Science.gov

Sample records for electron laser technology

  1. Storage Ring Technology for Free Electron Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    the undulator is \\o. K = eB,,X/2", mc is a dimensionless measure of the magnetic field and is referred to as the wiggler K parameter, and nK 2 /(4 + 2K...pole-face gap of the undulator, which can ~vi~lr I tr. Th be equated to the magnetic field strength [27], and the wiggler K parameter. The resonant...rings. For SRFEL systems with linear wigglers [13] Pl.aer ma ,oPsyn. (10) The output power of the laser is Paser, the total synchrotron-radiation power

  2. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  3. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  4. Pulsed Electric Discharge Laser Technology. Electron Beam Window Foil Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    6.0 INTERFEROMETRIC MEASUREMENT OF FOIL MOVEMENT A simple Michelson interferometer was used to measure foil movement on the test rig. Because the...TURNING BEAM MIRRORS BEAM DISPLAYFOCUEED IRIS AT FOOS. OPTICAL FIBRE * BUNDLE Figure 49. Schematic of interferometer . -98-7 reflected speckle. The...As a check on the pulse simulation, the actual movement of an electron-beam foil window was measured by interferometry. A speckle interferometer which

  5. Technology Development for Tapered-Wiggler Free-Electron Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    canting can produce equal e-beam focusing in each of the two - transverse directions. Thus the e-beam focusing characteristics of a helical wiggler can...Both taper prescriptions require a modest frequency chirp of less than 1.5 percent during start-up. 3.2 VARIALE -TAPER WIGGLER EMAWQEM DEVEPHE T This...with Nonuniform Wigglers," IEEE J. Quantum Electron. QE-16, 335 (1980). 4-8. J.P. Blewett and R. Chasman, "Orbits and Fields in the Helical Wiggler," J

  6. Laser microprocessing technologies for automotive, flexible electronics, and solar energy sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikumb, Suwas; Bathe, Ravi; Knopf, George K.

    2014-10-01

    Laser microprocessing technologies offer an important tool to fulfill the needs of many industrial sectors. In particular, there is growing interest in applications of these processes in the manufacturing areas such as automotive parts fabrication, printable electronics and solar energy panels. The technology is primarily driven by our understanding of the fundamental laser-material interaction, process control strategies and the advancement of significant fabrication experience over the past few years. The wide-ranging operating parameters available with respect to power, pulse width variation, beam quality, higher repetition rates as well as precise control of the energy deposition through programmable pulse shaping technologies, enables pre-defined material removal, selective scribing of individual layer within a stacked multi-layer thin film structure, texturing of material surfaces as well as precise introduction of heat into the material to monitor its characteristic properties are a few examples. In this research, results in the area of laser surface texturing of metals for added hydrodynamic lubricity to reduce friction, processing of ink-jet printed graphene oxide for flexible printed electronic circuit fabrication and scribing of multi-layer thin films for the development of photovoltaic CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) interconnects for solar panel devices will be discussed.

  7. High-power free-electron lasers-technology and future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2013-03-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) is an all-electric, high-power, high beam-quality source of coherent radiation, tunable - unlike other laser sources - at any wavelength within wide spectral region from hard X-rays to far-IR and beyond. After the initial push in the framework of the “Star Wars” program, the FEL technology benefited from decades of R&D and scientific applications. Currently, there are clear signs that the FEL technology reached maturity, enabling real-world applications. E.g., successful and unexpectedly smooth commissioning of the world-first X-ray FEL in 2010 increased in one blow by more than an order of magnitude (40×) wavelength region available by FEL technology and thus demonstrated that the theoretical predictions just keep true in real machines. Experience of ordering turn-key electron beamlines from commercial companies is a further demonstration of the FEL technology maturity. Moreover, successful commissioning of the world-first multi-turn energy-recovery linac demonstrated feasibility of reducing FEL size, cost and power consumption by probably an order of magnitude in respect to previous configurations, opening way to applications, previously considered as non-feasible. This review takes engineer-oriented approach to discuss the FEL technology issues, keeping in mind applications in the fields of military and aerospace, next generation semiconductor lithography, photo-chemistry and isotope separation.

  8. Staged Laser driven Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Shaw, Brian; Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl; Benedetti, Carlo; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2012-10-01

    Laser plasma accelerators have made tremendous progress over the last decade. Currently electron energies around 1 GeV [W. Leemans et al., Nature Physics 2, 696 (2006)] and above can be achieved. In the acceleration process, laser energy is transferred, via generation of a plasma wakefield by the laser pulse, to the electrons. The acceleration of electrons stops, when the laser energy is depleted. To increase the electron energy in current LPA schemes, laser systems with more pulse energy are needed, thus current laser plasma accelerators are limited by laser technology. Today, several projects are using or planning to use PW class laser systems to achieve electron energies up to 10 GeV [W. P. Leemans et al., AAC proceedings (2012)]. These laser systems represent the latest development in laser technology and are able to deliver the highest achievable laser intensities today. To overcome the electron energy limitation a staged acceleration concept is necessary. In this scheme multiple acceleration stages are placed in series, each driven by a separate laser pulse. Now the final electron energy is limited by the number of stages only. In a concept study a 1TeV electron-positron collider based on staged acceleration was envisioned in reference [W. P. Leemans and E. Esarey, Physics Today, 62, 44 (2009)]. We will present the latest results on a staged laser plasma experiment in which two stages and two laser pulses are used.

  9. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.; Vaughan, D.

    1986-04-01

    We can now produce intense, coherent light at wavelengths where no conventional lasers exist. The recent successes of devices known as free-electron lasers mark a striking confluence of two conceptual developments that themselves are only a few decades old. The first of these, the laser, is a product of the fifties and sixties whose essential characteristics have made it a staple resource in almost every field of science and technology. In a practical sense, what defines a laser is its emission of monochromatic, coherent light (that is, light of a single wavelength, with its waves locked in step) at a wavelength in the infrared, visible, or ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. A second kind of light, called synchrotron radiation, is a by-product of the age of particle accelerators and was first observed in the laboratory in 1947. As the energies of accelerators grew in the 1960s and 70s, intense, incoherent beams of ultraviolet radiation and x--rays became available at machines built for high-energy physics research. Today, several facilities operate solely as sources of synchrotron light. Unlike the well-collimated monochromatic light emitted by lasers, however, this incoherent radiation is like a sweeping searchlight--more accurately, like the headlight of a train on a circular track--whose wavelengths encompass a wide spectral band. Now, in several laboratories around the world, researchers have exploited the physics of these two light sources and have combined the virtues of both in a single contrivance, the free-electron laser, or FEL (1). The emitted light is laserlike in its narrow, sharply peaked spectral distribution and in its phase coherence, yet it can be of a wavelength unavailable with ordinary lasers. Furthermore, like synchrotron radiation, but unlike the output of most conventional lasers, the radiation emitted by free-electron lasers can be tuned, that is, its wavelength can be easily varied across a wide range. The promise of this

  10. Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Amoco Laser Company, a subsidiary of Amoco Corporation, has developed microlasers for the commercial market based on a JPL concept for optical communications over interplanetary distances. Lasers emit narrow, intense beams of light or other radiation. The beams transmit communication signals, drill, cut or melt materials or remove diseased body tissue. The microlasers cover a broad portion of the spectrum, and performance is improved significantly. Current applications include medical instrumentation, color separation equipment, telecommunications, etc.

  11. Laser technologies in biophotonics

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkatov, A N; Priezzhev, A V; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-05-31

    This and the following issues of Quantum Electronics comprise articles reflecting the state of the art of laser technologies both currently applied and promising for application in biomedical research. Rapid development of biophotonics that we witness nowadays is due to a number of factors. These include the new results in basic studies of the interaction of laser radiation with biological tissues and cells, essential progress in the field of development of means for delivery, detection and imaging of optical radiation, and implementation of novel computer- and nanotechnologies.

  12. Development of the Science and Technology of Electron Beam Pumped KrF Lasers for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, John

    2002-11-01

    Electron beam pumped krypton fluoride (KrF) lasers are an attractive driver for inertial fusion energy. They have demonstrated very high beam quality, which is essential for reducing imprint in direct drive targets. Their short wavelength (248 nm) mitigates the growth of plasma instabilities. And they have the potential to meet the fusion needs for repetition rate, efficiency, and cost. This paper reviews the development of e-beam pumped KrF lasers. It will include a description of the fundamental physics and technology, as well as the challenges in developing a fusion system. Although KrF laser development is a multi-disciplinary endeavor, this talk will emphasize areas of interest to plasma physicists: electron beams, KrF kinetics, and pulsed power. The paper will describe experiments and modeling that has identified and mitigated instabilities in the electron beam. It will describe the electron beam propagation experiments, the supporting 3D parallel PIC codes, and how these have been used to design systems for maximum electron energy deposition into the laser gas. KrF kinetics modeling will be discussed. These newly developed time dependent codes can predict the output of several experiments operating under significantly different conditions. They are now being used as a design tool to predict the performance of future KrF systems. Finally, the talk will discuss the development of the pulsed power needed to drive the electron beams. This includes conventional gas switched systems for single shot devices together with the recently demonstrated all solid state switches that have the promise to meet the fusion requirements. The talk will be cast in context of the large, single shot KrF lasers built in the 1990's such as Nike (NRL-US), Ashura (Japan), and Titania (UK), as well as the Electra 700 J, 5 Hz rep-rate laser that is currently under development at NRL.

  13. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-12-12

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac is described. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator, or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  14. Catalac free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  15. New laser source technology.

    PubMed

    Christensen, C P

    1984-04-13

    Over the past 5 to 8 years several new laser sources have been developed as a result of R & D efforts stimulated by a growing number of laser applications. Four families of new devices-semiconductor diod laser arrays, free electron lasers, rare gas halide excimer sources, and several new tunable solid-state lasers-show particular promise.

  16. Free-Electron Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brau, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of free-electron lasers as a source of coherent radiation over a broad range of wavelengths from the far-infrared to the far-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. Discusses some applications of these lasers, including medicine and strategic defense. (TW)

  17. Free-Electron Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brau, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of free-electron lasers as a source of coherent radiation over a broad range of wavelengths from the far-infrared to the far-ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. Discusses some applications of these lasers, including medicine and strategic defense. (TW)

  18. Dental laser technology.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2008-10-01

    Dental technology is rapidly affecting the treatment options available to patients. Dental lasers are an innovative technology for both hard- and soft-tissue treatment applications. The ability to recontour soft tissues efficiently and predictably with immediate hemostatsis and minimal postoperative sequelae is of value to both the dentist and the patient. This article reviews the principles of dental lasers, criteria to consider when selecting a dental laser, and some of their clinical applications.

  19. Free-electron lasers. Status and applications.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, P G; Freund, H P

    2001-06-08

    A free-electron laser consists of an electron beam propagating through a periodic magnetic field. Today such lasers are used for research in materials science, chemical technology, biophysical science, medical applications, surface studies, and solid-state physics. Free-electron lasers with higher average power and shorter wavelengths are under development. Future applications range from industrial processing of materials to light sources for soft and hard x-rays.

  20. Electron Technology - ELTE 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepański, Paweł; Kisiel, Ryszard; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents a digest of chosen research and technical work results shown by researchers from technical universities, governmental institutes and research firms during the XIth Scientific Conference on Electron Technology ELTE 2013. ELTE Conference has been held every three years since more than three decades. The ELTE 2013 conference was held in Ryn Castle (Poland) on 16-20 April 2013 and gathered around 270 scientists, theoreticians, technologists and engineers from such areas as material engineering, chemistry, sensors, integrated circuits, electronics engineering, laser industry, photonics, etc. The conference featured the following major four topical sessions - Micro and Nano, Photonics, Materials and Technologies, and Microsystems; two dedicated sessions - a keynote plenary session on hot topics in electron technology, as well as a session on large research projects and grants realized by the relevant community. Oral topical sessions were accompanied by poster sessions. The paper is a succinct topical introduction to the volume of ELTE 2013 proceedings. Over 100 papers, gathered in the volume, present a very relevant cross section and state-of-the-art of this branch of science and technology in Poland with involved international co-operation.

  1. Electronic Technology (Selected Articles).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-07

    4D-A127 369 ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY (SELECTED ARTICLESM() FOREIGN 1/1 N TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSON RFB OH 87 MAR 83 FTD-IDCRS) T-8082-3...RS )T-0082-83 - .FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION %’, ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY (Selected Articles) DTIC ELECTE MAY 1 01983 cw E C.") Approved for public...ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY (Selected Articles) K English pages: 14 Source: Dianzijishu, Nr. 8, 1982, pp. 2-5 Country of origin: China Translated by: LEO

  2. Circular free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Kurnit, Norman A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  3. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, W.B.; Sessler, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) uses a high quality relativistic beam of electrons passing through a periodic magnetic field to amplify a copropagating optical wave (1-4). In an oscillator configuration, the light is stored between the mirrors of an open optical resonator as shown in Figure 1. In an amplifier configuration, the optical wave and an intense electron beam pass through the undulator field to achieve high gain. In either case, the electrons must overlap the optical mode for good coupling. Typically, the peak electron beam current varies from several amperes to many hundreds of amperes and the electron energy ranges from a few MeV to a few GeV. The electrons are the power source in an FEL, and provide from a megawatt to more than a gigawatt flowing through the resonator or amplifier system. The undulator resonantly couples the electrons to the transverse electrical field of the optical wave in vacuum. The basic mechanism of the coherent energy exchange is the bunching of the electrons at optical wavelengths. Since the power source is large, even small coupling can result in a powerful laser. Energy extraction of 5% of the electron beam energy has already been demonstrated. The electron beam quality is crucial in maintaining the coupling over a significant interaction distance and of central importance to all FEL systems is the magnetic undulator. The peak undulator field strength is usually several kG and can be constructed from coil windings or permanent magnets. In the top part of Figure 2, the Halbach undulator design is shown for one period. The field can be achieved, to a good approximation, using permanent magnets made out of rare earth compounds; a technique developed by K. Halbach (5), and now employed in most undulators. The undulator wavelength is in the range of a few centimeters and the undulator length extends for a few meters, so that there are several hundred periods for the interaction (6-8). The polarization of the undulator can be either

  4. Free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  5. STaged ELectron Laser Acceleration (STELLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping

    This dissertation presents results from STELLA experiment demonstrating the staging of two laser-driven relativistic electron accelerators. The two laser accelerators operated in series, the first IFEL served to bunch the electrons into a few fs microbunches, which were rephased with the laser wave in the second IFEL. This fundamental accomplishment will help spur the development of practical multi-stage, monoenergetic laser accelerators.

  6. Manipulating relativistic electrons with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    2016-09-01

    The motion control of relativistic electrons with lasers allows for an efficient and elegant way to map the space with ultra-intense electric-field components, which, in turn, permits a unique improvement of the electron beam parameters. This perspective addresses the recent laser plasma accelerator experiments related to the phase space engineering of electron beams in a plasma medium performed at LOA.

  7. Towards possible opportunities in nuclear materials science and technology at an X-ray free electron laser research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froideval, A.; Badillo, A.; Bertsch, J.; Churakov, S.; Dähn, R.; Degueldre, C.; Lind, T.; Paladino, D.; Patterson, B. D.

    2011-09-01

    Spectroscopy and imaging of condensed matter have benefited greatly from the availability of intense X-ray beams from synchrotron sources, both in terms of spatial resolution and of elemental specificity. The advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-ray FEL) provides the additional features of ultra-short pulses and high transverse coherence, which greatly expand possibilities to study dynamic processes and to image non-crystalline materials. The proposed SwissFEL facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute is one of at present four X-ray FEL projects worldwide and is scheduled to go into operation in the year 2017. This article describes a selection of problems in nuclear materials science and technology that would directly benefit from this and similar X-ray FEL sources. X-ray FEL-based experiments are proposed to be conducted on nuclear energy-related materials using single-shot X-ray spectroscopy, coherent X-ray scattering and/or X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy in order to address relevant scientific questions such as the evolution in time of the irradiation-induced damage processes, the deformation processes in nuclear materials, the ion diffusion processes in the barrier systems of geological repositories, the boiling heat transfer in nuclear reactors, as well as the structural characterization of graphite dust in advanced nuclear reactors and clay colloid aggregates in the groundwater near a radioactive waste repository.

  8. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  9. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltman, S. B.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy technology allows the application of electron tunneling to position detectors for the first time. The vacuum tunnel junction is one of the most sensitive position detection mechanisms available. It is also compact, simple, and requires little power. A prototype accelerometer based on electron tunneling, and other sensor applications of this promising new technology are described.

  10. Electronics Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train electronics engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of electronics engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard electronics engineering…

  11. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  12. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  13. Advanced Electronic Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-15

    It AD AObS 062 MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH LEXINGTON LINCOLN LAB F/S 9/S ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY .(U) NOV 78 A J MCLAUGHLIN. A L MCWHORTER...T I T U T E OF T E C H N O L O G Y L I N C O L N L A B O R A T O R Y ADVANCED ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY QUARTERLY TECKNICAL SUMMAR Y REPORT TO THE AIR...Division 8 (Solid State) on the Advanced Electronic Technology Program. Hi

  14. Laser Welding in Electronic Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The laser has proven its worth in numerous high reliability electronic packaging applications ranging from medical to missile electronics. In particular, the pulsed YAG laser is an extremely flexible and versatile too] capable of hermetically sealing microelectronics packages containing sensitive components without damaging them. This paper presents an overview of details that must be considered for successful use of laser welding when addressing electronic package sealing. These include; metallurgical considerations such as alloy and plating selection, weld joint configuration, design of optics, use of protective gases and control of thermal distortions. The primary limitations on use of laser welding electronic for packaging applications are economic ones. The laser itself is a relatively costly device when compared to competing welding equipment. Further, the cost of consumables and repairs can be significant. These facts have relegated laser welding to use only where it presents a distinct quality or reliability advantages over other techniques of electronic package sealing. Because of the unique noncontact and low heat inputs characteristics of laser welding, it is an ideal candidate for sealing electronic packages containing MEMS devices (microelectromechanical systems). This paper addresses how the unique advantages of the pulsed YAG laser can be used to simplify MEMS packaging and deliver a product of improved quality.

  15. Laser Welding in Electronic Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The laser has proven its worth in numerous high reliability electronic packaging applications ranging from medical to missile electronics. In particular, the pulsed YAG laser is an extremely flexible and versatile too] capable of hermetically sealing microelectronics packages containing sensitive components without damaging them. This paper presents an overview of details that must be considered for successful use of laser welding when addressing electronic package sealing. These include; metallurgical considerations such as alloy and plating selection, weld joint configuration, design of optics, use of protective gases and control of thermal distortions. The primary limitations on use of laser welding electronic for packaging applications are economic ones. The laser itself is a relatively costly device when compared to competing welding equipment. Further, the cost of consumables and repairs can be significant. These facts have relegated laser welding to use only where it presents a distinct quality or reliability advantages over other techniques of electronic package sealing. Because of the unique noncontact and low heat inputs characteristics of laser welding, it is an ideal candidate for sealing electronic packages containing MEMS devices (microelectromechanical systems). This paper addresses how the unique advantages of the pulsed YAG laser can be used to simplify MEMS packaging and deliver a product of improved quality.

  16. Space electronics technology summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An overview is given of current electronics R and D activities, potential future thrusts, and related NASA payoffs. Major increases in NASA mission return and significant concurrent reductions in mission cost appear possible through a focused, long range electronics technology program. The overview covers: guidance assessments, navigation and control, and sensing and data acquisition processing, storage, and transfer.

  17. Advanced Electronic Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-24

    1975 4057 Integrated GaAs-AlGaAs Double- Heterostructure Lasers 4058 Low-Loss High Purity GaAs Waveguides for Monolithic Integrated Optical...waveguides for monolithic integrated optical circuits have been fabricated and characterized. Attenuation measurements of waveguides at...Introduction 2 II. Applications 2 III. Integrated Circuit Processing 3 IV. Design and Testing 3 Processor and Education Technology — Group 27 4

  18. Laser peening of metals- enabling laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; Daly, J.; Harrisson, J.

    1997-11-13

    Laser peening, a surface treatment for metals, employs laser induced shocks to create deep and intense residual stresses in critical components. In many applications this technology is proving to be superior to conventional treatments such as shot peening. The laser peening process has generated sufficiently impressive results to move it from a laboratory demonstration phase into a significant industrial process. However until now this evolution has been slowed because a laser system meeting the average power requirements for a high throughput process has been lacking.

  19. Research on Free Electron Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Communication 52, 409 (1985). [15] W. B. Colson, Free Electron Generators of Coherent Radiation, SPIE 453, 289, eds. Brau, Jacobs , Scully (1984). [16...quantum electrodynamics [39,401. Later, classical methods were shown to be accurate and complete (41-46]. The quasi- Bioch equations have enhanced the laser...of Phys. 7, 84 (1959). [7] Proceedings of the First Free Electron Laser Conference, Telluride, CO, eds. S. F. Jacobs , M. Sargent, III, and M. 0

  20. Electron Technology: ELTE 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarkiewicz, Tadeusz; Kucewicz, Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present a review of research results and technical accomplishments presented by researchers from technical universities, governmental institutes and research companies during the XIIth Scientific Conference Electron Technology, ELTE 2016. This review is based on materials presented at four topical conference sessions: Microelectronics and Nanoelectronics, Photonics, Materials and Technologies, and Microsystems and also on materials presented by invited speakers at two dedicated sessions. Oral sessions were accompanied by the poster sessions. In effect about 50 papers gathered in this volume reflect the topics discussed at the Conference. A short description of technological and measurement possibilities in the laboratories of Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology and also in the Department of Electronics of the Faculty of Computer Science, Electronics and Telecommunications AGH UST are given.

  1. Progress toward the Wisconsin Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, Joseph; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Jacobs, K; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J; Rogers, G C; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R

    2011-03-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison/Synchrotron Radiation Center is advancing its design for a seeded VUV/soft X-ray Free Electron Laser facility called WiFEL. To support this vision of an ultimate light source, we are pursuing a program of strategic R&D addressing several crucial elements. This includes development of a high repetition rate, VHF superconducting RF electron gun, R&D on photocathode materials by ARPES studies, and evaluation of FEL facility architectures (e.g., recirculation, compressor scenarios, CSR dechirping, undulator technologies) with the specific goal of cost containment. Studies of high harmonic generation for laser seeding are also planned.

  2. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  3. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-02-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  4. Japan's electronic packaging technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tummala, Rao R.; Pecht, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found Japan to have significant leadership over the United States in the strategic area of electronic packaging. Many technologies and products once considered the 'heart and soul' of U.S. industry have been lost over the past decades to Japan and other Asian countries. The loss of consumer electronics technologies and products is the most notable of these losses, because electronics is the United States' largest employment sector and is critical for growth businesses in consumer products, computers, automobiles, aerospace, and telecommunications. In the past there was a distinction between consumer and industrial product technologies. While Japan concentrated on the consumer market, the United States dominated the industrial sector. No such distinction is anticipated in the future; the consumer-oriented technologies Japan has dominated are expected to characterize both domains. The future of U.S. competitiveness will, therefore, depend on the ability of the United States to rebuild its technological capabilities in the area of portable electronic packaging.

  5. A Career in Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    The increased expansion of laser technology will create many new jobs and will require workers with many different skills. At the same time, some kinds of occupations will be adversely affected, due to increasing use of laser technology in a broad range of industries. (CT)

  6. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  7. Workshop on scientific and industrial applications of free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C. ); Perez, R.B. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1990-05-01

    A Workshop on Scientific and Industrial Applications of Free Electron Lasers was organized to address potential uses of a Free Electron Laser in the infrared wavelength region. A total of 13 speakers from national laboratories, universities, and the industry gave seminars to an average audience of 30 persons during June 12 and 13, 1989. The areas covered were: Free Electron Laser Technology, Chemistry and Surface Science, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Condensed Matter, and Biomedical Applications, Optical Damage, and Optoelectronics.

  8. Laser technologies in ophthalmic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atezhev, V. V.; Barchunov, B. V.; Vartapetov, S. K.; Zav'yalov, A. S.; Lapshin, K. E.; Movshev, V. G.; Shcherbakov, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Excimer and femtosecond lasers are widely used in ophthalmology to correct refraction. Laser systems for vision correction are based on versatile technical solutions and include multiple hard- and software components. Laser characteristics, properties of laser beam delivery system, algorithms for cornea treatment, and methods of pre-surgical diagnostics determine the surgical outcome. Here we describe the scientific and technological basis for laser systems for refractive surgery developed at the Physics Instrumentation Center (PIC) at the Prokhorov General Physics Institute (GPI), Russian Academy of Sciences.

  9. Thermo electronic laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, L. K.; Rasor, N. S.

    1976-01-01

    The thermo electronic laser energy converter (TELEC) is described and compared to the Waymouth converter and the conventional thermionic converter. The electrical output characteristics and efficiency of TELEC operation are calculated for a variety of design variables. Calculations and results are briefly outlined. It is shown that the TELEC concept can potentially convert 25 to 50 percent of incident laser radiation into electric power at high power densities and high waste heat rejection temperatures.

  10. The UK free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, E. W.

    1985-12-01

    The basic operating principles of a free electron laser (FEL) are reviewed. A description of a British research program to develop a pulsed relativistic electron beam and laser cavity for infrared and optical operation, the UK FEL program, is given. The tunable energy of the UK FEL is in the range 50-125 MeV, and the current is greater than or equal to 200 mA. The FEL Wiggler field consists of a periodic structure of permanent magnets made up of four sections each. The main goals of the UK FEL program are to study the spontaneous emission of the electron beam, as well as the amplification characteristics of the CO2 laser beam. Some of the prospective applications of infrared FELs include: single or multiphoton excitation; molecular dissociation; excitation of charge carriers over the infrared range; and optical bistable switching.

  11. Progress of the array laser detonation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Rui; He, Ai-feng; Wang, Hao-yu

    2016-01-01

    This paper stated the main characteristics of the array laser technology, introduced high application and development at home and abroad, especially having a comparison of solid array laser technology with semiconductor array laser technology on fast initiation and fire energy, etc. by researchment of the array laser technology, this paper forsaw the prospect of the array laser. at last, this paper summaries plenty of advantages of the laser array technology on miniaturization, intellectualization, integration.

  12. Uses of laser technology described

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-05-01

    The early gas lasers have been succeeded by solid phase, semiconductor, liquid, and free-electron lasers. They are used primarily in the following: medicine, information systems, engineering equipment and machine tools, construction and demolition, scientific laboratories and in reading the bar codes used to label various industrial, food and other products.

  13. Advances in femtosecond laser technology

    PubMed Central

    Callou, Thais Pinheiro; Garcia, Renato; Mukai, Adriana; Giacomin, Natalia T; de Souza, Rodrigo Guimarães; Bechara, Samir J

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser technology has become widely adopted by ophthalmic surgeons. The purpose of this study is to discuss applications and advantages of femtosecond lasers over traditional manual techniques, and related unique complications in cataract surgery and corneal refractive surgical procedures, including: LASIK flap creation, intracorneal ring segment implantation, presbyopic treatments, keratoplasty, astigmatic keratotomy, and intrastromal lenticule procedures. PMID:27143847

  14. Laser applications in the electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washio, Kunihiko

    1999-07-01

    This paper explains current status and technological trends in laser materials processing applications in electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan. Various laser equipment based on solid state lasers or gas lasers such as excimer lasers or CO2 lasers has been developed and applied in manufacturing electronic and optoelectronic devices to meet the strong demands for advanced device manufacturing technologies for high-performance, lightweight, low power-consumption portable digital electronic appliances, cellular mobile phones, personal computers, etc. Representative applications of solid-state lasers are, opaque and clear defects repairing of photomasks for LSIs and LCDs, trimming of thick-film chip resistors and low resistance metal resistors, laser cutting and drilling of thin films for high-pin count semiconductor CSP packages, laser patterning of thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells, and laser welding of electronic components such as hard-disk head suspensions, optical modules, miniature relays and lithium ion batteries. Compact and highly efficient diode- pumped and Q-switched solid-state lasers in second or third harmonic operation mode are now being increasingly incorporated in various laser equipment for fine material processing. Representative applications of excimer lasers are, sub-quarter micron design-rule LSI lithography and low- temperature annealing of poly-silicon TFT LCD.

  15. Electron beam pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Electron-beam-pumped semiconductor ultra-violet optical sources (ESUVOSs) are disclosed that use ballistic electron pumped wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The sources may produce incoherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped light emitting triodes (ELETs). The sources may produce coherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped laser triodes (ELTs). The ELTs may take the form of electron-beam-pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (EVCSEL) or edge emitting electron-beam-pumped lasers (EEELs). The semiconductor medium may take the form of an aluminum gallium nitride alloy that has a mole fraction of aluminum selected to give a desired emission wavelength, diamond, or diamond-like carbon (DLC). The sources may be produced from discrete components that are assembled after their individual formation or they may be produced using batch MEMS-type or semiconductor-type processing techniques to build them up in a whole or partial monolithic manner, or combination thereof.

  16. NASA Space Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Over the next two decades, the number of space based laser missions for mapping, spectroscopy, remote sensing and other scientific investigations will increase several fold. The demand for high wall-plug efficiency, low noise, narrow linewidth laser systems to meet different systems requirements that can reliably operate over the life of a mission will be high. The general trends will be for spatial quality very close to the diffraction limit, improved spectral performance, increased wall-plug efficiency and multi-beam processing. Improved spectral performance will include narrower spectral width (very near the transform limit), increased wavelength stability and or tuning (depending on application) and lasers reaching a wider range of wavelengths stretching into the mid-infrared and the near ultraviolet. We are actively developing high efficiency laser transmitter and high-sensitivity laser receiver systems that are suitable for spaceborne applications.

  17. Hybrid free electron laser devices

    SciTech Connect

    Asgekar, Vivek; Dattoli, G.

    2007-03-15

    We consider hybrid free electron laser devices consisting of Cerenkov and undulator sections. We will show that they can in principle be used as segmented devices and also show the possibility of exploiting Cerenkov devices for the generation of nonlinear harmonic coherent power. We discuss both oscillator and amplifier schemes.

  18. Los Alamos Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Kraus, R.H.; Ledford, J.; Meier, K.L.; Meyer, R.E.; Nguyen, D.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sigler, F.L.; Young, L.M.; Wang, T.S.; Wilson, W.L.; Wood, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    At Los Alamos, we are building a free-electron laser (FEL) for industrial, medical, and research applications. This FEL, which will incorporate many of the new technologies developed over the last decade, will be compact in size, robust, and user-friendly. Electrons produced by a photocathode will be accelerated to 20 MeV by a high-brightness accelerator and transported using permanent-magnet quadrupoles and dipoles. They will form an electron beam with an excellent instantaneous beam quality of 10 {pi} mm mrad in transverse emittance and 0.3% in energy spread at a peak current up to 300 A. Including operation at higher harmonics, the laser wavelength extends form 3.7 {mu}m to 0.4 {mu}m. In this paper, we will describe the project and the programs to date. 10 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  20. Laser Metalworking Technology Transfer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    development work relating to the laser hardfacing of aircraft S-"carrier catapult rails have been performed, and preliminary techniques and...processing data established for different combin- ations of hardfacing alloys/substrate materials. All the laser processing performed in this program was...such cladding. Speci- fically, it was desired to develop methods for cladding the rail material with hardfacing alloys having approximately the same

  1. Future Applications of Electronic Technology to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Arthur J.; And Others

    Developments in electronic technology that have improved and linked together telecommunication and computers are discussed, as well as their use in instruction, implications of this use, and associated issues. The first section briefly describes the following developments: microcomputers and microprocessors, bubble memory, lasers, holography,…

  2. Future Applications of Electronic Technology to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Arthur J.; And Others

    Developments in electronic technology that have improved and linked together telecommunication and computers are discussed, as well as their use in instruction, implications of this use, and associated issues. The first section briefly describes the following developments: microcomputers and microprocessors, bubble memory, lasers, holography,…

  3. Evaluation of Titanium Alloys Fabricated Using Rapid Prototyping Technologies-Electron Beam Melting and Laser Beam Melting.

    PubMed

    Koike, Mari; Greer, Preston; Owen, Kelly; Lilly, Guo; Murr, Lawrence E; Gaytan, Sara M; Martinez, Edwin; Okabe, Toru

    2011-10-10

    This study characterized properties of Ti-6Al-4V ELI (extra low interstitial, ASTM grade 23) specimens fabricated by a laser beam melting (LBM) and an electron beam melting (EBM) system for dental applications. Titanium alloy specimens were made into required size and shape for each standard test using fabrication methods. The LBM specimens were made by an LBM machine utilizing 20 µm of Ti-6Al-4V ELI powder. Ti-6Al-4V ELI specimens were also fabricated by an EBM using 40 µm of Ti-6Al-4V ELI powder (average diameter, 40 µm: Arcam AB(Ò)) in a vacuum. As a control, cast Ti-6Al-4V ELI specimens (Cast) were made using a centrifugal casting machine in an MgO-based mold. Also, a wrought form of Ti-6Al-4V ELI (Wrought) was used as a control. The mechanical properties, corrosion properties and grindability (wear properties) were evaluated and data was analyzed using ANOVA and a non-parametric method (α = 0.05). The strength of the LBM and wrought specimens were similar, whereas the EBM specimens were slightly lower than those two specimens. The hardness of both the LBM and EBM specimens was similar and slightly higher than that of the cast and wrought alloys. For the higher grindability speed at 1,250 m/min, the volume loss of Ti64 LBM and EBM showed no significant differences among all the fabrication methods. LBM and EBM exhibited favorable results in fabricating dental appliances with excellent properties as found for specimens made by other fabricating methods.

  4. Fluxless laser soldering for electronic packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Keicher, D.M.

    1991-12-31

    Conventional soldering typically requires the use of reactive fluxes to promote wetting. The resulting flux residues are removed primarily with halogenated or chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents. With the mandated phaseout of CFCs by the year 2000, there has been a concentrated effort to develop alternative, environmentally compatible manufacturing and cleaning technologies that will satisfy the restrictions placed on CFCs, but still yield high quality product. Sandia National Laboratories is currently evaluating a variety of alternative fluxless soldering technologies which can be applied to electronic packaging. Laser soldering in a controlled atmosphere has shown great potential as an environmentally compatible process. The effects of laser heating with a 100 watt CW Nd:YAG laser, joint design, and base/filler metal reactions on achieving fluxless wetting with good metallurgical bonds were examined. Satisfactory Ni-Au plated Kovar{reg_sign} solder joints were made with 80In-15Pb-5Ag and 63Sn-37Pb (wt. %) solder alloys in a slightly reducing cover gas. Wetting generally increased with increasing laser power, decreasing laser beam spot size, and decreasing part travel speed. The materials and processing interaction effects are identified and discussed.

  5. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stein, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  6. AN ELECTRON SOURCE FOR A LASER ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C

    2004-09-15

    Laser accelerators offer the promise of producing attosecond electron bunches from a compact accelerator. Electron source requirements for laser accelerators are challenging in several respects, but are achievable. The authors discuss these requirements, and propose an injector design. Simulation and design work for essential components for a laser accelerator electron source suitable for a high energy physics machine will be presented. Near-term plans to test key technical components of the laser injector will also be discussed.

  7. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  8. Laser Technologies in Industry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    generated by laser inspection of a random array ot tineparticles is a widely used method for characterizing the size distribution ot the scattering...The subsequent shifts in the size distributions are then used to adjust the process parameters according to this control scheme applied. The crystal...applied and the deconvolution step used for translating the recorded scatter pattern into a size distribution . Therefore a summarized survey is

  9. Radiobiological effectiveness of laser accelerated electrons in comparison to electron beams from a conventional linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Baumann, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Kaluza, Malte; Karsch, Leonhard; Lessmann, Elisabeth; Naumburger, Doreen; Nicolai, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sauerbrey, Roland; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Pawelke, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The notable progress in laser particle acceleration technology promises potential medical application in cancer therapy through compact and cost effective laser devices that are suitable for already existing clinics. Previously, consequences on the radiobiological response by laser driven particle beams characterised by an ultra high peak dose rate have to be investigated. Therefore, tumour and non-malignant cells were irradiated with pulsed laser accelerated electrons at the JETI facility for the comparison with continuous electrons of a conventional therapy LINAC. Dose response curves were measured for the biological endpoints clonogenic survival and residual DNA double strand breaks. The overall results show no significant differences in radiobiological response for in vitro cell experiments between laser accelerated pulsed and clinical used electron beams. These first systematic in vitro cell response studies with precise dosimetry to laser driven electron beams represent a first step toward the long term aim of the application of laser accelerated particles in radiotherapy.

  10. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hirose, T.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  11. Electra: A Repetitively Pulsed, Electron Beam Pumped KrF Laser to Develop the Technologies for Fusion Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    primary source of beam electrons comes from the inside of the capillary wall, and not explosive emission from the cathode material itself. This should...emitted from a field emission cathode driven by a fast pulsed power system. The electron beam propagates through a thin foil, which serves as the...pressure after the shot was reduced about five fold. In the case of the carbon fiber cathode , the RMS non-uniformity of the electron beam dropped

  12. FPGA technology application in a fast measurement and control system for the TESLA superconducting cavity of a FLASH free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2007-08-01

    Contemporary basic research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other branches uses methods based on sample penetration (and the effect measurement) with pulsed ultra-short EM waves of very high beam intensity. This paper is an overview of a free electron laser (FEL) used in such methods. A method for the stabilization of the EM field in a superconducting 'TESLA' cavity accelerator for electrons is presented. This requires precise measurements of the field. The SC accelerator is a basic part of the FEL. The given example concerns the FLASH machine in DESY. The presented, high power EM field stabilization system is based on FPGA circuits with embedded fast hardware multiplication blocks. Examples of a few families of such new generation practically designed and constructed system realizations are given. The system is referred to as the SIMCON (from the microwave superconducting cavity SIMulator and CONtroller). SIMCONs consist of either single-module, multi-module configurable or multichannel distributed units. The SIMCON system stabilizes the EM field by a very fast feedback loop with an adaptation process, supplemented with a feed-forward. The following are presented: a parametric hardware description (firmware) in the form of behavioural VHDL algorithms; implementation results in VirtexIIPro circuits; examples of measurements of high power EM field stability performed under the nominal conditions of accelerator work.

  13. Overview of Flexible Electronics Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, I.-Chun; Wagner, Sigurd

    This chapter provides an overview of the history, concepts, and possible applications of flexible electronics from the perspectives of materials and fabrication technology. The focus is on large-area capable electronic surfaces. These are made of backplane and frontplane optoelectronics that are fabricated as fully integrated circuits on flexible substrates. The discussion covers flexible electronics, and reaches back to rigid-substrate precursor technology where appropriate. Flexible electronics is a wide-open and rapidly developing field of research, development, pilot production, and field trials. The chapter puts a perspective on the technology by systematizing it and by describing representative examples.

  14. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: Operating the SDUV-FEL with the echo-enabled harmonic generation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Hui; Deng, Hai-Xiao; Gu, Qiang; Li, Dong-Guo; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Zhen-Tang

    2009-08-01

    Using the recently proposed echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) free-electron laser (FEL) scheme, it is shown that operating the Shanghai deep ultraviolet FEL (SDUV-FEL) with single-stage to higher harmonics is very promising, with higher frequency up-conversion efficiency, higher harmonic selectivity and lower power requirement of the seed laser. The considerations on a proof-of-principle experiment and expected performance in SDUV-FEL are given.

  15. Development of laser technology in Poland: 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankiewicz, Zdzisław; Jabczyński, Jan K.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper is an introduction to the volume of proceedings and a concise digest of works presented during the XIth National Symposium on Laser Technology (SLT2016) [1]. The Symposium is organized since 1984 every three years [2-8]. SLT2016 was organized by the Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology (IO, WAT) [9], Warsaw, with cooperation of Warsaw University of Technology (WUT) [10], in Jastarnia on 27-30 September 2016. Symposium Proceedings are traditionally published by SPIE [11-19]. The meeting has gathered around 150 participants who presented around 120 research and technical papers. The Symposium, organized every 3 years is a good portrait of laser technology and laser applications development in Poland at university laboratories, governmental institutes, company R&D laboratories, etc. The SLT also presents the current technical projects under realization by the national research, development and industrial teams. Topical tracks of the Symposium, traditionally divided to two large areas - sources and applications, were: laser sources in near and medium infrared, picosecond and femtosecond lasers, optical fiber lasers and amplifiers, semiconductor lasers, high power and high energy lasers and their applications, new materials and components for laser technology, applications of laser technology in measurements, metrology and science, military applications of laser technology, laser applications in environment protection and remote detection of trace substances, laser applications in medicine and biomedical engineering, laser applications in industry, technologies and material engineering.

  16. Laser power beaming applications and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robert J.; Cover, Ralph A.; Curtin, Mark S.; Dinius, R.; Lampel, Michael C.

    1994-05-01

    Beaming laser energy to spacecraft has important economic potential. It promises significant reduction in the cost of access to space, for commercial and government missions. While the potential payoff is attractive, existing technologies perform the same missions and the keys to market penetration for power beaming are a competitive cost and a schedule consistent with customers' plans. Rocketdyne is considering these questions in the context of a commercial enterprise -- thus, evaluation of the requirements must be done based on market assessments and recognition that significant private funding will be involved. It is in the context of top level business considerations that the technology requirements are being assessed and the program being designed. These considerations result in the essential elements of the development program. Since the free electron laser is regarded as the `long pole in the tent,' this paper summarizes Rocketdyne's approach for a timely, cost-effective program to demonstrate an FEL capable of supporting an initial operating capability.

  17. XUV/VUV free-electron laser oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; Cooper, R.K.; Comly, J.C. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    It is shown, from computations based on a detailed theoretical model, that modest improvements in electron beam and optical mirror technologies will enable a free-electron laser, driven by an rf linear accelerator, to operate in the 50 to 200-nm range of optical wavelengths. 10 references.

  18. Accurate manipulation using laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoving, Willem

    1997-08-01

    In the industrial production of electrical, optical, and micro-mechanical components, progress in miniaturization requires improved adjusting techniques. Sub-micrometer accuracy adjustment must be obtained within seconds, and the accuracy should be stable over many years. All methods that are presently applied for manipulation in sub-micron dimensions are cumbersome, time-consuming, and tedious, and require expensive equipment. A novel method, laser adjustment, is being explored in which permanent deformation of thin metal sheets are obtained by using thermo-mechanical stresses that occur when the sheets are locally heated using short, intense laser pulses. Manipulation along several degrees of freedom can be realized by both out-of-plane and in-plane laser adjustment or a combination thereof. Within the Brite-Euram project AMULET this new automated micro- manufacturing technology for mass production is developed in order to assemble components where tolerance conditions and accessibility are beyond human capability.

  19. Electronics. Education for Technology Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb. Dept. of Technology.

    This electronics curriculum is intended to provide instructors of electronics with a useful guide for relating important new technological advances to the vocational classroom. The competency-based learning activity guides are written to be used with any electronics equipment available at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Instructors must…

  20. EAU guidelines on laser technologies.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Thomas R W; Liatsikos, Evangelos N; Nagele, Udo; Traxer, Olivier; Merseburger, Axel S

    2012-04-01

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) Guidelines Office has set up a guideline working panel to analyse the scientific evidence published in the world literature on lasers in urologic practice. Review the physical background and physiologic and technical aspects of the use of lasers in urology, as well as current clinical results from these new and evolving technologies, together with recommendations for the application of lasers in urology. The primary objective of this structured presentation of the current evidence base in this area is to assist clinicians in making informed choices regarding the use of lasers in their practice. Structured literature searches using an expert consultant were designed for each section of this document. Searches were carried out in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Medline and Embase on the Dialog/DataStar platform. The controlled terminology of the respective databases was used, and both Medical Subject Headings and EMTREE were analysed for relevant entry terms. One Cochrane review was identified. Depending on the date of publication, the evidence for different laser treatments is heterogeneous. The available evidence allows treatments to be classified as safe alternatives for the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction in different clinical scenarios, such as refractory urinary retention, anticoagulation, and antiplatelet medication. Laser treatment for bladder cancer should only be used in a clinical trial setting or for patients who are not suitable for conventional treatment due to comorbidities or other complications. For the treatment of urinary stones and retrograde endoureterotomy, lasers provide a standard tool to augment the endourologic procedure. In benign prostatic obstruction (BPO), laser vaporisation, resection, or enucleation are alternative treatment options. The standard treatment for BPO remains transurethral resection of the prostate for

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT LASER TOUCH AND TECHNOLOGIES, LLC LASER TOUCH MODEL LT-B512

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of Laser Touch model LT-B512 targeting device manufactured by Laser Touch and Technologies, LLC, for manual spray painting operations. The relative transfer efficiency (TE) improved an avera...

  2. Anomalous free electron laser interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einat, M.; Jerby, E.; Kesar, A.

    2002-05-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are considered, typically, as fast wave devices. The normal FEL interaction satisfies the tuning condition ω≅( kz+ kW) Vz , where ω and kz are the em-wave angular frequency and longitudinal wave number, respectively, Vz is the electron axial speed, and kW is the wiggler periodicity. This paper presents an anomalous FEL interaction, which may occur in slow-wave FELs (i.e. loaded by dielectric or periodic structures). The anomalous FEL effect presented here satisfies the tuning condition ω≅( kz- kW) Vz , and it resembles the anomalous effect in slow-wave cyclotron resonance masers. A necessary condition for the anomalous interaction is ω/ kz< Vz (i.e., the em-wave phase velocity should be slower than the electron beam). The paper presents a preliminary experimental result demonstrating the anomalous FEL effect in a stripline dielectric-loaded FEL experiment. A linear Pierce equation is applied to describe both the anomalous and normal FELs in the same framework. The paper is concluded with a conceptual discussion.

  3. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  4. Material Technology for Vortex Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Oda, S.; Michikami, O.; Terashima, T.

    High-T_c superconductor (HTSC) thin films are typically grown by mean of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), sputtering or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). This chapter reviews recent progress in the thin film growth technologies of HTSCs.

  5. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Szoke, Abraham; Prosnitz, Donald

    1985-01-01

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  6. Staged Electron Laser Acceleration (STELLA) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M.; Campbell, L. J.; Cline, D. B.; Fiorito, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gottschalk, S. C.; He, P.; Jander, D. R.; Kimura, W. D.; Kusche, K. P.; Liu, Y.; Pantell, R. H.; Pogorelsky, I. V.; Quimby, D. C.; Robinson, K. R.; Rule, D. W.; Sandweiss, J.; Skaritka, J.; Steinhauer, L. C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Yakimenko, Y.

    1998-04-01

    The Staged Electron Laser Acceleration (STELLA) experiment being assembled at the BNL ATF features an inverse free-electron-laser (IFEL) prebuncher feeding into an inverse Cerenkov accelerator (ICA). Both systems are driven by the same high power ATF CO2 laser. This experiment is intended to examine the important issue of rephasing and acceleration of microbunches, which are generated by the IFEL, whose longitudinal dimensions are only microns long. The current status of the experiment will be reviewed along with model predictions.

  7. Accessible Electronic and Information Technology

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Policy establishes EPA's responsibilities and procedures for making its Electronic and Information Technology (EIT) products accessible to all people, including people with disabilities, in accordance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.

  8. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  9. High Frequency Electronic Packaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, M.; Lowry, L.; Lee, K.; Kolawa, E.; Tulintseff, A.; Shalkhauser, K.; Whitaker, J.; Piket-May, M.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial and government communication, radar, and information systems face the challenge of cost and mass reduction via the application of advanced packaging technology. A majority of both government and industry support has been focused on low frequency digital electronics.

  10. Advanced Electronic Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-15

    order to permit more nondestructive diagnostic information of packaged devices, a Coates and Welter scanning electron microscope is being modified to...4453 Etude des Proprietes Magnet- iques, Electriques et Optiques des Phases de Structure Perov- skite SrVOz 9Q et SrV03 4469 Low

  11. Demodulator electronics for laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, G.; Waz, A. T.; Kaczmarek, P. R.; Antonczak, A. J.; Sotor, J. Z.; Krzempek, K.; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    2012-06-01

    One of the most important parts of a fiber-laser vibrometer is demodulation electronic section. The distortion, nonlinearity, offset and added noise of measured signal come from electronic circuits and they have direct influence on finale measuring results. Two main parameters of an investigated vibrating object: velocity V(t) and displacement s(t), influence of detected beat signals. They are: the Doppler frequency deviation f(t) and phase shift φ(t), respectively. Because of wide range of deviations it is difficult to use just one demodulator. That is the reason why we use three different types of demodulators. The first one is the IQ demodulator, which is the most sensitive one and its output is proportional to the displacement. Each IQ channel is sampled simultaneously by an analog to digital converter (ADC) integrated in a digital signal processor (DSP). The output signals from the two FM demodulators are proportional to the frequency deviation of heterodyne signals. They are sensitive directly to the velocity of the object. The main disadvantage of scattered light interferometry system is a "speckle effect", appearing in relatively large amplitude fluctuation of a heterodyne signal. To minimize "speckle effect" influence on quality of beat signals we applied the automatic gain control (AGC) system. Data acquisition, further signal processing (e.g. vibration frequency spectra) and presentation of results is realized by PC via USB interface.

  12. Demodulator electronics for laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, G.; Waz, A. T.; Kaczmarek, P. R.; Antonczak, A. J.; Sotor, J. Z.; Krzempek, K.; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    2012-06-13

    One of the most important parts of a fiber-laser vibrometer is demodulation electronic section. The distortion, nonlinearity, offset and added noise of measured signal come from electronic circuits and they have direct influence on finale measuring results. Two main parameters of an investigated vibrating object: velocity V(t) and displacement s(t), influence of detected beat signals. They are: the Doppler frequency deviation f(t) and phase shift {phi}(t), respectively. Because of wide range of deviations it is difficult to use just one demodulator. That is the reason why we use three different types of demodulators. The first one is the IQ demodulator, which is the most sensitive one and its output is proportional to the displacement. Each IQ channel is sampled simultaneously by an analog to digital converter (ADC) integrated in a digital signal processor (DSP). The output signals from the two FM demodulators are proportional to the frequency deviation of heterodyne signals. They are sensitive directly to the velocity of the object. The main disadvantage of scattered light interferometry system is a ''speckle effect'', appearing in relatively large amplitude fluctuation of a heterodyne signal. To minimize ''speckle effect'' influence on quality of beat signals we applied the automatic gain control (AGC) system. Data acquisition, further signal processing (e.g. vibration frequency spectra) and presentation of results is realized by PC via USB interface.

  13. Solid state laser technology - A NASA perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's program for developing solid-state laser technology and applying it to the Space Shuttle and Space Platform is discussed. Solid-state lasers are required to fulfill the Earth Observation System's requirements. The role of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology in developing a NASA tunable solid-state laser program is described. The major goals of the program involve developing a solid-state pump laser in the green, using AlGaAs array technology, pumping a Nd:YAG/SLAB crystal or glass, and fabricating a lidar system, with either a CO2 laser at 10.6 microns or a Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 microns, to measure tropospheric winds to an accuracy of + or - 1 m/s and a vertical resolution of 1 km. The procedures to be followed in order to visualize this technology plan include: (1) material development and characterization, (2) laser development, and (3) implementation of the lasers.

  14. Solid state laser technology - A NASA perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's program for developing solid-state laser technology and applying it to the Space Shuttle and Space Platform is discussed. Solid-state lasers are required to fulfill the Earth Observation System's requirements. The role of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology in developing a NASA tunable solid-state laser program is described. The major goals of the program involve developing a solid-state pump laser in the green, using AlGaAs array technology, pumping a Nd:YAG/SLAB crystal or glass, and fabricating a lidar system, with either a CO2 laser at 10.6 microns or a Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 microns, to measure tropospheric winds to an accuracy of + or - 1 m/s and a vertical resolution of 1 km. The procedures to be followed in order to visualize this technology plan include: (1) material development and characterization, (2) laser development, and (3) implementation of the lasers.

  15. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers designed and constructed a novel electron tunnel sensor which takes advantage of the mechanical properties of micro-machined silicon. For the first time, electrostatic forces are used to control the tunnel electrode separation, thereby avoiding the thermal drift and noise problems associated with piezoelectric actuators. The entire structure is composed of micro-machined silicon single crystals, including a folded cantilever spring and a tip. The application of this sensor to the development of a sensitive accelerometer is described.

  16. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  17. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Free electron laser physical process code (FELPPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Schmitt, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    Even at the conceptual level, the strong coupling between subsystem elements complicates the understanding and design of a free electron laser (FEL). Given the requirements for high-performance FELS, the coupling between subsystems must be included to obtain a realistic picture of the potential operational capability. The concept of an Integrated Numerical Experiment (INEX) was implemented to accurately calculate the coupling between the FEL subsystems. During the late 1980`s, the INEX approach was successfully applied to a large number of accelerator and FEL experiments. Unfortunately, because of significant manpower and computational requirements, the integrated approach is difficult to apply to trade-off and initial design studies. However, the INEX codes provided a base from which realistic accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control models could be developed. The Free Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC) includes models developed from the INEX codes, provides coupling between the subsystem models, and incorporates application models relevant to a specific study. In other words, FELPPC solves the complete physical process model using realistic physics and technology constraints. FELPPC can calculate complex FEL configurations including multiple accelerator and wiggler combinations. When compared with the INEX codes, the subsystem models have been found to be quite accurate over many orders-of-magnitude. As a result, FELPPC has been used for the initial design studies of a large number of FEL applications: high-average-power ground, space, plane, and ship based FELS; beacon and illuminator FELS; medical and compact FELS; and XUV FELS.

  19. Two-Stage Free Electron Laser Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-24

    Ctmetenar an reverse ode It ne*eey aud identify fo black nmber) Free electron laser, two-stage free electron laser, quasioptical cavity, helical ...of very high intensity (_10 W/cm ). A quasioptical cavity concept has been developed to produce such a field. A helical wiggler is needed to excite...the TE waveguide mode in this cavity. Work is described on the development of a pfmanent magnet helical wiggler for this system. Off-axis electron

  20. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Emission of surface electromagnetic waves in the case of resonance tunneling of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenov, É. M.; Luskinovich, P. N.; Romanenko, V. I.; Sobolev, A. G.; Uskov, A. V.

    1987-10-01

    A calculation is made of the spectral density of the intensity of surface electromagnetic waves excited by the passage of a current across metal-barrier-metal tunnel structures when there are quantum potential wells inside the barrier. It is shown that quasilevels in these quantum wells give rise to narrow peaks in the spectrum of the excited surface electromagnetic waves and that the quantum efficiency of the excitation of such waves by tunneling electrons can reach unity. The peak positions can be controlled by altering the voltage across a tunnel structure.

  1. Advanced Electronic Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-15

    Circuits )Group 23 3 1. Introduction 3 IT. -’iMNOS Memory 3 ITT. ’TRestructurable VLSI-"-’) 4 IV. 4Silicon Processin~g, 4 Computer Systems - Group 28 ,6...1 II I I DIGITAL INTEGRATED CIRCUITS GROUP 23 I. INTRODUCTION Scaling experiments, linking technologies and the development of CMOS design rules are...chips where the on-chip decoding is bypassed. B. Megabit Design The design of a 1-megabit memory chip has been initiated. Several key improvements over

  2. Acceleration of electrons by inverse free electron laser interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, Pietro

    Laser accelerators hold the promise to constitute the future of particle accelerators. The Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator is one of the most efficient schemes to transfer energy from very high power lasers to electron beams. This scheme uses an undulator magnet to couple the transverse electromagnetic waves to the electron motion. In this dissertation we discuss the theoretical background of the Inverse Free Electron Laser interaction and we present the simulation tool developed to study and design an Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator. The main object of the dissertation is the discussion of the Inverse Free Electron Laser experiment at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA where we observed an energy gain in excess of 20 MeV. In this experiment, a 14.5 MeV electron beam is injected in an undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The IFEL driver is a CO2 10.6 mum laser with power larger than 400 GW. The Rayleigh range of the laser, ˜1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length so that the interaction is diffraction dominated. A few per cent of the injected particles are trapped in a stable accelerating bucket. Electron with energies up to 35 MeV are measured in a magnetic spectrometer. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Three-dimensional simulations, in good agreement with the measured electron energy spectrum, indicate that most of the acceleration occurs in the first 25 cm of the undulator, corresponding to an energy gradient larger than 70 MeV/m. The measured energy spectrum also indicates that higher harmonic Inverse Free Electron Laser interaction is taking place in the second section of the undulator. The possibility of coupling the laser wave and the electron beam on a different spectral line of the undulator radiation adds a new degree of flexibility in the design of Inverse Free Electron Laser interaction schemes and this novel

  3. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Dinh C.; Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  4. Isotope separation by laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Isotope separation processes operate on very small differences, given either by the Quotient of masses with the same number of electrons or by their mass difference. When separating isotopes of light elements in mass quantities, thermodynamic processes accounting for the quotient, either in diffusion, chemical reactivity or distillation are used. For heavy elements those quotients are very small. Therefore they need a large number of separation steps. Large plants with high energy consumption result from that. As uranium isotope separation is the most important industrial field, alternatives, taking account for the mass difference, as e.g. gas centrifuges, have been developed. They use only a fraction of the energy input, but need a very large number of machines, as the individual throughput is small. Since it was discovered, that molecules of high symmetry like Uranium-Hexafluoride as a deep-cooled gas stream can be ionized by multiple photon excitation, this process was studied in detail and in competition to the selective ionization of metal vapors, as already demonstrated with uranium. The paper reports about the principles of the laser excitation for both processes, the different laboratory scale and prototypical plants built, the difficulties with materials, as far as the metal vapor laser separation is concerned, and the difficulties experienced in the similarity in molecular spectra. An overview of the relative economic merits of the different processes and the auspices in a saturated market for uranium isotope separation, together with other potential markets for molecular laser separation, is contained in the conclusions.

  5. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2012-03-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  6. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2011-11-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  7. Skylab electronic technological advancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornback, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes three electronic devices designed for use in the Skylab airlock module: the teleprinter system, the quartz crystal microbalance contamination monitor (QCM), and the speaker. Design considerations, operation, characteristics, and system development are described for these systems, with accompanying diagrams, graphs, and photographs. The teleprinter is a thermal dot printer used to produce hard copy messages by electrically heating print elements in contact with heat-sensitive paper. The QCM was designed to estimate contamination buildup on optical surfaces of the earth resources experiment package. A vibrating quartz crystal is used as a microbalance relating deposited mass to shifts in the crystal's resonant frequency. Audio devices provide communication between crew members and between crew and STDN, and also provide audible alarms, via the caution and warning system, of out-of-limit-conditions.

  8. The Next Technology Revolution - Nano Electronic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlik, Iwona

    2004-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a revolutionary engine that will engender enormous changes in a vast majority of today's industries and markets, while potentially creating whole new industries. The impact of nanotechnology is particularly significant in the electronics industry, which is constantly driven by the need for higher performance, increased functionality, smaller size and lower cost. Nanotechnology can influence many of the hundreds of components that are typically assembled to manufacture modern electronic devices. Motorola manufactures electronics for a wide range of industries and communication products. In this presentation, the typical components of a cellular phone are outlined and technology requirements for future products, the customer benefits, and the potential impact of nanotechnology on many of the components are discussed. Technology needs include reliable materials supply, processes for high volume production, experimental and simulation tools, etc. For example, even routine procedures such as failure characterization may require the development of new tools for investigating nano-scale phenomena. Business needs include the development of an effective, high volume supply chain for nano-materials and devices, disruptive product platforms, and visible performance impact on the end consumer. An equally significant long-term industry need is the availability of science and engineering graduates with a multidisciplinary focus and a deep understanding of the fundamentals of nano-technology, that can harness the technology to create revolutionary products.

  9. Direct longitudinal laser acceleration of electrons in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo, Sergio; Nanni, Emilio A.; Wong, Liang Jie; Moriena, Gustavo; Keathley, Phillip D.; Laurent, Guillaume; Miller, R. J. Dwayne; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2016-02-01

    Compact laser-driven accelerators are pursued heavily worldwide because they make novel methods and tools invented at national laboratories widely accessible in science, health, security, and technology [V. Malka et al., Principles and applications of compact laser-plasma accelerators, Nat. Phys. 4, 447 (2008)]. Current leading laser-based accelerator technologies [S. P. D. Mangles et al., Monoenergetic beams of relativistic electrons from intense laser-plasma interactions, Nature (London) 431, 535 (2004); T. Toncian et al., Ultrafast laser-driven microlens to focus and energy-select mega-electron volt protons, Science 312, 410 (2006); S. Tokita et al. Single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction with a laser-accelerated sub-MeV electron pulse, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 111911 (2009)] rely on a medium to assist the light to particle energy transfer. The medium imposes material limitations or may introduce inhomogeneous fields [J. R. Dwyer et al., Femtosecond electron diffraction: "Making the molecular movie,", Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 364, 741 (2006)]. The advent of few cycle ultraintense radially polarized lasers [S. Carbajo et al., Efficient generation of ultraintense few-cycle radially polarized laser pulses, Opt. Lett. 39, 2487 (2014)] has ushered in a novel accelerator concept [L. J. Wong and F. X. Kärtner, Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially polarized laser beam, Opt. Express 18, 25035 (2010); F. Pierre-Louis et al. Direct-field electron acceleration with ultrafast radially polarized laser beams: Scaling laws and optimization, J. Phys. B 43, 025401 (2010); Y. I. Salamin, Electron acceleration from rest in vacuum by an axicon Gaussian laser beam, Phys. Rev. A 73, 043402 (2006); C. Varin and M. Piché, Relativistic attosecond electron pulses from a free-space laser-acceleration scheme, Phys. Rev. E 74, 045602 (2006); A. Sell and F. X. Kärtner, Attosecond electron bunches accelerated and compressed by radially polarized laser

  10. Laser science and technology update - 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H L; Powell, H T

    1999-09-23

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS and T) Program's mission is to provide advanced solid-state laser and optics technologies for the Laboratory, government, and industry. The primary activities of LS and T in 1998 have been threefold--to complete the laser technology development and laser component testing for the ICF/NIF Program, to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD) and DOE, and to address the needs of other government agencies and U.S. industry. After a four-year campaign, the LS and T Program achieved timely completion of the laser development effort for the NIF in 1998. This effort includes the special laser and component development, integrated performance testing on Beamlet, and detailed design and cost optimization using computation codes. Upon completing the Title II design review, the focus of the LS and T support effort has been shifted toward NIF laser hardware acquisition and deployment. The LS and T team also continued to develop advanced high-power solid-state laser technology for both the U.S. government and industrial partners. Progress was also made in several new areas: (a) diode-pumped solid-state laser drivers for high-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy; (b) high-average-power femtosecond and nanosecond lasers for materials processing; and (c) femtosecond lasers for the generation of advanced light sources.

  11. Electronic Media, Videodisc Technology, and the Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Frances E.

    1985-01-01

    The potential of electronic media for art education is examined. Discussed are computers, video recorders, interactive video discs, and two-way cable television. Emphasis is on laser videodisc technology. What changes must occur in the educational system to accommodate technology and discipline-based art education are also discussed. (Author/RM)

  12. One Micron Laser Technology Advancements at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the advancements made in one micron laser technology at Goddard Space Flight Center. It includes information about risk factors that are being addressed by GSFC, and overviews of the various programs that GSFC is currently managing that are using 1 micron laser technology.

  13. Precision laser processing for micro electronics and fiber optic manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Andrew; Osborne, Mike; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Dinkel, Duane W.

    2008-02-01

    The application of laser based materials processing for precision micro scale manufacturing in the electronics and fiber optic industry is becoming increasingly widespread and accepted. This presentation will review latest laser technologies available and discuss the issues to be considered in choosing the most appropriate laser and processing parameters. High repetition rate, short duration pulsed lasers have improved rapidly in recent years in terms of both performance and reliability enabling flexible, cost effective processing of many material types including metal, silicon, plastic, ceramic and glass. Demonstrating the relevance of laser micromachining, application examples where laser processing is in use for production will be presented, including miniaturization of surface mount capacitors by applying a laser technique for demetalization of tracks in the capacitor manufacturing process and high quality laser machining of fiber optics including stripping, cleaving and lensing, resulting in optical quality finishes without the need for traditional polishing. Applications include telecoms, biomedical and sensing. OpTek Systems was formed in 2000 and provide fully integrated systems and sub contract services for laser processes. They are headquartered in the UK and are establishing a presence in North America through a laser processing facility in South Carolina and sales office in the North East.

  14. Electronic Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in electronic technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings, and are used…

  15. Electronic Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in electronic technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings, and are used…

  16. Solar driven lasers for power satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taussio, R.; Cassady, P.; Klosterman, E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological feasibility of using multimagawatt lasers for space power transmission is discussed. Candidate lasers include electric discharge lasers, direct optically pumped lasers, and free electron lasers.

  17. Electronics reliability and measurement technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A summary is presented of the Electronics Reliability and Measurement Technology Workshop. The meeting examined the U.S. electronics industry with particular focus on reliability and state-of-the-art technology. A general consensus of the approximately 75 attendees was that "the U.S. electronics industries are facing a crisis that may threaten their existence". The workshop had specific objectives to discuss mechanisms to improve areas such as reliability, yield, and performance while reducing failure rates, delivery times, and cost. The findings of the workshop addressed various aspects of the industry from wafers to parts to assemblies. Key problem areas that were singled out for attention are identified, and action items necessary to accomplish their resolution are recommended.

  18. Laser-Bessel-Beam-Driven Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dazhi; Imasaki, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    A vacuum-laser-driven acceleration scheme using a laser Bessel beam is presented. In contrast to the conventional Gaussian beam, the Bessel beam demonstrates diffraction-free propagation, which implies the possibility of extending the effective interaction distance for a laser-electron system. In this method, the Bessel beam is truncated by annular slits to realize a series of nonsuccessive dim regions along the path of laser propagation, where the amplitude of the laser field is reduced, making the electron slightly decelerate as it travels in the decelerating phase. We analyzed the propagation characteristics of the truncated Bessel beam with scalar diffraction theory, and then introduced this approach with careful investigation of a three-stage acceleration model.

  19. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antici, P.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Rossi, A. R.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  20. Electron Impact of Laser Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-14

    In one apparatus a pulsed electron gun with less than 500 p sec cut off is used * to excite atoms or molecules contained in a gas cell . Time resolved...E can be further complicated by accidental coincidences. These occur when the clock is started and stopped by electrons and photons from different...to study the angular distribution of scattered electrons and will be referred to as electron-beam-gas- cell and crossed electron-beam-gas-beam

  1. Midwest Free Electron Laser Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-31

    PDT ) at the molecular level: a light scattering tissue with intrinisic absorption, the photosensitizer , and a singlet-oxygen sensitive biological target...particular significance, since the various projects are interdependent, being concerned with clinical studies of laser effects in neurosurgery, laser delivery...potato is being investigated with Photofrin II as the photosensitizer . This model system includes the key compcnents of photodynamic tumor therapy

  2. Laser wakefield acceleration of polarized electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, D. V.; Andreev, N. E.; Cros, B.

    2016-11-01

    The acceleration of highly polarized electron beams are widely used in state-of-the-art high-energy physics experiments. In this work, a model for investigation of polarization dynamics of electron beams in the laser-plasma accelerator depending on the initial energy of electrons was developed and tested. To obtain the evolution of the trajectory and momentum of the electron for modeling its acceleration the wakefield structure was determined. The spin precession of the beam electron was described by Thomas-Bargman-Michel-Telegdi equations. The evolution of the electron beam polarization was investigated for zero-emittance beams with zero-energy spread.

  3. Laser-ultrasonic technologies for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Latyshev, Alexei S.

    1999-06-01

    This review tackles the problem of further developing laser- ultrasonic medical technologies and gives the comparison of different laser and ultrasound combinations. The features of combined influence on biotissue are explicated with due regard for mechanic, ultrasonic (US), and thermal effects. The review present the effect of self-cleaning an optical fiber tip from the laser destruction products of biotissue, the result of research on the possibility of laser-US technology applications in endoscopy, and the ways of suppressing unwanted bending oscillations. Various spheres and peculiarities of applying laser-US technologies are discussed, including microsurgery, cosmetology, transcutaneous drug delivery, and the treatment of chronic prostatitis and infected wounds. Furthermore, the analysis of transcutaneous drug delivery methods employing a portable pulsed Er:YAG laser is presented. Drug diffusion has been shown to be enhanced under acoustic and US effects. The photo-vacuum drug injection mechanism recently suggested is discussed. It turned out that laser-US technology can be suitable for both impregnating the photosensitizer in local photodynamic therapy procedures and conducting microsurgery operations involving drug injection. Treatment of infectious processes based on the bactericidal action of photosensitizers and ultrasound due to the cavitation effect in solutions is described. An additional therapeutic effect can be achieved via the US intermingling of solutions with their simulations illumination by a matrix of red lasers or light diodes. An outlook on further developing laser-US technology and the ways of its apparatus realization are considered.

  4. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  5. Electronically Tunable Filter and Dye Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CaMoO4 filter was constructed, evaluated, and used to tune a flashlamp pumped dye laser. A total electronic tuning range of 6800 to 4735 was achieved...theoretical study of an electronically tunable CaMoO4 filter for use in the near infrared portion of the spectrum. (Author)

  6. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; ...

    2016-02-29

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient Inverse Free Electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gra- dients exceeding 200 MV/m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti:Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, non destructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with < 100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected tomore » pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.« less

  7. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. T.; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Betts, S.; Fisher, S.; Tremaine, A.; Musumeci, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200 MV /m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti :Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100 fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  8. Isochronous Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Berz, M.

    1990-07-01

    The transport systems required to feed a beam of highly relativistic electrons into a free electron laser have to satisfy very stringent requirements with respect to isochronicity and achromaticity. In addition, the line has to be tunable to match different operating modes of the free electron laser. Various beamlines emphasizing different aspects, such as quality of isochronicity and achromaticity, simplicity of the design, and space configurations are shown and compared. Solutions are presented having time resolution in the range of 2 to less than 0.5 picoseconds for one percent of energy spread.

  9. Biomedical Free Electron Laser Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    consistent with a;(echanism mediated by singlet oxygen. Involvement of peroxide and radicals havŚt been strictly ruled out. Exposures to laser light that...1981) J. Cell Biology 2Q:595-604. Tan, 0. and S. Kennedy (1987) Abstract 21. Lasers in Surg. and Med. 7-73.SI I I ! ! I I I I I I CHART IS~-~OO3 - ~ -F...tryptophan, enzyme activity and production of "daughter products". The latter appear to include N- formyl -kynurenine, kynurenine, tryptamine, and

  10. Electronics Technology Curriculum Development Project (ETCDP): Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana.

    The report describes in detail the Electronics Technology Curriculum Development Project, a two-year electronics technology program with six core courses (three in circuit analysis and three in fundamentals of electronics) and an introduction to electronics technology course. Two chapters present the operation, scope, and objectives of the project…

  11. Progress and development in fibre laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horley, Ray; Norman, Stephen; Zervas, Mikhail N.

    2007-10-01

    High performance fibre lasers are now well established as an extremely robust and reliable technology enabling a growing and diverse number of demanding industrial and medical and applications. Compared to rival technologies, such as carbon-dioxide (CO II), Lamp/Diode-Pumped Solid-State (L/DPSS) and disk lasers, fibre lasers offer a number of unique characteristics that have resulted in their wide adoption in an increasing number of industrial sectors. In addition to replacing conventional lasers in existing applications, fibre lasers have been very successful in enabling new applications, both factors which explain their increasing market share. In this paper we describe the basic features of fibre lasers, and discuss their generic advantages compared with other laser technologies and consider how these may translate to defence applications. We explain our proprietary cladding-pumping technology (GTWave TM) and the laser architectures we use to implement our commercial products. We present parametric performance data that show the vast range of pulse waveforms that can be produced and discuss some new industrial applications that they have recently enabled. Finally, we reference some of the leading research results for multi-kW continuous-wave (CW) fibre lasers and summarise SPIE's published work in this field.

  12. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  13. Free Electron Laser Research in Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-03

    necessar and identifi by block mtiwbmer Free electron laser Relativistic electron beam Gain Undulator Stimulated emission Wiggler magnet Spontaneous...lectron Beam, P 473. pass through a wiggler magnet K. Felch, L. Vallier, and which has a periodic transverse J.M. Ruzzi, Col ective Free- field. When...the electron beam is 7T-7 ot on Taspr in Re. onant Pump considered, the fiele of the Ce )d :t 0 Exper rt and wiggler magnet is equivalent to a 7hecnr

  14. Galvanometer scanning technology for laser additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi; Li, Jin; Lucas, Mark

    2017-02-01

    A galvanometer laser beam scanning system is an essential element in many laser additive manufacturing (LAM) technologies including Stereolithography (SLA), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Understanding the laser beam scanning techniques and recent innovations in this field will greatly benefit the 3D laser printing system integration and technology advance. One of the challenges to achieve high quality 3D printed parts is due to the non-uniform laser power density delivered on the materials caused by the acceleration and deceleration movements of the galvanometer at ends of the hatching and outlining patterns. One way to solve this problem is to modulate the laser power as the function of the scanning speed during the acceleration or deceleration periods. Another strategy is to maintain the constant scanning speed while accurately coordinating the laser on and off operation throughout the job. In this paper, we demonstrate the high speed, high accuracy and low drift digital scanning technology that incorporates both techniques to achieve uniform laser density with minimal additional process development. With the constant scanning speed method, the scanner not only delivers high quality and uniform results, but also a throughput increase of 23% on a typical LAM job, compared to that of the conventional control method that requires galvanometer acceleration and deceleration movements.

  15. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  16. Electron injector for Iranian Infrared Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Jazini, J.; Fathi, M.; Khosravi, N.; Shokri, B.

    2016-12-01

    The quality of the electron beam for applications like free electron lasers (FELs) has a direct impact on the quality of the laser radiation. The electron injector considered for Iranian Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRIFEL) includes a thermionic RF electron gun plus a bunch compressor as the electron preinjector and a 50 MeV constant gradient traveling wave linac as the main accelerator of the electron injector. In the present work, a thermionic RF gun is designed and matched with an optimized linac to produce a high quality mono-energetic electron beam. The results show that the preinjector is capable of delivering an electron bunch with 1 ps bunch length and 3 mm-mrad emittance to the linac entrance which is desirable for IRIFEL operation. The results also show that by geometrical manipulation and optimization of the linac structure, the pattern of the RF fields in the linac will be more symmetric, which is important in order to produce high stable mono-energetic bunches.

  17. High power induction free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John L.

    1988-12-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by linear induction accelerators have considerable potential for scaling to high average powers. The high electron beam current produces large single pass gain and extraction efficiency, resulting in high peak power. The pulse repetition frequency scaling is limited primarily by accelerator and pulsed power technology. Two FEL experiments have been performed by the Beam Research Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): The ELF experiment used the 3.5-MeV beam from the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and operated at a wavelength of 8.6 mm. This device achieved an overall single-pass gain of 45 dB, an output power of 1.5 GW, and an extraction efficiency of 35 percent. The microwave beam was confined in a waveguide in the 4-m-long wiggler. The PALADIN experiment uses the 45-MeV beam from the Advanced Test Accelerator and operates at a wavelength of 10.6 micrometers. Using a 15-m long wiggler a single pass gain of 27 dB was produced. Gain guiding was observed to confine the amplified beam within a beam tube that had a Fresnel number less than 1. The results of these experiments have been successfully modeled using a three dimensional particle simulation code. The Program also has ongoing efforts to develop wiggler, pulsed power and induction linac technology. A focus of much of this work is the ETA-II accelerator, which incorporates magnetic pulse compression drivers. One application of ETA-II will be to drive a 1 mm wavelength FEL. The microwave output will be used for a plasma heating experiment.

  18. High Power Induction Free Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John L.

    1989-07-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by linear induction accelerators have considerable potential for scaling to high average powers. The high electron beam current produces large single pass gain and extraction efficiency, resulting in high peak power. The pulse repetition frequency scaling is limited primarily by accelerator and pulsed power technology. Two FEL experiments have been performed by the Beam Research Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): The ELF experiment used the 3.5-MeV beam from the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and operated at a wavelength of 8.6 mm. This device achieved an overall single-pass gain of 45 dB, an output power of 1.5 GW, and an extraction efficiency of 35%. The microwave beam was confined in a waveguide in the 4-m-long wiggler. The PALADIN experiment uses the 45-MeV beam from the Advanced Test Accelerator and operates at a wavelength of 10.6 IA. Using a 15-m long wiggler a single pass gain of 27 dB was produced. Gain guiding was observed to confine the amplified beam within a beam tube that had a Fresnel number less than 1. The results of these expriments have been successfully modeled using a three dimensional particle simulation code. The Program also has ongoing efforts to develop wiggler, pulsed power and induction linac technology. A focus of much of this work is the ETA-II accelerator, which incorporates magnetic pulse compression drivers. One application of ETA-II will be to drive a 1 mm wavelength FEL. The microwave output will be used for a plasma heating experiment.

  19. An overview of laser microdissection technologies.

    PubMed

    Murray, Graeme I

    2007-01-01

    The development of laser-based tissue microdissection systems has provided the basis for the rapid acquisition of specific morphologically and/or phenotypically distinct types of cells for many types of molecular analysis. Two laser microdissection technologies based on distinct principles have been developed, namely: laser capture microdissection and laser cutting microdissection. This commentary will outline the principles of each system and indicate their main advantages and potential drawbacks. Also discussed will be methods of cell and tissue preparation with particular reference to fixation and staining, which are crucial to both successful laser-based microdissection and also downstream molecular studies. Laser microdissection techniques are powerful technologies which combine morphology and histochemistry with sophisticated molecular analysis. Through their appropriate application they have provided significant new insights into cell biology and pathology.

  20. Spatially modulated laser pulses for printing electronics.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Kim, Heungsoo; Mathews, Scott; Piqué, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is reviewed. Combining this technique with high-viscosity donor ink (silver nanopaste) results in laser-printed features that are highly congruent in shape and size to the incident laser beam spatial profile. The DMD empowers LIFT to become a highly parallel, rapidly reconfigurable direct-write technology. By adapting half-toning techniques to the DMD bitmap image, the laser transfer threshold fluence for 10 μm features can be reduced using an edge-enhanced beam profile. The integration of LIFT with this beam-shaping technique allows the printing of complex large-area patterns with a single laser pulse.

  1. Free electron lasers driven by linear induction accelerators: High power radiation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzechowski, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    The technology of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and linear induction accelerators (LIAs) is addressed by outlining the following topics: fundamentals of FELs; basic concepts of linear induction accelerators; the Electron Laser Facility (a microwave FEL); PALADIN (an infrared FEL); magnetic switching; IMP; and future directions (relativistic klystrons). This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  2. Laser Science & Technology Program Annual Report - 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H-L

    2001-03-20

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program Annual Report 2001 provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL LS&T Program during the April 2001 to March 2002 period using three formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the year; (2) brief summaries of research and development activity highlights within the four Program elements: Advanced Lasers and Components (AL&C), Laser Optics and Materials (LO&M), Short Pulse Laser Applications and Technologies (SPLAT), and High-Energy Laser System and Tests (HELST); and (3) a compilation of selected articles and technical reports published in reputable scientific or technology journals in this period. All three elements (Annual Overview, Activity Highlights, and Technical Reports) are also on the Web: http://laser.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. The underlying mission for the LS&T Program is to develop advanced lasers, optics, and materials technologies and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the Laboratory and the nation. This mission statement has been our guide for defining work appropriate for our Program. A major new focus of LS&T beginning this past year has been the development of high peak power short-pulse capability for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). LS&T is committed to this activity.

  3. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation ({lambda} = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1{sub w1} = 1.43cm) and then absorbed ({approximately} 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1{sub w2} = 1.8 {minus} 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup ({approximately} 9%) of electrons to {approximately} 1MeV.

  4. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation ([lambda] = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1[sub w1] = 1.43cm) and then absorbed ([approximately] 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1[sub w2] = 1.8 [minus] 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup ([approximately] 9%) of electrons to [approximately] 1MeV.

  5. Biophysics applications of free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert H.

    1993-07-01

    There has been a significant financial effort poured into the technology of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) over the last 15 years or so. Much of that money was spent in the hopes that the FEL would be a key element in the Strategic Defense Initiative, but a small fraction of money was allocated for the Medical FEL program. The Medical FELs program was aimed at exploring how the unique capabilities of the FEL could be utilized in medical applications. Part of the Medical FEl effort has been in clinical applications, but some of the effort has also been put into exploring applications of the FEL for fundamental biological physics. It is the purpose of this brief text to outline some of the fundamental biophysics I have done, and some plans we have for the future. Since the FEL is (still) considered to be an avant garde device, the reader should not be surprised to find that much of the work proposed here is also rather radical and avant garde.

  6. European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL): local implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European X-Ray FEL - free electron laser is under construction in DESY Hamburg. It is scheduled to be operational at 2015/16 at a cost more than 1 billion Euro. The laser uses SASE method to generate x-ray light. It is propelled by an electron linac of 17,5GeV energy and more than 2km in length. The linac uses superconducting SRF TESLA technology working at 1,3 GHz in frequency. The prototype of EXFEL is FLASH Laser (200 m in length), where the "proof of principle" was checked, and from the technologies were transferred to the bigger machine. The project was stared in the nineties by building a TTF Laboratory -Tesla Test Facility. The EXFEL laser is a child of a much bigger teraelectronovolt collider project TESLA (now abandoned in Germany but undertaken by international community in a form the ILC). A number of experts and young researchers from Poland participate in the design, construction and research of the FLASH and EXFEL lasers.

  7. Electron acceleration by a propagating laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Fengchao; Shen Baifei; Zhang Xiaomei; Li Xuemei; Jin Zhangying

    2007-08-15

    Electrons accelerated by a propagating laser pulse of linear or circular polarization in vacuum have been investigated by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and analytical modeling. A stopping target is used to stop the laser pulse and extract the energetic electrons from the laser field. The effect of the reflected light is taken into account. The maximum electron energy depends on the laser intensity and initial electron energy. There is an optimal acceleration length for electrons to gain maximum energy where electrons meet the peak of the laser pulse. The optimal acceleration length depends strongly on the laser pulse duration and amplitude.

  8. Rippled beam free electron Laser Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1998-04-21

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a T{sub 0n} mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and . A solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  9. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  10. Performance Testing in Electronic Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Bert; Pedersen, Joe F.

    This set of 21 performance tests in electronics technology was developed on the basis of a review of commercial and noncommercial instructional materials dealing with electronics technology. The tests, which were reviewed by a group of community college instructors and an advisory committee for electronics technology, address the following…

  11. Extension Learners' Use of Electronic Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenthner, Joseph F.; Swan, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Extension clientele use electronic technology for entertainment, communication, and business. Educational programs that use electronic technology can enhance learning. To learn more about use of electronic technology among Extension clientele, we surveyed 80 university students and 135 potato farmers. We found that the farmers were likely to use…

  12. Performance Testing in Electronic Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Bert; Pedersen, Joe F.

    This set of 21 performance tests in electronics technology was developed on the basis of a review of commercial and noncommercial instructional materials dealing with electronics technology. The tests, which were reviewed by a group of community college instructors and an advisory committee for electronics technology, address the following…

  13. Extension Learners' Use of Electronic Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenthner, Joseph F.; Swan, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Extension clientele use electronic technology for entertainment, communication, and business. Educational programs that use electronic technology can enhance learning. To learn more about use of electronic technology among Extension clientele, we surveyed 80 university students and 135 potato farmers. We found that the farmers were likely to use…

  14. High Extraction Free-Electron Laser Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-29

    intended to demonstrate that the tapered wiggler can provide significant electron kinectic energy extraction on a single pass through the wiggler...experiment has been constructed and initial energy extraction measurements have been made. The intent of the experiment is to demonstrate the high...laser beams making a single simultaneous pass through the wiggler. The interaction of these beams is monitored by comparison of the electron energy

  15. Free electron laser mode dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Shidong

    The University of Hawai'i at Manoa (UHM) Fox-Smith project opens a door for great research opportunities to the fields of high resolution infrared laser spectroscopy, quantum optics, coherent x-ray production and new and fundamental applications of phase-locked pulse trains and coherent frequency combs. An understanding of FEL mode dynamics is essential for facilitating this multimirror laser cavity design and improving laser performance for applications. Of particular interest is the nonlinear mode competition and mode evolution in the time domain which can give insight understanding of FELs' mode spectrum evolution. In this dissertation, I report the first thorough investigation and analysis of the nonlinear mode competition and mode evolution from the small signal regime through deep saturation using a time domain full particle simulation code based on the fundamental FEL equations of motion. It is found that the passive eigenmode theory of multimirror resonator FEL is not fully applicable in the large signal saturated regime. Extreme mode competition at the midpoint-phase offset versus beamsplitter reflectance indicating enhanced single mode operation is also discovered. In addition, matrix analysis including the proper form of the FEL gain saturation and the phase of the complex gain is also performed. This dissertation, for the first time known to the author, proposes a Michelson configuration which couples every third pulse. The feasibility and performance of the proposed configuration is elaborately investigated. An experimental design for evaluating the extreme mode competition effect discovered during the course of this dissertation research is described, based on the Mark V FEL in the current Michelson and the proposed new Michelson configurations. Finally, I report the construction and calibration of a Fox-Smith beamsplitter using a rotatable birefringent sapphire plate. High assembly precision is achieved. The angular beam wander caused by the rotation

  16. Laser printed interconnects for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pique, Alberto; Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott; Charipar, Nicholas

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) can be used to generate microscale 3D structures for interconnect applications non-lithographically. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or dispersed metallic nanoparticles. However, the resulting 3D structures do not achieve the bulk conductivity of metal interconnects of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. It is possible, however, to laser transfer entire structures using a LIFT technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place allows whole components and parts to be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This talk will present the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding solid metal interconnects to connect individual devices into functional circuits. Furthermore, the same laser can bend or fold the thin metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief due to flexing or thermal mismatch. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation flexible electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research Program.

  17. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  18. Electronic Subsystems For Laser Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Catherine; Maruschak, John; Patschke, Robert; Powers, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Electronic subsystems of free-space laser communication system carry digital signals at 650 Mb/s over long distances. Applicable to general optical communications involving transfer of great quantities of data, and transmission and reception of video images of high definition.

  19. Investigation of Plasma Processes in Electronic Transition Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    essential features of electron-beau controlled dis- charges of the type coumon to rare gas halide and mercury- halide lasers. Particular attention is...ELECTRON-BEAM CONTROLLED DISCHARGES A. Application to Electronic Transition Lasers III. RARE GAS- HALIDE AND MERCURY- HALIDE LASERS I A. XeCl(B X) Laser...Dist Special I I iii I oI. INTRODUCTION Electrically excited rare gas- halide lasers and their closely related I] mercury- halide counterparts are

  20. Acoustic analog of a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zavtrak, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    As well known, at the present time there are many types of laser the operation of which is based on the stimulated emission of light by an active medium. Lasers are generators of coherent electromagnetic waves in the range from ultraviolet to submillimeters. But acoustic analogs of such devices have not been created up to now in spite of the progress in laser technology. Meanwhile, an acoustic laser could have a lot of interesting applications. Recently a theoretical scheme for an acoustic laser was proposed by the present author. A liquid dielectric with dispersed particles was considered as an active medium. The pumping was created by an oscillating electric field deforming dispersed particle volumes. Different types of oils or distilled water can serve as a liquid dielectric with gas bubbles as dispersed particles. Gas bubbles in water can be created by an electrolysis. The phase bunching of the initially incoherent emitters (gas bubbles) was realized by acoustic radiation forces. This scheme is an analog of the free-electron laser (FEL). It was shown that two types of losses must be overcome for the beginning of a generation. The first type results from the energy dissipation in the active medium and the second one is caused by radiation losses at the boundaries of the resonator. The purposes of this report are: (1) to discuss the analogies between the acoustic laser and FEL; (2) to propose an effective scheme of an acoustic laser with a mechanical pumping (by a piezoelectric emitter of the piston type); (3) to consider the schemes of acoustic lasers with the different types of the resonators (rectangular and cylindrical); (4) to discuss the possibility of the creation of an impact acoustic laser (5) to discuss the experimental works which are planned to be carried out in cooperation with prof. L.A. Crum.

  1. Advances in tunable powerful lasers: The advanced free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, S.; Sheffield, R.

    1993-12-31

    In the past several decades, remarkable progress in laser science and technology has made it possible to obtain laser light from the ultra-violet to the far infra-red from a variety of laser types, and at power levels from milliwatts to kilowatts (and, some day, megawatts). However, the availability of tunable lasers at ``high`` power (above a few tens of watts) is more limited. Figure 1, an assessment of the availability of tunable lasers, shows the covered range to be about 400 to 2000 nanometers. A variety of dye lasers cover the visible and near infra red, each one of which is tunable over approximately a 10% range. In the same region, the TI:saphire laser is adjustable over a 20 to 25% range. And finally, optical parametric oscillators can cover the range from about 400 nanometers out to about 2000 nm (even farther at reduced energy output). The typical output energy per pulse may vary from a few to one hundred millijoules, and since repetition rates of 10 to 100 Hertz are generally attainable, average output powers of tens of watts are possible. In recent years, a new approach to powerful tunable lasers -- the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) -- has emerged. In this paper we will discuss advances in FEL technology which not only enable tunability at high average power over a very broad range of wavelengths, but also make this device more usable. At present, that range is about one micron to the far infra red; with extensions of existing technology, it should be extendable to the vacuum ultra violet region.

  2. Rippled-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe a new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. Due to nonlinearities in the orbit equation, the interaction can be made autoresonant, where the phase and amplitude of the gain is independent of the beam energy.

  3. IFEL driven mode locked free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudar, Nicholas; Musumeci, Pietro; Duris, Joe

    2014-12-01

    The x-ray free electron laser (FEL) has provided modern science with a tuneable source of high frequency, high power, coherent radiation. By manipulating the classic FEL set up, we can decrease the space required to build these machines while gaining control over the temporal and spectral structures of the outcoming radiation. In this paper we investigate a modelocked FEL with an input electron beam that has been accelerated to high energies through an inverse free electron laser (IFEL). We show that we can take advantage of the properties of the output beam from the IFEL to seed a modelocked FEL and obtain a series of periodically spaced, short pulses of coherent radiation.

  4. Lasers. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the materials required for presenting an 8-day competency-based technology learning activity (TLA) designed to introduce students in grades 6-10 to advances and career opportunities in the field of laser technology. The guide uses a series of hands-on exploratory experiences into which activities to help students develop…

  5. Demonstration of acceleration of relativistic electrons at a dielectric microstructure using femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent P.; Wu, Ziran; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Hanuka, Adi; Makasyuk, Igor V.; Peralta, Edgar A.; Soong, Ken; Byer, Robert L.; England, R. Joel

    2016-06-02

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. Achieving the desired GV m–1 accelerating gradients is possible only with laser pulse durations shorter than ~1 ps. In this Letter, we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of acceleration of relativistic electrons at a dielectric microstructure driven by femtosecond duration laser pulses. Furthermore, using this technique, an electron accelerating gradient of 690±100 MV m–1 was measured—a record for dielectric laser accelerators.

  6. Demonstration of acceleration of relativistic electrons at a dielectric microstructure using femtosecond laser pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Wootton, Kent P.; Wu, Ziran; Cowan, Benjamin M.; ...

    2016-06-02

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. Achieving the desired GV m–1 accelerating gradients is possible only with laser pulse durations shorter than ~1 ps. In this Letter, we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first demonstration of acceleration of relativistic electrons at a dielectric microstructure driven by femtosecond duration laser pulses. Furthermore, using this technique, an electron accelerating gradient of 690±100 MV m–1 was measured—a record for dielectric laser accelerators.

  7. High power free-electron laser concepts and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.

    1995-03-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) have long been thought to offer the potential of high average power operation. That potential exists because of several unique properties of FELs, such as the removal of ``waste heat`` at the velocity of light, the ``laser medium`` (the electron beam) is impervious to damage by very high optical intensitites, and the technology of generating very high average power relativistic electron beams. In particular, if one can build a laser with a power extraction efficiency 11 which is driven by an electron beam of average Power P{sub EB}, one expects a laser output power of P{sub L} = {eta} P{sub EB}. One approach to FEL devices with large values of {eta} (in excess of 10 %) is to use a ``tapered`` (or nonuniform) wiggler. This approach was followed at several laboratories during the FEL development Program for the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) project. In this paper, we review some concepts and technical requirements for high-power tapered-wiggler FELs driven by radio-frequency linear accelerators (rf-linacs) which were developed during the SDI project. Contributions from three quite different technologies - rf-accelerators, optics, and magnets - are needed to construct and operate an FEL oscillator. The particular requirements on these technologies for a high-power FEL were far beyond the state of the art in those areas when the SDI project started, so significant advances had to be made before a working device could be constructed. Many of those requirements were not clearly understood when the project started, but were developed during the course of the experimental and theoretical research for the project. This information can be useful in planning future high-power FEL projects.

  8. following an electron bunch for free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    A video artist's ultra-slow-motion impression of an APEX-style electron gun firing a continuous train of electron bunches into a superconducting linear accelerator (in reality this would happen a million times a second). As they approach the speed of light the bunches contract, maintaining beam quality. After acceleration, the electron bunches are diverted into one or more undulators, the key components of free electron lasers. Oscillating back and forth in the changing magnetic field, they create beams of structured x-ray pulses. Before entering the experimental areas the electron bunches are diverted to a beam dump. (Animation created by Illumina Visual, http://www.illuminavisual.com/, for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Music for this excerpt, "Feeling Dark (Behind The Mask)" is by 7OOP3D http://ccmixter.org/files/7OOP3D/29126 and is licensed under a Creative Commons license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)

  9. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A; York, R C

    2012-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  10. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  11. Cooling Technology for Electronic Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Wataru

    The rapid growth of data processing speed in computers has been sustained by the advances in cooling technology. This article first presents a review of the published data of heat loads in recent Japanese large-scale computers. The survey indicates that, since around 1980, the high-level integration of microelectronic circuits has brought about almost four fold increase in the power dissipation from logic chips. The integration also has invited the evolutions of multichip modules and new schemes of electronic interconnections. Forced convection air-cooling and liquid cooling coupled with thermal connectors are discussed with reference to the designs employed in actual computers. More advanced cooling schemes are also discussed. Finally, the importance of thermal environmental control of computer rooms is emphasized.

  12. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  13. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart.

  14. Laser Science and Technology Program Update 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H L; Hackel, L A

    2002-01-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program's mission is to develop advanced solid-state lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the Nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to ensure activation success. LS&T provides the NIF Programs with core competencies and supports its economic viability. The primary objectives of LS&T activities in fiscal year (FY) 2001 have been threefold: (1) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance lasers and optics performance for NIF, (2) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DoD), and (3) to invent, develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and U.S. industry. Special efforts have also been devoted to building and maintaining our capabilities in three technology areas: high-power solid-state lasers, high-power optical materials, and applications of advanced lasers.

  15. Polarization in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Papadichev, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Polarization of electromagnetic radiation is required very often in numerous scientific and industrial applications: studying of crystals, molecules and intermolecular interaction high-temperature superconductivity, semiconductors and their transitions, polymers and liquid crystals. Using polarized radiation allows to obtain important data (otherwise inaccessible) in astrophysics, meteorology and oceanology. It is promising in chemistry and biology for selective influence on definite parts of molecules in chain synthesis reactions, precise control of various processes at cell and subcell levels, genetic engineering etc. Though polarization methods are well elaborated in optics, they can fail in far-infrared, vacuum-ultraviolet and X-ray regions because of lack of suitable non-absorbing materials and damaging of optical elements at high specific power levels. Therefore, it is of some interest to analyse polarization of untreated FEL radiation obtained with various types of undulators, with and without axial magnetic field. The polarization is studied using solutions for electron orbits in various cases: plane or helical undulator with or without axial magnetic field, two plane undulators, a combination of right- and left-handed helical undulators with equal periods, but different field amplitudes. Some examples of how a desired polarization (elliptical circular or linear) can be obtained or changed quickly, which is necessary in many experiments, are given.

  16. The story of laser brazing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Dierken, Roland

    2012-03-01

    This article gives an overview on the development of laser brazing technology as a new joining technique for car body production. The story starts with fundamental research work at German institutes in 1993, continues with the first implementations in automobile production in 1998, gives examples of applications since then and ends with an outlook. Laser brazing adapted design of joints and boundary conditions for a safe processing are discussed. Besides a better understanding for the sensitivity of the process against joint irregularities and misalignment, the key to successful launch was an advanced system technology. Different working heads equipped with wire feeding device, seam tracking system or tactile sensors for an automated teaching are presented in this paper. Novel laser heads providing a two beam technology will allow improved penetration depth of the filler wire and a more ecological processing by means of energy consumption.

  17. ICESat-2 laser technology readiness level evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawruk, Nicholas W.; Burns, Patrick M.; Edwards, Ryan E.; Wysocki, Theodore; VanTuijl, Andre; Litvinovitch, Viatcheslav; Sullivan, Edward; Hovis, Floyd E.

    2015-02-01

    We report on the completion of the space qualification testing program for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) program. This paper describes the final performance results of the fully integrated (laser and electronics) flight laser system with an emphasis on the system design evolution from a breadboard demonstration to a fully space-qualified laser system. The 532 nm ICESat-2 laser transmitter generates diffraction limited pulse energies of 1 mJ, pulsewidths of < 1.5 ns, and 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency and has minimum lifetime of 1 trillion pulses on-orbit. A combination of engineering design units and correlated structural thermal optical analysis was used to systematically improve reliability and performance over the operating environment. The laser system qualification and acceptance test programs included electromagnetic interference (EMI), vibration, and thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing. This paper presents key laser performance results and lessons learned on the multi-year laser development to facilitate future space-qualified laser developments, improve reliability, and increase performance.

  18. Laser Electron Gamma Source. Biennial progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.; Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F.; Miceli, L.; Thorn, C.E.; Hoblit, S.; Khandaker, M. |

    1994-06-01

    The LEGS facility provides intense, polarized, monochromatic {gamma}-ray beams by Compton backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons circulating in the X-Ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the start of ring operations at 2.8 GeV, LEGS {gamma}-ray energies now extend to 370 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the development of a new laser system that will increase the beam energies to 470 MeV, and this system is expected to come into operation before the next biennial report. The total flux is administratively held at 6 {times} 10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}. The {gamma}-ray energy is determined, with a resolution of 5.5 MeV, by detecting the scattering electrons in a magnetic spectrometer. This spectrometer can `tag` all {gamma}-rays with energies from 185 MeV up to the Compton edge. The beam spot size at the target position is 8 mm (V) {times} 18 mm (H), FWHM. For a single laser wavelength, the linear polarization of the beam is 98% at the Compton edge and decreases to 50% at about 1/2 the energy of the edge. By choosing the laser wavelengths appropriately the polarization can be maintained above 85% throughout the tagging range. During the last two years, experimental running at LEGS occupied an average of 3000 hours annually. Highlights of some of the programs are discussed below.

  19. Laser-Hybrid welding, an innovative technology to join automotive body parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieben, Manuel; Brunnecker, Frank

    The design of Tail lamps has been changed dramatically since cars built. At modern lamps, the lenses are absolutely transparent and allow a direct view onto the weld seam. Conventional welding technologies, such as vibration and hot plate welding cannot compete with this demand. Focused on this targeted application, LPKF Laser & Electronics AG has developed in cooperation with the Bavarian Laser Centre a unique Laser welding technology called hybrid welding.

  20. Laser Science and Technology Program Update 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A; Chen, H L

    2003-03-01

    The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program's mission is to develop advanced lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support in the deployment and upgrade of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our other program activities synergistically develop technologies that are of interest to the NIF Directorate but outside the scope of the NIF funding. The primary objectives of LS&T activities in 2002 have been fourfold--(a) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance laser and optics performance for NIF, (b) to develop high-energy petawatt laser science and technology for the Department of Energy (DOE), (c) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD), and to invent develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and industry. Special efforts have been devoted to building and maintaining our capabilities in three technology areas: high-power short-pulse solid-state lasers, high-power optical materials, and applications of advanced lasers. LS&T activities during 2002 focused on seven major areas: (1) NIF Project--LS&T led major advances in the deployment of NIF Final Optics Assembly (FOA) and the development of 3{omega} optics processing and treatment technologies to enhance NIF's operations and performance capabilities. (2) Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP)--LS&T personnel continued development of ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-power, large-aperture optics for applications in SSP, extreme-field science and national defense. To enhance the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) capability in NIF, LS&T continued development of advanced compressor-grating and front-end laser technologies utilizing optical-parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA). (3) High-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy

  1. Medical free-electron laser: fact or fiction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James P.; Ponikvar, Donald R.

    1994-07-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has long been proposed as a flexible tool for a variety of medical applications, and yet the FEL has not seen widespread acceptance in the medical community. The issues have been the laser's size, cost, and complexity. Unfortunately, research on applications of FELs has outpaced the device development efforts. This paper describes the characteristics of the FEL, as they have been demonstrated in the U.S. Army's FEL technology development program, and identifies specific medical applications where demonstrated performance levels would suffice. This includes new photodynamic therapies for cancer and HIV treatment, orthopedic applications, tissue welding applications, and multiwavelength surgical techniques. A new tunable kilowatt class FEL device is described, which utilizes existing hardware from the U.S. Army program. An assessment of the future potential, based on realistic technology scaling is provided.

  2. Electron acceleration by femtosecond laser interaction with micro-structured plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goers, Andy James

    Laser-driven accelerators are a promising and compact alternative to RF accelerator technology for generating relativistic electron bunches for medical, scientific, and security applications. This dissertation presents three experiments using structured plasmas designed to advance the state of the art in laser-based electron accelerators, with the goal of reducing the energy of the drive laser pulse and enabling higher repetition rate operation with current laser technology. First, electron acceleration by intense femtosecond laser pulses in He-like nitrogen plasma waveguides is demonstrated. Second, significant progress toward a proof of concept realization of quasi-phasematched direct acceleration (QPM-DLA) is presented. Finally, a laser wakefield accelerator at very high plasma density is studied, enabling relativistic electron beam generation with ˜10 mJ pulse energies. Major results from these experiments include: • Acceleration of electrons up to 120 MeV from an ionization injected wakefield accelerator driven in a 1.5 mm long He-like nitrogen plasma waveguide • Guiding of an intense, quasi-radially polarized femtosecond laser pulse in a 1 cm plasma waveguide. This pulse provides a strong drive field for the QPM-DLA concept. • Wakefield acceleration of electrons up to ˜10 MeV with sub-terawatt, ˜10 mJ pulses interacting with a thin (˜200 mum), high density (>1020 cm-3) plasma. • Observation of an intense, coherent, broadband wave breaking radiation flash from a high plasma density laser wakefield accelerator. The flash radiates > 1% of the drive laser pulse energy in a bandwidth consistent with half-cycle (˜1 fs) emission from violent unidirectional acceleration of electron bunches from rest. These results open the way to high repetition rate (>˜kHz) laser-driven generation of relativistic electron beams with existing laser technology.

  3. Laser system for a subpicosecond electron linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R. A.

    1998-09-25

    At the Argonne Chemistry Division efforts are underway to develop a sub-picosecond electron beam pulse radiolysis facility for chemical studies. The target output of the accelerator is to generate electron pulses that can be adjusted from 3nC in .6ps to 100nC in 45ps. In conjunction with development of the accelerator a state-of-the-art ultrafast laser system is under construction that will drive the linac's photocathode and provide probe pulses that are tunable from the UV to IR spectral regions.

  4. Z-discharge free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schep, T.J.; Bazylev, V.A.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A new kind of plasma based free-electron laser is proposed. An electromagnetic wave is generated by a relativistic electron beam moving along a stabilised z-discharge. The radiation wavelength is determined by the discharge current and the relativistic factor of the beam. It is shown that the interaction is based on two bunching mechanisms. One is due to the dependency of the longitudinal beam velocity on the energy of the electrons (inertial bunching). The second mechanism leads to azimuthal bunching and is related to the energy dependence of the oscillation frequency of electrons in the magnetic field of the discharge. At certain conditions both bunching mechanisms tend to compensate their mutual action and the system has an autoresonance. Near these conditions a high efficiency and, therefore, a high output power can be reached.

  5. Inverse Free Electron Laser Accelerator Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Steenbergen, Arie

    1997-05-01

    The study of the Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) as a potential mode of electron acceleration has been pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for a number of years. The studies focused on the development of a low energy (few GeV), high gradient, multistage linear accelerator. As part of this program a proof-of-principle experiment with a single module accelerator unit has been successfully carried out. The IFEL accelerator made use of the 40 MeV Linac beam and high power CO2 laser beam of the BNL's Accelerator Test Facility, in conjunction with a fast excitation, tapered period, beam wiggler. Basic aspects of the design of this single module IFEL accelerator will be presented, together with the experimental results of Δ E/E as a function of the IFEL parameters, which in comparison with analytical and 1, 3-D numerical simulations clearly establish the IFEL character of the electron - EM wave energy exchange, permitting thereby scaling to higher laser power magnitude and acceleration gradients. In addition, planned near term IFEL accelerator development will be indicated, incorporating the use of the IFEL as a beam prebuncher preceding an Inverse Cherenkov Accelerator, and the use of two IFEL modules in cascade in order to more realistically test the feasibility of a multi-module IFEL accelerator. New experimental results can be found at the IFEL World-Wide-Web page.

  6. Generation of ultrashort electron bunches by colliding laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Lee, P B; Wurtele, J S; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    1999-05-01

    A proposed laser-plasma-based relativistic electron source [E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997)] using laser-triggered injection of electrons is investigated. The source generates ultrashort electron bunches by dephasing and trapping background plasma electrons undergoing fluid oscillations in an excited plasma wake. The plasma electrons are dephased by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses which generate a slow phase velocity beat wave. Laser pulse intensity thresholds for trapping and the optimal wake phase for injection are calculated. Numerical simulations of test particles, with prescribed plasma and laser fields, are used to verify analytic predictions and to study the longitudinal and transverse dynamics of the trapped plasma electrons. Simulations indicate that the colliding laser pulse injection scheme has the capability to produce relativistic femtosecond electron bunches with fractional energy spread of order a few percent and normalized transverse emittance less than 1 mm mrad using 1 TW injection laser pulses.

  7. Laser Technology in Commercial Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutwak, R.

    2006-05-01

    Commercial atomic frequency standards (AFS) are deployed in diverse civilian, military, and aerospace applications, ranging from high-precision measurement and calibration to navigation, communications and, of course, timekeeping. Currently, commercially available AFS include magnetically-selected cesium beam frequency standards and hydrogen masers and lamp-pumped rubidium oscillators. Despite the revolution in atomic physics and laboratory-scale AFS brought about by the advent of the tunable laser in the early 1970s, commercial AFS invariably rely on more conventional atomic physics technology developed in the 1950s. The reason for this lack of advancement of commercial AFS technology is the relatively poor reliability and environmental sensitivity of narrow-linewidth single-mode laser sources at atomic resonance wavelengths. Over the past 8 years, Symmetricom, in collaboration with laser manufacturers, has developed specialized laser sources for commercial AFS applications. These laser devices, optimized for high spectral purity and long-term reliability, will enable a new generation of commercial AFS. This talk will briefly describe two laser-based atomic frequency standard development programs at Symmetricom. The Chip-Scale Atomic Clock, two orders of magnitude smaller and lower power than any commercial AFS, will enable atomic timing accuracy in portable battery-powered applications. The Optically-Pumped Cesium Beam Frequency Standard, under development for deployment onboard the GPS-III satellite constellation, will provide enhanced short-term stability and longer lifetime compared to magnetically-selected cesium beam AFS.

  8. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  9. Laser powder technology for cladding and welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J.; Volz, R.

    1999-06-01

    Laser powder technology offers several advantages compared to conventional cladding and welding techniques and is attracting increasing industrial interest. The laser materials processing group of the German Aerospace Center at Stuttgart, Germany, is currently developing these new methods for application in industrial process engineering. Key areas of the work include the design and implementation of a modular working head that can be universally used for laser welding and surface treatment, the development of powder nozzles for cladding and welding, and the construction of new systems for special applications (e.g., for inner cladding). Some of these developments are described, as well as some important examples that highlight the potential of welding and surface treatment using laser powder techniques.

  10. Pulsed UV laser technologies for ophthalmic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Chernykh, V. V.; Bagayev, S. N.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol’tsev, E. S.; Iskakov, I. A.; Ermakova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the results of multiyear joint researches of team of collaborators of Institute of Laser Physics SB RAS together with NF IRTC “Eye Microsurgery” for the period from 1988 to the present, in which were first proposed and experimentally realized laser medical technologies for correction of refractive errors of known today as LASIK, the treatment of ophthalmic herpes and open-angle glaucoma. It is proposed to carry out operations for the correction of refractive errors the use of UV excimer KrCl laser with a wavelength of 222 nm. The same laser emission is the most suitable for the treatment of ophthalmic herpes, because it has a high clinical effect, combined with many years of absence of recrudescence. A minimally invasive technique of glaucoma operations using excimer XeCl laser (λ=308 nm) is developed. Its wavelength allows perform all stages of glaucoma operations, while the laser head itself has high stability and lifetime, will significantly reduce operating costs, compared with other types of lasers.

  11. Laser-boosted lightcraft technology demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J. C.; Morales, C.; Smith, W. L.; Myrabo, L. N.

    1990-01-01

    The detailed description and performance analysis of a 1.4 meter diameter Lightcraft Technology Demonstator (LTD) is presented. The launch system employs a 100 MW-class ground-based laser to transmit power directly to an advanced combined-cycle engine that propels the 120 kg LTD to orbit - with a mass ratio of two. The single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) LTD machine then becomes an autonomous sensor satellite that can deliver precise, high quality information typical of today's large orbital platforms. The dominant motivation behind this study is to provide an example of how laser propulsion and its low launch costs can induce a comparable order-of-magnitude reduction in sensor satellite packaging costs. The issue is simply one of production technology for future, survivable SSTO aerospace vehicles that intimately share both laser propulsion engine and satellite functional hardware.

  12. 3D Laser Scanning in Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser scanner can be used as a tool for design and problem solving in technology education. A hands-on experience can enhance learning by captivating students' interest and empowering them with creative tools. (Author/JOW)

  13. 3D Laser Scanning in Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser scanner can be used as a tool for design and problem solving in technology education. A hands-on experience can enhance learning by captivating students' interest and empowering them with creative tools. (Author/JOW)

  14. Radiation-reaction trapping of electrons in extreme laser fields.

    PubMed

    Ji, L L; Pukhov, A; Kostyukov, I Yu; Shen, B F; Akli, K

    2014-04-11

    A radiation-reaction trapping (RRT) of electrons is revealed in the near-QED regime of laser-plasma interaction. Electrons quivering in laser pulse experience radiation reaction (RR) recoil force by radiating photons. When the laser field reaches the threshold, the RR force becomes significant enough to compensate for the expelling laser ponderomotive force. Then electrons are trapped inside the laser pulse instead of being scattered off transversely and form a dense plasma bunch. The mechanism is demonstrated both by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the QED photonic approach and numerical test-particle modeling based on the classical Landau-Lifshitz formula of RR force. Furthermore, the proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  15. Laser Coating Technology; A Commercial Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Andrew G.; Mangaly, A. A.; Everett, M. A.; Hammeke, A. H.

    1988-10-01

    Commercial acceptance of laser coating technology suffered for many years due to questions about its economic viability. During this period, however, many companies, universities, and government research groups were busy developing the technology to overcome these questions. Today, laser coating technology is having a major impact as a high quality, economical method of hardfacing for wear and corrosion resistance in several key industries. This has occurred because of advances in five key areas: 1. High power laser design 2. Method of alloy deposition, and associated hardware 3. In-process feed back control system hardware/software development 4. Alloy systems 5. Marketing/sales sophistication High power lasers have improved in mode stability, power conversion efficiency, and optical flexibility (reflective vs. transmissive materials). This has enabled the process engineer to increase deposition efficiency, and maintain flexibility on the use of optics specifically designed for a user application. Improvements in the method of alloy deposition have led to developments such as the DPF system with specialized nozzles developed for specific user applications. Another effective technique includes the use of pre-fabricated cast alloy chips that are welded to the component surface on the specific area requiring protection. The development of feedback control systems that integrate process control software with hard tooling, the laser, and the alloy delivery system are greatly improving process reliability and product quality. Because of this, "in-process" quality control is becoming a viable alternative to traditional methods of quality control. Metallurgical evaluations of some of the most widely used hardfacing alloys and base materials have been investigated by numerous researchers. Analysis has confirmed that laser applied coatings are of high metallurgical quality, extremely low in dilution, and distort less due to low heat input. The technology can also be used to

  16. Quantum Mechanical Aspects of Free Electron Lasers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritepe, Selcuk

    Scope of study. A 2-D quantum theory of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) has been developed based on the solutions of Dirac equation for the motion of electrons moving in various wiggler geometries, uniform, tapered and enhanced by an axial guide field. It is shown that these solutions can be written in terms of Mathieu functions of fractional order. Using these solutions a perturbational analysis is carried out to calculate the frequencies and the gain of the FEL in each magnet configuration. Finally, an optical model for the FEL interaction is developed to explain the saturation behaviour and the short-pulse effects such as Laser Lethargy. Findings and conclusions. It is found that the quantum mechanical effects due to transverse momentum correction were gamma (Lorentz factor) times larger than the quantum recoil and spin effects and therefore important for the short wavelength FELs. These quantum mechanical effects cause a broadening in the spontaneous emission lineshape, a decrease in gain and an increase in the rate of harmonic frequency generation. In the presence of an axial field, gain is increased, harmonic frequency rate is reduced and Dirac solutions exhibit instability. The optical model developed in this thesis correctly predicts the oscillator rise time and uses a simpler algorithm to calculate the nonlinear saturation behaviour. Optical model also incorporates inhomogeneous broadening and quantum mechanical effects and explains the Laser Lethargy effect as an optical pulse compression phenomenon.

  17. The Oxford free electron laser project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, W. W. M.; Brau, C. A.; Brooks, C. B.; Doucas, G.; Elgin, J. N.; Gillispie, W. A.; Holmes, A. R.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Kimmitt, M. F.; Martin, P. F.; Mulvey, J. H.; Pidgeon, C. R.; Poole, M. W.

    1990-10-01

    It is proposed to use the Oxford 10 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as an electron beam source for a free electron laser (FEL) operating in the far infra red (FIR). The configuration and layout of the Van de Graaff make it very suitable for conversion, with a potentially high efficiency for electron beam recovery. Using a 2 m long wiggler of 34 mm period, the FEL would operate in the 60-300 μm wavelength band, with extension down to 30 μm on the 3rd harmonic. When constructed, the FEL will support a programme of FEL research and development, concentrating at first on investigations of behaviour in the moderately high-gain regime (˜ 100% per pass) and mechanisms for lasing on higher harmonics. It will also be the basis for a national UK user facility in the FIR.

  18. Threshold characteristics of free electron lasers without inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, Dmitry N.; Oganesyan, Koryun B.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between noncolinear laser and relativistic electron beams in a static magnetic undulator has been studied within the framework of dispersion equations. For a free-electron laser without inversion (FELWI), the threshold parameters are found. The large-amplification regime should be used to bring an FELWI above the threshold laser power.

  19. Laser Technology for Aerospace Maintenance and Sustainment Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Fiber Laser Evaluation • Integrated 6 kW IPG fiber laser with Fanuc robot at CTC for...a 16’x60’ room 3 ’x 7’x 9’ LADS II 8 kW COTS LASER made by Rofin Sinar Current Technologies ARCLRS (cont.) 13 • System successfully transitioned into...Program • Current Technologies • Future Robotic Technology • Advanced Laser Technology • Summary 3 Hand Sanding Chemical Stripping Problem

  20. Efficiency enhancement using electron energy detuning in a laser seeded free electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. J.; Watanabe, T.; Shen, Y.; Li, R. K.; Murphy, J. B.; Tsang, T.; Freund, H. P.

    2007-10-29

    We report the experimental characterization of efficiency enhancement in a single-pass seeded free-electron laser (FEL) where the electron energy is detuned from resonance. Experiments show a doubling of the efficiency for beam energies above the resonant energy. Measurements of the FEL spectra versus energy detuning shows that the wavelength is governed by the seed laser. The variation in the gain length with beam energy was also observed. Good agreement is found between the experiment and numerical simulations using the MEDUSA simulation code.

  1. Laser micro/nanoprocessing for functional electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung Hwan; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2008-10-01

    Inkjet direct writing of functional materials provides a promising pathway towards realization of ultra-low-cost, largearea printed electronics, albeit at the expense of lowered resolution (~20-50 μm). We demonstrate that selective laser sintering and ablation of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as highresolution patterning. Combined with an air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophene, all-inkjet-printed and laser-processed organic field effect transistors with micron to submicron critical feature resolution were fabricated in a fully maskless sequence, eliminating the need for any lithographic processes. All processing and characterization steps were carried out at plastic-compatible low temperatures and in air under ambient pressure. The fundamental mechanisms of the nanoparticle sintering process have been investigated by both Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations as well as in-situ probing.

  2. New Electronic Technologies for Facilitating Differentiated Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalise, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    With electronic technologies, differentiated instruction has the same meaning as in traditional instruction, but different tools are available for teachers to help students learn. Electronic technologies for differentiated instruction can add powerful new types of media inclusion, levels of interactivity, and response actions. This rapidly…

  3. Novel Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chung H.

    2004-06-01

    Laser ablation for surface cleaning has been pursued for the removal of paint on airplanes. It has also been pursued for the cleaning of semiconductor surfaces. However, all these approaches have been pursued by laser ablation in air. For highly contaminated surface, laser ablation in air can easily cause secondary contamination. Thus it is not suitable to apply to achieve surface decontamination for DOE facilities since many of these facilities have radioactive contaminants on the surface. Any secondary contamination will be a grave concern. The objective of this project is to develop a novel technology for laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination and to evaluate the economic feasibility for large scale surface decontamination with laser ablation in liquid. When laser ablation is pursued in the solution, all the desorbed contaminants will be confined in liquid. The contaminants can be precipitated and subsequently contained in a small volume for disposal. It can reduce the risk of the decontamination workers. It can also reduce the volume of contaminants dramatically.

  4. Electron transport estimated from electron spectra using electron spectrometer in LFEX laser target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, T.; Hata, M.; Matsuo, K.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Sakagami, H.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.; Yogo, A.; Morace, A.; Zhang, Z.; Shiraga, H.; Sakata, S.; Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Lee, S.; Nakai, M.; Nishimura, H.; Azechi, H.; FIREX Group; GXII-LFEX Group

    2016-05-01

    Hot electrons which are generated from targets irradiated by a high-intense laser are measured by two electron spectrometers (ESMs). However, total electron energy observed by the ESM is only less than 1%. Hot electrons are confined by self-fields due to the huge current. When an external magnetic field of several hundred Tesla is applied during the laser irradiation on targets, the ESM signals always increase. In the simulation, the same result can be obtained. The reason is that the Alfvén limit can be mitigated due to the external longitudinal magnetic field.

  5. New laser technology expands the range of holographic NDT

    SciTech Connect

    Ambroseo, J.; Peterson, P. )

    1994-05-01

    Holographic nondestructive testing and shearography are interferometric, optical methods used to detect flaws during stress testing. This process can be used to test a diverse cross-section of items, such as airplane jet engines, turbine rings, electronic circuit boards, and truck/aircraft tires. As with any interferometric technique, both methods require a coherent light source (laser) with appropriate characteristics. Until very recently, visible wavelength gas lasers have been the source of choice for these applications. In this article the authors examine the impact of a new breed of diode pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers that offers high power visible output, true portability, and a high level of stability and coherence. The major benefits of this novel technology for holography and shearography are improvements in resolution, accuracy, convenience, and utility, combined with low overall operating costs.

  6. A compact x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.; Attac, M.; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.; Wang, X.; Bhowmik, A.; Bobbs, B.; Cover, R.A.; Dixon, F.P.; Rakowsky, G.; Gallardo, J.; Pellegrini, C.; Westenskow, G.

    1988-09-09

    We present a design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact x-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient rf-linacs. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be concerted to soft x-rays in the range from 2--10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. A compact X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, W.; Atac, M.; Cline, D. B.; Kolonko, J.; Wang, X.; Bhowmik, A.; Bobbs, B.; Cover, R. A.; Dixon, F. P.; Rakowsky, G.

    1988-09-01

    A design concept and simulation of the performance of a compact X-ray, free electron laser driven by ultra-high gradient RF-linacs is presented. The accelerator design is based on recent advances in high gradient technology by a LLNL/SLAC/LBL collaboration and on the development of bright, high current electron sources by BNL and LANL. The GeV electron beams generated with such accelerators can be converted to soft X-rays in the range from 2 to 10 nm by passage through short period, high fields strength wigglers as are being designed at Rocketdyne. Linear light sources of this type can produce trains of picosecond (or shorter) pulses of extremely high spectral brilliance suitable for flash holography of biological specimens in vivo and for studies of fast chemical reactions.

  8. Kinetic theory of free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hafizi, B.; Roberson, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a relativistic kinetic theory of free electron lasers (FELs). The growth rate, efficiency, filling factor and radius of curvature of the radiation wave fronts are determined. We have used the theory to examine the effects of beam compression on growth rate. The theory has been extended to include self field effects on FEL operation. These effects are particularly important in compact, low voltage FELs. The surprising result is that the self field contribution to the beam quality is opposite to the emittance contribution. Hence self fields can improve beam quality, particularly in compact, low voltage FELs.

  9. Enhancement of electron energy to the multi-GeV regime by a dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator pumped by petawatt laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Pae, Ki Hong; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Kim, I Jong; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Laser-wakefield acceleration offers the promise of a compact electron accelerator for generating a multi-GeV electron beam using the huge field gradient induced by an intense laser pulse, compared to conventional rf accelerators. However, the energy and quality of the electron beam from the laser-wakefield accelerator have been limited by the power of the driving laser pulses and interaction properties in the target medium. Recent progress in laser technology has resulted in the realization of a petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser, which offers new capabilities for research on laser-wakefield acceleration. Here, we present a significant increase in laser-driven electron energy to the multi-GeV level by utilizing a 30-fs, 1-PW laser system. In particular, a dual-stage laser-wakefield acceleration scheme (injector and accelerator scheme) was applied to boost electron energies to over 3 GeV with a single PW laser pulse. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the multi-GeV electron generation from the dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator driven by PW laser pulses.

  10. Free-electron laser emission architecture impact on EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosler, Erik R.; Wood, Obert R.; Barletta, William A.

    2017-03-01

    Laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV sources have demonstrated approximately 125 W at customer sites, establishing confidence in EUV lithography as a viable manufacturing technology. However, beyond the 7 nm technology node existing scanner/source technology must enable higher-NA imaging systems (requiring increased resist dose and providing half-field exposures) and/or EUV multi-patterning (requiring increased wafer throughput proportional to the number of exposure passes. Both development paths will require a substantial increase in EUV source power to maintain the economic viability of the technology, creating an opportunity for free-electron laser (FEL) EUV sources. FEL-based EUV sources offer an economic, high-power/single-source alternative to LPP EUV sources. Should free-electron lasers become the preferred next generation EUV source, the choice of FEL emission architecture will greatly affect its operational stability and overall capability. A near-term industrialized FEL is expected to utilize one of the following three existing emission architectures: (1) selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE), (2) regenerative amplification (RAFEL), or (3) self-seeding (SS-FEL). Model accelerator parameters are put forward to evaluate the impact of emission architecture on FEL output. Then, variations in the parameter space are applied to assess the potential impact to lithography operations, thereby establishing component sensitivity. The operating range of various accelerator components is discussed based on current accelerator performance demonstrated at various scientific user facilities. Finally, comparison of the performance between the model accelerator parameters and the variation in parameter space provides a means to evaluate the potential emission architectures. A scorecard is presented to facilitate this evaluation and provide a framework for future FEL design and enablement for EUV lithography applications.

  11. Characteristics of the MIT microwiggler for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Stoner, R.; Bekefi, G.

    1995-12-31

    We report work on the development of microwiggler technology for free electron laser research. The MIT microwiggler is a pulsed electromagnet with 70 periods of 8.8 mm each which generates a peak on-axis field of 4.2 kG. The wiggler is characterized by extensive tunability. We developed a novel tuning regimen to control 140 degrees of freedom afforded by the individually tunable half periods and achieved an rms spread in the peak amplitudes of 0.08%. This is the lowest attained to date in any sub-cm period wiggler. The microwiggler design and comprehensive measurements of its characteristics will be described.

  12. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  13. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  14. Space charge effect simulation at electrons channeling in laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, E. N.; Dik, A. V.; Dabagov, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    In this work we present simulation results for electron beam channeling in ponderomotive potential of laser fields, calculated with a newly created code for electron beam dynamics taking into account space charge effect. It is shown that the use of laser field allows the electron beam to be shaped including focusing and collimation.

  15. Laser Processed Condensing Heat Exchanger Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott; Wright, Sarah; Wallace, Sarah; Hamilton, Tanner; Dennis, Alexander; Zuhlke, Craig; Roth, Nick; Sanders, John

    2017-01-01

    The reliance on non-permanent coatings in Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) designs is a significant technical issue to be solved before long-duration spaceflight can occur. Therefore, high reliability CHXs have been identified by the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) as critical technologies needed to move beyond low earth orbit. The Laser Processed Condensing Heat Exchanger project aims to solve these problems through the use of femtosecond laser processed surfaces, which have unique wetting properties and potentially exhibit anti-microbial growth properties. These surfaces were investigated to identify if they would be suitable candidates for a replacement CHX surface. Among the areas researched in this project include microbial growth testing, siloxane flow testing in which laser processed surfaces were exposed to siloxanes in an air stream, and manufacturability.

  16. Midwest free-electron laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, L. J.; Epstein, M.; Marhic, M. E.; Rymer, W. Z.; Spears, K. G.

    1991-12-01

    It has been shown that pulsed Nd:YAG irradiation of nervous tissue in both mammalian and frog preparations produces selective damage to conduction and axoplasmic transport in small caliber sensory afferent fibers, which may be those responsible for pain sensation. In addition, the thermal affects on peripheral nerve appear to be primarily on sodium channels. This preferential sodium effect can be enhanced or developed further for clinical use to provide novel interventions in anesthesia and surgical treatment of painful conditions. A laser system was built to simulate the high energy pulses of a low repetition rate FEL in the infrared and was used to develop the necessary techniques for the study of transient pump-probe experiments with infrared probe wavelengths. It was employed as a transient IR probe of UV laser effects in the study of metal-ligand dissociation. A novel chrono-coherent imaging technique has been developed which uses time gating with coherent holographic recording. Utilizing short pulses, such as those from the FEL, this technique should provide a means of imaging inside the skin using optical wavelengths. A unique method of short-range electron transfer across a single bond to form a dissociated ion pair has been studied as a function of solvent. Also, the laser mediated release of dye from liposomes has been investigated. Several types of flexible waveguides, suitable for the delivery of output beams of infrared FEL's tunable within the 1 to 10 micron range, have been developed.

  17. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  18. Monitoring structure movement with laser tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Giussani, Alberto; Roncoroni, Fabio; Previtali, Mattia

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the use of laser tracking technology for structure monitoring. In this field the use of this precise instrument is innovative and therefore new investigations are needed for civil structures, especially for applications carried out during unstable environmental conditions. On the other hand, as laser trackers are today very used in industrial applications aimed at collecting data at high speed with precisions superior to +/-0.05 mm, they seem quite promising for those civil engineering applications where numerous geodetic tools, often coupled with mechanical and electrical instruments, are usually used to inspect structure movements. This work illustrates three real civil engineering monitoring applications where laser tracking technology was used to detect object movements. The first one is a laboratory testing for the inspection of a beam (bending moment and shear). The second experiment is the stability inspection of a bridge. The last experiment is one of the first attempts where laser trackers tried to substitute traditional high precision geometric leveling for monitoring an important historical building: the Cathedral of Milan. The achieved results, pro and contra along with some practical issues are described.

  19. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Roy; Neil, George

    2007-02-01

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  20. Ultrafast laser inscription: science today, technology tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Ramsay, W. T.; Willoughby, N. A.; Paterson, L.; Kar, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in the field of ultrafast laser inscription provide ample evidence underscoring the potential of this technique in fabricating novel and previously unthinkable 2D and 3D photonic and optofluidic platforms enabling current sensor, diagnostics, monitoring and biochemical research to scale new heights. In addition to meeting the demands for compact, active waveguide devices designed for diverse applications such as optical metrology, non-linear microscopy and astrophotonics, this technology facilitates the integration of microfluidics with integrated optics which creates a powerful technology for the manufacture of custom lab-on-chip devices with advanced functionality. This paper highlights the capabilities of ultrafast laser inscription in fabricating novel 3D microfluidic devices aimed for biomedical applications.

  1. Hybrid laser technology and doped biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Zemek, Josef; Remsa, Jan; Mikšovský, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Písařík, Petr; Trávníčková, Martina; Filová, Elena; Bačáková, Lucie

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid laser-based technologies for deposition of new types of doped thin films are presented. The focus is on arrangements combining pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with magnetron sputtering (MS), and on the setup with two simultaneously running PLD systems (dual PLD). Advantages and disadvantages of both arrangements are discussed. Layers of different dopants concentration were prepared. Experience with deposition of chromium and titanium doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for potential coating of bone implants is presented. Properties of the layers prepared by both technologies are compared and discussed. The suitability of the layers for colonization with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and human osteoblast-like cells, were also evaluated under in vitro conditions.

  2. Inverse Cerenkov laser accelerator and observation of femtosecond electron beam microbunching by inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yabo

    This dissertation presents results from an experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using laser electric field accelerating relativistic electrons at the Accelerator Test Facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The gas breakdown associated with the laser acceleration process is discussed. In the second half of this dissertation we demonstrate the microbunching of using Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) Accelerator. It has proven experimentally that the IFEL accelerator is capable of functioning as a prebuncher for Inverse Cerenkov Laser Accelerator use.

  3. Applications of laser printing for organic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Ainsebaa, A.; Alloncle, A.-P.; Benetti, M.; Boutopoulos, C.; Cannata, D.; Di Pietrantonio, F.; Dinca, V.; Dinescu, M.; Dutroncy, J.; Eason, R.; Feinaugle, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J.-M.; Grisel, A.; Kaur, K.; Lehmann, U.; Lippert, T.; Loussert, C.; Makrygianni, M.; Manfredonia, I.; Mattle, T.; Morenza, J.-L.; Nagel, M.; Nüesch, F.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Rapp, L.; Rizvi, N.; Rodio, G.; Sanaur, S.; Serra, P.; Shaw-Stewart, J.; Sones, C. L.; Verona, E.; Zergioti, I.

    2013-03-01

    The development of organic electronic requires a non contact digital printing process. The European funded e-LIFT project investigated the possibility of using the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique to address this field of applications. This process has been optimized for the deposition of functional organic and inorganic materials in liquid and solid phase, and a set of polymer dynamic release layer (DRL) has been developed to allow a safe transfer of a large range of thin films. Then, some specific applications related to the development of heterogeneous integration in organic electronics have been addressed. We demonstrated the ability of LIFT process to print thin film of organic semiconductor and to realize Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) with mobilities as high as 4 10-2 cm2.V-1.s-1 and Ion/Ioff ratio of 2.8 105. Polymer Light Emitting Diodes (PLED) have been laser printed by transferring in a single step process a stack of thin films, leading to the fabrication of red, blue green PLEDs with luminance ranging from 145 cd.m-2 to 540 cd.m-2. Then, chemical sensors and biosensors have been fabricated by printing polymers and proteins on Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices. The ability of LIFT to transfer several sensing elements on a same device with high resolution allows improving the selectivity of these sensors and biosensors. Gas sensors based on the deposition of semiconducting oxide (SnO2) and biosensors for the detection of herbicides relying on the printing of proteins have also been realized and their performances overcome those of commercial devices. At last, we successfully laser-printed thermoelectric materials and realized microgenerators for energy harvesting applications.

  4. CO2 laser technology for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiland, W.; Wittig, M.

    1987-01-01

    The paper summarizes the current status of CO2 laser technology development and emphasizes the potential of emerging CO2 hardware components and subsystems for future optical space mission scenarios. Free space optical communications, navigation, lidar applications, and scientific missions are among the space application scenarios considered. It is noted that ESA, NASA, and Intelsat have selected the direct detection GaAlAs system for near-term preoperational applications of medium link distances and data rates.

  5. Ultrashort pulsed laser technology development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Navy has been pursuing a technology development program for advanced, all-fiber, Ultra Short Pulsed Laser (USPL) systems via Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs. Multiple topics have been published to promote and fund research that encompasses every critical component of a standard USPL system and enable the demonstration of mJ/pulse class systems with an all fiber architecture. This presentation will summarize published topics and funded programs.

  6. Analysis of the ac free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hung; Lee, Jin Hyun

    1990-06-01

    An ac free-electron laser (FEL) with a superconductor cavity and a FEL with a plasma wave wiggler are analyzed. The ac FEL has a small effective wiggler wavelength and higher wiggler strength. Therefore, it can supply high-power coherent radiation with a short wavelength. From the linear fluid theory and Maxwell's equations, the dispersion relation is derived. When the coupling term is much less than unity, the growth rate of electromagnetic instability is calculated. The intrinsic efficiency of radiation production is also estimated. For the small-signal gain regime, the gain coefficient is formulated. In a FEL with a plasma wiggler, the electron beam passing through the wiggler plasma might begin to thermalize due to various particle-particle and wave-particle interactions. To avoid such interactions, the electron beam should be bunched and narrower than the skin depth. It has been found that the growth rate has a linear dependence on the amplitude of the electric wiggler and decreases with increasing beam energy. The intrinsic efficiency of radiation production decreases with increasing beam energy. In a FEL with a plasma wiggler, the efficiency is enhanced by an increase in the electron beam density.

  7. Free electron lasers with small period wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Booske, J. H.; Destler, W. W.; Granatstein, V. L.; Mayergoyz, I. D.; Ott, E.

    1989-05-01

    Progress of research on a short period wiggler (SPW) free electron laser (FEL) with a sheet electron beam is reviewed. Most of the recent work has concentrated on addressing thermal engineering issued in the device. This particular emphasis was particularly stimulated by an evaluation by Panel XXI for the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee which stated that there are serious thermal management engineering uncertainties in the electron gun, the microwave cavity, and the wiggler that will need to be addressed for CW operation. In the panel's judgment, these thermal problems are likely to be insurmountable for fusion applications. In fact, recent experimental and theoretical results challenge this judgment. For example, our most recent conceptual designs involve small-to-negligible RF losses in the cavity walls. In addition, we have convincingly established that for electron beams of quality achievable with thermionic Pierce guns, body currents should be negligible to nonexistent, thus ensuring a thermally stable cavity. These discoveries, as well as other research progress, are reviewed in detail in the following report. Plans are described for a pulsed (100 ns) proof-of-principle lasing experiment to be conducted during the remainder of this fiscal year. In addition, we present a revised statement of work and budget for the follow-on year of the current grant. These proposed tasks will address the remaining risk issues for an ERCH source based on the SPW sheet-beam FEL. Upon the completion of those tasks, sufficient information will exist to confidently assess the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  8. Synchronization of sub-picosecond electron and laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage, G.P.

    1999-07-01

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is sub-picosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next generation experiments. The design of a microwave timing modulator system is now being investigated in more detail. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Synchronization of sub-picosecond electron and laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Le Sage, G. P.

    1999-07-12

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is sub-picosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next generation experiments. The design of a microwave timing modulator system is now being investigated in more detail.

  10. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Chapman, Henry N.; Marchesini, Stefano; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry Rohner, Urs; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Bajt, Sasa; Woods, Bruce; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  11. Electron Weibel Instability Mediated Laser Driven Electromagnetic Collisionless Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qing; Mima, Kunioki; Cai, Hong-Bo; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Nagatomo, Hideo; He, X. T.

    2015-11-01

    As a fundamental nonlinear structure, collisionless shock is widely studied in astrophysics. Recently, the rapidly-developing laser technology provides a good test-bed to study such shock physics in laboratory. In addition, the laser driven shock ion acceleration is also interested due to its potential applications. We explore the effect of external parallel magnetic field on the collisionless shock formation and resultant particle acceleration by using the 2D3V PIC simulations. We show that unlike the electrostatic shock generated in the unmagnetized plasma, the shock generated in the weakly-magnetized laser-driven plasma is mostly electromagnetic (EM)-like with higher Mach number. The generation mechanism is due to the stronger transverse magnetic field self-generated at the nonlinear stage of the electron Weibel instability which drastically scatters particles and leads to higher energy dissipation. Simulation results also suggest more ions are reflected by this EM shock and results in larger energy transfer rate from the laser to ions, which is of advantage for applications such as neutron production and ion fast ignition.

  12. PIC Simulations of direct laser accelerated electron from underdense plasmas using the OMEGA EP Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Amina; Batson, Thomas; Krushelnick, Karl; Willingale, Louise; Arefiev, Alex; Wang, Tao; Nilson, Phil; Froula, Dustin; Haberberger, Dan; Davies, Andrew; Theobald, Wolfgang; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The OMEGA EP laser system is used to study channeling phenomena and direct laser acceleration (DLA) through an underdense plasma. The interaction of a ps laser pulse with a subcritical density CH plasma plume results in the expulsion of electron along the laser axis, forming a positively charged channel. Electrons confined within this channel are subject to the action of the laser field as well as the transverse electric field of the channel, resulting the DLA of these electrons and the formation of a high energy electron beam. We have performed 2D simulations of ultra-intense laser radiation with underdense plasma using the PIC code EPOCH to investigate electron densities and self-consistently generated electric fields, as well as electron trajectories. This work was supported by the National Laser Users' Facility (NLUF), DOE.

  13. Free-electron lasers driven by laser plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, J.; Barber, S. K.; Isono, F.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) have the potential to drive compact free-electron lasers (FELs). Even with LPA energy spreads typically at the percent level, the e-beam brightness can be excellent, due to the low normalized emittance (<0.5 µm) and high peak current (multi-kA) resulting from the ultra-short e-beam duration (few fs). It is critical, however, that in order to mitigate the effect of percent-level energy spread, one has to actively manipulate the phase-space distribution of the e-beam. We provide an overview of the methods proposed by the various LPA FEL research groups. At the BELLA Center at LBNL, we are pursuing the use of a chicane for longitudinal e-beam decompression (therefore greatly reducing the slice energy spread), in combination with short-scale-length e-beam transportation with an active plasma lens and a strong-focusing 4-m-long undulator. We present ELEGANT & GENESIS simulations on the transport and FEL gain, showing strong enhancement in output power over the incoherent background, and present estimates of the 3D gain length for deviations from the expected e-beam properties (varying e-beam lengths and emittances). To highlight the role of collective effects, we also present ELEGANT & GENESIS simulation results.

  14. Direct metal laser sintering: a digitised metal casting technology.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, K Vijay; Nandini, V Vidyashree

    2013-12-01

    Dental technology is undergoing advancements at a fast pace and technology is being imported from various other fields. One such imported technology is direct metal laser sintering technology for casting metal crowns. This article will discuss the process of laser sintering for making metal crowns and fixed partial dentures with a understanding of their pros and cons.

  15. Comparison study of in vivo dose response to laser-driven versus conventional electron beam.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Melanie; Baumann, Michael; Bergmann, Ralf; Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Hartmann, Josefin; Karsch, Leonhard; Krause, Mechthild; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Nicolai, Maria; Reuter, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sävert, Alexander; Schnell, Michael; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Kaluza, Malte; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The long-term goal to integrate laser-based particle accelerators into radiotherapy clinics not only requires technological development of high-intensity lasers and new techniques for beam detection and dose delivery, but also characterization of the biological consequences of this new particle beam quality, i.e. ultra-short, ultra-intense pulses. In the present work, we describe successful in vivo experiments with laser-driven electron pulses by utilization of a small tumour model on the mouse ear for the human squamous cell carcinoma model FaDu. The already established in vitro irradiation technology at the laser system JETI was further enhanced for 3D tumour irradiation in vivo in terms of beam transport, beam monitoring, dose delivery and dosimetry in order to precisely apply a prescribed dose to each tumour in full-scale radiobiological experiments. Tumour growth delay was determined after irradiation with doses of 3 and 6 Gy by laser-accelerated electrons. Reference irradiation was performed with continuous electron beams at a clinical linear accelerator in order to both validate the dedicated dosimetry employed for laser-accelerated JETI electrons and above all review the biological results. No significant difference in radiation-induced tumour growth delay was revealed for the two investigated electron beams. These data provide evidence that the ultra-high dose rate generated by laser acceleration does not impact the biological effectiveness of the particles.

  16. Role of direct laser acceleration of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator with ionization injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Jessica; Lemos, Nuno; Amorim, Ligia Diana; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Marsh, Ken; Tsung, Frank; Froula, Dustin; Mori, Warren; Josh, Chan

    2016-10-01

    We show through experiments and supporting simulations the role of direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator when ionization injection of electrons is employed. The laser pulse is intense enough to create a nonlinear wakefield and long enough to overlap the electrons trapped in the first accelerating potential well (bucket) of the wakefield. The betatron oscillations of the trapped electrons in the plane of the laser polarization in the presence of an ion column lead to an energy transfer from the laser pulse to the electrons through DLA. We show that the produced electron beams exhibit characteristic features that are indicative of DLA as an additional acceleration mechanism when the laser pulse overlaps the trapped electrons. Experimental work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1415306 and DOE Grant DE-SC0010064. Simulation work done on the Fermi Cluster at Cineca.

  17. Electro-Optical Laser Technology. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawn, John H.

    This report describes a program to prepare students for employment as laser technicians and laser operators and to ensure that they have the necessary skills required by the industry. The objectives are to prepare a curriculum and syllabus for an associate degree program in Electro-Optical Laser Technology. The 2-year Electro-Optical Laser program…

  18. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  19. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Scharlemann, Ernst T.

    1988-01-01

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  20. Relativistic Laser Acceleration Of Electrons Along Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Z. M.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, M.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yuan, X. H.; Xu, M. H.; Zheng, Z. Y.; Liang, W. X.; Yu, Q. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, F.; Wang, Z. H.; Wei, Z. Y.; Jin, Z.; Zhang, J.; Nakamura, T.; Mima, K.

    2006-12-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies on surface electron emission will be presented. A collimated fast electron beam was observed along the target surface irradiated by intense laser pulses up to 20TW when the laser is incident with large angles such as over 45 degree. Numerical simulations suggest that such an electron beam is formed due to the confinement of the surface quasistatic electric and magnetic fields. Meanwhile, an acceleration process similar to the inverse-free-electron-laser is found to occur and is responsible for the generation of the most energetic electrons. A general formula for electron angular distributions accounting for the quasistatic electric and magnetic fields is given. In certain conditions, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams are also produced. These results are of interest for potential applications of laser-produced electron beams and helpful to the undersanding of the cone-target physics in the fast ignition related experiments.

  1. Tailored terahertz pulses from a laser-modulated electron beam.

    PubMed

    Byrd, J M; Hao, Z; Martin, M C; Robin, D S; Sannibale, F; Schoenlein, R W; Zholents, A A; Zolotorev, M S

    2006-04-28

    We present a new method to generate steady and tunable, coherent, broadband terahertz radiation from a relativistic electron beam modulated by a femtosecond laser. We have demonstrated this in the electron storage ring at the Advanced Light Source. Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse copropagating through a wiggler modulates the electron energies within a short slice of the electron bunch with about the same duration of the laser pulse. The bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories, and the resulting hole emits short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent terahertz pulses synchronized to the laser. We present measurements of the intensity and spectra of these pulses. This technique allows tremendous flexibility in shaping the terahertz pulse by appropriate modulation of the laser pulse.

  2. Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2006-04-28

    We present a new method to generate steady and tunable, coherent, broadband terahertz radiation from a relativistic electron beam modulated by a femtosecond laser. We have demonstrated this in the electron storage ring at the Advanced Light Source. Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse copropagating through a wiggler modulates the electron energies within a short slice of the electron bunch with about the same duration of the laser pulse. The bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories, and the resulting hole emits short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent terahertz pulses synchronized to the laser. We present measurements of the intensity and spectra of these pulses. This technique allows tremendous flexibility in shaping the terahertz pulse by appropriate modulation of the laser pulse.

  3. Synchrotron Facilities and Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vaclav, Vylet; Liu, James; /SLAC

    2007-12-21

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle travels along a curved trajectory. Initially encountered as a nuisance around orbits of high energy synchrotron accelerators, it gradually became an indispensable research tool in many applications: crystallography, X-ray lithography, micromechanics, structural biology, microprobe X-ray experiments, etc. So-called first generation SR sources were exploiting SR in parasitic mode at electron accelerators built to study particle collisions. The second generation of SR sources was the first facilities solely devoted to SR production. They were optimized to achieve stable high currents in the accelerator ring to achieve substantially higher photon flux and to provide a large number of SR beam lines for users. Third generation sources were further optimized for increased brilliance, i.e. with photons densely packed into a beam of very small cross-sectional area and minimal angular divergence (see the Appendix for more detailed definitions of flux, brightness and brilliance) and makes extensive use of the insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators. Free Electron Lasers (FELs), the fourth generation SR sources, open new research possibilities by offering extremely short pulses of extremely bright and coherent radiation. The number of SR sources around the world now probably exceeds 100. These facilities vary greatly in size, energy of the electron (or positron) beams, range of photon energies and other characteristics of the photon beams produced. In what follows we will concentrate on describing some common aspects of SR facilities, their operation modes and specific radiation protection aspects.

  4. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  5. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-09-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  6. Initial performance of Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Baca, D.M.; Chan, K.C.D.; Cheairs, R.B.; Fortgang, C.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Johnson, W.J.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Kinross-Wright, J.; McCann, S.W.; Meier, K.L.; Plato, J.G.; Sheffield, R.L.; Sherwood, B.A.; Sigler, F.E.; Timmer, C.A.; Warren, R.W.; Weber, M.E.; Wilson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report recent results on the high-brightness electron linac and initial performance of the Advanced FEL at Los Alamos. The design and construction of the Advanced FEL beamline are based upon integration of advanced technologies such as high-brightness photoinjector, high-gradient compact linac, and permanent-magnet beamline components. With the use of microwiggler, both permanent magnet and pulsed electromagnet, and compact optical resonator, the Advanced FEL will be the first of its kind small enough to be mounted on an optical table and yet capable of providing highpower optical output spanning the near-ir and visible regions. A schematic of the Advanced FEL is shown in. The source of high-current electron pulses is a laser-gated photoelectron injector which forms-an integral part of a high-gradient 1.2-m long rf linear accelerator. The latter is capable of accelerating electrons up to 20 MeV with room temperature operation and 25 MeV at 77K. The electrons are produced in 10-ps pulses with peak currents as high as 300 A. These electron pulses are transported in a brightness-preserving beamline consisting of permanent magnet dipoles and quadrupoles. The beamline has three 30{degrees} bends. The first bend allows for the photocathode drive laser input; the second allows for the FEL output and the third turns the electron beam into the floor for safety reasons. Additional information on the design physics of the Advanced FEL can be found elsewhere.

  7. Recent progress of the Los Alamos advanced free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Austin, R.H.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.; Goldstein, J.C.; Gierman, S.M.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Kong, S.H.; Plato, J.G.; Russell, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    Many industrial and research applications can benefit from the availability of a compact, user-friendly, broadly tunable and high average power free electron laser (FEL). Over the past four years, the Los Alamos Advanced FEL has been built with these design goals. The key to a compact FEL is the integration of advanced beam technologies such as a high-brightness photoinjector, a high-gradient compact linac, and permanent magnet beamline components. These technologies enable the authors to shrink the FEL size yet maintain its high average power capability. The Advanced FEL has been in operation in the near ir (4-6 {mu}m) since early 1993. Recent results of the Advanced FEL lasing at saturation and upgrades to improve its average power are presented.

  8. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  9. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    Synchrotron x-ray radiation sources have revolutionized many areas of science from elucidating the atomic structure of proteins to understanding the electronic structure of complex materials such as the cuprate superconductors. In a Free Electron Laser (FEL), the main difference to the synchrotron radiation mechanism is that the light field acts on the electron beam, over a long distance in an undulator, and causes electron bunching at the optical wavelength. Electrons in different parts of the electron bunch are therefore correlated, and so emit coherently, with a brightness that scales as the square of the number of electrons. In order to lase, the electron beam in a FEL must have a transverse geometric emittance less than the wavelength of the light to be produced. For the generation of x-ray wavelengths, this is one of the most difficult challenges in the design and construction of a FEL. The geometric emittance can be "compressed" by acceleration to very high energy, but with the penalty of very large physical size and very large cost. The motivation for this work was provided by the desire to investigate the fundamental origin of the emittance of an electron beam as it is born at a photocathode. If this initial, or "thermal" emittance can be reduced, the energy, scale and cost of accelerators potentially would be reduced. As the LCLS used copper as its photocathode, this material was the one studied in this work. Copper was used in the LCLS as it represented a "robust" material that could stand the very high accelerating gradients used in the photoinjector of the FEL. Metals are also prompt photoemitters, and so can be used to produce very short electron bunches. This can be a useful property for creation of extremely short FEL pulses, and also for creation of beams that are allowed to expand under space charge forces, but in a way that results in linear fields, allowing subsequent recompression. An ideal photocathode for FEL photoinjector should have high

  10. Pulsed lasers on plasmas produced by electron beams and discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, Viktor F; Yakovlenko, Sergei I

    2003-02-28

    The use of electron beams for pumping dense gases made it possible to obtain lasing on atomic and molecular transitions in different spectral ranges and to develop high-power pulsed lasers. N.G. Basov and coworkers made a substantial contribution to the formation and advancement of this field. A brief review of the research on efficient elevated-pressure active media and high-power pulsed lasers utilising plasmas produced both by an electron beam and an electron-beam-controlled discharge is presented. These are excimer and exciplex lasers, lasers utilising atomic transitions in xenon and neon, an Ar -N{sub 2} mixture laser, a molecular nitrogen ion laser, and a high-pressure CO{sub 2} laser. Data obtained in the investigation of the radiation of rare-gas halide complexes are given. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  11. Laser electron acceleration in the prepulse produced plasma corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, N. E.; Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Pugachev, L. P.; Levashov, P. R.

    2015-11-01

    The generation of hot electrons at grazing incidence of a subpicosecond relativistic-intense laser pulse onto the plane solid target is analyzed for the parameters of the petawatt class laser systems. We study the preplasma formation on the surface of solid Al target produced by the laser prepulses with different time structure. For modeling of the preplasma dynamics we use a wide-range two-temperature hydrodynamic model. As a result of simulations, the preplasma expansion under the action of the laser prepulse and the plasma density profiles for different contrast ratios of the nanosecond pedestal are found. These density profiles were used as the initial density distributions in 3-D PIC simulations of electron acceleration by the main P-polarized laser pulse. Results of modeling demonstrate the substantial increase of the characteristic energy and number of accelerated electrons for the grazing incidence of a subpicosecond intense laser pulse in comparison with the laser-target interaction at normal incidence.

  12. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachter, Levi; Ron, Amiram

    1989-07-01

    The operation of a free-electron laser in an open periodic structure is analyzed. When operated as an amplifier, it is shown that exponential gain can develop in such a device. An analytic expression for this gain is presented, and it is shown that this gain decays exponentially with the beam height above the grating; the gain dependence on the beam thickness is also analyzed. As the energy extraction rate is much higher in an exponential gain regime, the operation of an oscillator based on the same concept is also investigated. In this case, the Smith-Purcell radiation 'provides the startup' through a feedback system. The minimal current needed to sustain oscillations is given in an analytical form. Numerical calculations show that this current is more than three orders of magnitude lower than that necessary for an oscillator which operates in an algebraic gain regime.

  13. Electronics Troubleshooting. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodahl, Dan

    This learning module for a postsecondary electronics course in solid state circuits is designed to help teachers lead students through electronics troubleshooting. The module is intended to be used for a second-semester technical college course for electromechanical technology majors. The module introduces students to semiconductor devices and…

  14. Electronics Technology. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Guy

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 20 terminal objectives for a basic electronics technology course. The materials were developed for a two-semester course (2 hours daily) designed to include instruction in basic electricity and electronic fundamentals, and to develop skills and…

  15. Idaho Electronics Technology Level One. Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The curriculum standards for Idaho postsecondary-level electronics technology programs contained in this guide are intended to facilitate the development of a coordinated statewide electronics program that would enable students to transfer from one school to another to specialize in a second- or third-year option not available in the first school.…

  16. Electronic Devices and Systems. Energy Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Centre-Southwest, Waco, TX.

    This course in electronic devices and systems is one of 16 courses in the Energy Technology Series developed for an Energy Conservation-and-Use Technology curriculum. Intended for use in two-year postsecondary technical institutions to prepare technicians for employment, the courses are also useful in industry for updating employees in…

  17. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max

    2001-01-01

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  18. Surface electron acceleration in relativistic laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zheng, Jun; Ma, Yan-Yun; Bari, Muhammad; Li, Yu-Tong; Zhang, Jie

    2006-04-01

    Under the grazing incidence of a relativistic intense laser pulse onto a solid target, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that intense quasistatic magnetic and electric fields are generated near the front target surface during the interaction. Some electrons are confined in these quasistatic fields and move along the target surface with betatron oscillations. When this oscillating frequency is close to the laser frequency in the particle frame, these electrons can be accelerated significantly in the reflected laser field, similar to the inverse free-electron-laser acceleration. An analytical model for this surface betatron acceleration is proposed.

  19. Vanderbilt free electron laser project in biomedical and materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard F.; Tolk, N. H.

    1988-06-01

    The Medical Free Electron Laser Program was awarded to develop, construct and operate a free-electron laser facility dedicated to biomedical and materials studies, with particular emphases on: fundamental studies of absorption and localization of electromagnetic energy on and near material surfaces, especially through electronic and other selective, non-statistical processes; non-thermal photon-materials interactions (e.g., electronic bond-breaking or vibrational energy transfer) in physical and biological materials as well as in long-wavelength biopolymer dynamics; development of FEL-based methods to study drug action and to characterize biomolecular properties and metabolic processes in biomembranes; clinical applications in otolaryngology, neurosurgery, ophthalmology and radiology stressing the use of the laser for selective laser-tissue, laser-cellular and laser-molecule interactions in both therapeutic and diagnostic modalities.

  20. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  1. Two-dimensional optimization of free electron laser designs

    DOEpatents

    Prosnitz, Donald; Haas, Roger A.

    1985-01-01

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a "synchronous electron" at an optimal transverse radius r>0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  2. Amplification of Relativistic Electron Bunches by Acceleration in Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braenzel, J.; Andreev, A. A.; Abicht, F.; Ehrentraut, L.; Platonov, K.; Schnürer, M.

    2017-01-01

    Direct acceleration of electrons in a coherent, intense light field is revealed by a remarkable increase of the electron number in the MeV energy range. Laser irradiation of thin polymer foils with a peak intensity of ˜1 ×1020 W /cm2 releases electron bunches along the laser propagation direction that are postaccelerated in the partly transmitted laser field. They are decoupled from the laser field at high kinetic energies, when a second foil target at an appropriate distance prevents their subsequent deceleration in the declining laser field. The scheme is established with laser pulses of high temporal contrast (1010 peak to background ratio) and two ultrathin polymer foils at a distance of 500 μ m . 2D particle in cell simulations and an analytical model confirm a significant change of the electron spectral distribution due to the double foil setup, which leads to an amplification of about 3 times of the electron number around a peak at 1 MeV electron energy. The result verifies a theoretical concept of direct electron bunch acceleration in a laser field that is scalable to extreme acceleration potential gradients. This method can be used to enhance the density and energy spread of electron bunches injected into postaccelerator stages of laser driven radiation sources.

  3. Laser space communication experiment: Modulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of a contractual program to develop the modulator technology necessary for a 10.6 micron laser communication system using cadmium telluride as the modulator material. The program consisted of the following tasks: (1) The growth of cadmium telluride crystals of sufficient size and purity and with the necessary optical properties for use as laser modulator rods. (2) Develop a low loss antireflection coating for the cadmium telluride rods. (3) Design and build a modulator capable of 300 MHz modulation. (4) Develop a modulator driver capable of a data rate of 300 MBits/sec, 12 W rms output power, and 40 percent efficiency. (5) Assemble and test the modulator system. All design goals were met and the system was built and tested.

  4. Role of Direct Laser Acceleration of Electrons in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator with Ionization Injection.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J L; Lemos, N; Amorim, L D; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Marsh, K A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2017-02-10

    We show the first experimental demonstration that electrons being accelerated in a laser wakefield accelerator operating in the forced or blowout regimes gain significant energy from both the direct laser acceleration (DLA) and the laser wakefield acceleration mechanisms. Supporting full-scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations elucidate the role of the DLA of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator when ionization injection of electrons is employed. An explanation is given for how electrons can maintain the DLA resonance condition in a laser wakefield accelerator despite the evolving properties of both the drive laser and the electrons. The produced electron beams exhibit characteristic features that are indicative of DLA as an additional acceleration mechanism.

  5. Role of Direct Laser Acceleration of Electrons in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator with Ionization Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. L.; Lemos, N.; Amorim, L. D.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2017-02-01

    We show the first experimental demonstration that electrons being accelerated in a laser wakefield accelerator operating in the forced or blowout regimes gain significant energy from both the direct laser acceleration (DLA) and the laser wakefield acceleration mechanisms. Supporting full-scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations elucidate the role of the DLA of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator when ionization injection of electrons is employed. An explanation is given for how electrons can maintain the DLA resonance condition in a laser wakefield accelerator despite the evolving properties of both the drive laser and the electrons. The produced electron beams exhibit characteristic features that are indicative of DLA as an additional acceleration mechanism.

  6. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Electron beam deflection, focusing, and collimation by a femtosecond laser lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minogin, V. G.

    2009-11-01

    This work examines spatial separation of femtosecond electron bunches using the ponderomotive potential created by femtosecond laser pulses. It is shown that ponderomotive optical potentials are capable of effectively deflecting, focusing, and collimating narrow femtosecond electron bunches.

  7. Optimizing chirped laser pulse parameters for electron acceleration in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Akhyani, Mina; Jahangiri, Fazel; Niknam, Ali Reza; Massudi, Reza

    2015-11-14

    Electron dynamics in the field of a chirped linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated. Variations of electron energy gain versus chirp parameter, time duration, and initial phase of laser pulse are studied. Based on maximizing laser pulse asymmetry, a numerical optimization procedure is presented, which leads to the elimination of rapid fluctuations of gain versus the chirp parameter. Instead, a smooth variation is observed that considerably reduces the accuracy required for experimentally adjusting the chirp parameter.

  8. Free Electron Laser Analysis For the Innovative Navy Prototype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    are oscillating at microwave frequencies, but the laser operates at infrared frequencies due to relativistic Doppler shifts [1]. 2. Microscopic...Applications of a Free Electron Laser Lidar ”, Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, 2000, vol. 6, pp 2471-2473, 24-28 July 2000. [21] Frank Carroll...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited FREE ELECTRON LASER

  9. Universal scalings for laser acceleration of electrons in ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudik, Vladimir; Arefiev, Alexey; Zhang, Xi; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    We analytically investigate the acceleration of electrons undergoing betatron oscillations in an ion channel, driven by a laser beam propagating with superluminal (or luminal) phase velocity. The universal scalings for the maximum attainable electron energy are found for arbitrary laser and plasma parameters by deriving a set of dimensionless equations for paraxial ultra-relativistic electron motion. One of our analytic predictions is the emergence of forbidden zones in the electrons' phase space. For an individual electron, these give rise to a threshold-type dependence of the final energy gain on the laser intensity. The universal scalings are also generalized to the resonant laser interaction with the third harmonic of betatron motion and to the case when the laser beam is circularly polarized.

  10. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Matt; Bossard, John; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of laser ignition technology for bipropellant rocket engines applications. The objectives of this project include: (1) the selection test chambers and flows; (2) definition of the laser ignition setup; (3) pulse format optimization; (4) fiber optic coupled laser ignition system analysis; and (5) chamber integration issues definition. The testing concludes that rocket combustion chamber laser ignition is imminent. Support technologies (multiplexing, window durability/cleaning, and fiber optic durability) are feasible.

  11. An open-source laser electronics suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisenti, Neal C.; Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Restelli, Alessandro; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We present an integrated set of open-source electronics for controlling external-cavity diode lasers and other instruments in the laboratory. The complete package includes a low-noise circuit for driving high-voltage piezoelectric actuators, an ultra-stable current controller based on the design of, and a high-performance, multi-channel temperature controller capable of driving thermo-electric coolers or resistive heaters. Each circuit (with the exception of the temperature controller) is designed to fit in a Eurocard rack equipped with a low-noise linear power supply capable of driving up to 5 A at +/- 15 V. A custom backplane allows signals to be shared between modules, and a digital communication bus makes the entire rack addressable by external control software over TCP/IP. The modular architecture makes it easy for additional circuits to be designed and integrated with existing electronics, providing a low-cost, customizable alternative to commercial systems without sacrificing performance.

  12. Optimization and control of electron beams from laser wakefield accelerations using asymmetric laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, K.; Gupta, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    Optimization and control of electron beam quality in laser wakefield acceleration are explored by using a temporally asymmetric laser pulse of the sharp rising front portion. The temporally asymmetric laser pulse imparts stronger ponderomotive force on the ambient plasma electrons. The stronger ponderomotive force associated with the asymmetric pulse significantly affects the injection of electrons into the wakefield and consequently the quality of the injected bunch in terms of injected charge, mean energy, and emittance. Based on particle-in-cell simulations, we report to generate a monoenergetic electron beam with reduced emittance and enhanced charge in laser wakefield acceleration using an asymmetric pulse of duration 30 fs.

  13. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. K.; Cremers, D. A.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  14. Overview of laser technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G.K.; Cremers, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has had a long history of involvement in laser sciences and has been recognized both for its large laser programs and smaller scale developments in laser technology and applications. The first significant program was with the Rover nuclear-based rocket propulsion system in 1968 to study laser initiated fusion. From here applications spread to programs in laser isotope separation and development of large lasers for fusion. These programs established the technological human resource base of highly trained laser physicists, engineers, and chemists that remain at the Laboratory today. Almost every technical division at Los Alamos now has some laser capability ranging from laser development, applications, studies on nonlinear processes, modeling and materials processing. During the past six years over eight R&D-100 Awards have been received by Los Alamos for development of laser-based techniques and instrumentation. Outstanding examples of technology developed include LIDAR applications to environmental monitoring, single molecule detection using fluorescence spectroscopy, a laser-based high kinetic energy source of oxygen atoms produced by a laser-sustained plasma, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for compositional, analysis, thin film high temperature superconductor deposition, multi-station laser welding, and direct metal deposition and build-up of components by fusing powder particles with a laser beam.

  15. Synchronization of Sub-Picosecond Electron and Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Le Sage G.P.

    2000-08-15

    Sub-picosecond laser-electron synchronization is required to take full advantage of the experimental possibilities arising from the marriage of modern high intensity lasers and high brightness electron beams in the same laboratory. Two particular scenarios stand out in this regard, injection of ultra-short electron pulses in short wavelength laser-driven plasma accelerators, and Compton scattering of laser photons from short electron pulses. Both of these applications demand synchronization, which is subpicosecond, with tens of femtosecond synchronization implied for next-generation experiments. Typically, an RF electron accelerator is synchronized to a short pulse laser system by detecting the repetition signal of a laser oscillator, adjusted to an exact subharmonic of the linac RF frequency, and multiplying or phase locking this signal to produce the master RF clock. Pulse-to-pulse jitter characteristic of self-mode-locked laser oscillators represents a direct contribution to the ultimate timing jitter between a high intensity laser focus and electron beam at the interaction point, or a photocathode drive laser in an RF photoinjector. This timing jitter problem has been addressed most seriously in the context of the RF photoinjector, where the electron beam properties are sensitive functions of relative timing jitter. The timing jitter achieved in synchronized photocathode drive laser systems is near, or slightly below one picosecond. The ultimate time of arrival jitter of the beam at the photoinjector exit is typically a bit smaller than the photocathode drive-laser jitter due to velocity compression effects in the first RF cell of the gun. This tendency of the timing of the electron beam arrival at a given spatial point to lock to the RF lock is strongly reinforced by use of magnetic compression.

  16. Tenth Biennial Coherent Laser Radar Technology and Applications Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The tenth conference on coherent laser radar technology and applications is the latest in a series beginning in 1980 which provides a forum for exchange of information on recent events current status, and future directions of coherent laser radar (or lidar or lader) technology and applications. This conference emphasizes the latest advancement in the coherent laser radar field, including theory, modeling, components, systems, instrumentation, measurements, calibration, data processing techniques, operational uses, and comparisons with other remote sensing technologies.

  17. Tenth Biennial Coherent Laser Radar Technology and Applications Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The tenth conference on coherent laser radar technology and applications is the latest in a series beginning in 1980 which provides a forum for exchange of information on recent events current status, and future directions of coherent laser radar (or lidar or lader) technology and applications. This conference emphasizes the latest advancement in the coherent laser radar field, including theory, modeling, components, systems, instrumentation, measurements, calibration, data processing techniques, operational uses, and comparisons with other remote sensing technologies.

  18. Electron acceleration by a chirped Gaussian laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sohbatzadeh, F.; Mirzanejhad, S.; Ghasemi, M.

    2006-12-15

    Electron acceleration by a chirped Gaussian laser pulse is investigated numerically. A linear and negative chirp is employed in this study. At first, a simple analytical description for the chirp effect on the electron acceleration in vacuum is provided in one-dimensional model. The chirp mechanism is then extended to the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse and electron. The electron final energy is obtained as a function of laser beam waist, laser intensity, chirp parameter, and initial phase of the laser pulse. It is shown that the electron final energy depends strongly on the chirp parameter and the initial phase of the laser pulse. There is an optimal value for the chirp parameter in which the electron acceleration takes place effectively. The energy gain increases with laser beam waist and intensity. It is also shown that the electron is accelerated within a few degrees to the axial direction. Emphasis is on the important aspect of the chirp effect on the energy gained by an electron from the electromagnetic wave.

  19. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D.

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  20. High-gain harmonic-generation free-electron laser

    PubMed

    Yu; Babzien; Ben-Zvi; DiMauro; Doyuran; Graves; Johnson; Krinsky; Malone; Pogorelsky; Skaritka; Rakowsky; Solomon; Wang; Woodle; Yakimenko; Biedron; Galayda; Gluskin; Jagger; Sajaev; Vasserman

    2000-08-11

    A high-gain harmonic-generation free-electron laser is demonstrated. Our approach uses a laser-seeded free-electron laser to produce amplified, longitudinally coherent, Fourier transform-limited output at a harmonic of the seed laser. A seed carbon dioxide laser at a wavelength of 10.6 micrometers produced saturated, amplified free-electron laser output at the second-harmonic wavelength, 5.3 micrometers. The experiment verifies the theoretical foundation for the technique and prepares the way for the application of this technique in the vacuum ultraviolet region of the spectrum, with the ultimate goal of extending the approach to provide an intense, highly coherent source of hard x-rays.

  1. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Prof. Philip; Moore, Tom; Magel, Greg; Hartfield, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  2. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  3. The European XFEL Free Electron Laser at DESY

    ScienceCinema

    Weise, Hans [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Germany

    2016-07-12

    The European X-ray Free-Electron laser Facility (XFEL) is going to be built in an international collaboration at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Germany, and the Technical Design Report was published in 2006. The official project is expected for summer 2007. This new facility will offer photon beams at wavelengths as short as 1 angstrom with highest peak brilliance being more than 100 million times higher than present day synchrotron radiation sources. The radiation has a high degree of transverse coherence and the pulse duration is reduced from {approx}100 picoseconds (typ. for SR light sources) down to the {approx}10 femtosecond time domain. The overall layout of the XFEL will be described. This includes the envisaged operation parameters for the linear accelerator using superconducting TESLA technology. The complete design is based on the actually operated FLASH free-electron laser at DESY. Experience with the operation during first long user runs at wavelengths from 30 to 13 nm will be described in detail.

  4. Free electron lasers: Present status and future challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W A; Corlett, J N; Emma, P; Huang, Z; Kim, K -J; Lindberg, R; Murphy, J B; Neil, G P; Nguyen, D C; Pellegrini, C; Rimmer, R A; Sannibale, F; Stupakov, G; Walker, R P; Zholents, A A

    2010-06-01

    With the scientific successes of the soft X-ray FLASH facility in Germany and the recent spectacular commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC, free electron lasers are poised to take center stage as the premier source of tunable, intense, coherent photons of either ultra-short time resolution or ultra-fine spectral resolution, from the far infrared to the hard X-ray regime. This paper examines the state of the art in FEL performance and the underlying enabling technologies. It evaluates the state of readiness of the three basic machine architectures—SASE FELs, seeded FELs, and FEL oscillators—for the major X-ray science user facilities on the 5–10 years time scale and examines the challenges that lie ahead for FELs to achieve their full potential throughout the entire spectral range. In soft and hard X-rays, high longitudinal coherence, in addition to full transverse coherence, will be the key performance upgrade; ideas using laser-based or self-seeding or oscillators can be expected to be qualitatively superior to today's SASE sources. Short pulses, from femtoseconds to attoseconds, can be realistically envisioned. With high repetition rate electron sources coupled to superconducting radiofrequency linear accelerators, unprecedented average beam brightness will be possible and many users would be served simultaneously by a single accelerator complex.

  5. Free electron lasers: Present status and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, W. A.; Bisognano, J.; Corlett, J. N.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.; Lindberg, R.; Murphy, J. B.; Neil, G. R.; Nguyen, D. C.; Pellegrini, C.; Rimmer, R. A.; Sannibale, F.; Stupakov, G.; Walker, R. P.; Zholents, A. A.

    2010-06-01

    With the scientific successes of the soft X-ray FLASH facility in Germany and the recent spectacular commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC, free electron lasers are poised to take center stage as the premier source of tunable, intense, coherent photons of either ultra-short time resolution or ultra-fine spectral resolution, from the far infrared to the hard X-ray regime. This paper examines the state of the art in FEL performance and the underlying enabling technologies. It evaluates the state of readiness of the three basic machine architectures—SASE FELs, seeded FELs, and FEL oscillators—for the major X-ray science user facilities on the 5-10 years time scale and examines the challenges that lie ahead for FELs to achieve their full potential throughout the entire spectral range. In soft and hard X-rays, high longitudinal coherence, in addition to full transverse coherence, will be the key performance upgrade; ideas using laser-based or self-seeding or oscillators can be expected to be qualitatively superior to today's SASE sources. Short pulses, from femtoseconds to attoseconds, can be realistically envisioned. With high repetition rate electron sources coupled to superconducting radiofrequency linear accelerators, unprecedented average beam brightness will be possible and many users would be served simultaneously by a single accelerator complex.

  6. Electron acceleration with advanced injection methods at the ASTRA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poder, Kristjan; Carreira-Lopes, Nelson; Wood, Jonathan; Cole, Jason; Dangor, Bucker; Foster, Peta; Gopal, Ram; Kamperidis, Christos; Kononenko, Olena; Mangles, Stuart; Olgun, Halil; Palmer, Charlotte; Symes, Daniel; Pattathil, Rajeev; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Imperial College London Team; Central Laser Facility Collaboration; Tata InsituteFundamental Research Collaboration; DESY Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Recent electron acceleration results from the ASTRA laser facility are presented. Experiments were performed using both the 40 TW ASTRA and the 350 TW ASTRA-Gemini laser. Fundamental electron beam properties relating to its quality were investigated both experimentally and with PIC simulations. For increased control over such parameters, various injection mechanisms such as self-injection and ionization injection were employed. Particular interest is given to the dynamics of ionization injected electrons in strongly driven wakes.

  7. High-repetition rate relativistic electron beam generation from intense laser solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, Thomas; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, Karl

    2015-05-01

    Relativistic electron beams have applications spanning materials science, medicine, and home- land security. Recent advances in short pulse laser technology have enabled the production of very high focused intensities at kHz rep rates. Consequently this has led to the generation of high ux sources of relativistic electrons- which is a necessary characteristic of these laser plasma sources for any potential application. In our experiments, through the generation of a plasma with the lambda cubed laser system at the University of Michigan (a 5 × 1018W=cm2, 500 Hz, Ti:Sapphire laser), we have measured electrons ejected from the surface of fused silica nd Cu targets having energies in excess of an MeV. The spectrum of these electrons was measured with respect to incident laser angle, prepulse timing, and focusing conditions. While taken at a high repetition rate, the pulse energy of the lambda cubed system was consistently on the order of 10 mJ. In order to predict scaling of the electron energy with laser pulse energy, simulations are underway which compare the spectrum generated with the lambda cubed system to the predicted spectrum generated on the petawatt scale HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan.

  8. Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration of electrons to 2 GeV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Yi, S. A.; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Y.-Y.; Korzekwa, R.; Tsai, H.-E.; Pai, C.-H.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Borger, T.; Spinks, M.; Donovan, M.; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators of only a centimetre’s length have produced nearly monoenergetic electron bunches with energy as high as 1 GeV. Scaling these compact accelerators to multi-gigaelectronvolt energy would open the prospect of building X-ray free-electron lasers and linear colliders hundreds of times smaller than conventional facilities, but the 1 GeV barrier has so far proven insurmountable. Here, by applying new petawatt laser technology, we produce electron bunches with a spectrum prominently peaked at 2 GeV with only a few per cent energy spread and unprecedented sub-milliradian divergence. Petawatt pulses inject ambient plasma electrons into the laser-driven accelerator at much lower density than was previously possible, thereby overcoming the principal physical barriers to multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration: dephasing between laser-driven wake and accelerating electrons and laser pulse erosion. Simulations indicate that with improvements in the laser-pulse focus quality, acceleration to nearly 10 GeV should be possible with the available pulse energy. PMID:23756359

  9. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  10. Technology improvements for microscale laser sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, H.; Czerner, S.; Ostendorf, A.; Stippler, P.; Matteazzi, P.

    2005-06-01

    The steadily rising world market volume in the micro system technology area has made higher and higher claims on the micro production technologies so that there is still a shortage in the production of metallic components with total dimensions of only few millimeters and the smallest structures are in the few micrometer range. Currently, the methods of the rapid prototyping area are approved and in relation to the product development one of the most essential instrument of the component manufacturing, in which particularly the macroscopic 3D laser beam processing has proved its high potential with regard to flexible manufacturing of metallic components. New developments in the beam sources area open possibilities of using this method also for the production of micro components. Hence, the subject of the present work is the development of a suitable system concept for 3D micro cladding and/or sintering. This concept has been qualified by theoretical considerations as well as experimental investigations. The developed, fully automatically manageable facility contains a Yb:YAG disc laser of a laser beam focus diameter to be set below 10 μm. As for quality assurance, a pyrometric temperature regulation has been integrated into the facility, which controls the temperatures in the welding bath with the help of a focusable measuring spot down to 50 μm. The process takes place in a likewise controlled protection gas chamber in which atmospheres with an oxygen content below 100 ppm can be guaranteed. The aerodynamic micro particle delivery will be possible with the help of developed combination procedures. The focusing in the melting pool occurs through a coaxial nozzle. Experimental investigations confirm the high potential of this method through which sintered layers smaller than 15 μm can be generated. Samples will be shown.

  11. Nonlinear pulse evolution in seeded free-electron laser amplifiers and in free-electron laser cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Musumeci, P.; Spampinati, S.

    2005-08-15

    The advances in laser technology have made available very short and intense laser pulses which can be used to seed a high-gain single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier. With these seed pulses, a regime of the FEL interaction where the radiation evolution is simultaneously dominated by nonlinear effects (saturation) and time-dependent effects (slippage) can be explored. This regime is characterized by the propagation of a solitary wavelike pulse where the power of the optical wave grows quadratically with time, its pulse length decreases and the spectral bandwidth increases. We analyze the interplay between the field and particle dynamics of this propagation regime which was studied before and termed super-radiance. Furthermore we analyze the properties of the strong higher-order harmonic emission from this wave and its behavior when propagating in a cascade FEL. The super-radiant pulse is indeed capable of passing through the stages of a cascade FEL and to regenerate itself at the wavelength of the higher-order harmonic. The optical pulse obtained is shorter than a cooperation length and is strongly chirped in frequency, thus allowing further longitudinal compression down to the attosecond time scale.

  12. Advanced thermal management technologies for defense electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloschock, Kristen P.; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2012-05-01

    Thermal management technology plays a key role in the continuing miniaturization, performance improvements, and higher reliability of electronic systems. For the past decade, and particularly, the past 4 years, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has aggressively pursued the application of micro- and nano-technology to reduce or remove thermal constraints on the performance of defense electronic systems. The DARPA Thermal Management Technologies (TMT) portfolio is comprised of five technical thrust areas: Thermal Ground Plane (TGP), Microtechnologies for Air-Cooled Exchangers (MACE), NanoThermal Interfaces (NTI), Active Cooling Modules (ACM), and Near Junction Thermal Transport (NJTT). An overview of the TMT program will be presented with emphasis on the goals and status of these efforts relative to the current State-of-the-Art. The presentation will close with future challenges and opportunities in the thermal management of defense electronics.

  13. Overview of advanced law enforcement electronic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, W. R.

    1995-05-01

    Law enforcement and security management are using advanced electronic equipment to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the budget restricted police officer force. Currently there is also significant national attention concerning the possible utilization of 'military' electronic hardware to implement the much sought after 'force multiplier' which can help to alleviate each jurisdictions economic restrictions. However, as we are now finding, the transfer of 'military' hardware for utilization by law enforcement personnel is not as economically viable as hoped. This paper will address some of the recent advances in electronic technology that are being derived from the military technology base. Additionally, comments are given concerning the economic impact as the technology is transferred to the law enforcement community.

  14. Laser absorption and electron propagation in rippled plasma targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-10-01

    Efficient absorption of laser energy and the collimated propagation of relativistic electron beams (generated by the laser target interaction) in plasma are two issues which are of significant importance for applications such as fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is shown with the help of 2-D Particle- In- Cell simulations that introducing density ripples transverse to the laser propagation direction enhances the efficiency of laser power absorption. Furthermore, the density ripples are also instrumental in suppressing the Weibel instability of the propagating electron beam (which is responsible for the divergence of the beam). A physical understanding of the two effects is also provided.

  15. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.; Giordano, G.; Kistner, OC.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1986-07-01

    When completed, the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) is expected to provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized (circular or linear) gamma rays with energies up to 500 MeV. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in a storage ring. Progress with installation of the facility is described, particularly the Ar-ion laser and tagging spectrometer. Tests of the tagging spectrometer coponents is reported, and a second laser is described for higher energy operation. Estimates are given of expected beam parameters. Experimental equipment for the planned research projects to be carried out at the LEGS facility is discussed. (LEW)

  16. Generation of high-quality electron beams from a laser-based advanced accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. M. Elsied; Nasr, A. M. Hafz; Li, Song; Mohammad, Mirzaie; Thomas, Sokollik; Zhang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    At Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) we have established a research laboratory for advanced acceleration research based on high-power lasers and plasma technologies. In a primary experiment based on the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) scheme, multi-hundred MeV electron beams of reasonable quality are generated using 20-40 TW, 30 femtosecond laser pulses interacting independently with helium, neon, nitrogen and argon gas jet targets. The laser-plasma interaction conditions are optimized for stabilizing the electron beam generation from each type of gas. The electron beam pointing angle stability and divergence angle as well as the energy spectra from each gas jet are measured and compared. Supported by 973 National Basic Research Program of China (2013CBA01504) and Natural Science Foundation of China NSFC (11121504, 11334013, 11175119, 11374209)

  17. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: X-ray beam hardening correction for measuring density in linear accelerator industrial computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-Feng; Wang, Jue; Chen, Wei-Min

    2009-07-01

    Due to X-ray attenuation being approximately proportional to material density, it is possible to measure the inner density through Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) images accurately. In practice, however, a number of factors including the non-linear effects of beam hardening and diffuse scattered radiation complicate the quantitative measurement of density variations in materials. This paper is based on the linearization method of beam hardening correction, and uses polynomial fitting coefficient which is obtained by the curvature of iron polychromatic beam data to fit other materials. Through theoretical deduction, the paper proves that the density measure error is less than 2% if using pre-filters to make the spectrum of linear accelerator range mainly 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV. Experiment had been set up at an ICT system with a 9 MeV electron linear accelerator. The result is satisfactory. This technique makes the beam hardening correction easy and simple, and it is valuable for measuring the ICT density and making use of the CT images to recognize materials.

  18. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  19. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Edward M.; Rosen, Mordecai D.

    1989-01-01

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  20. The Chirped-Pulse Inverse Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, F. V.; Landahl, E. C.; Song, L.; Troha, A. L.; van Meter, J. R.; Gibson, D. J.; Baldis Luhmann, H. A., Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) concept has been demonstrated as a viable vacuum laser acceleration process; it is shown here that by using an ultrahigh-intensity chirped laser pulse, the dephasing length can be increased considerably, thus yielding high gradient IFEL acceleration. In addition, using negative dispersion focusing optics allows one to take advantage of the laser optical bandwidth and produce a chromatic line focus to maximize the accelerating field. The combination of these two novel ideas results in a compact, efficient, vacuum laser accelerator.

  1. Laser vacuum acceleration of a relativistic electron bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Glazyrin, I V; Karpeev, A V; Kotova, O G; Nazarov, K S; Bychenkov, V Yu

    2015-06-30

    With regard to the problem of laser acceleration of a relativistic electron bunch we present a scheme of its vacuum acceleration directly by a relativistic intensity laser pulse. The energy of the electron bunch injected into the laser pulse leading edge increases during its coaxial movement to a thin, pulse-reflecting target. The laser-accelerated electrons continue to move free forward, passing through the target. The study of this acceleration scheme in the three-dimensional geometry is verified in a numerical simulation by the particle-in-cell method, which showed that the energy of a part of the electrons can increase significantly compared to the initial one. Restrictions are discussed, which impose limiting values of energy and total charge of accelerated electrons. (superstrong light fields)

  2. Multi-GeV Electron Generation Using Texas Petawatt Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Du, D.; Yi, S. A.; Kalmykov, S.; D'avignon, E.; Fazel, N.; Zagdzaj, R.; Reed, S.; Dong, P.; Henderson, W.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Shvets, G.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M.

    2010-11-01

    We present simulation results and experimental setup for multi-GeV electron generation by a laser plasma wake field accelerator (LWFA) driven by the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser. Simulations show that, in plasma of density ne = 2-4×1017 cm-3, the TPW laser pulse (1.1 PW, 170 fs) can self-guide over 5 Rayleigh ranges, while electrons self-injected into the LWFA can accelerate up to 7 GeV. Optical diagnostic methods employed to observe the laser beam self-guiding, electron trapping and plasma bubble formation and evolution are discussed. Electron beam diagnostics, including optical transition radiation (OTR) and electron gamma ray shower (EGS) generation, are discussed as well.

  3. Free electron laser lithotripsy: threshold radiant exposures.

    PubMed

    Chan, K F; Hammer, D X; Choi, B; Teichman, J M; McGuff, H S; Pratisto, H; Jansen, E D; Welch, A J

    2000-03-01

    To determine the threshold radiant exposures (J/cm2) needed for ablation or fragmentation as a function of infrared wavelengths on various urinary calculi and to determine if there is a relation between these thresholds and lithotripsy efficiencies with respect to optical absorption coefficients. Human calculi composed of uric acid, calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine, or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH) were used. The calculi were irradiated in air with the free electron laser (FEL) at six wavelengths: 2.12, 2.5, 2.94, 3.13, 5, and 6.45 microm. Threshold radiant exposures increased as optical absorption decreased. At the near-infrared wave-lengths with low optical absorption, the thresholds were >1.5 J/cm2. The thresholds decreased below 0.5 J/cm2 for regions of high absorption for all the calculus types. Thresholds within the high-absorption regions were statistically different from those in the low-absorption regions, with P values much less than 0.05. Optical absorption coefficients or threshold radiant exposures can be used to predict lithotripsy efficiencies. For low ablation thresholds, smaller radiant exposures were required to achieve breakdown temperatures or to exceed the dynamic tensile strength of the material. Therefore, more energy is available for fragmentation, resulting in higher lithotripsy efficiencies.

  4. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schachter, L.; Ron, A.

    1989-07-15

    We analyze the operation of a free-electron laser in an open periodicstructure. When operated as an amplifier, it is shown that exponential gain candevelop in such a device. An analytic expression for this gain is presented,and it is shown that this gain decays exponentially with the beam height abovethe grating; the gain dependence on the beam thickness is also analyzed. As theenergy extraction rate is much higher in an exponential gain regime, we alsoinvestigate the operation of an oscillator based on the same concept. In thiscase, the Smith-Purcell radiation ''provides the startup'' through a feedbacksystem. The latter consists of several mirrors, which are placed in such a waythat (1) only a wave with the desired frequency develops and, at the same time,(2) small deviations in the wave parameters due to the wave-beam interaction donot cause deflection of the wave from the feedback loop. The minimal currentneeded to sustain oscillations is given in an analytical form. Numericalcalculations show that this current is more than three orders of magnitudelower than that necessary for an oscillator which operates in an algebraic gainregime.

  5. A theory for optical wavelength control in short pulse free electron laser oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkenson, Wade F.

    1993-06-01

    The future safety of the U.S. Navy warship depends on the development of a directed energy self-defense system to keep pace with the ever-improving technology of anti-ship missiles. Two candidates are reviewed. The free electron laser (FEL) has the most advantages, but a chemical laser proposed by TRW is ready for installation on existing ships. Initial testing of issues related to directed energy use at sea can be conducted with the chemical laser. When the technology of the FEL matures, it can replace the chemical laser to provide the best possible defense in the shortest period of time. Continuous tunability is a key advantage of the FEL over the conventional laser. But since the output wavelength is dependent on electron energy, it is subject to random fluctuations originating from the beam source. At the Stanford University Superconducting (SCA) Free Electron Laser (FEL) Facility, the effects are minimized through negative feedback by changing the input electron energy proportional to the observed wavelength drift. The process is simulated by modifying a short pulse FEL numerical program to allow the resonant wavelength to vary over many passes. The physical effects behind optical wavelength control are explained. A theory for the preferential nature of the FEL to follow the resonant wavelength from longer to shorter wavelengths is presented. Finally, the response of the FEL to a rapidly changing resonant wavelength is displayed as a transfer function for the system.

  6. Quasimonoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration in pure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, M. Z.; Ali, A.; Fedosejevs, R.; Fourmaux, S.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2012-02-13

    Quasimonoenergetic electron beams with maximum energy >0.5 GeV and 2 mrad divergence have been generated in pure nitrogen gas via wakefield acceleration with 80 TW, 30 fs laser pulses. Long low energy tail features were typically observed due to continuous ionization injection. The measured peak electron energy decreased with the plasma density, agreeing with the predicted scaling for electrons. The experiments showed a threshold electron density of 3x10{sup 18}cm{sup -3} for self-trapping. Our experiments suggest that pure Nitrogen is a potential candidate gas to achieve GeV monoenergetic electrons using the ionization induced injection scheme for laser wakefield acceleration.

  7. Laser wakefield accelerated electron beam monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, J. K.; Mori, M.; Kotaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kiriyama, H.; Kando, M.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2016-03-25

    We will discuss our participation in the ImPACT project, which has as one of its goals the development of an ultra-compact electron accelerator using lasers (< 1 GeV, < 10   m) and the generation of an x-ray beam from the accelerated electrons. Within this context we will discuss our investigation into electron beam monitoring and control. Since laser accelerated electrons will be used for x-ray beam generation combined with an undulator, we will present investigation into the possibilities of the improvement of electron beam emittance through cooling.

  8. Biological applications of ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    This review examines the possibilities for biological research using the three ultraviolet free-electron lasers that are nearing operational status in the US. The projected operating characteristics of major interest in biological research of the free-electron lasers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and Duke University are presented. Experimental applications in the areas of far- and vacuum ultraviolet photophysics and photochemistry, structural biology, environmental photobiology, and medical research are discussed and the prospects for advances in these areas, based upon the characteristics of the new ultraviolet free-electron lasers, are evaluated.

  9. Laser Electron Generator of the X-Ray Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukov, I. A.; Bessonov, E. G.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Maslova, Yu. Ya.; Popov, N. L.; Postnov, A. A.; Uspenski, Yu. A.; Feshchenko, R. M.; Shabalin, Yu. V.; Slovokhotov, Yu. L.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.; Ishanov, B. S.; Poseryaev, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Kostrukov, P. V.; Tunkin, V. G.

    The possibility of the creation and the application prospects of the laser-electron X-ray generator based on the Thompson scattering of the laser radiation on a bunch of relativistic electrons are considered. Such a generator fills the existing gap between X-ray tubes and synchrotron sources, which is several orders of magnitude in terms of the brightness, average intensity, size and also in the construction and exploitation costs. The layout of beam-lines and experimental stations intended for the applications of the X-ray laser-electron generator to the investigation of the elemental composition and material structure and biological objects is discussed.

  10. Low-voltage, megawatt free-electron lasers at a frequency near 300 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booske, J. H.; Granatstein, V. L.; Antonsen, T. M., Jr.; Destler, W. W.; Levush, B.

    1988-01-01

    Design procedures and beam transport feasibility experiments are discussed for a novel, millimeter-wave free electron laser (FEL) concept employing short period magnetic undulators and a sheet electron beam. The advantages of this concept include: (1) lower beam voltage compatible with thermionic Pierce gun technology and conventional power supplies (rather than electron accelerators); (2) a sheet electron beam geometry which enables high power operation without excessively high gun perveance; and (3) a streaming electron beam which is compatible with depressed collector beam energy recovery for enhancing overall system efficiency. Conceptual designs for pulsed and cw high power devices, and a cw low power device are presented.

  11. Advanced micromachining combining nanosecond lasers with water jet-guided laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauchard, A.; Lee, K.; Vago, N.; Pavius, M.; Obi, S.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the first scribing results obtained by combining a short-pulse 10ns green laser with the water jet-guided laser technology. A number of high-potential applications are presented, from the grooving of low-k silicon wafers, the scribing of metallic and amorphous Si layers of thin film solar cells, the grooving of SiC wafers, and dot marking of Si wafers. The combination of a short pulse laser beam with the water jet-guided laser technology offers a new industry-proven alternative for grooving and scribing processes, providing superior speed and quality compared to legacy laser technologies.

  12. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    DOE PAGES

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; ...

    2017-08-17

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency.more » Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μm. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.« less

  13. Ultraviolet laser transverse profile shaping for improving x-ray free electron laser performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Alverson, S.; Bohler, D.; Egger, A.; Fry, A.; Gilevich, S.; Huang, Z.; Miahnahri, A.; Ratner, D.; Robinson, J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-08-01

    The photocathode rf gun is one of the most critical components in x-ray free electron lasers. The drive laser strikes the photocathode surface, which emits electrons with properties that depend on the shape of the drive laser. Most free electron lasers use photocathodes with work function in the ultraviolet, a wavelength where direct laser manipulation becomes challenging. In this paper, we present a novel application of a digital micromirror device (DMD) for the 253 nm drive laser at the Linear Coherent Light Source. Laser profile shaping is accomplished through an iterative algorithm that takes into account shaping error and efficiency. Next, we use laser shaping to control the X-ray laser output via an online optimizer, which shows improvement in FEL pulse energy. Lastly, as a preparation for electron beam shaping, we use the DMD to measure the photocathode quantum efficiency across cathode surface with an averaged laser rms spot size of 59 μ m . Our experiments demonstrate promising outlook of using DMD to shape ultraviolet lasers for photocathode rf guns with various applications.

  14. Demonstration of cascaded optical inverse free-electron laser accelerator.

    PubMed

    Dunning, M; Hemsing, E; Hast, C; Raubenheimer, T O; Weathersby, S; Xiang, D; Fu, F

    2013-06-14

    We report on a proof-of-principle demonstration of a two-stage cascaded optical inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) accelerator in which an electron beam is accelerated by a strong laser pulse after being packed into optical microbunches by a weaker initial laser pulse. We show experimentally that injection of precisely prepared optical microbunches into an IFEL allows net acceleration or deceleration of the beam, depending on the relative phase of the two laser pulses. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with simulation. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the beam quality of IFELs and may have a strong impact on emerging laser accelerators driven by high-power optical lasers.

  15. Demonstration of Cascaded Optical Inverse Free-Electron Laser Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, M.; Hemsing, E.; Hast, C.; Raubenheimer, T. O.; Weathersby, S.; Xiang, D.; Fu, F.

    2013-06-01

    We report on a proof-of-principle demonstration of a two-stage cascaded optical inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) accelerator in which an electron beam is accelerated by a strong laser pulse after being packed into optical microbunches by a weaker initial laser pulse. We show experimentally that injection of precisely prepared optical microbunches into an IFEL allows net acceleration or deceleration of the beam, depending on the relative phase of the two laser pulses. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with simulation. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the beam quality of IFELs and may have a strong impact on emerging laser accelerators driven by high-power optical lasers.

  16. [INVITED] Laser-induced forward transfer: A high resolution additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaporte, Philippe; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Among the additive manufacturing techniques, laser-induced forward transfer addresses the challenges of printing thin films in solid phase or small volume droplets in liquid phase with very high resolution. This paper reviews the physics of this process and explores the pros and cons of this technology versus other digital printing technologies. The main field of applications are printed electronics, organic electronics and tissue engineering, and the most promising short terms ones concern digital laser printing of sensors and conductive tracks. Future directions and emerging areas of interest are discussed such as printing solid from a liquid phase and 3D digital nanomanufacturing.

  17. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.; Fazio, M.; Haynes, W.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that will make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that (1) the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and (2) such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. The axial FEL interaction is with a fast wave and does involve axial bunching of the electron beam, so the results found for this device also apply to transverse-coupling FELs. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. By changing the annulus radius, exact cancellation can be found for a variety of beam voltages and currents in the ranges of 0.5-1.0 MV and 1-5 kA. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons.

  18. Laser acceleration of electrons to giga-electron-volt energies using highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Starace, Anthony F

    2006-06-01

    The recent proposal to use highly charged ions as sources of electrons for laser acceleration [S. X. Hu and A. F. Starace, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 245003 (2002)] is investigated here in detail by means of three-dimensional, relativistic Monte Carlo simulations for a variety of system parameters, such as laser pulse duration, ionic charge state, and laser focusing spot size. Realistic laser focusing effects--e.g., the existence of longitudinal laser field components-are taken into account. Results of spatial averaging over the laser focus are also presented. These numerical simulations show that the proposed scheme for laser acceleration of electrons from highly charged ions is feasible with current or near-future experimental conditions and that electrons with GeV energies can be obtained in such experiments.

  19. Laser crystallization for large-area electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameshima, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    Laser crystallization is reviewed for the purpose of fabrication of polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors (poly-Si TFTs). Laser-induced rapid heating is important for formation of crystalline films with a low thermal budget. Reduction of electrically active defects located at grain boundaries is essential for improving electrical properties of poly-Si films and achieving poly-Si TFTs with high performances. The internal film stress is attractive to increase the carrier mobility. Recent developments in laser crystallization methods with pulsed and continuous-wave lasers are also reviewed. Control of heat flow results in crystalline grain growth in the lateral direction, which is important for fabrication of large crystalline grains. We also report an annealing method using a high-power infrared semiconductor laser. High-power lasers will be attractive for rapid formation of crystalline films over a large area and activation of silicon with impurity atoms.

  20. Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-11-22

    We study the direct acceleration of a free electron in infinite vacuum along the axis of a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam. We find that net energy transfer from laser pulse to electron is maximized with the tightest focusing. We show that the net energy gain of an electron initially moving at a relativistic velocity may exceed more than half the theoretical limit of energy transfer, which is not possible with an initially stationary electron in the parameter space studied. We determine and analyze the power scaling of maximum energy gain, extending our study to include a relatively unexplored regime of low powers and revealing that substantial acceleration is already possible without the use of petawatt peak-power laser technology.

  1. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  2. Technology, Privacy, and Electronic Freedom of Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Frances M.

    1986-01-01

    Explores five issues related to technology's impact on privacy and access to information--regulation and licensing of the press, electronic surveillance, invasion of privacy, copyright, and policy-making and regulation. The importance of First Amendment rights and civil liberties in forming a coherent national information policy is stressed.…

  3. Electronic Technology. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappe, Hoyt; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides a model for a postsecondary electronic technology program. It is divided into 10 sections. Section 1 overviews the philosophy, purpose, and goals for vocational education in Georgia. Contents of section 2 include a definition of the guide's purpose and program objective. Section 3 describes the occupational field,…

  4. Electron beam-switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, L.D.; Murray, J.R.; Goldhar, J.; Bradley, L.P.

    1979-12-11

    A method and apparatus are designed for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  5. CW Ultraviolet Laser Excited with an Electron Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    than the He-Ag ’ nfrared laser 2 Thne cotimum. average neon pressure was found to b7 ’Ce1 3 orr. W e note that with the octical cav4_ty ano- electr...Silfvast, "Neutral-Atcm Recombination Lasers in CO2 Laser-Vaporized Target Material," IEEE J. Quantum Electron., vol. QE-21, p. 1714, Oct. 1985. 4) W. T

  6. Millimeter wave tokamak heating and current drive with a high power free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on microwave generation using a free electron laser (FEL) have shown this to be an efficient way to generate millimeter wave power in short, intense pulses. Short pulse FEL's have several advantages that make them attractive for application to ECR heating of tokamak fusion reactors. This paper reports on plans made to demonstrate the technology at the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) Facility.

  7. Peculiarities of laser phase behavior associated with the accelerated electron in a chirped laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Q.; Wu, X. Y.; Wang, J. X.; Kawata, S.; Wang, P. X.

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, we qualitatively analyzed peculiarities of laser phase behavior associated with the accelerated electron in a chirped laser pulse. We unveiled the relationship between the changes in the orientation of the electron trajectory and the cusps in magnitude of the phase velocity of the optical field along the electron trajectory in a chirped laser pulse. We also explained how the chirp effect induced the singular point of the phase velocity. Finally, we discussed the phase velocity and phase witnessed by the electron in the particle's moving instantaneous frame.

  8. Dynamics of boundary layer electrons around a laser wakefield bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Chen, M.; Zhang, G.-B.; Yuan, T.; Yu, J.-Y.; Shen, Z.-C.; Yu, L.-L.; Weng, S.-M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of electrons forming the boundary layer of a highly nonlinear laser wakefield driven in the so called bubble or blowout regime is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that when the driver pulse intensity increases or the focal spot size decreases, a significant amount of electrons initially pushed by the laser pulse can detach from the bubble structure at its tail, middle, or front and form particular classes of waves locally with high densities, referred to as the tail wave, lateral wave, and bow wave. The tail wave and bow wave correspond to real electron trajectories, while the lateral wave does not. The detached electrons can be ejected transversely, containing considerable energy, and reducing the efficiency of the laser wakefield accelerator. Some of the transversely emitted electrons may obtain MeV level energy. These electrons can be used for wake evolution diagnosis and producing high frequency radiation.

  9. The research of laser marking control technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiue; Zhang, Rong

    2009-08-01

    In the area of Laser marking, the general control method is insert control card to computer's mother board, it can not support hot swap, it is difficult to assemble or it. Moreover, the one marking system must to equip one computer. In the system marking, the computer can not to do the other things except to transmit marking digital information. Otherwise it can affect marking precision. Based on traditional control methods existed some problems, introduced marking graphic editing and digital processing by the computer finish, high-speed digital signal processor (DSP) control marking the whole process. The laser marking controller is mainly contain DSP2812, digital memorizer, DAC (digital analog converting) transform unit circuit, USB interface control circuit, man-machine interface circuit, and other logic control circuit. Download the marking information which is processed by computer to U disk, DSP read the information by USB interface on time, then processing it, adopt the DSP inter timer control the marking time sequence, output the scanner control signal by D/A parts. Apply the technology can realize marking offline, thereby reduce the product cost, increase the product efficiency. The system have good effect in actual unit markings, the marking speed is more quickly than PCI control card to 20 percent. It has application value in practicality.

  10. Biomedical applications on laser technology at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigio, Irving J.; Loree, Thomas R.

    Los Alamos has a long history of research in laser technology, and over the past few years a program was begun directing some of that technology to a variety of applications in biology and medicine. As examples, two of these activities are described: the use of a laser interferometer to measure the microwave absorption spectrum of DNA, and spectral measurements of the secondary light produced during laser corneal ablation.

  11. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2002-01-01

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  12. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. . Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Radiating electron source generation in ultraintense laser-foil interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Capdessus, R. King, M.; McKenna, P.

    2016-08-15

    A radiating electron source is shown to be created by a laser pulse (with intensity of 10{sup 23 }W/cm{sup 2} and duration equal to 30 fs) interacting with a near-critical density plasma. It is shown that the back radiation reaction resulting from high energy synchrotron radiation tends to counteract the action of the ponderomotive force. This enhances the collective dynamics of the radiating electrons in the highest field areas, resulting in the production of a compact radiation source (containing 80% of the synchrotron radiation emission), with an energy on the order of tens of MeV over the laser pulse duration. These phenomena are investigated using a QED-particle-in-cell code, and compared with a kinetic model accounting for the radiation reaction force in the electron distribution function. The results shed new light on electron-photon sources at ultra-high laser intensities and could be tested on future laser facilities.

  14. A free-electron laser in a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ride, S. K.; Colson, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The study shows that a free-electron laser can operate in a uniform, longitudinal magnetic field. The fully relativistic Lorentz force equations are examined and solved order by order in a radiation field strength to obtain analytic expressions for the electron trajectory and energy as functions of initial electron position within a wavelength of light. Analytic expressions for the longitudinal and transverse bunching and for laser gain are found. The bunching of this laser process is compared to the bunching processes involved in (1) a Stanford free-electron laser and (2) a cyclotron maser. The results received can be useful in exploring light amplification in astrophysical magnetic fields, the magnetosphere, and in laboratory devices.

  15. Laser Technology Is Primed for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Explains the three characteristics of laser light (monochromatic light, divergence, and coherence), the components of a laser, applications of the laser (alignment, distance measurement, welding/cutting, marking, medical applications), and a complete laser training system appropriate for classroom use. (CT)

  16. Electron rescattering at metal nanotips induced by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter, G.; Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the interaction of moderate intensity near-infrared few cycle laser pulses with nano-scale metal tips. Local field enhancement in a nanometric region around the tip apex triggers coherent electron emission on the nanometer length and femtosecond time scale. The quantum dynamics at the surface are simulated with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and interpreted based on the simple man's model. We investigate the dependence of the emitted electron spectra on the laser wavelength.

  17. Observation of laser chirp dependency on electron yield in laser wakefield accelerators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Catravas, P. E.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Shadwick, B. A.; Toth, C.; van Tilborg, J.; Trines, R.; Cary, J. R.; Giacone, R.

    2001-10-01

    The effect of laser chirp on laser wakefield acceleration of electrons has been studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments operated in the self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration regime and used a high density (1-5 × 10^19 cm-3) laser ionized plasma and a Ti:Al_2O3 laser producing up to 10 TW peak power in 45-55 fs duration laser pulses [1]. For the same peak power, positively chirped laser pulse are found to result in significantly higher amounts of charge per bunch than negatively chirped pulses. Simulations using PIC codes indicate that larger amplitude fast phase velocity plasma waves are generated for positively chirped pulses as well as larger amounts of stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS-B). The enhanced SRS-B in turn leads to larger amounts of trapped, high energy electrons, consistent with the experiments. [1] W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2510(2001)

  18. Electron Dynamics in Nanostructures in Strong Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kling, Matthias

    2014-09-11

    The goal of our research was to gain deeper insight into the collective electron dynamics in nanosystems in strong, ultrashort laser fields. The laser field strengths will be strong enough to extract and accelerate electrons from the nanoparticles and to transiently modify the materials electronic properties. We aimed to observe, with sub-cycle resolution reaching the attosecond time domain, how collective electronic excitations in nanoparticles are formed, how the strong field influences the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial, and how the excitations in the presence of strong fields decay.

  19. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy powered by a free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Brunel, L-C; Edwards, D T; van Tol, J; Ramian, G; Han, S; Sherwin, M S

    2012-09-20

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy interrogates unpaired electron spins in solids and liquids to reveal local structure and dynamics; for example, EPR has elucidated parts of the structure of protein complexes that other techniques in structural biology have not been able to reveal. EPR can also probe the interplay of light and electricity in organic solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and the origin of decoherence in condensed matter, which is of fundamental importance to the development of quantum information processors. Like nuclear magnetic resonance, EPR spectroscopy becomes more powerful at high magnetic fields and frequencies, and with excitation by coherent pulses rather than continuous waves. However, the difficulty of generating sequences of powerful pulses at frequencies above 100 gigahertz has, until now, confined high-power pulsed EPR to magnetic fields of 3.5 teslas and below. Here we demonstrate that one-kilowatt pulses from a free-electron laser can power a pulsed EPR spectrometer at 240 gigahertz (8.5 teslas), providing transformative enhancements over the alternative, a state-of-the-art ∼30-milliwatt solid-state source. Our spectrometer can rotate spin-1/2 electrons through π/2 in only 6 nanoseconds (compared to 300 nanoseconds with the solid-state source). Fourier-transform EPR on nitrogen impurities in diamond demonstrates excitation and detection of EPR lines separated by about 200 megahertz. We measured decoherence times as short as 63 nanoseconds, in a frozen solution of nitroxide free-radicals at temperatures as high as 190 kelvin. Both free-electron lasers and the quasi-optical technology developed for the spectrometer are scalable to frequencies well in excess of one terahertz, opening the way to high-power pulsed EPR spectroscopy up to the highest static magnetic fields currently available.

  20. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  1. Current and long-term technologies of laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulashcyk, Vladimir S.; Volotovskaya, Anna V.

    2007-06-01

    Laser therapy, using low-energy laser radiation, is being more and more applied. The most applied technology is transcutaneous radiation of tissues by laser radiation. Originally, a direct action on a pathological site was mostly used, but recently more attention is given to reflexogenic areas, acupuncture points, and endocrine organ projection sites. The development of light-conductive engineering made it possible to practically apply intraorgan laser therapy. This technology is widely spread in gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, urology, gastroenterology, etc. Close to it are different versions of intratissue laser therapy (intraosteal, periosteal, myofascial). A special kind of laser therapy is laser hemotherapy. Depending on the techniques and protocol of its application, there are extracorporeal, intravascular, and supravenous ways of action. According to our comparative investigations, supravenous hemotherapy by its therapeutic efficacy and major medicinal effects can be well compared with intravascular laser hemotherapy. With good prospects and efficiency is laser therapy as a combination of laser and other physical factors. Magnetolaser therapy has been scientifically substantiated and practically applied so far. Theoretically and experimentally substantiated is a combined application of laser radiation and physical factors such as ultrasound, direct current field, vacuum, cryotherapy, etc. Experimental research and few so far clinical observations are indicative of prospects of a complex application of laser radiation and drugs. To improve light absorption, laser radiation is combined with different dyes. Photodynamic therapy, originally used in oncology, is applied today in treating different diseases. We showed a possibility of using a number of drugs possessing simultaneously photosensitizing properties to this end. Laser radiation significantly influences pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, which gives reason to practically implement laser

  2. Maskless selective laser patterning of PEDOT:PSS on barrier/foil for organic electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnakis, Dimitris; Stephens, Tim; Chabrol, Gregoire

    2013-03-01

    Rapid developments in organic electronics promise low cost devices for applications such as OLED, organic transistors and organic photovoltaics on large-area glass or flexible substrates in the near future. The technology is very attractive as most device layers can be solution printed. But when directly patterned deposition is impossible, a post-patterning step is required and laser processing is gradually emerging as a key-enabling tool. DPSS lasers offer several advantages including maskless, non-contact, dry patterning, but also scalable large area processing, well suited to roll-to-roll manufacturing at μm resolutions. However, very few reports discuss in detail the merits of DPSS laser patterning technology, especially on flexible substrates. This paper describes the potential of ultrafast DPSS laser technology for OLED fabrication on foil and, specifically, picosecond laser ablation of PEDOT:PSS on multilayered barrier/foil or metal grids aimed as a synthetic alternative to inorganic transparent conductive electrodes. Key requirements include: (a) the complete removal of PEDOT layers without residue, (b) the complete absence of surface contamination from redeposited laser debris to avoid short circuiting and (c) no loss in performance of from laser exposure. We will demonstrate that with careful optimisation and appropriate choice of ultrafast laser, the above criteria can be fulfilled. A suitable process window exists resulting in clean laser structuring without damage to the underlying heat sensitive barrier layers whilst also containing laser debris. A low temperature ablation most likely proceeds via a stress-assisted (film fracture and ejection) process as opposed to vaporisation or other phase change commonly encountered with longer pulse lasers.

  3. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    SciTech Connect

    I.Yu. Kostyukov; G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.M. Rax

    2001-12-12

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made.

  4. Investigation of Plasma Processes in Electronic Transition Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-28

    linewidth of the injected dye " Peek aDw, Dt,or laser radiation: 0.2 cm - ’ (grating tuned) or 0.04 cm - PO (grating tuned + intracavity etalon of I...I I I I [ II!9• I R89-9271 62-1 I INVESTIGATION OF PLASMA PROCESSES IN ELECTRONIC TRANSITION LASERS 3 <Final Report February 28, 1989 Sponsored by...RESEARCH CENTER East "Ief ord, Connecticut 06106 I 04 I U i R89-927162-1 I Investigation Of Plasma Processes In Electronic Transition Lasers I I Final

  5. Proposal for an x-ray free electron laser oscillator with intermediate energy electron beam.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinhua; Deng, Haixiao; Dai, Zhimin

    2012-01-20

    Harmonic lasing of low-gain free electron laser oscillators has been experimentally demonstrated in the terahertz and infrared regions. Recently, the low-gain oscillator has been reconsidered as a promising candidate for hard x-ray free electron lasers, through the use of high reflectivity, high-resolution x-ray crystals. In this Letter, it is proposed to utilize a crystal-based cavity resonant at a higher harmonic of the undulator radiation, together with phase shifting, to enable harmonic lasing of the x-ray free electron laser oscillator, and hence allow the generation of hard x-ray radiation at a reduced electron beam energy. Results show that fully coherent free electron laser radiation with megawatt peak power, in the spectral region of 10-25 keV, can be generated with a 3.5 GeV electron beam.

  6. Electronic technology and the SLD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Dean, T.; Fox, M.J.; Freytag, D.; Gioumousis, A.; Haller, G.; Hoeflich, J.; Horelick, D.; Kang, H; Mazaheri, G.; Nelson, D.J.; Olsen, J.J.; Oxoby, G.; Paffrath, L.; Stiles, P.; Yim, A. ); Bacchetta, N. ); Bilei, G.M. ); Carpinelli, M.; Cast

    1990-06-01

    The SLD detector consists of five major subsystems, each with associated front-end electronics and an integrated FASTBUS control and data acquisition system. This paper highlights the choices among electronic technologies that have been developed for the SLD detector electronics. The common control, calibration, and data acquisition architectures are described. The functions of selected SLD integrated circuits, standard cells, gate arrays, and hybrids are summarized, and the integration of these functions into the common data acquisition path is described. Particular attention is directed to four areas of electronic technology developed for the SLD detector: the preamplifier hybrid designs are compared to their performance and implementation examined; the application of full custom CMOS digital circuits in SLD is compared to gate array and EPLD (electrically programmable logic device) implementations; the fiberoptic signal transmission techniques in SLD are examined and the data rates and link topology are presented; and finally, the packaging, power consumption, and cooling requirements for system functions resident inside the detector structure are explored. The rationale for the implementation choices in the SLD electronics is presented so that others might benefit from our experience.

  7. Laser Technology for Advanced Acceleration: Accelerating Beyond TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Jonathan; Mourou, GéRard Tajima, Toshiki

    The implementation of the suggestion of thin film compression (TFC) allows the newest class of high power, ultrafast laser pulses (typically 20 fs at near-infrared wavelengths) to be compressed to the limit of a single-cycle laser pulse (2 fs). Its simplicity and high efficiency, as well as its accessibility to a single-cycle laser pulse, introduce a new regime of laser-plasma interaction that enhances laser acceleration. Single-cycle laser acceleration of ions is a far more efficient and coherent process than the known laser-ion acceleration mechanisms. The TFC-derived single-cycle optical pulse is capable of inducing a single-cycle X-ray laser pulse (with a far shorter pulse length and thus an extremely high intensity) through relativistic compression. The application of such an X-ray pulse leads to the novel regime of laser wakefield acceleration of electrons in the X-ray regime, yielding a prospect of "TeV on a chip." This possibility of single-cycle X-ray pulses heralds zeptosecond and EW lasers (and zeptoscience). The additional invention of the coherent amplification network (CAN) fiber laser pushes the frontier of high repetition, high efficiency lasers, which are the hallmark of needed applications such as laser-driven LWFA colliders and other, societal applications. CAN addresses the crucial aspect of intense lasers that have traditionally lacked the above properties.

  8. Laser Technology for Advanced Acceleration: Accelerating Beyond TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Jonathan; Mourou, Gérard; Tajima, Toshiki

    The implementation of the suggestion of thin film compression (TFC) allows the newest class of high power, ultrafast laser pulses (typically 20fs at near-infrared wavelengths) to be compressed to the limit of a single-cycle laser pulse (2fs). Its simplicity and high efficiency, as well as its accessibility to a single-cycle laser pulse, introduce a new regime of laser-plasma interaction that enhances laser acceleration. Single-cycle laser acceleration of ions is a far more efficient and coherent process than the known laser-ion acceleration mechanisms. The TFC-derived single-cycle optical pulse is capable of inducing a single-cycle X-ray laser pulse (with a far shorter pulse length and thus an extremely high intensity) through relativistic compression. The application of such an X-ray pulse leads to the novel regime of laser wakefield acceleration of electrons in the X-ray regime, yielding a prospect of “TeV on a chip.” This possibility of single-cycle X-ray pulses heralds zeptosecond and EW lasers (and zeptoscience). The additional invention of the coherent amplification network (CAN) fiber laser pushes the frontier of high repetition, high efficiency lasers, which are the hallmark of needed applications such as laser-driven LWFA colliders and other, societal applications. CAN addresses the crucial aspect of intense lasers that have traditionally lacked the above properties.

  9. Thermal effect control for biomedical tissue by free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihashi-Suzuki, Sachiko; Kanai, Taizo; Awazu, Kunio

    2007-02-01

    An absorption characteristic and a thermal relaxation time of a target biomedical tissue is an important parameter for development of low-invasive treatment that considers of interaction between biomedical tissue and laser. Laser irradiations with a wavelength corresponding to the absorption characteristics of tissue enable selective treatment. Furthermore, the thermal effect to tissue can be controlled at the laser irradiation time which depends on the laser pulse width and reception rate. A free electron laser (FEL) can continuously vary the wavelength in the mid-infrared region, has a unique pulse structure; the structure at the Institute of the Free Electron Laser (iFEL) consist of train of macropulses with a 15 μs pulse width, and each macropulse contained a train of 300-400 ultrashort micropulse with a 5 ps pulse width. In a previous report, we have proposed a novel laser treatment such as soft tissue cutting, dental treatment and laser angioplasty using the tenability of the FEL. To investigate the thermal effect to the biomedical tissue, we developed a FEL pulse control system using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). The AOM commonly are used the Q-switch for the pulse laser generation, has a high pulse control efficiency and good operationally. The system can control the FEL macropulse width from 200 ns. This system should be a novel tool for investigating the interaction between the FEL and biomedical tissue. In this report, the interaction between FEL pulse width and biomedical tissue will be discussed.

  10. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, P A; DiMauro, L F; Kulander, K; Sheehy, B; Walker, B

    1998-09-03

    Abstract. This talk examines two distinct cases in strong opbical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamic.s. In the first. example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two- level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one- electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unc

  11. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B. Agostini, P.A. Kulander, K.C.

    1999-06-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P.A.; Kulander, K.C.

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  13. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L. F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P. A.; Kulander, K. C.

    1999-06-11

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  14. Future electron accelerators and free electron lasers: Potentials in clinical medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Börje; Stepanek, Jiri

    1997-10-01

    Studies of the biological and technical prerequisites for the clinical use of monoenergetic X-rays, and their specific absorption in heavy elements are conducted, with a view towards plans for stereotactic photon activation radiosurgery. The primary aim is the controlled eradication of target structures in the brain for the treatment of functional brain disorders or small brain tumours, with monochromatic synchrotron X-rays. The specific cell-killing action is based on DNA-breakage caused by short-range Auger and Coster-Kronig electrons produced by heavy atoms upon K-shell absorption of their characteristic X-rays. To this end, iodine or heavy metals would have to be deposited, in or close to nuclear DNA in target cells by means of suitable molecular vehicles. Practically useful concepts for clinically useful monoenergetic X-ray facilities and beam-lines are being developed. In this paper attention is focussed on the possible use of laser Compton backscattering for the production of clinically useful monochromatic X-ray beams suitable for irradiation of very small targets in the brain through the intact skull. Particularly relevant, in the present context are prospects for introducing free electron laser technology to improve the calculated parameters of X-ray beams designed for stereotactic photon activation radiosurgery with monochromatic photons in the energy interval 30-100 keV. Constructive initiatives would be welcome!

  15. Energy Extraction from the Electron Beam in a Free Electron Laser Resonator Gaussian Mode.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Elias, Juan Gallardo and Peter Goldstein N00014-80-C-0308 S. PF OR -ING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS I . PROGRAM ELEMt.T PROJECT, TASK * ,’ niwxrsity...Elias, Juan Gallardo , Peter Goldstein Quantum Institue, University of California Santa Barbara, California 93106 ABSTRACT We present preliminary...QUANTUM INSTITUTE FREE ELECTRON LASER PROJECT Energy Extraction fran the Electron Beam in a Free Electron Laser Resonator Gaussian Mode Luis Elias, Juan

  16. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  17. Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

  18. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorati, M.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Antici, P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m) generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  19. High-intensity laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Ho, Y K; Feng, L; Kong, Q; Wang, P X; Yuan, Z S; Scheid, W

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, an approximate pulsed-laser-beam solution of Maxwell's equation in vacuum is derived. Then with the numerical simulation method, electron acceleration induced by high-intensity [Q(0)=eE(0)/(m(e)omega c)=3] lasers is discussed in connection with the recent experiment of Malka et al. It is found that the maximum energy gain and the relationship between the final energy and the scattering angle can be well reproduced, but the polarization effect of electron-laser interactions is not very prominent. These results show that the ponderomotive potential model is still applicable, which means that the stimulated Compton scattering is the main fundamental mechanism responsible for the electron acceleration at this laser intensity.

  20. Breaking of dynamical adiabaticity in direct laser acceleration of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. P. L.; Arefiev, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of an electron oscillating in an ion channel and irradiated by a plane electromagnetic wave is considered. It is shown that the interaction qualitatively changes with the increase of electron energy, as the oscillations across the channel become relativistic. The "square-wave-like" profile of the transverse velocity in the relativistic case enables breaking of the adiabaticity that precludes electron energy retention in the non-relativistic case. For an electron with a relativistic factor γ0, the adiabaticity breaks if ωL/ωp0≪√{γ0 } . Under these conditions, the kinetic energy acquired by the electron is retained once the interaction with the laser field ceases. This mechanism notably enables electron heating in regimes that do not require a resonant interaction between the initially oscillating electron and the laser electric field.

  1. Electronic Rotator For Sheet Of Laser Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, John M.; Rhodes, David B.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1989-01-01

    Primary flow-visualization system in Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) at NASA Langley Research Center is sheet of laser light generated by 5-W argon-ion laser and two-axis mirror galvanometer scanner. Generates single and multiple sheets of light, which remain stationary or driven to sweep out volume. Sine/cosine potentiometer used to orient two galvanometer/mirror devices simultaneously and yields desired result at reasonable cost and incorporated into prototype in 1 day.

  2. A Laser Technology Test Facility for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Campbell, R W; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Latkowski, J; Molander, W A; Sutton, S B; Telford, S; Caird, J A

    2009-10-06

    A LIFE laser driver needs to be designed and operated which meets the rigorous requirements of the NIF laser system while operating at high average power, and operate for a lifetime of >30 years. Ignition on NIF will serve to demonstrate laser driver functionality, operation of the Mercury laser system at LLNL demonstrates the ability of a diode-pumped solid-state laser to run at high average power, but the operational lifetime >30 yrs remains to be proven. A Laser Technology test Facility (LTF) has been designed to specifically address this issue. The LTF is a 100-Hz diode-pumped solid-state laser system intended for accelerated testing of the diodes, gain media, optics, frequency converters and final optics, providing system statistics for billion shot class tests. These statistics will be utilized for material and technology development as well as economic and reliability models for LIFE laser drivers.

  3. Midwest free-electron laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, L. J.; Epstein, M.; Marhic, M. E.; Rymer, W. Z.; Spears, K. G.

    1987-03-01

    Developments in infrared waveguides for laser beam delivery include liquid core fibers, germanium coated brass guides, whisper gallery waveguides, Bragg fibers and waveguides with periodic structures. Studies of interaction of laser radiation with tissue over a broad range of wavelengths include absorption of radiant energy by chromophores in a light scattered matrix, effects of heating with pulsed Nd-YAG lasers and the use of the diffusion model of radiative transfer to optical dosimetry in clinical phototherapy. The development of picosecond laser instrumentation for neuroscience research allows for the simulation of the FEL in pulse duration, energy and wavelengths. The effects of laser-beam energy in neural tissue were investigated. These studies included the effects of CO2 laser energy on the rat spinal cord as determined by the evoked potentials recorded from dorsal white matter in the mid-thoracic cord. The latter showed no discernable effects for levels below those causing visible damage to the dorsal column white matter. These studies indicate minimal thermal effects at levels corresponding to the onset of breakdown.

  4. Laser action in runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Panchenko, Nikolai A.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Suslov, Alexei I.

    2015-12-01

    Formation features of run-away electron preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) and REP DD properties in different experimental conditions are studied. It was shown that sufficient uniformity of REP DD allows its application as an excitation source of lasers on different gas mixtures at elevated pressure. Promising results of REP DD application for development of gas lasers are shown. Stimulated radiation in the IR, visible and UV spectral ranges was obtained in the diffuse discharge. Ultimate efficiency of non-chain HF(DF) chemical and nitrogen lasers on mixtures of SF6 with H2(D2) and N2 was achieved. New operation mode of nitrogen laser is demonstrated under REP DD excitation. Kinetic model of the REP DD in mixtures of nitrogen with SF6 is developed allowing to predict the radiation parameters of nitrogen laser at λ = 337,1 nm. Long-pulse operation of rare gas halide lasers was achieved.

  5. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) Development, procurement, maintenance, or use of electronic and information technology.—When developing,...

  6. 29 CFR 2205.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 2205... ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 2205.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) In... and information technology developed, procured, maintained, or used by the agency allows: (1...

  7. 29 CFR 2205.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 2205... ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 2205.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) In... and information technology developed, procured, maintained, or used by the agency allows: (1...

  8. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) Development, procurement, maintenance, or use of electronic and information technology.—When developing, procuring...

  9. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) Development, procurement, maintenance, or use of electronic and information technology.—When developing, procuring...

  10. 29 CFR 2205.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 2205... ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 2205.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) In... and information technology developed, procured, maintained, or used by the agency allows: (1...

  11. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) Development, procurement, maintenance, or use of electronic and information technology.—When developing, procuring...

  12. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) Development, procurement, maintenance, or use of electronic and information technology.—When developing,...

  13. Biomedical applications of laser technology at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigio, Irving J.; Loree, Thomas R.

    1991-05-01

    Los Alamos has a long history of research in laser technology and over the past few years we have begun to build a program directing some of that technology to a variety of applications in biology and medicine. As examples two of these activities will be described in this manuscript: 1) the use of a laser interferometer to measure the microwave absorption spectrum of DNA and 2) spectral measurements of the secondary light produced during laser corneal ablation with an ArF laser.

  14. Electron Beam Technology for Environmental Pollution Control.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, there are over 1700 electron beam (EB) units in commercial use, providing an estimated added value to numerous products, amounting to 100 billion USD or more. High-current electron accelerators are used in diverse industries to enhance the physical and chemical properties of materials and to reduce undesirable contaminants such as pathogens, toxic byproducts, or emissions. Over the past few decades, EB technologies have been developed aimed at ensuring the safety of gaseous and liquid effluents discharged to the environment. It has been demonstrated that EB technologies for flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification, and sludge hygienization can be effectively deployed to mitigate environmental degradation. Recently, extensive work has been carried out on the use of EB for environmental remediation, which also includes the removal of emerging contaminants such as VOCs, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and potential EDCs.

  15. Laser technology and applications in gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Adelman, M R; Tsai, L J; Tangchitnob, E P; Kahn, B S

    2013-04-01

    The term 'laser' is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers are commonly described by the emitted wavelength, which determines the colour of the light, as well as the active lasing medium. Currently, over 40 types of lasers have been developed with a wide range of both industrial and medical uses. Gas and solid-state lasers are frequently used in surgical applications, with CO2 and Ar being the most common examples of gas lasers, and the Nd:YAG and KTP:YAG being the most common examples of solid-state lasers. At present, it appears that the CO2, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers provide alternative methods for achieving similar results, as opposed to superior results, when compared with traditional endoscopic techniques, such as cold-cutting monopolar and bipolar energy. This review focuses on the physics, tissue interaction, safety and applications of commonly used lasers in gynaecological surgery.

  16. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  17. The Intelligent Technologies of Electronic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianyu

    2017-08-01

    Based upon the synopsis of system intelligence and information services, this paper puts forward the attributes and the logic structure of information service, sets forth intelligent technology framework of electronic information system, and presents a series of measures, such as optimizing business information flow, advancing data decision capability, improving information fusion precision, strengthening deep learning application and enhancing prognostic and health management, and demonstrates system operation effectiveness. This will benefit the enhancement of system intelligence.

  18. The role of technological analysis. Electronic technology: Means and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraud-Liria, Nadine

    1988-08-01

    Technological analysis concepts are reviewed including technical assistance, quality support, decision aids, failure analysis, and technical arbitration. A procedure of failure analysis of electronic components is presented as well as the techniques used. The destructive operations start with an internal visual inspection. The physical defect localization is obtained by microprobes, liquid crystals, or dynamic voltage contrast. It is shown that failure analysis allows it to follow corrective actions at the manufacturing level and at the utilization level.

  19. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1985-11-21

    This disclosure describes a free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  20. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1988-02-23

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped. 5 figs.

  1. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Mechanism of high-energy electron production in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism of high-energy electron production in the interaction of high-intensity short laser pulses with a solid target is proposed and analysed. The theoretical dependences of fast-electron kinetic energy on the parameters of laser radiation and target material are given. The effect of ionisation of the target material is considered. The generation of ultrastrong magnetic fields in the laser plasma is shown to play the key part in the formation, transfer, and acceleration of electron beams. This results in the production of vortex electric fields accelerating electrons. The theoretical dependences yield well-proved limits for the electron energy and are in good agreement with the results of experiments performed on high-intensity laser setups, including the results obtained with participation of the author.

  2. The chirped-pulse inverse free-electron laser: A high-gradient vacuum laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, F. V.; Landahl, E. C.; Troha, A. L.; Van Meter, J. R.; Baldis, H. A.; Freeman, R. R.; Luhmann, N. C.; Song, L.; Kerman, A. K.; Yu, D. U. L.

    1999-10-01

    The inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) interaction is studied theoretically and computationally in the case where the drive laser intensity approaches the relativistic regime, and the pulse duration is only a few optical cycles long. The IFEL concept has been demonstrated as a viable vacuum laser acceleration process; it is shown here that by using an ultrashort, ultrahigh-intensity drive laser pulse, the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased considerably, thus yielding large energy gains. Using a chirped pulse and negative dispersion focusing optics allows one to take further advantage of the laser optical bandwidth and produce a chromatic line focus maximizing the gradient. The combination of these novel ideas results in a compact vacuum laser accelerator capable of accelerating picosecond electron bunches with a high gradient (GeV/m) and very low energy spread.

  3. Theory and Simulation of an Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. K.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fang, J. M.; Marshall, T. C.

    1996-11-01

    An experimental demonstration of the acceleration of electrons using a high power CO2 laser in an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This experiment has generated data, which we are attempting to simulate. Included in our studies are such effects as: a low-loss metallic waveguide with a dielectric coating on the walls; multi-mode coupling due to self-consistent interaction between the electrons and the optical wave; space charge (which is significant at lower laser power); energy-spread of the electrons; arbitrary wiggler field profile; and slippage. Two types of wiggler profile have been considered: a linear taper of the period, and a step-taper of the period (the period is ~ 3cm, the field is ~ 1T, and the wiggler length is 47cm). The energy increment of the electrons ( ~ 1-2%) is analyzed in detail as a function of laser power, wiggler parameters, and the initial beam energy (40MeV). For laser power ~ 0.5GW, the predictions of the simulations are in good accord with experimental results. A matter currently under study is the discrepancy between theory and observations for the electron energy distribution observed at the end of the IFEL. This work is supported by the Department of Energy.

  4. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  5. Solder Mounting Technologies for Electronic Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    VIANCO, PAUL T.

    1999-09-23

    Soldering provides a cost-effective means for attaching electronic packages to circuit boards using both small scale and large scale manufacturing processes. Soldering processes accommodate through-hole leaded components as well as surface mount packages, including the newer area array packages such as the Ball Grid Arrays (BGA), Chip Scale Packages (CSP), and Flip Chip Technology. The versatility of soldering is attributed to the variety of available solder alloy compositions, substrate material methodologies, and different manufacturing processes. For example, low melting temperature solders are used with temperature sensitive materials and components. On the other hand, higher melting temperature solders provide reliable interconnects for electronics used in high temperature service. Automated soldering techniques can support large-volume manufacturing processes, while providing high reliability electronic products at a reasonable cost.

  6. Induction linac driven free-electron lasers for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William A.

    1992-03-01

    The recent development of highly reliable components for linear induction accelerators (LIA) and free-electron lasers (FEL) enable one to use these devices as economical sources of microwave power to drive magnetic fusion reactors and high gradient, rf linear accelerators. Based on the specifications and costs of the recently designed and fabricated LIA components at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Science Research Laboratory, Inc., and Pulse Sciences, Inc., this paper reviews the present technology of linear induction accelerators and presents an algorithm for scaling the cost of LIA-driven microwave sources to the high average power regime of interest for the next generation of fusion research machines and linear electorn-positron colliders at TeV energies. The algorithm allows one to optimize the output power of the sources with respect to cost (or other figure of merit) by varying he characteristics (pulse length, driven current, repetition rate, etc.) of the linear induction accelerator. It also allows one to explore cost sensitivities as a guide to formulating research strategies for developing advanced accelerator technologies.

  7. Mott scattering of polarized electrons in a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Manaut, B.; Taj, S.; Attaourti, Y.

    2005-04-01

    We present analytical and numerical results of the relativistic calculation of the transition matrix element S{sub fi} and differential cross sections for Mott scattering of initially polarized Dirac particles (electrons) in the presence of a strong laser field with linear polarization. We use exact Dirac-Volkov wave functions to describe the dressed electrons and the collision process is treated in the first Born approximation. The influence of the laser field on the degree of polarization of the scattered electron is reported.

  8. Electron Acceleration by a Tightly Focused Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2002-03-01

    State-of-the-art petawatt laser beams may be focused down to few-micron spot sizes and can produce violent electron acceleration as a result of the extremely intense and asymmetric fields. Classical fifth-order calculations in the diffraction angle show that electrons, injected sideways into the tightly focused laser beam, get captured and gain energy in the GeV regime. We point out the most favorable points of injection away from the focus, along with an efficient means of extracting the energetic electron with a static magnetic field.

  9. Impact of industrial needs on advances in laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denney, Paul E.

    2005-03-01

    Lasers have become accepted "tools" by a number of industries. Everything from cars to heart pacemakers to greeting cards are now using lasers to cut, drill, clad, heat treat, and weld/join. The market for industrial laser systems is expanding. For the first quarter of 2004 the sales in lasers systems increased 40% to over $120 million1. Some of this increase in sales may be due to the fact that lasers are now considered reliable and have proven to be economical. The primary industrial laser systems today are the CO2 and Nd:YAG (lamp pumped) lasers especially at the higher powers. Both laser designs have evolved in power, beam quality, and reliability. At the same time laser manufacturers have developed methods to decrease the fabrication cost for the lasers. While these improvements have had a major impact on the operating cost of lasers, significant additional improvements do not seem possible in the near future for these lasers. As a result other advances in laser technologies (diode, diode pumped Nd:YAG, disc, and Yb fiber) are being examined.

  10. Electron emission and fragmentation of molecules in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Prümper, G.; Hatamoto, T.; Okunishi, M.; Mathur, D.

    2007-06-01

    We have constructed an apparatus for high-resolution electron spectroscopy and electron-ion coincidence experiments on gas-phase molecules in intense laser fields. The apparatus comprises an electron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer and an ion TOF spectrometer with a position detector, placed on either side of an effusive molecular beam. The ionizing radiation is either the fundamental (800 nm wavelength) of a Ti:sapphire laser or frequency doubled 400-nm light, with pulse durations of ~ 150 fs and the repetition rate of 1 kHz. We have investigated the electron emission and fragmentation of linear alcohol molecules, methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol, in laser fields with peak intensities up to ~ 1×10 14 W/cm2. Details of our apparatus are described along with an overview of some recent results.

  11. Electron temperature and density measurements of laser induced germanium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shakeel, Hira; Arshad, Saboohi; Haq, S. U. Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-15

    The germanium plasma produced by the fundamental harmonics (1064 nm) of Nd:YAG laser in single and double pulse configurations have been studied spectroscopically. The plasma is characterized by measuring the electron temperature using the Boltzmann plot method for neutral and ionized species and electron number density as a function of laser irradiance, ambient pressure, and distance from the target surface. It is observed that the plasma parameters have an increasing trend with laser irradiance (9–33 GW/cm{sup 2}) and with ambient pressure (8–250 mbar). However, a decreasing trend is observed along the plume length up to 4.5 mm. The electron temperature and electron number density are also determined using a double pulse configuration, and their behavior at fixed energy ratio and different interpulse delays is discussed.

  12. Observation of 690 MV m-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with a Laser-Driven Dielectric Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, K. P.; Wu, Z.; Cowan, B. M.; Hanuka, A.; Makasyuk, I. V.; Peralta, E. A.; Soong, K.; Byer, R. L.; England, R. J.

    2016-06-27

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. In this work, experimental results are presented of relativistic electron acceleration with 690±100 MVm-1 gradient. This is a record-high accelerating gradient for a dielectric microstructure accelerator, nearly doubling the previous record gradient. To reach higher acceleration gradients the present experiment employs 90 fs duration laser pulses.

  13. Gas lasers and applications. [shock tube technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1973-01-01

    A brief review of laser elements is given. Flowing gas lasers are represented to have the best potential for high average power. The background of shock-tube researchers and the shock tube itself are alleged to be ideally suited for the development of such lasers. Three types - the electric discharge, the gasdynamic, and the chemical laser - are discussed briefly. A legion number of possible gas lasers is enumerated. With the development of their potential for higher power and efficiency, many additional and important uses of lasers are predicted, even beaming power through space for long distances, up to 1 AU. A few details of some current high-power gasdynamic laser devices are given.

  14. Second-generation dental laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Michael

    1993-07-01

    The first generation of dental lasers proved limited to soft tissue applications. Due to the thermal properties of these lasers, drilling of enamel and dentin is harmful to the underlying nerve tissue. As a solution to this problem, more sophisticated solidstate lasers are under commercial development for hard tissue applications. The first of these second generation lasers to emerge is the erbium:YAG now marketed in Europe by KaVo. This system relies on a cumbersome articulated arm delivery device. Other manufacturers have overcome this delivery problem with the introduction of flexible delivery methods. Another hard tissue laser that has been introduced is the short-pulsed Nd:YAG. This laser uses shaped pulses to drill teeth without thermal damage. An overview of these and other second generation dental lasers is presented.

  15. Laser Triggered Electron Injection into a Channel Guided Wakefield Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Filip, C.

    2005-10-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated the generation of narrow energy spread (˜ few %) electron beams with considerable amount of charge (>100 pC). Stability of laser-plasma accelerators, as in the conventional accelerators, requires highly synchronized injection of electrons into the structured accelerating field. The Colliding Pulse Method[1] with pre-formed plasma channel guiding [2] can result in jitter-free injection in a dark-current-free accelerating structure. We report on experimental progress of laser triggered injection of electrons into a laser wakefield, where an intense laser pulse is guided by a pre-formed plasma channel. The experiments use the multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser at LOASIS facility of LBNL. The ignitor-heater method is used to first produce a pre-formed plasma channel in a hydrogen gas jet. Two counter propagating beams (wakefield driver:100-500mJ-50fs, injector:50-300mJ-50fs) then are focused onto the entrance of the channel. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiment will be presented. [1]G.Fubiani, et al, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004). [2]C.G.R. Geddes et al, Nature 431, 538 (2004). This work is supported by DoE under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  16. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jyan-Min

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 μm CO2 laser have been carried out at Brookhaven`s Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5 % (ΔE/E) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed E which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were performed under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator.

  17. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  18. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Hongxiu; Neil, George R.

    1998-01-01

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  19. Research on laser fuze technology based on MEMS/MOEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yingwen; Li, Kun; Sun, Jianqiang

    2007-12-01

    With the development of semiconductor laser technology, laser proximity fuzes have been widely used in various kinds of guided missiles and conventional ammunitions. Conventional laser proximity fuzes consisting of separated components, have the disadvantages such as large volumes and poor anti-jamming abilities, so are not satisfied with the modern warfare circumstances. Combined with the separated components, the system has been divided into transmitting module, receiving module and information processing module, the different modules have been analyzed in detail,. Meanwhile, the transmitting driven circuit has been developed and laser pulse with 20ns narrow width was obtained. In order to meet the multifunction and miniaturization, laser fuzes based on MEMS/MOEMS have been introduced in this paper. Technologies include vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser, integrated resonant-cavity photodetector and refractive micro-optics. The entire structure was roughly 1~2mm thick and 1mm on a side.

  20. Vacuum electron acceleration by using two variable frequency laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-12-15

    A method is proposed for producing a relativistic electron bunch in vacuum via direct acceleration by using two frequency-chirped laser pulses. We consider the linearly polarized frequency-chiped Hermit-Gaussian 0, 0 mode lasers with linear chirp in which the local frequency varies linearly in time and space. Electron motion is investigated through a numerical simulation using a three-dimensional particle trajectory code in which the relativistic Newton's equations of motion with corresponding Lorentz force are solved. Two oblique laser pulses with proper chirp parameters and propagation angles are used for the electron acceleration along the z-axis. In this way, an electron initially at rest located at the origin could achieve high energy, γ=319 with the scattering angle of 1.02{sup ∘} with respect to the z-axis. Moreover, the acceleration of an electron in different initial positions on each coordinate axis is investigated. It was found that this mechanism has the capability of producing high energy electron microbunches with low scattering angles. The energy gain of an electron initially located at some regions on each axis could be greatly enhanced compared to the single pulse acceleration. Furthermore, the scattering angle will be lowered compared to the acceleration by using laser pulses propagating along the z-axis.

  1. Guiding-center equations for electrons in ultraintense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joel E.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1994-05-01

    The guiding-center equations are derived for electrons in arbitrarily intense laser fields also subject to external fields and ponderomotive forces. Exhibiting the relativistic mass increase of the oscillating electrons, a simple frame-invariant equation is shown to govern the behavior of the electrons for sufficiently weak background fields and ponderomotive forces. The parameter regime for which such a formulation is valid is made precise, and some predictions of the equation are checked by numerical simulation.

  2. Guiding-center equations for electrons in ultraintense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The guiding-center equations are derived for electrons in arbitrarily intense laser fields also subject to external fields and ponderomotive forces. Exhibiting the relativistic mass increase of the oscillating electrons, a simple frame-invariant equation is shown to govern the behavior of the electrons for sufficiently weak background fields and ponderomotive forces. The parameter regime for which such a formulation is valid is made precise, and some predictions of the equation are checked by numerical simulation.

  3. A 3-dimensional theory of free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.D.; Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2010-08-23

    In this paper, we present an analytical three-dimensional theory of free electron lasers. Under several assumptions, we arrive at an integral equation similar to earlier work carried out by Ching, Kim and Xie, but using a formulation better suited for the initial value problem of Coherent Electron Cooling. We use this model in later papers to obtain analytical results for gain guiding, as well as to develop a complete model of Coherent Electron Cooling.

  4. Free electron laser based on the Smith Purcell radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghong; Liu, Pukun; Ge, Guangying; Dong, Ruixin

    2007-09-01

    A Smith-Purcell (S-P) free electron laser (FEL) composed of a metallic diffraction flat grating, an open cylindrical mirror cavity and a relativistic sheet electron beam with moderate energy, is presented. The characteristics of this device are studied by theoretical analysis, experimental measurements and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method. Results indicate that coherent radiation with output peak power up to 50 MW at millimeter wavelengths can be generated by using relativistic electron beam of moderate energy.

  5. Free electron laser based on the Smith — Purcell radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming-Hong; Xiao, Xiao-Guang; Yu, Hui-Shan; Meng, Xian-Zhu

    2006-11-01

    A Smith-Purcell (SP) free electron laser (FEL), composed of a metallic diffraction flat grating, an open cylindrical mirror cavity and a relativistic sheet electron beam with moderate energy, is presented. The characteristics of this device are studied by theoretical analysis, experimental measurements and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method. Results indicate that the coherent radiation with an output peak power up to 50 MW at millimeter wavelengths can be generated by using relativistic electron beam of moderate energy

  6. Spreader Design for FERMI@Elettra Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A.; Bacescu, D.; Chow, K.; Diviacco, B.; Ferianis, M.; Di Mitri, S.; Wells, R.

    2007-01-18

    In this note we describe a conceptual design of a part ofthe electron beam delivery system for FERMI@Elettra free electron laser(FEL) located between the end of the linac and the entrance to the FEL.This part includes the emittance diagnostic section, the electron beamswitchyard for two FELs called spreader and matching sections. The designmeets various constrains imposed by the existing and planned buildingboundaries, desire for utilization of existing equipment and demands forvarious diagnostic instruments.

  7. High-quality microcutting in silicon by advanced laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, E.; Castelli, Paolo

    2003-11-01

    This paper reports on the potentialities of innovative lasers in microcutting of silicon, one of the most important materials in the field of microelectronics. In recent years, novel laser based micromachining methods have played an increasingly important role in the ongoing miniaturization of consumer electronics. Here, high-quality microcutting in silicon using a "green" laser, whose wavelength is readily absorbed by silicon, is presented.

  8. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  9. Coherent Doppler Laser Radar: Technology Development and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has been investigating, developing, and applying coherent Doppler laser radar technology for over 30 years. These efforts have included the first wind measurement in 1967, the first airborne flights in 1972, the first airborne wind field mapping in 1981, and the first measurement of hurricane eyewall winds in 1998. A parallel effort at MSFC since 1982 has been the study, modeling and technology development for a space-based global wind measurement system. These endeavors to date have resulted in compact, robust, eyesafe lidars at 2 micron wavelength based on solid-state laser technology; in a factor of 6 volume reduction in near diffraction limited, space-qualifiable telescopes; in sophisticated airborne scanners with full platform motion subtraction; in local oscillator lasers capable of rapid tuning of 25 GHz for removal of relative laser radar to target velocities over a 25 km/s range; in performance prediction theory and simulations that have been validated experimentally; and in extensive field campaign experience. We have also begun efforts to dramatically improve the fundamental photon efficiency of the laser radar, to demonstrate advanced lower mass laser radar telescopes and scanners; to develop laser and laser radar system alignment maintenance technologies; and to greatly improve the electrical efficiency, cooling technique, and robustness of the pulsed laser. This coherent Doppler laser radar technology is suitable for high resolution, high accuracy wind mapping; for aerosol and cloud measurement; for Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric and trace gases; for hard target range and velocity measurement; and for hard target vibration spectra measurement. It is also suitable for a number of aircraft operations applications such as clear air turbulence (CAT) detection; dangerous wind shear (microburst) detection; airspeed, angle of attack, and sideslip measurement; and fuel savings through

  10. Dynamics Of Electronic Excitation Of Solids With Ultrashort Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2010-10-08

    When ultrashort laser pulses irradiate a solid, photoabsorption by electrons in conduction band produces nonequilibrium highly energetic free electrons gas. We study the ionization and excitation of the electronic subsystem in a semiconductor and a metal (solid silicon and aluminum, respectively). The irradiating femtosecond laser pulse has a duration of 10 fs and a photon energy of h-bar {omega} = 38 eV. The classical Monte Carlo method is extended to take into account the electronic band structure and Pauli's principle for electrons excited to the conduction band. In the case of semiconductors this applies to the holes as well. Conduction band electrons and valence band holes induce secondary excitation and ionization processes which we simulate event by event. We discuss the transient electron dynamics with respect to the differences between semiconductors and metals. For metals the electronic distribution is split up into two branches: a low energy distribution as a slightly distorted Fermi-distribution and a long high energy tail. For the case of semiconductors it is split into two parts by the band gap. To thermalize, these excited electronic subsystems need longer times than the characteristic pulse duration. Therefore, the analysis of experimental data with femtosecond lasers must be based on non-equilibrium concepts.

  11. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Hutton, Andrew

    2009-03-03

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  12. Dynamics of emitting electrons in strong laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Naumova, Natalia M.; Nees, John A.; Yanovsky, Victor P.; Mourou, Gerard A.

    2009-09-15

    A new derivation of the motion of a radiating electron is given, leading to a formulation that differs from the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation and its published modifications. It satisfies the proper conservation laws. Particularly, it conserves the generalized momentum, eliminating the symmetry-breaking runaway solution. The equation allows a consistent calculation of the electron current, the radiation effect on the electron momentum, and the radiation itself, for a single electron or plasma electrons in strong electromagnetic fields. The equation is then applied to a simulation of a strong laser pulse interaction with a plasma target. Some analytical solutions are also provided.

  13. Electron circuits: Semiconductor laser multiple use installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Fan, J.; Weng, D.

    1983-04-01

    A light source for a multiple use installation using a same matter junction or different matter junction GaAlAs/GaAs semiconductor laser, which has the advantages of high interference resistance, long transmission distance (tens to hundreds of meters), good security, and low power consumption; in addition, the controller of the light source has multiple usages of alarming, switching and counting is presented. The multiple use installation can be used in control of breaking warps and counting on roving waste machines, warping machines and silk weaving machines in the textile industry; long distance speed measurement, alarming and counting in machinery, electricity and chemical industries; and alarming and control of water levels in reservoirs, rivers and water towers, as well as blockade alarming and control of important divisions. This multiple use installation is composed of two parts a laser emitter and a receiving device. The former component is used to produce the laser; after the receiver receives the laser, the installation completes operations of alarming, switching and counting.

  14. Optimization of positrons generation based on laser wakefield electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuchi; Han, Dan; Zhang, Tiankui; Dong, Kegong; Zhu, Bin; Yan, Yonghong; Gu, Yuqiu

    2016-08-01

    Laser based positron represents a new particle source with short pulse duration and high charge density. Positron production based on laser wakefield electron acceleration (LWFA) has been investigated theoretically in this paper. Analytical expressions for positron spectra and yield have been obtained through a combination of LWFA and cascade shower theories. The maximum positron yield and corresponding converter thickness have been optimized as a function of driven laser power. Under the optimal condition, high energy (>100 MeV ) positron yield up to 5 ×1011 can be produced by high power femtosecond lasers at ELI-NP. The percentage of positrons shows that a quasineutral electron-positron jet can be generated by setting the converter thickness greater than 5 radiation lengths.

  15. Coherent-state description of free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching Tsung

    1990-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the overall performance of free-electron lasers (FEL) can be understood without quantum mechanics. However, there are features of FEL such as photon statistics which can only be described quantum-mechanically. Although the majority of quantum-mechanical studies of FEL are devoted to one-particle models, there are also many studies on many-body effects of FEL. Unfortunately, the mathematical derivations of these studies are so complicated that it is not easy to follow the developments with a clearer picture in mind. The origin of the problem is the quantum recoils of the electrons. So we try to gain a clearer picture of the many-body effects by making the recoilless approximation. A simple model of FEL consists of a beam of relativistic electrons propagating through a spatially periodic magnetostatic wiggler field. The resulting laser output is propagating along the same direction as that of the electron beam. Quantum-mechanical analysis of FEL are usually based on the Bambini-Renieri frame which moves in the same direction as the propagating laser beam with a relativistic speed so that: (1) the wiggler field appears almost as a plane-wave radiation, (2) the frequency of the wiggler field coincides with that of the laser, and (3) the electron motion is nonrelativistic. Although in reality the laser beam can only derive its energy at the expense of the kinetic energy of the electrons, it appears in the Bambini-Renieri frame as if the photons of the laser were scattered from the fictitious photons of the wiggler field by the electrons.

  16. Information Technologies for the 1980's: Lasers and Microprocessors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, William D.

    This discussion of the development and application of lasers and microprocessors to information processing stresses laser communication in relation to capacity, reliability, and cost and the advantages of this technology to real-time information access and information storage. The increased capabilities of microprocessors are reviewed, and a…

  17. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  18. Information Technologies for the 1980's: Lasers and Microprocessors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, William D.

    This discussion of the development and application of lasers and microprocessors to information processing stresses laser communication in relation to capacity, reliability, and cost and the advantages of this technology to real-time information access and information storage. The increased capabilities of microprocessors are reviewed, and a…

  19. Research on key technology of space laser communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chengwu; Huang, Huiming; Liu, Hongyang; Gao, Shenghua; Cheng, Liyu

    2016-10-01

    Since the 21st century, Spatial laser communication has made a breakthrough development. Europe, the United States, Japan and other space powers have carried out the test of spatial laser communication technology on-orbit, and put forward a series of plans. In 2011, China made the first technology demonstration of satellite-ground laser communication carried by HY-2 satellite. Nowadays, in order to improve the transmission rate of spatial network, the topic of spatial laser communication network is becoming a research hotspot at home and abroad. This thesis, from the basic problem of spatial laser communication network to solve, analyzes the main difference between spatial network and ground network, which draws forth the key technology of spatial laser communication backbone network, and systematically introduces our research on aggregation, addressing, architecture of spatial network. From the perspective of technology development status and trends, the thesis proposes the development route of spatial laser communication network in stages. So as to provide reference about the development of spatial laser communication network in China.

  20. Engineering, Trade, and Technical Cluster. Task Analyses. Drafting and Design Technology, Precision Machining Technology, Electronics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center.

    Developed in Virginia, this publication contains task analysis guides to support selected tech prep programs that prepare students for careers in the engineering, trade, and technical cluster. Three occupations are profiled: drafting and design technology, precision machining technology, and electronics technology. Each guide contains the…

  1. Technology Assessment of Ring Laser Gyroscopes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    National Aerospace Sympoium, 47. Vali, V. and Shorthill, R.W., " Fibre Ring Interferometer ," AppliedOptics, Vol. 15, No. 5, May 1976. 48. Morrison...GYROSCOPE......................3 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3.2 Development ...................... 3 3.3 Other Interferometer ...Shapes ................. 3.4 Ring Laser Interferometer ............... 12 3.5 Laser Gyroscope Output................15 3.6 Laser Gyroscope Errors

  2. Electron-atom collisions in a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Philip H. G.; Flannery, M. R.

    1991-05-01

    Cross sections tor the 1S-2S and 1S-2P 0 transitions in laser assisted e-H(1S) collisions are calculated in both the multichannel eikonal and the Born-wave treatments as a function of impact energy and laser field intensity and phase. The laser considered is a monotonic, plane polarized CO 2 laser (photon energy = 0.117 eV), with the polarization direction parallel to the initial projectile velocity. Floquet dressing of the hydrogen atom in the soft-photon weak-field limit reveals a concise description of the laser assisted electron-atom collision. This model also links the microscopic detail of the individual collisions with the macroscopic considerations of experimental analysis.

  3. Multi-MeV Electron Acceleration by Subterawatt Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Goers, A J; Hine, G A; Feder, L; Miao, B; Salehi, F; Wahlstrand, J K; Milchberg, H M

    2015-11-06

    We demonstrate laser-plasma acceleration of high charge electron beams to the ∼10  MeV scale using ultrashort laser pulses with as little energy as 10 mJ. This result is made possible by an extremely dense and thin hydrogen gas jet. Total charge up to ∼0.5  nC is measured for energies >1  MeV. Acceleration is correlated to the presence of a relativistically self-focused laser filament accompanied by an intense coherent broadband light flash, associated with wave breaking, which can radiate more than ∼3% of the laser energy in a ∼1  fs bandwidth consistent with half-cycle optical emission. Our results enable truly portable applications of laser-driven acceleration, such as low dose radiography, ultrafast probing of matter, and isotope production.

  4. Investigations into a potential laser-NASP transport technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Laser propelled flight/transport technology is surveyed. A detailed conceptual design is presented for an on-place Mercury-Lightcraft: other designs are briefly explored for larger, 15-place Executive Lightcraft, and 150 to 350 passenger Jumbo Lightcraft.

  5. Frequency chirping for resonance-enhanced electron energy during laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2006-04-01

    The model given by Singh-Tripathi [Phys. Plasmas 11, 743 (2004)] for laser electron acceleration in a magnetic wiggler is revisited by including the effect of laser frequency chirping. Laser frequency chirp helps to maintain the resonance condition longer, which increases the electron energy gain. A significant enhancement in electron energy gain during laser acceleration is observed.

  6. Development of compact blue-green lasers for projection display based on Novalux extended-cavity surface-emitting laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Watson, Jason P.; Lee, Dicky; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Hallstein, Sascha; Carey, Glen P.; Hitchens, William R.; Scholz, Ken; Cantos, Brad D.; Niven, Greg; Jansen, Michael; Pelaprat, Jean-Michel; Mooradian, Aram

    2005-03-01

    Compact and efficient blue-green lasers have been receiving increasing interest in the last few years due to their applications in various industries: bio-instrumentation, reprographics, microscopy, etc. We report on the latest developments in frequency-doubled, compact blue-green lasers, based on Novalux extended-cavity surface emitting laser (NECSEL) technology. This discussion will touch upon using NECSEL technology to go beyond a 5-20 milliwatt cw laser design for instrumentation applications and obtain a compact design that is scalable to higher power levels in an array-based architecture. Such a blue-green laser array platform can address the needs of laser light sources in the projection display consumer electronics markets, particularly in rear-projection televisions.

  7. Ponderomotive acceleration of electrons by a self focused laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohtash; Sharma, A. K.

    2010-12-15

    Ponderomotive acceleration of electrons by a short laser pulse undergoing relativistic self-focusing in a plasma is investigated. The saturation in nonlinear plasma permittivity causes periodic self-focusing of the laser. The periodicity lengths are different for different axial segments of the pulse. As a result, pulse shape is distorted. An electron initially on the laser axis and at the front of the self-focusing pulse gains energy from the pulse until it is run over by the pulse peak. By the time electron reaches the tail, if pulse begins diverging, the deceleration of the electron is slower and the electron is left with net energy gain. The electrons slightly off the laser axis see a radial ponderomotive force too. Initially, when they are accelerated by the pulse front the acceleration is strong as they are closer to the axis. When they see the tail of the pulse (after being run by the pulse), they are farther from the axis and the retardation ponderomotive force is weaker. Thus, there is net energy gain.

  8. High-flux electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators driven by petawatt lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Tesileanu, Ovidiu

    2017-07-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are considered to be one of the most competitive next-generation accelerator candidates. In this paper, we will study the potential high-flux electron beam production of an LWFA driven by petawatt-level laser pulses. In our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, an optimal set of parameters gives ˜ 40 {nC} of charge with 2 {PW} laser power, thus ˜ 400 {kA} of instantaneous current if we assume the electron beam duration is 100 fs. This high flux and its secondary radiation are widely applicable in nuclear and QED physics, industrial imaging, medical and biological studies.

  9. High-flux electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators driven by petawatt lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, ZENG; Ovidiu, TESILEANU

    2017-07-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are considered to be one of the most competitive next-generation accelerator candidates. In this paper, we will study the potential high-flux electron beam production of an LWFA driven by petawatt-level laser pulses. In our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, an optimal set of parameters gives ∼ 40 {nC} of charge with 2 {PW} laser power, thus ∼ 400 {kA} of instantaneous current if we assume the electron beam duration is 100 fs. This high flux and its secondary radiation are widely applicable in nuclear and QED physics, industrial imaging, medical and biological studies.

  10. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-05-15

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO{sub 2} molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  11. Hot electrons transverse refluxing in ultraintense laser-solid interactions.

    PubMed

    Buffechoux, S; Psikal, J; Nakatsutsumi, M; Romagnani, L; Andreev, A; Zeil, K; Amin, M; Antici, P; Burris-Mog, T; Compant-La-Fontaine, A; d'Humières, E; Fourmaux, S; Gaillard, S; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Kraft, S; Mancic, A; Plaisir, C; Sarri, G; Tarisien, M; Toncian, T; Schramm, U; Tampo, M; Audebert, P; Willi, O; Cowan, T E; Pépin, H; Tikhonchuk, V; Borghesi, M; Fuchs, J

    2010-07-02

    We have analyzed the coupling of ultraintense lasers (at ∼2×10{19}  W/cm{2}) with solid foils of limited transverse extent (∼10  s of μm) by monitoring the electrons and ions emitted from the target. We observe that reducing the target surface area allows electrons at the target surface to be reflected from the target edges during or shortly after the laser pulse. This transverse refluxing can maintain a hotter, denser and more homogeneous electron sheath around the target for a longer time. Consequently, when transverse refluxing takes places within the acceleration time of associated ions, we observe increased maximum proton energies (up to threefold), increased laser-to-ion conversion efficiency (up to a factor 30), and reduced divergence which bodes well for a number of applications.

  12. Hot Electrons Transverse Refluxing in Ultraintense Laser-Solid Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Buffechoux, S.; Psikal, J.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Mancic, A.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.; Romagnani, L.; Sarri, G.; Borghesi, M.; Andreev, A.; Zeil, K.; Burris-Mog, T.; Gaillard, S.; Kraft, S.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E.; Amin, M.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Antici, P.

    2010-07-02

    We have analyzed the coupling of ultraintense lasers (at {approx}2x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) with solid foils of limited transverse extent ({approx}10 s of {mu}m) by monitoring the electrons and ions emitted from the target. We observe that reducing the target surface area allows electrons at the target surface to be reflected from the target edges during or shortly after the laser pulse. This transverse refluxing can maintain a hotter, denser and more homogeneous electron sheath around the target for a longer time. Consequently, when transverse refluxing takes places within the acceleration time of associated ions, we observe increased maximum proton energies (up to threefold), increased laser-to-ion conversion efficiency (up to a factor 30), and reduced divergence which bodes well for a number of applications.

  13. Inverse Free Electron Laser Experiment at the Neptune Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, P.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Varfolomeev, A.; Tolmachev, S.; Yarovoi, T.

    2002-12-01

    We present an Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator proposed for construction at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory. This experiment will use a 1 TW CO2 laser to accelerate through two strongly tapered undulators an electron beam from 16 MeV up to 55 MeV. The scheme proposed is the diffraction dominated IFEL interaction. The Raleigh range of the laser beam is about 2 cm, much shorter than the interaction length (the undulator length is 50 cm). In this regime adiabatic capture is possible in the first part of the undulator. In the focus region, we propose a solution to the problem of the dephasing between electrons and photons due to the Guoy phase shift. Ponderomotive effects and implications for tolerances are also studied.

  14. Chirped-Pulse Inverse Free Electron Laser: A Tabletop, High-Gradient Vacuum Laser Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Troha, A L; Baldis, H A

    2001-03-05

    The inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) interaction is studied both theoretically and numerically in the case where the drive laser intensity approaches the relativistic regime, and the pulse duration is only a few optical cycles long. We show that by using an ultrashort, ultrahigh-intensity drive laser pulse, the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased considerably, thus yielding large energy gains. Using a chirped pulse and negative dispersion focusing optics allows one to take further advantage of the laser optical bandwidth and produce a chromatic line focus maximizing the gradient. The combination of these novel ideas results in a compact vacuum laser accelerator capable of accelerating picosecond electron bunches with a high gradient (GeV/m) and very low energy spread. A computer code which takes into account the three-dimensional nature of the interaction is currently in development and results are expected this Spring.

  15. Electron Rescattering in a Bicircular Laser Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasović, E.; Becker, W.; Milošević, D. B.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) of krypton atoms by a bicircular laser field, which consists of two coplanar co- or counter-rotating circularly polarized fields of frequencies rw and sw. We show that the photoelectron spectra in the HATI process, presented in the momentum plane, exhibit the same discrete rotational symmetry as the driving field. We also analyze HATI spectra for various combinations of the intensities of two field components for co- and counter-rotating fields. We find that the appearance of high-energy plateau for the counter-rotating case is vary sensitive to the laser intensity ratio, while the plateau is always absent for the co-rotating bicircular field.

  16. Midwest Free-Electron Laser Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-17

    Report, December 1991 Page 9 4. Photosensitization tissue phantoms were developed for photodynamic tumor therapy ( PDT ) consisting of light scattering...preferential sodium effect can be enhanced or developed further for clinical use to provide novel interventions in anestheia and surgical trealment of...and of the laser-bioheat transfer equation with a convection boundary for incident gaussian beams; photosensitization tissue phantoms and analytical

  17. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  18. Laser-initiated explosive electron emission from flat germanium crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Porshyn, V. Mingels, S.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.

    2016-07-28

    Flat Sb-doped germanium (100) crystals were investigated in the triode configuration under pulsed tunable laser illumination (pulse duration t{sub laser} = 3.5 ns and photon energy hν = 0.54–5.90 eV) and under DC voltages <10{sup 4} V. Large bunch charges up to ∼1 μC were extracted from the cathodes for laser pulses >1 MW/cm{sup 2} corresponding to a high quantum efficiency up to 3.3% and cathode currents up to 417 A. This laser-induced explosive electron emission (EEE) from Ge was characterized by its voltage-, laser power- and hν-sensitivity. The analysis of the macroscopic surface damage caused by the EEE is included as well. Moreover, we have carried out first direct measurements of electron energy distributions produced during the EEE from the Ge samples. The measured electron spectra hint for electron excitations to the vacuum level of the bulk and emission from the plasma plume with an average kinetic energy of ∼0.8 eV.

  19. Laser-plasma generated very high energy electrons in radiation therapy of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DesRosiers, Colleen; Moskvin, Vadim; Cao, Minsong; Joshi, Chandrashekhar J.; Langer, Mark

    2008-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulation experiments have shown that very high energy electrons (VHEE), 150-250 MeV, have potential advantages in prostate cancer treatment over currently available electrons, photon and proton beam treatment. Small diameter VHEE beamlets can be scanned, thereby producing a finer resolution intensity modulated treatment than photon beams. VHEE beams may be delivered with greater precision and accelerators may be constructed at significantly lower cost than proton beams. A VHEE accelerator may be optimally designed using laser-plasma technology. If the accelerator is constructed to additionally produce low energy photon beams along with VHEE, real time imaging, bioprobing, and dose enhancement may be performed simultaneously. This paper describes a Monte Carlo experiment, using the parameters of the electron beam from the UCLA laser-plasma wakefield accelerator, whereby dose distributions on a human prostate are generated. The resulting dose distributions of the very high energy electrons are shown to be comparable to photon beam dose distributions. This simple experiment illustrates that the nature of the dose distribution of electrons is comparable to that of photons. However, the main advantage of electrons over photons and protons lies in the delivery and manipulation of electrons, rather than the nature of the dose distribution. This paper describes the radiation dose delivery of electrons employing technologies currently in exploration and evaluates potential benefits as compared with currently available photon and protons beams in the treatment of prostate and other cancers, commonly treated with radiation.

  20. Probing lattice dynamics in silicon with laser-wakefield accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nees, John; He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, Karl; Scott, S.; Legally, M.; Beaurepaire, B.; Gallé, G.; Faure, J.

    2016-10-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration is the key technology in a new breed of electron and photon beam sources that operate in the ultrafast domain. We show that the spatial and temporal properties of wakefield-generated electron beams can be manipulated to enable them interrogate ultrafast lattice dynamics in freestanding single-crystal silicon membranes, while maintaining spatial resolution on the atomic scale. In particular, picosecond resolution of Si lattice dynamics is obtained by recording streaked electron diffraction peaks using static magnetic fields. We will also discuss the role of wave front control in establishing optimal beam characteristics and the significance of single-shot measurements. Michigan support from NSF PHY-1535628.

  1. Laser furnace technology for zone refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser experiment facility is constructed to investigate the problems in using a laser beam to zone refine semiconductor and metal crystals. The hardware includes a computer to control scan mirrors and stepper motors to provide a variety of melt zone patterns. The equipment and its operating procedures are described.

  2. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Gruener, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by a high-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source ({approx}10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (> or approx.10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10{sup 13} photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  3. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-04

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (~;;10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10^13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  4. Influence of laser energy on the electron temperature of a laser-induced Mg plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asamoah, Emmanuel; Hongbing, Yao

    2017-01-01

    The magnesium plasma induced by a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in atmospheric air was investigated. The evolution of the plasma was studied by acquiring spectral images at different laser energies and delay times. We observed that the intensities of the spectral lines decrease with larger delay times. The electron temperature was determined using the Boltzmann plot method. At a delay time of 100 ns and laser energy of 350 mJ, the electron temperature attained their highest value at 10164 K and then decreases slowly up to 8833.6 K at 500 ns. We found that the electron temperature of the magnesium plasma increases rapidly with increasing laser energy.

  5. CO2 laser drives extreme ultraviolet nano-lithography — second life of mature laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K. M.; Ohta, T.; Suganuma, T.; Fujimoto, J.; Mizoguchi, H.; Sumitani, A.; Endo, A.

    2013-12-01

    It was shown both theoretically and experimentally that nanosecond order laser pulses at 10.6 micron wavelength were superior for driving the Sn plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source for nano-lithography for the reasons of higher conversion efficiency, lower production of debris and higher average power levels obtainable in CO2 media without serious problems of beam distortions and nonlinear effects occurring in competing solid-state lasers at high intensities. The renewed interest in such pulse format, wavelength, repetition rates in excess of 50 kHz and average power levels in excess of 18 kiloWatt has sparked new opportunities for a matured multi-kiloWatt CO2 laser technology. The power demand of EUV source could be only satisfied by a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier system configuration, leading to a development of a new type of hybrid pulsed CO2 laser employing a whole spectrum of CO2 technology, such as fast flow systems and diffusion-cooled planar waveguide lasers, and relatively recent quantum cascade lasers. In this paper we review briefly the history of relevant pulsed CO2 laser technology and the requirements for multi-kiloWatt CO2 laser, intended for the laser-produced plasma EUV source, and present our recent advances, such as novel solid-state seeded master oscillator and efficient multi-pass amplifiers built on planar waveguide CO2 lasers.

  6. Research on the laser angle deception jamming technology of laser countermeasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shi-wei; Chen, Wen-jian; Gao, Wei; Duan, Yuan-yuan

    2015-10-01

    In recent years , laser guided weapons behave very well at destroying the military goals in the local wars, the single-shot probability, effective range and hitting precision getting better. And the semi-active laser guided weapons are the most widely used laser guided weapons. In order to improve the viability and protect important military goals, it's necessary to study the technology to against the semi-active guided weapons. This paper studies the working principle, the advantages and disadvantages of the semi-active guided weapons at first, and analyze the possibility of laser angle deception jamming system working. Then it analyzes the working principle and process of laser angle deception jamming technology. Finally it designs a half-real simulation system of laser angle deception jamming, which consists of semi-active laser guided weapons simulation system and laser angle deception jamming system. The simulation system demonstrates the working process of the laser angle deception jamming system. This paper provides fundamental base for the research on the countermeasure technology of semi-active laser guided weapons.

  7. Pulse Splitting in Short Wavelength Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Labat, M.; Couprie, M. E.; Joly, N.; Bruni, C.

    2009-12-31

    We investigate a fundamental limitation occurring in vacuum ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet seeded free electron lasers (FELs). For a given electron beam and undulator configuration, an increase of the FEL output energy at saturation can be obtained via an increase of the seed pulse duration. We put in evidence a complex spatiotemporal deformation of the amplified pulse, leading ultimately to a pulse splitting effect. Numerical studies of the Colson-Bonifacio FEL equations reveal that slippage length and seed laser pulse wings are core ingredients of the dynamics.

  8. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  9. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Liu, Y.; Guo, Q.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.; Lau, W.; Yang, J.

    2016-03-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  10. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhang, W.; Yang, J.; Liu, Y.; Lau, W.; Wang, X.

    2016-03-07

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  11. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Gaetano; De Nicola, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed Fiore et al. [1] and Fiore and De Nicola [2] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  12. Search for electron EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the elementary particle has the sensitivity to the CP violation in the theories beyond the standard model (SM). The search for the EDM constitutes the stringent test to discriminate between the SM and beyond it. We plan to perform the electron EDM search by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom which has the largest enhancement factor of the electron EDM in the alkali atoms. In this paper, the present status of the laser cooled Fr factory that is being constructed at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University are reported.

  13. Short wavelength optics for future free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, D.T.

    1984-04-01

    Although much free-electron laser work is directed toward achieving sufficient single-pass gain to be useful for research purposes, the availability of mirrors of high reflectance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime would make resonant cavities a possibility. In addition, as in ordinary synchrotron radiation work, mirrors are required for the construction of realistic experiments and for beam manipulation purposes such as folding and extraction. The Working Group discussed a number of approaches to reflecting optics for free electron lasers, which are summarized here, and described in some detail. 16 references, 2 figures.

  14. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery: technology and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy V; Lawless, Michael; Chan, Colin Ck; Jacobs, Mark; Ng, David; Bali, Shveta J; Hodge, Chris; Sutton, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    The recent introduction of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has generated much interest among ophthalmologists around the world. Laser cataract surgery integrates high-resolution anterior segment imaging systems with a femtosecond laser, allowing key steps of the procedure, including the primary and side-port corneal incisions, the anterior capsulotomy and fragmentation of the lens nucleus, to be performed with computer-guided laser precision. There is emerging evidence of reduced phacoemulsification time, better wound architecture and a more stable refractive result with femtosecond cataract surgery, as well as reports documenting an initial learning curve. This article will review the current state of technology and discuss our clinical experience.

  15. The solid state detector technology for picosecond laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    We developed an all solid state laser ranging detector technology, which makes the goal of millimeter accuracy achievable. Our design and construction philosophy is to combine the techniques of single photon ranging, ultrashort laser pulses, and fast fixed threshold discrimination while avoiding any analog signal processing within the laser ranging chain. The all solid state laser ranging detector package consists of the START detector and the STOP solid state photon counting module. Both the detectors are working in an optically triggered avalanche switching regime. The optical signal is triggering an avalanche current buildup which results in the generation of a uniform, fast risetime output pulse.

  16. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  17. U.S. Army High Energy Laser (HEL) technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavan, Michael J.; Wachs, John J.

    2011-11-01

    The US Army is investing in Solid State Laser (SSL) technology to assess counter rocket, artillery, and mortar (C-RAM) and counter unmanned aerial vehicle (C-UAV) capabilities of solid state based HEL systems, as well as other potential applications for HELs of interest to the Army. The Army HEL program thrust areas are systematically moving the technology forward toward weaponization, including solid state laser technologies, advances in beam control technology, and conducting major demonstrations. The High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HELMD) will be a major step toward demonstrating HEL weapon capability to the soldier. The US Army will continue to pursue technologies that enable more compact systems compatible with, for example, a Stryker tactical vehicle as a crucial part of our strategy to provide a capability to the warfighter that can maneuver with the force.

  18. Relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen elastic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Attaourti, Y.; Manaut, B.; Makhoute, A.

    2004-06-01

    We study the effects of the relativistic electronic dressing in laser-assisted electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions. We begin by considering the case when no radiation is present. This is necessary in order to check the consistency of our calculations and we then carry out the calculations using the relativistic Dirac-Volkov states. It turns out that a simple formal analogy links the analytical expressions of the unpolarized differential cross section without laser and the unpolarized differential cross section in the presence of a laser field.

  19. Laser-plasma mirrors: from electron acceleration to harmonics generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thévenet, Maxence; Bocoum, Maïmouna; Faure, Jérôme; Leblanc, Adrien; Vincenti, Henri; Quéré, Fabien

    2016-10-01

    Accelerating electrons in the > 10 TV/m fields inside an ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse has been a long-standing goal in experimental physics, motivated by promising theoretical predictions. The biggest hurdle was to have electrons injected in the center of the laser pulse. Recent experimental and numerical results showed that this problem could be solved using a plasma mirror, i.e. an overdense plasma with a sharp (<laser wavelength) density gradient on its front side, leading to a 10 MeV 3 nC electron beam. Using particle-in-cell simulations, the ejection process was identified as a push-pull mechanism occuring at each laser period, resulting in a train of attosecond electron bunches injected in the reflected field. We present a study and a model of this process, and show the gradient characteristic length is the crucial parameter for this phenomenon. Finally, the electron ejection process was put into perspective with respect to the high harmonic generation mechanisms on plasma mirrors, giving new insights into the motion of the plasma mirror surface. funded by the European Research Council, Contract No. 306708, ERC Starting Grant FEMTOELEC.

  20. Undulator radiation driven by laser-wakefield accelerator electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Anania, M. P.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Reboredo, D.; Manahan, G.; Grant, D. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Laser-Plasma High-Energy Accelerators towards X-rays (ALPHA-X) programme is developing laserplasma accelerators for the production of ultra-short electron bunches with subsequent generation of coherent, bright, short-wavelength radiation pulses. The new Scottish Centre for the Application of Plasma-based Accelerators (SCAPA) will develop a wide range of applications utilising such light sources. Electron bunches can be propagated through a magnetic undulator with the aim of generating fully coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation in the ultra-violet and Xrays spectral ranges. Demonstration experiments producing spontaneous undulator radiation have been conducted at visible and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths but it is an on-going challenge to generate and maintain electron bunches of sufficient quality in order to stimulate FEL behaviour. In the ALPHA-X beam line experiments, a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser system with peak power 20 TW has been used to generate electron bunches of energy 80-150 MeV in a 2 mm gas jet laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and these bunches have been transported through a 100 period planar undulator. High peak brilliance, narrow band spontaneous radiation pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet wavelength range have been generated. Analysis is provided with respect to the magnetic quadrupole beam transport system and subsequent effect on beam emittance and duration. Requirements for coherent spontaneous emission and FEL operation are presented.

  1. Cold electron sources using laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of electron diffraction in 1927, electrons have been used to probe the structure of matter. High-brightness sources of thermal electrons have recently emerged that are capable of simultaneously providing high spatial resolving power along with ultrafast temporal resolution, however they are yet to demonstrate the holy grail of single-shot diffraction of non-crystalline objects. The development of the cold atom electron source, based around the ionisation of laser cooled atoms, has the potential to contribute to this goal. Electron generation from laser cooled atoms is in its infancy, but in just ten years has moved from a proposal to a source capable of performing single-shot diffraction imaging of crystalline structures. The high brightness, high transverse coherence length, and small energy spread of cold electron sources are also potentially advantageous for applications ranging from seeding of x-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons to coherent diffractive imaging and microscopy. In this review we discuss the context which motivates the development of these sources, the operating principles of the source, and recent experimental results. The achievements demonstrated thus far combined with theoretical proposals to alleviate current bottlenecks in development promise a bright future for these sources.

  2. Scientific applications of frequency-stabilized laser technology in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumaker, Bonny L.

    1990-01-01

    A synoptic investigation of the uses of frequency-stabilized lasers for scientific applications in space is presented. It begins by summarizing properties of lasers, characterizing their frequency stability, and describing limitations and techniques to achieve certain levels of frequency stability. Limits to precision set by laser frequency stability for various kinds of measurements are investigated and compared with other sources of error. These other sources include photon-counting statistics, scattered laser light, fluctuations in laser power, and intensity distribution across the beam, propagation effects, mechanical and thermal noise, and radiation pressure. Methods are explored to improve the sensitivity of laser-based interferometric and range-rate measurements. Several specific types of science experiments that rely on highly precise measurements made with lasers are analyzed, and anticipated errors and overall performance are discussed. Qualitative descriptions are given of a number of other possible science applications involving frequency-stabilized lasers and related laser technology in space. These applications will warrant more careful analysis as technology develops.

  3. Laser manufacturing for transparent, flexible and stretchable electronics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shutong; Yu, Yongchao; Feng, Guoying; Hu, Anming

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the interaction between femotsecond laser and polyimide with a high repetition femtosecond fiber laser and a precisely motorized 3D stage. We have found that high repetition femtosecond laser pulse train can effectively fabricate double-layer electrical conductive tracks inside a polyimide (PI) sheets by a single-time irradiation. This interaction comprised multi-photon absorption, dissociation of polymer molecules and the thermal accumulation. The experiment unveiled that dual-layer carbonization was a consequence of an inside micro-lens formed instantly as laser was just focused into the inside of polyimide. This micro-lens further focused the subsequent laser pulse to carbonize the polymer through multi-photon excitation, bond breaking and graphite layer reformation and eventually form the second electronic conductive layer. The second conductive layer was generated below the focal point. With the laser irradiating is kept at the same height, the top layer at the focused plane continued to absorb laser energy then carbonized into the conductive layer. We called the process as a kind of self-focusing phenomenon. We study the focus effect of inside microlenses under different laser powers and irradiation times. The gap of double electronic tracks embedded in the polyimide matrix can be adjusted with the laser processing parameters. When the gap is more than 30 micrometer, two conductive layers are electrically insulating. While the gap is smaller than 10 micrometer, two conductive layers are electrically connected. Various applications, such as, supercapacitors, capacitive sensors and the field effect transistors were investigated in the flexible PI sheets using this 3D double-layer electrical conductive architecture.

  4. Electron-phonon equilibration in laser-heated gold films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, T. G.; Mabey, P.; Gericke, D. O.; Hartley, N. J.; Doyle, H. W.; McGonegle, D.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Higginbotham, A.; Gregori, G.

    2014-07-01

    By irradiating a thin metal foil with an intense short-pulse laser, we have created a uniform system far from equilibrium. The deposited energy is initially deposited only within the electronic subsystem, and the subsequent evolution of the system is determined by the details of the electron-phonon coupling. Here, we measure the time evolution of the lattice parameter through multilayer Bragg diffraction and compare the result to classical molecular dynamic simulations to determine the lattice temperature. The electron-ion coupling constant for gold is then determined by comparison with the evolution of a two-temperature electron-phonon system.

  5. Novel concepts for laser-plasma-based acceleration of electrons using ultrahigh power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon-Koo

    Analytical and numerical studies of plasma physics in ultra-intense plasma wave generation, electron injection, and wavebreaking are performed, which are relevant to the subject of plasma wake-field accelerators. A method for generating large-amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, which utilizes an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses, is analyzed in one dimension both theoretically and numerically (using both Maxwell-fluid and particle-in-cell codes). Optimal pulse widths and interpulse spacings are computed for pulses with either square or finite-rise-time sine shapes. A resonant region of the plasma-wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. Resonant excitation is found to be superior for electron acceleration to either beatwave or single- pulse excitation because comparable plasma wave amplitudes may be generated at lower plasma densities, reducing electron-phase detuning, or at lower laser intensities, reducing laser-plasma instabilities. The idea of all-optical acceleration of electrons in the wakefield is also discussed. It is shown that the injection of background plasma electrons can be accomplished using the large ponderomotive force of an injection laser pulse in either collinear or transverse geometry with respect to the direction of pump propagation, thus removing the necessity of an expensive first-stage linac system for injection of electrons. Detailed nonlinear analysis of the trapping and acceleration of electrons inside the separatrix of the wakefield is formulated and compared with PIC (Particle- In-Cell) and fluid simulations. The three-dimensional wave-breaking of relativistic plasma waves driven by a ultrashort high-power lasers, is described within a framework of cold 2-D fluid theory. It is shown that the transverse nonlinearity of the plasma wave results in temporally increasing transverse plasma oscillation in the wake of the laser pulse, inevitably inducing wave

  6. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-06-28

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  7. Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces: Fundamental science empowering advances in technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-06-01

    Electron collisions with atoms, ions, molecules, and surfaces are critically important to the understanding and modeling of low-temperature plasmas (LTPs), and so in the development of technologies based on LTPs. Recent progress in obtaining experimental benchmark data and the development of highly sophisticated computational methods is highlighted. With the cesium-based diode-pumped alkali laser and remote plasma etching of Si3N4 as examples, we demonstrate how accurate and comprehensive datasets for electron collisions enable complex modeling of plasma-using technologies that empower our high-technology-based society.

  8. New laser technologies in the clinic of neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupak, V. V.; Fomichev, N. G.; Tsvetovsky, S. B.; Dmitriev, A. B.; Kobosev, V. V.; Bagaev, S. N.; Mayorov, A. P.; Struts, S. G.

    2005-08-01

    In report summarized more then 10 experience of authors in Novosibirsk Traumatology and orthopedics research institute Neurosurgery clinic on usage of laser technologies in treatment of central nervous system tumors. On the basis of ND-YAG laser application original technologies have been developed and used in surgical treatment of patients with various neurosurgical pathology and protected by 8 Patents of the Russian Federation. 427 patients were operated on with the use of YAG:Nd3+ laser. Out of them 152 patients had extracerebral tumors of various volume and localization, 135 patients - spinal cord tumors, 74 patients - a pathology of cerebrospinal transition (Amold-Chiari syndrome of 1-2 types), and 66 patients - intramedullary tumors of deep localization. Results showed good results of laser technologies usage for central nervous system tumors removal.

  9. Irreversible reactions studied with nanosecond transmission electron microscopy movies: Laser crystallization of phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santala, M. K.; Reed, B. W.; Raoux, S.; Topuria, T.; LaGrange, T.; Campbell, G. H.

    2013-04-01

    We use multi-frame, nanosecond-scale photo-emission transmission electron microscopy to create movies of irreversible reactions that occur too rapidly to capture with conventional microscopy. The technique is applied to the crystallization of phase change materials used for optical and resistive memory. For those applications, laser- or current-induced crystallization is orders of magnitude too fast to capture with other imaging techniques. We recorded movies of laser-induced crystallization and measured crystal growth rates at temperatures close to where the maximum growth rate occurs. This paves the way for studying crystallization kinetics of phase change materials over the whole range of technologically relevant temperatures.

  10. Forensic Applications Of Copper Laser Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, Edward R.

    1987-04-01

    Copper vapor lasers are being used in forensic applications at more than thirty regional, state and national level forensic science laboratories (crime labs) in the United States, Israel and Japan. These high gain lasing medium systems provide desirable operational and maintenance features. The green line produced by copper vapor lasers allows use of latent fingerprint inherent and chemically induced luminescence techniques developed for argon ion lasers. The yellow line has developed latent fingerprints which would not luminesce at blue-green wavelengths, and is better suited for some forensic examinations such as ink differentiation involving forgeries and document alterations.

  11. Synergistic Direct/Wakefield Acceleration of Plasma Electrons In the Plasma Bubble Regime Using Tailored Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    The integration of direct laser acceleration (DLA) and laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) is a new approach to plasma-based acceleration that confers several benefits over both schemes taken separately. Such integration requires a significant portion of the laser energy (e.g., a separate laser pulse) to trail the main bubble-producing laser pulse, and resonantly interact with the trapped accelerated electrons undergoing betatron motion inside the plasma bubble. I will demonstrate how electron dephasing from the accelerating wakefield, which is one of the key limitations of LWFA, is reduced by their growing undulating motion. Moreover, the distinct energy gains from wake and the laser pulse are compounding, thereby increasing the total energy gain. Even more significant increases of the overall acceleration can be obtained by moving away from single-frequency laser format toward combining mid-infrared laser pulses for plasma bubble generation with short-wavelength trailing pulses for DLA. Various injection mechanisms, such as ionization injection, external injection, self-injection, and their advantages will also be discussed. Translating these new concepts into specific experiments will take advantage of recent technological advances in synchronizing laser and electron beams, and using multiple beamlines for producing sophisticated laser pulse formats.

  12. Research of laser cleaning technology for steam generator tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Suixa; Luo, Jijun; Xu, Jun; Yuan, Bo

    2010-10-01

    Surface cleaning based on the laser-induced breakdown of gas and subsequent shock wave generation can remove small particles from solid surfaces. Accordingly, several studies in steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants were performed to expand the cleaning capability of the process. In this work, experimental apparatus of laser cleaning was designed in order to clean heat tubes in steam generator. The laser cleaning process is monitored by analyzing acoustic emission signal experimentally. Experiments demonstrate that laser cleaning can remove smaller particles from the surface of steam generator tubes better than other cleaning process. It has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource, and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes, which can be real-time monitoring in laser cleaning process of heat tubes by AE signal. As a green cleaning process, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect.

  13. Laser Assisted Emittance Exchange: Downsizing the X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    A technique is proposed to generate electron beam with ultralow transverse emittance through laser assisted transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange. In the scheme a laser operating in the TEM10 mode is used to interact with the electron beam in a dispersive region and to initiate the emittance exchange. It is shown that with the proposed technique one can significantly downsize an x-ray free electron laser (FEL), which may greatly extend the availability of these light sources. A hard x-ray FEL operating at 1.5 {angstrom} with a saturation length within 30 meters using a 3.8 GeV electron beam is shown to be practically feasible.

  14. Inverse Free Electron Laser Interactions with Sub-Picosecond High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Joshua Timothy

    Advanced accelerators have great promise in reducing the size and cost of high energy colliders as well as bringing high brightness x-ray sources to the laboratory tabletop scale. The inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is a high gradient advanced accelerator scheme that is one of the most ecient ways of transferring energy from a laser to an electron beam. By copropagating a laser and a relativistic electron beam through an undulator in vacuum and taking advantage of resonant ponderomotive motion of the electron beam, IFEL avoids the breakdown associated with other schemes that use a material to couple the laser fields to the electron beams. This dissertation provides an overview of IFEL, the photoinjector electron beams to be used in IFEL interactions, and two IFEL applications: compression and synchronization of a photoinjector electron beam to a laser application using THz driven IFEL and high gradient acceleration using IFEL. The numerically investigated THz IFEL application shows that with a 10 microJ THz 8 pulse train, an electron beam bunch length of 100 fs RMS can be compressed to 14 fs RMS and have the beam's time of arrival jitter relative to an external laser reduced by an order of magnitude. High gradient acceleration by IFEL was examined experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This experiment marks the first attempt to use sub-picosecond time pulse, TW peak power scale titanium:sapphire laser pulses to perform IFEL acceleration. The demonstrated energy gain from 77 to 120 MeV combined with particle tracking simulations shows an accelerating gradient of over 200 MeV/m. Because the laser pulse length is the same order as the slippage experienced by the electron beam with respect to the laser and the time of arrival jitter has been measured to be greater than 2 ps, the overlap is investigated through relative single shot time of arrival measurements using electro-optic sampling based spatial encoding techniques. The temporal

  15. Multidimensional simulations of the ELFA superradiant free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.; Sharp, W. M.

    1991-07-01

    ELFA (electron laser facility for acceleration) is a high-gain, microwave ( ν = 100 GHz) free electron laser (FEL) facility driven by an rf linac. ELFA will test the existence of the theoretically predicted regimes of strong and weak superradiance. Both regimes can be studied with the same FEL by changing the height of the interaction waveguide, which controls the radiation group velocity, and thus the relative slippage between electrons and photons. The operation of ELFA has been modeled using a modified version of the two-dimensional, time-dependent sideband code GINGER. The simulations take into account the time and space variations of the radiation field, as well as the space charge and transverse emittance of the electron beam. The sensitivity of the superradiant signal to variations of the beam emittance, energy and energy spread is examined.

  16. Evolution of relativistic electron vortices in laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezhnin, Kirill V.; Kniazev, Alexey R.; Soloviev, Sergei V.; Kamenets, Fedor F.; Weber, Stefan A.; Korn, Georg; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Bulanov, Sergei V.

    2017-05-01

    Electron vortices appear in the wake of a finite length laser pulse propogating in the underdense plasma. Usually they form two chains of vortices with opposite signs of the magnetic fields locked inside an electron cavity. Using 2D PIC simulations, we discuss the effects of evolution of single and binary electron vortices. Single electron vortices, though being in a quasistationary state on electron timescales, evolve on ion timescales, leading to anisotropic multishell ion motion. Binary electron vortices may be subject to complex motions, which can be described by the point-vortex solutions of Hasegawa-Mima equation. When the finite radius effects come into play, we observe effects as magnetic field annihilation with the subsequent fast electron bunch generation and secondary vortex formation.

  17. An inverse free electron laser accelerator: Experiment and theoretical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jyan-Min

    Experimental and numerical studies of the Inverse Free Electron Laser using a GW-level 10.6 /mu m CO2 laser have been carried out at Brookhaven's Accelerator Test Facility. An energy gain of 2.5% ([/Delta E/over E]) on a 40 MeV electron beam has been observed which compares well with theory. The effects on IFEL acceleration with respect to the variation of the laser electric field, the input electron beam energy, and the wiggler magnetic field strength were studied, and show the importance of matching the resonance condition in the IFEL. The numerical simulations were perforated under various conditions and the importance of the electron bunching in the IFEL is shown. The numerical interpretation of our IFEL experimental results was examined. Although good numerical agreement with the experimental results was obtained, there is a discrepancy between the level of the laser power measured in the experiment and used in the simulation, possibly due to the non-Gaussian profile of the input high power laser beam. The electron energy distribution was studied numerically and a smoothing of the energy spectrum by the space charge effect at the location of the spectrometer was found, compared with the spectrum at the exit of the wiggler. The electron bunching by the IFEL and the possibility of using the IFEL as an electron prebuncher for another laser-driven accelerator were studied numerically. We found that bunching of the electrons at 1 meter downstream from the wiggler can be achieved using the existing facility. The simulation shows that there is a fundamental difference between the operating conditions for using the IFEL as a high gradient accelerator, and as a prebuncher for another accelerator. For a high gradient accelerator, the IFEL requires the bunching of the electrons inside the wiggler for optimal energy gain, whereas using the IFEL as a prebuncher for another accelerator, a moderate energy gain may be sufficient for the best electron bunching results at a

  18. Electronic/electric technology benefits study. [avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howison, W. W.; Cronin, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits and payoffs of advanced electronic/electric technologies were investigated for three types of aircraft. The technologies, evaluated in each of the three airplanes, included advanced flight controls, advanced secondary power, advanced avionic complements, new cockpit displays, and advanced air traffic control techniques. For the advanced flight controls, the near term considered relaxed static stability (RSS) with mechanical backup. The far term considered an advanced fly by wire system for a longitudinally unstable airplane. In the case of the secondary power systems, trades were made in two steps: in the near term, engine bleed was eliminated; in the far term bleed air, air plus hydraulics were eliminated. Using three commercial aircraft, in the 150, 350, and 700 passenger range, the technology value and pay-offs were quantified, with emphasis on the fiscal benefits. Weight reductions deriving from fuel saving and other system improvements were identified and the weight savings were cycled for their impact on TOGW (takeoff gross weight) and upon the performance of the airframes/engines. Maintenance, reliability, and logistic support were the other criteria.

  19. Electron acceleration by laser fields in a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. R.

    1991-09-01

    The strong fields lasers can produce allow high energy acceleration of charged particles. As the phase velocity of the fields cannot be matched in vacuum to the particle velocity, cumulative interaction over arbitrarily long straight trajectories is impossible. However, over limited regions a large energy gain as well as considerable focusing action can be achieved with suitably shaped laser beams. Away from boundaries, all laser fields consist of superpositions of plane wave components. We describe the properties of several practical configurations, beginning with a single plane wave. Only straight particle trajectories are considered in this analysis and it is assumed the energy is large enough so their speed is nearly constant and very close to that of light. The particles considered are electrons. The physical limitation of the interaction region may be obtained by reflecting surfaces which generate no evanescent waves, with the electron beam crossing the boundaries through holes small enough not to disturb the fields. The laser power density over these reflectors could impose a practical limit to field intensity in the interaction region. An alternative way to limit the interaction range is by bending magnets to deflect the electrons; but the energy radiated must then be taken into consideration. In the rest of this paper, no further discussion is given of interaction region boundaries, although they must be present in every case. This paper contains a quantitative analysis of the acceleration and focusing properties of a particular laser configuration, and discusses means of extending the useful interaction range by phase compensation surfaces.

  20. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  1. Emittance measurements from a laser-driven electron injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, David A.

    1999-11-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 Å, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately I π mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance- compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, S-band, high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be ~13 π mm-mrad for 5 ps, and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.15 π mm-mrad.

  2. Short energetic electron bunches from laser wakefield accelerator with orthogonally polarized perpendicularly crossed laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej; Krůs, Miroslav

    2017-05-01

    Electron acceleration with optical injection by a perpendicularly propagating and orthogonally polarized low intensity laser pulse into a nonlinear plasma wave driven by a short intense laser pulse was explored by particle- in-cell simulations. The scheme presented here provides an energetic electron bunch in the first ion cavity with a low energy spread. The electron bunch short and compact, with the mean energy about 400 MeV and a low energy spread about 10 MeV in time of 6 ps of acceleration. The injected charge is several tens of pC for the low intensity of the injection pulse. Initial positions of electrons forming the energetic bunch are shown and then these electrons are followed during the simulation in order to understand the injection process and determine electron bunch properties.

  3. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  4. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  5. Laser thermographic technologies for hard copy recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmel'tsev, Viktor P.; Baev, Sergej G.

    1995-04-01

    Methods of hard copies recording based on thermal interaction of the beam from CO2 or YAG lasers with various kinds of films on any substrates have been developed. The recording processes are single-step and require no additional development. Among them are: (1) Laser thermodestruction of thin mask layers or of a material surface on any kinds of substrates. (2) Laser thermochemical reactions of thermal decomposition of metal salts in solid state phase on a surface of various hygroscopic substrates. The laser recording devices using the methods, described above have been developed and are manufactured now; they allow one to record hard copies with a size of up to 27 X 31 inches, a resolution of 4000 dpi.

  6. Advances in tunable diode laser technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, W.

    1980-01-01

    The improvement of long-term reliability, the purification of mode properties, and the achievement of higher-temperature operation were examined. In reliability studies a slow increase in contact resistance during room temperature storage for lasers fabricated with In-Au or In-Pt contacts was observed. This increase is actually caused by the diffusion of In into the surface layer of laser crystals. By using a three layered structure of In-Au-Pt or In-Pt-Au, this mode of degradation was reduced. In characterizing the mode properties, it was found that the lasers emit in a highly localized, filamentary manner. For widestripe lasers the emission occurs near the corners of the junction. In order to achieve single-mode operation, stripe widths on the order of 8-10 micrometers are needed. Also, it was found that room temperature electroluminescence is possible near 4.6 micrometers.

  7. Quantum/classical mode evolution in free electron laser oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, P.; Colson, W. B.; Freedman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of oscillator evolution and mode competition in free electron lasers is studied. Relativistic quantum field theory is used to calculate electron wave functions, the angular distribution of spontaneous emission, and the transition rates for stimulated emission and absorption in each mode. The photon rate equation for the weakfield regime is presented. This rate equation is applied to oscillator evolution with a conventional undulator, a two-stage optical klystron, and a tapered undulator. The effects of noise are briefly discussed.

  8. Quantum/classical mode evolution in free electron laser oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, P.; Colson, W. B.; Freedman, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of oscillator evolution and mode competition in free electron lasers is studied. Relativistic quantum field theory is used to calculate electron wave functions, the angular distribution of spontaneous emission, and the transition rates for stimulated emission and absorption in each mode. The photon rate equation for the weakfield regime is presented. This rate equation is applied to oscillator evolution with a conventional undulator, a two-stage optical klystron, and a tapered undulator. The effects of noise are briefly discussed.

  9. Study on a novel Smith Purcell free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghong; Xiao, Xiaoguang; Chen, Jiayu; Wei, Yanyu

    2005-10-01

    A novel Smith Purcell (SP) free-electron laser (FEL) with axial-symmetrical structure is proposed. The distribution of the high frequency field in the resonator is analyzed and the operating frequency and output power are also studied by the use of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation method. Results indicate that coherent radiation with output peak power up to 58 MW at millimeter wavelengths can be generated by using relativistic electron beams of moderate energy.

  10. High-Power Amplifier Free Electron Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    field amplitude 0 2a a= = . The separatrix is plotted in red and the paths of the electron are plotted with a yellow to red gradient. The separatrix...Focusing and Oscillation In this figure, the electron beam (shown in red ) enters at an angle that would lead to transverse beam drift along the... Wiggler Input Energy Spread (%) 0.02 Bunch Charge (nC) 1.4 Wiggler Period (mm) 32.5 PRF (MHz) 357 Wiggler Length (m) 3.9 Average Beam Current (A) 0.5

  11. Laser-driven electron beam generation for secondary photon sources with few terawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohacek, K.; Chaulagain, U.; Horny, V.; Kozlova, M.; Krus, M.; Nejdl, J.

    2017-05-01

    Relativistic electron beams accelerated by laser wakefield have the ability to serve as sources of collimated, point-like and femtosecond X-ray radiation. Experimental conditions for generation of stable quasi-monoenergetic electron bunches using a femtosecond few-terawatt laser pulse (600 mJ, 50 fs) were investigated as they are crucial for generation of stable betatron radiation and X-ray pulses from inverse Compton scattering. A mixture of helium with argon, and helium with an admixture of synthetic air were tested for this purpose using different backing pressures and the obtained results are compared. The approach to use synthetic air was previously proven to stabilize the energy and energy spread of the generated electron beams at the given laser power. The accelerator was operated in nonlinear regime with forced self-injection and resulted in the generation of stable relativistic electron beams with an energy of tens of MeV and betatron X-ray radiation was generated in the keV range. A razor blade was tested to create a steep density gradient in order to improve the stability of electron injection and to increase the total electron bunch charge. It was proven that the stable electron and X-ray source can be built at small-scale facilities, which readily opens possibilities for various applications due to availability of such few-terawatt laser systems in many laboratories around the world.

  12. Plans for a far-infrared free-electron laser in India

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnagopal, S.; Kumar, V.; Ramamurthi, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Centre for Advanced Technology is building the INDUS complex of synchrotron radiation sources. As part of this programme it is also proposed to build a far-infrared free-electron laser oscillator. This will use a microtron injector and a 40 period undulator made of NdFeB permanent magnets, and is designed to law around 200 microns. We discuss details of the FEL design and the present status of experimental activities on this front.

  13. Development of a Curriculum in Laser Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, William J.

    A Seattle Central Community College project visited existing programs, surveyed need, and developed a curriculum for a future program in Laser-Electro-Optics (LEO) Technology. To establish contacts and view successful programs, project staff made visits to LEO technology programs at San Jose City College and Texas State Technical Institute, Center…

  14. Development of a Curriculum in Laser Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, William J.

    A Seattle Central Community College project visited existing programs, surveyed need, and developed a curriculum for a future program in Laser-Electro-Optics (LEO) Technology. To establish contacts and view successful programs, project staff made visits to LEO technology programs at San Jose City College and Texas State Technical Institute, Center…

  15. Drift mechanism of laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgovsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced electron acceleration in vacuum is possible due to the ejection of electrons from the beam as a consequence of the transverse drift orthogonal to the propagation direction. The transverse drift is derived from the general solution of the equations of motion of the electrons in the field of a plane electromagnetic wave with arbitrary polarization. It is shown that the energy gain is proportional to the square of the field strength additionally modulated by the function of the injection and ejection phases. In particular, for a linearly polarized beam this function is reduced to the squared difference between the cosines of these phases. The finite laser pulse duration restricts the range of the field strength suitable for direct electron acceleration in vacuum within certain limits. It is demonstrated that the high efficiency of energy transfer from the laser wave into the kinetic energy of the accelerated electrons demands phase matching between the electron quiver phase at the exit point and the phase of the energy transfer.

  16. Optimization of electron-beam pumped excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowum, T. F.; Swecker, J. L.

    The output energy of an electron-beam pumped xenon flouride laser has been enhanced by optimizing certain electron-gun and gas-mix parameters. The optimized e-gun parameters include anode-cathode spacing, magnetic field strength, and cathode voltage. The optimized laser gas parameters include NF3 concentration, Xe concentration, and total pressure. The shortest anode-cathode spacing (9 cm), the strongest magnetic guide field (1600 Gauss), and the highest cathode voltage (375 kV) gave the highest laser output. The optimum gas concentrations were 0.05 percent NF3, 0.3 percent Xe, with Ne added to bring the total gas pressure to 60 psia. The energy degraded by 2 percent per shot with this gas mix.

  17. Laser pulse evolution and electron acceleration in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esarey, Eric

    2000-04-01

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators(For a review see, E. Esarey et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 24, 252 (1996).) require the propagation of intense laser pulses over long distances in plasmas, the generation of large amplitude wakefields, and the injection and acceleration of electrons. This talk will discuss the nonlinear propagation of short laser pulses in plasmas, with or without channels. Non-paraxial effects will be analyzed and simulated, including finite pulse duration, finite group velocity, and dispersion(E. Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted.). These effects on the evolution of the forward Raman and self-modulation instabilities, that lead the generation of wakefields, will be examined. Also discussed are methods for self-trapping and injecting electrons into the wakefield. Application to ongoing experiments at LBNL(W.P. Leemans et al., Phys. Plasma 5, 1615 (1998); in preparation.) will be discussed.

  18. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav; Fawley, William; Schroeder, Carl; Bartolini, Riccardo; Hooker, Simon

    2011-03-10

    The longitudinal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be enhanced by seeding the FEL with high harmonics of an optical laser pulse. The radiation produced by high-harmonic generation (HHG), however, has a fast-varying temporal profile that can violate the slowly varying envelope approximation and limited frequency window that is employed in conventional free-electron laser simulation codes. Here we investigate the implications of violating this approximation on the accuracy of simulations. On the basis of both analytical considerations and 1D numerical studies, it is concluded that, for most realistic scenarios, conventional FEL codes are capable of accurately simulating the FEL process even when the seed radiation violates the slowly varying envelope approximation. We additionally discuss the significance of filtering the harmonic content of broadband HHG seeds.

  19. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duris, J. P.; Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  20. Fiber optic sensors in the laser optical engineering technology laboratories at the Oregon Institute of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corones, John C.; Pierce, Robert M.

    1995-04-01

    Optical fibers are finding increasing application in feedback and control systems, medical, industrial, illumination and imaging applications, discrete, as well as distributed sensors and networks. In addition to a course in optical fiber principles and components, a fiber optic systems and applications course designed for both electronics and optical engineering technology students has been created at the Oregon Institute of Technology, in the Laser Optical Engineering Technology (LOET) Department. The systems and applications course is designed to illustrate the benefits of using fibers in communications and sensing, as well as to provide hands-on exposure to concepts of test, measurement, and calibration of fiber-optic components and instrumentation. In the laboratories of both courses, optical fiber sensor experiments are used to teach such concepts as selection and testing of components, design and assembly of transducers, system integration, testing, characterization, and optimization. These two mandatory courses provide an excellent introduction to optical fiber technology and applications. The courses exist primarily due to an NSF-OIT grant, however, companies have made significant contributions of hardware to the program. As a result, over $350 K of fiber optics components and instrumentation now are available for senior-students' use, to develop unique, year-long projects.