontaneous radiative decay rates, and electron impact collision strengths are calculated for La XXX. The data refer to 107 fine-structure levels belonging to the configurations (1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6})3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 9}4l, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}3d{sup 10}4l, and 3s3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4l (l = s, p, d, f). The collision strengths are calculated with a 20-collision-energy grid in terms of the energy of the scattered electron between 10 and 10,000 eV by using the distorted-wave approximation. Effective collision strengths are obtained at seven electron temperatures: T {sub e} (eV) = 10, 100, 300, 500, 800, 1000, and 1500 by integrating the collision strengths over a Maxwellian electron distribution. Coupled with these atomic data, a hydrodynamic code MED103 can be used to simulate the Ni-like La X-ray laser at 8.8 nm.

  6. Coincident excitation and radiative decay in electron-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    The distorted-wave Born approximation formalism for the description of the (e ,e'γ ) reaction, in which emitted photons and scattered electrons are simultaneously detected, is outlined. Both the Coulomb and the magnetic scattering are fully taken into account. The influence of electron bremsstrahlung is estimated within the plane-wave Born approximation. Recoil effects are also discussed. The formalism is applied for the low-energy (e ,e'γ )92Zr reaction with excitation of the first collective (21+) and mixed-symmetry (22+) states. The corresponding transition charge and current densities are taken from a random-phase approximation (RPA) calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. It is shown, by this example, in which way the magnetic subshell population of the excited state influences the angular distribution of the decay photon. For these quadrupole excitations the influence of magnetic scattering is only prominent at the backmost scattering angles, where a clear distinction of the photon pattern pertaining to the two states is predicted.

  7. Impact excitation of neon atoms by heated seed electrons in filamentary plasma gratings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liping; Li, Wenxue; Zhou, Hui; Ding, Liang'en; Zeng, Heping

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate impact ionization and dissociative recombination of neon (Ne) atoms by means of seeded-electron heating and subsequent electron-atom collisions in an ultraviolet plasma grating, allowing for a substantial fraction of the neutral Ne atomic population to reside in high-lying excited states. A buffer gas with relatively low ionization potential (nitrogen or argon) was used to provide high-density seed electrons. A three-step excitation model is verified by the fluorescence emission from the impact excitation of Ne atoms.

  8. Electron capture and single ionization in H+ + Ar collisions: classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frémont, F.

    2016-03-01

    A classical model is used to study electron capture and single ionization (SI) following H+ + Ar collisions at projectile energies varying from 400 to 40 keV. In the present model, the Ar electrons are treated independently from each other, and only the 3s and 3p electrons are supposed to be captured by the projectile. In addition, a Coulombic potential with an effective charge Z eff = 6.75, derived from Slater rules, is used in the calculations to simulate the screening of the Ar nucleus due to the presence of the core and 2l electrons. Total cross sections for single electron capture and SI are calculated and compared with previous experiments and earlier calculations based on a semiclassical approach. The reasonable agreement we observed allows a preliminary study of double electron capture (DC). The total cross section for DC is found to be much larger than the experimental one. Possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed.

  9. Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 107 Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Section Database (Web, free access)   This is a database primarily of total ionization cross sections of molecules by electron impact. The database also includes cross sections for a small number of atoms and energy distributions of ejected electrons for H, He, and H2. The cross sections were calculated using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, which combines the Mott cross section with the high-incident energy behavior of the Bethe cross section. Selected experimental data are included.

  10. X-ray emission cross sections following Ar{sup 18+} charge-exchange collisions on neutral argon: The role of the multiple electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Olson, R. E.

    2011-03-15

    X-ray emission originating in charge-exchange collisions between Ar{sup 18+} and neutral argon is studied at impact energies of 5-4000 eV/amu by means of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method (CTMC). Line emission and charge-exchange cross sections obtained from different CTMC versions based on the one-active electron approximation are contrasted among themselves and against the results obtained by means of a three-active electron code that lets us infer the role of multiple electron capture. The present results are compared to the recent experimental data available from the EBIT groups operating at Livermore, NIST, and Berlin. We were not able to reconcile the major difference in x-ray emission cross sections obtained from in situ measurements made in EBIT, versus those made in an exterior, field-free collision chamber using ions extracted from the EBIT. Our calculations support the extracted beam results.

  11. Simultaneous collision induced dissociation of the charge reduced parent ion during electron capture dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Jared M; Baba, Takashi; Glish, Gary L

    2009-08-01

    A method of performing collision induced dissociation (CID) on the charge-reduced parent ion as it is formed during electron capture dissociation (ECD), called ECD+CID, is described. In ECD+CID, the charge-reduced parent ion is selectively activated using resonant excitation and collisions with the helium bath gas inside a linear quadrupole ion trap ECD device (ECD(LIT)). It has been observed that ECD+CID can improve the sequence coverage for beta-endorphin over performing ECD alone (i.e., from 72 to 97%). Perhaps just as important, ECD+CID can be used to reduce the extent of multiple electron capture events observed when performing ECD in the ECD(LIT). Consequently, the abundance of mass-to-charge ratios corresponding to ECD product ions that contain neutralized protons is decreased, simplifying the interpretation of the product ion spectrum.

  12. Propagation of terahertz electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma with inhomogeneous electron density and collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, LinJing; Guo, LiXin; Li, JiangTing

    2017-02-01

    This study theoretically analyzes the propagation properties of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma that is inhomogeneous in both collision frequency and electron density. Three parabolic profiles are adopted to describe the inhomogeneity of these two parameters in the plasma slab. Numerical calculation results show that when a magnetic field is applied, an absorption valley appears near the middle of the absorption peak. The characteristics of the absorption spectra are affected by two factors: (1) the parameters in the plasma's first layer, which is the border between the air and the plasma and (2) the gradient of the parameters across the entire plasma. Specifically, a more substantial difference between the inhomogeneous plasma and the uniform plasma corresponds to a greater difference between the two absorption spectra. In addition, electron density, plasma thickness, and collision frequency also play important roles in the propagation.

  13. PHENIX Measurements of Single Electrons from Charm and Bottom Decays at Midrapidity in Au + Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlinchey, D.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy quarks are an ideal probe of the quark gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions. They are produced in the initial hard scattering and therefore experience the full evolution of the medium. PHENIX has previously measured the modification of heavy quark production in Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV via electrons from semileptonic decays, which indicated substantial modifications of the parent hadron momentum distribution. The PHENIX barrel silicon vertex detector (VTX), installed in 2011, allows for the separation of electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays through the use of displaced vertex measurements. These proceedings present the results of the completed analysis of the 2011 data set using the VTX.

  14. A new semiclassical decoupling scheme for electronic transitions in molecular collisions - Application to vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Lam, K. S.; Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    A new semiclassical decoupling scheme (the trajectory-based decoupling scheme) is introduced in a computational study of vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer for a simple model system that simulates collinear atom-diatom collisions. The probability of energy transfer (P) is calculated quasiclassically using the new scheme as well as quantum mechanically as a function of the atomic electronic-energy separation (lambda), with overall good agreement between the two sets of results. Classical mechanics with the new decoupling scheme is found to be capable of predicting resonance behavior whereas an earlier decoupling scheme (the coordinate-based decoupling scheme) failed. Interference effects are not exhibited in P vs lambda results.

  15. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, Gérald Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-15

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  16. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  17. Report on the XXIV International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-08-01

    The XXIV International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (XXIV ICPEAC) was held in Rosario, Argentina, on 20 26 July 2005, following ICPEAC in Santa Fe, USA, in 2001 and in Stockholm, Sweden, in 2003. This was the first ICPEAC in Latin America and the second one in the Southern Hemisphere, after ICPEAC in Brisbane, Australia, in 1991. The next ICPEAC (25th) will be held in Freiburg (Germany) in 2007.

  18. Report on the XXIII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Reinhold

    2004-01-01

    The XXIII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (23rd ICPEAC) was held in Stockholm, Sweden, from July 23rd to 29th, 2003, following ICPEAC in Sendai, Japan in 1999 and in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, in 2001. This was the first ICPEAC in Sweden and the second one in Scandinavia, after the 18th ICPEAC in Aarhus, Denmark in 1993. The next ICPEAC (24th) will be 2005 in Rosario, Argentina.

  19. On the continuous spectrum electromagnetic radiation in electron-fullerene collision

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the electromagnetic radiation spectrum in electron-fullerene collisions is dominated by a huge maximum of multielectron nature, similar to that already predicted and observed in photoabsorption. Due to coherence, the intensity of this radiation is much stronger than the sum of the intensities of isolated atoms. Experimental detection of such radiation would be of great importance for understanding the mechanism of its formation and for investigating fullerene structures. A paper describing these results was published.

  20. Electron-impact excitation of Fe-peak ions for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P.; Burke, P. G.

    2009-11-01

    This paper discusses one of the major outstanding problems in atomic collision physics, namely the accurate theoretical treatment of electron scattering from open d-shell systems, and explores how this issue has been addressed over recent years with the development of the new parallel R-matrix suite of codes. It focuses on one code in particular - the new parallel R-matrix package PRMAT, which has recently been extended to account for relativistic fine-structure effects. This program facilitates the determination of accurate electron-impact excitation rates for complex open 3d-shell systems including the astrophysically important Fe-peak ions such as Ni II, Fe II and Fe III. Results are presented for collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the optically forbidden fine-structure transitions of Ni II. To our knowledge this is the most extensive calculation completed to date for this ion.

  1. Stationary electron velocity distribution function in crossed electric and magnetic fields with collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shagayda, Andrey

    2012-08-15

    Analytical studies and numerical simulations show that the electron velocity distribution function in a Hall thruster discharge with crossed electric and magnetic fields is not Maxwellian. This is due to the fact that the mean free path between collisions is greater than both the Larmor radius and the characteristic dimensions of the discharge channel. However in numerical models of Hall thrusters, a hydrodynamic approach is often used to describe the electron dynamics, because discharge simulation in a fully kinetic approach requires large computing resources and is time consuming. A more accurate modeling of the electron flow in the hydrodynamic approximation requires taking into account the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function and finding its moments, an approach that reflects the properties of electrons drifting in crossed electric and magnetic fields better than the commonly used Euler or Navier-Stokes approximations. In the present paper, an expression for the electron velocity distribution function in rarefied spatially homogeneous stationary plasma with crossed electric and magnetic fields and predominance of collisions with heavy particles is derived in the relaxation approximation. The main moments of the distribution function including longitudinal and transversal temperatures, the components of the viscous stress tensor, and of the heat flux vector are calculated. Distinctive features of the hydrodynamic description of electrons with a strongly non-equilibrium distribution function and the prospects for further development of the proposed approach for calculating the distribution function in spatially inhomogeneous plasma are discussed.

  2. Single- and double-electron detachment from H- in collisions with He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víkor, L.; Sarkadi, L.; Penent, F.; Báder, A.; Pálinkás, J.

    1996-09-01

    The single- and double-electron detachment processes have been studied for 85 keV H- on He collisions measuring the energy spectra of the electrons emitted in forward direction. In the spectrum belonging to the single-electron loss (SEL) the nonresonant part (cusp) has been resolved from the resonant part [lines from the (2s2p)1Po shape resonance of H-]. The ratio of the integrated yield of the double-electron loss (DEL) to that of SEL was found to be 0.36+/-0.02. The yield of the cusp in the SEL spectrum was found to be surprisingly small, only (70+/-20)% of the yield of the cusp in the DEL spectrum. The formation of the cusp in SEL is interpreted as a result of dipolar interaction between the electron and the outgoing H0 atom.

  3. Non-Hertzian behavior in binary collisions of plastic balls derived from impact acoustics.

    PubMed

    Riner, Joshua; Petculescu, Andi

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents slight deviations from Hertz's impact law, inferred from acoustic signatures of polypropylene ball collisions. An impact acoustics model is used to fit the acoustic data. The model is built upon a generalized relationship between impact force (F) and deformation (xi) of the form F=kappaxi(alpha). Agreement with experiment is reached when alpha and kappa differ from Hertz's values by -6.25% and +1%, respectively. The difference is ascribable to non-idealities such as slight material inhomogeneities, impact-point asymmetry, plasticity etc. Also, the collision energy released as sound, which is usually dismissed as negligible, is derived from data fitting. The acoustic-to-incident energy ratio, dependent on impact duration, is constrained to be on the order of 100 ppm.

  4. Classical trajectory models for electronically nonadiabatic collision processes: A classical valence bond model for electronic degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William H.; Orel, Ann E.

    1981-06-01

    A classical interpretation of the Dirac–Van Vleck spin version of valence bond theory is used in this research to obtain a classical model for electronic degrees of freedom within the valence bond framework. The approach is illustrated by deriving the explicit forms of the classical Hamiltonians, involving electronic and heavy particle degrees of freedom, for the H–H2, F–H2, and O–H2 systems. It is also shown how the initial conditions for both electronic and heavy particle degrees of freedom are chosen to carry out a classical trajectory simulation of collision processes. In addition, the attractive feature of this model is that it is as easily applicable to electronically nonadiabatic processes as it is to adiabatic ones.

  5. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  6. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  7. Beauty production in pp collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV measured via semi-electronic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.

    2014-11-01

    The ALICE Collaboration at the LHC reports measurement of the inclusive production cross section of electrons from semi-leptonic decays of beauty hadrons with rapidity | y | < 0.8 and transverse momentum 1 collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV. Electrons not originating from semi-electronic decay of beauty hadrons are suppressed using the impact parameter of the corresponding tracks. The production cross section of beauty decay electrons is compared to the result obtained with an alternative method which uses the distribution of the azimuthal angle between heavy-flavour decay electrons and charged hadrons. Perturbative QCD predictions agree with the measured cross section within the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The integrated visible cross section, σb→e = 3.47 ± 0.40 (stat)-1.33+1.12 (sys) ± 0.07 (norm) μb, was extrapolated to full phase space using Fixed Order plus Next-to-Leading Log (FONLL) calculations to obtain the total b b bar production cross section, σbbbar = 130 ± 15.1 (stat)-49.8+42.1 (sys)-3.1+3.4 (extr) ± 2.5 (norm) ± 4.4 (BR) μb.

  8. R-MATRIX II Calculations for Electron Collisions with Ni II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil; Oelgoetz, Justin; Nahar, Sultana; Burke, V.; Burke, P.; Noble, C.

    2006-05-01

    The R-matrix II approach is especially designed to generate configuration-interaction expansions in a systematic manner, taking account of correlations due to one- two-, and three-electron excitations. The program package, PRMAT, is used to carry out heretofore the most elaborate electron scattering calculations for the astrophysically important ions Ni II and Fe II. Over 100 LS terms are included in the eigenfunction expansions, which yield good agreement with spectroscopically observed term energies. Large CI expansions are particularly important for accurate treatment of resonances that dominate the near-threshold behavior of collision strengths. Results are presented for a number transitions and compared with earlier works.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of cold magnetized non-relativistic plasma in the presence of electron-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Biswajit; Sinha, Anjana; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2015-09-15

    A numerical study is presented of the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetized, cold, non-relativistic plasma, in the presence of electron-ion collisions. The ions are considered to be immobile while the electrons move with non-relativistic velocities. The primary interest is to study the effects of the collision parameter, external magnetic field strength, and the initial electromagnetic polarization on the evolution of the plasma system.

  10. Influence of electron-neutral elastic collisions on the instability of an ion-contaminated cylindrical electron cloud: 2D3V PIC-with-MCC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is a simulation based investigation of the effect of elastic collisions and effectively elastic-like excitation collisions between electrons and background neutrals on the dynamics of a cylindrically trapped electron cloud that also has an ion contaminant mixed in it. A cross section of the trapped non neutral cloud composed of electrons mixed uniformly with a fractional population of ions is loaded on a 2D PIC grid with the plasma in a state of unstable equilibrium due to differential rotation between the electron and the ion component. The electrons are also loaded with an axial velocity component, vz, that mimics their bouncing motion between the electrostatic end plugs of a Penning-Malmberg trap. This vz loading facilitates 3D elastic and excitation collisions of the electrons with background neutrals under a MCC scheme. In the present set of numerical experiments, the electrons do not ionize the neutrals. This helps in separating out only the effect of non-ionizing collisions of electrons on the dynamics of the cloud. Simulations reveal that these non-ionizing collisions indirectly influence the ensuing collisionless ion resonance instability of the contaminated electron cloud by a feedback process. The collisional relaxation reduces the average density of the electron cloud and thereby increases the fractional density of the ions mixed in it. The dynamically changing electron density and fractional density of ions feed back on the ongoing ion-resonance (two-stream) instability between the two components of the nonneutral cloud and produce deviations in the paths of progression of the instability that are uncorrelated at different background gas pressures. Effects of the collisions on the instability are evident from alteration in the growth rate and energetics of the instability caused by the presence of background neutrals as compared to a vacuum background. Further in order to understand if the non-ionizing collisions can independently be a cause

  11. Electron capture in Ar++H2 collisions in the keV energy regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, M.; Chapman, S.; Lane, N. F.

    1986-03-01

    Electron capture in Ar+( 2P)+H2(X 1Σg) collisions in the keV energy regime has been studied theoretically. The molecular-orbital expansion method was used within a semiclassical formalism and an electron translation factor correction was incorporated to the first order in the magnitude of the relative velocity V. The molecular wave function and eigenenergy were obtained using the diatoms-in-molecules (DIM) method. We have examined the effect of the orientation of the target H2 molecule on the electron-capture mechanism within the sudden adiabatic approximation. Since π symmetry arising from the p orbital of the Ar+ ion is involved in this system, a strong influence on the probability of the molecular orientation was found in all energies studied. As the collision energy increases, the Π-symmetry state in the initial channel becomes more important through the rotational coupling to the electron-capture mechanism, while at lower energies the Σ-symmetry state in the initial channel is the dominant source for the electron capture through strong radial coupling. Agreement of the present theory with measurements is good, but marked disagreement is seen with the atomic-orbital calculation.

  12. Core excitation of Li by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwary, S.N.

    1985-07-01

    Cross sections for the excitation of a core electron, which leads to autoionization, in lithium (Li) atomic system by electron impact have been calculated with use of the single-configuration Hartree-Fock wave function within the asymptotic Green's-function approximation (AGFA) in the low-bombarding-energy region. Comparison is made with available results. Our investigation demonstrates that the AGFA supports the R-matrix as well as the distorted-wave Born-approximation behavior.

  13. Observation of exclusive electron-positron production in hadron-hadron collisions.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Budroni, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Caron, B; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; Cecco, S De; Deisher, A; Lentdecker, G De; Dell'orso, M; Paoli, F Delli; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Pedis, D De; Derwent, P F; Giovanni, G P Di; Dionisi, C; Ruzza, B Di; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pinfold, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ranjan, N; Rappoccio, S; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-03-16

    We present the first observation of exclusive e(+)e(-) production in hadron-hadron collisions, using pp[over] collision data at (square root) s = 1.96 TeV taken by the run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 532 pb(-1). We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy E(T) > 5 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta| < 2. With these criteria, 16 events are observed compared to a background expectation of 1.9+/-0.3 events. These events are consistent in cross section and properties with the QED process pp[over] --> p + e(+)e(-) + p[over] through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is 1.6(-0.3)(+0.5)(stat) +/- 0.3(syst) pb. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of 1.71+/-0.01 pb.

  14. New Accurate Oscillator Strengths and Electron Excitation Collision Strengths for N1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The nonorthogonal orbitals technique in a multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock approach is used to calculate oscillator strengths and transition probabilities of N(I) lines. The relativistic effects are allowed by means of Breit-Pauli operators. The length and velocity forms of oscillator strengths show good agreement for most transitions. The B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates approach has been used to calculate electron excitation collision strengths and rates. The nonorthogonal orbitals are used for an accurate description of both target wave functions and the R-matrix basis functions. The 24 spectroscopic bound and autoionizing states together with 15 pseudostates are included in the close-coupling expansion. The collision strengths for transitions between fine-structure levels are calculated by transforming the LS-coupled K-matrices to K-matrices in an intermediate coupling scheme. Thermally averaged collision strengths have been determined by integrating collision strength over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies over a temperature range suitable for the modeling of astrophysical plasmas. The oscillator strengths and thermally averaged collision strengths are presented for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s(sup 2)p(sup 3) (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0), 2s2p(sup 4) (sup 4)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s (sup 4)P, and (sup 2)P terms and from these levels to the levels of the 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3p (sup 2)S(sup 0), (sup 4)D(sup 0), (sup 4)P(sup 0), (sup 4)S(sup 0), (sup 2)D(sup 0), (sup 2)P(sup 0),2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3s(sup 2)D, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)4s(sup 4)P, (sup 2)P, 2s(sup 2)2p(sup 2)3d(sup 2)P, (sup 4)F,(sup 2)F,(sup 4)P, (sup 4)D, and (sup 2)D terms. Thermally averaged collision strengths are tabulated over a temperature range from 500 to 50,000 K.

  15. Comprehensive rate coefficients for electron-collision-induced transitions in hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Vrinceanu, D.; Onofrio, R.; Sadeghpour, H. R. E-mail: onofrior@gmail.com

    2014-01-01

    Energy-changing electron-hydrogen atom collisions are crucial to regulating the energy balance in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas and are relevant to the formation of stellar atmospheres, recombination in H II clouds, primordial recombination, three-body recombination, and heating in ultracold and fusion plasmas. Computational modeling of electron-hydrogen collision has been attempted through quantum mechanical scattering state-to-state calculations of transitions involving low-lying energy levels in hydrogen (with principal quantum number n < 7) and at large principal quantum numbers using classical trajectory techniques. Analytical expressions are proposed that interpolate the current quantum mechanical and classical trajectory results for electron-hydrogen scattering in the entire range of energy levels for nearly the entire temperature range of interest in astrophysical environments. An asymptotic expression for the Born cross section is interpolated with a modified expression previously derived for electron-hydrogen scattering in the Rydberg regime using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. The derived formula is compared to existing numerical data for transitions involving low principal quantum numbers, and the dependence of the deviations on temperature is discussed.

  16. Impact of Electronic Publishing on Scholarly Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, H. William

    Three general features of scholarly journals--internal processing, format, and form--are examined with regard to journals published by the American Institute of Physics (AIP). Reasons for the minor impact of electronic processing on output forms and display formats in physics journals are discussed, including the dependence of such journals on the…

  17. Recent advances in vibro-impact dynamics and collision of ocean vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of ship impacts and collisions takes different approaches depending on the emphasis of each discipline. For example, dynamicists, physicist, and mathematicians are dealing with developing analytical models and mappings of vibro-impact systems. On the other hand, naval architects and ship designers are interested in developing design codes and structural assessments due to slamming loads, liquid sloshing impact loads in liquefied natural gas tanks and ship grounding accidents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the main differences of the two disciplines. It begins with a brief account of the theory of vibro-impact dynamics based on modeling and mapping of systems experiencing discontinuous changes in their state of motion due to collision. The main techniques used in modeling include power-law phenomenological modeling, Hertzian modeling, and non-smooth coordinate transformations originally developed by Zhuravlev and Ivanov. In view of their effectiveness, both Zhuravlev and Ivanov non-smooth coordinate transformations will be described and assessed for the case of ship roll dynamics experiencing impact with rigid barriers. These transformations have the advantage of converting the vibro-impact oscillator into an oscillator without barriers such that the corresponding equation of motion does not contain any impact term. One of the recent results dealing with the coefficient of restitution is that its value monotonically decreases with the impact velocity and not unique but random in nature. Slamming loads and grounding events of ocean waves acting on the bottom of high speed vessels will be assessed with reference to the ship structural damage. It will be noticed that naval architects and marine engineers are treating these problems using different approaches from those used by dynamicists. The problem of sloshing impact in liquefied natural gas cargo and related problems will be assessed based on the numerical and experimental results. It is

  18. Signatures of quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2015-09-15

    Electron dynamics in the collision of an electron beam with a high-intensity focused ultrashort laser pulse are investigated using three-dimensional QED particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and the results are compared with those calculated by classical Landau and Lifshitz PIC simulations. Significant differences are observed from the angular dependence of the electron energy distribution patterns for the two different approaches, because photon emission is no longer well approximated by a continuous process in the quantum radiation-dominated regime. The stochastic nature of photon emission results in strong signatures of quantum radiation-reaction effects under certain conditions. We show that the laser spot size and duration greatly influence these signatures due to the competition of QED effects and the ponderomotive force, which is well described in the classical approximation. The clearest signatures of quantum radiation reaction are found in the limit of large laser spots and few cycle pulse durations.

  19. Double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-12-01

    We present first measurable predictions for electromagnetic (two-photon) double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at LHC. Measurable cross sections are obtained with realistic cuts on electron/positron (pseudo)rapidities and transverse momenta for the ALICE and ATLAS or CMS experiments. The predictions for total and differential cross sections are presented. We show also two-dimensional distributions in rapidities of the opposite-sign (from the same or different subcollisions) and of the same-sign (e+e+ or e-e-) electrons and in rapidity distance between them. Expected number of events are presented and discussed. Our calculations strongly suggest that relevant measurements with the help of ATLAS, CMS and ALICE detectors are possible in a near future. We show and compare energy dependence of the cross sections for one-pair and two-pair production.

  20. Benchmark Calculations of Electron-Impact Differential Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I.; Bostock, C. J.; Fursa, D. V.; Hines, C. W.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2011-05-11

    The calculation of electron-atom excitation and ionization cross section is considered in both the non-relativistic and relativistic scattering theory. We consider electron collisions with H, He, Cs, and Hg. Differential cross sections for elastic scattering and ionization are presented.

  1. Energy and angular distributions of detached electrons in a solvable model of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H.; Ovchinnikov, S.Y. |; Solovev, E.A.

    1999-08-01

    Electron energy and angular distributions are computed for a model of atom{endash}negative-ion collisions. In this model, electron-atom interactions are represented by zero-range potentials in an approximation where two identical atoms move along straight-line classical trajectories in head-on collisions. Analytic expressions for the ionization amplitudes are interpreted in terms of Sturmian eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. At high velocity, the computed distributions exhibit direct excitation and continuum capture cusps in addition to the binary encounter ridge. At low velocities, a single feature corresponding to an electron distribution centered midway between the target and projectile emerges. For initial conditions corresponding to gerade symmetry a single broad peak appears, while for ungerade symmetry there is a node at the midpoint so that the peak splits into two parts. It is confirmed that the advanced adiabatic approximation gives an accurate description of the ungerade distribution at low and intermediate velocities. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Energy and angular distributions of detached electrons in a solvable model of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, J.H.; Ovchinnikov, S.Y. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 ); Solovev, E.A. )

    1999-08-01

    Electron energy and angular distributions are computed for a model of atom[endash]negative-ion collisions. In this model, electron-atom interactions are represented by zero-range potentials in an approximation where two identical atoms move along straight-line classical trajectories in head-on collisions. Analytic expressions for the ionization amplitudes are interpreted in terms of Sturmian eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. At high velocity, the computed distributions exhibit direct excitation and continuum capture cusps in addition to the binary encounter ridge. At low velocities, a single feature corresponding to an electron distribution centered midway between the target and projectile emerges. For initial conditions corresponding to gerade symmetry a single broad peak appears, while for ungerade symmetry there is a node at the midpoint so that the peak splits into two parts. It is confirmed that the advanced adiabatic approximation gives an accurate description of the ungerade distribution at low and intermediate velocities. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  3. Proton emission following multiple electron capture in slow N{sup 7+}+HCl collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Fremont, F.; Martina, D.; Kamalou, O.; Sobocinski, P.; Chesnel, J.-Y.; McNab, I.R.; Bennett, F.R.

    2005-04-01

    Collisions between 98-keV N{sup 7+} ions and a HCl target have been investigated experimentally. The kinetic-energy distribution of fragment H{sup +} ions originating from multiple electron capture was detected at angles in the range 20 deg. -160 deg. with respect to the incident beam direction. Proton energies as large as 100 eV were observed, and calculations made in the simple Coulomb explosion model suggest that up to seven target electrons may be involved during the collision. Using the Landau-Zener model, we show that the N{sup 7+} projectile mainly captures outer-shell electrons from HCl. From the experimental data we derived multiple-capture cross sections which we compared with results from a model calculation made using the classical over-barrier model and also with a semiempirical scaling law. For the specific case of double capture, several structures appeared, which were assigned using ab initio calculations to states of HCl{sup 2+}.

  4. Ionization of glycerin molecule by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavilopulo, A. N.; Shpenik, O. B.; Markush, P. P.; Kontrosh, E. E.

    2015-07-01

    The methods and results of studying the yield of positive ions produced due to direct and dissociative electron impact ionization of the glycerin molecule are described. The experiment is carried out using two independent setups, namely, a setup with a monopole mass spectrometer employing the method of crossing electron and molecular beams and a setup with a hypocycloidal electron spectrometer with the gas-filled cell. The mass spectra of the glycerin molecule are studied in the range of mass numbers of 10-95 amu at various temperatures. The energy dependences of the effective cross sections of the glycerin molecular ions produced by a monoenergetic electron beam are obtained and analyzed; using these dependences, the appearance energies of fragment ions are determined. The dynamics of the glycerin molecule fragment ions formation is investigated in the temperature range of 300-340 K.

  5. Calculations on Electron Capture in Low Energy Ion-Molecule Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stancil, P.C.; Zygelman, B.; Kirby, K.

    1997-12-31

    Recent progress on the application of a quantal, molecular-orbital, close-coupling approach to the calculation of electron capture in collisions of multiply charged ions with molecules is discussed. Preliminary results for single electron capture by N{sup 2+} with H{sub 2} are presented. Electron capture by multiply charged ions colliding with H{sub 2} is an important process in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. It provides a recombination mechanism for multiply charged ions in x-ray ionized astronomical environments which may have sparse electron and atomic hydrogen abundances. In the divertor region of a tokamak fusion device, charge exchange of impurity ions with H{sub 2} plays a role in the ionization balance and the production of radiative energy loss leading to cooling, X-ray and ultraviolet auroral emission from Jupiter is believed to be due to charge exchange of O and S ions with H{sub 2} in the Jovian atmosphere. Solar wind ions interacting with cometary molecules may have produced the x-rays observed from Comet Hyakutake. In order to model and understand the behavior of these environments, it is necessary to obtain total, electronic state-selective (ESS), and vibrational (or rotational) state-selective (VSS) capture cross sections for collision energies as low as 10 meV/amu to as high as 100 keV/amu in some instances. Fortunately, charge transfer with molecular targets has received considerable experimental attention. Numerous measurements have been made with flow tubes, ion traps, and ion beams. Flow tube and ion trap studies generally provide information on rate coefficients for temperatures between 800 K and 20,000 K. In this article, we report on the progress of our group in implementing a quantum-mechanical Molecular Orbital Close Coupling (MOCC) approach to the study of electron capture by multiply charged ions in collisions with molecules. We illustrate this with a preliminary investigation of Single Electron Capture (SEC) by N{sup 2+} with H

  6. Superelastic collisions of electrons with the c 3Πu metastable state in hydrogen dc positive column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, J.; Lino, J. L. S.; Loureiro, J.; Lima, M. A. P.; da Paixão, F. J.

    1999-07-01

    We investigated the effect of superelastic electronic collisions of electrons, with the c 3Πu state of the H 2 molecule, on the electron energy distribution function (eedf) of a dc positive column. We use a recently calculated set of electronic superelastic collision cross-sections [C.S. Sartori, F.J. da Paixão, M.A.P. Lima, Phys. Rev. A 55 (1997) 3243] to study the effect of these collisions on the eedf, the transport parameters, ionization and dissociation rates. We include two possible pathways, c 3Πu → b 3Σ+u and c 3Πu → X 1Σ+g, for superelastic collisions of electrons with molecules in the metastable state. Cross-sections of the order of 10 -14 cm 2 at low energy enhance the eedf tail by superelastic electronic collisions, in particular for low reduced electric field E/ N. This result changes considerably the dissociation and ionization rates by six orders of magnitude in the region from 10 to 50 Td.

  7. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  8. Pressure broadening calculations for OH in collisions with argon: Rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2017-03-01

    Collisional parameters describing both the pressure-induced broadening and shifting of isolated lines in the spectrum of the hydroxyl radical in collisions with argon have been determined through quantum scattering calculations using accurate potential energy surfaces describing the OH(X2 Π , A2Σ+)-Ar interactions. These calculations have been carried for pure rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions. The calculated pressure broadening coefficients are in good agreement with the available measurements in the microwave, infrared, and ultraviolet spectral regions. Computed pressure broadening coefficients as a function of temperature are reported for these three types of transitions.

  9. Radiative double electron capture in collisions of fully-stripped fluorine ions with thin carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkafrawy, Tamer Mohammad Samy

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) is a one-step process in ion-atom collisions occurring when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of the projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. The emitted photon has approximately double the energy of the photon emitted due to radiative electron capture (REC), which occurs when a target electron is captured to a projectile bound state with simultaneous emission of a photon. REC and RDEC can be treated as time-reversed photoionization (PI) and double photoionization (DPI), respectively, if loosely-bound target electrons are captured. This concept can be formulated with the principle of detailed balance, in which the processes of our interest can be described in terms of their time-reversed ones. Fully-stripped ions were used as projectiles in the performed RDEC experiments, providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields. This allows the target electrons to be transferred without interaction with any of the projectile electrons, enabling accurate investigation of the electron-electron interaction in the vicinity of electromagnetic field. In this dissertation, RDEC was investigated during the collision of fully-stripped fluorine ions with a thin carbon foil and the results are compared with the recent experimental and theoretical studies. In the current work, x rays associated with projectile charge-changing by single and double electron capture and no charge change by F9+ ions were observed and compared with recent work for O8+ ions and with theory. Both the F 9+ and O8+ ions had energies in the ˜MeV/u range. REC, in turn, was investigated as a means to compare with the theoretical predictions of the RDEC/REC cross section ratio. The most significant background processes including various mechanisms of x-ray emission that may interfere with the energy region of interest are addressed in detail. This enables isolation of the contributions of REC and RDEC from the

  10. Collision integral in the kinetic equation for a rarefied electron gas with allowance for its spin polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Sasorov, P. V.; Fomin, I. V.

    2015-06-15

    The collision integral in the kinetic equation for a rarefied spin-polarized gas of fermions (electrons) is derived. The collisions between these fermions and the collisions with much heavier particles (ions) forming a randomly located stationary background (gas) are taken into account. An important new circumstance is that the particle-particle scattering amplitude is not assumed to be small, which could be obtained, for example, in the first Born approximation. The derived collision integral can be used in the kinetic equation, including that for a relatively cold rarefied spin-polarized plasma with a characteristic electron energy below α{sup 2}m{sub e}c{sup 2}, where α is the fine-structure constant.

  11. Surface-plasmon-assisted electron capture in H +/Mg and H +/Al collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, R.; Gutierrez, F. A.; Jouin, H.

    2007-05-01

    We analyze the velocity-dependent threshold behavior of the transition rate for the surface-plasmon mode of proton neutralization at metallic surfaces. Consideration of the proton velocity, which had not been considered so far, affects the transition rates in a nonnegligible way. In particular we study the opening of the collective channel for the H+/Al system, which remains closed in the fixed ion approximation. Preliminary calculations of neutral fractions, after grazing incidence collision of a proton beam with an Al(1 1 1) surface, seem to indicate that the collective mechanism starts to play a significant role for impact velocities greater than 0.5 a.u.

  12. Vortices Associated with the Wave Function of a Single Electron Emitted in Slow Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, L. Ph. H.; Goihl, C.; Metz, D.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Dörner, R.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu.; Macek, J. H.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-02-01

    We present measurements and calculations of the momentum distribution of electrons emitted during the ion-atom collision 10 keV/u He2++He→He++He2++e-, which show rich structures for ion scattering angles above 2 mrad arising dominantly from two-electron states. Our calculations reveal that minima in the measured distributions are zeros in the electronic probability density resulting from vortices in the electronic current.

  13. A kinetic study of solar wind electrons in the transition region from collision dominated to collisionless flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Leer, E.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the evolution of the velocity distribution function of a test population of electrons in the solar corona and inner solar wind region, using a recently developed kinetic model. The model solves the time dependent, linear transport equation, with a Fokker-Planck collision operator to describe Coulomb collisions between the 'test population' and a thermal background of charged particles, using a finite differencing scheme. The model provides information on how non-Maxwellian features develop in the distribution function in the transition region from collision dominated to collisionless flow. By taking moments of the distribution the evolution of higher order moments, such as the heat flow, can be studied.

  14. Collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, H, H/sub 2/ and He: Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, R.A.; Janev, R.K.; Pindzola, M.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report provides a handbook for fusion research of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for collisions of carbon and oxygen ions with electrons, hydrogen atoms and molecules, and helium atoms. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical, and parametrized form. Processes considered include exciation, ionization, and charge exchange at collision energies appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  15. Collision-energy-resolved penning ionization electron spectroscopy of HCOOH, CH3COOH, and HCOOCH3 by collision with He*(2(3)S) metastable atoms.

    PubMed

    Borodin, Andriy; Yamazaki, Masakazu; Kishimoto, Naoki; Ohno, Koichi

    2005-06-02

    Penning ionization of formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and methyl formate (HCOOCH3) upon collision with metastable He*(2(3)S) atoms was studied by collision-energy/electron-energy-resolved two-dimensional Penning ionization electron spectroscopy (2D-PIES). Anisotropy of interaction between the target molecule and He*(2(3)S) was investigated based on the collision energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) obtained from 2D-PIES as well as ab initio molecular orbital calculations for the access of a metastable atom to the target molecule. For the interaction potential calculations, a Li atom was used in place of He*(2(3)S) metastable atom because of its well-known similarity in interaction with targets. The results indicate that in the studied collision energy range the attractive potential localizes around the oxygen atoms and that the potential well at the carbonyl oxygen atom is at least twice as much as that at the hydroxyl oxygen. Moreover we can notice that attractive potential is highly anisotropic. Repulsive interactions can be found around carbon atoms and the methyl group.

  16. QED Approach to Modeling Spectra of the Multicharged Ions in a Plasma: Oscillator and Electron-ion Collision Strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Loboda, A. V.; Ignatenko, A.; Svinarenko, A.; Korchevsky, D.; Lovett, L.

    2008-10-22

    The uniform energy approach, formally based on the QED theory with using gauge invariant scheme of generation of the optimal one-electron representation, is used for the description of spectra of the multicharged ions in a laser plasma, calculation of electron-ion collision strengths, cross-sections in Ne-like and Ar-like ions.

  17. Theoretical Demonstration of the Feasibility of Observing Vortices in the Ejected Electron Spectrum in Bare-Ion Two-Electron-Atom Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, S. Yu.; Macek, Joseph H; Schmidt, L. Ph.H; Schultz, David Robert

    2011-01-01

    Using a fully correlated, 4-dimensional lattice, time-dependent Schr dinger equation (LTDSE) model of the collisions of bare projectile ions with two-electron atoms (H+, He2+ + He), we demonstrate the existence vortices in the resulting spectrum of ejected electrons. Following the uncovering of these features in collisions involving only one electron (H+ + H) [Macek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 143201 (2009)], this demonstration provides impetus for seeking these features in more readily feasible experimental conditions using a cold helium target and the reaction microscope technique.

  18. Band-structure-based collisional model for electronic excitations in ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Faraggi, M.N.; Gravielle, M.S.; Alducin, M.; Silkin, V.M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2005-07-15

    Energy loss per unit path in grazing collisions with metal surfaces is studied by using the collisional and dielectric formalisms. Within both theories we make use of the band-structure-based (BSB) model to represent the surface interaction. The BSB approach is based on a model potential and provides a precise description of the one-electron states and the surface-induced potential. The method is applied to evaluate the energy lost by 100 keV protons impinging on aluminum surfaces at glancing angles. We found that when the realistic BSB description of the surface is used, the energy loss obtained from the collisional formalism agrees with the dielectric one, which includes not only binary but also plasmon excitations. The distance-dependent stopping power derived from the BSB model is in good agreement with available experimental data. We have also investigated the influence of the surface band structure in collisions with the Al(100) surface. Surface-state contributions to the energy loss and electron emission probability are analyzed.

  19. Tunable entanglement resource in elastic electron-exchange collisions out of chaotic spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, B.; Blum, K.; Langer, B.

    2016-09-01

    Elastic collisions between initially unpolarized electrons and hydrogenlike atoms are discussed aiming to analyze the entanglement properties of the correlated final spin system. Explicit spin-dependent interactions are neglected and electron exchange only is taken into account. We show the final spin system to be completely characterized by a single spin correlation parameter depending on scattering angle and energy. Its numerical value identifies the final spins of the collision partners to be either in the separable, entangled, or Bell correlated regions. The symmetry of the scattering process allows for the construction of explicit examples applying methods of classical communication and local operations for illustrating the concepts of nonlocality versus separability. It is shown that strong correlations can be produced violating Bell's inequalities significantly. Furthermore, the degree of entanglement can be continuously varied simply by changing either the scattering angle and/or energy. This allows for the generation of tunable spin pairs with any desired degree of entanglement. It is suggested to use such nonlocally entangled spin pairs as a resource for further experiments, for example in quantum information processes.

  20. Coherent electron-positron pair production in ultra-peripheral AuAu collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, Matthew; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The focus of this study is coherent photoproduction of electron-positron pairs in 200 GeV ultraperipheral AuAu collisions detected by STAR, with an integrated luminosity of 1.9 inverse nanobarns. Because hadronic interactions are suppressed in ultra-peripheral collisions, these events provide an opportunity to study purely electromagnetic interaction in the non-perturbative regime. This presentation will provide a description of the techniques used to select exclusive electron-positron events, as well as the resulting kinematic distributions for pair invariant mass greater than 0.35 GeV, pair transverse momentum less than 0.1 GeV, and absolute value of pair pseudorapidity less than 0.8. Efficiency correction techniques will also be discussed. In previous measurements at the same energy at STAR, the shape of the transverse momentum distribution could not be fully described by the equivalent photon approximation (EPA). Measurements at the LHC indicate that the cross section is reduced by approximately 25 percent compared to the EPA. This study ultimately seeks to examine these effects in more detail at RHIC energies. Partial funding provided by DOE Grant #DE-FG02-96ER40991.

  1. Electron collisions with the BH{sub 2} radical using the R-matrix method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Songbin; Chen Xiangjun; Wang Jianguo; Janev, R. K.

    2010-12-15

    Differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for the rotationally elastic and inelastic scattering of electron by the BH{sub 2} radical at low collision energies (0-8 eV) are reported in a 22-state molecular R-matrix method. The excitation cross sections from the ground X {sup 2}A{sub 1} state to the first two excited states {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 4}A{sub 2} are calculated as well, for incident electron energies from the respective thresholds up to 8 eV. Configuration-interaction wave functions are used to represent the target states which account for the correlation effects. Four shape and three Feshbach resonances are detected. The Born-closure approximation is applied for the elastic and dipole-allowed transitions to account for the l>4 partial waves excluded from the R-matrix calculations.

  2. A scaling law for energy transfer by inelastic electron-molecule collisions in mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienkowski, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    The equation governing the electron energy distribution in the presence of a spatially uniform electric field in a weakly ionized gas was reformulated into an integral equation for the logarithmic slope of the distribution function. For gas mixtures in which the dominant electron energy loss mechanism is by vibrational excitation of the molecules, this equation is suitable for approximate analysis and exact numerical solution by iteration. Superelastic collisions are easily included in this formulation, and do not seriously effect the convergence of the numerical scheme. The approximate analytical results are only qualitatively correct, but suggest appropriate parameters which correlate the exact numerical results very well. The distribution function as well as certain gross properties such as net energy transfer into vibration, mean energy, and drift velocity depend primarily on a single nondimensional parameter involving only E/N and the cross sections.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  4. State-selective electron capture in 30- and 100-keV He++He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, D. L.; Ma, X.; Zhang, R. T.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Gao, Y.; Hai, B.; Zhang, M.; Wang, H. B.; Huang, Z. K.

    2017-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study on single capture in 30- and 100-keV He+ on He collisions was performed. By using a reaction microscope, we obtained the state selective cross sections and the angular-differential cross sections. It was found that the experimental state-selective cross sections were in good agreement with the dynamic screening classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculation for 100-keV He+ incident. The comparisons with various versions of such calculations reveal the roles played by different electron-electron correlation effects. Moreover, a prominent oscillatory structure was observed in the angular-differential cross sections for both projectile energies. With the single capture probability distribution obtained from the classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculation, the oscillation structures can be well explained by atomic-size Fraunhofer-type diffraction.

  5. ON THE COMPETITION BETWEEN RADIAL EXPANSION AND COULOMB COLLISIONS IN SHAPING THE ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: KINETIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Pantellini, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of the solar wind using a fully kinetic model which takes into account the effects of particle's binary collisions in a quasi-neutral plasma in spherical expansion. Starting from an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution function for the electrons, we show that the combined effect of expansion and Coulomb collisions leads to the formation of two populations: a collision-dominated cold and dense population almost isotropic in velocity space and a weakly collisional, tenuous field-aligned and antisunward drifting population generated by mirror force focusing in the radially decreasing magnetic field. The relative weights and drift velocities for the two populations observed in our simulations are in excellent agreement with the relative weights and drift velocities for both core and strahl populations observed in the real solar wind. The radial evolution of the main moments of the electron velocity distribution function is in the range observed in the solar wind. The electron temperature anisotropy with respect to the magnetic field direction is found to be related to the ratio between the collisional time and the solar wind expansion time. Even though collisions are found to shape the electron velocity distributions and regulate the properties of the strahl, it is found that the heat flux is conveniently described by a collisionless model where a fraction of the electron thermal energy is advected at the solar wind speed. This reinforces the currently largely admitted fact that collisions in the solar wind are clearly insufficient to force the electron heat flux obey the classical Spitzer-Haerm expression where heat flux and temperature gradient are proportional to each other. The presented results show that the electron dynamics in the solar wind cannot be understood without considering the role of collisions.

  6. Nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in graphene: Collinear scattering, Auger processes, and the impact of screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadin, Andrea; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Polini, Marco

    2013-07-01

    We present a combined analytical and numerical study of the early stages (sub-100-fs) of the nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in graphene. We employ the semiclassical Boltzmann equation with a collision integral that includes contributions from electron-electron (e-e) and electron-optical phonon interactions. Taking advantage of circular symmetry and employing the massless Dirac fermion (MDF) Hamiltonian, we are able to perform an essentially analytical study of the e-e contribution to the collision integral. This allows us to take particular care of subtle collinear scattering processes—processes in which incoming and outgoing momenta of the scattering particles lie on the same line—including carrier multiplication (CM) and Auger recombination (AR). These processes have a vanishing phase space for two-dimensional MDF bare bands. However, we argue that electron-lifetime effects, seen in experiments based on angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, provide a natural pathway to regularize this pathology, yielding a finite contribution due to CM and AR to the Coulomb collision integral. Finally, we discuss in detail the role of physics beyond the Fermi golden rule by including screening in the matrix element of the Coulomb interaction at the level of the random phase approximation (RPA), focusing in particular on the consequences of various approximations including static RPA screening, which maximizes the impact of CM and AR processes, and dynamical RPA screening, which completely suppresses them.

  7. Electron Attachment in Low-Energy Electron Elastic Collisions with Au and Pt Atoms: Identification of Excited Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Eure, A.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been benchmarked [1] on the accurately measured binding energies of the excited Ge= and Sn= anions [2] through the binding energies (BEs) extracted from the Regge-pole calculated elastic total cross sections (TCSs). Here the methodology is applied together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the vital core polarization interaction to investigate the possibility of forming excited Au= and Pt= anions in low-energy electron elastic collisions with Au and Pt atoms. From the positions of the characteristic extremely narrow resonances in the total cross sections, we extract the binding energies of the excited Au= and Pt= anions formed as Regge resonances during the collisions. The angular life of the complexes thus formed is used to differentiate the stable excited bound states of the anions from the shape resonances [3]. The BEs for the excited Au= and Pt= anions are found to be 0.475eVand 0.543eV, respectively, challenging both theory and experiment to verify. [1] A. Msezane et al, Phys. Rev. A, Submitted (2009) [2] M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. A 58, 2844 (1998) [3] Z. Felfli et al, Phys. Rev. A 79, 012714 (2009)

  8. Doubly differential cross sections of collision-produced forward electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Elston, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    The velocity space distribution of electrons emitted near the forward direction from collisions involving fast, highly stripped oxygen ions with gaseous and solid targets is presented and described in terms of multipole moments of the ejected charge distribution, which permits direct comparison with recent theory. The results are from a novel apparatus permitting rapid and efficient data acquisition by employing position-sensitive electron detection to combine angle definition with conventional electrostatic spectrometry. Excellent agreement is obtained between distribution observed for electron loss to projectile continuum processes and recent theory in the case of argon targets; less favorable results for simpler helium targets may indicate the need for theoretical study of higher order inelastic processes in that case. The multipole content observed with a solid target is consistent with a conceptual model of convoy electron production dominated by electron loss from the projectile within the bulk of the target and may signify the importance of steady-state production of excited states within the bulk solid. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Electron capture in collisions of Al2+ ions with He atoms at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, A.; Sato, H.; Gu, J. P.; Hirsch, G.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.

    2001-09-01

    Electron capture resulting from collisions of Al2+ ions with He atoms from 0.15 to 1000 keV/u is investigated using a molecular-orbital representation within a semiclassical frame. Molecular electronic states and corresponding couplings are determined by the ALCHEMY program. Sixteen molecular states all connecting to single-electron-capture processes are included, and hence radial and rotational couplings among these channels are fully considered. The trajectory effect arising from the straight-line, Coulomb, and ground-state potential trajectories for electron-capture and excitation processes is carefully assessed. The electron-capture cross section by ground-state Al2+(2S) ions slowly increases before it reaches a maximum of 1.3×10-16 cm2 at 100 keV/u. Those for metastable Al2+(2P) ions sharply increase with increasing energy, and reach a peak at 1 keV/u with a value of 1.5×10-16 cm2. The earlier experimental data are found to be larger by an order of magnitude although their energy dependence is in good accord with the present result. Excitation cross sections for both the ground and metastable states are found to be much larger by a factor of 2-3 than corresponding capture cross sections above 1 keV/u although they become comparable below this energy.

  10. Ion formation upon electron collisions with valine embedded in helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Nikolaus; Ralser, Stefan; Renzler, Michael; Harnisch, Martina; Kaiser, Alexander; Denifl, Stefan; Böhme, Diethard K.; Scheier, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We report here experimental results for the electron ionization of large superfluid helium nanodroplets with sizes of about 105 atoms that are doped with valine and clusters of valine. Spectra of both cations and anions were monitored with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (mass resolution >4000). Clear series of peaks with valine cluster sizes up to at least 40 and spaced by the mass of a valine molecule are visible in both the cation and anion spectra. Ion efficiency curves are presented for selected cations and anions at electron energies up to about 40 eV and these provide insight into the mode of ion formation. The measured onset of 24.59 eV for cations is indicative of valine ionization by He+ whereas broad resonances at 2, 10 and 22 eV (and beyond) in the formation of anions speak to the occurrence of various modes of dissociative electron attachment by collisions with electrons or He*- and the influence of droplet size on the relative importance of these processes. Comparisons are also made with gas phase results and these provide insight into a matrix effect within the superfluid helium nanodroplet. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  11. Theoretical investigation of electron transfer and detachment processes in low energy H- + Li and Li- + H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Lin, X. H.; Yan, B.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    The charge exchange and collisional detachment processes in H- + Li and Li- + H collisions have been studied by using the quantal molecular orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) method in the energy ranges of about 0.12-1000 eV u-1 and 0.1 meV-1000 eV, respectively, and the inelastic collision cross sections and rate coefficients have been computed and presented. It is found that the electron transfer process in the H- + Li and Li- + H collisions is due to the Demkov coupling between the 12Σ+ and 22Σ+ states at internuclear distances of about 15a0. The collisional electron detachment in the considered collision system is due to the excitation of the remaining six states, which are all unstable against autodetachment. These states are populated through a series of Landau-Zener couplings of the 22Σ+ state with upper 2Σ+ states and by the rotational 2Σ+-2Π couplings at small internuclear distances. The cross sections for electron transfer in H- + Li and Li- + H collisions in the energy range of 10-1000 eV u-1 attain values in the range of 10-16-10-15 cm2 (reaching their maximum values of about 5 × 10-15 cm2 at 500-600 eV u-1), while the values of the corresponding electron detachment cross sections in this energy range attain generally smaller values.

  12. Unravelling the dissociation pathways of acetic acid upon electron transfer in potassium collisions: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Meneses, G; Widmann, C; Cunha, T; Gil, A; Ferreira da Silva, F; Calhorda, M J; Limão-Vieira, P

    2017-01-04

    Electron transfer in alkali-molecule collisions with gas phase acetic acid and its deuterated analogues resulting in OH(-) formation requires considerable internal rearrangement in the temporary negative ion. At a collision energy well above the threshold of negative ion formation, electron transfer from potassium to CH3COOH/CH3COOD and CD3COOH results not only in H transfer from CH3 to COOH/COOD, but also in H release from COOH and subsequent rearrangement to eliminate OH(-). These processes are also investigated by theoretical post-Hartree-Fock and DFT calculations. The combination of both studies reveals that the most favourable intermediate mechanism occurs via diol formation. Such intramolecular H transfer is reported here for the first time in the context of electron transfer induced dissociation experiments in alkali-molecule collisions. A comprehensive fragmentation study is presented and dissociation mechanisms are suggested.

  13. Perceiving Collision Impacts in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Retinal Eccentricity on Optic Flow Deficits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Gyoon

    2015-01-01

    The present study explored whether the optic flow deficit in Alzheimer's disease (AD) reported in the literature transfers to different types of optic flow, in particular, one that specifies collision impacts with upcoming surfaces, with a special focus on the effect of retinal eccentricity. Displays simulated observer movement over a ground plane toward obstacles lying in the observer's path. Optical expansion was modulated by varying [Formula: see text]. The visual field was masked either centrally (peripheral vision) or peripherally (central vision) using masks ranging from 10° to 30° in diameter in steps of 10°. Participants were asked to indicate whether their approach would result in "collision" or "no collision" with the obstacles. Results showed that AD patients' sensitivity to [Formula: see text] was severely compromised, not only for central vision but also for peripheral vision, compared to age- and education-matched elderly controls. The results demonstrated that AD patients' optic flow deficit is not limited to radial optic flow but includes also the optical pattern engendered by [Formula: see text]. Further deterioration in the capacity to extract [Formula: see text] to determine potential collisions in conjunction with the inability to extract heading information from radial optic flow would exacerbate AD patients' difficulties in navigation and visuospatial orientation.

  14. Low-Energy Electrons Emitted in Ion Collisions with Thin Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Michael; Kozhuharov, Christophor; Durante, Marco; Hagmann, Siegbert; Kraft, Gerhard; Lineva, Natallia

    The realistic description of radiation damage after charged particle passage is an ongoing issue for both radiotherapy as well as space applications. In both areas of applied radiological science, living as well as nonliving matter is exposed to ionizing radiation, and it is of vital interest to predict the responses of structures like cells, detectors or electronic devices. In ion beam radiotherapy, for example, the Local Effect Model (LEM) is being used to calculate radiobiological effects with so far unprecedented versatility. This has been shown in the GSI radiotherapy pilot project and consequently this model has become the "industry standard" for treatment planning in subsequent commercial ion radiotherapy sites. The model has also been extended to nonliving matter, i.e. to describe the response of solid state detectors such as TLDs and films. A prerequisite for this model (and possibly similar ones) is the proper description of microscopic track structure and energy deposition. In particular, the area at a very low distance (¡20 nm) from the ion path needs special attention due to the locally very high dose and the rather limited experimental evidence for the shape of the dose distribution. The dose distribution at low distances is inevitably associated with the creation and transport of low-energy (sub-keV) electrons. While some data, elementary cross sections as well as dose distributions, exist for gaseous media, i.e. under single collision conditions, experimental data for the condensed phase are scarce. We have, therefore, launched a project aimed at systematic research of the energy and angular distributions of low-energy (sub-keV) electrons emitted from solids. These investigations com-prise creation as well as transport of low-energy electrons under multiple collision conditions and hence require accounting for the properties of the target, both bulk and surface, i.e. for the inherent inhomogeneity of the thickness and for the surface roughness. To

  15. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the Mg-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Emission lines from ions in the Mg-like iso-electronic sequence can be used as reliable diagnostics of temperature and density of astrophysical and fusion plasmas over a wide range of parameters. Data in the literature are quite lacking, there are no calculations for many of the ions in the sequence. Methods: We have carried-out intermediate coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations which include a total of 283 fine-structure levels in both the configuration interaction target and close-coupling collision expansions. These arise from the configurations 1s2 2s2 2p6 3 {s,p,d} nl with n = 4,5, and for l = 0-4. Results: We obtain ordinary collision strengths and Maxwell-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of all the ions of the Mg-like sequence, from Al+ to Zn18 +. We compare our results with those from previous R-matrix and distorted waves calculations, where available, for some benchmark ions. We find good agreement with the results of previous calculations for the transitions n = 3-3. We also find good agreement for the most intense transitions n = 3-4. These transitions are important for populating the upper levels of the main diagnostic lines. These data are made available in the APAP archive via http://www.apap-network.org, CHIANTI via http://www.chiantidatabase.org and open-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk

  16. Cross sections for 14-eV e-H{sub 2} resonant collisions: Dissociative electron attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Wadehra, J. M.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2009-07-15

    The dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process in electron-H{sub 2} molecule collisions, involving the {sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} excited electronic Rydberg state of molecular hydrogen ion H{sub 2}{sup -}, is investigated theoretically. The DEA cross section has been calculated within the local complex potential approximation. The convoluted cross section, which presents a peak located at the incident energy of about 14 eV, compares favorably with available experimental data.

  17. Observation of an impact-parameter window in low-velocity ionizing collisions of Ne+ on Ne proceeding through quasimolecular states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, M. A.; Wolff, W.; Wolf, H. E.; Cocke, C. L.; Stöckli, M.

    1998-11-01

    Target ionization in collisions of singly charged Ne+ ions with Ne has been investigated at projectile velocities from 0.25 to 0.55 a.u. using electron and recoil momentum imaging techniques. The momentum distributions of the ejected electrons were found to carry a distinct signature strongly suggesting that ionization is taking place by successive promotions through molecular orbitals. The observed recoil transverse momentum distributions are donut-shaped, indicating that single ionization is confined to a well-defined impact-parameter window.

  18. Electron-impact ionization of helium: A comprehensive experiment benchmarks theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X.; Pflueger, T.; Senftleben, A.; Xu, S.; Dorn, A.; Ullrich, J.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.V.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M.S.

    2011-05-15

    Single ionization of helium by 70.6-eV electron impact is studied in a comprehensive experiment covering a major part of the entire collision kinematics and the full 4{pi} solid angle for the emitted electron. The absolutely normalized triple-differential experimental cross sections are compared with results from the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and the time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) theories. Whereas excellent agreement with the TDCC prediction is only found for equal energy sharing, the CCC calculations are in excellent agreement with essentially all experimentally observed dynamical features, including the absolute magnitude of the cross sections.

  19. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of the DNA Sugar-Phosphate Backbone by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred M.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in living cells are not caused by the highly energetic incident radiation, but rather are induced by less energetic secondary species generated, the most abundant of which are free electrons.' The secondary electrons will further react to cause DNA damage via indirect and direct mechanisms. Detailed knowledge of these mechanisms is ultimately important for the development of global models of cellular radiation damage. We are studying one possible mechanism for the formation cf DNA strand breaks involving dissociative ionization of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone induced by secondary electron co!lisions. We will present ionization cross sections at electron collision energies between threshold and 10 KeV using the improved binary encounter dipole (iBED) formulation' Preliminary results of the possible dissociative ionization pathways will be presented. It is speculated that radical fragments produced from the dissociative ionization can further react, providing a possible mechanism for double strand breaks and base damage.

  20. Accurate Cross-section Calculations for Low-Energy Electron-Atom Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2011-05-11

    We describe a recently developed fully relativistic B-spline R-matrix method for atomic structure as well as calculations for electron and photon collision with atoms and ions. The method is based on the solution of the many-electron Fock-Dirac equation and allows to employ non-orthogonal sets of atomic orbitals. A B-spline basis is used to generate both the target description and the R-matrix basis functions in the inner region. Employing B-splines of different orders for the large and small components prevents the appearance of spurious states in the spectrum of the Dirac equation. Using term-dependent and thus nonorthogonal sets of one-electron functions enables us to generate accurate and flexible representations of the target states and the scattering function. Our method is based upon the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian and thus may be employed for any complex atom or ion, without the use of phenomenological core potentials. Example results from recent applications of the method for accurate calculations of low-energy electron scattering from noble gases are presented. In most cases we obtained a substantial improvement over results obtained in previous Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculations.

  1. Collisions between low-energy electrons and small polyatomic targets of biological relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, Leigh

    2016-05-01

    Over the last decade, cross section measurements and calculations for DNA prototype molecules have received significant attention from the collisions community, due to the potential applications of this data in modelling electron transport through biological matter with a view to improving radiation dosimetry. Such data are additionally interesting from a fundamental aspect, as small carbon-based molecules are ideal targets for considering effects including target conformation, long-range dynamical interactions and coupling effects between the various degrees of freedom on the scattering properties of the target. At the California State University Fullerton, we have made a series of measurements of the elastic, vibrationally inelastic and electronically inelastic cross sections for a variety of small polyatomic targets, including water and the basic alcohols, ethylene, toluene and several fluorinated alkanes. These processes are important in a range of applications, primarily for modelling electron transport and thermalization, and energy deposition to a biological media. The data were obtained using a high resolution electron energy-loss spectrometer, operating in a crossed beam configuration with a moveable aperture gas source. The gas source design facilitates both an expedient and highly accurate method of removing background signal, and removes uncertainties from the data due to uncertainties in the beam profile. We have also performed scattering calculations employing the Schwinger Multichannel method, in collaboration with the California institute of technology, to compare with our measurements. In this talk, I will present an overview of our recent data and future research plans.

  2. Observation of Exclusive Electron-Positron Production in Hadron-Hadron Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first observation of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} production in hadron-hadron collisions, using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 532 pb{sup -1}. We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy E{sub T} > 5 GeV and pseudorapidity |{eta}| < 2. With these criteria, 16 events are observed compared to a background expectation of 1.9 {+-} 0.3 events. These events are consistent in cross section and properties with the QED process p{bar p} {yields} p + e{sup +}e{sup -} + {bar p} through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is 1.6{sub -0.3}{sup +0.5}(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst) pb. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of 1.71 {+-} 0.01 pb.

  3. Coincidence measurements of electron-impact coherence parameters for e-He scattering in the full range of scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Dziczek, Dariusz; Pleskacz, Katarzyna; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2009-12-15

    Electron impact coherence parameters for inelastic e-He scattering have been measured for the excitation to the 2 {sup 1}P{sub 1} state at collision energy of 100 eV. The experiment was conducted using angular correlation electron-photon coincidence technique with a magnetic angle changer allowing measurements in full range of scattering angles. The results are compared with other experimental data and theoretical predictions available for this collisional system.

  4. Averaged electron collision cross sections for thermal mixtures of \\alpha -alanine conformers in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Milton M.; de Lima, Erik V. R.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical study of elastic electron collisions with 9 conformers of the gas-phase amino acid α-alanine (CH3CH(NH2)COOH) is performed. The eigenphase sums, resonance features, differential and integral cross sections are computed for each individual conformer. Resonance positions for the low-energy {π }* shape resonance are found to vary from 2.6 to 3.1 eV and the resonance widths from 0.3 to 0.5 eV. Averaged cross sections for thermal mixtures of the 9 conformers are presented. Both theoretical and experimental population ratios are considered. Thermally averaged cross sections obtained using the best theoretical estimates give reasonable agreement with the observed thermal cross sections. Excited conformers IIA and IIB make a large contribution to this average due to their large permanent dipole moments.

  5. Studies of electron-molecule collisions - Applications to e-H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brescansin, L. M.; Lima, M. A. P.; Gibson, T. L.; Mckoy, V.; Huo, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic differential and momentum transfer cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons by H2O are reported for collision energies from 2 to 20 eV. These fixed-nuclei static-exchange cross sections were obtained using the Schwinger variational approach. In these studies the exchange potential is directly evaluated and not approximated by local models. The calculated differential cross sections, obtained with a basis set expansion of the scattering wave function, agree well with available experimental data at intermediate and larger angles. As used here, the results cannot adequately describe the divergent cross sections at small angles. An interesting feature of the calculated cross sections, particularly at 15 and 20 eV, is their significant backward peaking. This peaking occurs in the experimentally inaccessible region beyond a scattering angle of 120 deg. The implication of this feature for the determination of momentum transfer cross sections is described.

  6. Electron transfer, excitation, and ionization in {alpha}-H collisions studied with a Sturmian basis

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Thomas G.

    2007-12-15

    Cross sections have been determined for electron transfer, direct excitation, and ionization in collisions between {alpha} particles and H(1s) atoms at {alpha} energies 3 keV-38.4 MeV, extending earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 25, 697 (1982)] restricted to total transfer at 20-200 keV. Transfer as well as excitation cross sections into individual states up to 3d have been determined with several coupled-Sturmian pseudostate bases, and tests of basis sensitivity have been carried out. These and ionization cross sections have been compared with existing experimental and other coupled-state results. Structure is observed in the lower-energy excitation cross sections, which is believed not to be an artifact of the bases used. Ionization and excitation cross sections have also been compared with corresponding Born results at higher energies.

  7. Low-Energy Electron Capture in Collisions of C3+ with He

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Qi, Y. Y.; Yan, J.; Wang, J. G.; Li, Y.; Buenker, R. J.; Kato, D.; Krstic, Predrag S

    2009-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground-state C{sup 3+}(1s{sup 2}2s {sup 2}S) ions with He atoms are studied using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method for energies in the range 10{sup -4}-2 x 10{sup 3} eV/u. The ab initio adiabatic potentials and radial couplings utilized in the calculations are obtained from the multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction approach. Total and state-selective single-electron capture cross sections and rate coefficients are calculated and compared with the available experimental and theoretical data. A good agreement is found between the measured cross sections and the present calculations. However, the previous calculations of total rate coefficients using the Landau-Zener model are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the present results.

  8. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of cyclopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Čurík, R. Čársky, P.; Allan, M.

    2015-04-14

    We report a very detailed test of the ab initio discrete momentum representation (DMR) method of calculating vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules by electron impact, by comparison of its results with an extensive set of experimental data, covering the entire range of scattering angles from 10{sup ∘} to 180{sup ∘} and electron energies from 0.4 to 20 eV. The DMR calculations were carried out by solving the two-channel Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the momentum space, and the interaction between the scattered electron and the target molecule was described by exact static-exchange potential corrected by a density functional theory (DFT) correlation-polarization interaction that models target’s response to the field of incoming electron. The theory is found to quantitatively reproduce the measured spectra for all normal modes, even at the difficult conditions of extreme angles and at low energies, and thus provides full understanding of the excitation mechanism. It is shown that the overlap of individual vibrational bands caused by limited experimental resolution and rotational excitation must be properly taken into account for correct comparison of experiment and theory. By doing so, an apparent discrepancy between published experimental data could be reconciled. A substantial cross section is found for excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry by the 5.5 eV A{sub 2}{sup ′} resonance, surprisingly because the currently accepted selection rules predict this process to be forbidden. The DMR theory shows that the excitation is caused by an incoming electron in an f-wave of A{sub 2}{sup ′} symmetry which causes excitation of the non-symmetric HCH twisting mode ν{sub 4} of the A{sub 1}{sup ″} symmetry and departs in p- and f-waves of A{sub 2}{sup ″} symmetry.

  9. Assessment of plasma impedance probe for measuring electron density and collision frequency in a plasma with spatial and temporal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Mark A. King, Lyon B.

    2014-05-15

    Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were combined to determine the ability of a plasma impedance probe (PIP) to measure plasma density and electron collision frequency in a plasma containing spatial gradients as well as time-varying oscillations in the plasma density. A PIP is sensitive to collision frequency through the width of the parallel resonance in the Re[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic, while also being sensitive to electron density through the zero-crossing of the Im[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic at parallel resonance. Simulations of the probe characteristic in a linear plasma gradient indicated that the broadening of Re[Z] due to the spatial gradient obscured the broadening due to electron collision frequency, preventing a quantitative measurement of the absolute collision frequency for gradients considered in this study. Simulation results also showed that the PIP is sensitive to relative changes in electron collision frequency in a spatial density gradient, but a second broadening effect due to time-varying oscillations made collision frequency measurements impossible. The time-varying oscillations had the effect of causing multiple zero-crossings in Im[Z] at parallel resonance. Results of experiments and simulations indicated that the lowest-frequency zero-crossing represented the lowest plasma density in the oscillations and the highest-frequency zero-crossing represented the highest plasma density in the oscillations, thus the PIP probe was found to be an effective tool to measure both the average plasma density as well as the maximum and minimum densities due to temporal oscillations.

  10. Lunar Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 μm size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  11. Lunary Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Crave, P. D.; LeClair, A.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEES). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/ planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEES discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  12. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: COMPLEX ROLE OF SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSIONS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 {mu}m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  13. Electronic quenching of OH A 2Σ+ induced by collisions with Kr atoms.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia H; Lester, Marsha I; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H; Dagdigian, Paul J; Herráez-Aguilar, Diego; Aoiz, F Javier; Brouard, Mark; Chadwick, Helen; Perkins, Tom; Seamons, Scott A

    2013-12-19

    Electronic quenching of OH A (2)Σ(+) by Kr was investigated through experimental studies of the collision cross sections and the OH X (2)Π product state distribution. The quenching cross sections decrease with increasing rotational excitation in the excited OH A (2)Σ(+) electronic state. The OH X (2)Π products of quenching exhibit a significant degree of rotational excitation but minimal vibrational excitation. Complementary theoretical studies of the OH (A (2)Σ(+), X (2)Π) + Kr potential energy surfaces (PESs), nonadiabatic coupling, and quasiclassical trajectory calculations were carried out to elucidate the quenching dynamics. Accurate PESs for the two lowest diabatic states of A' symmetry were computed along with the angularly dependent coupling between them. Coupling in nearly linear HO-Kr configurations provides the mechanism for the observed electronic quenching. A deep attractive well on the OH A (2)Σ(+) + Kr PES facilitates access to this region of strong coupling. Surface-hopping quasiclassical trajectory calculations yielded quenching cross sections and a OH X (2)Π product rotational distribution in good accord with experimental observations.

  14. Shifts of the spectral lines of He(+) produced by electron collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnikrishnan, K.; Callaway, J.; Oza, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    The shifts of the Ly-alpha, Ly-beta, and H-alpha lines of He(+) in a plasma, produced by electron scattering from radiating ions are calculated. Electron densities in the neighborhood of 10 to the 17th/cu cm and plasma temperatures from 1 to 6 eV are considered. The calculation is made in the impact approximation, and is based on a six-state close-coupling computation of the scattering matrices, into which an optical potential has been inserted. Small red shifts of the lines are obtained. The contribution of electron scattering to the linewidths is also considered.

  15. Measurement of beauty-hadron decay electrons in Pb-Pb collisions at &sqrt;{s_{NN}} = 2.76 TeV with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völk, Martin; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The ALICE Collaboration at the LHC studies heavy-ion collisions to investigate the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Heavy quarks (charm and beauty) are effective probes for this purpose. Both their energy loss in the medium as well as their possible thermalization yield information about the medium properties. In ALICE, the reconstruction of exclusive decays is currently accessible for charm, but not for beauty hadrons. For hadrons with beauty valence quarks a promising strategy is the measurement of their decay electrons. To separate these from the background electrons (mainly from charm hadron decays, photon conversions or light-meson decays) the large decay length of beauty hadrons can be utilized. It leads to a relatively large typical impact parameter of the decay electrons. By comparing the impact parameter distribution of the signal electrons with those from the background sources, the signal can be statistically separated from the background. For this purpose a maximum likelihood fit is employed using impact parameter distribution templates from simulations. The resulting nuclear modification factor for electrons from beauty-hadron decays shows a sizeable suppression for pT > 3 GeV/c, albeit still with large uncertainties.

  16. Electron impact ionization at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ali; Cole, Kyra; Hertlein, Marcus; Feinberg, Benedict; Schriel, Ralf; Adaniya, Hidehito; Neumann, Nadine

    2004-05-01

    We used an ion time-of-flight set up based on a pulsed high-voltage extraction technique to study the charge state distribution of He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe atoms after impact of 0.2 to 1.5 GeV electrons. The relativistic electron beam is produced at the booster beamline at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The yield of ions drops drastically with the charge state number. Our measurements show that the ratio of doubly-charge to singly-charged ions reaches an asymptotic limit of 0.0028 for He already at electron energies below 40 MeV. However we observe a very pronounced energy dependence of the ratio of the doubly-charged to singly-charged ions for the heavier atoms such as Kr and Xe in the 0.2 - 1.5 GeV energy range. This energy dependence takes place way above the energy at which theories based on the equivalent photon method or the born- approximation predict the asymptotic limit to be reached. This may be an indication of new physics coming into play in the photoionization process due to relativistic effects.

  17. Low Energy Electron Impact Excitation of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralphs, Kevin; Serna, Gabriela; Hargreaves, Leigh R.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, B. Vincent

    2011-10-01

    We present normalized absolute differential and integral cross-section measurements for the low energy electron impact excitation of the lowest dissociative 3B1, 1B1,3A1 and 1A1 states of H2O. The DCS were taken at incident energies of 9 eV, 10 eV, 12 eV, 15 eV and 20 eV and scattering angles of 15° to 130° and normalized to the elastic electron scattering measurements of. The DCS were obtained after a sophisticated unfolding of the electron energy loss spectrum of water using photoabsorption data in the literature as investigated by Thorn et al.. Our measurements extend those of to near-threshold energies. We find both important agreements and differences between our DCS and those of. Comparison to our theory (multi-channel Schwinger) and that of earlier work will also be presented. Funded by an NSF grant # RUI-PHY 0968874.

  18. Electron Impact Ionization of C_2F_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iga, Ione; Pereira Sanches, Ivana; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2001-10-01

    Besides CF_4, perfluoroethane, C_2F_6, is also one of the fluorocarbon compounds most frequently used in plasma processing applications. Consequently, the knowledge of the ionization properties of C_2F6 is clearly of interest in order to model the plasma-chemical reactions. Nevertheless, only few partial ionization-cross-section measurements [1,2] for this molecule were reported in the literature. Also, the energy range covered in these studies was very limited (below 120 eV). Recently, we have studied these properties. More specifically, partial ionization cross sections (PICS) for the fragments: C^+, F^+, CF^+, CF_2^+, CF_3^+ and C_2F_5^+, produced by electron impact on C_2F_6, were measured in a single-collision condition from near ionization threshold to 1000 eV. In addition, total ionization cross sections (TICS) are also obtained by summing up the PICS's. The comparison of our measured PICS and derived TICS with available data [1-4] will be presented during the Conference. [1] H. U. Poll, J. Meischner, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 27 (1987) 359. [2] C. Q. Jiao, A Garscadden, P. D. Haaland, Chem. Phys. Lett. 310 (1999) 52. [3] H. Nishimura, W. M. Huo, M. A Ali and Y -K. Kim, J. Chem. Phys. 110 (1999) 3811. [4] L. G. Christophorou and J. K. Olthoff, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 27 (1998) 1 and references therein.

  19. Electron density and collision frequency of microwave resonant cavity produced discharges. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.; Brooks, C.; Brake, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    This progress report consists of an article, the abstract of which follows, and apparently the references and vita from a proposal. A review of perturbation diagnostics applied to microwave resonant cavity discharges is presented. The classical microwave perturbation technique examines the shift in the resonant frequency and cavity quality factor of the resonant cavity caused by low electron density discharges. However, modifications presented here allow the analysis to be applied to discharges with electron densities beyond the limit predicted by perturbation theory. An {open_quote}exact{close_quote} perturbation analysis is presented which models the discharge as a separate dielectric, thereby removing the restrictions on electron density imposed by the classical technique. The {open_quote}exact{close_quote} method also uses measurements of the shifts in the resonant conditions of the cavity. Thirdly, an electromagnetic analysis is presented which uses a characteristic equation, based upon Maxwell`s laws, and predicts the discharge conductivity based upon measurements of a complex axial wave number. By allowing the axial wave number of the electromagnetic fields to be complex, the fields are experimentally and theoretically shown to be spatially attenuated. The diagnostics are applied to continuous-wave microwave (2.45 GHz) discharges produced in an Asmussen resonant cavity. Double Langmuir probes, placed directly in the discharge at the point where the radial electric field is zero, act as a comparison with the analytic diagnostics. Microwave powers ranging from 30 to 100 watts produce helium and nitrogen discharges with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 6 torr. Analysis of the data predicts electron temperatures from 5 to 20 eV, electron densities from 10{sup 11} to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, and collision frequencies from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 11} sec{sup {minus}1}.

  20. A split-step method to include electron–electron collisions via Monte Carlo in multiple rate equation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Huthmacher, Klaus; Molberg, Andreas K.; Rethfeld, Bärbel; Gulley, Jeremy R.

    2016-10-01

    A split-step numerical method for calculating ultrafast free-electron dynamics in dielectrics is introduced. The two split steps, independently programmed in C++11 and FORTRAN 2003, are interfaced via the presented open source wrapper. The first step solves a deterministic extended multi-rate equation for the ionization, electron–phonon collisions, and single photon absorption by free-carriers. The second step is stochastic and models electron–electron collisions using Monte-Carlo techniques. This combination of deterministic and stochastic approaches is a unique and efficient method of calculating the nonlinear dynamics of 3D materials exposed to high intensity ultrashort pulses. Results from simulations solving the proposed model demonstrate how electron–electron scattering relaxes the non-equilibrium electron distribution on the femtosecond time scale.

  1. Coincidence measurements between fragment ions and the number of emitted electrons in heavy ion collisions with polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, T.; Majima, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.

    2012-11-01

    We have studied multiple ionization and multifragmentation of a chlorofluorocarbon molecule, CH2FCF3, induced by collisions of 580-keV C+ ions. Coincidence measurements of product ions and the number of emitted electrons from CH2FCF3 were performed under charge-changing conditions of C+ → Cq+ (q = 0, 2, 3). A fully inclusive measurement regardless of outgoing projectile charge state was also performed by making coincidence with a pulsed ion beam. Mass distributions of fragment ions and number distributions of emitted electrons were both found to change greatly according to charge-changing conditions. Highly multiple ionization emitting up to about 10 electrons was observed in electron loss collisions.

  2. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]. Final technical report, June 15, 1986--June 14, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The research on theoretical atomic collisions that was funded at The Pennsylvania State University`s Wilkes-Barre Campus by DOE from 1986 to 1998 was carried out by Winger from 1986 to 1989 and by Winter and Alston from 1989 to 1998. The fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-ion, ion-atom, and, more recently, ion-molecule collisions were addressed. These collision processes were treated in the context of simple one-electron, quasi-one-electron, or two-electron systems in order to provide unambiguous results and reveal more clearly the collisional mechanisms. Winter`s work generally focused on the intermediate projectile-energy range corresponding to proton energies from about ten to a few hundred keV. In this velocity-matching energy range, the electron-transfer cross section reaches a peak, and many states, including electron-transfer and ionization states, contribute to the overall electron-cloud distribution and transition probabilities; a large number of states are coupled, and therefore perturbative approaches are generally inappropriate. These coupled-state calculations were sometimes also extended to higher energies to join with perturbative results. Alston concentrated on intermediate-energy asymmetric collision systems, for which coupling with the projectile is weaker, but many target states are included, and on high energies (MeV energies). Thus, while perturbation theory for electron transfer is valid, it is not adequate to first order. The studies by Winter and Alston described were often done in parallel. Alston also developed formal perturbative approaches not tied to any particular system. Materials studied included He{sup +}, Li{sup 2+}, Be{sup 3+}, B{sup 4+}, C{sup 5+}, and the H{sup +} + Na system.

  3. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the Be-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Menchero, L.; Del Zanna, G.; Badnell, N. R.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: Emission lines from ions in the Be-like isoelectronic sequence can be used for reliable diagnostics of temperature and density of astrophysical and fusion plasmas over a wide range of temperatures. Surprisingly, interpolated data is all that is available for a number of astrophysically important ions. Methods: We have carried out intermediate coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations which include a total of 238 fine-structure levels in both the configuration interaction target and close-coupling collision expansions. These arise from the configurations 1s2 2 {s, p} nl with n = 3-7, and l = 0-4 for n ≤ 5 and l = 0-2 for n = 6,7. Results: We obtain ordinary collision strengths and Maxwell-averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of all the ions of the Be-like sequence, from B+ to Zn26+. We compare with previous R-matrix calculations and interpolated values for some benchmark ions. We find good agreement for transitions n = 2-2 with previous R-matrix calculations but some disagreements with interpolated values. We also find good agreement for the most intense transitions n = 2-3 which contribute via cascade to the (n = 2) diagnostic radiating levels. These data are made available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org and OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk

  4. Electron emission in collisions of fast highly charged bare ions with helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Abhoy; Mandal, Chittranjan; Purkait, Malay

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electron emission from ground state helium atom in collision with fast bare heavy ions at intermediate and high incident energies. In the present study, we have applied the present three-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-3B) model and the previously adopted four-body formalism of the three Coulomb wave (3C-4B). To represent the active electron in the helium atom in the 3C-3B model, the initial bound state wavefunction is chosen to be hydrogenic with an effective nuclear charge. The wavefunction for the ejected electron in the exit channel has been approximated to be a Coulomb continuum wavefunction with same effective nuclear charge. Effectively the continuum-continuum correlation effect has been considered in the present investigation. Here we have calculated the energy and angular distribution of double differential cross sections (DDCS) at low and high energy electron emission from helium atom. The large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the angular distribution which is explained in terms of the two-center effect (TCE). Our theoretical results are compared with available experimental results as well as other theoretical calculations based on the plain wave Born approximation (PWBA), continuum-distorted wave (CDW) approximation, continuum-distorted wave eikonal-initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation, and the corresponding values obtained from the 3C-4B model [S. Jana, R. Samanta, M. Purkait, Phys. Scr. 88, 055301 (2013)] respectively. It is observed that the four-body version of the present investigation produces results which are in better agreement with experimental observations for all cases.

  5. Accuracy of Theoretical Calculations for Electron-Impact Ionization of atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, Don

    2015-09-01

    In the last two decades, there have been several close-coupling approaches developed which can accurately calculate the triply differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of effective one and two electron atoms. The agreement between experiment and theory is not particularly good for more complicated atoms and molecules. Very recently, a B-spline R-matrix with pseudostates (BSRPS) approach was used to investigate low energy electron impact ionization of neon and very good agreement with experiment was found. The perturbative 3-body distorted wave (3DW) approach which includes the exact final state electron-electron interaction (post collision interaction - PCI) gave comparably good agreement with experiment. For ionization of molecules, there have been numerous studies of high-energy electron impact. These studies are called EMS (Electron Momentum Spectroscopy) and they were very valuable in determining the accuracy of molecular wavefunctions since the measured cross sections were proportional to the momentum space molecular wavefunction. More recently, lower energy collisions have started to be measured and these cross sections are much more difficult for theory since the detailed kinematics of the experiment become important. So far, the only close coupling calculation reported for ionization of molecules is the time-dependent close-coupling calculation (TDCC) which has been developed for ionization of H2 and it yields relative good agreement with experiment. Again the molecular 3-body distorted wave (M3DW) gave equally good agreement with experiment. For polyatomic molecules, the only theory available is the M3DW. In this talk, I will show the current status of agreement between experiment and theory for low and intermediate energy single ionization of atoms and molecules. Work supported by the NSF and XSEDE.

  6. Electron cyclotron current drive simulations for finite collisionality plasmas in Wendelstein 7-X using the full linearized collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F.; Marushchenko, Nikolai B.; Turkin, Yuriy

    2016-11-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) efficiency is usually modeled in the collisionless limit. While such models are sufficient for plasmas with rather low collisionality, they might underestimate the current drive in plasmas at low temperatures likely to occur at the initial phase of high density device operation. In this paper, the impact of finite collisionality effects on the wave-induced current drive is studied for a high-mirror configuration of Wendelstein 7-X using a combination of the drift kinetic equation solver NEO-2 and the ray-tracing code TRAVIS for a realistic set of plasma parameter profiles. The generalized Spitzer function, which describes the ECCD efficiency in phase space, is modeled with help of NEO-2, which uses the full linearized Coulomb collision operator, including energy and momentum conservation. Within this approach, the linearized drift kinetic equation is solved by means of the field line integration technique without any simplifications on device geometry. The results of the ray-tracing code TRAVIS using the ECCD efficiency from NEO-2 within the adjoint approach show a significant difference for the driven current when compared to commonly used collisionless models for the ordinary as well as the extraordinary second harmonic mode.

  7. Halogenation effects on electron collisions with CF3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, T. C.; Lopes, A. R.; Azeredo, A. D.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2016-04-01

    We report differential and integral elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with CF3Cl, CF2Cl2, and CFCl3 molecules for energies ranging from 0.1 eV to 30 eV. The calculations were performed using the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations. The influence of the permanent electric dipole moment on the cross sections was included using the Born closure scheme. A very good agreement between our calculations and the experimental results of Jones [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 813 (1986)], Mann and Linder [J. Phys. B 25, 1621 (1992); 25, 1633 (1992)] and Hoshino et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 214305 (2013)] was found. We also compare our results with the calculations of Beyer et al. [Chem. Phys. 255, 1 (2000)] using the R-matrix method, where we find good agreement with respect to the location of the resonances, and with the calculations of Hoshino et al. using the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule, where we find qualitative agreement at energies above 20 eV. Additional electronic structure calculations were carried out in order to help in the interpretation of the scattering results. The stabilization the lowest σ∗ resonance due to the exchange of fluorine by chlorine atoms (halogenation effect) follows a simple linear relation with the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals and can be considered as a signature of the halogenation effect.

  8. FEM R-Matrix Calculations of Electron-H2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Electron-H2 Collisions have been studied using the finite-element R-matrix method. Our approach uses a mixed finite-element and Gaussian basis to describe the continuum electron. In the inner region, the multi-centered nature of the Gaussian basis provides an efficient representation in the regions of space near the nuclei, whereas the piecemeal and energy-independent nature of the FEM basis is particular well suited for R-matrix calculations. Fixed nuclei calculations have been carried out at 1.4 a(sub 0), the equilibrium internuclear distance of the ground state. Up to six target states are included: the X(sup 1)E+(sub g), b(sup 3)E+(sub u), a(sup 3)E+(sub g), B(sup 1)E+(sub u), c(sup 3)II(sub u), and C(sup 1)II(sub u) states, and configuration-interaction functions are used to describe the target states. The results will be compared with available theoretical and experimental data.

  9. Evidence of strong projectile-target-core interaction in single ionization of neon by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.; Zhang, P.; Xu, S.; Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Liu, H. P.

    2010-11-15

    The momentum distributions of recoil ions were measured in the single ionization of neon by electron impact at incident energies between 80 and 2300 eV. It was found that there are a noticeable number of recoil ions carrying large momenta, and the relative contributions of these ions becomes more pronounced with the further decrease of incident electron energy. These observed behaviors indicate that there is a strong projectile-target-core interaction in the single-ionization reaction. By comparing our results with those of electron-neon elastic scattering, we concluded that the elastic scattering of the projectile electron on the target core plays an important role at low and intermediate collision energies.

  10. Dissociative Ionization of Benzene by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred; Dateo, Christopher; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of benzene from the low-lying ionization channels. Our approach makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and DI is treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in an ion with the same nuclear geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the nuclei relax from the initial geometry and undergo unimolecular dissociation. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For the unimolecular dissociation step, we study the steepest descent reaction path to the minimum of the ion potential energy surface. The path is used to analyze the probability of unimolecular dissociation and to determine the product distributions. Our analysis of the dissociation products and the thresholds of the productions are compared with the result dissociative photoionization measurements of Feng et al. The partial oscillator strengths from Feng et al. are then used in the iBED cross section calculations.

  11. Electron capture from Ni surface resulting from H+ ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Reiko; Suzuki, Reiko; Sato, Hiroshi; Kimura, Mineo

    1998-10-01

    Electron capture from Cu and Co surfaces by H+ and He+ ion bombardment has been investigated theoretically by using the molecular representation. Since an experimental condition was that the incoming particle was introduced on the surface with a large angle, the binary collision would be satisfied. We have obtained electronic states of the colliding pair by the ALCHEMY, and the scattering dynamics was solved by using the semiclassical close coupling treatment. We have included trajectories of compete recoils of the projectile through the coupling of electronic and nuclear motions. The preliminary result obtained shed much light on the understanding of the experimental finding.

  12. Experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy final state electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amami, Sadek; Ozer, Zehra N.; Dogan, Mevlut; Yavuz, Murat; Varol, Onur; Madison, Don

    2016-09-01

    There have been several studies of electron-impact ionization of inert gases for asymmetric final state energy sharing and normally one electron has an energy significantly higher than the other. However, there have been relatively few studies examining equal energy final state electrons. Here we report experimental and theoretical triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar (3p) for equal energy sharing of the outgoing electrons. Previous experimental results combined with some new measurements are compared with distorted wave born approximation (DWBA) results, DWBA results using the Ward-Macek (WM) approximation for the post collision interaction (PCI), and three-body distorted wave (3DW) which includes PCI without approximation. The results show that it is crucially important to include PCI in the calculation particularly for lower energies and that the WM approximation is valid only for high energies. The 3DW, on the other hand, is in reasonably good agreement with data down to fairly low energies.

  13. Fully relativistic B-spline R-matrix calculations for electron collisions with mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    We have applied our recently developed fully relativistic Dirac B-spline R-matrix (DBSR) code [1] to calculate electron scattering from mercury atoms. Results from a 36-state close-coupling calculation are compared with numerous experimental benchmark data for angle-integrated and angle-differential cross sections, as well as spin-asymmetry, spin-polarization, and electron-impact coherence parameters. We generally obtain significant improvement in the agreement between experiment and theory compared to previous distorted-wave and close-coupling attempts. [1] O. Zatsarinny and K. Bartschat, Phys. Rev. A 77, 062701 (2008).

  14. PREFACE: XXVIII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guoqing; Cai, Xiaohong; Ding, Dajun; Ma, Xinwen; Zhao, Yongtao

    2014-04-01

    The 28th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXVIII ICPEAC) was held by the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP) on 24-30 July, 2013 in Lanzhou, China. The 444 conference participants came from 37 countries and/or regions. Five plenary lectures, more than 80 progress reports and special reports had been arranged according to the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Meanwhile, more than 650 abstracts were selected as poster presentations. Before the conference, three highly distinguished scientists, Professor Joachim Burgdöorfer, Professor Hossein Sadeghpour and Professor Yasunori Yamazaki, presented tutorial lectures with the support of the IMP Branch of Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS (IMP-YIPA). During the conference, Professor Jianwei Pan from University of Sciences and Technology in China presented an enlightening public lecture on quantum communication. Furthermore, 2013 IUPAP Young Scientist Prize was awarded to Dr T Jahnke from Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Germany. The Sheldon Datz Prize for an Outstanding Young Scientist Attending ICPEAC was awarded to Dr Diogo Almeida from University of Fribourg of Switzerland. As a biannual academic conference, ICPEAC is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, atomic, ionic, molecular, cluster collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to China for the very first time. IMP has been preparing the conference six years before, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXVIII ICPEAC in Lanzhou. This proceedings includes the papers of the two plenary lectures, 40 progress reports, 17 special reports and 337 posters, which were reviewed and revised according to the comments of the referees. The Local Organizing Committee would like to

  15. Evaluation of the impacts of cooperative adaptive cruise control on reducing rear-end collision risks on freeways.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Wang, Hao; Wang, Wei; Xing, Lu; Liu, Shanwen; Wei, Xueyan

    2017-01-01

    Although plenty of studies have been conducted recently about the impacts of cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) system on traffic efficiency, there are few researches analyzing the safety effects of this advanced driving-assistant system. Thus, the primary objective of this study is to evaluate the impacts of the CACC system on reducing rear-end collision risks on freeways. The CACC model is firstly developed, which is based on the Intelligent Driver Model (IDM). Then, two surrogated safety measures, derived from the time-to-collision (TTC), denoting time exposed time-to-collision (TET) and time integrated time-to-collision (TIT), are introduced for quantifying the collision risks. And the safety effects are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally, by the linear stability analysis and simulations. The theoretical and simulation results conformably indicate that the CACC system brings dramatic benefits for reducing rear-end collision risks (TET and TIT are reduced more than 90%, respectively), when the desired time headway and time delay are set properly. The sensitivity analysis indicates there are few differences among different values of the threshold of TTC and the length of a CACC platoon. The results also show that the safety improvements weaken with the decrease of the penetration rates of CACC on the market and the increase of time delay between platoons. We also evaluate the traffic efficiency of the CACC system with different desired time headway.

  16. Electron reconstruction and identification efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using the 2011 LHC proton-proton collision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Ammosov, V. V.; Santos, S. P. Amor Dos; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Mayes, J. Backus; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães da; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Garcia, J. A. Benitez; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman de; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Urbán, S. Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Toro, R. Camacho; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Armadans, R. Caminal; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Garrido, M. D. M. Capeans; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Gimenez, V. Castillo; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Barajas, C. A. Chavez; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Moursli, R. Cherkaoui El; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Muiño, P. Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Ortuzar, M. Crispin; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Donszelmann, T. Cuhadar; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; De Sousa, M. J. Da Cunha Sargedas; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Hoffmann, M. Dano; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Ciaccio, A. Di; Di Ciaccio, L.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Girolamo, A. Di; Girolamo, B. Di; Mattia, A. Di; Micco, B. Di; Nardo, R. Di; Simone, A. Di; Sipio, R. Di; Valentino, D. Di; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. 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A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pages, A. Pacheco; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Lopez, S. Pedraza; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; García-Estan, M. T. 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A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. 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C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; Eldik, N. van; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Schroeder, T. Vazquez; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Schmitt, H. von der; Radziewski, H. von; Toerne, E. von; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-07-01

    Many of the interesting physics processes to be measured at the LHC have a signature involving one or more isolated electrons. The electron reconstruction and identification efficiencies of the ATLAS detector at the LHC have been evaluated using proton-proton collision data collected in 2011 at TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb. Tag-and-probe methods using events with leptonic decays of and bosons and mesons are employed to benchmark these performance parameters. The combination of all measurements results in identification efficiencies determined with an accuracy at the few per mil level for electron transverse energy greater than 30 GeV.

  17. The FEM-R-Matrix Approach: Use of Mixed Finite Element and Gaussian Basis Sets for Electron Molecule Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    For the calculation of electron molecule collision cross sections R-matrix methods automatically take advantage of the division of configuration space into an inner region (I) bounded by radius tau b, where the scattered electron is within the molecular charge cloud and the system is described by an correlated Configuration Interaction (CI) treatment in close analogy to bound state calculations, and an outer region (II) where the scattered electron moves in the long-range multipole potential of the target and efficient analytic methods can be used for solving the asymptotic Schroedinger equation plus boundary conditions.

  18. Analysis of relativistic effects in electron-impact excitation of SP transitions in heavy atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Nils; Bartschat, Klaus

    2002-05-01

    While elastic electron scattering from heavy atoms is known to be strongly affected by relativistic effects such as Mott scattering, it seems surprising that several sets of recent experimental results for electron-impact excitation of the (6s)^2S_1/2 (6p)^2P_1/2,3/2 transition [1,2] in Cs could be well reproduced by a non-relativistic ``convergent close-coupling'' (CCC) model. It is, therefore, desirable to analyze the sensitivity of currently measured observables to relativistic effects, as well as to develop new prescriptions to enhance the potential for experimental tests of sophisticated collision theories. Using the above transition as an example, we developed a new formulation to describe the collision process and the experimental investigations, based on the concept of ``generalized Stokes parameters'' [3]. [1] V. Karaganov, P.J.O. Teubner, and M.J. Brunger, in Correlations, Polarization, and Ionization in Atomic Systems, AIP (New York, 2000). [2] G. Baum and I. Bray (2002), private communication. [3] N. Andersen and K. Bartschat, Polarization, Alignment, and Orientation in Atomic Collisions, Springer (New York, 2000).

  19. Cross sections for radicals from electron impact on methane and fluoroalkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motlagh, Safa; Moore, John H.

    1998-07-01

    Molecular and atomic radicals from electron-impact dissociation of methane and a variety of fluoroalkanes are detected mass spectometrically as organotellurides produced by the reaction of the radicals at the surface of a tellurium mirror. The radicals detected include CH3 from CH4; CF3 from CF4 and CHF3; CHF2 from CHF3 and CH2F2; CH2F from CH3F; and CF3 and C2F5 from C2F6 and C3F8 produced by electron impact at energies between 10 eV and 500 eV. Relative cross sections are measured. These are placed on an absolute scale by comparison with related measurements. For the collision energies relevant to processing plasmas, 10-30 eV, it is shown that dissociation into neutrals rather than dissociative ionization is mainly responsible for the production of molecular radicals.

  20. 4-HNE adduct stability characterized by collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Kristofer S; Kellersberger, Katherine A; Gomez, Jose D; Petersen, Dennis R

    2012-04-16

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) alters numerous proteomic and genomic processes. Understanding chemical mechanisms of 4-HNE interactions with biomolecules and their respective stabilities may lead to new discoveries in biomarkers for numerous diseases of oxidative stress. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) MS/MS were utilized to examine the stability of a 4-HNE-Cys Michael adduct. CID conditions resulted in the neutral loss of 4-HNE, also known as a retro-Michael addition reaction (RMA). Consequently, performing ETD fragmentation on this same adduct did not result in RMA. Interestingly, 4-HNE adduct reduction via sodium borohydride (NaBH₄) treatment stabilized against the CID induced RMA. In a direct comparison of three forms of 4-HNE adducts, computational modeling revealed sizable shifts in the shape and orientation of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) density around the 4-HNE-Cys moiety. These findings demonstrate that ETD MS/MS analysis can be used to improve the detection of 4-HNE-protein modifications by preventing RMA reactions from occurring.

  1. Ionization and Electron Transfer in p-He^+ and Other Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, T. G.; Winter, J. R.

    2000-06-01

    Recently,(T. G. Winter and J. R. Winter, Phys. Rev. A (submitted).) cross sections have been determined primarily for ionization in p-He^+(ns) collisions with n = 1, 2, or 3 at proton energies of 200-2000 keV using the coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach. These processes are relevant to an understanding of the feasibility of muon-catalyzed nuclear fusion.(J. S. Cohen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 58), 1407 (1987); J. S. Cohen (private communication). Detailed convergence studies are presented, and the coupled-state results for n = 1, 2 are compared with others.(A. Henne, H. J. Lüdde, A. Toepfer, T. Gluth, and R. M. Dreizler, J. Phys. B 26), 3815 (1993); L. F. Errea and P. Sánchez, J. Phys. B 27, 3677 (1994); K. A. Hall, J. F. Reading, and A. L. Ford, J. Phys. B 27, 5257 (1994). For comparison, and to include neglected higher partial waves, first-Born cross sections are also reported. A correction has been applied to the uneven distribution of Sturmian-generated energies at the ionization threshold, yielding cross sections much more stable with respect to basis size. Other one-electron collisional systems will also be considered.

  2. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B. F. E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se; Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I.; Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A.

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  3. Electron-impact ionization of W25+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kynienė, A.; Pakalka, S.; Masys, Š.; Jonauskas, V.

    2016-09-01

    Electron-impact ionization cross sections for the ground level of the W25+ ion have been investigated by performing level-to-level calculations and using the Dirac-Fock-Slater method in the single-configuration approach. The main attention has been focused on the influence of the increasing principal and orbital quantum numbers on the excitation-autoionization (EA) process and its contribution to the total ionization cross sections. The obtained results demonstrate that excitations to the high-nl shells (n≥slant 9) increase cross sections of the indirect ionization process by about 60% compared to the excitations to the lower shells (n≤slant 8). It was established that excitations to the shells with the orbital quantum number l = 4 give the greatest contribution to EA. Maxwellian rate coefficients derived from the cross sections for the ground state are compared with the previously obtained values from the configuration-average distorted-wave (CADW) approximation. The rate coefficients for direct ionization (DI) are smaller than the corresponding CADW values, while the EA rate coefficients are larger than the ones from the CADW calculations. The total DI+EA rate coefficients are about 20% larger than the CADW rate coefficients.

  4. Electron-impact excitation of molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammit, Mark C.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2017-02-01

    We report the electron impact integrated and differential cross sections for excitation to the b 3Σu+ , a 3Σg+ , c 3Πu , B 1Σu+ , E ,F 1Σg+ , C 1Πu , e 3Σu+ , h 3Σg+ , d 3Πu , B'1Σu+ , D 1Πu , B''1Σu+ , and D'1Πu states of molecular hydrogen in the energy range from 10 to 300 eV. Total scattering and total ionization cross sections are also presented. The calculations have been performed by using the convergent close-coupling method within the fixed-nuclei approximation. Detailed convergence studies have been performed with respect to the size of the close-coupling expansion and a set of recommended cross sections has been produced. Significant differences with previous calculations are found. Agreement with experiment is mixed, ranging from excellent to poor depending on the transition and incident energies.

  5. Electron impact ionization-excitation of Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo; Gomez, A. I.; Gasaneo, G.; Mitnik, D. M.; Ambrosio, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate triple differential cross sections (TDCS) for the process of ionization-excitation of Helium by fast electron impact in which the residual ion is left in the n =2 excited state. We chose the strongly asymmetric kinematics used in the experiment performed by Dupré et al.. In a perturbative scheme, for high projectile energies the four-body problem reduces to a three-body one and, within that framework, we solve the time- independent Schrödinger equation with a Sturmian approach. The method, based on Generalized Sturmian Functions (GSF), is employed to obtain the initial ground state of Helium, the single-continuum state and the scattering wave function; for each of them, the GSF basis is constructed with the corresponding adequate asymptotic conditions. Besides, the method presents the following advantage: the scattering amplitudes can be extracted directly in the asymptotic region of the scattering solution, and thus the TDCS can be obtained without requiring a matrix element evaluation.

  6. Electron-impact detachment from B-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L. H.; Jensen, M. J.; Pedersen, H. B.; Vejby-Christensen, L.; Djurić, N.

    1998-10-01

    Cross sections for electron-impact single and double detachment from B- have been measured from 0 to 200 eV. The single-detachment cross section peaks at 4-5 eV with a cross-section maximum of about 10-14 cm2. A (2p3) 4S state has recently been predicted to give rise to a resonance state in the H2- dianion [T. Sommerfeld et al., Phys. Rev. A 55 1903 (1997)]. We observe no resonances in the detachment cross section of B- and hence no sign of an equivalent shortlived B2-(2p3) state. The ratio of the double- to single-detachment cross section reaches a constant value of 3% at energies above 50 eV. A simple model relates this number to a shake-off probability of about 90%. The ratio between double and single ionization of neutral atomic targets at high energy is also discussed, and the model relates this ratio to the shake-off probability in the sudden approximation.

  7. Impact of electron irradiation on electron holographic potentiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. B.; Niermann, T.; Lehmann, M.; Berger, D.; Knauer, A.; Weyers, M.; Koslow, I.; Kneissl, M.

    2014-09-01

    While electron holography in the transmission electron microscope offers the possibility to measure maps of the electrostatic potential of semiconductors down to nanometer dimensions, these measurements are known to underestimate the absolute value of the potential, especially in GaN. We have varied the dose rates of electron irradiation over several orders of magnitude and observed strong variations of the holographically detected voltages. Overall, the results indicate that the electron beam generates electrical currents within the specimens primarily by the photovoltaic effect and due to secondary electron emission. These currents have to be considered for a quantitative interpretation of electron holographic measurements, as their negligence contributes to large parts in the observed discrepancy between the measured and expected potential values in GaN.

  8. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for the B-like iso-electronic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Badnell, N. R.; Zhao, G.

    2012-11-01

    We have carried-out parallel intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix calculations for electron-impact excitation amongst the 204 close-coupling levels of the 2sx2py (x + y = 3), 2s2{3,4}l, 2s2p{3,4}l, and 2p23l configurations for all boron-like ions from C+ to Kr31+. We have also included the configuration interaction due to the 2p24l, 2s3l3l' and 2p3s3l configurations. A detailed comparison has been made of the target structure and excitation data for four specific ions (viz., Ne5+, Ar13+, Fe21+ and Kr31+) that span the sequence, so as to assess the accuracy over the entire sequence. Effective collision strengths (Υs) are presented at temperatures ranging from 2 × 102(z + 1)2 K to 2 × 106(z + 1)2 K (where z is the residual charge of the ions, i.e. Z - 5). Detailed comparisons for the (effective) collision strengths (Υs) Ω are made with the results of previous calculations for the four representative ions. Furthermore, we examine the iso-electronic trends of the effective collision strengths as a function of temperature. These data are made available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org, OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk as well as at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/547/A87

  9. Theoretical analysis of Young-type electron interference in He2++H2 collisions using a semiclassical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliviéro, G.; Pestel, V.; Bottey, L.; Philippe, M.; Frémont, F.

    2014-10-01

    A four-body semiclassical model is developed to describe interferences observed in the angular distribution of Auger electrons emitted after double capture in 30-keV He2++H2 collisions. The present model is based on both the corpuscular and wave behaviors of the emitted electron. The corpuscular aspect is used to determine the trajectories of the collision partners, while the wave behavior occurs only in the determination of the phase shift. The results of the calculation are found to reproduce the experiment remarkably well. Series of maxima and minima are found in the angular distribution, with periods that are close to the experimental values. In addition, at a fixed angle, oscillations in the energy distribution are clearly evidenced in both the experiment and calculation.

  10. Calculation of cross sections for vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment in electron collisions with HBr and DBr

    SciTech Connect

    Horacek, J. |||; Domcke, W. ||

    1996-04-01

    The nonlocal resonance model developed earlier for the description of low-energy inelastic and reactive electron-HCl collisions has been adapted to the electron-HBr collision system. The parameters of the model have been determined by fitting the eigenphase sum in the fixed-nuclei approximation to the data of an {ital ab} {ital initio} {ital R}-matrix calculation of Morgan, Burke, and collaborators. The Schwinger-Lanczos method has been employed to solve the nuclear scattering problem with a nonlocal, complex, and energy-dependent effective potential. Fully converged cross sections have been obtained on a dense grid of energies for many vibrational excitation, deexcitation, and dissociative channels in both HBr and DBr. The computed cross sections are generally in good agreement with experiment as far as data are available. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Theoretical investigation of the dynamics of O(1D→3P) electronic quenching by collision with Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.; Alexander, Millard H.; Kłos, Jacek

    2015-08-01

    We present the quantum close-coupling treatment of spin-orbit induced transitions between the 1D and 3P states of an atom in collisions with a closed-shell spherical partner. In the particular case of O colliding with Xe, we used electronic structure calculations to compute the relevant potential energy curves and spin-orbit coupling matrix elements. We then carried out quantum scattering calculations of integral and differential quenching cross sections as functions of the collision energy. The calculated differential cross sections for electronic quenching are in reasonable agreement with measurements [Garofalo et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 054307 (2015)]. The differential cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillations as a function of the scattering angle. By a semiclassical analysis, we show that these oscillations result from quantum mechanical interference between two classical paths.

  12. Collision of ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma: Effect of dust grains and trapped electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, Ravinder; Lonngren, Karl E.; Nishida, Yasushi

    2015-12-01

    The head-on collision of two ion acoustic solitary waves is investigated in a magnetized plasma containing trapped electrons and dust grains. For completeness, the fluctuations in dust grain charge are taken into account. By using the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method, an analytical expression is obtained for the phase shift that takes place due to the collision of the waves. How the phase shift behaves under the combined effect of trapped electrons and dust grains along with the finite temperature of ions is examined. A focus is given to uncover the situations of fluctuating charge and fixed charge on the dust grains in the plasma. Interestingly, the solitary waves acquire a larger phase shift and are delayed more in the case of dust grains having a fluctuating charge.

  13. Zero-degree binary encounter electrons in fast collisions of highly charged F and O ions with H 2 targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Sanders, J. M.; Hidmi, H.; Richard, P.

    1993-06-01

    Doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) for binary encounter electrons (BEe) produced by 0.5-2 MeV/u highly-charged F and O ions in collisions with H 2 gas targets have been studied at 0° with respect to the ion beam direction. The measured DDCS of the broad binary encounter peak was well described by a simple impulse approximation (IA) treatment for bare ions, and was demonstrated to provide in situ detection efficiency of the electron spectrometer. The projectile energy dependence of the BEe production for nonbare (clothed) projectiles is found to follow a scaled IA prediction, in which a BEe enhancement is consistently exhibited for the collision energy range studied.

  14. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-07

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions.

  15. Analysis and simulation for a model of electron impact excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bokai; Caflisch, Russel E.; Barekat, Farzin; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes a kinetic model and a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation method for excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination by electron impact in a plasma free of external fields. The atoms and ions in the plasma are represented by continuum densities and the electrons by a particle distribution. A Boltzmann-type equation is formulated and a corresponding H-theorem is formally derived. An efficient Monte Carlo method is developed for an idealized analytic model of the excitation and ionization collision cross sections. To accelerate the simulation, the reduced rejection method and binary search method are used to overcome the singular rate in the recombination process. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the method on spatially homogeneous problems. The evolution of the electron distribution function and atomic states is studied, revealing the possibility under certain circumstances of system relaxation towards stationary states that are not the equilibrium states, a potential non-ergodic behavior.

  16. Electronic management: Exploring its impact on small business

    SciTech Connect

    Bewayo, E.D.

    1994-12-31

    Macworld magazine recently reported that more than one in five companies eavesdrops electronically on its employees. Electronic eavesdropping is one name given to electronic management Besides being known as electronic eaves-dropping, electronic management also goes by electronic monitoring, electronic supervision, electronic snooping, electronic sweat-shopping, electronic surveillance, electronic Big Brothering, and computerized performance monitoring. Some of these labels connote negative things about electronic management, and relate to applications of electronic management to extreme and unreasonable levels. In the rest of this paper the terms electronic management and electronic monitoring will be used interchangeably. In this paper we discuss the impacts of electronic management, positive and negative, on workplaces, with emphasis on small businesses. This small business emphasis is partly because of the author`s research interests, and partly because most of what has been written on electronic management has been based on large business contexts. This large business bias has been partly due to the fact that the early inroads of electronic management were almost exclusively limited to large companies--beginning with telephone service observation in the late 1800s. However, now with the growing affordability and, consequently, the proliferation of electronic technology (especially the computer), electronic management is no longer the monopoly of large corporations. Electronic management has now reached restaurants, drug stores, liquor stores, convenience stores, and trucking companies. And in some industries, e.g., banking, every business, regardless of size, uses electronic monitoring.

  17. Electron impact ionization cross sections of beryllium-tungsten clusters*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukuba, Ivan; Kaiser, Alexander; Huber, Stefan E.; Urban, Jan; Probst, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report calculated electron impact ionization cross sections (EICSs) of beryllium-tungsten clusters, BenW with n = 1,...,12, from the ionization threshold to 10 keV using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) and the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The positions of the maxima of DM and BEB cross sections are mostly close to each other. The DM cross sections are more sensitive with respect to the cluster size. For the clusters smaller than Be4W they yield smaller cross sections than BEB and vice versa larger cross sections than BEB for clusters larger than Be6W. The maximum cross section values for the singlet-spin groundstate clusters range from 7.0 × 10-16 cm2 at 28 eV (BeW) to 54.2 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the DM cross sections and from 13.5 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (BeW) to 38.9 × 10-16 cm2 at 43 eV (Be12W) for the BEB cross sections. Differences of the EICSs in different isomers and between singlet and triplet states are also explored. Both the DM and BEB cross sections could be fitted perfectly to a simple expression used in modeling and simulation codes in the framework of nuclear fusion research. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2015-60583-7

  18. Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K; Miller, W O; Levatin, J L; Pertica, A J; Olivier, S S

    2010-09-06

    Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time- and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their

  19. The behavior of beams of relativistic non-thermal electrons under the influence of collisions and synchrotron losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mctiernan, James M.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1989-01-01

    For many astrophysical situations, such as in solar flares or cosmic gamma-ray bursts, continuum gamma rays with energies up to hundreds of MeV were observed, and can be interpreted to be due to bremsstrahlung radiation by relativistic electrons. The region of acceleration for these particles is not necessarily the same as the region in which the radiation is produced, and the effects of the transport of the electrons must be included in the general problem. Hence it is necessary to solve the kinetic equation for relativistic electrons, including all the interactions and loss mechanisms relevant at such energies. The resulting kinetic equation for non-thermal electrons, including the effects of Coulomb collisions and losses due to synchrotron emission, was solved analytically in some simple limiting cases, and numerically for the general cases including constant and varying background plasma density and magnetic field. New approximate analytic solutions are presented for collision dominated cases, for small pitch angles and all energies, synchrotron dominated cases, both steady-state and time dependent, for all pitch angles and energies, and for cases when both synchrotron and collisional energy losses are important, but for relativistic electrons. These analytic solutions are compared to the full numerical results in the proper limits. These results will be useful for calculation of spectra and angular distribution of the radiation (x rays, gamma-rays, and microwaves) emitted via synchrotron or bremsstrahlung processes by the electrons. These properties and their relevance to observations will be observed in subsequent papers.

  20. Evaluating the impact of bike network indicators on cyclist safety using macro-level collision prediction models.

    PubMed

    Osama, Ahmed; Sayed, Tarek

    2016-12-01

    Many cities worldwide are recognizing the important role that cycling plays in creating green and livable communities. However, vulnerable road users such as cyclists are usually subjected to an elevated level of injury risk which discourages many road users to cycle. This paper studies cyclist-vehicle collisions at 134 traffic analysis zones in the city of Vancouver to assess the impact of bike network structure on cyclist safety. Several network indicators were developed using Graph theory and their effect on cyclist safety was investigated. The indicators included measures of connectivity, directness, and topography of the bike network. The study developed several macro-level (zonal) collision prediction models that explicitly incorporated bike network indicators as explanatory variables. As well, the models incorporated the actual cyclist exposure (bike kilometers travelled) as opposed to relying on proxies such as population or bike network length. The macro-level collision prediction models were developed using generalized linear regression and full Bayesian techniques, with and without spatial effects. The models showed that cyclist collisions were positively associated with bike and vehicle exposure. The exponents of the exposure variables were less than one which supports the "safety in numbers" hypothesis. Moreover, the models showed positive associations between cyclist collisions and the bike network connectivity and linearity indicators. In contrast, negative associations were found between cyclist collisions and the bike network continuity and topography indicators. The spatial effects were statistically significant in all of the developed models.

  1. COLLISIONS BETWEEN GRAVITY-DOMINATED BODIES. II. THE DIVERSITY OF IMPACT OUTCOMES DURING THE END STAGE OF PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Sarah T.; Leinhardt, Zoee M. E-mail: zoe.leinhardt@bristol.ac.uk

    2012-05-20

    Numerical simulations of the stochastic end stage of planet formation typically begin with a population of embryos and planetesimals that grow into planets by merging. We analyzed the impact parameters of collisions leading to the growth of terrestrial planets from recent N-body simulations that assumed perfect merging and calculated more realistic outcomes using a new analytic collision physics model. We find that collision outcomes are diverse and span all possible regimes: hit-and-run, merging, partial accretion, partial erosion, and catastrophic disruption. The primary outcomes of giant impacts between planetary embryos are approximately evenly split between partial accretion, graze-and-merge, and hit-and-run events. To explore the cumulative effects of more realistic collision outcomes, we modeled the growth of individual planets with a Monte Carlo technique using the distribution of impact parameters from N-body simulations. We find that fewer planets reached masses >0.7 M{sub Earth} using the collision physics model compared to simulations that assumed every collision results in perfect merging. For final planets with masses >0.7 M{sub Earth}, 60% are enriched in their core-to-mantle mass fraction by >10% compared to the initial embryo composition. Fragmentation during planet formation produces significant debris ({approx}15% of the final mass) and occurs primarily by erosion of the smaller body in partial accretion and hit-and-run events. In partial accretion events, the target body grows by preferentially accreting the iron core of the projectile and the escaping fragments are derived primarily from the silicate mantles of both bodies. Thus, the bulk composition of a planet can evolve via stochastic giant impacts.

  2. F + H2 collisions on two electronic potential energy surfaces - Quantum-mechanical study of the collinear reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, I. H.; Baer, M.; George, T. F.

    1979-01-01

    Collinear quantum calculations are carried out for reactive F + H2 collisions on two electronic potential energy surfaces. The resulting transmission and reflection probabilities exhibit much greater variation with energy than single-surface studies would lead us to anticipate. Transmission to low-lying product channels is increased by orders of magnitude by the presence of the second surface; however, branching ratios among product states are found to be independent of the initial electronic state of the reactants. These apparently contradictory aspects of the calculation are discussed and a tentative explanation put forward to resolve them.

  3. Sequential binary collision ionization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Boeyen, R. W.; Watanabe, N.; Doering, J. P.; Moore, J. H.; Coplan, M. A.; Cooper, J. W.

    2004-03-01

    Fully differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of the magnesium 3s orbital have been measured in a high-momentum-transfer regime wherein the ionization mechanisms can be accurately described by simple binary collision models. Measurements where performed at incident-electron energies from 400 to 3000 eV, ejected-electron energies of 62 eV, scattering angle of 20 °, and momentum transfers of 2 to 5 a.u. In the out-of-plane geometry of the experiment the cross section is observed far off the Bethe ridge. Both first- and second-order processes can be clearly distinguished as previously observed by Murray et al [Ref. 1] and Schulz et al [Ref. 2]. Owing to the relatively large momentum of the ejected electron, the second order processes can be modeled as sequential binary collisions involving a binary elastic collision between the incident electron and ionic core and a binary knock-out collision between the incident electron and target electron. At low incident-electron energies the cross section for both first and second order processes are comparable, while at high incident energies second-order processes dominate. *Supported by NSF under grant PHY-99-87870. [1] A. J. Murray, M. B. J. Woolf, and F. H. Read J. Phys. B 25, 3021 (1992). [2] M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, D. Fischer, H. Kollmus, D. H. Madison. S. Jones and J. Ullrich, Nature 422, 48 (2003).

  4. Independent-electron analysis of the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in Ne10 + collisions with He, Ne, and Ar atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2015-09-01

    We present a theoretical study on the x-ray spectra from single-electron capture in 4.54 keV/amu Ne10 +-He, -Ne, and -Ar collisions. Single-particle capture probabilities were calculated using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. In this framework we investigated the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on capture cross sections and x-ray spectra. Excellent agreement is shown with the previously measured relative cross sections and x-ray spectra and calculations based on the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method using the no-response single-particle electron capture probabilities in a multinomial single-electron capture analysis. Our results demonstrate the importance of using this consistent statistical analysis of single-electron capture within the independent electron model; a requirement that a previous calculation for the same collision problem using the two-center atomic-orbital close-coupling method may not have considered.

  5. PREFACE: XXIX International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, C.; Rabadán, I.; García, G.; Méndez, L.; Martín, F.

    2015-09-01

    The 29th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXIX ICPEAC) was held at the Palacio de Congresos ''El Greco'', Toledo, Spain, on 22-28 July, 2015, and was organized by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC). ICPEAC is held biannually and is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to Spain in 2015 for the very first time. UAM and CSIC had been preparing the conference for six years, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXIX ICPEAC in Toledo. The conference gathered 670 participants from 52 countries and attracted 854 contributed papers for presentation in poster sessions. Among the latter, 754 are presented in issues 2-12 of this volume of the Journal of Physics Conference Series. In addition, five plenary lectures, including the opening one by the Nobel laureate Prof. Ahmed H. Zewail and the lectures by Prof. Maciej Lewenstein, Prof. Paul Scheier, Prof. Philip H. Bucksbaum, and Prof. Stephen J. Buckman, 62 progress reports and 26 special reports were presented following the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Detailed write-ups of most of the latter are presented in issue 1 of this volume, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting. On the occasion of the International Year of Light (IYL2015) and with the support of the Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología (FECYT), the program was completed with two public lectures delivered by the Nobel laureate Prof. Serge Haroche and the Príncipe de Asturias laureate Prof. Pedro M. Echenique on, respectively, ''Fifty years of laser revolutions in physics'rquot; and ''The sublime usefulness of useless science''. Also a

  6. Improving the identification rate of endogenous peptides using electron transfer dissociation and collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Eisuke; Menschaert, Gerben; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Luyten, Walter; Gevaert, Kris; Baggerman, Geert; Schoofs, Liliane

    2013-12-06

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) combined with bioinformatics tools have enabled fast and systematic protein identification based on peptide-to-spectrum matches. However, it remains challenging to obtain accurate identification of endogenous peptides, such as neuropeptides, peptide hormones, peptide pheromones, venom peptides, and antimicrobial peptides. Since these peptides are processed at sites that are difficult to predict reliably, the search of their MS/MS spectra in sequence databases needs to be done without any protease setting. In addition, many endogenous peptides carry various post-translational modifications, making it essential to take these into account in the database search. These characteristics of endogenous peptides result in a huge search space, frequently leading to poor confidence of the peptide characterizations in peptidomics studies. We have developed a new MS/MS spectrum search tool for highly accurate and confident identification of endogenous peptides by combining two different fragmentation methods. Our approach takes advantage of the combination of two independent fragmentation methods (collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation). Their peptide spectral matching is carried out separately in both methods, and the final score is built as a combination of the two separate scores. We demonstrate that this approach is very effective in discriminating correct peptide identifications from false hits. We applied this approach to a spectral data set of neuropeptides extracted from mouse pituitary tumor cells. Compared to conventional MS-based identification, i.e., using a single fragmentation method, our approach significantly increased the peptide identification rate. It proved also highly effective for scanning spectra against a very large search space, enabling more accurate genome-wide searches and searches including multiple potential post-translational modifications.

  7. Rotational and translational effects in collisions of electronically excited diatomic hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1988-01-01

    Collisional quenching and vibrational energy proceed competitively with rotational energy transfer for several excited states of the diatomic radicals OH, NH, and CH. This occurs for a wide variety of molecular collision partners. This phenomenon permits the examination of the influence of rotational motion on the collision dynamics of these theoretically tractable species. Measurements can also be made as a function of temperature, i.e., collision velocity. In OH (sup 2 sigma +), both vibrational transfer and quenching are found to decrease with an increase in rotational level, while quenching decreases with increasing temperature. This behavior indicates that for OH, anisotropic attractive forces govern the entrance channel dynamics for these collisions. The quenching of NH (sup 3 pi sub i) by many (although not all) collision partners also decreases with increasing rotational and translational energy, and NH (sup 1 pi) behaves much like OH (sup 2 sigma +). However, the quenching of CH (sup 2 delta) appears to decrease with increasing rotation but increases with increasing temperature, suggesting in this case anisotropic forces involving a barrier or repulsive wall. Such similarities and differences should furnish useful comparisons with both simple and detailed theoretical pictures of the appropriate collision dynamics.

  8. Exchange effects and collision mechanisms in (e, 2e) processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang-jin, Chen; Zhi-xiang, Ni; Qi-cun, Shi; Ke-zun, Xu

    1998-07-01

    In this work the triple differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of helium at an incident energy of 64.6 eV is considered in the coplanar symmetric energy-sharing and fixed relative angles of the two out-going electrons kinematics. A new collision process called triple-binary collision is identified. It has been shown that the ordinary double-binary collision process is excluded from the collision kinematics considered here. It has also been shown how the exchange effects symmetrically contribute to the peaks in the cross sections.

  9. Lead-Free Electronics: Impact for Space Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pb is used as a constituent in solder alloys used to connect and attach electronic parts to printed wiring boards (PWBs). Similar Pbbearing alloys are electroplated or hot dipped onto the terminations of electronic parts to protect the terminations and make them solderable. Changing to Pb-free solders and termination finishes has introduced significant technical challenges into the supply chain. Tin/lead (Sn/Pb) alloys have been the solders of choice for electronics for more than 50 years. Pb-free solder alloys are available but there is not a plug-in replacement for 60/40 or 63/37 (Sn/Pb) alloys, which have been the industry workhorses.

  10. Electron impact excitation of Fe-peak elements: forbidden transitions in the 3d5 manifold of Fe IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, B. M.; Hibbert, A.; Scott, M. P.; Noble, C. J.; Burke, V. M.; Burke, P. G.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-impact excitation collision strengths of the Fe-peak element Fe IV are calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the R-matrix suite of codes PRMAT designed for parallel processors. One hundred and eight LS-coupled states arising from the 3d5, 3d44s and 3d44p configurations of Fe IV, are retained in the present calculations. Detailed multi-configuration interaction target wavefunctions are used with the aid of 3p2 → 3d2 electron promotions and a \\rm 4\\overline{d} correlation orbital in the present calculations. Effective collision strengths for optically forbidden transitions, which are extremely important in the analysis of lines in the Fe IV spectra, are obtained by averaging the electron collision strengths for a wide range of incident electron energies, over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities. Results are presented for electron temperatures (Te in Kelvin) in the range 3.3 <= Log Te<= 6.0 applicable to many laboratory and astrophysical plasmas for transitions within the 3d5 manifold. The present results compared to previous investigations provide improved results for important lines in the Fe IV spectrum.

  11. Measurement of the Electron Charge Asymmetry in Inclusive W Production in pp Collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.

    2012-09-01

    A measurement of the electron charge asymmetry in inclusive pp→W+X→eν+X production at s=7TeV is presented based on data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 840pb-1. The electron charge asymmetry reflects the unequal production of W+ and W- bosons in pp collisions. The electron charge asymmetry is measured in bins of the absolute value of electron pseudorapidity in the range of |η|<2.4. The asymmetry rises from about 0.1 to 0.2 as a function of the pseudorapidity and is measured with a relative precision better than 7%. This measurement provides new stringent constraints for parton distribution functions.

  12. Formation and reshuffling of disulfide bonds in bovine serum albumin demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Scherf, Katharina A; Lambrecht, Marlies A; Koehler, Peter; Delcour, Jan A

    2015-07-20

    Thermolysin hydrolyzates of freshly isolated, extensively stored (6 years, 6 °C, dry) and heated (60 min, 90 °C, in excess water) bovine serum albumin (BSA) samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using alternating electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The positions of disulfide bonds and free thiol groups in the different samples were compared to those deduced from the crystal structure of native BSA. Results revealed non-enzymatic posttranslational modifications of cysteine during isolation, extensive dry storage, and heating. Heat-induced extractability loss of BSA was linked to the impact of protein unfolding on the involvement of specific cysteine residues in intermolecular and intramolecular thiol-disulfide interchange and thiol oxidation reactions. The here developed approach holds promise for exploring disulfide bond formation and reshuffling in various proteins under conditions relevant for chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical and food processing.

  13. Particle production in the Color Glass Condensate: from electron-proton DIS to proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.; Mäntysaari, H.

    2014-06-01

    We study single inclusive hadron production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions in the CGC framework. The parameters in the calculation are obtained by fitting electron-proton deep inelastic scattering data. The obtained dipole-proton amplitude is generalized to dipole-nucleus scattering without any additional nuclear parameters other than the Woods-Saxon distribution. We show that it is possible to use an initial condition without an anomalous dimension and still obtain a good description of the HERA inclusive cross section and LHC single particle production measurements. We argue that one must consistently use the proton transverse area as measured by a high virtuality probe in DIS also for the single inclusive cross section in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions, and obtain a nuclear modification factor RpA that at midrapidity approaches unity at large momenta and at all energies.

  14. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms I. Package outline and high energy code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    Being motivated by the applied researchers’ persisting need for accurate scattering data for the collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms, we developed a computer package-Hex-that is designed to provide trustworthy results for all basic discrete and continuous processes within non-relativistic framework. The package consists of several computational modules that implement different methods, valid for specific energy regimes. Results of the modules are kept in a common database in the unified form of low-level scattering data (partial-wave T-matrices) and accessed by an interface program which is able to produce various derived quantities like e.g. differential and integral cross sections. This article is the first one of a series of articles that are concerned with the implementation and testing of the modules. Here we give an overview of their structure and present (a) the command-line interface program hex-db that can be also easily compiled into a derived code or used as a backend for a web-page form and (b) simple illustrative module specialized for high energies, hex-dwba, that implements distorted and plane wave Born approximation. Catalogue identifier: AETH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data etc.: 30367 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data etc.: 232032 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11 Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). RAM: Test run 3 MiB. CPC Library Classification: 2.4 Electron scattering External libraries:GSL [49], FFTW3[52], SQLite3 [46]. All of the libraries are open-source and maintained. Nature of problem: Extraction of derived (observable) quantities from partial

  15. Single-electron capture processes in slow collisions of He{sup 2+} ions with O{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Haija, O.; Kamber, E.Y.; Ferguson, S.M.; Stolterfoht, N.

    2005-10-15

    Using the translational energy-gain spectroscopy technique, we have measured the energy-gain spectra and absolute total cross sections for single-electron capture (SEC) in collisions of He{sup 2+} ions with O{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} at laboratory impact energies between 25 and 400 eV/amu. The measured spectra for the He{sup 2+}-N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} collision systems show that the dominant reaction channel is due to dissociative transfer ionization (i.e., SEC accompanied by ionization of the molecular target ion). In the case of the He{sup 2+}-NH{sub 3} collision system, nondissociative single-electron capture into n=2 states of He{sup +} with production of NH{sub 3}{sup +} in the ground state is predominantly populated. These processes are observed to be the dominant reaction channels over the entire impact energy region studied and at laboratory scattering angles between 0 deg. and 8 deg. The energy dependence of total cross sections for SEC are also measured and found to slowly increase with increasing impact energies. The measured cross sections are also compared with the available measurements and theoretical results based on the Demkov and Landau-Zener models.

  16. Production of non-photonic electrons in U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV at the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdosova, Katarina

    2016-11-01

    Heavy quarks are suitable probes to study the properties of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), a strongly interacting medium, which can be created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Non-photonic electrons (NPE) that originate from semileptonic decays of D and B mesons can serve as a good proxy for heavy flavor quarks. Nuclear modification factor RAA of NPE is measured in heavy-ion collisions, which is sensitive to the effect of QGP on heavy quarks. Measurements of NPE RAA in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV reveal that NPE production is strongly suppressed. In year 2012 STAR collected data from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV. In most central collisions higher energy density can be achieved in comparison to collisions of gold nuclei. In this proceedings the preliminary results on NPE in 0-5% most central U+U collisions at a transverse momentum range 1.2 < pT < 6 GeV/c are presented. The nuclear modification factor in U+U collisions is compared to that in Au+Au collisions and theoretical models.

  17. Operational Impact of Improved Space Tracking on Collision Avoidance in the Future LEO Space Debris Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibert, D.; Borgeson, D.; Peterson, G.; Jenkin, A.; Sorge, M.

    2010-09-01

    Even if global space policy successfully curtails on orbit explosions and ASAT demonstrations, studies indicate that the number of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) will continue to grow solely from debris on debris collisions and debris generated from new launches. This study examines the threat posed by this growing space debris population over the next 30 years and how improvements in our space tracking capabilities can reduce the number of Collision Avoidance (COLA) maneuvers required keep the risk of operational satellite loss within tolerable limits. Particular focus is given to satellites operated by the Department of Defense (DoD) and Intelligence Community (IC) in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The following debris field and space tracking performance parameters were varied parametrically in the experiment to study the impact on the number of collision avoidance maneuvers required: - Debris Field Density (by year 2009, 2019, 2029, and 2039) - Quality of Track Update (starting 1 sigma error ellipsoid) - Future Propagator Accuracy (error ellipsoid growth rates - Special Perturbations in 3 axes) - Track Update Rate for Debris (stochastic) - Track Update Rate for Payloads (stochastic) Baseline values matching present day tracking performance for quality of track update, propagator accuracy, and track update rate were derived by analyzing updates to the unclassified Satellite Catalog (SatCat). Track update rates varied significantly for active payloads and debris and as such we used different models for the track update rates for military payloads and debris. The analysis was conducted using the System Effectiveness Analysis Simulation (SEAS) an agent based model developed by the United States Air Force Space Command’s Space and Missile Systems Center to evaluate the military utility of space systems. The future debris field was modeled by The Aerospace Corporation using a tool chain which models the growth of the 10cm+ debris field using high fidelity

  18. Electron capture and excitation in collisions of O+ ( 4S , 2D , 2P ) with H2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichl, Lukáš; Li, Yan; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Buenker, Robert J.; Kimura, Mineo

    2004-06-01

    Using an electronic-state close-coupling method, we treated the electron capture and excitation processes of O+ ions both in ground state O+ ( 4S ) and metastable states O+* ( 2D ) and O+* ( 2P ) in collisions with the H2 molecule. In the ground-state projectile energy region considered (from 50 eV/amu to 10 keV/amu ), the experimental data vary by orders of magnitude: our results smoothly connect to the data by FleschNg, J. Chem. Phys.9419912372 and Xuet al., J. Phys. B2319901235 at low energy and agree with Phaneufet al., Phys. Rev. A171978534 in the high-energy region. The present values differ from Sieglaffet al., Phys. Rev. A5919993538 and Nuttet al., J. Phys. B121979L157, especially in the energy region below 1 keV/amu . We provide the first calculated state-resolved cross sections of electron capture and target-projectile electronic excitations for the O+ ( 4S , 2D , 2P )- H2 collision system.

  19. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-03-15

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle φ=π/2. In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  20. Electron-impact ionization of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newson, Karl A.; Luc, Stephanie M.; Price, Stephen D.; Mason, Nigel J.

    1995-10-01

    Partial electron ionization cross-sections of ozone for incident electron energies from 40 to 500 eV have been determined using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The cross-sections are derived by identifying the contribution of ozone to the ion signals recorded following ionization of a mixture of O2 and O3. Only one previous determination of these cross-sections, for energies up to 100 eV, is available in the literature. The cross-sections derived in the present study at these lower electron energies are in good agreement with the previous determination.

  1. Electron impact cross sections for the 2,2P state excitation of lithium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, L.; Trajmar, S.; Register, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the 2p 2P state of Li was studied at 10, 20, 60, 100, 150 and 200 eV. Relative differential cross sections in the angular range 3-120 deg were measured and then normalized to the absolute scale by using the optical f value. Integral and momentum transfer cross sections were obtained by extrapolating the differential cross sections to 0 deg and to 180 deg. The question of normalizing electron-metal-atom collision cross sections in general was examined and the method of normalization to optical f values in particular was investigated in detail. It has been concluded that the extrapolation of the apparent generalized oscillator strength (obtained from the measured differential cross sections) to the zero momentum transfer limit with an expression using even powers of the momentum transfer and normalization of the limit to the optical f value yields reliable absolute cross sections.

  2. Electron impact polarization of atomic spectral lines. I - A general theoretical scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Degl'innocenti, Egidio L.

    1992-01-01

    A suitable theoretical scheme able to describe, in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, the phenomenon of atomic line polarization by electron impact is developed. Starting from the general principles of quantum mechanics and assuming the Born approximation, the rate equations for the density matrix elements of a multilevel atomic system, interacting with a nonrelativistic electron beam having any kind of angular distribution, are derived in full generality. The resulting theory generalizes the previous ones by accounting for the collisional rates and the cross sections concerning both inelastic and superelastic collisions (in any geometrical situation), and, moreover, by taking into account the coherences among Zeeman sublevels split by a magnetic field. As an example of particular relevance, the general formulas derived in the first sections of the paper are subsequently particularized to the case of the electric dipole interaction.

  3. Experimental study on impact disruption of porous asteroids: Effects of oblique impact and multiple collisions on impact strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Minami; Takano, Shota; Matsue, Kazuma; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2015-08-01

    Most of asteroids would have pores and a plenty of pre-cracks in their interiors, and the pre-cracks could be formed by multiple impacts at various impact angles. Porosity and pre-cracks are important physical properties controlling the impact strength. Okamoto and Arakawa (2009) did impact experiments of porous gypsum spheres to obtain the impact strength of porous asteroids, but they carried out only single impact experiments on the same target at head-on. In this study, we conducted oblique impact and multiple impacts on porous gypsum and examined the effects of impact angle and pre-cracks on the impact strength.We carried out impact experiments by using the one-stage He gas gun and the two-stage H2 gas gun at Kobe University. The impact velocities were <200 m/s (low-vi) and >3 km/s (high-vi). Targets were porous gypsum spheres with the porosity of 55% and the diameters of 7 or 12 cm. The projectiles were a porous gypsum sphere with the diameter of 2.5 cm at low-vi or a polycarbonate sphere with the diameter of 4.7 cm at high-vi. The impact angle changed from 15° to 90°, and the projectile was impacted on the same target for 2-15 times. The impact phenomena were observed by a high-speed digital video camera to measure the fragment velocities.The oblique impact experiments showed that the impact strength did not depend on the impact angle θ between 45° and 90°, and obtained to be ~2000 J/kg, while it drastically changed at the θ from 15° to 30°. We reanalyzed our results by using the effective energy density defined as Qsin2θ, where Q is the energy density, and found that most of the results were consistent with the results of head-on impacts. The multiple impacts showed that the impact strength of pre-impacted targets was larger than that of intact targets in the case of low-vi. This might be caused by the compaction of the target surface. In the case of high-vi, the impact strength of pre-impacted targets was smaller than that of intact targets. This

  4. Electron impact ionization of tungsten ions in a statistical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, A. V.; Kadomtsev, M. B.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Shurygin, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The statistical model for calculations of the electron impact ionization cross sections of multielectron ions is developed for the first time. The model is based on the idea of collective excitations of atomic electrons with the local plasma frequency, while the Thomas-Fermi model is used for atomic electrons density distribution. The electron impact ionization cross sections and related ionization rates of tungsten ions from W+ up to W63+ are calculated and then compared with the vast collection of modern experimental and modeling results. The reasonable correspondence between experimental and theoretical data demonstrates the universal nature of statistical approach to the description of atomic processes in multielectron systems.

  5. Mesospheric Response to Impacting Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenette, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Daily maps of the spatial distributions of precipitating energetic electrons were produced for the period 10-20 May 1992. These data will serve as the input for potential changes in upper atmosphere composition.

  6. Collision-energy-resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of p-benzoquinone: Study of electronic structure and anisotropic interaction with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Okamura, Kohji; Ohno, Koichi

    2004-06-01

    Collision energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) of p-benzoquinone with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms indicates that interaction potentials between p-benzoquinone and He*(2 3S) are highly anisotropic in the studied collision energy range (100-250 meV). Attractive interactions were found around the C=O groups for in-plane and out-of-plane directions, while repulsive interactions were found around CH bonds and the benzenoid ring. Assignment of the first four ionic states of p-benzoquinone and an analogous methyl-substituted compound was examined with CEDPICS and anisotropic distributions of the corresponding two nonbonding oxygen orbitals (nO+,nO-) and two πCC orbitals (πCC+,πCC-). An extra band that shows negative CEDPICS was observed at ca. 7.2 eV in Penning ionization electron spectrum.

  7. Isomer and Fluorination Effects among Fluorine Substituted Hydrocarbon C3/C4 Molecules in Electron Impact Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, U. R.; Joshipura, K. N.

    2015-05-01

    Electron collision processes are very important in both man-made and natural plasmas, for determining the energy balances and transport properties of electrons. Electron -molecule scattering leading to ionization represents one of the most fundamental processes in collision physics. In the gas phase, the total efficiency of the process is described by the absolute total electron impact ionization cross section. Carbon based materials are some of the widely used materials for a divertor plate and magnetically confined fusion devices. In the ``ITER,'' it is very important for steady state operation to have an estimate of the lifetime of carbon plasma facing components. Apart from fusion plasma relevance, the present theoretical study is very important in modeling and controlling other electron assisted processes in many areas. Hydrocarbons play an important role for plasma diagnostics as impurities in the Tokamak fusion divertor, as seed gases for the production of radicals and ions in low temperature plasma processing. Fluorine substituted hydrocarbons (perfluorocarbons) are important as reactants in plasma assisted fabrication processes. In the present work, we have calculated total ionization cross sections Qion for C3/C4 Hydrocarbon isomers by electron impact, and comparisons are made mutually to observe isomer effect. Comparisons are also made by substituting H atom by F atom and revealing fluorination effect. The present calculations are quite significant owing to the lack of experimental data, with just an isolated previous theoretical work in some cases.

  8. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  9. Electron impact vibrational excitation of methyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, Ahmad; Hargreaves, Leigh; Khakoo, Murtadha

    2016-05-01

    Low energy differential cross sections and excitation functions for vibrational excitation of CH3 Cl are presented for five vibrational features in the electron energy loss spectrum of this molecule. Electron energies range from 1 eV to 15 eV and scattering angles from 10o to 125o. Results will be compared to existing data for CH3 Cl in the literature. Funded by a NSF-AMOP-RUI Grant.

  10. Modeling the electron-impact dissociation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowski, Marcin; Vikár, Anna; Mayes, Maricris Lodriguito; Bencsura, Ákos; Lendvay, György; Schatz, George C.

    2012-12-01

    The product yield of the electron-impact dissociation of methane has been studied with a combination of three theoretical methods: R-matrix theory to determine the electronically inelastic collisional excitation cross sections, high-level electronic structure methods to determine excited states energies and derivative couplings, and trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations to determine branching in the dissociation of the methane excited states to give CH3, CH2, and CH. The calculations involve the lowest 24 excited-state potential surfaces of methane, up to the ionization energy. According to the R-matrix calculations, electron impact preferentially produces triplet excited states, especially for electron kinetic energies close to the dissociation threshold. The potential surfaces of excited states are characterized by numerous avoided and real crossings such that the TSH calculations show rapid cascading down to the lowest excited singlet or triplet states, and then slower the dissociation of these lowest states. Product branching for electron-impact dissociation was therefore estimated by combining the electron-impact excitation cross sections with TSH product branching ratios that were obtained from the lowest singlet and triplet states, with the singlet dissociation giving a comparable formation of CH2 and CH3 while triplet dissociation gives CH3 exclusively. The overall branching in electron-impact dissociation is dominated by CH3 over CH2. A small branching yield for CH is also predicted.

  11. Impact Sensors for Use with Electronic Fuzes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    TABLES A-I Characteristics of Impact Data, Projectile, and Target . . 20 C-I Design Characteristics of Impact Elements Used in Point Detonating ...or electrical switch that fires a detonator . The energy driving the mechanical element must act against various elastically and plastically...energy driving the element against stab detonators must be large enough to work against the biasing element and close the gap and also accelerate the

  12. Operational Impact of Improved Space Tracking on Collision Avoidance in the Future LEO Space Debris Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    objects at the time of closest approach. Keywords: Orbital Debris , Conjunction, Collision Avoidance, Future Debris Field Report Documentation Page...critical satellites can suddenly be lost in a collision. Large spikes in the tracked orbital debris population associated with this collision, the...perform the analysis required for this study, an up-to-date orbital debris model with associated predictions of the future debris field was required. The

  13. Electron reconstruction and identification efficiency measurements with the ATLAS detector using the 2011 LHC proton-proton collision data.

    PubMed

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    Many of the interesting physics processes to be measured at the LHC have a signature involving one or more isolated electrons. The electron reconstruction and identification efficiencies of the ATLAS detector at the LHC have been evaluated using proton-proton collision data collected in 2011 at [Formula: see text] TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb[Formula: see text]. Tag-and-probe methods using events with leptonic decays of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] bosons and [Formula: see text] mesons are employed to benchmark these performance parameters. The combination of all measurements results in identification efficiencies determined with an accuracy at the few per mil level for electron transverse energy greater than 30 GeV.

  14. Coupled-Sturmian and perturbative treatments of electron transfer and ionization in high-energy p -He sup + collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G. Department of Physics, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251 ); Alston, S.G. )

    1992-02-01

    Cross sections have been determined for electron transfer and ionization in collisions between protons and He{sup +} ions at proton energies from several hundred kilo-electron-volts to 2 MeV. A coupled-Sturmian approach is taken, extending the work of Winter (Phys. Rev. A 35, 3799 (1987)) and Stodden {ital et} {ital al}. (Phys. Rev. A 41, 1281 (1990)) to high energies where perturbative approaches are expected to be valid. An explicit connection is made with the first-order Born approximation for ionization and the impulse version of the distorted, strong-potential Born approximation for electron transfer. The capture cross section is shown to be affected by the presence of target basis functions of positive energy near {ital v}{sup 2}/2, corresponding to the Thomas mechanism.

  15. Effects of experience and electronic stability control on low friction collision avoidance in a truck driving simulator.

    PubMed

    Markkula, Gustav; Benderius, Ola; Wolff, Krister; Wahde, Mattias

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out in a moving-base simulator, in which truck drivers of varying experience levels encountered a rear-end collision scenario on a low-friction road surface, with and without an electronic stability control (ESC) system. In the first experiment, the drivers experienced one instance of the rear-end scenario unexpectedly, and then several instances of a version of the scenario adapted for repeated collision avoidance. In the second experiment, the unexpected rear-end scenario concluded a stretch of driving otherwise unrelated to the study presented here. Across both experiments, novice drivers were found to collide more often than experienced drivers in the unexpected scenario. This result was found to be attributable mainly to longer steering reaction times of the novice drivers, possibly caused by lower expectancy for steering avoidance. The paradigm for repeated collision avoidance was able to reproduce the type of steering avoidance situation for which critical losses of control were observed in the unexpected scenario and, here, ESC was found to reliably reduce skidding and control loss. However, it remains unclear to what extent the results regarding ESC benefits in repeated avoidance are generalisable to unexpected situations. The approach of collecting data by appending one unexpected scenario to the end of an otherwise unrelated experiment was found useful, albeit with some caveats.

  16. A Full-Relativistic B-Spline R-Matrix Method for Electron and Photon Collisions with Atoms and Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2008-05-01

    We have extended our B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) method [1] to fully account for relativistic effects in a Dirac-Coulomb formulation. Our numerical implementation of the close-coupling method enables us to construct term-dependent, non-orthogonal sets of one-electron orbitals for the bound and continuum electrons. This is a critical aspect for complex targets, where individually optimized one-electron orbitals can significantly reduce the size of the multi-configuration expansions needed for an accurate target description. Furthermore, core-valence correlation effets are treated fully ab initio, rather than through semi-empirical, and usually local, model potentials. The method will be described in detail and illustrated by comparing our theoretical predictions for e-Cs collisions with benchmark experiments for angle-integrated and angle-differential cross sections [2], various spin-dependent scattering asymmetries [3], and Stokes parameters measured in superelastic collisions with laser-excited atoms [4]. [1] O. Zatsarinny, Comp. Phys. Commun. 174, 273 (2006). [2] W. Gehenn and E. Reichert, J. Phys. B 10, 3105 (1977). [3] G. Baum et al., Phys. Rev. A 66, 022705 (2002) and 70, 012707 (2004). [4] D.S. Slaughter et al., Phys. Rev. A 75, 062717 (2007).

  17. A Fully Relativistic B-Spline R-Matrix Method for Electron and Photon Collisions with Atoms and Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    We have extended our B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) method [1] to fully account for relativistic effects in a Dirac-Coulomb formulation. Our numerical implementation of the close-coupling method enables us to construct term-dependent, non-orthogonal sets of one-electron orbitals for the bound and continuum electrons. This is a critical aspect for complex targets, where individually optimized one-electron orbitals can significantly reduce the size of the multi-configuration expansions needed for an accurate target description. Core-valence correlation effets are treated fully ab initio, rather than through semi-empirical model potentials. The method is described in detail and will be illustrated by comparing our theoretical predictions for e-Cs collisions [2] with benchmark experiments for angle-integrated and angle-differential cross sections [3], various spin-dependent scattering asymmetries [4], and Stokes parameters measured in superelastic collisions with laser-excited atoms [5]. [1] O. Zatsarinny, Comp. Phys. Commun. 174, 273 (2006). [2] O. Zatsarinny and K. Bartschat, Phys. Rev. A 77, 062701 (2008). [3] W. Gehenn and E. Reichert, J. Phys. B 10, 3105 (1977). [4] G. Baum et al., Phys. Rev. A 66, 022705 (2002) and 70, 012707 (2004). [5] D.S. Slaughter et al., Phys. Rev. A 75, 062717 (2007).

  18. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; ...

    2016-03-07

    We measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au + Au collisions at √s(NN) = 200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons, using the PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. In the past, heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transversemore » momentum are measured in Au + Au collisions. Here, we compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p + p collisions at √s(NN) = 200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for p(T) > 4 GeV/c. We use the bottom electron fractions in Au + Au and p + p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron R(AA) to calculate the R(AA) for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. Finally, we find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3 < p(T) < 4 GeV/c.« less

  19. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.

    2016-03-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. Previous heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transverse momentum are measured in Au +Au collisions. We compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p +p collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for pT>4 GeV/c . We use the bottom electron fractions in Au +Au and p +p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron RA A to calculate the RA A for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. We find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3

  20. Electron identification in Au+Au collisions at 1.23 GeV/u using multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harabasz, Szymon; Hades Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Au+Au collisions at a beam kinetic energy of 1.23 GeV/u have been measured by HADES in 2012. Lepton identification in this experiment has been done using a multivariate algorithm based on an artificial neural network. In the proceedings, details of the identification method and its assessment in terms of purity of the final lepton sample are presented. The obtained purity reaches 95% and the amount of identified electrons and positrons is sufficient to perform further steps of the physics analysis with e+e- pairs.

  1. Plasma and collision processes of hypervelocity meteorite impact in the prehistory of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managadze, G.

    2010-07-01

    A new concept is proposed, according to which the plasma and collision processes accompanying hypervelocity impacts of meteorites can contribute to the arising of the conditions on early Earth, which are necessary for the appearance of primary forms of living matter. It was shown that the processes necessary for the emergence of living matter could have started in a plasma torch of meteorite impact and have continued in an impact crater in the case of the arising of the simplest life form. It is generally accepted that planets are the optimal place for the origin and evolution of life. In the process of forming the planetary systems the meteorites, space bodies feeding planet growth, appear around stars. In the process of Earth's formation, meteorite sizes ranged from hundreds and thousands of kilometres. These space bodies consisted mostly of the planetesimals and comet nucleus. During acceleration in Earth's gravitational field they reached hypervelocity and, hitting the surface of planet, generated powerful blowouts of hot plasma in the form of a torch. They also created giant-size craters and dense dust clouds. These bodies were composed of all elements needed for the synthesis of organic compounds, with the content of carbon being up to 5%-15%. A new idea of possible synthesis of the complex organic compounds in the hypervelocity impact-generated plasma torch was proposed and experimentally confirmed. A previously unknown and experimentally corroborated feature of the impact-generated plasma torch allowed a new concept of the prehistory of life to be developed. According to this concept the intensive synthesis of complex organic compounds arose during meteoritic bombardment in the first 0.5 billion years at the stage of the planet's formation. This most powerful and destructive action in Earth's history could have played a key role and prepared conditions for the origin of life. In the interstellar gas-dust clouds, the synthesis of simple organic matter could

  2. Electron-impact rotational and hyperfine excitation of HCN, HNC, DCN and DNC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Alexandre; Varambhia, Hemal N.; Stoecklin, Thierry; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2007-12-01

    Rotational excitation of isotopologues of HCN and HNC by thermal electron-impact is studied using the molecular R-matrix method combined with the adiabatic-nuclei-rotation approximation. Rate coefficients are obtained for electron temperatures in the range 5-6000 K and for transitions among all levels up to J = 8. Hyperfine rates are also derived using the infinite-order-sudden scaling method. It is shown that the dominant rotational transitions are dipole-allowed, that is, those for which ΔJ = 1. The hyperfine propensity rule ΔJ = ΔF is found to be stronger than that in the case of He-HCN collisions. For dipole-allowed transitions, electron-impact rates are shown to exceed those for excitation of HCN by He atoms by six orders of magnitude. As a result, the present rates should be included in any detailed population model of isotopologues of HCN and HNC in sources where the electron fraction is larger than 10-6, for example, in interstellar shocks and comets.

  3. Single impacts of keV fullerene ions on free standing graphene: Emission of ions and electrons from confined volume

    SciTech Connect

    Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Geng, Sheng; Schweikert, Emile A.; Czerwinski, Bartlomiej; Young, Amanda E.; Delcorte, Arnaud

    2015-10-28

    We present the first data from individual C{sub 60} impacting one to four layer graphene at 25 and 50 keV. Negative secondary ions and electrons emitted in transmission were recorded separately from each impact. The yields for C{sub n}{sup −} clusters are above 10% for n ≤ 4, they oscillate with electron affinities and decrease exponentially with n. The result can be explained with the aid of MD simulation as a post-collision process where sufficient vibrational energy is accumulated around the rim of the impact hole for sputtering of carbon clusters. The ionization probability can be estimated by comparing experimental yields of C{sub n}{sup −} with those of C{sub n}{sup 0} from MD simulation, where it increases exponentially with n. The ionization probability can be approximated with ejecta from a thermally excited (3700 K) rim damped by cluster fragmentation and electron detachment. The experimental electron probability distributions are Poisson-like. On average, three electrons of thermal energies are emitted per impact. The thermal excitation model invoked for C{sub n}{sup −} emission can also explain the emission of electrons. The interaction of C{sub 60} with graphene is fundamentally different from impacts on 3D targets. A key characteristic is the high degree of ionization of the ejecta.

  4. Electron's anomalous magnetic-moment effects on electron-hydrogen elastic collisions in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Elhandi, S.; Taj, S.; Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Oufni, L.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment on the relativistic electronic dressing for the process of electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions is investigated. We consider a laser field with circular polarization and various electric field strengths. The Dirac-Volkov states taking into account this anomaly are used to describe the process in the first order of perturbation theory. The correlation between the terms coming from this anomaly and the electric field strength gives rise to the strong dependence of the spinor part of the differential cross section (DCS) with respect to these terms. A detailed study has been devoted to the nonrelativistic regime as well as the moderate relativistic regime. Some aspects of this dependence as well as the dynamical behavior of the DCS in the relativistic regime have been addressed.

  5. Excitation, ionization, and electron capture cross sections for collisions of Li{sup 3+} with ground state and excited hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, I. Yan, J.; Sato, H.; Kimura, M.; Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.

    2008-03-15

    Using the available experimental and theoretical data, as well as the established cross section scaling relationships, a comprehensive cross section database for excitation, ionization and electron capture in collisions of Li{sup 3+} ions with ground state and excited hydrogen atoms has been generated. The critically assessed cross sections are represented by analytic fit functions that have the correct asymptotic behavior both at low and high collision energies. The derived cross sections are also presented in graphical form.

  6. Determining concentration depth profiles of thin foam films with neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridings, Christiaan; Andersson, Gunther G.

    2010-11-01

    Equipment is developed to measure the concentration depth profiles in foam films with the vacuum based technique neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy. Thin foam films have not previously been investigated using vacuum based techniques, hence specialized methods and equipment have been developed for generating and equilibrating of foam films under vacuum. A specialized film holder has been developed that encloses the foam film in a pressure cell. The pressure cell is air-tight except for apertures that allow for the entrance and exit of the ion beam to facilitate the analysis with the ion scattering technique. The cell is supplied with a reservoir of solvent which evaporates upon evacuating the main chamber. This causes the cell to be maintained at the vapor pressure of the solvent, thus minimizing further evaporation from the films. In order to investigate the effect of varying the pressure over the films, a hydrostatic pressure is applied to the foam films. Concentration depth profiles of the elements in a thin foam film made from a solution of glycerol and the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) were measured. The measured concentration depth profiles are used to compare the charge distribution in foam films with the charge distribution at the surface of a bulk solution. A greater charge separation was observed at the films' surface compared to the bulk surface, which implies a greater electrostatic force contribution to the stabilization of thin foam films.

  7. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Absorption of a femtosecond laser pulse by metals and the possibility of determining effective electron—electron collision frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakov, Vladimir A.; Kanavin, Andrey P.; Uryupin, Sergey A.

    2006-10-01

    A method is proposed for describing absorption of an electron-heating femtosecond laser pulse that interacts with a metal under conditions of high-frequency skin effect. It is shown that the effective frequencies of electron—electron collisions accompanied by umklapp processes can be determined by measuring the absorption or reflection coefficients of a femtosecond pulse.

  8. A study on the static and impact structural behavior of concrete filled steel tubular members under Tsunami flotsam collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effendi, Mahmud Kori; Kawano, Akihiko

    2017-03-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake triggered the Tsunami which caused massive great damage of the structural building either by the Tsunami waves themselves or by the Tsunami flotsam impact. With respect to the wave pressure, the loads by wave pressure are treated as statically equivalent loads. On the other hand, with respect to the collision of flotsam, the quantitative design method has not been established so far. The collision between Tsunami flotsam and concrete filled steel tubular (CFT) member is studied. Specimens consist of square, circular, and diamond cross-sectional shapes. The three dimensional finite element analysis (FEM) by MSC Marc Mentat (2012) was performed to evaluate static behavior of CFT members subjected to concentrated lateral load. The tip shape of lateral load is intended the collision with Tsunami flotsam. The solid element is used for steel tubes and infill concrete, respectively. The contact analysis between tip shapes of load and the steel as well as the concrete and steel are also considered. The fiber element analysis program developed by Kawano (1995) is employed to the impact response analysis. The members are modelled by beam-column elements with a cross section consisting of stress fibers. The collision model is developed to consider that Tsunami flotsam with the velocity 7m/sec collides with the CFT members. The gap element is employed to model the contact and separation between Tsunami flotsam and CFT members. The precision of analytical models of the FEM analysis and the frame analysis is confirmed by the comparison with the experimental test results. The FEM analysis is capable reproducing the deflected shape of the static test which also same as those of impact test results. It is discussed the comparison of energy absorption capacity of a CFT member under both impact and static loading.

  9. Dissociative Ionization of Pyridine by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher; Huo, Winifred; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In order to understand the damage of biomolecules by electrons, a process important in radiation damage, we undertake a study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of pyridine (C5H5N) from the low-lying ionization channels. The methodology used is the same as in the benzene study. While no experimental DI data are available, we compare the dissociation products from our calculations with the dissociative photoionization measurements of Tixier et al. using dipole (e, e(+) ion) coincidence spectroscopy. Comparisons with the DI of benzene is also made so as to understand the difference in DI between a heterocyclic and an aromatic molecule.

  10. Effects of electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) on doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z(·)-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  11. Effects of Electron-Transfer Coupled with Collision-Induced Dissociation (ET/CID) on Doubly Charged Peptides and Phosphopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Wei; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) is a useful peptide fragmentation technique that can be applied to investigate post-translational modifications (PTMs), the sequencing of highly hydrophilic peptides, and the identification of large peptides and even intact proteins. In contrast to traditional fragmentation methods, such as collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD produces c- and z·-type product ions by randomly cleaving the N-Cα bonds. The disappointing fragmentation efficiency of ETD for doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptide ions has been improved by ETcaD (supplemental activation). However, the ETD data derived from most database search algorithms yield low confidence scores due to the presence of unreacted precursors and charge-reduced ions within MS/MS spectra. In this work, we demonstrate that eight out of ten standard doubly charged peptides and phosphopeptides can be effortlessly identified by electron-transfer coupled with collision-induced dissociation (ET/CID) using the SEQUEST algorithm without further spectral processing. ET/CID was performed with the further dissociation of the charge-reduced ions isolated from ETD ion/ion reactions. ET/CID had high fragmentation efficiency, which elevated the confidence scores of doubly charged peptide and phosphospeptide sequencing. ET/CID was found to be an effective fragmentation strategy in "bottom-up" proteomic analysis.

  12. Charge transfer and electronic excitation in collisions of protons with water molecules below 10keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mada, Shogo; Hida, Ken-Nosuke; Kimura, Mineo; Pichl, Lukáš; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Li, Yan; Buenker, Robert J.

    2007-02-01

    Charge transfer and electronic excitation processes for H++H2O collisions are investigated theoretically below 10keV . Molecular-orbital close-coupling approach is employed for scattering dynamics, while an ab initio multireference single- and double-configuration interaction method is used for the determination of molecular states. The present results for charge transfer show rather weak energy dependence in the energy range from 10keV down to a few tens of eV with very slowly varying cross-section value of 4-13×10-16cm2 , and are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements by Lindsay [Phys. Rev. A 55, 3945 (1997)] where the energy in the experiment and theory overlaps. The electronic-excitation cross sections are found to be much smaller than those for the charge transfer, but increase rapidly and become comparable to charge transfer at a few keV. Most of the water molecular ions and excited species produced in the collision are unstable and soon undergo dissociation; some insight into the fragmentation process and the fragmented species is given.

  13. Charge transfer and electronic excitation in collisions of protons with water molecules below 10 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Mada, Shogo; Hida, Ken-nosuke; Kimura, Mineo; Pichl, Lukas; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Li, Yan; Buenker, Robert J.

    2007-02-15

    Charge transfer and electronic excitation processes for H{sup +}+H{sub 2}O collisions are investigated theoretically below 10 keV. Molecular-orbital close-coupling approach is employed for scattering dynamics, while an ab initio multireference single- and double-configuration interaction method is used for the determination of molecular states. The present results for charge transfer show rather weak energy dependence in the energy range from 10 keV down to a few tens of eV with very slowly varying cross-section value of 4-13x10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}, and are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements by Lindsay et al. [Phys. Rev. A 55, 3945 (1997)] where the energy in the experiment and theory overlaps. The electronic-excitation cross sections are found to be much smaller than those for the charge transfer, but increase rapidly and become comparable to charge transfer at a few keV. Most of the water molecular ions and excited species produced in the collision are unstable and soon undergo dissociation; some insight into the fragmentation process and the fragmented species is given.

  14. Termolecular Associations of Ions in Gases, Recombination and Electron-Atom Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Recombination, Master Equation, Variational Principle, N/A N/A N/A Diffusional Method ...Bottleneck Method , Strong-Collision, Coupled.Nearest-Neighbor, Radiative, Dissociative 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block...as papers, with reprints sent to’AFOSR at various times during the period. The exact Master Equation Method , a Variational Principle discovered during

  15. Cross sections for electron capture in H{sup +}-Li(2p{sigma},{pi}{sup {+-}}) collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Liu, C. H.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2011-09-15

    State-selective and total single-electron-capture cross sections in collisions of H{sup +} with the excited Li{sup *}(2p) atom have been investigated by using the full quantum-mechanical molecular orbital close-coupling (QMOCC) method in the energy range 0.001-3 keV/u and by the two-center atomic orbital close-coupling (TC-AOCC) method in the energy range 0.1-100 keV/u. The present results are also compared with data from other sources when available. It is found that the total and partial electron-capture cross sections are sensitive to the initial p-state charge cloud alignment, particularly in the low-energy region.

  16. Electronic bolus design impacts on administration.

    PubMed

    Hentz, F; Umstätter, C; Gilaverte, S; Prado, O R; Silva, C J A; Monteiro, A L G

    2014-06-01

    Electronic identification of animals has become increasingly important worldwide to improve and ensure traceability. In warm and hot climates, such as Brazil, boluses can have advantages over ear tags as the internal devices reduce the risks of ear tag losses, tissue damage, and lesions on the ear. Electronic boluses, however, are often perceived as having negative characteristics, including reported difficulties of administration in small ruminants. This paper describes the factors associated with bolus design that affect the swallowing of a bolus in sheep. Other factors that might influence bolus swallowing time have also been considered. In addition, the effect of bolus design on its performance was evaluated. A total of 56 Suffolk ewes were used to assess the ease of administration and retention of 3 types of electronic ruminal boluses (mini, 11.5 × 58.0 mm and 21.7 g; small, 14.8 × 48.5 mm and 29.5 g; standard, 19.3 × 69.8 mm and 74.4 g) during a whole productive year, including pregnancy and lamb suckling. Ewe age (5.6 ± 2.3 yr) and weight (85.07 ± 8.2 kg BW) were recorded, as well as time for bolus swallowing. The deglutition of the bolus and any resulting blockages in the esophagus were monitored by visual observations. Retention and readability of the boluses were regularly monitored for d 1, wk 1, mo 1, and every mo until 1 yr. Time for bolus swallowing differed substantially with bolus type and was greater (P < 0.05) for the standard bolus (32.8 ± 6.9 s) when compared to small and mini boluses, which did not differ (8.5 ± 2.0 vs. 9.2 ± 2.7 s; P > 0.05). The bolus o.d. and length were positively correlated with swallowing time (P < 0.01). The ewe weight was negatively correlated with swallowing time (P < 0.05). At 6 mo all electronic boluses showed 100% retention rate, and at 12 mo, bolus retention was 100%, 94.5%, and 100% for mini, small, and standard boluses, respectively (P > 0.05). At 12 mo, all boluses showed 100% readability, except for

  17. The Impact of a Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System on the Air Traffic Control Radar Beacon System and Mode S System in the Los Angeles Basin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    FAAIPM-84130 The Impact of a Traffic Alert and Program Engineering Collision Avoidance System on the and Maintenance Service Air Traffic Control Radar...ON4 THE AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL RADAR BEACON SYSTEM 6.~ eforming organization Cede AND THE MODE :3 SYSTEM IN THE LOS ANGELES BASIN P032 7 A~,re~lIS...performed to predict the impact of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) on the performance of selected air traffic control and surveil

  18. Electron-impact excitation of the low-lying electronic states of formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1974-01-01

    Electron-impact excitation has been observed at incident electron energies of 10.1 and 20.1 eV to the first five excited electronic states of formaldehyde lying at and below the 1B2 state at 7.10 eV. These excitations include two new transitions in the energy-loss range 5.6-6.2 eV and 6.7-7.0 eV which have been detected for the first time, either through electron-impact excitation or photon absorption. The differential cross sections of these new excitations are given at scattering angles between 15 and 135 deg. These cross-section ratios peak at large scattering angles - a characteristic of triplet - singlet excitations. The design and performance of the electron-impact spectrometer used in the above observations is outlined and discussed.

  19. Theoretical and experimental investigations of electron emission in C 6+ + H 2O collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Cappello, C.; Champion, C.; Boudrioua, O.; Lekadir, H.; Sato, Y.; Ohsawa, D.

    2009-03-01

    Theoretical differential and total cross sections for the direct ionization process of water vapour by 6 MeV/u C 6+ ions are compared to new experimental measurements performed by the dedicated apparatus already used for measuring the energy and angular distributions of secondary electrons emitted from water vapour by fast heavy-ion impact [D. Ohsawa, H. Kawauchi, M. Hirabayashi, Y. Okada, T. Homma, A. Higashi, S. Amano, Y. Hashimoto, F. Soga, Y. Sato, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 227 (2005) 431]. In the present work, ab initio calculations have been carried out in the first Born approximation by using an accurate molecular wave function for describing the initial bound state of the target. The calculated cross sections exhibit good agreement with the present experimental measurements and compare relatively well to the existing semi-empirical results over the entire angular and energy ranges investigated here. Free from any adjustable parameter, the proposed theoretical approach describes in detail the complete kinematics of the water molecule ionization process by highly energetic carbon ions, and could therefore be easily used for modelling the heavy charged-particle transport in the biological matter.

  20. Metastable Oxygen Production by Electron-Impact of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, J. D.; Malone, C. P.; Kanik, I.; Johnson, P. V.

    2013-12-01

    Electron-impact excitation processes involving atomic and molecular oxygen are important in atmospheric interactions. The production of long-lived metastable O(1S) and O(1D) through electron impact of atomic O and molecular O2 play a significant role in the dynamics of oxygen-containing atmospheres (Earth, Europa, Io). Emissions from metastable O (1S → 1D) produce the well-recognized green light from terrestrial aurora. Electron-impact excitation to 1S and 1D are sensitive channels for determining energy partitioning and dynamics from space weather. Electron-impact excitation cross sections determined through fundamental experimental studies are necessary for modeling of natural phenomena and observation data. The detection of metastable states in laboratory experiments requires a novel approach, since typical detection techniques (e.g., fluorescence by radiative de-excitation) cannot be performed due to the long-lived nature of the excited species. In this work, metastable O is incident on a cryogenically cooled rare gas matrix, where excimer production and subsequent rapid radiative de-excitation provides measurable signal that is directly related to the originating electron-impact excitation process.

  1. Influence of electron-electron collisions on the propagation of ion-acoustic space-charge waves in a warm plasma waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-04-01

    The influence of electron–electron collisions on the propagation of the ion-acoustic space-charge wave is investigated in a cylindrical waveguide filled with warm collisional plasma by employing the normal mode analysis and the method of separation of variables. It is shown that the frequency of the ion-acoustic space-charge wave with higher-harmonic modes is always smaller than that with lower-harmonic modes, especially in intermediate wave number domains. It is also shown that the collisional damping rate of the ion-acoustic space-charge wave due to the electron–electron collision effect with higher-harmonic modes is smaller than that with lower-harmonic modes. In addition, it is found that the maximum position of the collisional damping rate shifts to large wave numbers with an increase of the harmonic mode. The variation of the wave frequency and the collisional damping rate of the ion-acoustic space-charge wave is also discussed.

  2. Measurement of single electrons and implications for charm production in Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-05-13

    Transverse momentum spectra of electrons from Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV have been measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The spectra show an excess above the background from photon conversions and light hadron decays. The electron signal is consistent with that expected from semileptonic decays of charm. The yield of the electron signal dN(e)/dy for p(T) > 0.8 GeV/c is 0.025+/-0.004(stat)+/-0.010(syst) in central collisions, and the corresponding charm cross section is 380+/-60(stat)+/-200(syst) microb per binary nucleon-nucleon collision.

  3. Electric dipole excitation of 208Pb by polarized electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.; Ponomarev, V. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The cross sections and spin asymmetries for the excitation of 1- states in 208Pb by transversely polarized electrons with collision energy of 30-180MeV have been examined within the DWBA scattering formalism. As examples, we have considered a low-lying 1- state and also states belonging to the pygmy dipole and giant dipole resonances. The structure of these states and their corresponding transition charge and current densities have been taken from an RPA calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. The complex-plane rotation method has been applied to achieve the convergence of the radial DWBA integrals for backward scattering. We have studied the behaviour of the cross sections and spin asymmetries as a function of electron energy and scattering angle. The role of the longitudinal and transversal contributions to the excitation has been thoroughly studied. We conclude that the spin asymmetry S, related to unpolarized outgoing electrons, is mostly well below 1% even at the backward scattering angles and its measurement provides a challenge for future experiments with polarized electrons.

  4. Electronic excited states of CO/sub 2/: An electron impact investigation

    SciTech Connect

    McDiarmid, R.; Doering, J.P.

    1984-01-15

    The electronic excited states of CO/sub 2/ were restudied by variable incident energy, variable angle electron impact spectroscopy. In this study, valence states of mixed configurations were distinguished from pure Rydberg states. Our results are incompatible with the theoretical description of CO/sub 2/, in which only two valence singlet states are located.

  5. Evaluation of Severity Score in Patients with Lower Limb and Pelvic Fractures Injured in Motor Vehicle Front-Impact Collisions.

    PubMed

    Gokalp, Mehmet Ata; Hekimoglu, Yavuz; Gozen, Abdurrahim; Guner, Savas; Asirdizer, Mahmut

    2016-12-01

    BACKGROUND Lower limb and pelvic injuries and fractures occur at a very high incidence in motor vehicle accidents. In this study, the characteristics (e.g., body side, bone location, and fracture severity) of lower limb and pelvic fractures that occurred during front-impact collisions were correlated with the injured patients' sex, age, and position in the vehicle. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively evaluated 191 patients (136 males, 55 females) who were injured in motor vehicle accidents, specifically in frontal collisions. RESULTS This study revealed that most of lower limb and pelvic fractures occurred in males (71.2%; p=.000), 19-36 years old (55.5%; p=.000), small vehicles (86.4%; p=.000), and rear seat passengers (49.2%; p=.000). Fractures most commonly occurred in the left side of the body (46.6%; p=.000) and upper legs (37.7%; p=.000). Severity scores were higher (2.76) in males than females (2.07). No statistically significant was found in severity scores of patients and other personal characteristics and fracture features of patients with lower limb and pelvic fractures who were injured in a vehicle during front-impact collisions (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS The results of this study will be useful for the automobile industry, forensics and criminal scientists, and for trauma research studies.

  6. Evaluation of Severity Score in Patients with Lower Limb and Pelvic Fractures Injured in Motor Vehicle Front-Impact Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Gokalp, Mehmet Ata; Hekimoglu, Yavuz; Gozen, Abdurrahim; Guner, Savas; Asirdizer, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Lower limb and pelvic injuries and fractures occur at a very high incidence in motor vehicle accidents. In this study, the characteristics (e.g., body side, bone location, and fracture severity) of lower limb and pelvic fractures that occurred during front-impact collisions were correlated with the injured patients’ sex, age, and position in the vehicle. Material/Methods We retrospectively evaluated 191 patients (136 males, 55 females) who were injured in motor vehicle accidents, specifically in frontal collisions. Results This study revealed that most of lower limb and pelvic fractures occurred in males (71.2%; p=.000), 19–36 years old (55.5%; p=.000), small vehicles (86.4%; p=.000), and rear seat passengers (49.2%; p=.000). Fractures most commonly occurred in the left side of the body (46.6%; p=.000) and upper legs (37.7%; p=.000). Severity scores were higher (2.76) in males than females (2.07). No statistically significant was found in severity scores of patients and other personal characteristics and fracture features of patients with lower limb and pelvic fractures who were injured in a vehicle during front-impact collisions (p>0.05). Conclusions The results of this study will be useful for the automobile industry, forensics and criminal scientists, and for trauma research studies. PMID:27905350

  7. An electrophysiological study of the impact of a Forward Collision Warning System in a simulator driving task.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Mercedes; Fabrigoule, Colette; Deleurence, Philippe; Ndiaye, Daniel; Fort, Alexandra

    2012-08-27

    Driver distraction has been identified as the most important contributing factor in rear-end collisions. In this context, Forward Collision Warning Systems (FCWS) have been developed specifically to warn drivers of potential rear-end collisions. The main objective of this work is to evaluate the impact of a surrogate FCWS and of its reliability according to the driver's attentional state by recording both behavioral and electrophysiological data. Participants drove following a lead motorcycle in a simplified simulator with or without a warning system which gave forewarning of the preceding vehicle braking. Participants had to perform this driving task either alone (simple task) or simultaneously with a secondary cognitive task (dual task). Behavioral and electrophysiological data contributed to revealing a positive effect of the warning system. Participants were faster in detecting the brake light when the system was perfect or imperfect, and the time and attentional resources allocation required for processing the target at higher cognitive level were reduced when the system was completely reliable. When both tasks were performed simultaneously, warning effectiveness was considerably affected at both performance and neural levels; however, the analysis of the brain activity revealed fewer differences between distracted and undistracted drivers when using the warning system. These results show that electrophysiological data could be a valuable tool to complement behavioral data and to have a better understanding of how these systems impact the driver.

  8. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Romarly F; de Oliveira, Eliane M; Bettega, Márcio H F; Varella, Márcio T do N; Jones, Darryl B; Brunger, Michael J; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Lima, Marco A P

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C6H5OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the Nopen-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  9. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  10. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms II. Low-energy program using the method of the exterior complex scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    While collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms pose a well studied and in some sense closed problem, there is still no free computer code ready for “production use”, that would enable applied researchers to generate necessary data for arbitrary impact energies and scattering transitions directly if absent in on-line scattering databases. This is the second article on the Hex program package, which describes a new computer code that is, with a little setup, capable of solving the scattering equations for energies ranging from a fraction of the ionization threshold to approximately 100 eV or more, depending on the available computational resources. The program implements the exterior complex scaling method in the B-spline basis. Catalogue identifier: AETI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AETI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 440 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 643 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++11. Computer: Any. Operating system: Any system with a C++11 compiler (e.g. GCC 4.8.1; tested on OpenSUSE 13.1 and Windows 8). Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Parallelized by OpenMP and MPI. RAM: Depending on input; 4.9 GiB for the test run. Classification: 2.4. External routines: GSL [1], HDF5 [2], UMFPACK [3], FFTW3 [4], optionally with OpenBLAS [5]. Nature of problem: Solution of the two-particle Schrödinger equation in central field. Solution method: The two-electron states are expanded into angular momentum eigenstates, which gives rise to the coupled bi-radial equations. The bi-radially dependent solution is then represented in a B-spline basis, which transforms the set of equations into a large matrix equation in this basis. The boundary condition

  11. Electron-impact detachment and dissociation of C4- ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Padellec, A.; Rabilloud, F.; Pegg, D.; Neau, A.; Hellberg, F.; Thomas, R.; Schmidt, H. T.; Larsson, M.; Danared, H.; Källberg, A.; Andersson, K.; Hanstorp, D.

    2001-12-01

    CRYRING was used to study collision processes between an electron and a negative ion cluster C4-. The total detachment cross sections for the production of the neutral 4C, 3C, 2C, and C fragments were measured. The cross sections for pure detachment, and for detachment plus dissociation leading to the production of C3+C, 2C2, and C2+2C were extracted using a grid. It was found that the pure detachment process overwhelmingly dominates all other fragmentation processes. The threshold location for the detachment channel is found to be around 6.0 eV. Although the doubly charged negative ion C42- has received little previous attention, a defined near-threshold resonance observed in the detachment cross section curve, has been associated with the short-lived state C42- (0.7 fs lifetime).

  12. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, H. V.; Do, T. P. T.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  13. Resonant vibrational excitation of adsorbed molecules by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djamo, V.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1993-11-01

    The vibrational excitation of N2 molecules adsorbed on a silver surface by low energy electron impact is studied within the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The process involves the formation of a transient negative molecular ion. The results account well for the observations of Demuth and co-workers. They also reveal that most of the vibrational excitation corresponds to electrons scattered into the metal and thus unobservable in a scattering experiment.

  14. Calculation of electron-impact ionization of potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2009-11-01

    We calculate electron-impact ionization of potassium at a broad range of energies for the case where it is the valence electron that is ejected. The convergent close-coupling method is used to calculate the total and fully differential cross sections. The unusual shape of the total ionization spin asymmetries measured by Baum et al. [1] is explained. However, agreement with the fully differential cross section measurements of Murray [2] is somewhat mixed.

  15. R-matrix electron-impact excitation data for astrophysically abundant sulphur ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G. Y.; Badnell, N. R.; Zhao, G.; Zhong, J. Y.; Wang, F. L.

    2011-09-01

    We present results for the electron-impact excitation of highly-charged sulphur ions (S8+-S11+) obtained using the intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix approach. A detailed comparison of the target structure has been made for the four ions to assess the uncertainty on collision strengths from the target structure. Effective collision strengths (Υs) are presented at temperatures ranging from 2 × 102(z + 1)2 K to 2 × 106(z + 1)2 K (where z is the residual charge of ions). Detailed comparisons for the Υs are made with the results of previous calculations for these ions, which will pose insight on the uncertainty in their usage by astrophysical and fusion modelling codes. Data are available in the archives of APAP via http://www.apap-network.org, and OPEN-ADAS via http://open.adas.ac.uk. Data and full Tables 5 and 6 are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/533/A87

  16. MEASURING NEBULAR TEMPERATURES: THE EFFECT OF NEW COLLISION STRENGTHS WITH EQUILIBRIUM AND {kappa}-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRON ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Palay, Ethan

    2013-08-15

    In this paper we develop tools for observers to use when analyzing nebular spectra for temperatures and metallicities, with two goals: to present a new, simple method to calculate equilibrium electron temperatures for collisionally excited line flux ratios, using the latest atomic data; and to adapt current methods to include the effects of possible non-equilibrium ''{kappa}'' electron energy distributions. Adopting recent collision strength data for [O III], [S III], [O II], [S II], and [N II], we find that existing methods based on older atomic data seriously overestimate the electron temperatures, even when considering purely Maxwellian statistics. If {kappa} distributions exist in H II regions and planetary nebulae as they do in solar system plasmas, it is important to investigate the observational consequences. This paper continues our previous work on the {kappa} distribution. We present simple formulaic methods that allow observers to (1) measure equilibrium electron temperatures and atomic abundances using the latest atomic data, and (2) to apply simple corrections to existing equilibrium analysis techniques to allow for possible non-equilibrium effects. These tools should lead to better consistency in temperature and abundance measurements, and a clearer understanding of the physics of H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  17. Electron-Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that secondary electrons play an important role in radiation damage to humans. Particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. Our study of electron-impact ionization of DNA fragments uses the improved binary-encounter dipole model and covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3(sup prime)- and C5 (sup prime)-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. Investigation of tandem double lesion initiated by electron-impact dissociative ionization of guanine, followed by proton reaction with the cytosine in the Watson-Crick pair, is currently being studied to see if tandem double lesion can be initiated by electron impact. Up to now only OH-induced tandem double lesion has been studied.

  18. Electron impact ionization of the gas-phase sorbitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, Irina; Markush, Pavlo; Zavilopulo, Anatoly; Shpenik, Otto

    2015-03-01

    Ionization and dissociative ionization of the sorbitol molecule by electron impact have been studied using two different experimental methods. In the mass range of m/ z = 10-190, the mass spectra of sorbitol were recorded at the ionizing electron energies of 70 and 30 eV. The ion yield curves for the fragment ions have been analyzed and the appearance energies of these ions have been determined. The relative total ionization cross section of the sorbitol molecule was measured using monoenergetic electron beam. Possible fragmentation pathways for the sorbitol molecule were proposed.

  19. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  20. Centrality dependence of charm production from a measurement of single electrons in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-03-04

    The PHENIX experiment has measured midrapidity transverse momentum spectra (0.4electrons as a function of centrality in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. Contributions from photon conversions and Dalitz decays of light neutral mesons are measured by introducing a thin (1.7% X0) converter into the PHENIX acceptance and are statistically removed. The subtracted nonphotonic electron spectra are primarily due to the semileptonic decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, mainly charm at lower p(T). For all centralities, the charm production cross section is found to scale with the nuclear overlap function, T(AA). For minimum-bias collisions the charm cross section per binary collision is N(cc )/T(AA)=622+/-57(stat)+/-160(syst) microb.

  1. Precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.E.; SLD Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    A precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry (A{sub LR}) for Z boson production by e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions has been attained at the Slac Linear Collider with the SLD detector. We describe this measurement for the 1993 data run, emphasizing the significant improvements in polarized beam operation which took place for this run, where the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization averaged 62.6 {plus_minus} 1.2 %. Preliminary 1993 results for A{sub LR} are presented. When combined with the (less precise) 1992 result, the preliminary result for the effective weak mixing angle is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W {sup eff}} = 0.2290 {plus_minus} 0.0010.

  2. Fragmentation dynamics of CO(2)(3+) investigated by multiple electron capture in collisions with slow highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Neumann, N; Hant, D; Schmidt, L Ph H; Titze, J; Jahnke, T; Czasch, A; Schöffler, M S; Kreidi, K; Jagutzki, O; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Dörner, R

    2010-03-12

    Fragmentation of highly charged molecular ions or clusters consisting of more than two atoms can proceed in a one step synchronous manner where all bonds break simultaneously or sequentially by emitting one ion after the other. We separated these decay channels for the fragmentation of CO(2)(3+) ions by measuring the momenta of the ionic fragments. We show that the total energy deposited in the molecular ion is a control parameter which switches between three distinct fragmentation pathways: the sequential fragmentation in which the emission of an O(+) ion leaves a rotating CO(2+) ion behind that fragments after a time delay, the Coulomb explosion and an in-between fragmentation--the asynchronous dissociation. These mechanisms are directly distinguishable in Dalitz plots and Newton diagrams of the fragment momenta. The CO(2)(3+) ions are produced by multiple electron capture in collisions with 3.2 keV/u Ar(8+) ions.

  3. Photoionization of Co+ and electron-impact excitation of Co2 + using the Dirac R-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyndall, N. B.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Ballance, C. P.; Hibbert, A.

    2016-11-01

    Modelling of massive stars and supernovae (SNe) plays a crucial role in understanding galaxies. From this modelling we can derive fundamental constraints on stellar evolution, mass-loss processes, mixing, and the products of nucleosynthesis. Proper account must be taken of all important processes that populate and depopulate the levels (collisional excitation, de-excitation, ionization, recombination, photoionization, bound-bound processes). For the analysis of Type Ia SNe and core collapse SNe (Types Ib, Ic and II) Fe group elements are particularly important. Unfortunately little data is currently available and most noticeably absent are the photoionization cross-sections for the Fe-peaks which have high abundances in SNe. Important interactions for both photoionization and electron-impact excitation are calculated using the relativistic Dirac atomic R-matrix codes (DARC) for low-ionization stages of Cobalt. All results are calculated up to photon energies of 45 eV and electron energies up to 20 eV. The wavefunction representation of Co III has been generated using GRASP0 by including the dominant 3d7, 3d6[4s, 4p], 3p43d9 and 3p63d9 configurations, resulting in 292 fine structure levels. Electron-impact collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths across a wide range of astrophysically relevant temperatures are computed for Co III. In addition, statistically weighted level-resolved ground and metastable photoionization cross-sections are presented for Co II and compared directly with existing work.

  4. Electron impact excitation coefficients for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J.; Kepple, P. C.; Blaha, M.

    1976-01-01

    Electron impact excitation rate coefficients have been obtained for a number of transitions in highly ionized ions of interest to astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The calculations were done using the method of distorted waves. Results are presented for various transitions in highly ionized Ne, Na, Al, Si, A, Ca, Ni and Fe.

  5. Low impact to fixed cell processing aiming transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Ortrud Monika; da Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes; Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    In cell culture, cell structures suffer strong impact due to centrifugation during processing for electron microscope observation. In order to minimise this effect, a new protocol was successfully developed. Using conventional reagents and equipments, it took over one week, but cell compression was reduced to none or the lowest deformation possible. PMID:27276186

  6. High-Energy Electron-Ion and Photon-Ion Collisions: Status and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-LTE plasmas are ubiquitous in objects studied in the UV and X-ray energy bands. Collisional and photoionization cross sections for atoms and ions are fundamental to our ability to model such plasmas. Modeling is key in the X-ray band, where detector properties and limited spectral resolution limit the ability to measure model-independent line strengths, or other spectral features. Much of the motivation for studying such collisions and many of the tools, are not new. However, the motivation for such studies and their applications, have been affected by the advent of X-ray spectroscopy with the gratings on Chandra and XMM-Newton. In this talk I will review this motivation and describe the tools currently in use for such studies. I will also describe some current unresolved problems and the likely future needs for such data.

  7. Tetrapositive plutonium, neptunium, uranium, and thorium coordination complexes: chemistry revealed by electron transfer and collision induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K

    2014-04-17

    The Pu(4+), Np(4+), and U(4+) ions, which have large electron affinities of ∼34.6, ∼33.6, and ∼32.6 eV, respectively, were stabilized from solution to the gas phase upon coordination by three neutral tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide ligands (TMOGA). Both collision induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) reveal the propensity for reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III), by loss of TMOGA(+) in CID and by simple electron transfer in ETD. The reduction of Pu(IV) is in distinct contrast to retention of Th(IV) in both CID and ETD of Th(TMOGA)3(4+), where only the C-Oether bond cleavage product was observed. U(TMOGA)3(4+) behaves similarly to Th(TMOGA)3(4+) upon CID and ETD, while the fragmentation patterns of Np(TMOGA)3(4+) lie between those of Pu(TMOGA)3(4+) and U(TMOGA)3(4+). It is notable that the gas-phase fragmentation behaviors of these exceptional tetrapositive complexes parallel fundamental differences in condensed phase chemistry within the actinide series, specifically the tendency for reduction from the IV to III oxidation states.

  8. Total electron loss, charge transfer, and ionization in proton-hydrogen collisions at 10-100 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołakowska, A.; Pindzola, M. S.; Schultz, D. R.

    1999-05-01

    A three-dimensional lattice solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for low quantum states (n<=3) is combined with classical trajectory Monte Carlo results for high quantum states (n>=4) to predict total electron loss and total charge-transfer cross sections for proton collisions with atomic hydrogen at intermediate energies. The total charge-transfer cross sections range from 5% above to 10% below the furnace target measurements of McClure [Phys. Rev. 148, 47 (1966)], while the total electron-loss cross sections range from 5% to 15% above the pulsed crossed-beams measurements of Shah, Elliot, and Gilbody [J. Phys. B 20, 3501 (1987)]. The calculation of ionization as a difference between electron loss and charge transfer leads to theoretical ionization cross sections that are 10% to 35% larger than the crossed-beams measurements of Shah and Gilbody [J. Phys. B 14, 2361 (1981)] and Shah, Elliott, and Gilbody [J. Phys. B 20, 2481 (1987)].

  9. Electron-impact excitation of the low-lying electronic states of HCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Tanaka, H.; Srivastava, S. K.; Wicke, B. G.

    1977-01-01

    The first study of the low-energy electron-impact excitation of low-lying electronic transitions in the HCN molecule is reported. Measurements were made at incident electron energies of 11.6 and 21.6 eV in the energy-loss range of 3-10 eV, and at scattering angles of 20-130 deg. Inelastic scattering spectra were placed on the absolute cross-section scale by determining first the ratio of inelastic-to-elastic scattering cross sections, and then separately measuring the absolute elastic scattering cross section. Several new electronic transitions are observed which are intrinsically overlapped in the molecule itself. Assignments of these electronic transitions are suggested. These assignments are based on present spectroscopic and cross-sections measurements, high-energy electron scattering spectra, optical absorption spectra, and ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  10. Final Report for "Accurate Numerical Models of the Secondary Electron Yield from Grazing-incidence Collisions".

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2008-10-21

    Effects of stray electrons are a main factor limiting performance of many accelerators. Because heavy-ion fusion (HIF) accelerators will operate in regimes of higher current and with walls much closer to the beam than accelerators operating today, stray electrons might have a large, detrimental effect on the performance of an HIF accelerator. A primary source of stray electrons is electrons generated when halo ions strike the beam pipe walls. There is some research on these types of secondary electrons for the HIF community to draw upon, but this work is missing one crucial ingredient: the effect of grazing incidence. The overall goal of this project was to develop the numerical tools necessary to accurately model the effect of grazing incidence on the behavior of halo ions in a HIF accelerator, and further, to provide accurate models of heavy ion stopping powers with applications to ICF, WDM, and HEDP experiments.

  11. Nanoparticle-electrode collision processes: The electroplating of bulk cadmium on impacting silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi-Ge; Rees, Neil V.; Compton, Richard G.

    2011-08-01

    We report, for the first time, the bulk deposition (electroplating) of a metal onto nanoparticles during collisions with an inert electrode surface. Experiments show that for silver nanoparticles, multiple layers of Cd atoms can be electroplated onto the AgNPs from aqueous Cd 2+ during collisions with a glassy carbon electrode held at a suitably reducing potential, and an average of 19 atomic layers of cadmium are found to be deposited in the few milliseconds that the NP is in contact with the electrode. For comparison, results are also presented for the underpotential deposition of Cd onto AgNPs under similar conditions.

  12. Impact Collision Ion Scattering Spectroscopy Applied to the Determination of Atomic Surface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Richard Stephen

    1990-08-01

    The technique of impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) was used to investigate the atomic structure and low energy ion scattering dynamics from various surfaces. A new formalism for calculating the three-dimensional cross section for an ion to scatter sequentially and classically from two atoms has been developed. This method can be used to assist in the interpretation of ICISS data in terms of quantitative surface-structure models. Shadowing and blocking effects for energetic ions scattering from more than one atom are shown to be special cases of rainbow scattering. Even at keV energies and above, the cross section at the critical angle for scattering must be evaluated by quantum or semi-classical means to avoid the singularity in the classically calculated cross sections. In an ICISS investigation of the Ag(110) surface, a surface flux peak analysis demonstrated that the surface was not a complete monolayer, but rather contained 10-15% random vacancies. Subsurface Li^+ scattering results confirmed the oscillatory relaxation of the first two atomic layers of the surface, with Delta_{12} = -7.5% and Delta_{23} = 4.0%. Modeling of the neutralization mechanism for the He^+ scattering gave a best fit time-dependent Auger neutralization time constant of 0.84 +/- 0.08 fs. A neutralization study of 5 keV He^+ ions scattered from Au adatoms on the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt {3}-Au surface showed the He^+ ICISS data contained false shadowing features that were actually the result of local neutralization effects. Good agreement was obtained for a radially dependent ion-atom neutralization theory with rate R = Aexp (-ar) , where A and a are 15.5 fs^{ -1} and 1.94 A^{-1} , respectively. A detailed examination of the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt{3 })-Ag surface was also made. The 5 keV Li ^+ ICISS data gave evidence for Ag island formation at single monolayer coverages of silver, while the LEED, AES and LEIS data showed that at relatively high coverages of Ag (35 ML

  13. First-principles investigation of the dissociation and coupling of methane on small copper clusters: Interplay of collision dynamics and geometric and electronic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Jithin J.; Mushrif, Samir H.

    2015-05-01

    Small metal clusters exhibit unique size and morphology dependent catalytic activity. The search for alternate minimum energy pathways and catalysts to transform methane to more useful chemicals and carbon nanomaterials led us to investigate collision induced dissociation of methane on small Cu clusters. We report here for the first time, the free energy barriers for the collision induced activation, dissociation, and coupling of methane on small Cu clusters (Cun where n = 2-12) using ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations. The collision induced activation of the stretching and bending vibrations of methane significantly reduces the free energy barrier for its dissociation. Increase in the cluster size reduces the barrier for dissociation of methane due to the corresponding increase in delocalisation of electron density within the cluster, as demonstrated using the electron localisation function topology analysis. This enables higher probability of favourable alignment of the C-H stretching vibration of methane towards regions of high electron density within the cluster and makes higher number of sites available for the chemisorption of CH3 and H upon dissociation. These characteristics contribute in lowering the barrier for dissociation of methane. Distortion and reorganisation of cluster geometry due to high temperature collision dynamics disturb electron delocalisation within them and increase the barrier for dissociation. Coupling reactions of CHx (x = 1-3) species and recombination of H with CHx have free energy barriers significantly lower than complete dehydrogenation of methane to carbon. Thus, competition favours the former reactions at high hydrogen saturation on the clusters.

  14. Identifying drug metallation sites on peptides using electron transfer dissociation (ETD), collision induced dissociation (CID) and ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS).

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan P; Brown, Jeffery M; Campuzano, Iain; Sadler, Peter J

    2010-08-14

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision induced dissociation (CID) have been used to locate the precise binding sites for platinum and ruthenium anticancer complexes on the peptide Substance P. We show that ETD combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry significantly reduces mass spectral complexity and improves the S/N of the product-ions formed.

  15. Electron-impact excitation and ionization of boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    We present a comprehensive study of electron collisions with neutral boron atoms. The calculations were performed with the B-Spline R-matrix (close-coupling) method, by employing a parallelized version of the associated computer code. Elastic, momentum-transfer, excitation, and ionization cross sections were obtained for all transitions involving the lowest 11 states of boron, for incident electron energies ranging from threshold to 100 eV. A multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with non-orthogonal term-dependent orbitals was used to generate accurate wavefunctions for the target states. Close-coupling expansions including 13, 51, and 999 physical and pseudo-states were set up to check the sensitivity of the predictions to variations in the theoretical model. The cross-section dataset generated in this work is expected to be the most accurate one available today and should be sufficiently comprehensive for most modeling applications involving neutral boron. Work supported by the China Scholarship Council and the United States National Science Foundation under grants PHY-1403245 and PHY-1520970, and by the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031.

  16. Calculations for electron-impact excitation and ionization of beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2016-12-01

    The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium over an energy range from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with other available results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudostate and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a prominent shape resonance. The ionization from the {(2s2p)}3P and {(2s2p)}1P states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set of electron scattering data for neutral beryllium, which should be sufficient for most modeling applications.

  17. Electron performance measurements with the ATLAS detector using the 2010 LHC proton-proton collision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. 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Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2012-03-01

    Detailed measurements of the electron performance of the ATLAS detector at the LHC are reported, using decays of the Z, W and J/ ψ particles. Data collected in 2010 at sqrt{s}=7{ TeV} are used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of almost 40 pb-1. The inter-alignment of the inner detector and the electromagnetic calorimeter, the determination of the electron energy scale and resolution, and the performance in terms of response uniformity and linearity are discussed. The electron identification, reconstruction and trigger efficiencies, as well as the charge misidentification probability, are also presented.

  18. Review of electron impact excitation cross sections for copper atom

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, N.W.; Hazi, A.U.

    1982-02-01

    Excitation of atomic copper by electron impact plays an important role in the copper vapor laser and accurate cross sections are needed for understanding and modeling laser performance. During the past seven years, there have been several attempts to normalize the relative elastic and inelastic cross sections measured by Trajmar and coworkers. However, each of these efforts have yielded different cross sections, and the uncertainty in the correct normalization of the data has been a source of confusion and concern for the kinetic modeling efforts. This difficulty has motivated us to review previous work on the electron impact excitation of copper atom and to perform new calculations of the inelastic cross sections using the impact parameter method. In this memorandum we review the previous attempts to normalize the experimental data and provide a critical assessment of the accuracy of the resulting cross sections. We also present new theoretical cross sections for the electron impact excitation of the /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/P/sup 0/ and /sup 2/S ..-->.. /sup 2/D transitions in copper. When the experimental cross sections are renormalized to the results of the impact parameter calculations, they are a factor of three smaller than those published in the latest paper of Trajmar et. al. At impact energies above 60 eV the excitation cross sections obtained with the impact parameter method agree well with the results of the very recent, unpublished, close-coupling calculations of Henry. This agreement suggests that the present normalization of the experimental cross sections is probably the most reliable one obtained to date.

  19. Semirelativistic model for ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.; Manaut, B.

    2005-06-01

    We present a semirelativistic model for the description of the ionization process of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the first Born approximation by using the Darwin wave function to describe the bound state of atomic hydrogen and the Sommerfeld-Maue wave function to describe the ejected electron. This model, accurate to first order in Z/c in the relativistic correction, shows that, even at low kinetic energies of the incident electron, spin effects are small but not negligible. These effects become noticeable with increasing incident electron energies. All analytical calculations are exact and our semirelativistic results are compared with the results obtained in the nonrelativistic Coulomb Born approximation both for the coplanar asymmetric and the binary coplanar geometries.

  20. Semirelativistic model for ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Taj, S.; Manaut, B.

    2005-06-15

    We present a semirelativistic model for the description of the ionization process of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the first Born approximation by using the Darwin wave function to describe the bound state of atomic hydrogen and the Sommerfeld-Maue wave function to describe the ejected electron. This model, accurate to first order in Z/c in the relativistic correction, shows that, even at low kinetic energies of the incident electron, spin effects are small but not negligible. These effects become noticeable with increasing incident electron energies. All analytical calculations are exact and our semirelativistic results are compared with the results obtained in the nonrelativistic Coulomb Born approximation both for the coplanar asymmetric and the binary coplanar geometries.

  1. Measurement of the di-electron mass spectrum in 12C+12C collisions at 2 AGeV by HADES

    SciTech Connect

    Sudol, Malgorzata

    2006-07-11

    The High Acceptance DiElectron Spectrometer (HADES) has been constructed at the SIS accelerator (GSI, Darmstadt) to investigate electron-positron pairs produced in proton, pion and heavy-ion induced reactions. The physics programme of HADES is focused on in-medium properties of light vector mesons. In this contribution the HADES experiment is outlined and first results obtained for 12C + 12C collisions at 2 AGeV are presented.

  2. A Probabilistic Model for Hydrokinetic Turbine Collision Risks: Exploring Impacts on Fish

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Linus; Eggertsen, Linda; Andersson, Sandra; Ehnberg, Jimmy; Arvidsson, Rickard; Gullström, Martin; Molander, Sverker

    2015-01-01

    A variety of hydrokinetic turbines are currently under development for power generation in rivers, tidal straits and ocean currents. Because some of these turbines are large, with rapidly moving rotor blades, the risk of collision with aquatic animals has been brought to attention. The behavior and fate of animals that approach such large hydrokinetic turbines have not yet been monitored at any detail. In this paper, we conduct a synthesis of the current knowledge and understanding of hydrokinetic turbine collision risks. The outcome is a generic fault tree based probabilistic model suitable for estimating population-level ecological risks. New video-based data on fish behavior in strong currents are provided and models describing fish avoidance behaviors are presented. The findings indicate low risk for small-sized fish. However, at large turbines (≥5 m), bigger fish seem to have high probability of collision, mostly because rotor detection and avoidance is difficult in low visibility. Risks can therefore be substantial for vulnerable populations of large-sized fish, which thrive in strong currents. The suggested collision risk model can be applied to different turbine designs and at a variety of locations as basis for case-specific risk assessments. The structure of the model facilitates successive model validation, refinement and application to other organism groups such as marine mammals. PMID:25730314

  3. A probabilistic model for hydrokinetic turbine collision risks: exploring impacts on fish.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Linus; Eggertsen, Linda; Andersson, Sandra; Ehnberg, Jimmy; Arvidsson, Rickard; Gullström, Martin; Molander, Sverker

    2015-01-01

    A variety of hydrokinetic turbines are currently under development for power generation in rivers, tidal straits and ocean currents. Because some of these turbines are large, with rapidly moving rotor blades, the risk of collision with aquatic animals has been brought to attention. The behavior and fate of animals that approach such large hydrokinetic turbines have not yet been monitored at any detail. In this paper, we conduct a synthesis of the current knowledge and understanding of hydrokinetic turbine collision risks. The outcome is a generic fault tree based probabilistic model suitable for estimating population-level ecological risks. New video-based data on fish behavior in strong currents are provided and models describing fish avoidance behaviors are presented. The findings indicate low risk for small-sized fish. However, at large turbines (≥5 m), bigger fish seem to have high probability of collision, mostly because rotor detection and avoidance is difficult in low visibility. Risks can therefore be substantial for vulnerable populations of large-sized fish, which thrive in strong currents. The suggested collision risk model can be applied to different turbine designs and at a variety of locations as basis for case-specific risk assessments. The structure of the model facilitates successive model validation, refinement and application to other organism groups such as marine mammals.

  4. Observation of orientation-dependent electron transfer in molecule–surface collisions

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Nils; Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Christof; Chen, Li; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Molecules typically must point in specific relative directions to participate efficiently in energy transfer and reactions. For example, Förster energy transfer favors specific relative directions of each molecule’s transition dipole [Förster T (1948) Ann Phys 2(1-2):55–75] and electron transfer between gas-phase molecules often depends on the relative orientation of orbitals [Brooks PR, et al. (2007) J Am Chem Soc 129(50):15572–15580]. Surface chemical reactions can be many orders of magnitude faster than their gas-phase analogs, a fact that underscores the importance of surfaces for catalysis. One reason surface reactions can be so fast is the labile change of oxidation state that commonly takes place upon adsorption, a process involving electron transfer between a solid metal and an approaching molecule. By transferring electrons to or from the adsorbate, the process of bond weakening and/or cleavage is initiated, chemically activating the reactant [Yoon B, et al. (2005) Science 307(5708):403–407]. Here, we show that the vibrational relaxation of NO—an example of electronically nonadiabatic energy transfer that is driven by an electron transfer event [Gadzuk JW (1983) J Chem Phys 79(12):6341–6348]—is dramatically enhanced when the molecule approaches an Au(111) surface with the N atom oriented toward the surface. This represents a rare opportunity to investigate the steric influences on an electron transfer reaction happening at a surface. PMID:24127598

  5. Research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hoshing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To consider the research gaps related to the environmental impacts of electronic cigarettes due to their manufacture, use and disposal. Methods Literature searches were conducted through December 2013. Studies were included in this review if they related to the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes. Results Scientific information on the environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing, use and disposal is very limited. No studies formally evaluated the environmental impacts of the manufacturing process or disposal of components, including batteries. Four studies evaluated potential exposure to secondhand e-cigarette aerosol, an indication of impacts on indoor air quality. A 2010 survey of six e-cigarette models found that none of the products provided disposal instructions for spent cartridges containing nicotine. Notably, some e-cigarette manufacturers claim their e-cigarettes are ‘eco-friendly’ or ‘green’, despite the lack of any supporting data or environmental impact studies. Some authors argue that such advertising may boost sales and increase e-cigarette appeal, especially among adolescents. Conclusions Little is known about the environmental impacts of e-cigarettes, and a number of topics could be further elucidated by additional investigation. These topics include potential environmental impacts related to manufacturing, use and disposal. The environmental impacts of e-cigarette manufacturing will depend upon factory size and the nicotine extracting method used. The environmental impacts of e-cigarette use will include chemical and aerosol exposure in the indoor environment. The environmental impacts of disposal of e-cigarette cartridges (which contain residual nicotine) and disposal of e-cigarettes (which contain batteries) represent yet another environmental concern. PMID:24732165

  6. Impact and implications of the Afro-Eurasian collision south of Cyprus from reflection seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, Jennifer; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2014-06-01

    The Cyprus Arc in the Eastern Mediterranean represents the active collision front between the African and Eurasian (Anatolian) Plates. Along the Cyprus Arc, the Eratosthenes Seamount is believed to have been blocking the northward motion of the African Plate since the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. Based on a dense grid of 2D reflection seismic profiles covering the Eratosthenes Seamount and western Levant Basin offshore Cyprus, new observations regarding the Cyprus Arc collision front at the triple transition zone Eratosthenes Seamount-Levant Basin-Hecataeus Rise are presented. The data show that the Levant Basin is filled with ~ 10 km of sediments of Early Mesozoic (probably Jurassic) to Plio-Quaternary age with only a localized deformation affecting the Miocene-Oligocene rock units. The sediments onlap directly against the steep eastern flank of the Eratosthenes Seamount to the west and the southern flank of the Hecataeus Rise to the north. The sediments show no deformation that could be associated with collision and are undeformed even very close to the two prominent structures. Pinching out of the Base Miocene reflector in the Levant Basin due to onlapping of the Middle Miocene reflector indicates uplift of the Eratosthenes Seamount and the Hecataeus Rise. In contrast to the Messinian Evaporites north of the Eratosthenes Seamount, the salt in the Levant Basin, even close to the Hecataeus Rise, is tectonically undeformed. It is proposed that the Eratosthenes Seamount, the western Levant Basin and the Hecataeus Rise act as one tectonic unit. This implies that the collision front is located north of this unit and that the Hecataeus Rise shields the sediments south of it from deformation associated with collision of the African and Anatolian Plates.

  7. International Symposium on Correlation and Polarization in Electron-Atom Collisions Held in Pasadena, California on 1-2 August 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-02

    Collisions With Heavy Atoms 12:15 - 1:30 LUNCH 1:30 - 2:10 p.m. 0. Berger, University of Munster ’Elastic Scattering of Polarized Electrons From Mercury ...scattering of electrons from Hg and Pb. /I/ G.F. Hanne, Comments At. Mol. Phys. 14 (1983) 163 4 ELASTIC SCATTERING OF POLARISED ELECTRONS FROM MERCURY ...parameters S, T and U has been measured at various fixed Lnergies between 25 eV and 350 eV for mercury and xenon. The polarised electrons are produced

  8. On the role of fluctuations, cathode placement, and collisions on the transport of electrons in the near-field of Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. W.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2010-09-01

    The performance of Hall thrusters can be highly sensitive to the position and operational parameters of the external cathode, hinting that the electron transport in the near-field is strongly dependent on the emitted electrons' initial properties. In addition, the plasma plumes of Hall discharges often exhibit fluctuations which are expected to alter electron trajectories. By implementing recent near-field plasma potential measurements made on a low-power Hall thruster in 3D electron-trajectory simulations, it is shown that electron transport from the external cathode to the thruster channel is strongly sensitive to cathode parameters including position, orientation, and electron emission divergence. Periodic, low-frequency (i.e., 25 kHz) plasma potential fluctuations reduce electron transport to the channel of the thruster by more than 65% compared to the transport achieved with static 3D fields and substantially homogenize the electron density distribution. Additional gas-phase collisions are found to have only marginal effects, even when prescribed to occur at exaggerated rates (reaching 10 MHz). The three-dimensionality of the E and B fields, together with electron-wall collisions, appear to be important drivers of cross-field transport in this region of the discharge, yielding sufficient levels of electron transport to the channel without invoking plasma turbulence.

  9. Electron Impact Ionization of He atom using screening potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Hari P.

    2012-06-01

    We will report the results of our investigation on electron impact ionization of helium atom using our extended MCHF method [1] for electron impact ionization of atoms. The initial state wave function will be calculated with both HF and MCHF approximations and the electron correlation between the two final state continuum electrons will be obtained using the screening potential [2-4]. Calculations will be made for triple differential cross sections for 4 eV excess energy sharing equally by the two final state continuum electrons. The results will be presented for all scattering angles and all kinematics. Comparison will be made with available experimental and theoretical data. [4pt] [1] Hari P. Saha, Phys. Rev. A82, 042703 (2010); J.Phys. B44, 065202 (2011).[0pt] [2] M.R.H. Rudge and M.J. Seaton, Proc. Roy. Soc. A293. 262 (1965).[0pt] [3] M.R.H. Rudge, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40, 564 (1968).[0pt] [4] C.Pan and A.F Starace, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 185 (1991); Phys. Rev. A45, 4588 (1992).

  10. Research of the relationship of pedestrian injury to collision speed, car-type, impact location and pedestrian sizes using human FE model (THUMS Version 4).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryosuke; Katsuhara, Tadasuke; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Injuries in car to pedestrian collisions are affected by various factors such as the vehicle body type, pedestrian body size and impact location as well as the collision speed. This study aimed to investigate the influence of such factors taking a Finite Element (FE) approach. A total of 72 collision cases were simulated using three different vehicle FE models (Sedan, SUV, Mini-Van), three different pedestrian FE models (AM50, AF05, AM95), assuming two different impact locations (center and the corner of the bumper) and at four different collision speeds (20, 30, 40 and 50 km/h). The impact kinematics and the responses of the pedestrian model were validated against those in the literature prior to the simulations. The relationship between the collision speed and the predicted occurrence of head and chest injuries was examined for each case, analyzing the impact kinematics of the pedestrian against the vehicle body and resultant loading to the head and the chest. Strain based indicators were used in the simulation model to estimate skeletal injury (bony fracture) and soft tissue (brain and internal organs) injury. The study results primarily showed that the injury risk became higher with the collision speed, but was also affected by the combination of the factors such as the pedestrian size and the impact location. The study also discussed the injury patterns and trends with respect to the factors examined. In all of the simulated conditions, the model did not predict any severe injury at a collision speed of 20 km/h.

  11. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    SciTech Connect

    Do, T. P. T.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au; Jones, D. B. E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  12. Formation and reshuffling of disulfide bonds in bovine serum albumin demonstrated using tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Scherf, Katharina A.; Koehler, Peter; Delcour, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermolysin hydrolyzates of freshly isolated, extensively stored (6 years, 6 °C, dry) and heated (60 min, 90 °C, in excess water) bovine serum albumin (BSA) samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using alternating electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The positions of disulfide bonds and free thiol groups in the different samples were compared to those deduced from the crystal structure of native BSA. Results revealed non-enzymatic posttranslational modifications of cysteine during isolation, extensive dry storage, and heating. Heat-induced extractability loss of BSA was linked to the impact of protein unfolding on the involvement of specific cysteine residues in intermolecular and intramolecular thiol-disulfide interchange and thiol oxidation reactions. The here developed approach holds promise for exploring disulfide bond formation and reshuffling in various proteins under conditions relevant for chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical and food processing. PMID:26193081

  13. Characterization of glycopeptides by combining collision-induced dissociation and electron-transfer dissociation mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Alley, William R; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V

    2009-01-01

    Structural characterization of a glycopeptide is not easily attained through collision-induced dissociation (CID), due to the extensive fragmentation of glycan moieties and minimal fragmentation of peptide backbones. In this study, we have exploited the potential of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) as a complementary approach for peptide fragmentation. Model glycoproteins, including ribonuclease B, fetuin, horseradish peroxidase, and haptoglobin, were used here. In ETD, radical anions transfer an electron to the peptide backbone and induce cleavage of the N-Calpha bond. The glycan moiety is retained on the peptide backbone, being largely unaffected by the ETD process. Accordingly, ETD allows not only the identification of the amino acid sequence of a glycopeptide, but also the unambiguous assignment of its glycosylation site. When data acquired from both fragmentation techniques are combined, it is possible to characterize comprehensively the entire glycopeptide. This is being achieved with a mass spectrometer capable of alternating between CID and ETD on-the-fly during an LC/MS/MS analysis. This is demonstrated here with several tryptic glycopeptides.

  14. Excitation of Meinel and the first negative band system at the collision of electrons and protons with the nitrogen molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Gochitashvili, Malkhaz R.; Lomsadze, Ramaz A.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2010-08-15

    The absolute cross sections for the e-N{sub 2} and p-N{sub 2} collisions for the first negative B{sup 2{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}-X{sup 2{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +} and Meinel A{sup 2{Pi}}{sub u}-X{sup 2{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +} bands have been measured in the energy region of 400-1500 eV for electrons and 0.4-10 keV for protons, respectively. Measurements are performed in the visible spectral region of 400-800 nm by an optical spectroscopy method. The ratio of the cross sections of the Meinel band system to the cross section of the first negative band system (0,0) does not depend on the incident electron energy. The populations of vibrational levels corresponding to A{sup 2{Pi}}{sub u} states are consistent with the Franck-Condon principle. The ratios of the cross sections of (4,1) to (3,0) bands and (5,2) to (3,0) bands exhibit slight dependence on the proton energy. A theoretical estimation within the quasimolecular approximation provides a reasonable description of the total cross section for the first negative band.

  15. Interruption of electronically excited Xe dimer formation by the photoassociation of Xe(6s[3/2]2)-Xe(5p6 1S0) thermal collision pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, T. C.; Wagner, C. J.; Eden, J. G.

    2016-06-01

    The diatomic collisional intermediate responsible for the formation of an electronically excited molecule by teratomic recombination has been observed in both the spectral and temporal domains by laser spectroscopy. We report experiments demonstrating thermal Xe(6s[3/2]2)-Xe(5p6 1S0) atomic collision pairs to be the immediate precursor to the formation of Xe 2∗ ( a 3 Σu + , A 1 Σu +) by the three body process: Xe∗(6s) + 2Xe ⟶ Xe 2∗ + Xe, where the asterisk denotes an excited electronic state. Photoassociating Xe(6s)-Xe atomic pairs by free ⟵ free transitions of the collision complex interrupts the production of the electronically excited Xe dimer, thereby suppressing Xe2 spontaneous emission in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, λ ˜ 172 nm, A 1 Σu + → X 1 Σg +). Intercepting Xe(6s)-Xe pairs before the complex is stabilized by the arrival of the third atom in the teratomic collision process selectively depletes the pair population in a specific Franck-Condon region determined by the probe laser wavelength (λ). Measurements of the variation of VUV emission suppression with λ provide a spectral signature of the [Xe(6s[3/2]2) - Xe(1S0)]∗ complex and map the probe laser wavelength onto the thermal energy (ɛ″) of the incoming collision pairs.

  16. Interruption of electronically excited Xe dimer formation by the photoassociation of Xe(6s[3/2]2)-Xe(5p(6) (1)S0) thermal collision pairs.

    PubMed

    Galvin, T C; Wagner, C J; Eden, J G

    2016-06-28

    The diatomic collisional intermediate responsible for the formation of an electronically excited molecule by teratomic recombination has been observed in both the spectral and temporal domains by laser spectroscopy. We report experiments demonstrating thermal Xe(6s[3/2]2)-Xe(5p(6) (1)S0) atomic collision pairs to be the immediate precursor to the formation of Xe2 (∗)(a(3)Σu (+),A(1)Σu (+)) by the three body process: Xe(∗)(6s) + 2Xe ⟶ Xe2 (∗) + Xe, where the asterisk denotes an excited electronic state. Photoassociating Xe(6s)-Xe atomic pairs by free ⟵ free transitions of the collision complex interrupts the production of the electronically excited Xe dimer, thereby suppressing Xe2 spontaneous emission in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, λ ∼ 172 nm, A(1)Σu (+)→X(1)Σg (+)). Intercepting Xe(6s)-Xe pairs before the complex is stabilized by the arrival of the third atom in the teratomic collision process selectively depletes the pair population in a specific Franck-Condon region determined by the probe laser wavelength (λ). Measurements of the variation of VUV emission suppression with λ provide a spectral signature of the [Xe(6s[3/2]2) - Xe((1)S0)](∗) complex and map the probe laser wavelength onto the thermal energy (ϵ″) of the incoming collision pairs.

  17. Low energy electron collisions in H2S and H2Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouaf, Robert; Teillet-Billy, Dominique

    2008-11-01

    Dissociative electron attachment between 0 and 4 eV has been investigated in hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen selenide with an improved electron resolution (0.040 eV). HS- and HSe- cross-sections versus electron energy present vertical onsets revealing that the potential surfaces of the resonances which are reached around 2 eV are bound. A well-developed and intriguing structure is observed in HS-, S-, HSe- and Se- cross-sections. It could reveal interferences due to an attractive resonance having a lifetime of the order of one vibrational period. The strong similarity between the anion behaviour in H2S and H2Se is in contrast with H2O where no dissociative attachment process occurs in this energy range.

  18. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regeta, K.; Allan, M.

    2015-05-01

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π∗ orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  19. Two-dimensional spectra of electron collisions with acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile reveal nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Regeta, K. Allan, M.

    2015-05-14

    Detailed experimental information on the motion of a nuclear packet on a complex (resonant) anion potential surface is obtained by measuring 2-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra. The cross section is plotted as a function of incident electron energy, which determines which resonant anion state is populated, i.e., along which normal coordinate the wave packet is launched, and of the electron energy loss, which reveals into which final states each specific resonant state decays. The 2D spectra are presented for acrylonitrile and methacrylonitrile, at the incident energy range 0.095-1.0 eV, where the incoming electron is temporarily captured in the lowest π{sup ∗} orbital. The 2D spectra reveal selectivity patterns with respect to which vibrations are excited in the attachment and de-excited in the detachment. Further insight is gained by recording 1D spectra measured along horizontal, vertical, and diagonal cuts of the 2D spectrum. The methyl group in methacrylonitrile increases the resonance width 7 times. This converts the sharp resonances of acrylonitrile into boomerang structures but preserves the essence of the selectivity patterns. Selectivity of vibrational excitation by higher-lying shape resonances up to 8 eV is also reported.

  20. Electron impact excitation of autoionising states of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.

    1978-01-01

    Energy-loss spectra of krypton in the region between 21 and 29 eV have been obtained at electron impact energies of 30, 60 and 100 eV. For each energy, the angular distribution of intensities has been measured at 5, 10 and 15 deg scattering angles. Assignments of spectral features found in this region are suggested and a comparison is made with previous measurements.

  1. Double differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun-fei, Yao; Zhang-jin, Chen

    1999-03-01

    The double differential cross sections for electron impact ionization of helium at incident energies of 200 eV, 100 eV and 64.6 eV have been calculated in the BBK model. The present results are found to be in generally good agreement with the latest measurements of Röder et al. and the theoretical results of the convergent close-coupling method although some quantitative discrepancy remains.

  2. Charge exchange ionization in collision cells as a method to detect the presence of long-lived excited electronic states of polyatomic ions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, C H; Kim, M S; Choe, J C

    2001-10-01

    Charge exchange ionization in collision cells installed in a double focusing mass spectrometer with reversed geometry has been used to detect the presence of a long-lived excited electronic state of benzene ion. In particular, the first collision cell located between the ion source and the magnetic sector was modified to serve as an ion source for the reagent ion generated by charge exchange with the primary ion. Strong reagent ion signals were observed when the ionization energies of the reagents (1,3-C4H6, CS2, CH3Cl) were lower than the recombination energy (approximately 11.5 eV) of the excited state benzene ion, while the signals were negligible for reagents (CH3F,CH4) with higher ionization energy. The fact that a strong signal is observable only for electronically exoergic charge exchange is useful for detecting the presence of a long-lived electronically excited state.

  3. Degree of impactor fragmentation under collision with a regolith surface—Laboratory impact experiments of rock projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Hiroki; Takasawa, Susumu; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Sangen, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Some meteorites consist of a mix of components of various parent bodies that were presumably brought together by past collisions. Impact experiments have been performed to investigate the degree of target fragmentation during such collisions. However, much less attention has been paid to the fate of the impactors. Here, we report the results of our study of the empirical relationship between the degree of projectile fragmentation and the impact conditions. Millimeter-sized pyrophyllite and basalt projectiles were impacted onto regolith-like sand targets and an aluminum target at velocities of up to 960 m s-1. Experiments using millimeter-sized pyrophyllite blocks as targets were also conducted to fill the gap between this study and the previous studies of centimeter-sized rock targets. The catastrophic disruption threshold for a projectile is defined as the energy density at which the mass of the largest fragment is the half of the original mass. The thresholds with the sand target were 4.5 ± 1.1 × 104 and 9.0 ± 1.9 × 104 J kg-1, for pyrophyllite and basalt projectiles, respectively. These values are two orders of magnitude larger than the threshold for impacts between pyrophyllite projectiles onto aluminum targets, but are qualitatively consistent with the fact that the compressive and tensile strengths of basalt are larger than those of pyrophyllite. The threshold for pyrophyllite projectiles and the aluminum target agrees with the threshold for aluminum projectiles and pyrophyllite targets within the margin of error. Consistent with a previous result, the threshold depended on the size of the rocks with a power of approximately -0.4 (Housen and Holsapple 1999). Destruction of rock projectiles occurred when the peak pressure was about ten times the tensile strength of the rocks.

  4. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R. E.; Tamm, A.; Béland, L. K.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stocks, G. M.; Caro, A.; Slipchenko, L. V.; Osetsky, Yu. N.; Aabloo, A.; Klintenberg, M.; Wang, Y.

    2016-04-25

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. The distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm during these collisions. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. But, there is no accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure.

  5. Impact of Short-Range Forces on Defect Production from High-Energy Collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Stoller, R. E.; Tamm, A.; Béland, L. K.; ...

    2016-04-25

    Primary radiation damage formation in solid materials typically involves collisions between atoms that have up to a few hundred keV of kinetic energy. The distance between two colliding atoms can approach 0.05 nm during these collisions. At such small atomic separations, force fields fitted to equilibrium properties tend to significantly underestimate the potential energy of the colliding dimer. To enable molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collisions, it is common practice to use a screened Coulomb force field to describe the interactions and to smoothly join this to the equilibrium force field at a suitable interatomic spacing. But, there is nomore » accepted standard method for choosing the parameters used in the joining process, and our results prove that defect production is sensitive to how the force fields are linked. A new procedure is presented that involves the use of ab initio calculations to determine the magnitude and spatial dependence of the pair interactions at intermediate distances, along with systematic criteria for choosing the joining parameters. Results are presented for the case of nickel, which demonstrate the use and validity of the procedure.« less

  6. Perceived traffic risk for cyclists: the impact of near miss and collision experiences.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rebecca L

    2015-02-01

    Though the percentage of people bicycling for transportation rose during the last decade, with an average increase in bicycle commuting of 47% (Flusche, 2012), still only 1% of all U.S. trips are made by bike (Flusche, 2010). Research suggests that people's concern regarding the risk of bicycling near traffic-namely the risk of being hit by a car-remain a significant barrier to widespread cycling. However, research has not disaggregated traffic risk to expose its many aspects and how they may affect bicyclists with differing skill levels, experiences, and behaviors. This study begins to address this gap in our understanding. Elaborating on results from an internet survey, this study examined various aspects of traffic risk among 406 potential and current bicyclists in the San Francisco Bay Area. The data indicate that perceived traffic risk negatively influences the decision to bicycle for potential and occasional bicyclists, although the influence decreases with cycling frequency. Additionally, cycling frequency seems to heighten awareness of traffic risk, particularly for cyclists who have experienced "near misses" or collisions. In particular, near misses were found to be (a) much more common than collisions and (b) more strongly associated than collisions with perceived traffic risk. The findings suggest that efforts targeting road user behaviors and roadway designs associated with these near misses could mitigate perceived and actual traffic risk for bicyclists, and thereby eventually help achieve higher cycling ridership.

  7. Electron impact excitation of N IV: calculations with the DARC code and a comparison with ICFT results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Keenan, F. P.; Lawson, K. D.

    2016-10-01

    There have been discussions in the recent literature regarding the accuracy of the available electron impact excitation rates (equivalently effective collision strengths Υ) for transitions in Be-like ions. In the present paper we demonstrate, once again, that earlier results for Υ are indeed overestimated (by up to four orders of magnitude), for over 40 per cent of transitions and over a wide range of temperatures. To do this we have performed two sets of calculations for N IV, with two different model sizes consisting of 166 and 238 fine-structure energy levels. As in our previous work, for the determination of atomic structure the GRASP (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) is adopted and for the scattering calculations (the standard and parallelised versions of) the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC) are employed. Calculations for collision strengths and effective collision strengths have been performed over a wide range of energy (up to 45 Ryd) and temperature (up to 2.0 × 106 K), useful for applications in a variety of plasmas. Corresponding results for energy levels, lifetimes and A-values for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions among 238 levels of N IV are also reported.

  8. Electron impact ionization of cycloalkanes, aldehydes, and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Antony, Bobby

    2014-08-07

    The theoretical calculations of electron impact total ionization cross section for cycloalkane, aldehyde, and ketone group molecules are undertaken from ionization threshold to 2 keV. The present calculations are based on the spherical complex optical potential formalism and complex scattering potential ionization contribution method. The results of most of the targets studied compare fairly well with the recent measurements, wherever available and the cross sections for many targets are predicted for the first time. The correlation between the peak of ionization cross sections with number of target electrons and target parameters is also reported. It was found that the cross sections at their maximum depend linearly with the number of target electrons and with other target parameters, confirming the consistency of the values reported here.

  9. Windowless Far-Ultraviolet Electron Impact Calibration Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, K.; McCandliss, S. R.; Pelton, R.

    2002-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a windowless calibration lamp for determining wavelength solutions and detector flat-fielding at far-ultraviolet wavelengths. This lamp produces free electrons from a filament, accelerating them toward a tungsten target by an applied voltage ( 200 - 2000 V). An emission line spectrum is produced by electrons impacting the residual gas molecules present and continuous emission is produced by bremsstrahlung as the electrons collide with the target. The emission line spectrum can be modified to provide a rich wavelength coverage by introducing different species, and spectra of H2, N2, O2, CO2, HD, and Ar have been measured at modest spectral resolution (1 Å) across the far-UV bandpass (900 - 1400 Å). The long wavelength tail of the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum falling in this bandpass can be used to make detector flat-field measurements. The lamp is robust and compact, housed in a mini-conflat cube and operates at the ambient vacuum compatible with microchannel plate operation. It is scheduled to be tested on an upcoming sounding rocket flight. We present initial results of both electron impact and bremsstrahlung spectra and adaptability to space-based instrumentation. This work is supported by NASA grant NAG5-5315 to The Johns Hopkins University.

  10. Electron Impact Ionization Cross Sections of n-decane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Charles; Dejoseph, Charles; Garscadden, Alan

    2001-10-01

    The ionization and dissociation of hydrocarbon fuels with various plasma excitation schemes including pulsed high E/n discharges have been proposed to alleviate the problem of ignition in supersonic flow combustors and operations at high altitudes. The fuel which is also used for cooling, must not pyrolyse at operational temperatures. We have examined the electron ionization collision processes in n-decane using high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry that permits measurements of the 24 ions with cross sections larger than 10-19cm2. These generally fall into two broad categories: those with five or more carbon atoms whose ionization cross sections rise rapidly and essentially saturate within twice the appearance potential and those with four carbon atoms and less whose cross sections rise more gradually and are only saturating at energies above 70 eV. The total ionization cross section is large, rising to 7x10-16cm2. Studies were made with deuterated samples to distinguish the potential mechanisms in fragment ion induced dissociation of the parent gas. The results are compared with similar data for octane.

  11. Charge-changing collisions of argon ions on argon gas. One-electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, J.; Bliman, S.; Geller, R.; Jacquot, B.; Van Houtte, D.

    1980-12-01

    Single-electron-capture cross sections have been measured for argon ions with initial charges 2< or =q< or =12 incident on an argon-gas target. The cross sections show little dependence on the incident ion energy in the range 1q--10q keV. A remarkable oscillating feature is seen for cross sections sigma/sub q/,q-1 when q> or =7. Particularly, sigma/sub 8,7/ is smaller than sigma/sub 7,6/ and sigma/sub 9,8/, the Ar/sup 8 +/ electronic structure being Ne-like. Variation of the cross section is shown as function of the initial charge at constant energy.

  12. Electroweak measurements in electron-positron collisions at W-boson-pair energies at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; DELPHI Collaboration; L3 Collaboration; OPAL Collaboration; LEP Electroweak Working Group 1

    2013-11-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3 fb-1 collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130 GeV to 209 GeV.

  13. Ionization of N2 in collisions with fast electrons: Evidence of an interference effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chowdhury, Madhusree; Stia, C. R.; Tachino, C. A.; Fojon, O. A.; Rivarola, Roberto D.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2016-11-01

    Absolute double differential cross sections (DDCS) of electron emission were measured for ionization of N2 by fast electrons with energy 7 keV. Measurements were performed for different electron emission angles and energies. Evidence of oscillation due to Young-type interference was observed in the DDCS ratios for all angles. The frequency for large backward angle is found to be larger compared to that for small forward angle. Consequently, the forward-backward asymmetry parameter reveals the oscillatory structure even more clearly. The oscillations observed for both experimental-to-theoretical DDCS ratios and forward-backward asymmetry were well explained by the Cohen-Fano model of interference in a molecular double slit. A periodic deviation of the Cohen-Fano model from the asymmetry parameter data reveals the presence of a higher-frequency component. The first Born model was employed to explain the results of molecular nitrogen for which a complete-neglect-of-differential-overlap approximation was used along with an effective atomic number.

  14. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Nefedov, N. A.; Antonchik, V. A.; Bogdanov, S. D.; Kosmach, V. F.; Likhachev, A. YU.; Benton, E. V.; Crawford, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  15. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Nefedov, N. A.; Antonchik, V. A.; Bogdanov, S. D.; Kosmach, V. F.; Benton, E. V.; Crawford, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  16. Dependence of the multiplicities of secondary particles on the impact parameter in collisions of high-energy neon and iron nuclei with photoemulsion nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dudkin, V.E.; Kovalev, E.E.; Nefedov, N.A.; Antonchik, V.A.; Bogdanov, S.D.; Kosmach, V.F.; Likhachev, A.Yu.; Benton, E.V.; Crawford, H.J. ||

    1995-03-01

    A method is proposed for finding the dependence of mean multiplicities of secondaries on the nucleus-collision impact parameter from the data on the total interaction ensemble. The impact parameter has been shown to completely define the mean characteristics of an individual interaction event. A difference has been found between experimental results and the data calculated in terms of the cascade-evaporation model at impact-parameter values below 3 fm.

  17. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, R. F. C.; Jones, D. B.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Ratnavelu, K.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  18. On the minimum electron transport coefficients in tokamaks in the range of low collision frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merezhkin, V. G.

    2009-06-01

    There are two close empirical scalings, namely, the T-11 and neo-Alcator ones, that provide correct estimates for the energy confinement time in tokamaks in ohmic heating regimes in the linear part of the dependence τ E ( bar n_e ) in the range of low values of bar n_e and <ν{/e *}> ≤ 1. The similar character of electron energy confinement in this range, which expands with increasing magnetic field B 0, has stimulated the search for dimensionless parameters and simple physical models that would explain the experimentally observed dependences χ e ˜ 1/ n e and τ Ee ˜ bar n_e . In 1987, T. Okhawa showed that the experimental data were satisfactorily described by the formula χ e⊥ = ( c 2/ω{/pe 2}) ν e / qR, in deriving of which the random spatial leap along the radius r on the electron trajectory was assumed to be the same as that in the coefficient of the poloidal field diffusion, while the repetition rate of these leaps was assumed to be ν e / qR. In 2004, J. Callen took into account the decrease in the fraction of transient electrons with increasing toroidal ratio ɛ = r/R and corrected the coefficient c 2/ω{/pe 2} in Okhawa equation by the factor σ{‖/Sp}/σ{‖/neo}. If one takes into account this correction and assumes that the frequency of the stochastic process is equal to the reciprocal of the half-period of rotation of a trapped electron along its banana trajectory, then the resulting expression for χ e⊥ will coincide with the T-11 scaling: χ{/e an} ∞ ɛ1.75( T e / A i )0.5/( n e qR) at A i = 1. If the same stochastic process also involves ions, it may result in the opening of the orbit of a trapped ion at the distance ˜( c/ω pe )( m i / m e )1/4. In this case, the calculated coefficient of electron and ion diffusion D is close to D an ≈ χ{/e an}/2.

  19. Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. 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