Science.gov

Sample records for electron microscopic observations

  1. Electron microscopic observations of human hair medulla.

    PubMed

    de Cássia Comis Wagner, Rita; Kiyohara, Pedro Kunihiko; Silveira, Marina; Joekes, Inés

    2007-04-01

    In the study of human hair, medulla is the less studied structure because it is believed that it has no influence on the fibre properties. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the better understanding of medulla morphology. Using reproducible methods for hair samples preparations allowed observing the inner fibre by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Three medulla subunits were observed in cryofractured samples. In addition, the application of plasma etching on samples allowed accessing chemical differences between them. Two kinds of medulla were identified using stereomicroscopy: thin and thick medulla. They were morphologically differentiated using TEM. These methods can be used to study systematically the effects of medulla on hair properties and to evaluate the efficiency of cosmetic products.

  2. Observation of a vacuum tunnel gap in a transmission electron microscope using a micromechanical tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutwyche, M. I.; Wada, Y.

    1995-05-01

    This letter reports the observation of the vacuum tunnel gap between two conductors using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. A 2.5 mm square micromachined tunneling microscope chip has been fabricated with a minimum feature size of 0.4 μm. The chip fits into a modified side-entry type transmission electron microscope holder. The tunnel gap is controlled by a purpose-built feedback controller. The micromachines work reliably during observation of the tip apex in a transmission electron microscope, allowing the voltage and current to be changed while the tunnel gap is observed.

  3. Observation of Materials Processes in Liquids in the Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chong M.; Liao, Honggang; Ross, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    Materials synthesis and the functioning of devices often indispensably involve liquid media. But direct visualization of dynamic process in liquids, especially with high spatial and temporal resolution, has been challenging. For solid materials, advances in aberration corrected electron microscopy have made observation of atomic level features a routine practice. Here we discuss the extent to which one can take advantage of the resolution of modern electron microscopes to image phenomenon occuring in liquids. We will describe the fundamentals of two different experimental approaches, closed and open liquid cells. We will illustrate the capabilities of each approach by considering processes in batteries and nucleation and growth of nanoparticles from solution. We conclude that liquid cell electron microscopy appears to be duly fulfilling its role for in situ studies of nanoscale processes in liquids, revealing physical and chemical processes otherwise difficult to observe.

  4. Scanning electron microscopic observations of Anopheles albimanus (Diptera: Culicidae) eggs.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M H; Chavez, B; Orozco, A; Loyola, E G; Martinez-Palomo, A

    1992-05-01

    To investigate the existence of subspecies of Anopheles albimanus Wiedeman in southern Mexico, the egg morphology of specimens obtained from several field populations and from insectary-adapted colonies of uniform pupal phenotype was examined. Scanning electron microscopic observations have shown that the eggs of An. albimanus are polymorphic in respect to the size and shape of their floats, but not in their ornamentation. Four types of eggs were found. Differences in the proportion of the various morphological types were statistically significant, although proportions of egg types were variable among individuals within the same population. These observations are suggestive of distinctive populations and warrant further studies using more sensitive methods to investigate sibling species in An. albimanus sensu lato.

  5. Electron microscopic observations of terminals of functionally identified afferent fibers in cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Egger, M D; Freeman, N C; Malamed, S; Masarachia, P; Proshansky, E

    1981-02-23

    Using the method of intra-axonal injection of horseradish peroxidase, functionally identified afferent fibers from three slowly adapting (Type I) receptors and one Pacinian corpuscle in the glabrous skin of the hind paw of the cat were stained. Electron microscopic observation of the terminals of these fibers revealed predominantly axodendritic asymmetric synapses containing round, clear vesicles. Multiple synapses on a single dendrite were observed, separated by as little as 900 mm from one another.

  6. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  7. Improved specimen coating technique for scanning electron microscope observation of decomposer microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Draggan, S

    1976-02-01

    Sputter coating of leaf litter microbe samples provides scanning electron microscope images with greater information content than either vacuum evaporation of thin metal coatings or tissue conductance.

  8. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

  9. Electron microscopic observation of the sagittal structure of Drosophila mature sperm.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, Yusaku; Yamamoto, Masa-Toshi

    2014-09-01

    Observation of sperm development and determination of their morphological characteristics are very important to the understanding of phylogenetic relationships and the study of sperm function during fertilization. Although ultrastructural studies of sperm development in the testes of the fruit fly Drosophila have been performed, there are few reports describing electron microscopic morphology of mature sperm, that is, those released from the testes to the seminal vesicles. Here, we present the first report of the sagittal organization of Drosophila sperm head and neck regions by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The head and tail structures of a mature sperm, for example, the acrosome, nucleus, and flagellum, were easy to distinguish by the morphological characteristics of the sperm surface by SEM. The morphological relationships between the surface and internal structures of mature sperm were confirmed by observing longitudinal sections with TEM. Our approach overcame the technical difficulties involved in sample preparation for electron microscopic observation of the Drosophila mature sperm head, and therefore, this study serves as an important foundation for future genetic dissection of sperm ultrastructure and function in male sterile mutants.

  10. Investigation of Sterilization Effect by various Gas Plasmas and Electron Microscopic Observation of Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yota; Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Oshita, Takaya; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi; Ikeda, Keiko; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Kohno, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric non-thermal plasmas have attracted attention as a new sterilization method. It is considered that factor of plasma sterilization are mainly reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the sterilization mechanism hasn't been investigated in detail because conventional plasma sources have a limitation in usable gas species and lack variety of ROS. So we developed multi-gas plasma jet which can generate various gas plasmas. In this study, investigation of sterilization effect by various gas plasmas and electron microscopic observation of bacteria were performed. Oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon and air were used as plasma gas. To investigate gas-species dependence of sterilization effect, S.aureus was treated. As a result, nitrogen plasma and carbon dioxide plasma were effective for sterilization. To investigate sterilization mechanism, the surface of S.aureus was observed by scanning electron microscope. As a result, dimples were observed on the surface after irradiation of nitrogen plasma, but no change observed in the case of carbon dioxide plasma. These results suggest that bactericidal mechanism of nitrogen and carbon dioxide plasma should be different. In the presentation, Measurement result of ROS will be reported.

  11. Study on Image Drift Induced by Charging during Observation by Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Sohda, Yasunari

    2012-06-01

    The mechanism of image drift in the observation of a boundary between a metal and an insulator by scanning electron microscope (SEM) is clarified by electron-trajectory simulation and experiment. In the region involving a straight boundary between a large-area metal layer and an insulating substrate, the largest image drift is expected to be observed owing to an asymmetric charging on the sample surface. The simulation result shows that a metal-insulator boundary in the SEM image shifts toward the metal part over several seconds, which is induced by a positively charged area outside of the irradiation region in the insulator part. This simulation result is confirmed to qualitatively coincide with the experimental one. In addition, we demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the image drift can be controlled by changing the charging voltage of the insulating substrate by applying a bias voltage to the anode facing the sample surface.

  12. Transmission electron microscopic observations of nanobubbles and their capture of impurities in wastewater

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Unique properties of micro- and nanobubbles (MNBs), such as a high adsorption of impurities on their surface, are difficult to verify because MNBs are too small to observe directly. We thus used a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the freeze-fractured replica method to observe oxygen (O2) MNBs in solutions. MNBs in pure water and in 1% NaCl solutions were spherical or oval. Their size distribution estimated from TEM images close to that of the original solution is measured by light-scattered methods. When we applied this technique to the observation of O2 MNBs formed in the wastewater of a sewage plant, we found the characteristic features of spherical MNBs that adsorbed surrounding impurity particles on their surface. PACS: 68.03.-g, 81.07.-b, 92.40.qc PMID:21711798

  13. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  14. High resolution transmission electron microscopic in-situ observations of plastic deformation of compressed nanocrystalline gold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guoyong; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-09-14

    Nanocrystalline (nc) metals possess extremely high strength, while their capability to deform plastically has been debated for decades. Low ductility has hitherto been considered an intrinsic behavior for most nc metals, due to the lack of five independent slip systems actively operating during deformation in each nanograin. Here we report in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) observations of deformation process of nc gold under compression, showing the excellent ductility of individual and aggregate nanograins. Compression causes permanent change in the profile of individual nanograins, which is mediated by dislocation slip and grain rotation. The high rate of grain boundary sliding and large extent of widely exited grain rotation may meet the boundary compatibility requirements during plastic deformation. The in situ HRTEM observations suggest that nc gold is not intrinsically brittle under compressive loading.

  15. High resolution transmission electron microscope observation of zero-strain deformation twinning mechanisms in Ag.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, J; Gong, S K; Mao, S X

    2011-04-29

    We have observed a new deformation-twinning mechanism using the high resolution transmission electron microscope in polycrystalline Ag films, zero-strain twinning via nucleation, and the migration of a Σ3{112} incoherent twin boundary (ITB). This twinning mechanism produces a near zero macroscopic strain because the net Burgers vectors either equal zero or are equivalent to a Shockley partial dislocation. This observation provides new insight into the understanding of deformation twinning and confirms a previous hypothesis: detwinning could be accomplished via the nucleation and migration of Σ3{112} ITBs. The zero-strain twinning mechanism may be unique to low staking fault energy metals with implications for their deformation behavior.

  16. Observations of YBCO superconductors under a low-temperature scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A.; Lam, C. C.; Li, S. H.; Lam, H. S.; Fung, P. C. W.

    1999-09-01

    Microscopic analyses have been performed on YBCO superconductors with Ca-doping and Gd-doping as a function of temperature by employing a low-temperature scanning electron microscope (LTSEM). On lowering temperature of the sample from 300 K to 90 K, the brightness of the SEM image changes due to the change in resistance of the sample. For the underdoped cuprates Y{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, with x=0.2, the pseudo gap in the normal state is opened at a temperature T* which far below the critical temperature T{sub c} of the superconductor. The opening of the pseudo gap has directly been observed under LTSEM (temperature fluctuating in the range of {+-}5 K). At temperature T* the formation of quasi-particles takes place, thus a sudden brightness change in the SEM image is observed. The results of these measurements are compared with the four-point probe measurements. It is proved that the data of these two measurements are quite in agreement with each other.

  17. [Scanning electron microscopic observations of Monochamus alternatus antennal sensilla and their electroantennographic responses].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sibao; Zhou, Hongchun; Miao, Xuexia; Fan, Meizhen; Li, Zengzhi; Si, Shengli; Huang, Yongping

    2005-02-01

    With scanning electron microscope (SEM), this paper observed the shape, category, amount and distribution of the main antenna sensilla of adult Monochamus alternatus, and tested their electroantennographic (EAG) responses to the main volatiles of Pinus spp.. There were seven types of antennal sensilla, i. e., sensilla trichoid, sensilla basiconica, sensilla digit-like, sensilla rod-like, sensilla bottle-like, sensilla bud-like and sensilla chaetica, among which, sensilla trichoid and sensilla basiconica were the most abundant on the antenna surface, and each of them could be divided into three subtypes. Two subtypes of sensilla digit-like could also be observed. The II and III subtypes of sensilla trichoid and I and II subtypes of sensilla basiconica had deep longitudinal grooves on their surface, the typical characteristics of olfactory receptor. The comparison of the EAG response of different parts of Monochamus alternatus antennae to alpha-Pinene showed that each volatile and their compounds could provoke significant EAG responses of both females and males. The dose-response test showed that there was a certain rule in the EAG responses of M. alternatus.

  18. Light and electron microscope observations on Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. (Prasinophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C. K.; Jiao-Fen, Chen; Zhe-Fu, Zhang; Hui-Qi, Zhang

    1994-09-01

    Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. is described on the basis of light and electron microscope observations of cultured material originally collected and isolated from seawater of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China. The periplasts on the cell body and flagella are covered by five types of scales, two types on the flagella and three on the body. Among these, the morphology and the number of spines of large stellate body scales differ remarkably from those of previously described species of Nephroselmis. Apart from these, the unusual fine structure of the eyespot (stigma) is very characteristic. As in the other species of Nephroselmis, the eyespot lies immediately under the two-membraned chloroplast envelope; unlike the others, however, it is not composed of a number of osmiophilic globules, but consists of about 14 curved rod-shaped osmiophilic bodies arranged loosely and randomly. This feature distinguishes the present new species not only from the other species of Nephroselmis but also from the other motile algal species, the eyespots structure of which had been previously described.

  19. Electron microscope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  20. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS ON THE SUBMICROSCOPIC MORPHOLOGY OF THE MEIOTIC NUCLEUS AND CHROMOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, E.

    1956-01-01

    Thin sections of the testicular follicles of the grasshopper Laplatacris dispar were studied under the electron microscope. In the primary spermatocytes, during meiotic prophase, three main regions can be recognized within the nucleus: (1) the nucleolus and associated nucleolar material; (2) the interchromosomal regions with the dense particles; and (3) the chromosomes. The nucleolus is generally compact and is surrounded by nucleolar bodies that comprise aggregations of dense round particles 100 to 250 A in diameter. A continuous transition can be observed between these particles and those found isolated or in short chains in the interchromosomal spaces. Particles of similar size (mean diameter of 160 A) can be found associated with the nuclear membrane and in the cytoplasm. The chromosomes show different degrees of condensation in different stages of meiotic prophase. The bulk of the chromosome appears to be made of very fine and irregularly coiled filaments of macromolecular dimensions. Their length cannot be determined because of the thinness of the section but some of them can be followed without interruption for about 1000 to 2000 A. The thickness of the chromosome filaments seems to vary with different stages of prophase and in metaphase. In early prophase, filaments vary between 28 ± 7 A and 84 ± 7 A with a mean of 47 A, in late prophase the mean is about 70 A. In metaphase the filaments vary between 60 and 170 A with a mean of about 100 A. Neither the prophase nor the metaphase chromosomes have a membrane or other inhomogeneities. The finding of a macromolecular filamentous component of chromosomes is discussed in relation to the physicochemical literature on nucleoproteins and nucleic acids and as a result it is suggested that the thinnest chromosome filaments (28 ± 7 A) probably represent single deoxyribonucleoprotein molecules. PMID:13398445

  1. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  2. Observation of the atomic structure of ß'-SiAlON using three generations of high resolution electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorel, A.; Ciston, J.; Bartel, T.; Song, C.-Y.; Dahmen, U.

    2013-04-01

    The structure of a ß‧-SiAlON (Si5.6Al0.4O0.4N7.6) has been observed using three generations of unique high resolution microscopes spanning over three decades of development in instrumentation - the Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), the One Angstrom Microscope (OAM) and the Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope (TEAM). The information limits of these microscopes are 0.16, 0.08 and 0.05 nm respectively. Observations along ⟨0 0 0 1⟩ at Scherzer defocus for each microscope demonstrate a drastic increase in structural information. Images taken on TEAM show clearly resolved atomic columns whereas the ARM images were only indirectly related to the structure. Nevertheless, the loss of the six-fold symmetry associated with the O/N and Al/Si substitutions was already visible on images taken on the ARM, and an associated ∼25 pm displacement of the O substituting for N in some of the 2c Wyckoff positions of the SiN unit cell was measured on exit wave reconstructions obtained from through focal series on the OAM. This paper illustrates how progress in instrumentation impacts our analysis and understanding of materials.

  3. Observations of carbon nanotube oxidation in an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ai Leen; Gidcumb, Emily; Zhou, Otto; Sinclair, Robert

    2013-03-26

    We report the first direct study on the oxidation of carbon nanotubes at the resolution of an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM), as we locate and identify changes in the same nanotubes as they undergo oxidation at increasing temperatures in situ in the ETEM. Contrary to earlier reports that CNT oxidation initiates at the end of the tube and proceeds along its length, our findings show that only the outside graphene layer is being removed and, on occasion, the interior inner wall is oxidized, presumably due to oxygen infiltrating into the hollow nanotube through an open end or breaks in the tube. We believe that this work provides the foundation for a greater scientific understanding of the mechanism underlying the nanotube oxidation process, as well as guidelines to manipulate the nanotubes' structure or prevent their oxidation.

  4. Observations of Carbon Nanotube Oxidation in an Aberration-Corrected, Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ai Leen; Gidcumb, Emily; Zhou, Otto; Sinclair, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We report the first direct study on the oxidation of carbon nanotubes at the resolution of an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM), as we locate and identify changes in the same nanotubes as they undergo oxidation at increasing temperatures in-situ in the ETEM. Contrary to earlier reports that CNT oxidation initiates at the end of the tube and proceeds along its length, our findings show that only the outside graphene layer is being removed and on occasion, the interior inner wall is oxidized, presumably due to oxygen infiltrating into the hollow nanotube through an open end or breaks in the tube. We believe that this work provides the foundation for much scientific understanding of the mechanism underlying the nanotube oxidation process, as well as guidelines to manipulate their structure or prevent their oxidation. PMID:23360330

  5. [Scanning electron microscope observation on endosperm starch grain characters in multiplasmic maize].

    PubMed

    Li, J L; Jia, J L; Liu, M; Zhao, S M; Liu, Y N; Zeng, M Q; Li, S R

    1999-01-01

    In this article, endosperm starch grains of eleven lines in multiplasmic maize were studied by scanning electron microscope. The results show that different cytoplasm has different effects on the characters of starch grain. The starch grains of three sweet corn cytoplasmic lines (su1, sh2, btl) are mainly spherical and packed tightly, which means they have some degree of similarity. While the grains of four cytolasmic male sterility lines (T, S, C, 21A) are mostly irregular and packed loosely except (T) Mo17, in which grains are tightly packed. The average diameter of these eleven varieties is ranged from 9.78 microns to 14.69 microns. Through the study of endosperm starch grain shape and size, we tried to explore the relationship between the property of starches and the quality of seeds. And this will significantly prompt the development of maize genetics and breeding.

  6. Congenital adenoma of the iris and ciliary body: light and electron microscopic observations.

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, I G; Parsons, M A; Palmer, C A

    1992-01-01

    A 23-year-old man had a lesion in the right inferior iris which appeared to have enlarged since it was first seen when the patient was aged 5 years. The lesion was excised by a partial iridocyclectomy. Histopathologically the neoplasm was composed of both pigmented and non-pigmented cells. Pseudoacini, containing acid mucopolysaccharides, were present throughout the tumour matrix. Electron microscopically the non-pigmented cells were found to possess a convoluted plasmalemma, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, and numerous desmosomes and gap junctions. The pigmented cells contained large, round, mature melanosomes, occasional premelanosomes, and desmosomes, which resembled the posterior pigment epithelium of the iris. The intercellular matrix contained fine collagen fibrils resembling vitreous. We believe that this neoplasm represents a congenital adenoma of the ciliary body and iris. Images PMID:1420064

  7. Lorentz microscopy observation of vortices in high-Tc superconductors using a 1-MV field emission transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ken

    2013-06-01

    Lorentz microscopy has opened the door to observing a single quantized magnetic flux line (i.e. a vortex) and its dynamic behavior inside a superconductor in real time. It resulted from the efforts of Dr Akira Tonomura and his collaborators, who developed a field emission electron microscope and advanced the technologies used for visualizing vortices (e.g. a low-temperature specimen stage and a magnetic-field application system). They used a 1-MV field emission transmission electron microscope with an electron beam that can penetrate thick specimens of high-temperature superconductors (Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and YB2C3O7-δ) to reveal the flux-line features inside materials and their interactions with defects. This memorial paper reviews the results of research in the area of vortex matter physics.

  8. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscope Observation of Carbon Nanotubes in Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Makoto; Fujieda, Tadashi; Hidaka, Kishio; Muneyoshi, Takahiko; Yaguchi, Tomio

    2005-04-01

    Transmission electron microscope is used to examine the movements of carbon nanotubes in electric fields. Carbon nanotubes lying along the surface of the cathode electrode start to move into alignment with the electric field vector when the field strength reaches 0.5 V/μm and become increasingly well-aligned with the vector as field strength increases. The carbon nanotubes return to their original positions when the electric field strength returns to zero. We also examine the abrupt breakdown of carbon nanotubes when the electric field is maintained at 5.5 V/μm. The corresponding breakdown emission current density is estimated as 3.4× 107 A/cm2. The distance between the nearest nanotubes standing to align with the electric field vector is approximately 2 μm. This fact means that emission site density could be increased up to 3× 107 points/cm2 (which corresponds to one tube for each 2 μm square).

  9. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  10. Characterization of Anthropogenic Magnetic Particles in Asian Dust Using Magnetic Measurements and Electron Microscope Observations in Seoul, Korea: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Doh, S.; Park, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Magnetic measurements and electron microscopic observations have been performed for Asian dust samples in Seoul, Korea, and desert-sand and loess samples in source regions in China to identify pollution of Asian dust by anthropogenic particulates during transportation. Asian dust samples in Seoul have been collected during four Asian dust events occurred in March 19 and 23, April 9, 2002, and April 12, 2003. Desert-sand samples from Khorchin, Lanzhou and Tengel regions, and loess samples from Chifeng region were also collected for comparison during March 2-9, 2003. χLF, ARM and SIRM values (magnetic concentration parameters) of Asian dust in Seoul showed 2~288, 2~61 and 2 ~251 times, respectively, higher than those of desert-sand and loess in source regions. This result indicates that Asian dust originated from source regions in China experienced significant influx of magnetic particles during transportation to Seoul, Korea. These magnetic particles added in Asian dust can be recognized as ferrimagnetic minerals (e.g., magnetite and maghemite) based on IRM acquisition patterns and S-ratio values. During the electron microscopic observations for magnetic particles in Asian dust, iron-oxide spherules accompanied by carbon were frequently observed, implying that magnetic contaminants in Asian dust might be originated from fossil fuel combustions. Air- mass backward trajectories during four Asian dust events showed that the air-mass, transporting Asian dust, was originated from the central China and passed through the industrialized eastern China and western Korea on its way to Seoul. Therefore, it can be interpreted that Asian dust in Seoul was highly polluted by anthropogenic magnetic particles originated from industrialized regions in China and Korea. The present study reveals the pollution of Asian dust by anthropogenic particulates during transportation, and suggests that magnetic measurements associated with electron microscopic observations can be used as an

  11. Carbon fibres and plasma-preserved tendon allografts for gap repair of flexor tendon in bovines: gross, microscopic and scanning electron microscopic observations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Sharma, A K; Sharma, A K; Kumar, S

    2002-06-01

    The efficacy of carbon fibres and plasma-preserved tendon allografts for gap repair in the superficial digital flexor tendon in the mid-metatarsal region was evaluated in 12 crossbred calves. Experimental tenectomies were performed, followed by implantation of carbon fibres in group I (12 legs) and plasma-preserved tendon allografts in group II (12 legs). Gross observations in group I showed filling of the defect with granulation tissue with more vascularity on day 7, which was less prominent at day 14. On day 30, the neotendon formed was slightly thicker and comparable to normal tendon in appearance and texture. On day 90, it exhibited all the characteristics of a fully developed tendon. Whereas, in group II increased vascularity at the site and encapsulation of the graft with connective tissue in early periods was observed. The gap between graft and host was filled with fibrous connective tissue. Peritendinous adhesions were maximum on day 7 which were gradually reduced in both groups. Microscopically, an acute inflammatory reaction in the periphery of carbon fibres was observed on day 7. Immature fibroblasts were arranged in a haphazard pattern at this stage. By day 14, numerous newly formed capillaries and comparatively more mature fibroblasts were present in between and around the carbon fibres which were aligning parallel to the longitudinal axis of the tendon. By day 30 the healing tissue exhibited longitudinal orientation of collagen fibres and was at a more advance stage of maturation. By day 90, the neotendon formed simulated the picture of normal tendon. In the grafted tendon group, there was normal healing tissue at the functional sites between host and grafted tendon. The fibroblastic activity appeared to be both extrinsic and intrinsic in origin. The connective tissue had invaded the graft to a variable distance and there was resorption of graft which was replaced by newly formed connective tissue on day 90. Scanning electron microscopic observation

  12. Cell Aging of Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Observed by Light and Electron Microscopic Radioautography

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    The term “cell aging” initially means how the cells change due to their aging. There are two meanings, i.e. how a cell changes when it is isolated from original animals such as in vitro cells in cell culture, otherwise how all the cells of an animal change in vivo due to the aging of the individual animal. We have been studying the latter changes from the viewpoint of the cell nutrients, the precursors for the macromolecular synthesis such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), proteins, glucides and lipids, which are incorporated and synthesized into various cells of individual animals. Therefore, this article deals with only the cell aging of animal cells in vivo, how the metabolism, i.e. incorporations and syntheses of respective nutrient precursors in various kinds of cells change due to the aging of individual experimental animals such as mice by means of microscopic radioautography to localize the RI-labeled precursors. The incorporations and syntheses of various precursors for macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, proteins, glucides, lipids and others in various kinds of cells of various organs in the gastrointestinal tract such as the mouth, esophagus, stomach and intestines are reviewed referring many original papers already published from our laboratory during these 60 years since the late 20th century. PMID:27785275

  13. Observation Technique of Surface Magnetic Structure Using Type-I Magnetic Contrast in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Masatoshi; Katoh, Misao; Suga, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    The type-I magnetic contrast in the scanning electron microscope is simulated. The magnetic flux that leaked from the surface magnetic domain is calculated based on the Maxwell equation. Trajectories of secondary electrons emitted from the surface are traced considering this magnetic field and the electric field generated by the secondary electron detector. On the basis of the characteristic variation of the spatial deviation of electrons arriving at the detector, the original domain structure at the specimen surface is estimated.

  14. Electron microscopic observations on the pecten of the great blue heron (Ardea herodias).

    PubMed

    Braekevelt, C R

    1991-07-01

    The pecten oculi of the great blue heron (Ardea herodias) has been examined by both light and electron microscopy. In this species the pecten is large and of the pleated type. It consists of 14-15 acordion folds that are joined apically by a more heavily pigmented bridge of tissue which holds the pecten in a fan-like shape widest at its base. As in other species it is situated over the optic nerve head and projects out into the vitreous. Within each fold are numerous capillaries, larger supply and drainage vessels and many melanocytes. The capillaries are extremely specialized vessels which display extensive microfolds on both their luminal and abluminal borders. The endothelial cell bodies are extremely thin with most organelles present in a paranuclear location. The capillaries are surrounded by thick fibrillar basal laminae which are felt to be structurally useful. Pericytes are a common feature of these capillaries. The numerous pleomorphic melanocytes which form an incomplete sheath around the capillaries and other blood vessels are also felt to be important in structural support of the pecten. The morphology of the pecten of the great blue heron is indicative of a heavy involvement in the transport of materials.

  15. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation and streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.

  16. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    DOE PAGES

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; ...

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation andmore » streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.« less

  17. [Scanning electron microscopic observation on the parasitic form of the fungi in the horny layer in dermatophytosis].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nanako; Wakumoto, Keiko; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Electron microscopic techniques have been widely used to investigate the pathogenesis of dermatophytosis. In this article, morphological studies by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) concerned with the dermatophyte infection process are literary reviewed and we introduced our morphological study observing the parasitic form of dermatophytes in the lesional cornified layer. Various experimental models have been established to study fungal adhesion and invasion to the skin surface in the early stage of infection by several authors.In these studies, arthroconidial adherence to corneocytes and germination was demonstrated by SEM and TEM. To understand the host-fungus relationship in dermatophytosis, it is also important to identify parasitic forms of fungi and morphological changes of corneocytes in the lesion. The three-dimensional structure of growing or parasitic dermatophytes in the lesional cornified cell layer was observed using the adhesive strip method in tinea cruris and tinea glabrosa. In tinea unguium, however, it is difficult to apply this method because of subungual hyperkeratosis. We introduce the alkaline treatment method for SEM for use in observing fungal elements in a subungual hyperkeratotic lesion and scales in dermatophytosis. With this technique, small pieces of nails or scales were fixed with 2.5% glutaraldehyde, and were treated with low concentrations of alkaline and subjected to the conventional procedure for SEM observation. This method is applicable to various skin lesions, such as tinea unguium, tinea pedis and tinea capitis to investigate the parasitic forms of dermatophytes and the spatial relationship with corneocytes and is useful to understand the infection process of dermatophytosis.

  18. Science 101: How Does an Electron Microscope Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion, electron microscopes are not used to look at electrons. They are used to look for structure in things that are too small to observe with an optical microscope, or to obtain images that are magnified much more than is obtainable with an optical microscope. To understand how electron microscopes work, it will help to go…

  19. Scanning electron microscopical observation of an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture on micropatterned orthopaedic ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ker, Andrew; Meek, RM Dominic; Nadeem, Danish; Sjostrom, Terje; Su, Bo; McNamara, Laura E; Dalby, Matthew J; Young, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    In biomaterial engineering, the surface of an implant can influence cell differentiation, adhesion and affinity towards the implant. On contact with an implant, bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells demonstrate differentiation towards bone forming osteoblasts, which can improve osteointegration. The process of micropatterning has been shown to improve osteointegration in polymers, but there are few reports surrounding ceramics. The purpose of this study was to establish a co-culture of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells with osteoclast progenitor cells and to observe the response to micropatterned zirconia toughened alumina ceramics with 30 µm diameter pits. The aim was to establish whether the pits were specifically bioactive towards osteogenesis or were generally bioactive and would also stimulate osteoclastogenesis that could potentially lead to osteolysis. We demonstrate specific bioactivity of micropatterns towards osteogenesis, with more nodule formation and less osteoclastogenesis compared to planar controls. In addition, we found that that macrophage and osteoclast-like cells did not interact with the pits and formed fewer full-size osteoclast-like cells on the pitted surfaces. This may have a role when designing ceramic orthopaedic implants. PMID:25383174

  20. Electron microscope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1991-06-01

    This year our laboratory has continued to make progress in the design of electron-optical systems, in the study of structure-function relationships of large multi-subunit proteins, in the development of new image processing software and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. We present an algebraic approach to the symmetrical Einzel (unipotential) lens wherein we simplify the analysis by specifying a field shape that meets some preferred set of boundary or other conditions and then calculate the fields. In a second study we generalize this approach to study of three element electrostatic lenses of which the symmetrical Einzel lens is a particular form. The purpose is to develop a method for assisting in the design of a lens for a particular purpose. In our biological work we study a stable and functional dodecameric complex of globin chains from the hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris. This is a complex lacking the linker'' subunit first imaged in this lab and required for maintenance of the native structure. In addition, we do a complete work-up on the hemoglobin of the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouverii demonstrating the presence of a hierarchy of globin complexes. We demonstrate stable field-emission in the sub-angstrom STEM and the preliminary alignment of the beam. We continue our exploration of a algorithms for alignment of sequences of protein and DNA. Our computer facilities now include four second generation RISC workstations and we continue to take increasing advantage of the floating-point and graphical performance of these devices.

  1. Effect of Lysimachia ramosa (Primulaceae) on helminth parasites: motility, mortality and scanning electron microscopic observations on surface topography.

    PubMed

    Challam, M; Roy, B; Tandon, V

    2010-04-19

    The alcoholic extract of Lysimachia ramosa Wall (Primulaceae) was tested in vitro against helminth parasites, Fasciolopsis buski and Ascaris suum, from porcine hosts and Raillietina echinobothrida from domestic fowl. The live adult parasites, collected from a freshly autopsied host, were exposed to different concentrations (5-50mg) of the test plant extract in physiological phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) having 0.1% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) at 37+/-1 degrees C. The treated parasites revealed complete inactivation and flaccid paralysis that was followed by death at varying periods of time. A dose-dependent loss of motility and mortality was observed in all the treated parasites. Scanning electron microscopic observations revealed conspicuous deformity of the surface architecture in all the parasites exposed to the test plant extract. The general tegument in F. buski showed shrinkage and loss of scale-like spines; proglottides all along the strobilar length in R. echinobothrida appeared shrunken and deformed and the cuticular surface of A. suum appeared disorganised, having lost transverse striations. The botanicals of the test plant seem to be effective against all the three types of helminth parasites.

  2. Primary oral Penicillium marneffei infection diagnosed by PCR-based molecular identification and transmission electron microscopic observation from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xia; Zhang, Ruifeng; Yang, Hanjun; Lei, Song; Zhang, Yizhi; Ran, Yuping

    2012-11-07

    We report a case of primary oral Penicillium marneffei infection in a 39-year-old man without HIV infection. Although fungal culture was negative, the patient was finally confirmed to have P. marneffei infection by PCR-based molecular identification and transmission electron microscopic observation from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. The patient was cured with taking itraconazole for 3 months.

  3. Observation of electron trapping along scratches on SiO2 surface in mirror electron microscope images under ultraviolet light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masaki; Shimakura, Tomokazu

    2010-04-01

    Surface charge distribution change caused by electrons trapped at defects of a SiO2 surface has been observed by using a mirror electron microscope (MEM) under monochromatized ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. Scratches on the SiO2 surface on a silicon wafer were formed by mechanically polishing to create spatially distributed defects on the SiO2 surface. Exposure of the SiO2 surface by UV light with energy above 4.25 eV, which is the threshold energy for internal photoemission from silicon to SiO2, produced significant change in the contrast in the MEM images. This contrast change is mainly due to negative charging by the photoexcited electrons trapped at the defects along the scratches. The negative charging changes the curvature of the electrostatic equipotential surface above the scratches from a concave shape to a convex shape; as a result, their contrast in the MEM image becomes reversed. The surface density of the trapped electrons at a typical scratch was roughly estimated to be 1010 cm-2. This result of analysis of the contrast change shows that the MEM can be used for spatially resolved and spectroscopic characterizations of defects relating charge trapping in insulator films in conjunction with a charge-injection technique such as UV irradiation.

  4. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-21

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  5. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  6. Nano Robotic Manipulation inside Electron Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Toshio; Nakajima, Masahiro; Liu, Pou

    We report nanomanipulation and nanoassembly through nanorobotic manipulation inside electron microscopes. A hybrid nanorobotic manipulation system, which is integrated with a nanorobotic manipulator inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and nanorobotic manipulators inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM), is used. The elasticity of a multi-walled CNT (MWNT) is measured inside a TEM. The telescoping MWNT is fabricated by peeling off outer layers through destructive fabrication process. The electrostatic actuation of telescoping MWNT is directly observed by a TEM. A cutting technique for CNTs assisted by the presence of oxygen gas is also presented. The cutting procedure was conducted in less than 1 minute using a low-energy electron beam inside a scanning electron microscope. A bending technique of a CNT assisted by the presence of oxygen gas is also applied for the 3-D fabrication of nanosturucture. We expect that these techniques will be applied for the rapid prototyping nanoassembly of various CNT nanodevices. For the nano-biological applications, environmental-SEM (E-SEM) nanomanipulation system is also presented with the direct observation of the hydroscopic samples with non-drying treatment.

  7. Electron Microscopic Observation and Biochemical Properties of Carp Myosin B during Frozen Storage at -8°C with Cryoprotectants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Norio; Oguni, Moritoshi; Yamamoto, Mika; Shinano, Haruo

    The cryoprotective effect of sorbitol (0.5M) and monosodium glutamate (0.3M) was examined on the freeze denaturation of carp myosin B filaments by observing the morphological changes in electron microscopy. Myosin B in the presence of 0.1 or 0.6M KCl was stored at -8°C that was higer temperature than the eutectic point of KCl and provided the concentrated KCl solution for causing the filamentous structure to deform. In the case of frozen storage in 0.1M KCl, the deformation of myosin B filaments was protected with both cryoprotectants. In the case of 0.6M KCl with monosodium glutamate, the deformation of the filaments was prevented. However, the granular matters deformed from myosin B were observed to some extent in 0.6M KCl with sorbitol. Morphological changes of the filaments in the electron microscopy agreed with the changes in biochemical properties of myosin B.

  8. Electron microscope observations of impact crater debris amongst contaminating particulates on materials surfaces exposed in space in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murr, L. E.; Rivas, J. M.; Quinones, S.; Niou, C.-S.; Advani, A. H.; Marquez, B.

    1993-01-01

    Debris particles extracted from a small sampling region on the leading edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft have been examined by analytical transmission electron microscopy and the elemental frequency observed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and compared with upper atmosphere (Earth) particle elemental frequency and the average elemental compositions of interplanetary dust particles. A much broader elemental distribution was observed for the exposed spacecraft surface debris milieu. Numerous metal microfragment analyses, particularly aluminum and stainless steel, were compared with scanning electron microscope observations-of impact crater features, and the corresponding elemental spectra on selected LDEF aluminium tray clamps and stainless steel bolts. The compositions and melt features for these impact craters and ejecta have been shown to be consistent with microcrystalline debris fragments in the case of aluminum, and these observations suggest an ever changing debris milieu on exposed surfaces for space craft and space system materials.

  9. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    PubMed Central

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W.-G.; Wu, L.; Xin, H.; Wen, J. G.; Luo, W.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations. PMID:27874069

  10. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    DOE PAGES

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W. -G.; ...

    2016-11-22

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here, we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Furthermore,more » our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.« less

  11. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W.-G.; Wu, L.; Xin, H.; Wen, J. G.; Luo, W.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-11-01

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.

  12. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Sun, K; Yin, W-G; Wu, L; Xin, H; Wen, J G; Luo, W; Pennycook, S J; Tranquada, J M; Zhu, Y

    2016-11-22

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Moreover, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.

  13. Electron microscopic observation of the early stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual multiplication and development in in vitro axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    The stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual exogenous development were investigated at high ultra-structural resolution in cell-free culture using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early C. parvum trophozoites were ovoid in shape, 1.07 × 1.47 μm(2) in size, and contained a large nucleus and adjacent Golgi complex. Dividing and mature meronts containing four to eight developing merozoites, 2.34 × 2.7 μm(2) in size, were observed within the first 24h of cultivation. An obvious peculiarity was found within the merozoite pellicle, as it was composed of the outer plasma membrane with underlying middle and inner membrane complexes. Further novel findings were vacuolization of the meront's residuum and extension of its outer pellicle, as parasitophorous vacuole-like membranes were also evident. The asexual reproduction of C. parvum was consistent with the developmental pattern of both eimerian coccidia and Arthrogregarinida (formerly Neogregarinida). The unique cell-free development of C. parvum described here, along with the establishment of meronts and merozoite formation, is the first such evidence obtained from in vitro cell-free culture at the ultrastructural level.

  14. In situ observation of the formation process for free-standing Au nanowires with a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Akira; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-03-10

    We have developed a simultaneous electronic and structural characterization method for studying the formation process for Au nanowires. The method is based on two-probe electronic transport measurement of free-standing Au nanowires and simultaneous structural characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We measured the electronic currents during the electromigration (EM)-induced narrowing process for the free-standing Au nanowires. A free-standing Au nanowire with a desired conductance value was fabricated by EM. Simultaneous SEM and conductance measurements revealed the EM-induced narrowing process for the Au wires, in which material transfer in the nanowires caused growth towards the positively biased electrode and contact failure at the negatively biased electrode. The narrowed free-standing Au nanowires were stable and could be maintained for more than 10 h without their conductance changing. These results indicate the high stability of the EM-processed Au nanowires compared to Au nanowires fabricated by mechanical elongation or the breaking of Au nanocontacts.

  15. In situ observation of the formation process for free-standing Au nanowires with a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiba, Akira; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a simultaneous electronic and structural characterization method for studying the formation process for Au nanowires. The method is based on two-probe electronic transport measurement of free-standing Au nanowires and simultaneous structural characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We measured the electronic currents during the electromigration (EM)-induced narrowing process for the free-standing Au nanowires. A free-standing Au nanowire with a desired conductance value was fabricated by EM. Simultaneous SEM and conductance measurements revealed the EM-induced narrowing process for the Au wires, in which material transfer in the nanowires caused growth towards the positively biased electrode and contact failure at the negatively biased electrode. The narrowed free-standing Au nanowires were stable and could be maintained for more than 10 h without their conductance changing. These results indicate the high stability of the EM-processed Au nanowires compared to Au nanowires fabricated by mechanical elongation or the breaking of Au nanocontacts.

  16. Ultrafast Electron Microscopes: Design Criteria, Electron Sources, and Column Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Joel A.

    Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy, and its picosecond/femtosecond subclass Ultrafast Electron Microscopy, is an emerging field in instrumentation science. It attempts to combine the nanoscale spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopes with the temporal resolution of modern ultrafast lasers. In this thesis, I present my contributions to this young field. These include a novel model for simulating the dynamics of ultrafast electron pulses in electron microscope systems, design criteria for constructing such a system, and theoretical and experimental groundwork geared towards selecting a useful photocathode for electron pulse generation. I also present the prototype ultrafast electron microscope system being built at UIC.

  17. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope.

  18. Seismic isolation of an electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Godden, W.G.; Aslam, M.; Scalise, D.T.

    1980-01-01

    A unique two-stage dynamic-isolation problem is presented by the conflicting design requirements for the foundations of an electron microscope in a seismic region. Under normal operational conditions the microscope must be isolated from ambient ground noise; this creates a system extremely vulnerable to seismic ground motions. Under earthquake loading the internal equipment forces must be limited to prevent damage or collapse. An analysis of the proposed design solution is presented. This study was motivated by the 1.5 MeV High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM) to be installed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) located near the Hayward Fault in California.

  19. Neural differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells in a rat model of striatal lacunar infarction: light and electron microscopic observations

    PubMed Central

    Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma C.; Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Ana P.; Serrano, Julia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Vellosillo-Huerta, Lara; Taylor, Julian S.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The increased risk and prevalence of lacunar stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) makes the search for better experimental models an important requirement for translational research. In this study we assess ischemic damage of the nigrostriatal pathway in a model of lacunar stroke evoked by damaging the perforating arteries in the territory of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat after stereotaxic administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We hypothesized that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity of differentiating into diverse cell types such as neurons and glia, but with limited proliferation potential, would constitute an alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for lacunar stroke. These cells showed neuritogenic activity in vitro and a high potential for neural differentiation. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry was used to characterize GFP-positive neurons derived from the transplants. 48 h after ET-1 injection, we characterized an area of selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the nigrostriatal pathway characterized with tissue necrosis and glial scar formation, with subsequent behavioral signs of Parkinsonism. Light microscopy showed that grafted cells within the striatal infarction zone differentiated with a high yield into mature glial cells (GFAP-positive) and neuron types present in the normal striatum. Electron microscopy revealed that NSCs-derived neurons integrated into the host circuitry establishing synaptic contacts, mostly of the asymmetric type. Astrocytes were closely associated with normal small-sized blood vessels in the area of infarct, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of the blood brain barrier and angiogenesis. Our results encourage the use of NSCs as a cell-replacement therapy for the treatment of human vascular Parkinsonism. PMID:22876219

  20. Digestive system of the sacoglossan Plakobranchus ocellatus (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia): light- and electron-microscopic observations with remarks on chloroplast retention.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Euichi

    2005-08-01

    The sacoglossan Plakobranchus ocellatus feeds by sucking the cytoplasmic contents from algae and retains intact algal chloroplasts within the cells of the digestive gland. Morphology of the entire digestive system of this species was firstly described by means of a combination of histology and electron microscopy (both SEM and TEM). The short alimentary canal is confined to the head, and the anus opens at the anterior right corner of the pericardial swelling, as is the case in many non-shelled sacoglossans. The alimentary canal of the specimens examined rarely contained ingesta, suggesting that the retained chloroplasts provide sufficient nourishment to the sacoglossan hosts and that sea slugs with empty stomachs survive well in the field. The digestive gland, with the retained chloroplasts, branches from the stomach and is sparsely distributed throughout the body, including the head region, but is aggregated mainly in the dorsal lamellae. Chloroplasts were occasionally found in the epithelial cells in the transitional region from the stomach wall to the digestive gland, which may be a site at which chloroplasts are incorporated into the animal cells by endocytosis. Numerous microvilli filling the lumen of the digestive gland suggest that molecules are actively transferred within the gland. The sea slug thus apparently provides a favorable environment to support the long-term retention and function of chloroplasts.

  1. Microscopic observations of sonoporation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghimi, Aya; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2017-03-01

    Background Sonoporation promises a local gene/drug delivery with a high therapeutic efficacy and low toxicity level. However, the mechanisms orchestrating the molecules uptake are still unclear. Here, we investigate the effects of sonoporation on the plasma membrane of U-87 MG cells, either immediately or at different times post-sonoporation, using electron microscopy, and also the implication of cytoskeleton during the sonoporation process. Methods In our set-up, the U-87 MG cells were seeded on 18 mm diameter cover slips, placed in 24-well plates. The acoustic exposure conditions consisted of ultrasound pulses at 1 MHz, 1W/cm2 with duty cycle of 20% for 60 seconds. BR14® microbubbles were added to the cell medium before sonoporation at a microbubble/cell ratio of 5. These acoustic parameters were obtained as a result of a prior optimization experiments. Membrane permeabilization after sonoporation was assessed using SYTOX® Green dye (1 µM), as a model drug which does not cross the membrane of normal cells. The cell mortality was measured with propidium iodide staining. The alterations, on the plasma membrane, after sonoporation were monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cell samples were processed immediately (0 min) and every 5 min up to 60 min post-sonoporation and coated by platinum sputtering (5 nm). For immunofluorescence experiments, the cells were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and then incubated with TRITC-labeled Phalloidin, used to stain the actin cytoskeleton. Tubulin antibody Alexa Fluor® 555 conjugate was used to label the microtubules. Results Our results showed that immediately after ultrasound and microbubble exposure, dark and spherical structures appear on the plasma membrane. These structures have a diameter ranging from few nanometers to 160 nm. These structures are transient, since 15 min post-sonoporation, almost half of these structures disappeared. The decrease in the number of permeant structures is accentuated over

  2. Quantification of the Information Limit of Transmission Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2008-11-14

    The resolving power of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes is characterized by the information limit, which reflects the size of the smallest object detail observable with a particular instrument. We introduce a highly accurate measurement method for the information limit, which is suitable for modern aberration-corrected electron microscopes. An experimental comparison with the traditionally applied Young's fringe method yields severe discrepancies and confirms theoretical considerations according to which the Young's fringe method does not reveal the information limit.

  3. Scanning electron microscopic observation of spermiophage cell within the lumen of the epididymal duct of the vasectomized Japanese monkey (Macacus fuscatus).

    PubMed

    Murakami, M; Shimada, T; Suefuji, K

    1977-08-15

    The spermiophagic process by intraluminal macrophages in the epididymal ducts of the vasectomized Japanese monkey was well visualized with scanning electron microscope. The fragments of disintegrated spermatozoa were seen in the phase enveloped in bulk by flap-like cytoplasmic extensions or in the phase ingested within the cytoplasm.

  4. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  5. Development of scanning electron and x-ray microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Tomokazu Hirano, Tomohiko Suyama, Motohiro

    2016-01-28

    We have developed a new type of microscope possessing a unique feature of observing both scanning electron and X-ray images under one unit. Unlike former X-ray microscopes using SEM [1, 2], this scanning electron and X-ray (SELX) microscope has a sample in vacuum, thus it enables one to observe a surface structure of a sample by SEM mode, to search the region of interest, and to observe an X-ray image which transmits the region. For the X-ray observation, we have been focusing on the soft X-ray region from 280 eV to 3 keV to observe some bio samples and soft materials. The resolutions of SEM and X-ray modes are 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively, at the electron energy of 7 keV.

  6. Automated monitoring to reduce electron microscope downtime.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Matthias J; Resch, Guenter P

    2009-10-01

    High-end transmission electron microscopes are complex and sensitive instruments. Failure of one of the external supplies, malfunction of the microscope hardware or maloperation are typical reasons for subsystems to fail. Especially if undiscovered for a longer period of time, this can cause unnecessary downtime, compromising user access and increasing operating costs. Utilizing the software introduced in this article ("MoniTEM"), we have succeeded to reduce downtime of an FEI Tecnai Polara by coupling constant monitoring of critical subsystems with automatic, remote feedback to the system supervisor, ensuring immediate problem solving. The software described here is freely available from http://www.imba.oeaw.ac.at/monitem/ and can be readily adapted for use with other FEI transmission electron microscopes.

  7. Optics of high-performance electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Rose, H H

    2008-01-01

    During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by multipole fields and to a discussion of the most advanced design that take advantage of these techniques. The theory of electron mirrors is developed and it is shown how this can be used to correct aberrations and to design energy filters. Finally, different types of energy filters are described.

  8. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko; Talin, Albert Alec; Chandler, David W.; Michael, Joseph R.

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  9. Optics of high-performance electron microscopes*

    PubMed Central

    Rose, H H

    2008-01-01

    During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by multipole fields and to a discussion of the most advanced design that take advantage of these techniques. The theory of electron mirrors is developed and it is shown how this can be used to correct aberrations and to design energy filters. Finally, different types of energy filters are described. PMID:27877933

  10. Charge collection microscopy of in-situ switchable PRAM line cells in a scanning electron microscope: Technique development and unique observations

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Schuitema, R. W.; Brink, G. H. ten; Kooi, B. J.; Gravesteijn, D. J.

    2015-03-15

    An imaging method has been developed based on charge collection in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) that allows discrimination between the amorphous and crystalline states of Phase-change Random Access Memory (PRAM) line cells. During imaging, the cells are electrically connected and can be switched between the states and the resistance can be measured. This allows for electrical characterization of the line cells in-situ in the SEM. Details on sample and measurement system requirements are provided which turned out to be crucial for the successful development of this method. Results show that the amorphous or crystalline state of the line cells can be readily discerned, but the spatial resolution is relatively poor. Nevertheless, it is still possible to estimate the length of the amorphous mark, and also for the first time, we could directly observe the shift of the amorphous mark from one side of the line cell to the other side when the polarity of the applied (50 ns) RESET pulse was reversed.

  11. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  12. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W [Livermore, CA

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  13. Applications of 1 MV field-emission transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Akira

    2003-01-01

    A newly developed 1 MV field-emission transmission electron microscope has recently been applied to the field of superconductivity by utilizing its bright and monochromatic field-emission electron beam. This microscope allows individual magnetic vortices inside high-Tc superconductors to be observed, thus, opening the way to investigate the unusual behaviour of vortices, which reflects the anisotropic layered structure of these superconducting materials. One example is the observation of the arrangements of chain vortex lines that are formed when a magnetic field is applied obliquely to the layer plane of the materials.

  14. Theoretical Evaluation of Compositional Contrast of Scanning Electron Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Fujiwara, Takafumi; Suga, Hiroshi

    1992-12-01

    The compositional contrast in the scanning electron microscope image is calculated for Al-Cu, Si-Cu and Al-Si contacts. An electron scattering phenomenon in the specimen is simulated in a direct manner. Electron refraction at the boundary, because of the agreement of each Fermi energy at the boundary, is precisely taken into account. The backscattered electron image shows better resolution than the secondary electron image in terms of the boundary contrast when the primary electron energy is 1 keV. The signal intensity varies depending on materials adjacent to the location observed. The ultimate resolution of the compositional contrast of the scanning electron microscope can be below 1 nm.

  15. Transmission electron microscopic pathoanatomy of congenital trigger thumb.

    PubMed

    Buchman, M T; Gibson, T W; McCallum, D; Cuda, D D; Ramos, A G

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies of trigger digits in children have been limited to gross morphology and light-microscopic histology. Nine children with 11 trigger thumbs formed a preliminary study group for electron-microscopic evaluation of tendon nodules and A-1 pulleys. This pathoanatomic investigation was not previously reported. Comparison was made with light-microscopic sections. Large amounts of mature collagen was observed. Fibroblasts with prominent rough endoplasmic reticulum were present. No degenerative or inflammatory changes were noted in either tendon or sheath. We believe that although the etiology of trigger digits is still uncertain, an infectious, inflammatory, or degenerative process is unlikely.

  16. Bioassay and Scanning Electron Microscopic Observations Reveal High Virulence of Entomopathogenic Fungus, Beauveria bassiana, on the Onion Maggot (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) Adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shengyong; Xing, Zhenlong; Wang, Xiaoqing; Lei, Zhongren

    2016-12-01

    When flies were dipped in 1 × 10(8) conidia/ml conidia suspensions and then kept in the incubator (22 ± 1 °C, 70 ± 5% RH), scanning electron microscope observations revealed that, at 2 h, the majority of adhering Beauveria bassiana conidia were attached to either the wing surface or the interstitial area between the macrochaetae on the thorax and abdomen of the onion maggot adults. Germ tubes were being produced and had oriented toward the cuticle by 18 h. Penetration of the insect cuticle had occurred by 36 h, and by 48 h, germ tubes had completely penetrated the cuticle. Fungal mycelia had emerged from the insect body and were proliferating after 72 h. The superficial area and structure of the wings and macrochaetae may facilitate the attachment of conidia and enable effective penetration. The susceptibility of adults to 12 isolates, at a concentration of 1 × 10(7) conidia/ml, was tested in laboratory experiments. Eight of the more potent strains caused in excess of 85% adult mortality 8 d post inoculation, while the median lethal time (LT50) of these strains was <6 d. The virulence of the more effective strains was further tested, and the median lethal concentrations (LC50) were calculated by exposing adults to doses ranging from 10(3)-10(7) conidia/ml. The lowest LC50 value, found in the isolate XJWLMQ-32, for the adults was 3.87 × 10(3) conidia/ml. These results demonstrate that some B. bassiana strains are highly virulent to onion maggot adults and should be considered as potential biocontrol agents against the adult flies.

  17. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of iron crystals which grow in a small vug or cavity in a recrystallized breccia (fragmented rock) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The largest crystal is three microns across. Perfectly developed crystals such as these indicate slow formation from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling. The crystals are resting on an interlocking lattice of pyroxene (calsium-magnesium-iron silicate).

  18. Investigation of Fretting by Microscopic Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Douglas

    1951-01-01

    An experimental investigation, using microscopic observation and color motion photomicrographs of the action, was conducted to determine the cause of fretting. Glass and other noncorrosive materials, as well as metals, were used as specimens. A very simple apparatus vibrated convex surfaces in contact with stationary flat surfaces at frequencies of 120 cycles or less than l cycle per second, an amplitude of 0.0001 inch, and load of 0.2 pound.

  19. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Andrew M.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  20. Miniature electron microscope beam column optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Jody Stuart

    This investigation is in the area of electrostatic lens design with the overarching goal of contributing to the creation of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope (SEM) for use in mineralogical analysis or detection of signs of life on the surface of Mars. Such an instrument could also have application in the exploration of Earth's moon, planetary moons, asteroids, or comets. Other embodiments could include tabletop or field portable SEMs for use on Earth. The scope of this research is in the design of a beam column that attains focusing, demagnification, and aberration control within the smallest achievable package. The goals of planetary exploration and of spaceflight in general impose severe constraints on the instrument's mass and electrical power consumption, while favoring a robust design of small size and high rigidity that is also simple to align. To meet these requirements a design using electrostatic lenses was favored because of the lower power requirement and mass of electrostatic versus magnetic lenses, their relatively simple construction, as well as inherently easier shielding from extraneous fields. In modeling the lens field, a hybrid of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) and a Fourier series solution was employed, whereby an initial solution from the BEM is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain for the subsequent Fourier series solution. The approach is applicable to many problems in physics and combines the inherent precision of this series solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized electrode shapes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. A significant speed increase in tracing rays is also observed. The modeling technique has been validated by reproducing example ray-traces through

  1. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  2. In-situ scanning electron microscope observation of electromigration-induced void growth in 30 nm ½ pitch Cu interconnect structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vanstreels, K. Czarnecki, P.; Siew, Y. K.; De Wolf, I.; Bömmels, J.; Tőkei, Zs.; Croes, K.; Kirimura, T.

    2014-02-21

    In-situ electromigration tests have been performed inside a scanning electron microscope on 30 nm wide single damascene interconnects without vias, where a good resolution was obtained and drift velocities during void growth could be measured at 300 °C. These tests showed direct evidence that the cathode end of the line, where a polycrystalline grain cluster encounters a bigger grain, can act as a flux divergent point of Cu diffusion. Moreover, it was found that a thicker barrier suppresses barrier/interface diffusivity of Cu atoms, thereby slowing down electromigration-induced void growth. It was also demonstrated that Cobalt based metal caps are beneficial to electromigration for advanced interconnects where thinner barriers are required.

  3. Intrinsic instability of aberration-corrected electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Schramm, S M; van der Molen, S J; Tromp, R M

    2012-10-19

    Aberration-corrected microscopes with subatomic resolution will impact broad areas of science and technology. However, the experimentally observed lifetime of the corrected state is just a few minutes. Here we show that the corrected state is intrinsically unstable; the higher its quality, the more unstable it is. Analyzing the contrast transfer function near optimum correction, we define an "instability budget" which allows a rational trade-off between resolution and stability. Unless control systems are developed to overcome these challenges, intrinsic instability poses a fundamental limit to the resolution practically achievable in the electron microscope.

  4. Intrinsic Instability of Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, S. M.; van der Molen, S. J.; Tromp, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    Aberration-corrected microscopes with subatomic resolution will impact broad areas of science and technology. However, the experimentally observed lifetime of the corrected state is just a few minutes. Here we show that the corrected state is intrinsically unstable; the higher its quality, the more unstable it is. Analyzing the contrast transfer function near optimum correction, we define an “instability budget” which allows a rational trade-off between resolution and stability. Unless control systems are developed to overcome these challenges, intrinsic instability poses a fundamental limit to the resolution practically achievable in the electron microscope.

  5. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage.

  6. Direct observation of electronic-liquid-crystal phase transitions and their microscopic origin in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, J.; Sun, K.; Yin, W. -G.; Wu, L.; Xin, H.; Wen, J. G.; Luo, W.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2016-11-22

    The ground-state electronic order in doped manganites is frequently associated with a lattice modulation, contributing to their many interesting properties. However, measuring the thermal evolution of the lattice superstructure with reciprocal-space probes alone can lead to ambiguous results with competing interpretations. Here, we provide direct observations of the evolution of the superstructure in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 in real space, as well as reciprocal space, using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. We show that the transitions are the consequence of a proliferation of dislocations plus electronic phase separation. The resulting states are well described by the symmetries associated with electronic-liquid-crystal (ELC) phases. Furthermore, our results resolve the long-standing controversy over the origin of the incommensurate superstructure and suggest a new structural model that is consistent with recent theoretical calculations.

  7. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  8. TEBAL: Nanosculpting devices with electrons in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drndic, Marija

    2008-03-01

    Manipulation of matter on the scale of atoms and molecules is an essential part of realizing the potential that nanotechnology has to offer. In this talk I will describe transmission electron beam ablation lithography (TEBAL), a method for fabricating nanostructures and fully integrated devices on silicon nitride membranes by nanosculpting evaporated metal films with electron beams. TEBAL works by controllably exposing materials to an intense and highly focused beam of 200 keV electrons inside the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The effect of electron irradiation can be used to controllably displace or ablate regions of the metal with resolution on the scale of tens of atoms per exposure. In situ TEM imaging of the ablation action with atomic resolution allows for real-time feedback control during fabrication. Specific examples presented here include the fabrication and characterization of nanogaps, nanorings, nanowires with tailored shapes and curvatures, and multi-terminal devices with nanoislands or nanopores between the terminals. These nanostructures are fabricated at precise locations on a chip and seamlessly integrated into large-scale circuitry. I will discuss how the combination of high resolution, geometrical control and yield make TEBAL attractive for many applications including nanoelectronics, superconductivity, nanofluidics and molecular (DNA) translocation studies through nanopore-based transistors. References: 1) M.D. Fischbein and M. Drndic, ``Sub-10 nm Device Fabrication in a Transmission Electron Microscope'', Nano Letters, 7 (5), 1329, 2007. 2) M. D. Fischbein and M. Drndic, ``Nanogaps by direct lithography for high-resolution imaging and electronic characterization of nanostructures'', Applied Physics Letters, 88 (6), 063116, 2006.

  9. Topics in recent studies with high-voltage electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotaro

    2011-01-01

    In this article, topics in recent studies with high-voltage electron microscopes (HVEMs) are reviewed. High-voltage electron microscopy possesses a number of advantages that cannot be afforded by conventional electron microscopy, thus providing a unique microscopy technique in both materials science and biological science. One of these advantages is the capability of continuously observing phenomena using a variety of electron microscopy techniques simultaneously with the introduction of the displacement of atoms from lattice points. This has enabled in-depth studies on such fundamental subjects as the crystalline-to-amorphous-to-crystalline transition, the motion properties of point defects and the one-dimensional diffusion of dislocation loops. Electron tomography studies using HVEMs take advantage of the large observable thickness of a specimen. In addition, by combining different advantages, a number of advanced applications in materials science have been carried out, including analyses of the atomic structure of a reduction-induced reconstructed surface and the atomic mechanism behind the self-catalytic vapor-liquid-solid growth of an oxide nanowire. As long as excellent and invaluable studies that cannot be carried out without HVEMs appear in succession, it is necessary to make the utmost efforts to improve these microscopes.

  10. Electron-beam-induced ferroelectric domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope: Toward deterministic domain patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, James L.; Liu, Shi; Lang, Andrew C.; Hubert, Alexander; Zukauskas, Andrius; Canalias, Carlota; Beanland, Richard; Rappe, Andrew M.; Arredondo, Miryam; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on transmission electron microscope beam-induced ferroelectric domain nucleation and motion. While previous observations of this phenomenon have been reported, a consistent theory explaining induced domain response is lacking, and little control over domain behavior has been demonstrated. We identify positive sample charging, a result of Auger and secondary electron emission, as the underlying mechanism driving domain behavior. By converging the electron beam to a focused probe, we demonstrate controlled nucleation of nanoscale domains. Molecular dynamics simulations performed are consistent with experimental results, confirming positive sample charging and reproducing the result of controlled domain nucleation. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of sample geometry and electron irradiation conditions on induced domain response. These findings elucidate past reports of electron beam-induced domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope and provide a path towards more predictive, deterministic domain patterning through electron irradiation.

  11. Ultrahigh vacuum scanning electron microscope system combined with wide-movable scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, A.; Homma, Y.; Hibino, H.; Ogino, T.

    2005-08-15

    A surface analysis system has been newly developed with combination of ultrahigh vacuum scanning electron microscope (SEM) and wide-movable scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The basic performance is experimentally demonstrated. These SEM and STM images are clear enough to obtain details of surface structures. The STM unit moves horizontally over several millimeters by sliding motion of PZT actuators. The motion resolution is proved to be submicrometers. The STM tip mounted on another PZT scanner can be guided to a specific object on the sample surface during SEM observation. In the observation of a Si(111) surface rapidly cooled from high temperature, the STM tip was accurately guided to an isolated atomic step and slightly moved along it during SEM observation. The STM observation shows an asymmetry of the (7x7)-transformed region along the step between the upper and lower terraces. (7x7) bands continuously formed along the edge of terraces, while (7x7) domains distributed on the terraces slightly far from the step. These experiments show the wide-movable STM unit resolves a gap of observation area between SEM and STM and the system enables a specific object found in the SEM image to be observed easily by STM.

  12. Image resolution and sensitivity in an environmental transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Jinschek, J R; Helveg, S

    2012-11-01

    An environmental transmission electron microscope provides unique means for the atomic-scale exploration of nanomaterials during the exposure to a reactive gas environment. Here we examine conditions to obtain such in situ observations in the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) mode with an image resolution of 0.10nm. This HRTEM image resolution threshold is mapped out under different gas conditions, including gas types and pressures, and under different electron optical settings, including electron beam energies, doses and dose-rates. The 0.10nm resolution is retainable for H(2) at 1-10mbar. Even for N(2), the 0.10nm resolution threshold is reached up to at least 10mbar. The optimal imaging conditions are determined by the electron beam energy and the dose-rate as well as an image signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio that is consistent with Rose's criterion of S/N≥5. A discussion on the electron-gas interactions responsible for gas-induced resolution deterioration is given based on interplay with complementary electron diffraction (ED), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data.

  13. Analytical electron microscope study of eight ataxites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, P. M.; Goldstein, J. I.; Williams, D. B.

    1982-12-01

    Optical and electron optical (SEM, TEM, AEM) techniques were employed to investigate the fine structure of eight ataxite-iron meteorites. Structural studies indicated that the ataxites can be divided into two groups: a Widmanstaetten decomposition group and a martensite decomposition group. The Widmanstaetten decomposition group has a Type I plessite microstructure and the central taenite regions contain highly dislocated lath martensite. The steep M shaped Ni gradients in the taenite are consistent with the fast cooling rates, of not less than 500 C/my, observed for this group. The martensite decomposition group has a Type III plessite microstructure and contains all the chemical group IVB ataxites. The maximum taenite Ni contents vary from 47.5 to 52.7 wt % and are consistent with slow cooling to low temperatures of not greater than 350 C at cooling rates of not greater than 25 C/my.

  14. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDIES OF RENAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Harrison

    1960-01-01

    The nephrotic syndrome, glomerulonephritis, disseminated lupus erythematosus and the Fanconi syndrome show characteristic changes with electron microscopy. Experimental studies of animals were carried out to determine the significance of such changes by observing reactions that occur under carefully controlled conditions. A lesion with collagen deposition that was found in the centrolobular region of glomeruli sheds new light on the function of this region. This evidence must be considered in developing an understanding of how the production of urine is controlled. Fluid-filled compartments and various bodies associated with the ultrastructure of tubule cells can be produced under conditions which suggest that these structures play a role in tubular resorption. ImagesFigure 1, 2.Figure 3.Figure 4, 5.Figure 6, 7.Figure 8, 9.Figure 10.Figure 11, 12.Figure 13, 14.Figure 15, 16.Figure 17. PMID:13759386

  15. Electron microscopic observations of the anterior pituitary gland. Part I. The neurons in the "transitional zone" of the anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, Yoshio; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Sakuma, Eisuke; Wada, Ikuo; Horiuchi, Osamu; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Herbert, Damon C; Soji, Tsuyoshi

    2008-06-01

    Since [Westlud, K.N., Chils, G.V., 1982. Localization of serotonin fibers in the rat adenohypophysis. Endocrinology 111, 1761-1763] initially identified the serotonin nerve fibers in the anterior pituitary gland, attention has been paid to the rostral zone of the anterior lobe into which nerve fibers enter and subsequently spread to deeper regions of the lobe. The rostral zone is the trifurcated junction of the partes tuberalis, intermedia and distalis, and has the important role(s) for hormone secretion via the "transitional zone" [Sato, G, Shirasawa, N, Sakuma, E, Sato, Y, Asai, Y, Wada, I, Horiuchi, O, Sakamoto, A, Herbert, DC, Soji, T, 2005a. Intercellular communications within the rat anterior pituitary. XI: An immunohistochemical study of distributions of S-100 positive cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat. Tissue and Cell 37, 269-280.]. The objective of this study was to focus on the ultrastructure of this "zone." All of the animals studied were fixed by perfusion with glutaraldehyde via the left ventricle of the heart and examined by electron microscopy. In the "transitional zone," a cluster of neuronal elements was observed between the folliculo-stellate cell-rich area and the anterior lobe. This cluster consisted of myelinated fibers, unmyelinated fibers, neuroendocrine fibers, large cells, and supporting cells. The large cells were perikarya of neurons which made a "ganglion-like" structure with associated satellite cells. Agranular, folliculo-stellate cells were intermingled among the elements. This is the first report that neuronal elements form clusters in the "transitional zone." A relationship of the unmyelinated and neuroendocrine fibers in the basal layer and in the "transitional zone" is discussed.

  16. Edge-on ion irradiation of electron microscope specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Otero, M.P. |; Allen, C.W.

    1992-07-01

    A special technique is described for in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) experiments involving simultaneous ion irradiation, in which the resultant phenomena are observed as in a cross-section TEM specimen. That is, instead of ion-irradiating the film or foil specimen normal to the major surfaces and observing in plan view (i.e., in the same direction), the specimen is irradiated edge-on (i.e., parallel to the major surfaces) and is observed normal to the depth direction with respect to the irradiation. The results of amorphization of Si, irradiated in this orientation by 1 or 1.5 MeV Kr, are presented and briefly compared with the usual plan view observations. The limitations of the technique are discussed and several experiments which might profitably employ this technique are suggested.

  17. Edge-on ion irradiation of electron microscope specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Otero, M.P. Fundacao de Tecnologia Industrial , Lorena, SP ); Allen, C.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A special technique is described for in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) experiments involving simultaneous ion irradiation, in which the resultant phenomena are observed as in a cross-section TEM specimen. That is, instead of ion-irradiating the film or foil specimen normal to the major surfaces and observing in plan view (i.e., in the same direction), the specimen is irradiated edge-on (i.e., parallel to the major surfaces) and is observed normal to the depth direction with respect to the irradiation. The results of amorphization of Si, irradiated in this orientation by 1 or 1.5 MeV Kr, are presented and briefly compared with the usual plan view observations. The limitations of the technique are discussed and several experiments which might profitably employ this technique are suggested.

  18. The Scanning Electron Microscope and the Archaeologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponting, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Images from scanning electron microscopy are now quite common and they can be of great value in archaeology. Techniques such as secondary electron imaging, backscattered electron imaging and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis can reveal information such as the presence of weevils in grain in Roman Britain, the composition of Roman coins and the…

  19. Understanding oxide interfaces: From microscopic imaging to electronic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilani, Shahal

    2014-03-01

    In the last decade, the advent of complex oxide interfaces has unleashed a wealth of new possibilities to create materials with unexpected functionalities. A notable example is the two-dimensional electron system formed at the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (LAO/STO), which exhibits ferromagnetism, superconductivity, and a wide range of unique magneto-transport properties. A key challenge is to find the microscopic mechanisms that underlie these emergent phenomena. While there is a growing understanding that these phenomena might reflect rich structures at the micro-scale, experimental progress toward microscopic imaging of this system has been so far rather limited due to the buried nature of its interface. In this talk I will discuss our experiments that study this system on microscopic and macroscopic scales. Using a newly-developed nanotube-based scanning electrometer we image on the nanoscale the electrostatics and mechanics of this buried interface. We reveal the dynamics of structural domains in STO, their role in generating the contested anomalous piezoelectricity of this substrate, and their direct effects on the physics of the interface electrons. Using macroscopic magneto-transport experiments we demonstrate that a universal Lifshitz transition between the population of d-orbitals with different symmetries underlies many of the transport phenomena observed to date. We further show that the interactions between the itinerant electrons and localized spins leads to an unusual, gate-tunable magnetic phase diagram. These measurements highlight the unique physical settings that can be realized within this new class of low dimensional systems.

  20. Flexible high-voltage supply for experimental electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. L.; Jung, E. A.; Lewis, R. N.; Van Loon, L. S.; Welter, L. M.

    1969-01-01

    Scanning microscope uses a field-emission tip for the electron source, an electron gun that simultaneously accelerates and focuses electrons from the source, and one auxiliary lens to produce a final probe size at the specimen on the order of angstroms.

  1. Simultaneous specimen and stage cleaning device for analytical electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1996-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are provided for cleaning both a specimen stage, a specimen and an interior of an analytical electron microscope (AEM). The apparatus for cleaning a specimen stage and specimen comprising a plasma chamber for containing a gas plasma and an air lock coupled to the plasma chamber for permitting passage of the specimen stage and specimen into the plasma chamber and maintaining an airtight chamber. The specimen stage and specimen are subjected to a reactive plasma gas that is either DC or RF excited. The apparatus can be mounted on the analytical electron microscope (AEM) for cleaning the interior of the microscope.

  2. In situ formation of bismuth nanoparticles through electron-beam irradiation in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda-Guzman, S.; Elizondo-Villarreal, N.; Ferrer, D.; Torres-Castro, A.; Gao, X.; Zhou, J. P.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, bismuth nanoparticles were synthesized when a precursor, sodium bismuthate, was exposed to an electron beam at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The irradiation effects were investigated in situ using selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After the electron irradiation, bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 6 nm were observed. The average particle size increased with the irradiation time. The electron-induced reduction is attributed to the desorption of oxygen ions. This method offers a one-step route to synthesize bismuth nanoparticles using electron irradiation, and the particle size can be controlled by the irradiation time.

  3. MicroDiffraction in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Goehner, R.P.; Michael, J.R.; Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    The identification of crystallographic phases in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been limited by the lack of a simple way to obtain electron diffraction data of an unknown while observing the micro structure of the specimen. With the development of Charge Coupled Device (CCD) based detectors, backscattered electron Kikuchi patterns (BEKP), alternately referred to as electron backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP), can be easily collected. Previously, BEKP has been limited to crystallographic orientation studies due to the poor pattern quality collected with video rate detector systems. With CCD detectors, a typical BEKP can now be acquired from a micron or sub-micron-sized crystal using an exposure time of 1-10 seconds with an accelerating voltage of 10-40 kV and a beam current as low as 0.1 nA. Crystallographic phase analysis using BEKP is unique in that the properly equipped SEM permits high magnification images, BEKP`s, and elemental information to be collected from bulk specimens. BEKP in the SEM has numerous advantages over other electron microscopy crystallographic techniques. The large angular view ( 70 degrees) provided by BEKP and the lack of difficult specimen preparation are distinct advantages of the technique. No sample preparation beyond what is commonly used for SEM specimens is required for BEKP.

  4. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  5. Transmission electron microscope calibration methods for critical dimension standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Garcia-Gutierrez, Domingo I.; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Bishop, Michael; Cresswell, Michael W.; Allen, Richard A.; Allgair, John A.

    2016-10-01

    One of the key challenges in critical dimension (CD) metrology is finding suitable dimensional calibration standards. The transmission electron microscope (TEM), which produces lattice-resolved images having scale traceability to the SI (International System of Units) definition of length through an atomic lattice constant, has gained wide usage in different areas of CD calibration. One such area is critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) tip width calibration. To properly calibrate CD-AFM tip widths, errors in the calibration process must be quantified. Although the use of TEM for CD-AFM tip width calibration has been around for about a decade, there is still confusion on what should be considered in the uncertainty analysis. We characterized CD-AFM tip-width samples using high-resolution TEM and high angle annular dark field scanning TEM and two CD-AFMs that are implemented as reference measurement systems. The results are used to outline how to develop a rigorous uncertainty estimate for TEM/CD-AFM calibration, and to compare how information from the two electron microscopy modes are applied to practical CD-AFM measurements. The results also represent a separate validation of previous TEM/CD-AFM calibration. Excellent agreement was observed.

  6. The evolution of ultrafast electron microscope instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Evans, J E; LaGrange, T; Masiel, D J

    2009-08-01

    Extrapolating from a brief survey of the literature, we outline a vision for the future development of time-resolved electron probe instruments that could offer levels of performance and flexibility that push the limits of physical possibility. This includes a discussion of the electron beam parameters (brightness and emittance) that limit performance, the identification of a dimensionless invariant figure of merit for pulsed electron guns (the number of electrons per lateral coherence area, per pulse), and calculations of how this figure of merit determines the trade-off of spatial against temporal resolution for different imaging modes. Modern photonics' ability to control its fundamental particles at the quantum level, while enjoying extreme flexibility and a very large variety of operating modes, is held up as an example and a goal. We argue that this goal may be approached by combining ideas already in the literature, suggesting the need for large-scale collaborative development of next-generation time-resolved instruments.

  7. Influence of mechanical noise inside a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Marcelo Gaudenzi; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The scanning electron microscope is becoming a popular tool to perform tasks that require positioning, manipulation, characterization, and assembly of micro-components. However, some of these applications require a higher level of performance with respect to dynamics and precision of positioning. One limiting factor is the presence of unidentified noises and disturbances. This work aims to study the influence of mechanical disturbances generated by the environment and by the microscope, identifying how these can affect elements in the vacuum chamber. To achieve this objective, a dedicated setup, including a high-resolution vibrometer, was built inside the microscope. This work led to the identification and quantification of main disturbances and noise sources acting on a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, the effects of external acoustic excitations were analysed. Potential applications of these results include noise compensation and real-time control for high accuracy tasks.

  8. Influence of mechanical noise inside a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudenzi de Faria, Marcelo; Haddab, Yassine Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2015-04-15

    The scanning electron microscope is becoming a popular tool to perform tasks that require positioning, manipulation, characterization, and assembly of micro-components. However, some of these applications require a higher level of performance with respect to dynamics and precision of positioning. One limiting factor is the presence of unidentified noises and disturbances. This work aims to study the influence of mechanical disturbances generated by the environment and by the microscope, identifying how these can affect elements in the vacuum chamber. To achieve this objective, a dedicated setup, including a high-resolution vibrometer, was built inside the microscope. This work led to the identification and quantification of main disturbances and noise sources acting on a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, the effects of external acoustic excitations were analysed. Potential applications of these results include noise compensation and real-time control for high accuracy tasks.

  9. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  10. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  11. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging. PMID:27403922

  12. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-11

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins' functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000-160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging.

  13. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging.

  14. Electron microscope study of Sarcocystis sp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeve, V.H.; Price, D.L.; Herman, C.M.

    1966-01-01

    Sarcocystis sp. obtained from wild populations of grackles, Quiscalus quiscula (Linn.), were examined to clarify the effect of the parasite on the host. Electron micrographs are presented to show areas of muscle destruction adjacent to the parasite which appear to be mechanically produced by the parasite. The microtubules within the villus-like projections of the cyst suggest that their possible function is absorptive and/or conductive with regard to the production of a toxin or the conveyance of nutritive material to the developing cells. The proposed function of submembranous filaments and their relation to the conoid is discussed. Similarities in the ultrastructure to Toxoplasma and other protozoa tend to negate the relegation of Sarcocystis to the fungi and further emphasize its protozoan nature.

  15. Electron Microscope Studies of the Human Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Hibbs, Richard G.; Clark, Wallace H.

    1959-01-01

    The thin skin of the left upper quadrant of the human abdomen has been studied by electron microscopy. Tissue removed with a high speed rotary punch was fixed in osmium tetroxide or potassium permanganate. The latter fixative in our preparations is superior to osmium for the demonstration of epidermal cell membranes and certain other membranous structures of the epidermis. The cytoplasmic membranes of basal cells and cells of the stratum granulosum have been found to be relatively straight, while those of most spinous cells are sharply scalloped. The deep cells of the stratum spinosum in the rete ridge area show cell membranes and cytoplasmic structure intermediate between true basal cells and most cells of the stratum spinosum. The extracellular material of the desmosome has been found to consist of alternate dark and light laminae similar to those described by Odland (13) and Horstmann and Knoop (7). PMID:13673050

  16. A negative stain for electron microscopic tomography.

    PubMed

    Fera, Andrea; Farrington, Jane E; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Reese, Thomas S

    2012-04-01

    While negative staining can provide detailed, two-dimensional images of biological structures, the potential of combining tomography with negative staining to provide three-dimensional views has yet to be fully realized. Basic requirements of a negative stain for tomography are that the density and atomic number of the stain are optimal, and that the stain does not degrade or rearrange with the intensive electron dose (~10⁶ e/nm²) needed to collect a full set of tomographic images. A commercially available, tungsten-based stain appears to satisfy these prerequisites. Comparison of the surface structure of negatively stained influenza A virus with previous structural results served to evaluate this negative stain. The combination of many projections of the same structure yielded detailed images of single proteins on the viral surface. Corresponding surface renderings are a good fit to images of the viral surface derived from cryomicroscopy as well as to the shapes of crystallized surface proteins. Negative stain tomography with the appropriate stain yields detailed images of individual molecules in their normal setting on the surface of the influenza A virus.

  17. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  18. Dental wear: a scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia; Raspanti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  19. High Cycle Fatigue in the Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Bufford, Daniel C; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M; Syed Asif, S A; Boyce, Brad L; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-08-10

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this study, the tension-tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were applied at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 10(6) cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ∼10(-12) m·cycle(-1). This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. These observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.

  20. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.; ...

    2016-06-28

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were appliedmore » at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 106 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10–12 m·cycle–1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.« less

  1. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.; Syed Asif, S. A.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-06-28

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were applied at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 106 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10–12 m·cycle–1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.

  2. Light and scanning electron microscopic report of four fractured implants.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, A; Piattelli, M; Scarano, A; Montesani, L

    1998-01-01

    Although they are fortunately rare, implant fractures can cause significant problems for both clinicians and patients. The authors present a light and scanning electron microscopic study of four fractured implants in two patients. Both patients had parafunctional habits (bruxism), hypertrophic masticatory muscles, and wear of occlusal surfaces. The scanning electron microscopic study of the fractured surfaces of all four implants showed the presence of fatigue striations. Bending overload was probably created by a combination of parafunctional forces, bone resorption, posterior location of the implants, and implant diameter.

  3. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDIES ON SALIVARY GLAND CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, J.; Sirlin, J. L.

    1963-01-01

    Salivary glands were fixed in cold 1 per cent osmium tetroxide in veronal-acetate buffer containing sucrose and embedded in methacrylate mixture or Araldite. The salivary gland nuclei of sciarids show a continuous production of nucleoli, which remain multiple and not consolidated into a single structure. The earliest recognizable nucleoli, which we call "elementary nucleoli," are aggregations of a few paired 40 A fibrils and a few 150 A particles, at many points within chromosome bands. Further development consists of the detachment of the elementary nucleoli from their points of origin and their subsequent mutual coalescence. As a result, dense patches of nucleolar material are formed which become large nucleoli at the surface of chromosomes, either attached to the band or free. The fully formed nucleoli have a characteristic dual structure with a narrow dense periphery and a broader less dense internum. Fibrils and particles are present in both regions, and the difference in density reflects differences in the packing of the two structural elements. The duality in structure is lost in later stages. The nucleolar fibrils appear to be similar to the chromosomal fibrils. The 150 A particles in nucleoli, chromosomes, and nuclear sap seem identical. The significance of these observations is discussed for nucleologenesis in general. PMID:13964284

  4. Scanning electron microscope facility for examination of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.R.; Braski, D.N.

    1985-02-01

    An AMRAY model 1200B scanning electron microscope was modified to permit remote examination of radioactive specimens. Features of the modification include pneumatic vibration isolation of the column, motorized stage controls, improvements for monitoring vacuum, and a system for changing filaments without entering the hot cell.

  5. Achondrogenesis type I: light and electron-microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Molz, G; Spycher, M A

    1980-06-01

    The light- and electron-microscopic structure of articular and costal cartilage in a case of achondrogenesis type I has been described. The most characteristic ultrastructural change in the chondrocytes was conspicuous dilatation of the rough endoplasmatic reticulum (RER) which contained amorphous electronopaque material. This change in the RER was accompanied by marked hypertrophy of the Golgi apparatus; the matrix was basically unchanged.

  6. Examples of electrostatic electron optics: the Farrand and Elektros microscopes and electron mirrors.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2012-08-01

    The role of Gertrude Rempfer in the design of the Farrand and Elektros microscopes is evoked. The study of electron mirror optics, aberration correction using mirrors and the development of microscopes employing electron mirrors are recapitulated, accompanied by a full bibliography, of earlier publications in particular.

  7. Response function and optimum configuration of semiconductor backscattered-electron detectors for scanning electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, E. I.; Orlikovskiy, N. A.; Ivanova, E. S.

    2012-06-15

    A new highly efficient design for semiconductor detectors of intermediate-energy electrons (1-50 keV) for application in scanning electron microscopes is proposed. Calculations of the response function of advanced detectors and control experiments show that the efficiency of the developed devices increases on average twofold, which is a significant positive factor in the operation of modern electron microscopes in the mode of low currents and at low primary electron energies.

  8. Transmission electron microscope characterisation of molar-incisor-hypomineralisation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zonghan; Kilpatrick, Nicky M; Swain, Michael V; Munroe, Paul R; Hoffman, Mark

    2008-10-01

    Molar-incisor-hypomineralisation (MIH), one of the major developmental defects in dental enamel, is presenting challenge to clinicians due, in part, to the limited understanding of microstructural changes in affected teeth. Difficulties in the preparation of site-specific transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimens are partly responsible for this deficit. In this study, a dual-beam field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM)/focused ion beam (FIB) milling instrument was used to prepare electron transparent specimens of sound and hypomineralised enamel. Microstructural analysis revealed that the hypomineralised areas in enamel were associated with marked changes in microstructure; loosely packed apatite crystals within prisms and wider sheath regions were identified. Microstructural changes appear to occur during enamel maturation and may be responsible for the dramatic reduction in mechanical properties of the affected regions. An enhanced knowledge of the degradation of structural integrity in hypomineralised enamel could shed light on more appropriate management strategies for these developmental defects.

  9. Secondary electron imaging of monolayer materials inside a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cretu, Ovidiu Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2015-08-10

    A scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a backscattered and secondary electron detector is shown capable to image graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Secondary electron contrasts of the two lightest monolayer materials are clearly distinguished from the vacuum level. A signal difference between these two materials is attributed to electronic structure differences, which will influence the escape probabilities of the secondary electrons. Our results show that the secondary electron signal can be used to distinguish between the electronic structures of materials with atomic layer sensitivity, enhancing its applicability as a complementary signal in the analytical microscope.

  10. Prevention of electron beam transmittance for biological cell imaging using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated the high-spatial-resolution imaging of label-free biological cells using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope without irradiation damage by the electron beam. An EXA microscope can be used to observe a specimen with a nanometric light source excited in the Si3N4 membrane by an electron beam. The incident electron beam penetrates the Si3N4 membrane and damages the specimen. To suppress the irradiation damage of the specimen, we prevented the transmittance of the electron beam by coating the Si3N4 membrane with a gold thin film. To obtain an electron beam transmittance through the Si3N4 of 0%, a gold film of 15 nm thickness was required. By adding the gold layer, a label-free cellular structure was observed with 135-nm spatial resolution.

  11. Interaction-Free Quantum Electron Microscope in Free-Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yujia; Kim, Chung-Soo; Hobbs, Richard; Manfrinato, Vitor; Celiker, Orhan; Kruit, Pieter; Berggren, Karl

    2015-03-01

    We propose the design and theoretical analysis of a quantum electron microscope (QEM), which utilizes interaction-free quantum measurement with electrons for nanoscale imaging. The QEM can be used to image electron-irradiation-sensitive materials, such as biological samples, with a high resolution and low radiation damage. Our QEM scheme is an electron interferometer with a storage resonator. The incoming electron beam is asymmetrically split into a strong reference beam and a weak sample beam, both of which are stored in the resonator. Only the weak sample beam transmits through the sample for multiple times. We propose to build the QEM with free-space electron optics. We develop a scattering matrix method to theoretically analyze the contrast mechanism, radiation damage, and measurement accuracy. We propose an electron-mirror-based storage resonator and we have performed electron optics simulation of electron trajectories within the resonator. We also report experimental implementation and characterization of the electron beam-splitter to be used in the QEM. Thin crystals fabricated with focused ion beam and nano-gratings fabricated with electron-beam lithography are two candidate beam-splitters, both of which are characterized by electron diffraction. This work is funded by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  12. Electron microscope evidence of virus infection in cultured marine fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiu-Qin; Zhang, Jin-Xing; Qu, Ling-Yun

    2000-09-01

    Electron microscope investigation on the red sea bream ( Pagrosomus major), bastard halibut ( Paralichthys olivaceus) and stone flounder ( Kareius bicoloratus) in North China revealed virus infection in the bodies of the dead and diseased fish. These viruses included the lymphocystis disease virus (LDV), parvovirus, globular virus, and a kind of baculavirus which was not discovered and reported before and is now tentatively named baculavirus of stone flounder ( Kareius bicoloratus).

  13. Applications of the Analytical Electron Microscope to Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the analytical electron microscope (AEM) as allowed investigators to obtain chemical and structural information from less than 50 nanometer diameter regions in thin samples of materials and to explore problems where reactions occur at boundaries and interfaces or within small particles or phases in bulk samples. Examples of the application of the AEM to materials science problems are presented in this paper and demonstrate the usefulness and the future potential of this instrument.

  14. Sub-10 nm device fabrication in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Fischbein, Michael D; Drndić, Marija

    2007-05-01

    We show that a high-resolution transmission electron microscope can be used to fabricate metal nanostructures and devices on insulating membranes by nanosculpting metal films. Fabricated devices include nanogaps, nanodiscs, nanorings, nanochannels, and nanowires with tailored curvatures and multi-terminal nanogap devices with nanoislands or nanoholes between the terminals. The high resolution, geometrical flexibility, and yield make this fabrication method attractive for many applications including nanoelectronics and nanofluidics.

  15. A new clustering algorithm for scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr; Duraisamy, Prakash; Karim, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope that produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the sample atoms, producing various signals that are collected by detectors. The gathered signals contain information about the sample's surface topography and composition. The electron beam is generally scanned in a raster scan pattern, and the beam's position is combined with the detected signal to produce an image. The most common configuration for an SEM produces a single value per pixel, with the results usually rendered as grayscale images. The captured images may be produced with insufficient brightness, anomalous contrast, jagged edges, and poor quality due to low signal-to-noise ratio, grained topography and poor surface details. The segmentation of the SEM images is a tackling problems in the presence of the previously mentioned distortions. In this paper, we are stressing on the clustering of these type of images. In that sense, we evaluate the performance of the well-known unsupervised clustering and classification techniques such as connectivity based clustering (hierarchical clustering), centroid-based clustering, distribution-based clustering and density-based clustering. Furthermore, we propose a new spatial fuzzy clustering technique that works efficiently on this type of images and compare its results against these regular techniques in terms of clustering validation metrics.

  16. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  17. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Andrew Murphy

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids. Chapter 2 details the unique specimen preparation techniques employed to meet the geometrical constraints of the in situ experiments. These techniques include bulk silicon micromachining and the use of a focused ion beam. In section 2.4 a method of voltage-controlled mechanical testing is derived theoretically and proven experimentally. This method enables the quantification of the mechanical behavior during in situ nanoindentation experiments. Three classes of material systems were studied with this new technique: (1) bulk single crystal, (2) a soft thin film on a harder substrate and (3) a hard thin film on a softer substrate. Section 3.2 provides the first direct evidence of dislocation nucleation in single crystal silicon at room temperature. In contrast to the observation of phase transformations during conventional indentation experiments, the unique geometry employed for the in situ experiments resulted in dislocation plasticity. In section 3.3 results from in situ nanoindentation of Al films on Si substrates are presented. These results include the correlation of the microstructural deformation behavior with load vs. displacement data. It is shown that a sharp change in the force-displacement response at the elastic-to-plastic transition signifies the nucleation of dislocations. Additionally, the softening of sub-micron grains with size is observed. Section 3.4 discussed the influence of the substrate on the indentation response of two thin film/substrate systems where the films were harder than the substrate. Amorphous diamond on Si and epitaxial TiN on MgO (001) systems were studied. It was found that the deformation in the harder films was controlled by the deformation in

  18. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  19. Atomic force microscope observations of otoconia in the newt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallworth, R.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Campbell, J. B.; Steyger, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    Calcitic and aragonitic otoconia from the Japanese red-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, were examined using an atomic force microscope. The surface structure of both otoconial polymorphs consisted of arrays of elements approximately 50 nm in diameter. Elements were generally round and were separated by shallow depressions of no more than 20 nm. The elements are suggested to be single crystals of calcium carbonate. The relationship of these observations to theories of otoconial genesis is discussed.

  20. Elastofibroma. A correlated light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kindblom, L G; Spicer, S S

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of elastofibroma located in the subscapular region of 3 men aged 66, 74, and 83 years, and a woman 70 years old are reported. A correlated light and electron microscopic study including ultrastructural examination of Verhoeff's iron-hematoxylin (VIH)-stained sections was performed. Light microscopically, the elastofibromas were characterized by connective tissue built up by collagen fibers and sclerotic masses mingled with numerous fibers and globules of elastin material. In one micron thick Epon sections these elastin fibers often revealed a central axis surrounded by a mantle composed of periodic segments giving them a necklace-like appearance. The ultrastructural findings of these elastin structures, stained with VIH, and the appearance of the stroma cells and their relation to the elastin indicate that elastofibroma is a non-neoplastic reactive lesion in which elastin material is synthesized by the stromal cells and predominantly laid down around preexisting elastic fibers.

  1. Comparison of Electron Imaging Modes for Dimensional Measurements in the Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Postek, Michael T; Vladár, András E; Villarrubia, John S; Muto, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Dimensional measurements from secondary electron (SE) images were compared with those from backscattered electron (BSE) and low-loss electron (LLE) images. With the commonly used 50% threshold criterion, the lines consistently appeared larger in the SE images. As the images were acquired simultaneously by an instrument with the capability to operate detectors for both signals at the same time, the differences cannot be explained by the assumption that contamination or drift between images affected the SE, BSE, or LLE images differently. Simulations with JMONSEL, an electron microscope simulator, indicate that the nanometer-scale differences observed on this sample can be explained by the different convolution effects of a beam with finite size on signals with different symmetry (the SE signal's characteristic peak versus the BSE or LLE signal's characteristic step). This effect is too small to explain the >100 nm discrepancies that were observed in earlier work on different samples. Additional modeling indicates that those discrepancies can be explained by the much larger sidewall angles of the earlier samples, coupled with the different response of SE versus BSE/LLE profiles to such wall angles.

  2. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Prof. Philip; Moore, Tom; Magel, Greg; Hartfield, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  3. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D.

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  4. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  5. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be ‘safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope. PMID:26961578

  6. Fabrication and characterization of solid-state nanopores using a field emission scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Hung; Iqbal, Samir M.; Stach, Eric A.; King, Alexander H.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Bashir, Rashid

    2006-03-06

    The fabrication of solid-state nanopores using the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been reported in the past. Here, we report a similar method to fabricate solid-state nanopores using the electron source of a conventional field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) instead. Micromachining was used to create initial pore diameters between 50 nm and 200 nm, and controlled pore shrinking to sub 10 nm diameters was performed subsequently during in situ processing in the FESEM. Noticeably, different shrinking behavior was observed when using irradiation from the electron source of the FESEM than the TEM. Unlike previous reports of TEM mediated pore shrinkage, the mechanism of pore shrinkage when using the FESEM could be a result of surface defects generated by radiolysis and subsequent motion of silicon atoms to the pore periphery.

  7. Analysis of improvement in performance and design parameters for enhancing resolution in an atmospheric scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeo Hun; Kim, Seung Jae; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    The scanning electron microscope is used in various fields to go beyond diffraction limits of the optical microscope. However, the electron pathway should be conducted in a vacuum so as not to scatter electrons. The pretreatment of the sample is needed for use in the vacuum. To directly observe large and fully hydrophilic samples without pretreatment, the atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) is needed. We developed an electron filter unit and an electron detector unit for implementation of the ASEM. The key of the electron filter unit is that electrons are transmitted while air molecules remain untransmitted through the unit. The electron detector unit collected the backscattered electrons. We conducted experiments using the selected materials with Havar foil, carbon film and SiN film.

  8. Integrated windows-based control system for an electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shengyang; Kapp, Oscar H.

    1994-12-01

    A Windows application has been developed for management and operation of beam instruments such as electron or ion microscopes. It provides a facility that allows an operator to manage a complicated instrument with minimal effort, primarily under mouse control. The hardware control components used on similar instruments (e.g., the scanning transmission electron microscopes in our lab), such as toggles, buttons, and potentiometers for adjustments on various scales, are all replaced by the controls of the Windows application and are addressable on a single screen. The new controls in this program (via adjustable software settings) offer speed of response and smooth operation providing tailored control of various instrument parameters. Along with the controls offering single parameter adjustment, a two-dimensional control was developed that allows two parameters to be coupled and addressed simultaneously. This capability provides convenience for such tasks as ``finding the beam'' and directing it to a location of interest on the specimen. Using an icon-based display, this Windows application provides better integrated and more robust information for monitoring instrument status than the indicators and meters of the traditional instrument controls. As a Windows application, this program is naturally able to share the resources of the Windows system and is thus able to link to many other applications such as our image acquisition and processing programs. Computer control provides automatic protection and instant diagnostics for the experimental instrument. This Windows application is fully functional and is in daily use to control a new type of electron microscope developed in our lab.

  9. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments.

  10. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, K. S. Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S.

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  11. Voyager 2 Observes Energetic Electrons

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Voyager 2 observations of energetic electrons. Voyager 2 detected a dramatic drop of the flux of electrons as it left the sector region. The intense flux came back as soon ...

  12. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  13. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Buzzi, M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Raabe, J.; Nolting, F.

    2015-08-15

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg{sub 0.66}Nb{sub 0.33})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  14. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzi, M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Raabe, J.; Nolting, F.

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg0.66Nb0.33)O3-PbTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  15. Coherent Chromatic Effect in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erni, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    Under the assumption of local atomic scattering, elastic electron scattering at finite scattering angles implies a small but finite energy loss. This energy loss, which under conventional imaging conditions in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is of the order of 0.1 meV and thus negligible, increases by more than 2 orders of magnitude if light elements are investigated at sub-Ångström resolution. For a microscope of finite chromatic aberration, the energy loss leads to an element-specific chromatic effect which increases with the instrument resolution and with decreasing mass of the scattering atom. Despite that this effect is small, it can degrade the achievable image contrast. However, the effect can be considered in the optimization of the phase-contrast imaging conditions and even be beneficial to enhance the relative image contrast of light atoms in the presence of heavy atoms.

  16. Coherent Chromatic Effect in the Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Erni, Rolf

    2016-03-18

    Under the assumption of local atomic scattering, elastic electron scattering at finite scattering angles implies a small but finite energy loss. This energy loss, which under conventional imaging conditions in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is of the order of 0.1 meV and thus negligible, increases by more than 2 orders of magnitude if light elements are investigated at sub-Ångström resolution. For a microscope of finite chromatic aberration, the energy loss leads to an element-specific chromatic effect which increases with the instrument resolution and with decreasing mass of the scattering atom. Despite that this effect is small, it can degrade the achievable image contrast. However, the effect can be considered in the optimization of the phase-contrast imaging conditions and even be beneficial to enhance the relative image contrast of light atoms in the presence of heavy atoms.

  17. A new apparatus for electron tomography in the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, V. Maccagnani, P.; Masini, L.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Pezza, A.; Del Marro, M.; Pallocca, G.; Vinciguerra, P.; Rossi, M.; Ferroni, M.; Sberveglieri, G.; Vittori-Antisari, M.

    2015-06-23

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of a microscopic specimen has been obtained by applying the tomographic algorithm to a set of images acquired in a Scanning Electron Microscope. This result was achieved starting from a series of projections obtained by stepwise rotating the sample under the beam raster. The Scanning Electron Microscope was operated in the scanning-transmission imaging mode, where the intensity of the transmitted electron beam is a monotonic function of the local mass-density and thickness of the specimen. The detection strategy has been implemented and tailored in order to maintain the projection requirement over the large tilt range, as required by the tomographic workflow. A Si-based electron detector and an eucentric-rotation specimen holder have been specifically developed for the purpose.

  18. Electron microscopic localization of cytoplasmic myosin with ferritin- labeled antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We localized myosin in vertebrate nonmuscle cells by electron microscopy using purified antibodies coupled with ferritin. Native and formaldehyde-fixed filaments of purified platelet myosin filaments each consisting of approximately 30 myosin molecules bound an equivalent number of ferritin-antimyosin conjugates. In preparations of crude platelet actomyosin, the ferritin-antimyosin bound exclusively to similar short, 10-15 nm wide filaments. In both cases, binding of the ferritin-antimyosin to the myosin filaments was blocked by preincubation with unlabeled antimyosin. With indirect fluorescent antibody staining at the light microscope level, we found that the ferritin-antimyosin and unlabeled antimyosin stained HeLa cells identically, with the antibodies concentrated in 0.5-microns spots along stress fibers. By electron microscopy, we found that the concentration of ferritin-antimyosin in the dense regions of stress fibers was five to six times that in the intervening less dense regions, 20 times that in the cytoplasmic matrix, and 100 times that in the nucleus. These concentration differences may account for the light microscope antibody staining pattern of spread interphase cells. Some, but certainly not all, of the ferritin-antimyosin was associated with 10-15-nm filaments. In mouse intestinal epithelial cells, ferritin- antimyosin was located almost exclusively in the terminal web. In isolated brush borders exposed to 5 mM MgCl2, ferritin-antimyosin was also concentrated in the terminal web associated with 10-15-nm filaments. PMID:7193682

  19. Charge-Density Waves Observed with a Tunneling Microscope.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    RD-R158 779 CHRGE-DENSITY UAVES OBSERVED WITH A TUNNELING / NICROSCOPE(U) CALIFORNIA UNIV SANTA BARBARA DEPT OF PHYSICS R V COLEMAN ET AL. 91 JUL 85...Physical review Letters, lyAg t195 IS, KEY WORDS (Continue On reverse aide of necessary md identify by block nimbe) Charge Density, waves, tunneling ...showe only atoms. The tunneling microscope was ooerated under licuid nitrogen with a Pt(O3 1 02 tp for both types of samples.. D OR",m3 1473 EDITION

  20. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  1. Stereo-microvision. Development of an opto-electronic operating microscope.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, H F; Horstmann, G A; Spink, R; Amrein, E I; Forrer, P

    1993-06-01

    A novel opto-electronic operating microscope has been designed and clinically tested. It consists of a small camera microscope, a central electronic unit, and a stereoscopic video monitor. Advanced miniaturization permitted ergonomics superior to those of conventional optomechanical microscopes. Electronic imaging facilitates coupling to an ultrasound navigation system which enables the neurosurgeon to verify the location of the focus in real time, correlated with CT and MRI pictures. A fully computerized, digital operating microscope will now be developed based on this prototype.

  2. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  3. Microscopic theory of the residual surface resistivity of Rashba electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Juba; Lounis, Samir; Blügel, Stefan; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    A microscopic expression of the residual electrical resistivity tensor is derived in linear response theory for Rashba electrons scattering at a magnetic impurity with cylindrical or noncylindrical potential. The behavior of the longitudinal and transversal residual resistivity is obtained analytically and computed for an Fe impurity at the Au(111) surface. We studied the evolution of the resistivity tensor elements as a function of the Rashba spin-orbit strength and the magnetization direction of the impurity. We found that the absolute values of longitudinal resistivity reduce with increasing spin-orbit strength of the substrate and that the scattering of the conduction electrons at magnetic impurities with magnetic moments pointing in directions not perpendicular to the surface plane produce a planar Hall effect and an anisotropic magnetoresistance even if the impurity carries no spin-orbit interaction. Functional forms are provided describing the anisotropy of the planar Hall effect and the anisotropic magnetoresistance with respect to the direction of the impurity moment. In the limit of no spin-orbit interaction and a nonmagnetic impurity of cylindrical symmetry, the expression of the residual resistivity of a two-dimensional electron gas has the same simplicity and form as for the three-dimensional electron gas [J. Friedel, J. Nuovo. Cim. 7, 287 (1958), 10.1007/BF02751483] and can also be expressed in terms of scattering phase shifts.

  4. Miniature self-contained vacuum compatible electronic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Batson, Phillip J.; Denham, Paul E.; Jones, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    A vacuum compatible CCD-based microscopic camera with an integrated illuminator. The camera can provide video or still feed from the microscope contained within a vacuum chamber. Activation of an optional integral illuminator can provide light to illuminate the microscope subject. The microscope camera comprises a housing with a objective port, modified objective, beam-splitter, CCD camera, and LED illuminator.

  5. Direct microscopic observation of forward osmosis membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yining; Wicaksana, Filicia; Tang, Chuyang Y; Fane, Anthony G

    2010-09-15

    This study describes the application of a noninvasive direct microscopic observation method for characterizing fouling of a forward osmosis (FO) membrane. The effect of the draw solution concentration, membrane orientation, and feed spacer on FO fouling was systematically investigated in a cross-flow setup using latex particles as model foulant in the feedwater. Higher draw solution (DS) concentrations (and thus increased flux levels) resulted in dramatic increase in the surface coverage by latex particles, suggesting that the critical flux concept might be applicable even for the osmotically driven FO process. Under identical draw solution concentrations, the active-layer-facing-the-feed-solution orientation (AL-FS) experienced significantly less fouling compared to the alternative orientation. This may be explained by the lower water flux in AL-FS, which is consistent with the critical flux concept. The use of a feed spacer not only dramatically enhanced the initial flux of the FO membrane, but also significantly improved the flux stability during FO fouling. Despite such beneficial effects of using the feed spacer, a significant amount of particle accumulation was found near the spacer filament, suggesting further opportunities for improved spacer design. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first direct microscopic observation study on FO fouling.

  6. A Transmission Electron Microscope Study of Experimentally Shocked Pregraphitic Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A transmission electron microscope study of experimental shock metamorphism in natural pre-graphitic carbon simulates the response of the most common natural carbons to increased shock pressure. The d-spacings of this carbon are insensitive to the shock pressure and have no apparent diagnostic value, but progressive comminution occurs in response to increased shock pressure up to 59.6 GPa. The function, P = 869.1 x (size(sub minimum )(exp -0.83), describes the relationship between the minimum root-mean-square subgrain size (nm) and shock pressure (GPa). While a subgrain texture of natural pregraphitic carbons carries little information when pre-shock textures are unknown, this texture may go unnoticed as a shock metamorphic feature.

  7. An improved visual tracking method in scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Ru, Changhai; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Haibo; Chen, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Since their invention, nanomanipulation systems in scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) have provided researchers with an increasing ability to interact with objects at the nanoscale. However, most nanomanipulators that are capable of generating nanometer displacement operate in an open-loop without suitable feedback mechanisms. In this article, a robust and effective tracking framework for visual servoing applications is presented inside an SEM to achieve more precise tracking manipulation and measurement. A subpixel template matching tracking algorithm based on contour models in the SEM has been developed to improve the tracking accuracy. A feed-forward controller is integrated into the control system to improve the response time. Experimental results demonstrate that a subpixel tracking accuracy is realized. Furthermore, the robustness against clutter can be achieved even in a challenging tracking environment.

  8. Pigmentosis tubae, a new entity: light and electron microscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, G.A.; Reimann, B.E.; Greenberg, H.L.; Miles, P.A.

    1983-03-01

    The authors noted an unusual finding in the fallopian tubes of a 31-year-old woman who had received external and internal whole pelvis radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Aggregates of macrophages containing pigment, identified in a subepithelial location, were reminiscent of melanosis coli, which is caused by abuse of anthracene-containing laxatives. Electron microscopic examination of the pigment revealed cytoplasmic material with the appearance of lipofuscin, identical to the pigment described in cases of colonic melanosis. After a careful study of possible etiologic agents, it was concluded that the pigment most likely resulted from cellular damage caused by radiotherapy. The authors are not aware of any other reported case of this entity, which will be called pigmentosis tubae.

  9. Smart flexible microrobots for scanning electron microscope (SEM) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoeckel, Ferdinand; Fatikow, Sergej

    2000-06-01

    In the scanning electron microscope (SEM), specially designed microrobots can act as a flexible assembly facility for hybrid microsystems, as probing devices for in-situ tests on IC structures or just as a helpful teleoperated tool for the SEM operator when examining samples. Several flexible microrobots of this kind have been developed and tested. Driven by piezoactuators, these few cubic centimeters small mobile robots perform manipulations with a precision of up to 10 nm and transport the gripped objects at speeds of up to 3 cm/s. In accuracy, flexibility and price they are superior to conventional precision robots. A new SEM-suited microrobot prototype is described in this paper. The SEM's vacuum chamber has been equipped with various elements like flanges and CCD cameras to enable the robot to operate. In order to use the SEM image for the automatic real-time control of the robots, the SEM's electron beam is actively controlled by a PC. The latter submits the images to the robots' control computer system. For obtaining three-dimensional information in real time, especially for the closed-loop control of a robot endeffector, e.g. microgripper, a triangulation method with the luminescent spot of the SEM's electron beam is being investigated.

  10. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvimov, Sergei; Plachinda, Pavel; Moeck, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Three novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals in a transmission electron microscope are presented. Either a single high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image [1] or a single precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] may be employed. PEDs from fine-grained crystal powders may also be utilized. Automation of the former two strategies is in progress and shall lead to statistically significant results on ensembles of nanocrystals. Open-access databases such as the Crystallography Open Database which provides more than 81,500 crystal structure data sets [3] or its mainly inorganic and educational subsets [4] may be utilized. [1] http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals 2007/j/of/dissertation.htm [2] P. Moeck and S. Rouvimov, in: {Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences}, Vol. 191, 2009, 270-313 [3] http://cod.ibt.lt, http://www.crystallography.net, http://cod.ensicaen.fr, http://nanocrystallography.org, http://nanocrystallography.net, http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2009/04/00/kk5039/kk5039.pdf [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  11. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    PubMed

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  12. Large area fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structure by conventional scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sudheer, Tiwari, P.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukharjee, C.

    2015-06-24

    Plasmonic nanoparticle grating (PNG) structure of different periods has been fabricated by electron beam lithography using silver halide based transmission electron microscope film as a substrate. Conventional scanning electron microscope is used as a fabrication tool for electron beam lithography. Optical microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) have been used for its morphological and elemental characterization. Optical characterization is performed by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique.

  13. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence imaging of subgrain boundaries, twins and planar deformation features in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, M. F.; Pennock, G. M.; Drury, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    The study of deformation features has been of great importance to determine deformation mechanisms in quartz. Relevant microstructures in both growth and deformation processes include dislocations, subgrains, subgrain boundaries, Brazil and Dauphiné twins and planar deformation features (PDFs). Dislocations and twin boundaries are most commonly imaged using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), because these cannot directly be observed using light microscopy, in contrast to PDFs. Here, we show that red-filtered cathodoluminescence imaging in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a useful method to visualise subgrain boundaries, Brazil and Dauphiné twin boundaries. Because standard petrographic thin sections can be studied in the SEM, the observed structures can be directly and easily correlated to light microscopy studies. In contrast to TEM preparation methods, SEM techniques are non-destructive to the area of interest on a petrographic thin section.

  14. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  15. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven `quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  16. An in situ transmission electron microscope deformation study of the slip transfer mechanisms in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Robertson, I.M.; Birnbaum, H.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-09-01

    The slip transfer mechanisms across grain boundaries in 310 stainless steel, high-purity aluminum, and a Ni-S alloy have been studied by using the in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) deformation technique. Several interactions between mobile lattice dislocations and grain boundaries have been observed, including the transfer and generation of dislocations at grain boundaries and the nucleation and propagation of a grain boundary crack. Quantitative condition have been established to correctly predict the slip transfer mechanism.

  17. Observation of synchronized atomic motions in the field ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Fhm F; Notte, John A; Livengood, Richard H; Tan, Shida

    2013-03-01

    For over half a century, the field ion microscope (FIM) has been used to visualize atomic structures at the apex of a sharpened needle by way of the ion beams which are created at the most protruding atoms. In this paper we used a conventional FIM to study the emission characteristics of the neon ion beams produced within the FIM. The neon emission pattern is observed to be relatively short lived and subject to temporal and angular fluctuations. The nature of these fluctuations is complex, often with different parts of the emission pattern changing in a synchronized fashion over timescales spanning from milliseconds to a few tens of seconds. In this paper, we characterize the observed instability of the neon emission. We also offer a simple model of adsorbed atom mobility that explains much of these observations. And finally, we present a method by which the stability can be greatly improved so that the produced neon beam can be used effectively for nanomachining applications.

  18. Frequency-doubled Alexandrite laser for use in periodontology: a scanning electron microscopic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Hennig, Thomas

    1996-12-01

    During prior studies it could be demonstrated that engaging a frequency double Alexandrite-laser allows a fast and strictly selective ablation of supra- and subgingival calculus. Furthermore, the removal of unstained microbial plaque was observed. First conclusions were drawn following light microscopic investigations on undecalcified sections of irradiated teeth. In the present study the cementum surface after irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite-laser was observed by means of a scanning electron microscope. After irradiation sections of teeth were dried in alcohol and sputtered with gold. In comparison irradiated cementum surfaces of unerupted operatively removed wisdom teeth and tooth surfaces after the selective removal of calculus were investigated. A complete removal of calculus was observed as well as a remaining smooth surface of irradiated cementum.

  19. A scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of the cerebral aqueduct in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Meller, S T; Dennis, B J

    1993-09-01

    An examination of the surface of the cerebral aqueduct with the scanning electron microscope revealed that the walls of the cerebral aqueduct were so heavily ciliated that most of the ependymal surface was obscured, yet certain specialized supraependymal structures could be discerned lying on (or embedded within) this matt of cilia. These structures were determined by transmission electron microscopy and Golgi analysis to be either macrophages, supraependymal neurons, dendrites from medial periaqueductal gray neurons, or axons of unknown origin. Some axons, which were found to contain vesicles, appeared to make synaptic contacts with ependymal cells. Using the transmission electron microscope, the ependymal lining was found to consist of two different cell types: normal ependymal cells and tanycytes which have a long tapering basal process that was observed to contact blood vessels or, more rarely, seemed to terminate in relation to neuronal elements. While there have been previous reports on the structure of the third and lateral ventricles in other species, there are limited reports in the rabbit. The present report is not only the first description for the rabbit, but it is the first complete scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of the cerebral aqueduct in any species.

  20. A method of dynamic chromatic aberration correction in low-voltage scanning electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Khursheed, Anjam

    2005-07-01

    A time-of-flight concept that dynamically corrects for chromatic aberration effects in scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) is presented. The method is predicted to reduce the microscope's chromatic aberration by an order of magnitude. The scheme should significantly improve the spatial resolution of low-voltage scanning electron microscopes (LVSEMs). The dynamic means of correcting for chromatic aberration also allows for the possibility of obtaining high image resolution from electron guns that have relatively large energy spreads.

  1. Morphological characteristics of monosodium urate: a transmission electron microscopic study of intact natural and synthetic crystals.

    PubMed

    Paul, H; Reginato, A J; Schumacher, H R

    1983-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopic studies of synthetic and natural monosodium urate crystals dried on formvar coated grids showed identical internal structures in all crystals. At higher magnification the crystals' surface showed angular or wavy irregularities, and more rarely some crystals appeared to have other tiny crystals on the surface. Protein-like surface coating was not observed except in crystals from one asymptomatic patient in whom synovial fluid was loaded with monosodium urate crystals, but no inflammatory cells were present. Heated synthetic monosodium urate crystals retained the ultrastructural characteristics in their interior but they lost their needle or rod-like shape. Transmission electron microscopic study of monosodium urate crystals dried on formvar coated grids provides a quick method of investigating crystal ultrastructure.

  2. Morphological characteristics of monosodium urate: a transmission electron microscopic study of intact natural and synthetic crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, H; Reginato, A J; Schumacher, H R

    1983-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopic studies of synthetic and natural monosodium urate crystals dried on formvar coated grids showed identical internal structures in all crystals. At higher magnification the crystals' surface showed angular or wavy irregularities, and more rarely some crystals appeared to have other tiny crystals on the surface. Protein-like surface coating was not observed except in crystals from one asymptomatic patient in whom synovial fluid was loaded with monosodium urate crystals, but no inflammatory cells were present. Heated synthetic monosodium urate crystals retained the ultrastructural characteristics in their interior but they lost their needle or rod-like shape. Transmission electron microscopic study of monosodium urate crystals dried on formvar coated grids provides a quick method of investigating crystal ultrastructure. Images PMID:6830327

  3. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  4. Enhanced microscopic nonlinear optical properties of novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiang; Pan, Lin; Jia, Kun; Tang, Xianzhong

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, novel Y-type chromophores with dual electron donor groups, containing either styryl or azobenzene based π-conjugated bridge structures, were synthesized and their chemical structures, molecular configuration, microscopic optical properties as well as thermal properties were systematically characterized. The experimental results indicated that eight times increasing of second-order molecular hyperpolarizability as well as 50-100 nm blue shift of maximum absorption band for azobenzene based chromophore were observed by introducing Y-type dual electron donor groups, which was derived from the highly efficient 'total charge transfer' in this kind of chromophore as confirmed by the density functional theory calculation.

  5. Semiautomatic classification of cementitious materials using scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumetz, Lucas; Mura, Mauro Dalla; Meulenyzer, Samuel; Lombard, Sébastien; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2015-11-01

    Segmentation and classification are prolific research topics in the image processing community. These topics have been increasingly used in the context of analysis of cementitious materials on images acquired with a scanning electron microscope. Indeed, there is a need to be able to detect and to quantify the materials present in a cement paste in order to follow the chemical reactions occurring in the material even days after the solidification. We propose a new approach for segmentation and classification of cementitious materials based on the denoising of the data with a block-matching three-dimensional (3-D) algorithm, binary partition tree (BPT) segmentation, support vector machines (SVM) classification, and interactivity with the user. The BPT provides a hierarchical representation of the spatial regions of the data, allowing a segmentation to be selected among the admissible partitions of the image. SVMs are used to obtain a classification map of the image. This approach combines state-of-the-art image processing tools with user interactivity to allow a better segmentation to be performed, or to help the classifier discriminate the classes better. We show that the proposed approach outperforms a previous method when applied to synthetic data and several real datasets coming from cement samples, both qualitatively with visual examination and quantitatively with the comparison of experimental results with theoretical ones.

  6. Scanning electron microscopic and profilometric study of different sharpening stones.

    PubMed

    Andrade Acevedo, Roberto Antonio; Cardozo, Ana Karina Veloso; Sampaio, José Eduardo César

    2006-01-01

    Scaling and root planing contribute to the recovery of periodontal health. All periodontal instruments loose their fine cutting angle after use. To maintain this angle, correct sharpening is required using specifically designed stones. The characteristics of sharpening stones can be compared to the blade of the instruments and also transported to root surface during instrumentation. Root smoothness is related to the quality of the blade. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of 9 sharpening stones by scanning electron microscopic and profilometric analyses. Ceramic and Neumar stones were very fine and both may be recommended to maintain the sharpness of the instruments. Arkansas, Thompson and CE stones presented greater roughness with very regular and round particles, and are suitable for maintenance of the cutting angle. In addition, these stones may be indicated for the routine sharpening of the instruments that are partly dull. Oxide Aluminum, Carborundum and JON stones were the coarsest with large irregular particles and may be indicated for initial sharpening of totally dull instruments with completion of sharpening with finer stones.

  7. Visualizing bone porosities using a tabletop scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, D.; DaPonte, J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Daniel, D.; Alter, L.

    2010-04-01

    Pores are naturally occurring entities in bone. Changes in pore size and number are often associated with diseases such as Osteoporosis and even microgravity during spaceflight. Studying bone perforations may yield great insight into bone's material properties, including bone density and may contribute to identifying therapies to halt or potentially reverse bone loss. Current technologies used in this field include nuclear magnetic resonance, micro-computed tomography and the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) 2, 5. However, limitations in each method limit further advancement. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using a new generation of analytical instruments, the TM-1000 tabletop, SEM with back-scatter electron (BSE) detector, to analyze cortical bone porosities. Hind limb unloaded and age-based controlled mouse femurs were extracted and tested in vitro for changes in pores on the periosteal surface. An important advantage of using the tabletop is the simplified sample preparation that excludes extra coatings, dehydration and fixation steps that are otherwise required for conventional SEM. For quantitative data, pores were treated as particles in order to use an analyze particles feature in the NIH ImageJ software. Several image-processing techniques for background smoothing, thresholding and filtering were employed to produce a binary image suitable for particle analysis. It was hypothesized that the unloaded bones would show an increase in pore area, as the lack of mechanical loading would affect bone-remodeling processes taking place in and around pores. Preliminary results suggest only a slight different in frequency but not in size of pores between unloaded and control femurs.

  8. Microscopic Observation of Self-Propagation of Calcifying Nanoparticles (Nanobacteria)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, Grace; McKay, David S.; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    2007-01-01

    Biologists typically define living organisms as carbon and water-based cellular forms with :self-replication" as the fundamental trait of the life process. However, this standard dictionary definition of life does not help scientists to categorize self-replicators like viruses, prions, proteons and artificial life. CNP also named nanobacteria were discovered in early 1990s as about 100 nanometer-sized bacteria-like particles with unique apatite mineral-shells around them, and found to be associated with pathological-calcification related diseases. Although CNP have been isolated and cultured from mammalian blood and diseased calcified tissues, and their biomineralizing properties well established, their biological nature and self-replicating capability have always been severely challenged. The terms "self-replication", "self-assembly" or "self-propagation" have been widely used for all systems including nanomachines, crystals, computer viruses and memes. In a simple taxonomy, all biological and non-biological "self replicators", have been classified into "living" or "nonliving" based on the properties of the systems and the amount of support they require to self-replicate. To enhance our understanding about self-replicating nature of CNP, we have investigated their growth in specific culture conditions using conventional inverted light microscope and BioStation IM, Nikon s latest time-lapse imaging system. Their morphological structure was examined using scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. This present study, in conjunction with previous findings of metabolic activity, antibiotic sensitivity, antibody specificity, morphological aspects and infectivity, all concomitantly validate CNP as living self-replicators.

  9. Scanning electron microscopic study on Toxascaris transfuga (Rudolphi, 1819) (Nematoda).

    PubMed

    Tenora, F; Mituch, J; Hovorka, I

    1989-01-01

    The authors present original observations on the species Toxascaris transfuga obtained by means of scanning electron microscopy. Attention was paid to the structure of head end, morphology of papillae of the head and abdominal end, specific morphological traits of cloacae edges and morphology of the egg surface. Presented are morphological criteria which apparently differentiate the species T. transfuga from T. leonina (Linstow, 1902). T. transfuga and T. multipapillata Kreis, 1938 seem to be conspecific.

  10. Microscopic observations of self-healing products in calcareous fly ash mortars.

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The results of microstructural characterization of mortars containing fly ash class C (High Calcium Fly Ash) from combustion of lignite are presented. The evaluation of the microstructure was performed using scanning electron microscope, optical, and confocal microscope. The tested beams were bent till the crack and microcracks opening, which were healed during the different curing time. The results showed that the replacement of cement with fly ash class C influenced the process of crack healing. The addition of HCFA, at both 30% and 60%, speeds up the self-healing process in cracks and particularly in micro-cracks. In the research, the completely filling up of the cracks by new phases has not been observed, only the beginning of such process has been noticed.

  11. Electron channeling contrast imaging studies of nonpolar nitrides using a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Kraeusel, S.; Bruckbauer, J.; Edwards, P. R.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C.; Mauder, C.; Heuken, M.; Wang, K. R.; Trampert, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Giesen, C.; Day, A. P.

    2013-04-08

    Threading dislocations, stacking faults, and associated partial dislocations significantly degrade the optical and electrical properties of materials such as non-polar III-nitride semiconductor thin films. Stacking faults are generally difficult to detect and quantify with existing characterization techniques. We demonstrate the use of electron channeling contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope to non-destructively reveal basal plane stacking faults terminated by partial dislocations in m-plane GaN and InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures grown on {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy.

  12. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; ...

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with nomore » observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.« less

  13. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Eberle, A L; Mikula, S; Schalek, R; Lichtman, J; Knothe Tate, M L; Zeidler, D

    2015-08-01

    Electron-electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers.

  14. Electron microscopic examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components.

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T T; Maratea, D; Bishop, P L

    1983-01-01

    This research documents in situ wastewater biofilm formation, structure, and physiochemical properties as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cationized ferritin was used to label anionic sites of the biofilm glycocalyx for viewing in thin section. Wastewater biofilm formation paralleled the processes involved in marine biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dramatic increase in cell colonization and growth over a 144-h period. Constituents included a variety of actively dividing morphological types. Many of the colonizing bacteria were flagellated. Filaments were seen after primary colonization of the surface. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a dominant gram-negative cell wall structure in the biofilm constituents. At least three types of glycocalyces were observed. The predominant glycocalyx possessed interstices and was densely labeled with cationized ferritin. Two of the glycocalyces appeared to mediate biofilm adhesion to the substratum. The results suggest that the predominant glycocalyx of this thin wastewater biofilm serves, in part, to: (i) enclose the bacteria in a matrix and anchor the biofilm to the substratum and (ii) provide an extensive surface area with polyanionic properties. Images PMID:6881965

  15. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: configuration and applications.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Koji; Kitamura, Shinich; Konyuba, Yuji; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2014-12-01

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240°C and sintered.

  16. Electron holography study of magnetization behavior in the writer pole of a perpendicular magnetic recording head by a 1 MV transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kei; Ishida, Yoichi; Akashi, Tetsuya; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic domain structure of the writer poles of perpendicular magnetic recording heads was studied using electron holography. Although the domain structure of a 100-nm-thick writer pole could be observed with a 300 kV transmission electron microscope, that of the 250-nm-thick writer pole could not be analyzed due to the limited transmission capability of the instrument. On the other hand, the detailed domain structure of the 250-nm-thick writer pole was successfully analyzed by a 1 MV electron microscope using its high transmission capability. The thickness and material dependency of the domain structure of a writer pole were discussed.

  17. Transmission electron microscopic method for gene mapping on polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Davidson, N

    1981-11-01

    A transmission electron microscope method for gene mapping by in situ hybridization to Drosophila polytene chromosomes has been developed. As electron-opaque labels, we use colloidal gold spheres having a diameter of 25 nm. The spheres are coated with a layer of protein to which Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA is photochemically crosslinked. Poly(dT) tails are added to the 3' OH ends of these DNA strands, and poly(dA) tails are added to the 3' OH ends of a fragmented cloned Drosophila DNA. These probe--dA strands are hybridized in situ to polytene chromosome squashes. Gold spheres are linked to the hybridized probe--dA strands by A.T base pairing. The sphere positions relative to the chromosome bands can be observed by transmission electron microscopy. The method shows low background and high resolution.

  18. Investigation of magnetic domains in Ni Mn Ga alloys with a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y.; Heczko, O.; Söderberg, O.; Hannula, S.-P.; Lindroos, V. K.

    2005-10-01

    The magnetic domains of martensite have been investigated with a scanning electron microscope in three Ni-Mn-Ga alloys with five-layered, seven-layered and non-layered (T) martensite structure. Type I magnetic contrast provides an overview of the domain pattern. This contrast arises from the stray field of the specimen and it is observed in a secondary-electron image. The type II magnetic contrast of a backscattered electron image gives the detailed magnetic microstructure together with the crystal morphology. A stripe domain pattern is formed in all the alloys when there is one dominant martensite variant in the sample. The second minor variant might be distorted due to interaction with the magnetic domain structure of the major variant. The mechanism of the deformation is not entirely clear and a tentative explanation for this deformation is suggested.

  19. Apparatus and methods for controlling electron microscope stages

    DOEpatents

    Duden, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for generating an image of a specimen with a microscope (e.g., TEM) are disclosed. In one aspect, the microscope may generally include a beam generator, a stage, a detector, and an image generator. A plurality of crystal parameters, which describe a plurality of properties of a crystal sample, are received. In a display associated with the microscope, an interactive control sphere based at least in part on the received crystal parameters and that is rotatable by a user to different sphere orientations is presented. The sphere includes a plurality of stage coordinates that correspond to a plurality of positions of the stage and a plurality of crystallographic pole coordinates that correspond to a plurality of polar orientations of the crystal sample. Movement of the sphere causes movement of the stage, wherein the stage coordinates move in conjunction with the crystallographic coordinates represented by pole positions so as to show a relationship between stage positions and the pole positions.

  20. Scanning-electron-microscope study of normal-impingement erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the erosion of annealed copper and aluminum surfaces produced by both single- and multiple-particle impacts. Macroscopic 3.2 mm diameter steel balls and microscopic, brittle erodant particles were projected by a gas gun system so as to impact at normal incidence at speeds up to 140 m/sec. During the impacts by the brittle erodant particles, at lower speeds the erosion behavior was similar to that observed for the larger steel balls. At higher velocities, particle fragmentation and the subsequent cutting by the radial wash of debris created a marked change in the erosion mechanism.

  1. Leakage radiation microscope for observation of non-transparent samples.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Ye, Fan; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2014-09-22

    We describe a leakage radiation microscope technique that can be used to extend the leakage radiation microscopy to optically non-transparent samples. In particular, two experiments are presented, first to demonstrate that acquired images with our configuration correspond to the leakage radiation phenomenon and second, to show possible applications by directly imaging a plasmonic structure that previously could only be imaged with a near-field scanning optical microscope. It is shown that the measured surface plasmon wavelength and propagation length agree with theoretically-calculated values. This configuration opens the possibility to study important effects where samples are optically non-transparent, as in plasmonic cavities and single hole plasmonic excitation, without the use of time-consuming near-field scanning optical microscopy.

  2. Charging/discharge events in coated spacecraft polymers during electron beam irradiation in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeremuszkin, G.; Latrèche, M.; Wertheimer, M. R.

    2001-12-01

    Spacecraft, such as those operating in geosynchronous orbit (GEO), can be subjected to intense irradiation by charged particles, for example high-energy (e.g. 20 keV) electrons. The surfaces of dielectric materials (for example, polymers used as "thermal blankets") can therefore become potential sites for damaging electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulse events. We simulate these conditions by examining small specimens of three relevant polymers (polyimide, polyester and fluoropolymer), both bare and coated, in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The coatings examined include commercial indium-tin oxide (ITO), and thin films of SiO 2 and a-Si:H deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). All coatings are found to greatly modify the observed ESD behavior, compared with that of the bare polymer counterparts. These observations are explained in terms of the model for ESD pulses proposed by Frederickson.

  3. Comparison of the myotoxic effects of levobupivacaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine: an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Öz Gergin, Özlem; Yıldız, Karamehmet; Bayram, Adnan; Sencar, Leman; Coşkun, Gülfidan; Yay, Arzu; Biçer, Cihangir; Özdamar, Saim; Polat, Sait

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the myotoxic effects of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and levobupivacaine which were applied intramuscularly to rat skeletal muscle. Forty Wistar-Albino rats were divided into four groups. In the study, .5% bupivacaine (Group B), .5% ropivacaine (Group R), .5% levobupivacaine (Group L), or .9% normal saline (Group SF) was applied intramuscularly to the right gastrocnemius muscle of rats. The rats in each group were sacrificed on the second day after injection. Sections of muscle samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin for light microscopic investigation and prepared for the evaluation of ultrastructural changes in the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy. All three local anesthetic agents caused qualitatively similar skeletal muscle damage. The most observed muscle damage was in Group B, muscle damage of Group R was less than that of Group B, and the least damage was seen in Group L quantitatively. Electron microscopic examination of each group that caused cellular damage was qualitatively similar. The most subcellular damage was observed in the group receiving bupivacaine, less was seen in the ropivacaine group, and the least was observed in the levobupivacaine group. The results indicated that bupivacaine caused more myotoxic damage than the other two agents in the skeletal muscle of rats and that levobupivacaine caused less myotoxic damage than both bupivacaine and ropivacaine at the cell and tissue levels.

  4. Analytical electron microscope based on scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, Masanari; Tsuneta, Ruriko; Anan, Yoshihiro; Nakamae, Koji

    2017-01-01

    An analytical electron microscope based on the scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (STEM-WDX) to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements has been developed. In this study, a large-solid-angle multi-capillary x-rays lens with a focal length of 5 mm, long-time data acquisition (e.g. longer than 26 h), and a drift-free system made it possible to visualize boron-dopant images in a Si substrate at a detection limit of 0.2 atomic percent.

  5. Effects of X radiation on the retina of the albino rabbit as viewed with the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.C.; Barsa-Newton, M.C.; Wardly, J.

    1980-02-01

    The eyes of albino rabbits were exposed in vivo to 7000 rad of X radiation, and the retinas were examined with a scanning electron microscope 24 and 72 h after irradiation. The rods and cones of the retina were observed to show the most severe damage.

  6. In vitro phagocytosis of exogenous collagen by fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament: an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, E L; Brunette, D M; Melcher, A H

    1979-01-01

    There have been numerous electron microscopic reports of apparent phagocytosis of collagen by fibroblasts and other cells in vivo. We have developed an in vitro system which, to the best of our knowledge, will permit for the first time the study of regulatory mechanisms governing phagocytosis and digestion of collagen fibres. Cells were cultured from explants of monkey periodontal ligament, subcultured, and grown to confluence in alpha-MEM plus 15% fetal calf serum plus antibiotics. The confluent cells were then cultured together with minced rat tail tendon collagen in alpha-MEM lacking proline, lysine, glycine and fetal calf serum for up to 7 days, after which they were processed for electron microscopy. Intracellular collagen profiles could be seen in cultured cells that were associated with exogenous collagen fibrils as early as 24 hours after addition of the collagen. Through electron microscopic examination of serial sections of the culture, we have demonstrated: (1) that fibroblasts can phagocytose collagen; (2) that the observed intracellular collagen is not the result of aggregation of endogenous synthesized collagen; (3) that it is not possible to base a decision as to whether a collagen fibril has been phagocytosed in whole or in part by the type of vesicle with which it is associated; (4) that cleavage of collagen into small pieces may not be a necessary prelude to its phagocytosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 (cont.) Fig. 4 Fig. 6 (cont.) Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:108237

  7. Image-based autonomous micromanipulation system for arrangement of spheres in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaya, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Hideki T.; Saito, Shigeki; Koyano, Koichi; Yamaura, Tomio; Sato, Tomomasa

    2004-06-01

    The micromanipulation technique in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been attracting interest as a technique to produce microstructures such as three-dimensional photonic crystals or advanced high-density electronic circuits. However, it is difficult to fabricate a large-scale structure or to conduct a systematic experiment using numbers of structures, as long as we rely on manually operated micromanipulation. In this study, we constructed an automatic system which arranges 10-μm-sized microspheres into a given two-dimensional pattern in a SEM. The spheres are picked up by touching with the center of the planar tip of a probe (needle), and placed on the substrate by moving the contact point to the edge of the tip and inclining the probe. The positions of the probe and the spheres are visually recognized from the SEM image from above and the optical microscope image from the side. The generalized Hough transform, which can robustly detect arbitrary shape from the edge fragments, is employed for the image recognition. Contact force information obtained by a force sensor with a resolution of 14 μN is also utilized for the control. Completely automatic rearrangement of randomly sprinkled metal spheres with a diameter of 30 μm into arbitrary patterns was successfully demonstrated. Autonomous micromanipulation technique under the observation of a SEM would contribute not merely to laboratories but also to the opto-electronics industry.

  8. Using electron microscopes to look into the lung.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Matthias; Knudsen, Lars; Hegermann, Jan; Wrede, Christoph; Grothausmann, Roman; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2016-12-01

    In the nineteenth century, there was a dispute about the existence of a lung alveolar epithelium which remained unsolved until the invention of electron microscopy (EM) and its application to the lung. From the early 1960s, Ewald Weibel became the master of lung EM. He showed that the alveolar epithelium is covered with a lining layer containing surfactant. Weibel also explained the phenomenon of "non-nucleated plates" observed already in 1881 by Albert Kölliker. Weibel's most significant contribution was to the development of stereological methods. Therefore, quantitative characterization of lung structure revealing structure-function relationships became possible. Today, the spectrum of EM methods to study the fine structure of the lung has been extended significantly. Cryo-preparation techniques are available which are necessary for immunogold labeling of molecules. Energy-filtering techniques can be used for the detection of elements. There have also been major improvements in stereology, thus providing a very versatile toolbox for quantitative lung phenotype analyses. A new dimension was added by 3D EM techniques. Depending on the desired sample size and resolution, the spectrum ranges from array tomography via serial block face scanning EM and focused ion beam scanning EM to electron tomography. These 3D datasets provide new insights into lung ultrastructure. Biomedical EM is an ever-developing field. Its high resolution remains unparalleled. Moreover, EM has the unique advantage of providing an "open view" into cells and tissues within their full architectural context. Therefore, EM will remain an indispensable tool for a better understanding of the lung's functional design.

  9. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-07

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.

  10. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored.

  11. Using the scanning electron microscope on the production line to assure quality semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adolphsen, J. W.; Anstead, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The use of the scanning electron microscope to detect metallization defects introduced during batch processing of semiconductor devices is discussed. A method of determining metallization integrity was developed which culminates in a procurement specification using the scanning microscope on the production line as a quality control tool. Batch process control of the metallization operation is monitored early in the manufacturing cycle.

  12. Electron microscopic detection of human papillomavirus particles in oral proliferative lesions.

    PubMed

    Broich, G; Sasaki, T

    1989-11-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) has been demonstrated in a series of benign proliferative lesions of skin and mucosae. To prove the distribution of HPV in the oral proliferative lesions at the ultrastructural level, we performed electron microscopic analysis of 10 specimens taken from 5 patients through large excisional biopsy. All of them were diagnosed pathologically as fibropapilloma. In each patient, specimens were taken from both clinically evident proliferative lesions and clinically normal surrounding mucosa. Obtained specimens were fixed in a glutaraldehyde solution and processed for routine ultrathin sectioning. Before electron microscopic observation, the tissue sections on copper grids were subjected to amylase digestion of glycogen granules. Spherical viral particles of 40-55 nm in diameter were detected the non-keratinized epithelial cells in all specimens examined. Of particular interest were the large amounts of viral particles found in the cytoplasmic matrix and nuclei (especially on their chromatin masses) of the cells in intermediate and surface layers, which did not form a crystal array. All the membranous cell organelles of epithelial cells were, however, devoid of viral particles. Some viral particles were distributed in the extracellular spaces of an intermediate layer. Viral particles were hardly observed in the cells of a basal/suprabasal and prickle cell layers. There were no significant differences in the HPV distribution between the cells derived from the proliferative lesion and those derived from the surrounding normal mucosa.

  13. AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF CULTURED RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Bunge, Richard P.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Peterson, Edith R.

    1965-01-01

    Explants prepared from 17- to 18-day fetal rat spinal cord were allowed to mature in culture; such preparations have been shown to differentiate and myelinate in vitro (61) and to be capable of complex bioelectric activity (14–16). At 23, 35, or 76 days, the cultures were fixed (without removal from the coverslip) in buffered OsO4, embedded in Epon, sectioned, and stained for light and electron microscopy. These mature explants generally are composed of several strata of neurons with an overlying zone of neuropil. The remarkable cytological similarity between in vivo and in vitro nervous tissues is established by the following observations. Cells and processes in the central culture mass are generally closely packed together with little intervening space. Neurons exhibit well developed Nissl bodies, elaborate Golgi regions, and subsurface cisternae. Axosomatic and axodendritic synapses, including synaptic junctions between axons and dendritic spines, are present. Typical synaptic vesicles and increased membrane densities are seen at the terminals. Variations in synaptic fine structure (Type 1 and Type 2 synapses of Gray) are visible. Some characteristics of the cultured spinal cord resemble infrequently observed specializations of in vivo central nervous tissue. Neuronal somas may display minute synapse-bearing projections. Occasionally, synaptic vesicles are grouped in a crystal-like array. A variety of glial cells, many apparently at intermediate stages of differentiation, are found throughout the otherwise mature explant. There is ultrastructural evidence of extensive glycogen deposits in some glial processes and scattered glycogen particles in neuronal terminals. This is the first description of the ultrastructure of cultured spinal cord. Where possible, correlation is made between the ultrastructural data and the known physiological properties of these cultures. PMID:14326105

  14. In situ fatigue loading stage inside scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter; Brewer, David

    1988-01-01

    A fatigue loading stage inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was developed. The stage allows dynamic and static high-magnification and high-resolution viewing of the fatigue crack initiation and crack propagation processes. The loading stage is controlled by a closed-loop servohydraulic system. Maximum load is 1000 lb (4450 N) with test frequencies ranging up to 30 Hz. The stage accommodates specimens up to 2 inches (50 mm) in length and tolerates substantial specimen translation to view the propagating crack. At room temperature, acceptable working resolution is obtainable for magnifications ranging up to 10,000X. The system is equipped with a high-temperature setup designed for temperatures up to 2000 F (1100 C). The signal can be videotaped for further analysis of the pertinent fatigue damage mechanisms. The design allows for quick and easy interchange and conversion of the SEM from a loading stage configuration to its normal operational configuration and vice versa. Tests are performed entirely in the in-situ mode. In contrast to other designs, the NASA design has greatly extended the life of the loading stage by not exposing the bellows to cyclic loading. The loading stage was used to investigate the fatigue crack growth mechanisms in the (100)-oriented PWA 1480 single-crystal, nickel-based supperalloy. The high-magnification observations revealed the details of the crack growth processes.

  15. Morphogenesis of Coronavirus HCoV-NL63 in Cell Culture: A Transmission Electron Microscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, Jan M; Banach, Bridget; Baker, Susan C

    2008-01-01

    NL63 (HCoV-NL63) is a recently discovered human coronavirus that causes respiratory disease in infants and young children. NL63 productively infects LLCMK2 cells and ciliated epithelial cells of human airway cell cultures. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies of NL63 infected LLCMK2 cells revealed that virions are spherical, spiked, and range from 75 to 115 nm in diameter. Virus replication predominantly occurs on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), both perinuclear and cytoplasmic, and the Golgi. Plasma membrane budding was occasionally observed. As virus production increased, aberrant viral forms appeared with greater frequency. Unusual inclusions were present in infected cells including tubular and laminated structures. Pleomorphic double membrane-bound vesicles (DMV), measuring roughly 140 to 210 nm in diameter, were observed. The virus was released via exocytosis and cell lysis. In summary, we report the key morphologic characteristics of NL63 infection observed by TEM analysis.

  16. Naturally Occurring Immune-Complex Glomerulonephritis in Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca irus). I. Light, Immunofluorescence, and Electron Microscopic Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    IMMUNOGLOBULINS, *VETERINARY MEDICINE, *MONKEYS, PATHOLOGY, FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUES, DISEASES , GAMMA GLOBULIN, ANTIGENS, ANTIBODIES, HISTOLOGY, ETIOLOGY, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, MICROSCOPES, IMMUNOLOGY.

  17. A photonic microscope for observing real-time vibrations of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Arthur W.; Zhang, Mian; Wiederhecker, Gustavo; Lipson, Michal; McEuen, Paul L.

    Vibrational modes in suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are incredibly responsive to small forces, which makes them a prime candidate as nano-mechanical sensors. However, transducing this mechanical motion into detectable signals is a considerable challenge. Electrical detection, which has been the prevailing method thus far, suffers a significant impedance mismatch to macroscopic electronics and is thus susceptible to noise. We demonstrate an alternative: optical readout of CNT vibrations in real-time. By combining a unique CNT microtweezer platform with a high-finesse optical microdisk resonator, we dramatically enhance the naturally small optical cross-section of CNTs and thereby achieve unprecedented detection sensitivity. With this novel photonic microscope, we directly measure the thermal Brownian motion of CNTs and observe marked spectral diffusion at room temperature, shedding light on CNTs unique thermal physics. By further enhancing the optical coupling, we demonstrate optical amplification of CNT vibrations and directly observe period-doubling in the amplified state.

  18. Direct observations of atomic diffusion by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, M.; Kopf, D.; Utlaut, M.; Parker, N. W.; Crewe, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope to study the diffusion of heavy atoms on thin film substrates of low atomic number has been investigated. We have shown that it is possible to visualize the diffusion of individual uranium atoms adsorbed to thin carbon film substrates and that the observed motion of the atoms does not appear to be induced by the incident electron beam. Images PMID:16592396

  19. An alternative to the flat substrate method of preparing electron microscope autoradiographs.

    PubMed

    Ball, A K; Tidball, J G; Dickson, D H

    1981-07-01

    Difficulty with flat substrate methods of preparing electron microscope autoradiographs has prompted reconsideration and refinement of a technique in which an electron microscope grid is placed beneath the specimen prior to dipping. This technique avoids the problems commonly associated with the direct application of emulsions to specimen grids, and should be considered as an alternative to flat substrate techniques when difficulty with these methods is encountered.

  20. In situ electronic characterization of graphene nanoconstrictions fabricated in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye; Merchant, Christopher A; Drndić, Marija; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2011-12-14

    We report electronic measurements on high-quality graphene nanoconstrictions (GNCs) fabricated in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the first measurements on GNC conductance with an accurate measurement of constriction width down to 1 nm. To create the GNCs, freely suspended graphene ribbons were fabricated using few-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The ribbons were loaded into the TEM, and a current-annealing procedure was used to clean the material and improve its electronic characteristics. The TEM beam was then used to sculpt GNCs to a series of desired widths in the range 1-700 nm; after each sculpting step, the sample was imaged by TEM and its electronic properties were measured in situ. GNC conductance was found to be remarkably high, comparable to that of exfoliated graphene samples of similar size. The GNC conductance varied with width approximately as G(w)=(e2/h)w0.75, where w is the constriction width in nanometers. GNCs support current densities greater than 120 μA/nm2, 2 orders of magnitude higher than that which has been previously reported for graphene nanoribbons and 2000 times higher than that reported for copper.

  1. In Situ Electronic Characterization of Graphene Nanoconstrictions Fabricated in a Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ye; Merchant, Christopher; Drndic, Marija; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2012-02-01

    We report electronic measurements on high quality graphene nanoconstrictions (GNCs) fabricated in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the first measurements on GNC conductance with an accurate measurement of constriction width down to 1 nm. To create the GNCs, freely suspended graphene ribbons were fabricated using few-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The ribbons were loaded into the TEM, and a current-annealing procedure was used to clean the material and improve its electronic characteristics. The TEM beam was then used to sculpt GNCs to a series of desired widths in the range 1-700 nm; after each sculpting step, the sample was imaged by TEM and its electronic properties were measured in situ. GNC conductance was found to be remarkably high, comparable to that of exfoliated graphene samples of similar size. The GNC conductance varied with width approximately as G(w) = (e^2/h)w^0.75, where w is the constriction width in nanometers. GNCs support current densities greater than 120 μA/nm^2, 2 orders of magnitude higher than that which has been previously reported for graphene nanoribbons and 2000 times higher than that reported for copper.

  2. Microscopic observation of titanomagnetite grains during palaeointensity experiments of volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidefumi; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2014-01-01

    Titanomagnetite (Tmt) grains, some partially maghemitized, of various oxidation levels were microscopically observed under reflected light as a function of temperature step in a Königsberger Thellier Thellier experiment in air. The reflected light microscopy indicated that the brownish colour of homogeneous Tmt turned blue at ˜300 °C. This false blue colour was caused by submicron scale rugged stripes on the surface, according to scanning electron microscope observations, which was made after the final heating step. The typical grey-to-bluish colour of maghemitized parts of Tmt grains turned to a brownish colour at ˜300 °C, indicating inversion of titanomaghemite to a mixture of magnetite and ilmenite (Ilm) or haematite (Hem). Although these observations were from Tmt grains on the sample surface, oxidation must have proceeded similarly within samples because the surface changes in the Tmt grains were highly correlated with behaviour of data points on Arai plots. Alterations in Tmt after heating at 610 °C in air for increasing times from 10 to 500 min were evaluated by reflected light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy at the end of the experiment. Mottled patches gradually emerged in the Tmt grains during subsequent heatings. However, the formation of new Ilm lamellae was not observed, even after the final 500 min heating. In conclusion, the alteration of Tmt during laboratory heating in air at ˜600 °C is likely not due to the typical high-temperature oxidation that forms trellis-type Ilm lamellae. Below ˜400 °C, the process should be closer to low-temperature oxidation. On the other hand, maghemitized parts of Tmt grains invert instantaneously at 300 °C, and a trellis-type structure with Hem lamellae soon emerges when heated at 610 °C.

  3. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE AND ITS ENVIRONMENT IN A VESICULAR LEPROUS LESION.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, T; Convit, J

    1962-01-01

    Imaeda, Tamotsu (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela) and Jacinto Convit. Electron microscope study of Mycobacterium leprae and its environment in a vesicular leprous lesion. J. Bacteriol. 83:43-52. 1962.-Biopsied specimens of a borderline leprosy lesion were observed with the electron microscope. In this lesion, the majority of Mycobacterium leprae were laden with cytoplasmic components. The bacilli were separated from the cytoplasm of host cells by an enclosing membrane, thus differing from the environment of well-developed lepra cells in lepromatous lesions. The cell wall is composed of a moderately dense layer. A diffuse layer is discernible outside the cell wall, separated from it by a low density space. It is suggested that the cell wall is further coated by a low density layer, although the nature of the outermost diffuse layer has not yet been determined. The plasma membrane consists of a double layer, i.e., dense inner and outer layers separated by a low density space. The outer layer is closely adjacent to the cell wall. In the region where the outer layer of the plasma membrane enters the cytoplasm and is transformed into a complex membranous structure, the inner layer encloses this membranous configuration. Together they form the intracytoplasmic membrane system. In the bacterial cytoplasm, moderately dense, presumably polyphosphate bodies are apparent. As neither these bodies nor the intracytoplasmic membrane system are visible in the degenerating bacilli, it seems probable that these two components represent indicators of the state of bacillary activity.

  4. Scanning electron microscope studies of human metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shemilt, L A; Estandarte, A K C; Yusuf, M; Robinson, I K

    2014-03-06

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to evaluate potential chromosome preparations and staining methods for application in high-resolution three-dimensional X-ray imaging. Our starting point is optical fluorescence microscopy, the standard method for chromosomes, which only gives structural detail at the 200 nm scale. In principle, with suitable sample preparation protocols, including contrast enhancing staining, the surface structure of the chromosomes can be viewed at the 1 nm level by SEM. Here, we evaluate a heavy metal nucleic-acid-specific stain, which gives strong contrast in the backscattered electron signal. This study uses SEM to examine chromosomes prepared in different ways to establish a sample preparation protocol for X-rays. Secondary electron and backscattered electron signals are compared to evaluate the effectiveness of platinum-based stains used to enhance the contrast.

  5. Further Electron Microscope Studies of a Mouse Leukemia Induced by Cell-Free Filtrates

    PubMed Central

    de Harven, Etienne; Friend, Charlotte

    1960-01-01

    Further electron microscope observations of tissues from Swiss and DBA/2 mice with leukemia transmissible by cell-free filtrates to the adult animals are presented. The cytological characteristics of the leukemic cells, the fine structure of the viruses, and the virus host-cell relationships have been examined. The leukemia virus has an external diameter averaging 870 A, and appears to be formed at the level of cell membranes by a budding process. The viruses are observed most frequently in intercellular spaces, but are also often found within cytoplasmic vacuoles of megakaryocytes. Lead hydroxide staining was applied to the study of the leukemic material. The viruses have been found to have a considerable affinity for this lead salt, only comparable in intensity to the affinity shown by RNP granules for the same chemical. PMID:13814781

  6. Electron Microscopic Analysis of Hippocampal Axo‐Somatic Synapses in a Chronic Stress Model for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Csabai, Dávid; Seress, László; Varga, Zsófia; Ábrahám, Hajnalka; Miseta, Attila; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress can alter the number and morphology of excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, but nothing is known about the effect of stress on inhibitory synapses. Here, we used an animal model for depression, the chronic mild stress model, and quantified the number of perisomatic inhibitory neurons and their synapses. We found reduced density of parvalbumin‐positive (PV+) neurons in response to stress, while the density of cholecystokinin‐immunoreactive (CCK+) neurons was unaffected. We did a detailed electron microscopic analysis to quantify the frequency and morphology of perisomatic inhibitory synapses in the hippocampal CA1 area. We analyzed 1100 CA1 pyramidal neurons and 4800 perisomatic terminals in five control and four chronically stressed rats. In the control animals we observed the following parameters: Number of terminals/soma = 57; Number of terminals/100 µm cell perimeter = 10; Synapse/terminal ratio = 32%; Synapse number/100 terminal = 120; Average terminal length = 920nm. None of these parameters were affected by the stress exposure. Overall, these data indicate that despite the depressive‐like behavior and the decrease in the number of perisomatic PV+ neurons in the light microscopic preparations, the number of perisomatic inhibitory synapses on CA1 pyramidal cells was not affected by stress. In the electron microscope, PV+ neurons and the axon terminals appeared to be normal and we did not find any apoptotic or necrotic cells. This data is in sharp contrast to the remarkable remodeling of the excitatory synapses on spines that has been reported in response to stress and depressive‐like behavior. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27571571

  7. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    EBERLE, AL; MIKULA, S; SCHALEK, R; LICHTMAN, J; TATE, ML KNOTHE; ZEIDLER, D

    2015-01-01

    Electron–electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers. Lay Description The composition of our world and our bodies on the very small scale has always fascinated people, making them search for ways to make this visible to the human eye. Where light microscopes reach their resolution limit at a certain magnification, electron microscopes can go beyond. But their capability of visualizing extremely small features comes at the cost of a very small field of view. Some of the questions researchers seek to answer today deal with the ultrafine structure of brains, bones or computer chips. Capturing these objects with electron microscopes takes a lot of time – maybe even exceeding the time span of a human being – or new tools that do the job much faster. A new type of scanning electron microscope scans with 61 electron beams in parallel, acquiring 61 adjacent images of the sample at the same time a conventional scanning electron microscope captures one of these images. In principle, the multibeam scanning electron microscope’s field of view is 61 times larger and therefore coverage of the sample surface can be accomplished in less time. This enables researchers to think about large-scale projects, for example in the rather new field of connectomics. A very good introduction to imaging a brain at nanometre resolution can be found within course material from Harvard University on http://www.mcb80x.org/# as featured media entitled ‘connectomics’. PMID:25627873

  8. On the interpretation of electron microscopic maps of biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin; Moore, Peter B

    2017-01-01

    The images of flash-frozen biological macromolecules produced by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) can be used to generate accurate, three-dimensional, electric potential maps for these molecules that resemble X-ray-derived electron density maps. However, unlike electron density maps, electric potential maps can include negative features that might for example represent the negatively charged, backbone phosphate groups of nucleic acids or protein carboxylate side chains, which can complicate their interpretation. This study examines the images of groups that include charged atoms that appear in recently-published, high-resolution EM potential maps of the ribosome and β-galactosidase. Comparisons of simulated maps of these same groups with their experimental counterparts highlight the impact that charge has on the appearance of electric potential maps.

  9. Transmission electron microscopic examination of phosphoric acid fuel cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pebler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to physically characterize tested and untested phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) components. Those examined included carbon-supported platinum catalysts, carbon backing paper, and Teflon-bonded catalyst layers at various stages of fabrication and after testing in pressurized PAFC's. Applicability of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy for identifying the various phases was explored. The discussion focuses on the morphology and size distribution of platinum, the morphology and structural aspects of Teflon in catalyst layers, and the structural evidence of carbon corrosion. Reference is made to other physical characterization techniques where appropriate. A qualitative model of the catalyst layer that emerged from the TEM studies is presented.

  10. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall’s long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a SiO2 surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  11. Light and electron microscopic observations of fabrication, release, and fate of biphasic secretion granules produced by epididymal epithelial principal cells of the fan-throated lizard Sitana ponticeriana cuvier.

    PubMed

    Akbarsha, M A; Tamilarasan, V; Kadalmani, B

    2006-06-01

    The epididymis of the fan-throated lizard Sitana ponticeriana was examined with light and transmission electron microscopy to understand the cellular mechanisms of fabrication of secretion granules in epithelial principal cells, granule release into the lumen, and the fate of the dense structured granules after reaching the lumen. Principal cells of the ductus epididymis, except at the cauda, secrete electron-dense biphasic granules copiously, which decrease in abundance from the initial segment to corpus. The principal cell possesses a prominent Golgi apparatus and all versions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), rough, smooth, and sparsely granulated. The material of the dense portion of the secretion granules, after processing at the Golgi apparatus, appears to accumulate in large ER cisternae in the supranuclear cytoplasm. It undergoes condensation when the cisternae become condensing vacuoles. Mitochondria appear to play a role in dense granule formation. The condensing vacuoles are displaced toward the apical cytoplasm when the material of the less dense portion is added to the condensing vacuoles at the Golgi area. Thus, the less dense and dense portions of the secretion granules are secreted and added to the condensing vacuoles separately. The composite granules are released into the lumen by exocytosis when the less dense portion merges with the luminal content, whereas the dense portion maintains its structured identity. The latter, initially measuring 1-2 microm in diameter, increases in size several times. It is inferred that these granules release their content gradually, resulting in the appearance of vacuoles, and suggesting that the granules have an insoluble matrix in which there is a sparingly soluble material. The substance leaching out of the granules appears to contribute to keeping the sperm quiescent and alive during storage in the male reproductive tract.

  12. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Mirvish, Ezra D.; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  13. Electron-microscopic study of Sn-chrisotile asbestos nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, L. M.; Kalmykov, A. E.; Fokin, A. V.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2014-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the structural state of tin in Sn-chrisotile asbestos nanocomposite. It is shown that tin in the nanocomposite forms a system of nanowires, which, in turn, consist of crystallites of different lengths. Various orientational relations between the matrix and crystallites are revealed.

  14. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  15. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES ON A HOMOLOGOUS SERIES OF SATURATED PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINES.

    PubMed

    ELBERS, P F; VERVERGAERT, P H

    1965-05-01

    Three homologous saturated phosphatidylcholines were studied by electron microscopy after tricomplex fixation. The results are compared with those obtained by x-ray diffraction analysis of the same and some other homologous compounds, in the dry crystalline state and after tricomplex fixation. By electron microscopy alternating dark and light bands are observed which are likely to correspond to phosphatide double layers. X-Ray diffraction reveals the presence of lamellar structures of regular spacing. The layer spacings obtained by both methods are in good agreement. From the electron micrographs the width of the polar parts of the double layers can be derived directly. The width of the carboxylglycerylphosphorylcholine moiety of the layers is found by extrapolating the x-ray diffraction data to zero chain length of the fatty acids. When from this width the contribution of the carboxylglyceryl part of the molecules is subtracted, again we find good agreement with the electron microscope measurements. An attempt has been made to account for the different layer spacings measured in terms of orientation of the molecules within the double layers.

  16. In-situ straining and time-resolved electron tomography data acquisition in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hata, S; Miyazaki, S; Gondo, T; Kawamoto, K; Horii, N; Sato, K; Furukawa, H; Kudo, H; Miyazaki, H; Murayama, M

    2016-12-18

    This paper reports the preliminary results of a new in-situ three-dimensional (3D) imaging system for observing plastic deformation behavior in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) as a directly relevant development of the recently reported straining-and-tomography holder [Sato K et al (2015) Development of a novel straining holder for transmission electron microscopy compatible with single tilt-axis electron tomography. Microsc. 64: 369-375]. We designed an integrated system using the holder and newly developed straining and image-acquisition software and then developed an experimental procedure for in-situ straining and time-resolved electron tomography (ET) data acquisition. The software for image acquisition and 3D visualization was developed based on the commercially available ET software TEMography(TM) We achieved time-resolved 3D visualization of nanometer-scale plastic deformation behavior in a Pb-Sn alloy sample, thus demonstrating the capability of this system for potential applications in materials science.

  17. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2014-04-03

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  18. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    ScienceCinema

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2016-07-12

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  19. A transmission electron microscopic study of the Bethany iron meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, F.; Axon, H. J.

    1985-02-01

    The Bethany iron meteorite, which is a part of the Gibeon shower, is a fine octahedrite with zoned plessite fields of various sizes. The optically irresolvable microstructural details inside the plessitic fields have been studied by transmission electron microscopy, and the crystallographic relationships between the primary kamacite (alpha) and the parent taenite (gamma), and between the alpha and gamma particles in the coarse plessite, have been examined using electron diffraction. In the case of primary kamacite, the orientation-relationship with gamma was close to the Nishiyama-Wasserman relationship, whereas, for the plessitic alpha, the orientation-relationship with gamma was close to Kurdjumov-Sachs. It was also found that the (111)-gamma and (110)-alpha planes were not strictly parallel. Additionally, measurements of the composition profile through the zoned plessite have been made using STEM microanalysis technique, and related to microstructure.

  20. Microscopic probabilistic model for the simulation of secondary electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.T.F.

    2002-07-29

    We provide a detailed description of a model and its computational algorithm for the secondary electron emission process. The model is based on a broad phenomenological fit to data for the secondary emission yield (SEY) and the emitted-energy spectrum. We provide two sets of values for the parameters by fitting our model to two particular data sets, one for copper and the other one for stainless steel.

  1. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F.; McDonald, Sarah M.

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  2. Design of an electron microscope phase plate using a focused continuous-wave laser

    PubMed Central

    Müller, H; Jin, Jian; Danev, R; Spence, J; Padmore, H; Glaeser, R M

    2010-01-01

    We propose a Zernike phase contrast electron microscope that uses an intense laser focus to convert a phase image into a visible image. We present the relativistic quantum theory of the phase shift caused by the laser–electron interaction, study resonant cavities for enhancing the laser intensity and discuss applications in biology, soft-materials science and atomic and molecular physics. PMID:20808709

  3. Design of an electron microscope phase plate using a focused continuous-wave laser

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.; Muller, H; Jin, Jian; Danev, R; Padmore, H; Glaeser, R.M

    2010-07-01

    We propose a Zernike phase contrast electron microscope that uses an intense laser focus to convert a phase image into a visible image. We present the relativistic quantum theory of the phase shift caused by the laser–electron interaction, study resonant cavities for enhancing the laser intensity and discuss applications in biology, soft-materials science and atomic and molecular physics.

  4. [The evaluation of acrylic resins for the study of nondecalcified human teeth with the light and electronic microscopes].

    PubMed

    Botti, F; Martignoni, M; Scala, C; Cocchia, D

    1995-04-01

    Resin embedding of human teeth for light and transmission electron microscopic studies becomes difficult without previous decalcification. The limited and slow infiltration of the resin into hard tissues may cause problems during preparation and observation of the samples. Moreover the type of resin that is used may affect the morphologic preservation of both tissues and cellular elements. Recently there has been an increasing number of studies on the application of acrylic resins in light and electron microscopy, in order to overcome problems encountered with the use of epoxy resins still utilized in morphologic studies. We compared different acrylic resins (Technovit 7200 VLC, LR White, LR Gold, Bioacryl) in order to understand which one was more suitable for undecalcified human dental tissues under light and transmission electron microscope. Evaluation of such resins was performed using the following criteria: ease of cutting with ultramicrotome, soft and hard tissues infiltration, uptake of tissue stains for both light and electron microscopy, morphologic preservation and stability under electron beam. This study, carried out on the pulp area comprising predentin and dentin, showed excellent quality of Bioacryl and LR Gold, the two resins presenting, by far, the best results among all the different types tested. The optimal morphologic preservation obtained with such resins is indicated for light and electron microscopic studies, allowing their application in different fields of dental research.

  5. Light microscopic, electron microscopic, and immunohistochemical comparison of Bama minipig (Sus scrofa domestica) and human skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Jun-ying; Shang, Hai-tao; Liu, Chang-e; Wang, Yong; Niu, Rong; Wu, Jun; Wei, Hong

    2010-04-01

    Here we sought to evaluate the possibility of using Chinese Bama miniature pig skin as a suitable animal model for human skin. Morphologic features of the skin of Bama miniature pigs resemble those of human skin, including skin layer thickness, development of a superficial vascular system, structure of the dermal-epidermal interface, and extracellular matrix. The characteristics and densities of Langerhans cells, fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells, and mast cells were similar between Bama pig and human skin. Immunohistochemistry showed that miniature pigs and humans have the same antigenic determinants of human laminin, fibronectin, filaggrin, collagen I, collagen III, collagen IV, and keratin but not CD34, ICAM1, or S100. In addition, collagen type I from Bama miniature pig skin exhibited physicochemical characteristics resembling those of human skin, in regard to HPLC chromatography, UV spectroscopy, amino-acid composition, and SDS-PAGE analysis. Given these results, we concluded that Bama miniature pigs have great potential as a human skin model and for developing dermal substitute materials in wound repair. However, we also observed some disparities between the skin of Bama miniature pigs and humans, including pigment cell distribution, sweat gland types, and others. Therefore, further studies are needed to completely evaluate the effects of these interspecies differences on the actual application of the model.

  6. Germination, growth rates, and electron microscope analysis of tomato seeds flown on the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Bridgers, Kevin; Brown, Cecelia Wright

    1995-01-01

    The tomato seeds were flown in orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for nearly six years. During this time, the tomato seeds received an abundant exposure to cosmic radiation and solar wind. Upon the return of the LDEF to earth, the seeds were distributed throughout the United States and 30 foreign countries for analysis. The purpose of the experiment was to determine the long term effect of cosmic rays on living tissue. Our university analysis included germination and growth rates as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray analysis of the control as well as Space-exposed tomato seeds. In analyzing the seeds under the Electron Microscope, usual observations were performed on the nutritional and epidermis layer of the seed. These layers appeared to be more porous in the Space-exposed seeds than on the Earth-based control seeds. This unusual characteristic may explain the increases in the space seeds growth pattern. (Several test results show that the Space-exposed seeds germinate sooner than the Earth-Based seeds. Also, the Space-exposed seeds grew at a faster rate). The porous nutritional region may allow the seeds to receive necessary nutrients and liquids more readily, thus enabling the plant to grow at a faster rate. Roots, leaves and stems were cut into small sections and mounted. After sputter coating the specimens with Argon/Gold Palladium Plasma, they were ready to be viewed under the Electron Microscope. Many micrographs were taken. The X-ray analysis displayed possible identifications of calcium, potassium, chlorine, copper, aluminum, silicon, phosphate, carbon, and sometimes sulfur and iron. The highest concentrations were shown in potassium and calcium. The Space-exposed specimens displayed a high concentration of copper and calcium in the two specimens. There was a significantly high concentration of copper in the Earth-based specimens, whereas there was no copper in the Space-exposed specimens.

  7. Construction of a new type of low-energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-05-01

    We describe a new type of scanning electron microscope which works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field and focussed to a spot using a microscale einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 microns, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification, at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size and an atomic emission site with give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 Å), and because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100nm in diameter the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 Å) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids) it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field-emission and can be up to a million times larger than in a typical (high-energy) electron microscope. The construction of this microscope, based on using a nanotip electron source which is mounted on a nanopositioner so that it can be positioned at the correct point adjacent to the microscope, entrance aperture, is described. In this geometry the scanning is achieved by moving the sample using piezos. Two methods for the construction of the microscope column are reviewed and the results of preliminary tests are described. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam, electron microscope with atomic resolution are described. It can be used in either scanning mode or diffraction mode. The major advantage over existing microscopes is that because it works at very low

  8. Three-dimensional architecture of hair-cell linkages as revealedby electron-microscopic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Auer, Manfred; Koster, Bram; Ziese, Ulrike; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Volkmann, Niels; Wang, Da Neng; Hudspeth, A. James

    2006-07-28

    The senses of hearing and balance rest upon mechanoelectrical transduction by the hair bundles of hair cells in the inner ear. Located at the apical cellular surface, each hair bundle comprises several tens of stereocilia and a single kinocilium that are interconnected by extracellular proteinaceous links. Using electron-microscopic tomography of bullfrog saccular sensory epithelia, we examined the three-dimensional structures of ankle or basal links, kinociliary links, and tip links. We observed clear differences in the dimensions and appearances of the three links. We found two distinct populations of tip links suggestive of the involvement of two proteins or splice variants. We noted auxiliary links connecting the upper portions of tip links to the taller stereocilia. Tip links and auxiliary links show a tendency to adopt a globular conformation when disconnected from the membrane surface.

  9. Electron microscopic investigation of the diffusion of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase into corn starch granules.

    PubMed

    Helbert, W; Schülein, M; Henrissat, B

    1996-10-01

    A method for the direct electron microscopic observation of amylases in interaction with starch granules is presented. The technique involves immuno-gold labeling of the enzymes and cross-sectioning of hydrated starch granules. This approach allows the analysis of the internal degradation of starch with a concomitant visualization of enzymes at the sites of hydrolysis. The visualization of enzymes at the surface, inside the channel and inside the core of the degraded granules shows that the alpha-amylase molecules first proceed from the surface toward the center (centripetal hydrolysis). Then the core is completely degraded from within by erosion of its periphery (centrifugal hydrolysis). In the first case (centripetal hydrolysis), the enzymes act by progressing along the polysaccharide chains. By contrast, the centrifugal hydrolysis leads to even erosion, indicative of a more diffusive motion of the enzymes.

  10. Pseudocyanotic pigmentation of the skin induced by amiodarone: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Delage, C.; Lagacé, R.; Huard, J.

    1975-01-01

    An unusual bluish discolouration of the nose was noticed in a woman 9 months after she had begun treatment with a coronary vasodilator, amiodarone hydrochloride. Cutaneous biopsies of the nose were obtained 6 and 9 months later for light and electron microscopic studies. In the dermis were histiocytes containing cytoplasmic yellow-brown granules with histochemical properties of melanin and lipofuscin. Ultrastructurally the granules appeared as lysosomal membrane-bound dense bodies similar to lipofuscin. Similar granules were observed at diascopy in both corneas. The pathogenesis is obscure. A storage disease involving the drug or its metabolites cannot be ruled out. Another possibility is that amiodarone accelerates the normal cellular autophagocytosis, resulting in increased production of lipofuscin, which then accumulates in lysosomes because of a deficiency in lipolytic enzymes. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:47784

  11. Real-Time Measurement of Nanotube Resonator Fluctuations in an Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsioutsios, I.; Tavernarakis, A.; Osmond, J.; Verlot, P.; Bachtold, A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical resonators based on low-dimensional materials provide a unique platform for exploring a broad range of physical phenomena. The mechanical vibrational states are indeed extremely sensitive to charges, spins, photons, and adsorbed masses. However, the roadblock is often the readout of the resonator, since the detection of the vibrational states becomes increasingly difficult for smaller resonators. Here, we report an unprecedentedly sensitive method to detect nanotube resonators with effective masses in the 10^-20 kg range. We use the beam of an electron microscope to resolve the mechanical fluctuations of a nanotube in real-time for the first time. We obtain full access to the thermally-driven Brownian motion of the resonator, both in space and time domains. Our results establish the viability of carbon nanotube resonator technology at room temperature and pave the way towards the observation of novel thermodynamics regimes and quantum effects in nano-mechanics.

  12. Real-Time Measurement of Nanotube Resonator Fluctuations in an Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical resonators based on low-dimensional materials provide a unique platform for exploring a broad range of physical phenomena. The mechanical vibrational states are indeed extremely sensitive to charges, spins, photons, and adsorbed masses. However, the roadblock is often the readout of the resonator, because the detection of the vibrational states becomes increasingly difficult for smaller resonators. Here, we report an unprecedentedly sensitive method to detect nanotube resonators with effective masses in the 10–20 kg range. We use the beam of an electron microscope to resolve the mechanical fluctuations of a nanotube in real-time for the first time. We obtain full access to the thermally driven Brownian motion of the resonator, both in space and time domains. Our results establish the viability of carbon nanotube resonator technology at room temperature and pave the way toward the observation of novel thermodynamics regimes and quantum effects in nanomechanics. PMID:28186773

  13. Nanoscale Mechanics of Carbon Nanotube Evaluated by Nanoprobe Manipulation in Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzumaki, Toru; Mitsuda, Yoshitaka

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the nanoscale mechanics of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by a nanoprobe manipulation technique in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The force applied to individual MWCNTs was measured using a commercially available Si cantilever installed in a manipulator. It was clearly observed that this force is released by buckling like deformation. The average Young’s modulus of the MWCNTs estimated using a conventional mechanical theory was approximately 1.1 TPa. Although the MWCNTs exhibited a high flexibility, the deformation of the MWCNTs above the elastic limit led to structural defects, which resulted in a local plastic deformation. Nanomechanics measurements in the TEM revealed that the structural defects cause stiffness deterioration.

  14. Real-Time Measurement of Nanotube Resonator Fluctuations in an Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Tsioutsios, I; Tavernarakis, A; Osmond, J; Verlot, P; Bachtold, A

    2017-03-08

    Mechanical resonators based on low-dimensional materials provide a unique platform for exploring a broad range of physical phenomena. The mechanical vibrational states are indeed extremely sensitive to charges, spins, photons, and adsorbed masses. However, the roadblock is often the readout of the resonator, because the detection of the vibrational states becomes increasingly difficult for smaller resonators. Here, we report an unprecedentedly sensitive method to detect nanotube resonators with effective masses in the 10(-20) kg range. We use the beam of an electron microscope to resolve the mechanical fluctuations of a nanotube in real-time for the first time. We obtain full access to the thermally driven Brownian motion of the resonator, both in space and time domains. Our results establish the viability of carbon nanotube resonator technology at room temperature and pave the way toward the observation of novel thermodynamics regimes and quantum effects in nanomechanics.

  15. Continual skin peeling syndrome. An electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, A K; Ellis, C N; Beals, T F; Woo, T Y

    1986-01-01

    We encountered a patient with continual skin peeling syndrome, a rare disorder in which generalized, noninflammatory exfoliation of the stratum corneum occurs. Although scaling occurred spontaneously in our patient, he was also able to manually peel sheets of skin without bleeding or pain. Histologically, there was separation of corneocytes above the granular cell layer. Ultrastructural examination revealed an unusual type of intracellular cleavage, in which the plasma membrane of the "peeling" cell remained firmly adherent to the underlying cell while the upper part of the cell exfoliated. Unique intercellular electron-dense globular deposits were localized to the stratum corneum.

  16. Horner's syndrome: an electron microscopic study of a human iris.

    PubMed Central

    McCartney, A. C.; Riordan-Eva, P.; Howes, R. C.; Spalton, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopy was performed on the irides of a man with a history of a long standing Horner's syndrome which resulted in iris heterochromia. Comparison of his normal brown iris with the depigmented blue iris showed depletion of anterior border cells and absence of sympathetic nerve fibres. Stromal melanocyte numbers were also diminished but melanosome numbers within the residual cells were not significantly different. Postnatal maintenance of stromal and anterior border zone pigmentation, derived from the neural crest, would appear to be dependent on an intact sympathetic nerve supply in contrast to the iris pigment epithelium which remains normally unaffected in Horner's syndrome. Images PMID:1486079

  17. [Electron microscopic study of pathogenic bacteria on environmental objects].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, I B; Lenchenko, E M

    1998-01-01

    The morphological picture of different bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Yersinia enterocolitica O3, Y.pseudotuberculosis 1, Y.frederiksenii, Y.intermedia, Y.kristensenii) on environmental objects was studied with the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bacteria adhered to the surface of pieces of fodder, egg shell, cabbage leaves and form microcolonies, whose morphology was similar to colonies, grown on nutrient media. The cells produced extracellular substances, seen in SEM as integuments. These integuments were gourd to protect the population from the action of unfavorable factors.

  18. Transmission electron microscopic study of polytene chromosome 2R from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Waddell, J

    1982-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for studying polytene chromosome squashes by transmission electron microscope (TEM) is described. This technique provides close correlation between the light microscopic image and the TEM image. Fine structures of the chromosomes are preserved. The band pattern of region 44 A to 50 F of the chromosome 2 R has been analyzed and compared with Bridges' map (1935) and Lefevre's photographic representation (1976).

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF THE AMYLOID FIBRIL

    PubMed Central

    Shirahama, Tsuranobu; Cohen, Alan S.

    1967-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of the fibrous component of amyloid has been analyzed by means of high resolution electron microscopy of negatively stained isolated amyloid fibrils and of positively stained amyloid fibrils in thin tissue sections. It was found that a number of subunits could be resolved according to their dimensions. The following structural organization is proposed. The amyloid fibril, the fibrous component of amyloid as seen in electron microscopy of thin tissue sections, consists of a number of filaments aggregated side-by-side. These amyloid filaments are approximately 75–80 A in diameter and consist of five (or less likely six) subunits (amyloid protofibrils) which are arranged parallel to each other, longitudinal or slightly oblique to the long axis of the filament. The filament has often seemed to disperse into several longitudinal rows. The amyloid protofibril is about 25–35 A wide and appears to consist of two or three subunit strands helically arranged with a 35–50-A repeat (or, less likely, is composed of globular subunits aggregated end-to-end). These amyloid subprotofibrillar strands measure approximately 10–15 A in diameter. PMID:6036530

  20. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, D.R.; Blum, A.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 ??m thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ???105 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  1. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, David R.; Blum, Alex E.; Chipera, Stephen J.

    2006-09-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 μm thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ˜10 5 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  2. Uterine vasculature of the pregnant pig: a scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A A

    1976-04-01

    Colored cold setting acrylic cement was injected through catheters into the arteries and veins of sixteen gravid uteri obtained from pigs at various stages of pregnancy. After the cement had set hard, the reproductive tracts were macerated in concentrated acid and the vascular casts resulting were washed clean of digested tissues. Small pieces of cast were coated with gold and viewed by means of a scanning electron microscope. Early in pregnancy the capillary network consists of low parallel ranks of ridges and troughs; later, cross ridging was observed which developed in complexity as pregnancy progressed. The density of capillaries comprising the microvascular network also increased towards term. No comparable changes were noted in the relatively less well vascularized areas surrounding the mouths of the uterine glands. This technique surmounted the problems of obtaining an adequate depth of focus for viewing the capillary network of the gravid uterus with the light microscope. The relationships that the blood vessels bore to the overlying epithelial layers were discussed and the inference tentatively drawn that blood flow at the capillary level was from ridge top to trough base.

  3. Microscopic observations of osteoblast growth on micro-arc oxidized β titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsien-Te; Chung, Chi-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Ching; Tang, Chin-Hsin; He, Ju-Liang

    2013-02-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in orthopedic and dental implants, owing to their excellent physical properties and biocompatibility. By using the micro-arc oxidation (MAO), we generated anatase-rich (A-TiO2) and rutile-rich (R-TiO2) titanium dioxide coatings, individually on β-Ti alloy, in which the latter achieved an enhanced in vitro and in vivo performance. Thoroughly elucidating how the osteoblasts interact with TiO2 coatings is of worthwhile interest. This study adopts the focused ion beam (FIB) to section off the TiO2 coated samples for further scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation. The detailed crystal structures of the TiO2 coated specimens are also characterized. Experimental results indicate osteoblasts adhered more tenaciously and grew conformably with more lamellipodia extent on the R-TiO2 specimen than on the A-TiO2 and raw β-Ti specimens. FIB/SEM cross-sectional images of the cell/TiO2 interface revealed micro gaps between the cell membrane and contact surface of A-TiO2 specimen, while it was not found on the R-TiO2 specimen. Additionally, the number of adhered and proliferated cells on the R-TiO2 specimen was visually greater than the others. Closely examining EDS line scans and elemental mappings of the FIB/TEM cross-sectional images of the cell/TiO2 interface reveals both the cell body and interior space of the TiO2 coating contain nitrogen and sulfur (the biological elements in cell). This finding supports the assumption that osteoblast can grow into the porous structure of TiO2 coatings and demonstrating that the R-TiO2 coating formed by MAO serves the best for β-Ti alloys as orthopedic and dental implants.

  4. Transmission electron microscope cells for use with liquid samples

    DOEpatents

    Khalid, Waqas; Alivisatos, Paul A.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-08-09

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and devices related to transmission electron microscopy cells for use with liquids. In one aspect a device includes a substrate, a first graphene layer, and a second graphene layer. The substrate has a first surface and a second surface. The first surface defines a first channel, a second channel, and an outlet channel. The first channel and the second channel are joined to the outlet channel. The outlet channel defines a viewport region forming a though hole in the substrate. The first graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including an interior area of the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel. The second graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including open regions defined by the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel.

  5. [Electron microscopic studies in enzootic muscular dystrophy in cattle].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, V; Kursa, J

    1979-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to examine the sekeletal muscles of young cattle, aged between 13 and 24 months, with spontaneous enzootic myodystrophy (nutritional myodegeneration due to selenium deficiency, white muscle disease). The animals had been received from Sumava District, Southern Bohemia, an area known for shortage of selenium. Outbreaks of clinical illness were recorded from them between four and 18 days from the beginning of grazing. Most of the ultrastructural changes included decomposition of myofibrils and hyalinisation of fibres as well as defective fibril synthesis (Z-striation abnormality), some of the latter phenomena recordable even from regenerating fibre. However, minor disorders only were established from the mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum, components of sarcoplasm, and vessels. There were far-reaching ultrastructural similarities to nutritional myodegeneration of sheep. The changes recorded are likely to suggest a specific role played by selenium in the formation and preservation of myofibril proteins.

  6. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki Shimakura, Tomokazu; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Furutsu, Tadao; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Müller, Heiko; Haider, Maximilian; Tonomura, Akira

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44 pm.

  7. Intercomparison of lateral scales of scanning electron microscopes and atomic force microscopes in research institutes in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Korpelainen, Virpi; Bergstrand, Sten; Karlsson, Helge; Lillepea, Lauri; Lassila, Antti

    2014-04-01

    An intercomparison of lateral scales of scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and atomic force microscopes (AFM) in various research laboratories in Northern Europe was organized by the local national metrology institutes. In this paper are presented the results of the comparison, with also an example uncertainty budget for AFM grating pitch measurement. Grating samples (1D) were circulated among the participating laboratories. The participating laboratories were also asked about the calibration of their instruments. The accuracy of the uncertainty estimates seemed to vary largely between the laboratories, and for some laboratories the appropriateness of the calibration procedures could be considered. Several institutes (60% of all results in terms of En value) also had good comprehension of their measurement capability. The average difference from reference value was 6.7 and 10.0 nm for calibrated instruments and 20.6 and 39.9 nm for uncalibrated instruments for 300 nm and 700 nm gratings, respectively. The correlation of the results for both nominally 300 and 700 nm gratings shows that a simple scale factor calibration would have corrected a large part of the deviations from the reference values.

  8. Electron microscopic examination of the dormant spore and the sporulation of Paenibacillus motobuensis strain MC10.

    PubMed

    Iida, Ken-ichiro; Amako, Kazunobu; Takade, Akemi; Ueda, Yasuichi; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported a new species Paenibacillus motobuensis. The type strain MC10 was stained gram-negative, but had a gram-positive cell wall structure and its spore had a characteristic star shape. The spore and sporulation process of P. motobuensis strain MC10 were examined by electron microscopy using the technique of freeze-substitution in thin sectioning. The structure of the dormant spore was basically the same as that of the other Bacillus spp. The core of the spore was enveloped with two main spore components, the cortex and the spore coat. In thin section, the spore showed a star-shaped image, which was derived from the structure of the spore coat, which is composed of three layers, namely the inner, middle and outer spore coat. The middle coat was an electron-dense thick layer and had a characteristic ridge. By scanning electron microscopic observation, the ridges were seen running parallel to the long axis of the oval-shaped spore. The process of sporulation was essentially the same as that of the other Bacillus spp. The forespore was engulfed by the mother cell membrane, then the spore coat and the cortex were accumulated in the space between the mother cell membrane and forespore membrane. The mother cell membrane seemed to participate in the synthesis of the spore coat. MC10 strain showed almost identical heat resistance to that of B. subtilis.

  9. Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiba, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Nagamura, N.; Toyoda, S.; Kumigashira, H.; Oshima, M.; Amemiya, K.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.

    2011-11-01

    In order to achieve nondestructive observation of the three-dimensional spatially resolved electronic structure of solids, we have developed a scanning photoelectron microscope system with the capability of depth profiling in electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). We call this system 3D nano-ESCA. For focusing the x-ray, a Fresnel zone plate with a diameter of 200 μm and an outermost zone width of 35 nm is used. In order to obtain the angular dependence of the photoelectron spectra for the depth-profile analysis without rotating the sample, we adopted a modified VG Scienta R3000 analyzer with an acceptance angle of 60° as a high-resolution angle-resolved electron spectrometer. The system has been installed at the University-of-Tokyo Materials Science Outstation beamline, BL07LSU, at SPring-8. From the results of the line-scan profiles of the poly-Si/high-k gate patterns, we achieved a total spatial resolution better than 70 nm. The capability of our system for pinpoint depth-profile analysis and high-resolution chemical state analysis is demonstrated.

  10. Scanning photoelectron microscope for nanoscale three-dimensional spatial-resolved electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Horiba, K.; Oshima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nagamura, N.; Toyoda, S.; Kumigashira, H.; Amemiya, K.; Senba, Y.; Ohashi, H.

    2011-11-15

    In order to achieve nondestructive observation of the three-dimensional spatially resolved electronic structure of solids, we have developed a scanning photoelectron microscope system with the capability of depth profiling in electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). We call this system 3D nano-ESCA. For focusing the x-ray, a Fresnel zone plate with a diameter of 200 {mu}m and an outermost zone width of 35 nm is used. In order to obtain the angular dependence of the photoelectron spectra for the depth-profile analysis without rotating the sample, we adopted a modified VG Scienta R3000 analyzer with an acceptance angle of 60 deg. as a high-resolution angle-resolved electron spectrometer. The system has been installed at the University-of-Tokyo Materials Science Outstation beamline, BL07LSU, at SPring-8. From the results of the line-scan profiles of the poly-Si/high-k gate patterns, we achieved a total spatial resolution better than 70 nm. The capability of our system for pinpoint depth-profile analysis and high-resolution chemical state analysis is demonstrated.

  11. Nanoelectrical probing with multiprobe SPM Systems compatible with scanning electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Ignatov, Andrey; Taha, Hesham; Zhinoviev, Oleg; Komissar, Anatoly; Krol, Alexander; Lewis, David

    2011-03-01

    A scanning electron microscope compatible platform that permits multiprobe atomic force microscopy based nanoelectrical characterization will be described. To achieve such multiple parameter nanocharacterization with scanning electron microscope compatibility involves a number of innovations both in instrument and probe design. This presentation will focus on how these advances were achieved and the results obtained with such instrumentation on electrical nano-characterization and electrical nano-manipulation. The advances include: 1. Specialized scanners; 2. An ultrasensitive feedback mechanism based on tuning forks with no optical feedback interference that can induce carriers in semiconductor devices; and 3. Unique probes compatible with multiprobe geometries in which the probe tips can be brought into physical contact with one another. Experiments will be described with such systems that will include multiprobe electrical measurements with metal and glass coated coaxial nanowires of platinum. This combination of scanning electron microscopes integrated with multiprobe instrumentation allows for important applications not available today in the field of semiconductor processing technology.

  12. Electron microscopic visualization of trp operon expression in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    French, S; Martin, K; Patterson, T; Bauerle, R; Miller, O L

    1985-07-01

    Transcriptional activity of plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant trp operons was visualized in cell lysates of Salmonella typhimurium. Plasmid and transcription-unit sizes varied with the size of the cloned operon. Following 3-(3-indolyl)acrylic acid derepression, all operons of a particular type exhibited the same high level of transcriptional activity. An estimated 11-14 transcripts must be initiated each minute to maintain the 190-base-pair spacing of RNA polymerases observed on the promoter-proximal half of the wild-type trp operon. A decline in RNA polymerase density was observed on promoter-distal portions of cloned trp operons, which may be attributable to premature transcription termination accompanying translation inhibition due to indolylacrylic acid's interference with normal tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase activity.

  13. Removal of Vesicle Structures From Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred J.; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruction. In our approach, we estimate the subspace of the vesicle structures and project the micrographs onto the orthogonal complement of this subspace. We construct a 2d statistical model of the vesicle structure, based on higher order singular value decomposition (HOSVD), by considering the structural symmetries of the vesicles in the polar coordinate plane. We then propose to lift the HOSVD model to a novel hierarchical model by summarizing the multidimensional HOSVD coefficients by their principal components. Along with the model, a solid vesicle normalization scheme and model selection criterion are proposed to make a compact and general model. The results show that the vesicle structures are accurately separated from the background by the HOSVD model that is also able to adapt to the asymmetries of the vesicles. This is a promising result and suggests even wider applicability of the proposed approach in learning and removal of statistical structures. PMID:26642456

  14. Environmental scanning electron microscope imaging examples related to particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Wight, S A; Zeissler, C J

    1993-08-01

    This work provides examples of some of the imaging capabilities of environmental scanning electron microscopy applied to easily charged samples relevant to particle analysis. Environmental SEM (also referred to as high pressure or low vacuum SEM) can address uncoated samples that are known to be difficult to image. Most of these specimens are difficult to image by conventional SEM even when coated with a conductive layer. Another area where environmental SEM is particularly applicable is for specimens not compatible with high vacuum, such as volatile specimens. Samples from which images were obtained that otherwise may not have been possible by conventional methods included fly ash particles on an oiled plastic membrane impactor substrate, a one micrometer diameter fiber mounted on the end of a wire, uranium oxide particles embedded in oil-bearing cellulose nitrate, teflon and polycarbonate filter materials with collected air particulate matter, polystyrene latex spheres on cellulosic filter paper, polystyrene latex spheres "loosely" sitting on a glass slide, and subsurface tracks in an etched nuclear track-etch detector. Surface charging problems experienced in high vacuum SEMs are virtually eliminated in the low vacuum SEM, extending imaging capabilities to samples previously difficult to use or incompatible with conventional methods.

  15. A transmission electron microscope study of Itokawa regolith grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, Eve L.

    2014-12-01

    Analyses of two olivine-rich particles from asteroid 25143 Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa mission (RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211) show evidence for space weathering processes that occurred in the Itokawa regolith. Submicrometer impact-derived crystalline and glassy grains are observed adhering to the surfaces of the particles, including albite, orthopyroxene, olivine, augite, pyrrhotite, troilite, melt splashes, and melt spherules. Both particles are surrounded by 50- to 100-nm-thick disordered rims that are nanocrystalline, not amorphous, and compositionally similar to the grain cores. A pyrrhotite grain attached to RA-QD02-0125 also shows a disordered rim that is sulfur-depleted with nanophase Fe metal grains decorating the outermost surface. The structurally disordered rims on the Hayabusa particles likely result from atomic displacement damage from solar wind ions given the similarity of the rim thickness compared to the implantation depth of solar wind ions. The outermost few nanometers of the disordered rims are more Si-rich and Mg- and Fe-depleted relative to the cores of the grains and likely represent a minor accumulation of impact-generated vapors or sputter deposits. Nanophase Fe metal particles are present in the rim on RA-QD02-0211 but were not detected in the rim on RA-QD02-0125. Solar flare particle tracks are observed in RA-QD02-0211 but were not observed in RA-QD02-0125, suggesting short surface exposure times for the particles, on the order of approximately 103 to 104 years. This result implies that the optical effects of space weathering develop far more rapidly than was previously recognized.

  16. The scanning electron microscope as a tool in space biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Normal erythrocytes are disc-shaped and are referred to here descriptively as discocytes. Several morphologically variant forms occur nomally but in rather small amounts, usually less than one percent of total. It has been shown though, that spiculed variant forms referred to as echinocytes are generated in significant amounts at zero g. Normal red cells have been stressed in vitro in an effort to duplicate the observed discocyte-echinocyte transformation at zero g. The significance of this transformation to extended stay in space and some of the plausible reasons for this transformation are discussed.

  17. Choice of operating voltage for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Egerton, R F

    2014-10-01

    An accelerating voltage of 100-300kV remains a good choice for the majority of TEM or STEM specimens, avoiding the expense of high-voltage microscopy but providing the possibility of atomic resolution even in the absence of lens-aberration correction. For specimens thicker than a few tens of nm, the image intensity and scattering contrast are likely to be higher than at lower voltage, as is the visibility of ionization edges below 1000eV (as required for EELS elemental analysis). In thick (>100nm) specimens, higher voltage ensures less beam broadening and better spatial resolution for STEM imaging and EDX spectroscopy. Low-voltage (e.g. 30kV) TEM or STEM is attractive for a very thin (e.g. 10nm) specimen, as it provides higher scattering contrast and fewer problems for valence-excitation EELS. Specimens that are immune to radiolysis suffer knock-on damage at high current densities, and this form of radiation damage can be reduced or avoided by choosing a low accelerating voltage. Low-voltage STEM with an aberration-corrected objective lens (together with a high-angle dark-field detector and/or EELS) offers atomic resolution and elemental identification from very thin specimens. Conventional TEM can provide atomic resolution in low-voltage phase-contrast images but requires correction of chromatic aberration and preferably an electron-beam monochromator. Many non-conducting (e.g. organic) specimens damage easily by radiolysis and radiation damage then determines the TEM image resolution. For bright-field scattering contrast, low kV can provide slightly better dose-limited resolution if the specimen is very thin (a few nm) but considerably better resolution is possible from a thicker specimen, for which higher kV is required. Use of a phase plate in a conventional TEM offers the most dose-efficient way of achieving atomic resolution from beam-sensitive specimens.

  18. Scanning electron microscope observations of sublimates from Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.

    1993-01-01

    Sublimates were sampled from high-temperature (up to 800??C) fumaroles at Merapi volcano in January 1984. Sampling is accomplished by inserting silica tubes into high-temperature vents. Volcanic glass flows through the tubes and sublimates precipitate on the inner walls in response to the temperature gradient. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) in the tubes, there are five sublimate zones. Texturally, the sublimate phases grade from large, well-formed crystals at their highest-temperature occurrence to more numerous, smaller crystals that are less perfect at lower temperatures. These changes imply that the crystal nucleation and growth rates increase and decrease, respectively, as temperature decreases. Overall, the textural data suggest that the gas is saturated or slightly super-saturated with the phases at their hottest occurrence, but that the gas becomes increasingly super-saturated with the phases at lower temperatures. -from Author

  19. In situ study of single-walled carbon nanotube growth in an environmental scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi, H.-A.; Ravaux, J.; Tahir, S.; Podor, R.; Jourdain, V.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) during their growth is a highly sought-after goal in view of understanding the processes involved in the nucleation, elongation and termination which ultimately control the diameter and chiral selectivity. Here, we report on the first truly in situ observations of SWCNT growth in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The CNT growth from lithographically patterned catalysts was investigated as a function of the catalyst type (Fe, Co or Ni), temperature, type of precursor (ethanol or acetylene), gas phase composition and pressure, and pretreatment conditions, and we report on the most appropriate conditions for SWCNT growth in ESEM conditions. We show that this approach allows the observation at the submicron scale of the different steps of the nanotube synthesis including the catalyst reduction, the growth and percolation of the nanotube network, and the deposition of individual nanotubes grown in the gas phase on the substrate. Despite these obvious advantages, we identified a few limitations which will need to be tackled for fully taking advantage of the approach, for instance for monitoring the growth of individual SWCNTs by ESEM, including the short lifetime of the catalyst nanoparticles, the preference for kite growth (by opposition to surface growth) and the influence of the electron beam on the nanotube growth.

  20. In situ detection of specific gene expression during and immediately after transcription at electron microscopic level.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Sohei; Kitazawa, Riko

    2006-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a widely applied technique used for visualizing specific nucleic acid sequences at chromosomal, cytologic, and histologic levels. It sometimes fails, however, to demonstrate precise cell identity, early stages of gene expression and variants of alternative splicing because of its limited resolution. To overcome this shortcoming, we have developed an improved ISH technique at the electron microscopic (EM) level by conducting en bloc hybridization before embedding (pre-embedding) and immuno-EM detection after ultra-thin sectioning (post-embedding). We applied this technique to demonstrate both the dynamic expression of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA immediately after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, and the static expression of osteonectin mRNA in a differentiating osteoblastic cell linage. Tissue samples were diced into 1mm cubes, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and then successively hybridized en bloc with the digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled single-stranded probe measuring 200-300 bp with the aid of microwave treatment. After washing, for EM observation, the cubes were embedded in epon for ultra-thin sectioning, and a gold-colloid-labeled anti-DIG antibody was used for post-embedding immuno-EM; some of the cubes was directly incubated with anti-DIG antibody and developed en bloc for stereoscopic and light microscopic observation. IL-6 mRNA during and immediately after transcription was demonstrated in the nuclei of the alveolar macrophages and in neutrophils of mouse lung tissue as early as 15 min after LPS treatment, which was of better sensitivity than that by Northern blot or nuclear run-on techniques. Moreover, in mouse calvaria tissue, osteonectin mRNA both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm was observed in a differentiating osteoblastic cell linage in a differentiation-specific manner. This technique is useful in identifying specific cell types during and immediately after transcribing specific mRNA based on ultrastructural morphology.

  1. Quantitative Nanostructure Characterization Using Atomic Pair Distribution Functions Obtained From Laboratory Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Abeykoon M.; Billinge S.; Malliakas, C.D.; Juhas, P.; Bozin, E.S.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

    2012-05-01

    Quantitatively reliable atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) have been obtained from nanomaterials in a straightforward way from a standard laboratory transmission electron microscope (TEM). The approach looks very promising for making electron derived PDFs (ePDFs) a routine step in the characterization of nanomaterials because of the ubiquity of such TEMs in chemistry and materials laboratories. No special attachments such as energy filters were required on the microscope. The methodology for obtaining the ePDFs is described as well as some opportunities and limitations of the method.

  2. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  3. Electronic Single Molecule Measurements with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Jong One

    Richard Feynman said "There's plenty of room at the bottom". This inspired the techniques to improve the single molecule measurements. Since the first single molecule study was in 1961, it has been developed in various field and evolved into powerful tools to understand chemical and biological property of molecules. This thesis demonstrates electronic single molecule measurement with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and two of applications of STM; Break Junction (BJ) and Recognition Tunneling (RT). First, the two series of carotenoid molecules with four different substituents were investigated to show how substituents relate to the conductance and molecular structure. The measured conductance by STM-BJ shows that Nitrogen induces molecular twist of phenyl distal substituents and conductivity increasing rather than Carbon. Also, the conductivity is adjustable by replacing the sort of residues at phenyl substituents. Next, amino acids and peptides were identified through STM-RT. The distribution of the intuitive features (such as amplitude or width) are mostly overlapped and gives only a little bit higher separation probability than random separation. By generating some features in frequency and cepstrum domain, the classification accuracy was dramatically increased. Because of large data size and many features, supporting vector machine (machine learning algorithm for big data) was used to identify the analyte from a data pool of all analytes RT data. The STM-RT opens a possibility of molecular sequencing in single molecule level. Similarly, carbohydrates were studied by STM-RT. Carbohydrates are difficult to read the sequence, due to their huge number of possible isomeric configurations. This study shows that STM-RT can identify not only isomers of mono-saccharides and disaccharides, but also various mono-saccharides from a data pool of eleven analytes. In addition, the binding affinity between recognition molecule and analyte was investigated by comparing with

  4. Light propagation and interaction observed with electrons.

    PubMed

    Word, Robert C; Fitzgerald, J P S; Könenkamp, R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss possibilities for a microscopic optical characterization of thin films and surfaces based on photoemission electron microscopy. We show that propagating light with wavelengths across the visible range can readily be visualized, and linear and non-linear materials properties can be evaluated non-invasively with nanometer spatial resolution. While femtosecond temporal resolution can be achieved in pump-probe-type experiments, the interferometric approach presented here has typical image frame times of ~200 fs.

  5. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged.

  6. Quantum Phenomena Observed Using Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tonomura, Akira

    2011-05-06

    Electron phase microscopy based on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect principle has been used to illuminate fundamental phenomena concerning magnetism and superconductivity by visualizing quantitative magnetic lines of force. This paper deals with confirmation experiments on the AB effect, the magnetization process of tiny magnetic heads for perpendicular recording, and vortex behaviors in high-Tc superconductors.

  7. Trim simulations and possible studies for edge-on ion irradiation of electron microscope specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.J.; Allen, C.W.; Frischherz, M.C. |; Otero, M.P. |

    1992-12-31

    A TRIM code has been modified to simulate a special technique, first described at the Spring 92 MRS Meeting, for in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) experiments involving simultaneous ion irradiation, in which the resultant phenomena are observed as in a cross-section TEM specimen without further specimen preparation. Instead of ion-irradiating the film or foil specimen normal to the major surfaces and observing in plan view (i.e., in essentially the same direction), the specimen is irradiated edge-on (i.e., parallel to the major surfaces) and is observed normal to the depth direction of the irradiation. Results of calculations utilizing the modified TRIM code are presented for cases of 200 and 500 keV Co impinging onto the edge of Si films 200 and 600 nm thick. Limitations of the technique are discussed and feasibility of experiments involving implantation of Co into Si and the formation of CoSi{sub 2}, which employ this technique, are briefly discussed. 10 refs, 3 figs.

  8. Copper thick film sintering studies in an environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Link, L F; Gerristead, W R; Tamhankar, S

    1993-08-01

    The significance of the ElectroScan environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) as a processing tool for studying dynamic morphological changes under controlled temperature/atmosphere conditions was evaluated. The ability to observe dynamic processes in situ, which cannot be achieved by other means, is critical to understanding microstructural formation. Processing of printed copper thick films on ceramics was used as a test case, wherein morphological changes associated with the steps of organic binder removal and sintering of copper particles were observed/examined in real time. Good agreement was seen between microstructures obtained in the ESM and those achieved in a belt furnace when similar process variables were used. When processed in atmospheres which were proven to induce sintering in a conventional belt furnace, sintering was evident in both cases, and the microstructural changes were documented on video-tapes in real time. Determination of critical event temperatures was achieved--that is, binder burnout occurring between 270 degrees and 350 degrees C, onset of oxidation at 520 degrees C, and sintering starting at 770 degrees C. It was thus verified that the microstructural changes during the copper thick film sintering process can be observed in situ using an ESEM.

  9. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  10. The formation and interpretation of defect images from crystalline materials in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Maher, D M; Joy, D C

    1976-06-01

    The technique of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been employed usefully in studies of amorphous materials, and the theory of image formation and interpretation in this case has been well developed. Less attention has been given to the practical and theoretical problems associated with the use of STEM for the examination of crystalline materials. In this case the contrast mechanisms are dominated by Bragg diffraction and so they are quite different from those occurring in amorphous substances. In this paper practical techniques for the observation and interpretation of contrast from defects in crystalline materials are discussed. It is shown that whilst images of defects are obtained readily under all typical STEM operating conditions, the form of the image and the information it contains varies with the angle subtended at the specimen by the detector. If this angle is too large significant image modifications relative to the "conventional" transmission electron microscope case may occur and the resolution of the image may degrade. If this angle is too small, then signal to noise considerations make an interpretation of the image difficult. In this paper we indicate how the detector angle may be chosen correctly, and also present techniques for setting up a STEM instrument for imaging a crystalline material containing lattice defects.

  11. Combined light and electron microscopic visualization of neuropeptides and their receptors in central neurons.

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Lossi, Laura; Merighi, Adalberto

    2011-01-01

    The study of neuronal connections and neuron to neuron (or neuron to glia) communication is of fundamental importance in understanding brain structure and function. Therefore, ultrastructural investigation by the use of immunocytochemical techniques is a really precious tool to obtain an exact map of the localization of neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) and their receptors at different types of synapses. However, in immunocytochemical procedures one has always to search for the optimal compromise between structural preservation and retention of antigenicity. This is often made difficult by the need to localize not only small transmitter molecules, as in the case of transmitter amino acids and neuropeptides, but also their specific receptors that are usually large proteins very sensitive to fixation procedures. We describe here a preembedding procedure employing the Fluoronanogold™ reagent, a probe consisting of fluorescein-tagged antibodies conjugated with ultrasmall gold particles that can be made visible under the electron microscope by a gold intensification procedure. This technique permits correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy observations, providing a very useful tool for the study of neuronal connectivity. Moreover, the Fluoronanogold™ procedure can be combined with conventional postembedding immunogold techniques in multiple labeling studies.

  12. Dark field imaging of biological macromolecules with the scanning transmission electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Mitsuo; Isaacson, Michael S.; Crewe, A. V.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) equipped with a field emission gun has been employed for the examination of biological macromolecules at high resolution. The quality of micrographs obtained with the STEM is dependent upon the quality of the substrate used to support biological objects because the image contrast in dark field is proportional to the mass density of the specimen. In order to reduce deleterious effects of the substrates on the image quality, we have developed a method of fabricating substrates consisting of very thin, very clean carbon films supported on very clean fenestrated plastic films. These films are approximately 15 Å thick. Well-known biological macromolecules such as glutamine synthetase and tobacco mosaic virus (both stained) and low-density lipoprotein and ferritin (both unstained were placed on these substrates and examined with the STEM by using various modes of contrast. The micrographs obtained by using the dark field mode of contrast employing an annular detector were free from phase contrast, as expected. Using this contrast mode, we have been able to directly observe (in-focus) 2.5- to 4.4-Å lattice spacings in the ferritin core. The effect of electron radiation damage on the helical structure of tobacco mosaic virus was also examined. Micrographs as well as corresponding optical diffraction patterns obtained with moderately low doses showed very clear helical structure from both sides of the virus. In addition, the (11.5 Å)-1 layer lines indicated the effective resolution attained on these particles. Images PMID:35788

  13. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha Ropers, Claus

    2015-11-07

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Fully kinetic simulations of collisionless, mesothermal plasma emission: Macroscopic plume structure and microscopic electron characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a fully kinetic particle particle-in-cell simulation study on the emission of a collisionless plasma plume consisting of cold beam ions and thermal electrons. Results are presented for both the two-dimensional macroscopic plume structure and the microscopic electron kinetic characteristics. We find that the macroscopic plume structure exhibits several distinctive regions, including an undisturbed core region, an electron cooling expansion region, and an electron isothermal expansion region. The properties of each region are determined by microscopic electron kinetic characteristics. The division between the undisturbed region and the cooling expansion region approximately matches the Mach line generated at the edge of the emission surface, and that between the cooling expansion region and the isothermal expansion region approximately matches the potential well established in the beam. The interactions between electrons and the potential well lead to a new, near-equilibrium state different from the initial distribution for the electrons in the isothermal expansion region. The electron kinetic characteristics in the plume are also very anisotropic. As the electron expansion process is mostly non-equilibrium and anisotropic, the commonly used assumption that the electrons in a collisionless, mesothermal plasma plume may be treated as a single equilibrium fluid in general is not valid.

  15. The microscopic world: A demonstration of electron microscopy for younger students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Linda L.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose is to excite students about the importance of scientific investigation and demonstrate why they should look at things in greater detail, extending beyond superficial examination. The topics covered include: microscopy, scanning electron microscopes, high magnification, and the scientific method.

  16. Clinical and electron microscopic studies of a case of glycolipid lipoidosis (Fabry's disease)

    PubMed Central

    Rae, Angus I.; Lee, John C.; Hopper, James

    1967-01-01

    A case of glycolipid lipoidosis (Fabry's disease) in a 27-year-old man is recorded. The case is unusual in that despite extensive disease evidenced by widespread skin lesions, ocular abnormalities, and proteinuria, renal function was only minimally impaired. Electron microscope studies of kidney and skin showed that most cells contained the characteristic lipid described in this condition. Images PMID:6016885

  17. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal growing on pyroxene crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of a four-micron size iron crystal growing on a pyroxene crystal (calcium-magnesium-iron silicate) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The well developed crystal faces indicate that the crystal was formed from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling.

  18. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  19. Scanning electron microscopic study of an anterior chamber intraocular lens: latent endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Schémann, J F

    1987-01-01

    Two years after intracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation, an anterior chamber lens was removed. The lens was studied by scanning electron microscope which demonstrated the presence of colonies of cocci, a thin acellular membrane covering part of the lens and some modifications of the lens surface.

  20. Which image parameter(s) for the automation of the electron microscope?

    PubMed

    Bonnet, N; Zinzindohoue, P

    1989-03-01

    Experiments on automating the transmission electron microscope rely on the search for minimum variance. This image parameter gives satisfactory results for automatic focusing, astigmatism correction, and beam alignment. We investigate here the different image descriptors that might also be used; we conclude that texture parameters, which are directional, would be better candidates correcting astigmatism and beam tilt.

  1. Facilities for in situ ion beam studies in transmission electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.W.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and electron diffraction from very small regions to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are ten such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the USA. General specifications of facilities which are operational in 1993 are summarized, and additional facilities which are planned or being proposed are briefly described.

  2. Effects of microscopic transport coefficients on fission observables calculated by the Langevin equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usang, M. D.; Ivanyuk, F. A.; Ishizuka, C.; Chiba, S.

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear fission is treated by using the Langevin dynamical description with macroscopic and microscopic transport coefficients (mass and friction tensors), and it is elucidated how the microscopic (shell and pairing) effects in the transport coefficients, especially their dependence on temperature, affects various fission observables. We found that the microscopic transport coefficients, calculated by linear response theory, change drastically as a function of temperature: in general, the friction increases with growing temperature while the mass tensor decreases. This temperature dependence brings a noticeable change in the mass distribution and kinetic energies of fission fragments from nuclei around 236U at an excitation energy of 20 MeV. The prescission kinetic energy decreases from 25 MeV at low temperature to about 2.5 MeV at high temperature. In contrast, the Coulomb kinetic energy increases as the temperature increases. Interpolating the microscopic transport coefficients among the various temperatures enabled our Langevin equation to use the microscopic transport coefficients at a deformation-dependent local temperature of the dynamical evolution. This allowed us to compare directly the fission observables of both macroscopic and microscopic calculations, and we found almost identical results under the conditions considered in this work.

  3. Evaluation of Enterococcus faecalis adhesion, penetration, and method to prevent the penetration of Enterococcus faecalis into root cementum: Confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Halkai, Rahul S.; Hegde, Mithra N.; Halkai, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To ascertain the role of Enterococcus faecalis in persistent infection and a possible method to prevent the penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum. Methodology: One hundred and twenty human single-rooted extracted teeth divided into five groups. Group I (control): intact teeth, Group II: no apical treatment done, Group III divided into two subgroups. In Groups IIIa and IIIb, root apex treated with lactic acid of acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Group IV: apical root cementum exposed to lactic acid and roughened to mimic the apical resorption. Group V: apical treatment done same as Group IV and root-end filling done using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Apical one-third of all samples immersed in E. faecalis broth for 8 weeks followed by bone morphogenetic protein and obturation and again immersed into broth for 8 weeks. Teeth split into two halves and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, organism identified by culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Results: Adhesion and penetration was observed in Group IIIa and Group IV. Only adhesion in Group II and IIIB and no adhesion and penetration in Group I and V. Conclusion: Adhesion and penetration of E. faecalis into root cementum providing a long-term nidus for subsequent infection are the possible reason for persistent infection and root-end filling with MTA prevents the adhesion and penetration. PMID:27994316

  4. Bottlenecks in bog pine multiplication by somatic embryogenesis and their visualization with the environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Vlašínová, Helena; Neděla, Vilem; Đorđević, Biljana; Havel, Ladislav

    2016-10-25

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an important biotechnological technique used for the propagation of many pine species in vitro. However, in bog pine, one of the most endangered tree species in the Czech Republic, limitations were observed, which negatively influenced the development and further germination of somatic embryos. Although initiation frequency was very low-0.95 %, all obtained cell lines were subjected to maturation. The best responding cell line (BC1) was used and subjected to six different variants of the maturation media. The media on which the highest number of early-precotyledonary/cotyledonary somatic embryos was formed was supplemented with 121 μM abscisic acid (ABA) and with 6 % maltose. In the end of maturation experiments, different abnormalities in formation of somatic embryos were observed. For visualization and identification of abnormalities in meristem development during proliferation and maturation processes, the environmental scanning electron microscope was used. In comparison to the classical light microscope, the non-commercial environmental scanning electron microscope AQUASEM II has been found as a very useful tool for the quick recognition of apical meristem disruption and abnormal development. To our knowledge, this is the first report discussing somatic embryogenesis in bog pine. Based on this observation, the cultivation procedure could be enhanced and the method for SE of bog pine optimized.

  5. Ultra-structural hair alterations in Friedreich's ataxia: A scanning electron microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Turkmenoglu, F Pinar; Kasirga, U Baran; Celik, H Hamdi

    2015-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder involving progressive damage to the central and peripheral nervous systems and cardiomyopathy. FRDA is caused by the silencing of the FXN gene and reduced levels of the encoded protein, frataxin. Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that functions primarily in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. Skin disorders including hair abnormalities have previously been reported in patients with mitochondrial disorders. However, to our knowledge, ultra-structural hair alterations in FRDA were not demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to determine ultra-structural alterations in the hairs of FRDA patients as well as carriers. Hair specimen from four patients, who are in different stages of the disease, and two carriers were examined by scanning electron microscope. Thin and weak hair follicles with absence of homogeneities on the cuticular surface, local damages of the cuticular layer, cuticular fractures were detected in both carriers and patients, but these alterations were much more prominent in the hair follicles of patients. In addition, erosions on the surface of the cuticle and local deep cavities just under the cuticular level were observed only in patients. Indistinct cuticular pattern, pores on the cuticular surface, and presence of concavities on the hair follicle were also detected in patients in later stages of the disease. According to our results, progression of the disease increased the alterations on hair structure. We suggest that ultra-structural alterations observed in hair samples might be due to oxidative stress caused by deficient frataxin expression in mitochondria.

  6. Electron microscope studies. Progress report, 1 July 1964--1 June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  7. In situ nanomechanical testing of twinned metals in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nan; Wang, Jiangwei; Mao, Scott; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization to explore twins in face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic monolithic metals, and their impact on the overall mechanical performance. Taking advantage of simultaneous nanomechanical deformation and nanoscale imaging using versatile in situ TEM tools, direct correlation of these unique microscopic defects with macroscopic mechanical performance becomes possible. This article summarizes recent evidence to support the mechanisms related to strengthening and plasticity in metals, including nanotwinned Cu, Ni, Al, Au, and others in bulk, thin film, and nanowire forms.

  8. In situ nanomechanical testing of twinned metals in a transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Nan; Wang, Jiangwei; Mao, Scott; ...

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization to explore twins in face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic monolithic metals, and their impact on the overall mechanical performance. Taking advantage of simultaneous nanomechanical deformation and nanoscale imaging using versatile in situ TEM tools, direct correlation of these unique microscopic defects with macroscopic mechanical performance becomes possible. This article summarizes recent evidence to support the mechanisms related to strengthening and plasticity in metals, including nanotwinned Cu, Ni, Al, Au, and others in bulk, thin film, and nanowire forms.

  9. In Situ Microstructural Control and Mechanical Testing Inside the Transmission Electron Microscope at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    With atomic-scale imaging and analytical capabilities such as electron diffraction and energy-loss spectroscopy, the transmission electron microscope has allowed access to the internal microstructure of materials like no other microscopy. It has been mostly a passive or post-mortem analysis tool, but that trend is changing with in situ straining, heating and electrical biasing. In this study, we design and demonstrate a multi-functional microchip that integrates actuators, sensors, heaters and electrodes with freestanding electron transparent specimens. In addition to mechanical testing at elevated temperatures, the chip can actively control microstructures (grain growth and phase change) of the specimen material. Using nano-crystalline aluminum, nickel and zirconium as specimen materials, we demonstrate these novel capabilities inside the microscope. Our approach of active microstructural control and quantitative testing with real-time visualization can influence mechanistic modeling by providing direct and accurate evidence of the fundamental mechanisms behind materials behavior.

  10. Analysis with electron microscope of multielement samples using pure element standards

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne E.

    1987-01-01

    A method and modified analytical electron microscope for determining the concentration of elements in a multielement sample by exposing samples with differing thicknesses for each element to a beam of electrons, simultaneously measuring the electron dosage and x-ray intensities for each sample of element to determine a "K.sub.AB " value to be used in the equation ##EQU1## where I is intensity and C is concentration for elements A and B, and exposing the multielement sample to determine the concentrations of the elements in the sample.

  11. Analysis with electron microscope of multielement samples using pure element standards

    DOEpatents

    King, W.E.

    1986-01-06

    This disclosure describes a method and modified analytical electron microscope for determining the concentration of elements in a multielement sample by exposing samples with differing thicknesses for each element to a beam of electrons. Simultaneously the electron dosage and x-ray intensities are measured for each sample of element to determine a ''K/sub AB/'' value to be used in the equation (I/sub A/I/sub B/) = K/sub AB/ (C/sub A//C/sub B/), where I is intensity and C is concentration for elements A and B. The multielement sample is exposed to determine the concentrations of the elements in the sample.

  12. Use of emission electron microscope for potential mapping in semiconductor microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Nepijko, S A; Sedov, N N; Schönhense, G; Escher, M

    2002-05-01

    An emission electron microscope was used for visualization and measurement of the distribution of electric fields and potentials on the surface under study. The contrast of microfields is caused by the fact that slow-moving electrons emitted from the object surface are deflected by these fields. The measurements were performed on a p-n junction to which a voltage was applied. It is shown that the type of contrast from the p-n junction can be reversed depending on the position of the contrast aperture restricting the electron beam. The same result was obtained by means of a computer simulation.

  13. Transformation of diamond nanoparticles into onion-like carbon by electron irradiation studied directly inside an ultrahigh-vacuum transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, J.; Mori, H.; Taguchi, E.; Yasuda, H.; Kinoshita, H.; Ohmae, N.

    2005-05-30

    In situ observation of the transformation of diamond nanoparticles (DNP) into onion-like carbon (OLC) was made during electron-beam irradiation inside an ultrahigh-vacuum transmission electron microscope at 300 kV with 8.5x10{sup 23} e/m{sup 2}. 5 nm DNP changed into OLC within about 10 min of irradiation, while 20 nm DNP did not change to OLC but to graphite. Therefore, the size effect is critical to the formation of OLC. The mechanism of formation of OLC from DNP is discussed.

  14. Electron-beam irradiation induced conductivity in ZnS nanowires as revealed by in situ transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baodan; Bando, Yoshio; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhi, Chunyi; Fang, Xiaosheng; Tang, Chengchun; Mitome, Masanori; Golberg, Dmitri

    2009-08-01

    Electron transport variations in individual ZnS nanowires synthesized through a chemical vapor deposition process were in situ studied in transmission electron microscope under convergent electron-beam irradiation (EBI). It was found that the transport can dramatically be enhanced using proper irradiation conditions. The conductivity mechanism was revealed based on a detailed study of microstructure and composition evolutions under irradiation. EBI-induced Zn-rich domains' appearance and related O doping were mainly responsible for the conductivity improvements. First-principles theoretical calculations additionally indicated that the generation of midbands within a ZnS band gap might also contribute to the improved conductivity.

  15. Enhanced contrast separation in scanning electron microscopes via a suspended-thin sample approach.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Wang, Li; Guo, Zhenxi; Wei, Bin; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yinqi; Sui, Manling; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    A suspended-thin-sample (STS) approach for signal selection and contrast separation is developed in scanning electron microscopes with commonly used primary beam energies and traditional detectors. Topography contrast, electron channeling contrast and composition contrast are separated and largely enhanced from suspended thin samples of several hundred nanometers in thickness, which is less than the escape depth of backscattered electrons. This imaging technique enables to detect relatively pure secondary electron and elastic backscattered electron singles, whereas suppress multiple inelastic scattering effects. The provided contrast features are different from those of bulk samples, which are largely mixed with inelastic scattering effects. The STS imaging concept and method could be expected to have more applications in distinguishing materials of nanostructures, multilayers, compounds and composites, as well as in SEM-based electron backscatter diffraction, cathodoluminesence, and x-ray microanalysis.

  16. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  17. Design and commissioning of an aberration-corrected ultrafast spin-polarized low energy electron microscope with multiple electron sources.

    PubMed

    Wan, Weishi; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Lin; Yang, Xiaodong; Wei, Zheng; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Feng, Jun; Kunze, Kai; Schaff, Oliver; Tromp, Ruud; Tang, Wen-Xin

    2016-12-27

    We describe the design and commissioning of a novel aberration-corrected low energy electron microscope (AC-LEEM). A third magnetic prism array (MPA) is added to the standard AC-LEEM with two prism arrays, allowing the incorporation of an ultrafast spin-polarized electron source alongside the standard cold field emission electron source, without degrading spatial resolution. The high degree of symmetries of the AC-LEEM are utilized while we design the electron optics of the ultrafast spin-polarized electron source, so as to minimize the deleterious effect of time broadening, while maintaining full control of electron spin. A spatial resolution of 2nm and temporal resolution of 10ps (ps) are expected in the future time resolved aberration-corrected spin-polarized LEEM (TR-AC-SPLEEM). The commissioning of the three-prism AC-LEEM has been successfully finished with the cold field emission source, with a spatial resolution below 2nm.

  18. Attempt to assess the infiltration of enamel made with experimental preparation using a scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The resin infiltration technique, a minimally invasive method, involves the saturation, strengthening, and stabilization of demineralized enamel by a mixture of polymer resins without the need to use rotary tools or the risk of losing healthy tooth structures. Aim of the study To design and synthesize an experimental infiltrant with potential bacteriostatic properties.To compare the depth of infiltration of the designed experimental preparation with the infiltrant available in the market using a scanning electron microscope. Material and Methods Composition of the experimental infiltrant was established after analysis of 1H NMR spectra of the commercially available compounds that can penetrate pores of demineralized enamel. As the infiltrant should have bacteriostatic features by definition, an addition of 1% of monomer containing metronidazole was made. Thirty extracted human teeth were soaked in an acidic solution, which was to provide appropriate conditions for demineralization of enamel. Afterward, each tooth was divided along the coronal-root axis into two zones. One zone had experimental preparation applied to it (the test group), while the other had commercially available Icon (the control group). The teeth were dissected along the long axis and described above underwent initial observation with use of a Hitachi S-4200 scanning electron microscope. Results It was found that all samples contained only oxygen and carbon, regardless of the concentration of additions introduced into them. The occurrence of carbon is partially because it is a component of the preparation in question and partially because of sputtering of the sample with it. Hydrogen is also a component of the preparation, as a result of its phase composition; however, it cannot be detected by the EDS method. Conclusions SEM, in combination with X-ray microanalysis, does not allow one to explicitly assess the depth of penetration of infiltration preparations into enamel.In order to

  19. Macroanatomic, light and scanning electron microscopic studies of the pecten oculi in the stork (Ciconia ciconia).

    PubMed

    Onuk, Burcu; Tutuncu, Serife; Alan, Aydin; Kabak, Murat; Ince, Nazan Gezer

    2013-09-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the pecten oculi of stork by using macroscopic, light and electron microscopic techniques. A total of 20 eyes that were obtained from 10 storks were used. The eyes were cleaned and isolated by dissection. After various procedures, four of the pecten oculi were examined by light microscope while the other four with an electron microscope. The remaining 12 eyes were assigned for macroscopic investigation. Pecten oculi of the stork were determined as accordion-like structures that originated from n. opticus, consisting of 15-17 plica and projecting up to 2/5 of the diameter of the bulbus oculi. Light microscopic examination revealed two types of blood vessels. Afferent-efferent vessels were larger in diamater (40-45 µm), fewer in numbers, and the capillary vessels were smaller in diamater (2-5 µm) and more in numbers. There were granules including amount of melanin pigment at the apical part of the pleats. These granules were fewer and scattered randomly on the basal part of the pleats. As a result, pecten oculi in the stork, which is a migrating bird, were determined to be similar to those of other diurnal birds.

  20. In Situ Wear Test on Thermal Spray Coatings in a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weifeng; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Selvadurai, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the determination of the mass loss is usually used for a quantitative evaluation of wear tests, while the analysis of wear tracks is utilized for a qualitative evaluation of wear. Both evaluation methods can only be used after the wear testing process and their results only present the final outcome of the wear test. However, the changes during the wear test and the time-dependent wear mechanisms are of great interest as well. A running wear test in a large chamber scanning electron microscope (SEM) offers the first opportunity to observe the wear process in situ. Different wear mechanisms, such as the adhesive, abrasive wear, surface fatigue and tribochemical reaction, can be recorded with high magnification. Within this research, a special pin-on-disk testing device is designed for a vacuum environment. Using this device, arc-sprayed NiCrBSi coatings and high-velocity-oxygen-fuel-sprayed WC-12Co coatings were tested in a large chamber SEM with Al2O3 ceramic balls as wear counterparts. During the wear testing, different wear mechanisms were determined and the processes were recorded in short video streams.

  1. Electron Microscopic Alterations in Pediculus humanus capitis Exposed to Some Pediculicidal Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Akkad, Dina M. H. El; El-Gebaly, Naglaa Saad M.; Yousof, Hebat-Allah Salah A.; Ismail, Mousa A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, infestation is an important public health problem in Egypt. Inadequate application of topical pediculicides and the increasing resistance to the commonly used pediculicides made the urgent need for the development of new agents able to induce irreversible changes in the exposed lice leading to their mortality. The aim of the present work is to evaluate pediculicidal efficacy of some natural products such as olive oil, tea tree oil, lemon juice, and ivermectin separately in comparison with tetramethrin-piperonyl butoxide (licid), as a standard pediculicide commonly used in Egypt. The effects of these products were evaluated by direct observation using dissecting and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Results showed that after 1 hr exposure time in vitro, absolute (100%) mortalities were recorded after exposure to 1% ivermectin and fresh concentrate lemon juice. The mortalities were decreased to 96.7% after exposure to tea tree oil. Very low percentage of mortality (23.3%) was recorded after 1 hr of exposure to extra virgin olive oil. On the other hand, the reference pediculicide (licid) revealed only mortality rate of 93.3%. On the contrary, no mortalities were recorded in the control group exposed to distilled water. By SEM examination, control lice preserved outer smooth architecture, eyes, antenna, respiratory spiracles, sensory hairs, and legs with hook-like claws. In contrast, dead lice which had been exposed to pediculicidal products showed damage of outer smooth architecture, sensory hairs, respiratory spiracles and/or clinching claws according to pediculicidal products used. PMID:27658606

  2. Comparative evaluation of enamel abrasivity by toothbrush and velcro: An in vitro scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Saroj Kumar; Javdekar, Sadashiv Bhaskar; Dhir, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Context: Plaque control has been shown to be pivotal in maintaining the optimal periodontal health. Mechanical plaque control is the most popular option for establishing the optimal oral health. Toothbrushes have been the novel tool for mechanical cleansing. However, the abrasive potential of the toothbrushes on the enamel surface is an area in gray. Aims: The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the abrasivity of the toothbrush versus the velcro fasteners. Materials and Methods: The mounted teeth of both the groups were subjected to abrasion test, and the tooth surfaces were observed for the possible abrasions from the oscillating strokes (toothbrush) and frictional contacts (hook and loop velcro) and examined under the scanning electron microscope. Results: Comparative assessment of both velcro (hook and loop) and toothbrush bristles did not reveal any evidence of abrasion on the tooth specimens. Conclusions: Veclro fasteners are safe and qualitatively at par to the manual toothbrush for their efficacy and efficiency in teeth cleansing PMID:26229264

  3. Interface Between MTA and Dental Bonding Agents: Scanning Electron Microscope Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cervino, Gabriele; Fiorillo, Luca; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Bramanti, Ennio; Laino, Luigi; Lauritano, Floriana; Cicciù, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Nowadays, the material that offers the best sealing characteristic in the field of endodontic treatment is the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), nevertheless, this material necessities an adhesive bonding agent to perfectly join to the dental surface. The aim of this study was to analyze using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) the possible microgap between the adhesive, MTA, and the dental surface. Material and Methods: Fourteen extracted molars were divided into two groups – group A was prepared with MTA-component adhesive and group B was prepared with MTA and composite dual etching. The observations were carried out with a SEM Phenom G2 Pro mode S.E.I. JMP® software was used for statistical analysis, and a t-test was used for evaluating the difference between the two groups. Results: The gap of the areas at higher magnification (1000×) with a size greater than 5 microns in width and 20 microns in length were considered significant, and only group A recorded significant data. Conclusions: The SEM analysis performed in the group A with interposition of adhesive and flow between the dental pulp chamber and MTA demonstrates the presence of a marginal gap of considerable amplitude in the all of the samples investigated. PMID:28316952

  4. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  5. Scanning electron microscopic description of cellular activity and mineral changes in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, O; Boudigues, S; Pilet, P; Aguado, E; Heymann, D; Daculsi, G

    2001-12-01

    The cellular activity and changes in mineral composition of dental tissues involved in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions were investigated. Teeth with at least 1 lesion (n = 10) were extracted from 10 different cats that were presented primarily for chronic gingivostomatitis and/or severe periodontal disease. Scanning electron microscopic methods were used to determine the presence of resorptive cells in 8 teeth while 2 teeth were evaluated for pathologic changes in dental mineral composition. Observations were complicated by the presence of organic wear on the dental surfaces, however resorptive cells could be clearly identified in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions. Resorptive cells had morphologic features indicative of "osteoclast-like" cells or odontoclasts. Resorptive cell activity created a resorption area of darker dentin continuous with physiologic dentin. The darker dentin area seemed poorly mineralized and showed a significantly lower calcium/phosphorous ratio compared with adjacent physiologic denting in 1 tooth. A significantly higher level of magnesium combined with available carbonate ions may have increased the solubility in areas of darker dentin.

  6. Electron Microscopic Alterations in Pediculus humanus capitis Exposed to Some Pediculicidal Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Akkad, Dina M H El; El-Gebaly, Naglaa Saad M; Yousof, Hebat-Allah Salah A; Ismail, Mousa A M

    2016-08-01

    Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, infestation is an important public health problem in Egypt. Inadequate application of topical pediculicides and the increasing resistance to the commonly used pediculicides made the urgent need for the development of new agents able to induce irreversible changes in the exposed lice leading to their mortality. The aim of the present work is to evaluate pediculicidal efficacy of some natural products such as olive oil, tea tree oil, lemon juice, and ivermectin separately in comparison with tetramethrin-piperonyl butoxide (licid), as a standard pediculicide commonly used in Egypt. The effects of these products were evaluated by direct observation using dissecting and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Results showed that after 1 hr exposure time in vitro, absolute (100%) mortalities were recorded after exposure to 1% ivermectin and fresh concentrate lemon juice. The mortalities were decreased to 96.7% after exposure to tea tree oil. Very low percentage of mortality (23.3%) was recorded after 1 hr of exposure to extra virgin olive oil. On the other hand, the reference pediculicide (licid) revealed only mortality rate of 93.3%. On the contrary, no mortalities were recorded in the control group exposed to distilled water. By SEM examination, control lice preserved outer smooth architecture, eyes, antenna, respiratory spiracles, sensory hairs, and legs with hook-like claws. In contrast, dead lice which had been exposed to pediculicidal products showed damage of outer smooth architecture, sensory hairs, respiratory spiracles and/or clinching claws according to pediculicidal products used.

  7. Prevalence and Scanning Electron Microscopic Identification of Anoplocephalid Cestodes among Small Ruminants in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Tetsuya; Ba, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anoplocephalid cestodes in sheep and goats in Senegal. Intestines of 462 sheep and 48 goats were examined; 47.4% of sheep and 6.2% of goats were infected. The species identified and their prevalence were, among sheep, Avitellina centripunctata 38.7%, Moniezia expansa 15.4%, Stilesia globipunctata 16.7%, and Thysaniezia ovilla 0.4%. Among goats, they were M. expansa 6.2% and T. ovilla 2.1%. The prevalence of all species was not statistically different between dry and rainy seasons. The infections were single or multiple. Indeed, 56.2% of sheep were infected by a single species, 37.4% by two species, and 6.4% by three species. For goats, 66.7% were infected by M. expansa and 33.3% by both M. expansa and T. ovilla. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations of tapeworms show the general diagnosis characters of these species. PMID:27597893

  8. Rapid specimen preparation to improve the throughput of electron microscopic volume imaging for three-dimensional analyses of subcellular ultrastructures with serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thai, Truc Quynh; Nguyen, Huy Bang; Saitoh, Sei; Wu, Bao; Saitoh, Yurika; Shimo, Satoshi; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Ichii, Osamu; Kon, Yasuhiro; Takaki, Takashi; Joh, Kensuke; Ohno, Nobuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Serial block-face imaging using scanning electron microscopy enables rapid observations of three-dimensional ultrastructures in a large volume of biological specimens. However, such imaging usually requires days for sample preparation to reduce charging and increase image contrast. In this study, we report a rapid procedure to acquire serial electron microscopic images within 1 day for three-dimensional analyses of subcellular ultrastructures. This procedure is based on serial block-face with two major modifications, including a new sample treatment device and direct polymerization on the rivets, to reduce the time and workload needed. The modified procedure without uranyl acetate can produce tens of embedded samples observable under serial block-face scanning electron microscopy within 1 day. The serial images obtained are similar to the block-face images acquired by common procedures, and are applicable to three-dimensional reconstructions at a subcellular resolution. Using this approach, regional immune deposits and the double contour or heterogeneous thinning of basement membranes were observed in the glomerular capillary loops of an autoimmune nephropathy model. These modifications provide options to improve the throughput of three-dimensional electron microscopic examinations, and will ultimately be beneficial for the wider application of volume imaging in life science and clinical medicine.

  9. ELECTRON ABSORBED FRACTIONS IN AN IMAGE-BASED MICROSCOPIC SKELETAL DOSIMETRY MODEL OF CHINESE ADULT MALE.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shenshen; Ren, Li; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Li, Junli

    2017-01-10

    Based on the Chinese reference adult male voxel model, a set of microscopic skeletal models of Chinese adult male is constructed through the processes of computed tomography (CT) imaging, bone coring, micro-CT imaging, image segmentation, merging into macroscopic bone model and implementation in Geant4. At the step of image segmentation, a new bone endosteum (BE) segmentation method is realized by sampling. The set of model contains 32 spongiosa samples with voxel size of 19 μm cubes. The microscopic spongiosa bone data for Chinese adult male are provided. Electron absorbed fractions in red bone marrow (RBM) and BE are calculated. Source tissues include the bone marrow (red and yellow), trabecular bone (surfaces and volumes) and cortical bone (surfaces and volumes). Target tissues include RBM and BE. Electron energies range from 10 keV to 10 MeV. Additionally, comparison of the result with other investigations is provided.

  10. Scanning Electron Microscope Calibration Using a Multi-Image Non-Linear Minimization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Le; Marchand, Éric

    2015-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) calibrating approach based on non-linear minimization procedure is presented in this article. A part of this article has been published in IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2014. . Both the intrinsic parameters and the extrinsic parameters estimations are achieved simultaneously by minimizing the registration error. The proposed approach considers multi-images of a multi-scale calibration pattern view from different positions and orientations. Since the projection geometry of the scanning electron microscope is different from that of a classical optical sensor, the perspective projection model and the parallel projection model are considered and compared with distortion models. Experiments are realized by varying the position and the orientation of a multi-scale chessboard calibration pattern from 300× to 10,000×. The experimental results show the efficiency and the accuracy of this approach.

  11. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections.

  12. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections. PMID:27646194

  13. Artificial submicron or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and electron microscope speckle photography

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhanwei; Xie Huimin; Fang Daining; Dai Fulong; Wang Weining; Fang Yan

    2007-03-15

    In this article, a novel artificial submicro- or nanometer speckle fabricating technique is proposed by taking advantage of submicro or nanometer particles. In the technique, submicron or nanometer particles were adhered to an object surface by using ultrasonic dispersing technique. The particles on the object surface can be regarded as submicro or nanometer speckle by using a scanning electronic microscope at a special magnification. In addition, an electron microscope speckle photography (EMSP) method is developed to measure in-plane submicron or nanometer deformation of the object coated with the artificial submicro or nanometer speckles. The principle of artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and the EMSP method are discussed in detail in this article. Some typical applications of this method are offered. The experimental results verified that the artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and EMSP method is feasible.

  14. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, Albina Y; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed.

  15. A sample holder with integrated laser optics for an ELMITEC photoemission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gierster, L.; Pape, L.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new sample holder compatible with ELMITEC Photoemission Electron Microscopes (PEEMs) containing an optical lens and a mirror. With the integrated optical elements, a laser beam is focused from the back side of the sample at normal incidence, yielding a minimum spot size of about 1 μm. This opens up new possibilities for local laser excitations in PEEM experiments such as imaging all-optical magnetization switching at a small length scale.

  16. A Transmission Electron Microscope Investigation of Space Weathering Effects in Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, Eve L.

    2014-01-01

    The Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa successfully returned the first direct samples of the regolith from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special opportunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal surfaces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the more complex effects of space weathering. Here we describe the mineralogy, microstructure and composition of three Hayabusa mission particles using transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques

  17. Comparison of macroscopic and microscopic (stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy) features of bone lesions due to hatchet hacking trauma.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Luísa; Quatrehomme, Gérald; Bertrand, Marie-France; Rallon, Christophe; Ceinos, Romain; du Jardin, Philippe; Adalian, Pascal; Alunni, Véronique

    2017-03-01

    This experimental study examined the lesions produced by a hatchet on human bones (tibiae). A total of 30 lesions were produced and examined macroscopically (naked eye) and by stereomicroscopy. 13 of them were also analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The general shape of the lesion, both edges, both walls, the kerf floor and the extremities were described. The length and maximum width of the lesions were also recorded. The microscopic analysis of the lesions led to the description of a sharp-blunt mechanism. Specific criteria were identified (lateral pushing back, fragmentation of the upraising, fossa dug laterally to the edge and vertical striae) enabling the forensic expert to conclude that a hacking instrument was used. These criteria are easily identifiable using scanning electron microscopy, but can also be observed with stereomicroscopy. Overall, lateral pushing back and vertical striae visible using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy signal the use of a hacking tool.

  18. The Scanning Electron Microscope As An Accelerator For The Undergraduate Advanced Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Randolph S.; Berggren, Karl K.; Mondol, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator for the undergraduate, advanced physics laboratory, the SEM is an excellent substitute for an ion accelerator. Although there are no nuclear physics experiments that can be performed with a typical 30 kV SEM, there is an opportunity for experimental work on accelerator physics, atomic physics, electron-solid interactions, and the basics of modern e-beam lithography.

  19. A compact multipurpose nanomanipulator for use inside a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeres, E. C.; Katan, A. J.; van Es, M. H.; Beker, A. F.; Hesselberth, M.; van der Zalm, D. J.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2010-02-01

    A compact, two-stage nanomanipulator was designed and built for use inside a scanning electron microscope. It consists of a fine stage employing piezostacks that provide a 15 μm range in three dimensions and a coarse stage based on commercially available stick-slip motors. Besides the fabrication of enhanced probes for scanning probe microscopy and the enhancement of electron field emitters, other novel manipulation processes were developed, such as locating, picking up, and positioning small nanostructures with an accuracy of ˜10 nm. In combination with in situ I-V experiments, welding, and etching, this results in a multipurpose nanofactory, enabling a new range of experiments.

  20. Experimental evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopes at high chamber pressure.

    PubMed

    Fitzek, H; Schroettner, H; Wagner, J; Hofer, F; Rattenberger, J

    2015-11-01

    In environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) high pressure applications have become increasingly important. Wet or biological samples can be investigated without time-consuming sample preparation and potential artefacts from this preparation can be neglected. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio strongly decreases with increasing chamber pressure. To evaluate the high pressure performance of ESEM and to compare different electron microscopes, information about spatial resolution and detector type is not enough. On the one hand, the scattering of the primary electron beam increases, which vanishes the contrast in images; and on the other hand, the secondary electrons (SE) signal amplification decreases. The stagnation gas thickness (effective distance the beam has to travel through the imaging gas) as well as the SE detection system depend on the microscope and for a complete and serious evaluation of an ESEM or low vacuum SEM it is necessary to specify these two parameters. A method is presented to determine the fraction of scattered and unscattered electrons and to calculate the stagnation gas thickness (θ). To evaluate the high pressure performance of the SE detection system, a method is presented that allows for an analysis of a single image and the calculation of the signal-to-noise ratio of this image. All investigations are performed on an FEI ESEM Quanta 600 (field emission gun) and an FEI ESEM Quanta 200 (thermionic gun). These methods and measurements should represent opportunities for evaluating the high pressure performance of an ESEM.

  1. Solid-gas reactions of complex oxides inside an environmental high-resolution transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Sayagués, M J; Krumeich, F; Hutchison, J L

    2001-07-01

    In a gas reaction cell (GRC), installed in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) (JEOL 4000EX), samples can be manipulated in an ambient atmosphere (p<50mbar). This experimental setup permits not only the observation of solid-gas reactions in situ at close to the atomic level but also the induction of structural modifications under the influence of a plasma, generated by the ionization of gas particles by an intense electron beam. Solid state reactions of non-stoichiometric niobium oxides and niobium tungsten oxides with different gases (O2, H2 and He) have been carried out inside this controlled environment transmission electron microscope (CETEM), and this has led to reaction products with novel structures which are not accessible by conventional solid state synthesis methods. Monoclinic and orthorhombic Nb(12)O(29) crystallize in block structures comprising [3x4] blocks. The oxidation of the monoclinic phase occurs via a three step mechanism: firstly, a lamellar defect of composition Nb(11)O(27) is formed. Empty rectangular channels in this defect provide the diffusion paths in the subsequent oxidation. In the second step, microdomains of the Nb(22)O(54) phase are generated as an intermediate state of the oxidation process. The structure of the final product Nb(10)O(25), which consists of [3x3] blocks and tetrahedral coordinated sites, is isostructural to PNb(9)O(25). Microdomains of this apparently metastable phase appear as a product of the Nb(22)O(54) oxidation. The oxidation reaction of Nb(12)O(29) was found to be a reversible process: the reduction of the oxidation product with H(2) results in the formation of the starting Nb(12)O(29) structure. On the other hand, the block structure of Nb(12)O(29) has been destroyed by a direct treatment of the sample with H(2) while NbO in a cubic rock salt structure is produced. This in situ technique has also been applied to niobium tungsten oxides which constitute the solid solution series Nb(8-n

  2. Light-microscopic observations of individual microtubules reconstituted from brain tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, R; Miki-Noumura, T

    1975-12-01

    The course of polymerization of individual brain microtubules could be observed with a light microscope employing dark-field illumination. Statistical analysis of the increase in microtubule length during the polymerization was in accordance with the time course of viscosity change of the tubulin solution. After a plateau level in viscosity was attained, there was no significant change in histograms showing length distribution. These observations were confirmed with fixed and stained microtubules, using a phase-contrast microscope. Observations with dark-field illumination revealed that reconstituted microtubules depolymerized and disappeared immediately upon exposure to buffer containing CaCl2 or sulphydryl reagents such as p-chloromercuriphenyl sulphonic acid (PCMPS) and p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB). They were also cold-labile. The growth of heterogeneous microtubules which were assembled by mixing purified tubulin dimers with ciliary outer fibres could also be followed with these optical systems.

  3. Craniofacial abnormalities induced by retinoic acid: a preliminary histological and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) study.

    PubMed

    Emmanouil-Nikoloussi, E N; Goret-Nicaise, M; Foroglou, C H; Katsarma, E; Dhem, A; Dourov, N; Persaud, T V; Thliveris, J A

    2000-10-01

    Exogenous retinoic acid has been found to be teratogenic in animals and man. Craniofacial defects induced by retinoic acid have stimulated considerable research interest. The present report deals with scanning electron microscopical observations of the craniofacial region concurrent with histological examination of craniofacial dysmorphism induced in rat embryos following maternal treatment treated with varying dosages of all-trans-retinoic acid (tretinoin). Two groups of pregnant rats were treated with rat embryos exposed to retinoic acid suspended in corn oil (100 mg/kg b.w. on gestational day 11.5 and 50 mg/kg b.w. on gestational day 10, 11 and 12 respectively). A third group was treated with corn oil (vehicle) while a fourth group remained untreated. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities, including exophthalmos, microphthalmia and anophthalmia, maxillo-mandibular dysostosis, micrognathia of both maxilla and mandible, cleft palate, subdevelopment of ear lobe, preauricular tags and macroglossia, were observed in the offspring of retinoic acid treated animals. The abnormalities were both time and dosage dependent, and characteristic of Treacher Collins syndrome when retinoic-acid was administered on gestational day 11.5. In contrast, when retinoic acid was administered were on gestational days 10-12, the defects were similar to those seen in the first and second pharyngeal arch syndrome, as well as in the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum. Whereas our data support the hypothesis that all-trans retinoic-acid disturbs growth and differentiation of several embryonic cell types essential for normal craniofacial development, its mechanism of action remains unclear.

  4. Transient of scanning electron microscopic images for a buried microstructure in insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haibo; Li Daoyu; Li Weiqin

    2007-12-15

    We clarify the transient process and its mechanism of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of a trench microstructure buried in insulators. First, interface charges of primary electrons trapped on the trench are derived from the charging model of a capacitor considering the electron beam induced current, and the surface potential is therefore assumed. The SEM signal current is then determined from its simplified relation with the surface potential. Calculated profiles of the secondary electron (SE) signal current and their time-evolution behaviors can well fit the transient of the experimental SEM images. Results show that the variation of the surface potential due to the transient interface charges and the effect of SE redistribution result in transients of the SEM imaging signal and the image width of the buried trench.

  5. Microscopic Theory of Resistive Switching in Ordered Insulators: Electronic vs. Thermal Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajun; Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel; Han, Jong E

    2017-04-10

    We investigate the dramatic switch of resistance in ordered correlated insulators, when driven out of equilibrium by a strong voltage bias. Microscopic calculations on a driven-dissipative lattice of interacting electrons explain the main experimental features of resistive switching (RS), such as the hysteretic $I$-$V$ curves and the formation of hot conductive filaments. The energy-resolved electron distribution at the RS reveals the underlying nonequilibrium electronic mechanism, namely Landau-Zener tunneling, and also justifies a thermal description where the hot-electron temperature, estimated from the first moment of the distribution, matches the equilibrium phase transition temperature. We discuss the tangled relationship between filament growth and negative differential resistance, and the influence of crystallographic structure and disorder in the RS.

  6. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H; Barber, Samuel K; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z; Voronov, Dmitriy L

    2010-09-17

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality x-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)} and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010)]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  7. Characterization of Electron Microscopes with Binary Pseudo-random Multilayer Test Samples

    SciTech Connect

    V Yashchuk; R Conley; E Anderson; S Barber; N Bouet; W McKinney; P Takacs; D Voronov

    2011-12-31

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [1] and [2] and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [5]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  8. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V.V.; Conley, R.; Anderson, E.H.; Barber, S.K.; Bouet, N.; McKinney, W.R.; Takacs, P.Z. and Voronov, D.L.

    2010-12-08

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binarypseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested and and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer. Here we describe the details of development of binarypseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi{sub 2}/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML testsamples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  9. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2011-09-01

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [1,2] and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [5]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi 2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  10. Central GABAergic innervation of the pituitary in goldfish: a radioautographic and immunocytochemical study at the electron microscope level

    SciTech Connect

    Kah, O.; Dubourg, P.; Martinoli, M.G.; Rabhi, M.; Gonnet, F.; Geffard, M.; Calas, A.

    1987-09-01

    The GABAergic innervation of the goldfish pituitary was studied at the light and electron microscope levels by means of radioautography after in vitro incubation in tritiated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and immunocytochemistry using antibodies against GABA. Following incubation of pituitary fragments in a medium containing tritiated GABA, a selective uptake of the tracer was observed within the digitations of the neurohypophysis. Silver grain clusters were also observed in the adenohypophyseal tissue. At the electron microscope level, this uptake was found to correspond to nerve endings containing small clear and dense-core vesicles. These labeled profiles were located mainly in neurohypophyseal digitations in close apposition with the basement membrane separating the neurohypophysis from the adenohypophysis. However, they were also encountered in direct contact with most adenohypophyseal cell types in the different lobes. These results were confirmed by immunocytochemical data demonstrating the presence of numerous GABA immunoreactive fibers in both anterior and neurointermediate lobes. They were found either in the digitations of the neurohypophysis or in the adenohypophysis in direct contact with the glandular cells with a distribution and an ultrastructural aspect similar to those observed by radioautography. These data demonstrate that the pituitary of teleosts receives a massive GABAergic innervation. Although physiological data providing a functional significance for such an innervation are lacking, the present study suggests that, as already documented in mammals, GABA may be involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of pituitary functions in teleosts.

  11. Microscopic analytical theory of a correlated, two-dimensional N-electron gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Quiroga, Luis

    1997-07-01

    We present a microscopic, analytical theory describing a confined N-electron gas in two dimensions subject to an external magnetic field. The number of electrons N and strength of the electron - electron interaction can be arbitrarily large, and all Landau levels are included implicitly. For any value of the magnetic field B, the correlated N-electron states are determined by the solution to a universal effective problem which resembles that of a fictitious particle moving in a multi-dimensional space, without a magnetic field, occupied by potential minima corresponding to the classical N-electron equilibrium configurations. Introducing the requirement of total wavefunction antisymmetry selects out the allowed minimum-energy N-electron states. It is shown that low-energy minima can exist at filling factors 0953-8984/9/27/018/img5 where p and n are any positive integers. These filling factors correspond to the experimentally observed fractional (FQHE) and integer (IQHE) quantum Hall effects. The energy gaps calculated analytically at 0953-8984/9/27/018/img6 are found to be consistent with experimental data as a function of magnetic field, over a range of samples.

  12. Osteogenesis imperfecta lethal in infancy: case report and scanning electron microscopic studies of the deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Levin, L S; Rosenbaum, K N; Brady, J M; Dorst, J P

    1982-12-01

    Radiologic evaluation of the skeleton and scanning electron microscopic studies of the teeth were performed on an infant boy with a lethal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) syndrome who died at 10 mo of pneumonia. The skeletal findings included ribs that were focally expanded by fracture calluses, flat vertebral bodies, and wide limb bones. On fractured tooth surfaces, the enamel and dentin were normal as was the dentin calcification front. Although microscopic abnormalities have been noted in teeth from previously reported infants with lethal OI, a few studies also report infants with normal teeth. These differences in dental findings may indicate heterogeneity in OI lethal in infancy. Results of our study indicate that, until the primary biochemical defects in the OI syndromes are elucidated, examination of teeth from other infants with lethal OI and detailed evaluation of other clinical and skeletal features will aid in delineating heterogeneity and variation in expression in lethal OI.

  13. Fractal evaluation of drug amorphicity from optical and scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriloaia, Bogdan-Mihai G.; Vizireanu, Radu C.; Neamtu, Catalin I.; Gavriloaia, Gheorghe V.

    2013-09-01

    Amorphous materials are metastable, more reactive than the crystalline ones, and have to be evaluated before pharmaceutical compound formulation. Amorphicity is interpreted as a spatial chaos, and patterns of molecular aggregates of dexamethasone, D, were investigated in this paper by using fractal dimension, FD. Images having three magnifications of D were taken from an optical microscope, OM, and with eight magnifications, from a scanning electron microscope, SEM, were analyzed. The average FD for pattern irregularities of OM images was 1.538, and about 1.692 for SEM images. The FDs of the two kinds of images are less sensitive of threshold level. 3D images were shown to illustrate dependence of FD of threshold and magnification level. As a result, optical image of single scale is enough to characterize the drug amorphicity. As a result, the OM image at a single scale is enough to characterize the amorphicity of D.

  14. Light and electron microscopic evaluation of thymuses from feline leukemia virus-infected kittens.

    PubMed

    Pack, F D; Chapman, W L

    1980-01-01

    Light microscopic and electron microscopic findings in thymuses from 4-week old feline leukemia virus-infected and 4- and 9-week old noninfected kittens were evaluated and found to be morphologically similar to each other. Thymuses from 9-week old feline leukemia virusinfected kittens were markedly atrophied and individual lobules within each thymus varied in the severity of atrophy. Loubules having the least severe atrophy had a moderate thinning of the cortex and a heterogeneous thymuses included intense eosinopoiesis at the corticomedullary junction, increased prominence of vasculature, and enlarged Hassal's corpuscles. In addition to these changes lobules of thymus having the most severe atrophy had a marked cortical thymocyte depletion, lobule collapse, and increased numbers of mast cells. Degeneration of epithelial cells in most lobules was indicated by electronlucency of the cytoplasmic matrix and often greatly dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Application trials of in situ hybridization at the electron microscopic level.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Sohei; Kondo, Takeshi; Kitazawa, Riko

    2005-09-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a morphology-oriented technique for demonstrating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences at chromosomal, cytological and histological levels. It is, however, sometimes difficult to recognize specific cell identity, early phase mRNA expression and alternative splicing because of the limited resolution of the light microscope. To overcome this limitation, we developed an improved technique for ISH at the electron microscopic level, in which pre-embedding hybridization with a non-radioactively labeled probe was used, followed by post-embedding immunoglobulin gold colloid staining. By applying this technique, early phase bone morphogenetic protein-3 mRNA in the nuclei and cytoplasm was successfully demonstrated in a differentiating chondrocytic cell lineage. Moreover, with oligo-DNA probes specific for alternative spliced forms of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA, we demonstrated such forms in a hyperplastic parathyroid gland attributed to renal failure.

  16. Simulations and measurements in scanning electron microscopes at low electron energy.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher G H; Frank, Luděk; Müllerová, Ilona

    2016-11-01

    The advent of new imaging technologies in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) using low energy (0-2 keV) electrons has brought about new ways to study materials at the nanoscale. It also brings new challenges in terms of understanding electron transport at these energies. In addition, reduction in energy has brought new contrast mechanisms producing images that are sometimes difficult to interpret. This is increasing the push for simulation tools, in particular for low impact energies of electrons. The use of Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the transport of electrons in materials has been undertaken by many authors for several decades. However, inaccuracies associated with the Monte Carlo technique start to grow as the energy is reduced. This is not simply associated with inaccuracies in the knowledge of the scattering cross-sections, but is fundamental to the Monte Carlo technique itself. This is because effects due to the wave nature of the electron and the energy band structure of the target above the vacuum energy level become important and these are properties which are difficult to handle using the Monte Carlo method. In this review we briefly describe the new techniques of scanning low energy electron microscopy and then outline the problems and challenges of trying to understand and quantify the signals that are obtained. The effects of charging and spin polarised measurement are also briefly explored. SCANNING 38:802-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Scanning electron microscope and statistical analysis of suspended heavy metal particles in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Fernández, M. Monroy; Luszczewski Kudra, A.; Leyva Ramos, R.

    Three hundred samples of urban aerosol were collected in high-volume samplers from five urban locations situated near an important metallurgical plant in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Whole samples were analyzed by atomic absorption (AA) for Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Ni, Fe and Cr. One hundred eighty of these samples were subjected to X-ray microanalysis (EDS) coupled with a scanning electron microscope to classify individual particles according to their chemical or mineralogical composition. The principal component analysis (PCA) obtained from the bulk sample analysis, and X-ray microanalysis from individual particles, confirmed chemical associations among elements directly and indirectly. PCA from bulk assays made the most effective use of X-ray microanalysis to characterize major particle types. Some chemical associations would be difficult to detect using microanalysis, alone, for example, in anthropogenic complex phases. In this work, the combined use of microanalysis and statistical methods permitted identification of associations among elements. We observed an association of Pb-As-Cd and Fe-Mn among the samples. In a second order, Pb-Fe, Pb-Mn, Fe-As, Fe-Cd, Cd-Mn and As-Mn showed a lower association. Only Ni and Cu appeared unassociated with any other element analyzed by AA. We characterized the mineral phases by size range, morphology and chemical composition using SEM-EDS to obtain a compositional approach of anthropogenic phases and peculiar morphology and size. A high percentage of heavy metal particles smaller than 2 μm were detected.

  18. Light and electron microscopic study on the pineal complex of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae Smith.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, M A; Merhige, M E

    1977-03-09

    The pineal complex of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae was studied light and electron microscopically. It consists of two vesicles representing parapineal and pineal organs. Both occur intracranially and openly communicate with each other and the brain ventricle. The entire complex shows a striking photoreceptor morphology with sensory, ependymal and nerve cells. The last cell type is more abundant in the parapineal vesicle than in the pineal organ. The following ultrastructural details of the parapineal are noteworthy: 1. The sensory cells possess large inner and outer segments protruding freely in the vesicular cavity. The outer segments measure 8-10 mum in length and consist of as many as 275 lamellae. The basal processes of these cells terminate in neuropil-like regions. Occasionally, dense granules (500-1000 A) of uncertain identity occur in the perinuclear and inner segment cytoplasm of the cells. 2. The supporting cells are of the ependymal type. Their cytoplasm contains a filamentous feltwork and pinocytotic vesicles, but lacks secretory granules. Cytosomes are particularly abundant in cell processes in the neuropil-like zones. The basal end-feet of these cells isolate the receptor and nerve cells from the perivascular space. 3. In the neuropil-like regions, terminals of sensory cells make synaptic contacts with neuronal dendrites. Synaptic ribbon-like profiles in the terminals characterize the contact zones. Only unmyelinated nerve fibers could be observed in the small area of the tissue examined. The results are discussed with regard to photoreceptive and secretory functions of the pineal complex and its evolution in lower vertebrates.

  19. Effects of iloprost on vasospasm after experimental spinal cord injury: an electron and light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Attar, A; Tuna, H; Ugur, H C; Sargon, M F; Egemen, N

    2001-12-01

    It has been increasingly reported that traumatic and ischemic insults to the spinal cord may produce tissue damage through both direct and indirect mechanisms. In spite of many theories about post-traumatic spinal cord injury, there is still no satisfactory account of the exact mechanism. Vasospasm may be related to the trauma and release of vasoconstrictor or vasoactive amines. This study aims at studying the possible protective mechanisms of iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin, after spinal cord injury on the rabbit. Forty-two adult male rabbits (New Zealand albino) were inflicted injuries by epidural application of an aneurysm clip to the spinal cord. Twenty-one rabbits received an i.v. infusion of 25 microg kg(-1) x h(-1) iloprost. The remaining twenty-one rabbits received an i.v. infusion of saline as the control group. Intravenous treatment started immediately after the infliction of the spinal cord injury and lasted for 1 h. Iloprost treatment had no side effects on the general physiological parameters in the rabbits. Control and iloprost treatment groups were divided into three sub-groups. The first group of animals was deeply anesthetized and spinal cords were removed 15 min after treatment. Second and third group animals were sacrificed in the 3rd and 24th hours respectively. All spinal cords were removed for light and electron microscopic examination. The width of anteriolar smooth muscle cells and the ultrastructural analysis of sulcal arterioles and venules in the ventral median fissure of spinal cords treated by iloprost revealed less thickening in all groups especially on the 24th hour group (p < 0.01), but less thickening was observed on the 3rd hour group. Iloprost-treated groups had limited edema and moderate protection of myelin and axons. These results suggest that iloprost treatment after spinal cord injury has a highly protective effect, and the possible protective effect of iloprost is resolution of vasospasm due to spinal cord injury.

  20. The atrioventricular valves of the mouse. I. A scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed Central

    Icardo, J M; Arrechedera, H; Colvee, E

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports a scanning electron microscope study of the morphology of the atrioventricular (AV) valves in the mouse. The leaflet tissue of the 2 AV valves consists of a continuous veil that shows no commissures or clefts. In all instances, the chordae that arise from the papillary system merge with the free border of the leaflet tissue. No distinct terminations of chordae were observed on the ventricular face of the valves. The leaflet tissue of the right AV valve can be divided into parietal and septal components on the basis of the insertion into the ventricular wall and of the papillary system. While the septal component is similar in shape, location and tension apparatus to the septal tricuspid leaflet in man, the parietal component appears to correspond to the anterior and posterior human leaflets. This segment of the valve is served by 3 papillary muscles that arise from the septal wall. The right AV valve is not a tricuspid structure from the morphological standpoint, but appears to function as such because of the particular attachment of the papillary muscles. The leaflet tissue of the mitral valve is served by 2 papillary muscles, anterior and posterior, which consist of muscular trabeculae extending from the heart apex to the base of the valve. These muscles remain associated with the ventricular wall. The leaflet tissue attaches directly to these papillary muscles, which give rise to a very small number of slender chordae. There are thus several important differences between the AV valves of the mouse and man.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Figs 4-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:8509303

  1. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hachtel, Jordan A.; Marvinney, Claire; Mouti, Anas; ...

    2016-03-02

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows usmore » to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. Furthermore, the approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications.« less

  2. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hachtel, Jordan A.; Marvinney, Claire; Mouti, Anas; Mayo, Daniel; Mu, Richard R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Haglund, R. F.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2016-03-02

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. Furthermore, the approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications.

  3. Proton Transmitting Energy Spectra and Transmission Electron Microscope Examinations of Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chun-yu; Xia, Yue-yuan; Zhang, Jian-hua; Mu, Yu-guang; Wang, Rui-jin; Liu, Ji-tian; Liu, Xiang-dong; Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-02-01

    Transmission energy spectra of 530 keV H+ ion penetrating 140 μm thick seed coat of maize and fruit peel of grape with thickness of 100 μm were measured. The result indicates that these thick biological targets, as seen by the penetrating ions, are inhomogeneous, and there are open "channel like" paths along which the incident ions can transmit the targets easily. While most of the incident ions are stopped in the targets, some of the transmitting ions only lose a small fraction of their initial incident energy. The transmission energy spectra show a pure electronic stopping feature. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographes taken from the samples of seed coat of maize and fruit peel of tomato with thickness of 60 μm indicate that 150 keV electron beam from the TEM can penetrate the thick samples to give very good images with clear contrasts.

  4. An aberration corrected photoemission electron microscope at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; MacDowell, A.A.; Duarte, R.; Doran, A.; Forest, E.; Kelez, N.; Marcus, M.; Munson, D.; Padmore, H.; Petermann, K.; Raoux, S.; Robin, D.; Scholl, A.; Schlueter, R.; Schmid, P.; Stohr, J.; Wan, W.; Wei, D.H.; Wu, Y.

    2003-11-01

    Design of a new aberration corrected Photoemission electron microscope PEEM3 at the Advanced Light Source is outlined. PEEM3 will be installed on an elliptically polarized undulator beamline and will be used for the study of complex materials at high spatial and spectral resolution. The critical components of PEEM3 are the electron mirror aberration corrector and aberration-free magnetic beam separator. The models to calculate the optical properties of the electron mirror are discussed. The goal of the PEEM3 project is to achieve the highest possible transmission of the system at resolutions comparable to our present PEEM2 system (50 nm) and to enable significantly higher resolution, albeit at the sacrifice of intensity. We have left open the possibility to add an energy filter at a later date, if it becomes necessary driven by scientific need to improve the resolution further.

  5. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2015-10-20

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  6. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; Dehope, William J; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M

    2016-06-21

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  7. High-speed multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2016-02-23

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses each being of a programmable pulse duration, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has a plurality of plates. A control system having a digital sequencer controls the laser and a plurality of switching components, synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to enable programmable pulse durations and programmable inter-pulse spacings.

  8. Implementation of subcellular water mapping by electron energy loss spectroscopy in a medium-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Terryn, C; Michel, J; Thomas, X; Laurent-Maquin, D; Balossier, G

    2004-07-01

    The water concentration in biological cells plays a predominant role in cellular life. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy, the feasibility to measure the water content in cells has already been demonstrated. In this paper, we present an upgrade of water measurement in hydrated cryosections by spectrum imaging mode in a medium-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope. The electron energy loss spectra are recorded in spectrum imaging mode in a 2(n)x2(n) pixels array. Each spectrum is processed in order to determine the water mass content in the corresponding pixel. Then a parametric image is obtained in which grey levels are related to water concentration. In this image, it is possible to recognize the different subcellular compartments. By averaging the water concentration over the relevant pixels, we can determine the water mass content in the concerned subcellular compartment. As an example, we present water mass content measurement at subcellular level in rat hepatocytes.

  9. ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; HUAN, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.; IRISO, U.

    2007-03-01

    Since 2081 MIC has experienced electron cloud effects, which have limited the beam intensity. These include dynamic pressure rises - including pressure instabilities, tune shifts: electrons, a reduction of the stability threshold for bunches crossing the transition energy, and possibly slow emittance growth. We summarize the main observations in operation and dedicated experiments, as well as countermeasures including baking, NEG coated warm beam pipes, solenoids, bunch patterns, anti-grazing rings, pre-pumped cold beam pipes, and scrubbing.

  10. Acquisition of a High Resolution Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope for the Analysis of Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant furnished funds to purchase a state-of-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support our analytical facilities for extraterrestrial samples. After evaluating several instruments, we purchased a JEOL 6500F thermal field emission SEM with the following analytical accessories: EDAX energy-dispersive x-ray analysis system with fully automated control of instrument and sample stage; EDAX LEXS wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for high sensitivity light-element analysis; EDAX/TSL electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system with software for phase identification and crystal orientation mapping; Robinson backscatter electron detector; and an in situ micro-manipulator (Kleindiek). The total price was $550,000 (with $150,000 of the purchase supported by Carnegie institution matching funds). The microscope was delivered in October 2002, and most of the analytical accessories were installed by January 2003. With the exception of the wavelength spectrometer (which has been undergoing design changes) everything is working well and the SEM is in routine use in our laboratory.

  11. Martian electron foreshock from MAVEN observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, K.; Mazelle, C. X.; Romanelli, N.; Mitchell, D. L.; Espley, J. R.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Hamza, A. M.; Halekas, J.; McFadden, J. P.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-02-01

    Flux enhancements of energetic electrons are always observed when the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is magnetically connected to the shock. The observations indicate that the foreshock electrons consist of two populations. The most energetic (E≥237 eV) originate from a narrow region at the nearly perpendicular shock. They always appear as spikes, and their flux level reaches a maximum when the angle θBn approaches 90°. The other population emanates from the entire Martian bow shock surface, and the flux level decreases slightly from the quasi-parallel to quasi-perpendicular regions. A detailed examination of the pitch angle distribution shows that the enhanced fluxes are associated with electrons moving sunward. Annulus centered along the interplanetary magnetic field direction is the most stringent feature of the 3-D angular distribution. The gyrotropic character is observed over the whole range of shock geometry. Although such signatures in the electron pitch angle distribution function strongly suggest that the reflection off the shock of a fraction of the solar wind electrons is the main mechanism for the production of Martian foreshock electrons, the decay of the flux of the second population on the other hand has yet to be understood.

  12. The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and Recent Applications of an Aberration-Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Chin, Richard; Koh, Ai Leen

    2014-05-01

    This article describes the establishment, over a period of ten years or so, of a multi-user, institution-wide facility for the characterization of materials and devices at the nano-scale. Emphasis is placed on the type of equipment that we have found to be most useful for our users, and the business strategy that maintains its operations. A central component of our facility is an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope and its application is summarized in the studies of plasmon energies of silver nanoparticles, the band gap of PbS quantum dots, atomic site occupancy near grain boundaries in yttria stabilized zirconia, the lithiation of silicon nanoparticles, in situ observations on carbon nanotube oxidation and the electron tomography of varicella zoster virus nucleocapsids.

  13. The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and Recent Applications of an Aberration-Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope**

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Chin, Richard; Koh, Ai Leen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the establishment, over a period of ten years or so, of a multi-user, institution-wide facility for the characterization of materials and devices at the nano-scale. Emphasis is placed on the type of equipment that we have found to be most useful for our users, and the business strategy that maintains its operations. A central component of our facility is an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope and its application is summarized in the studies of plasmon energies of silver nanoparticles, the band gap of PbS quantum dots, atomic site occupancy near grain boundaries in yttria stabilized zirconia, the lithiation of silicon nanoparticles, in situ observations on carbon nanotube oxidation and the electron tomography of varicella zoster virus nucleocapsids. PMID:25364299

  14. Electron microscopic study of soot particulate matter emissions from aircraft turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Liati, Anthi; Brem, Benjamin T; Durdina, Lukas; Vögtli, Melanie; Dasilva, Yadira Arroyo Rojas; Eggenschwiler, Panayotis Dimopoulos; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-16

    The microscopic characteristics of soot particulate matter (PM) in gas turbine exhaust are critical for an accurate assessment of the potential impacts of the aviation industry on the environment and human health. The morphology and internal structure of soot particles emitted from a CFM 56-7B26/3 turbofan engine were analyzed in an electron microscopic study, down to the nanoscale, for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65%, and ∼ 7% static engine thrust as a proxy for takeoff, cruising, and taxiing, respectively. Sampling was performed directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with a state-of-the-art sampling system designed for nonvolatile particulate matter. The electron microscopy results reveal that ∼ 100% thrust produces the highest amount of soot, the highest soot particle volume, and the largest and most crystalline primary soot particles with the lowest oxidative reactivity. The opposite is the case for soot produced during taxiing, where primary soot particles are smallest and most reactive and the soot amount and volume are lowest. The microscopic characteristics of cruising condition soot resemble the ones of the ∼ 100% thrust conditions, but they are more moderate. Real time online measurements of number and mass concentration show also a clear correlation with engine thrust level, comparable with the TEM study. The results of the present work, in particular the small size of primary soot particles present in the exhaust (modes of 24, 20, and 13 nm in diameter for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65% and ∼ 7% engine thrust, respectively) could be a concern for human health and the environment and merit further study. This work further emphasizes the significance of the detailed morphological characteristics of soot for assessing environmental impacts.

  15. Electron microscopic visualization of autophagosomes induced by infection of human papillomavirus pseudovirions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Yoshiyuki

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •HPV16 pseudovirions (16PsVs) infection induces an autophagy response. •The autophagy was analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). •TEM showed the double-membrane vesicles in HeLa cells inoculated with 16PsVs. •These vesicles incorporated 16PsVs particles in the lumen. •These results imply that autophagosomes are generated from the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Autophagy is a bulk degradation process for subcellular proteins and organelles to manage cell starvation. Autophagy is associated with the formation of autophagosomes and further functions as a defense mechanism against infection by various pathogens. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection induces an autophagy response, such as up-regulation of marker proteins for autophagy, in host keratinocytes. However, direct microscopic evidence for autophagy induction by HPV infection is still lacking. Here, I report an electron microscopic analysis of autophagosomes elicited by the entry of HPV pseudovirions (PsVs). HeLa cells showed enhanced infectivity for PsVs of HPV type 16 (16PsVs) when treated with an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in HPV infection. In HeLa cells inoculated with 16PsVs, transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of cup-shaped, double-membrane vesicles (phagophores) and double-membrane-bound vesicles, which are typical structures of autophagosomes. These double-membrane vesicles displayed a large lumen volume and incorporated 10–50 16PsVs particles in the lumen. These results demonstrate that autophagy is indeed induced during the HPV16 entry process and imply that autophagosomes are generated from the plasma membrane by HPV infection.

  16. Macroscopic observables experimentally linked to microscopic processes in the explosive fracture and fragmentation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Lawrence M

    2010-12-16

    The response of a metal element to explosive loading depends on a broad spectrum of explosive and metal properties, macroscopic geometry plays a crucial role in defining the localized loading history and the resulting gradients of interest, while microscopic effects and defects are generally believed responsible for damage nucleation. Certain experiments reduce the complexity by producing conditions that are uniform in some sense, allowing dynamic measurement of variables that can be correlated with corresponding microscopic effects observed in recovery experiments. Spherical expansion of thin shells, that eventually fragment, and steady wave loading of flat plates are two such experiments. Proton radiography, x-radiography, laser velocimetry, imaging IR, and visible light photography all have produced dynamic measurements in 4340 steel, copper, uranium alloys, tantalum, and titanium. Correlation of the macroscopic measurements with microscopy on recovered samples has been done with a statistical approach.

  17. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-01

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  18. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-19

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  19. Electron microscopic and optical studies of prism faces of synthetic quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzek, B. C.; Vagh, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    Application of electron and optical microscopic techniques to the study of growth spirals on quartz crystal faces is described. Attention is centered on the centers of the spirals and on screw ledges; overhanging kinks are revealed on one side of the spiral centers. The possibility that these special features may have developed after growth of the crystals went to completion is explored. The conjecture is raised that such structures might result from adsorption of growth-inhibiting impurities at the center of the growth spiral on the quartz habit faces.

  20. Unveiling the Mysteries of Mars with a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Doloboff, I. J.; Jerman, G.

    2017-01-01

    Development of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope that will utilize the martian atmosphere to dissipate charge during analysis continues. This instrument is expected to be used on a future rover or lander to answer fundamental Mars science questions. To identify the most important questions, a survey was taken at the 47th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC). From the gathered information initial topics were identified for a SEM on the martian surface. These priorities are identified and discussed below. Additionally, a concept of operations is provided with the goal of maximizing the science obtained with the minimum amount of communication with the instrument.

  1. Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    1996-01-01

    A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

  2. A low temperature scanning tunneling microscope for electronic and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smit, R H M; Grande, R; Lasanta, B; Riquelme, J J; Rubio-Bollinger, G; Agraït, N

    2007-11-01

    In this article, we describe and test a novel way to extend a low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with the capability to measure forces. The tuning fork that we use for this is optimized to have a high quality factor and frequency resolution. Moreover, as this technique is fully compatible with the use of bulk tips, it is possible to combine the force measurements with the use of superconductive or magnetic tips, advantageous for electronic spectroscopy. It also allows us to calibrate both the amplitude and the spring constant of the tuning fork easily, in situ and with high precision.

  3. Transmission electron microscope imaging of single-walled carbon nanotube interactions and mechanics on nitride grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Z. R.; Lereah, Y.; Hanein, Y.

    2006-09-01

    A method for analysing systems of isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes is of paramount importance if their structural characteristics are to be fully understood and utilized. Here we offer a simple technique for analysing such systems, with unprecedented contrast, using transmission electron microscope imaging of carbon nanotubes suspended over large holes in a silicon nitride grid. The nanotubes are grown directly on the viewing grids, using the chemical vapour deposition process, thus avoiding the use of chemicals or aggressive treatments. This method is simultaneously non-invasive, reusable, allows the analysis of multiple structures based on carbon nanotubes and is quickly implemented.

  4. A practical method for the remote control of the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Atsushi; Hirahara, Osamu; Tsuchida, Takayoshi; Sugano, Naoki; Date, Masaru

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a remote control system for the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is called Web-SEM and can be accessed by anyone through the Web browser. It is not necessary to install special software to control the SEM. Because the operating performance changes with the amount of traffic on the Internet, we have connected the Web-SEM to a LAN/Internet in order to overcome this. We have checked the performance of the remote control operation and we were able to perform focus adjustment, stage movement, etc. over the Internet by improving the method of operation and image transfer.

  5. Rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and multidrug resistance with the microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Giacomazzi, C G; Cespedes-Alvarado, C G; Losada-Cabruja, E A; McDermott, J L; Rojas-Andrade, C A; Varnier, O E

    2010-06-01

    A collaborative project was established between the Alli Causai Foundation in Ambato, Ecuador, and the University of Genoa, Italy, to introduce the microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Ecuador. A total of 507 samples were evaluated during a 10-month period, and DNA was extracted from each isolate and sent to Genoa for confirmatory molecular analysis. M. tuberculosis was identified in 45 samples by MODS, and drug resistance was observed in approximately 21% of the isolates, with four multidrug-resistant strains detected in two patients.

  6. Observations of a human hair shaft with an x-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hwa Shik; Jung, Suk-Won

    2005-11-01

    We observed the internal structures of a human hair shaft using x-ray microscopes with a spatial resolution in the range from a few microns to less than 100 nm. The energy of the x-ray used is 6.95 keV. The Zernike phase contrast together with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm enabled us to see the cuticles of scales, the cortex of macrofibrils and the medulla. All these internal features and more can easily be observed with no sample preparation including staining.

  7. Microscopic observations of riming on an ice surface using high speed video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emersic, C.; Connolly, P. J.

    2017-03-01

    Microscopic droplet riming events on an ice surface have been observed using high speed video. Observations included greater propensity for droplet spreading at temperatures higher than - 15 °C on flatter ice surfaces, and subsequently, the formation of growing rime spires into the flow, allowing glancing droplet collisions and more spherical freezing of smaller droplets. Insight into differences between laboratory observations of the Hallett-Mossop process is offered, relating to the nature of droplet spreading associated with the structure of the rimer surface prior to impact. Observations of a difference between air speed and resulting droplet impact speed on an ice surface may affect interpretations of riming laboratory studies, and may explain recent observations of a high secondary ice production rate in supercooled layer clouds.

  8. In-situ investigation of laser surface modifications of WC-Co hard metals inside a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H.; Wetzig, K.; Schultrich, B.; Pompe, Wolfgang; Chapliev, N. I.; Konov, Vitaly I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1989-05-01

    The investigation of laser interaction with solid surfaces and of the resulting mechanism of surface modification are of technical interest to optimize technological processes, and they are also of fundamental scientific importance. Most instructive indormation is available with the ail of the in-situ techniques. For instance, measuring of the photon emission of the irradiated surface ane the plasma torch (if it is produced) simultaneously to laser action, makes it possible to gain a global characterization of the laser-solid interaction. In order to obtain additional information about surface and structure modifications in microscopic detail , a laser and scanning electron microscope were combined in to a tandem equipment (LASEM). Inside this eqiipment the microscopic observation is carried out directly at the laser irradiated area without any displacement of the sample. In this way, the stepwise development of surface modification during multipulse irradiation is visible in microscopic details and much more reliable information about the surface modification process is obtainable in comparison to an external laser irradiation. Such kind of equipments were realized simultaneously and independently in the Institut of General Physics (Moscow) and the Central Institute of Solid State Physics and Material Research (Dresden) using a CO2 and a LTd-glass-laser, respectively. In the following the advantages and possibilities of a LASEM shall be demonstrated by some selected investigations of WC-CO hardmeta. The results were obtained in collaboration by both groups with the aid of the pulsed CO2-laser. The TEA CO2 laser was transmitted through a ZnSe-window into the sample chamber of the SEM and focused ofAo tfte sample surface. It was operated in TEM - oo mode with a repetition rate of about 1 pulse per second. A peak power density of about 160 MW/cm2 was achieved in front of the sample surface.

  9. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Fumio; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shinkawa, Takao; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2016-08-01

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field's components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field's derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope.

  10. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barthel, J; Thust, A

    2013-11-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state.

  11. A new method for measurement of the vitrification rate of earthenware texture by scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun Jung; Kim, Su Kyeong; Han, Min Su; Lee, Eun Woo; Heo, Jun Su; Lee, Han Hyoung

    2013-08-01

    A new method for determining the vitrification rate of pottery depending on the firing temperature was devised using secondary electron images (SEI) of scanning electron microscope (SEM). Several tests were performed to establish the appropriate operating conditions of SEM and reproducibility as well as to examine the applicability of the method. The grayscale values converted from each pixel of SEI were used to determine the vitrification rate of pottery, which in our study were artificially fired specimens composed of three types of clay. A comparison between the vitrification rate value and appearance temperature of minerals shows that mullite formation starts at 1,100°C, during which the vitrification rate rapidly increases by over 10%. In consequence, the result presented here demonstrates that the new method can be applied to estimate the firing temperature of pottery.

  12. A scanning electron microscope examination of silver cones removed from endodontically treated teeth. 1972.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Samuel; Green, Daniel B; Weiner, Neil; DeRenzis, Frank

    2004-07-01

    Twenty-five silver cones were removed from teeth which had been treated endodontically from 3 months to 20 years previously. Examination by the scanning electron microscope revealed that these cones were moderately to severely corroded. The corrosion patterns were described as ranging from pitting to deep crater formation with globular or spherical agglomerations. Examinations with the electron probe showed sulfur peaks on the corroded portions of the cones. X-ray diffraction analyses indicated that the chemical compounds formed were silver sulfides, silver sulfates, silver carbonates, and silver amine sulfate amide hydrates. Tissue culture studies indicated that the corrosion products were highly cytotoxic. The mechanisms for the formation of the corrosion products have been postulated as being due to plastic deformations and metal transfer to the silver cones, plus contact of the silver with tissue fluids.

  13. Local temperature measurements on nanoscale materials using a movable nanothermocouple assembled in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wei, Xianlong; Tang, Dai-Ming; Murakami, Yasukazu; Shindo, Daisuke; Mitome, Masanori; Golberg, Dmitri

    2011-12-01

    A nanoscale thermocouple consisting of merged Cu and Cu-Ni tips is developed for local temperature measurements on advanced nanomaterials by using a probing technique in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with a double probe scanning tunneling microcopy (STM) unit. The fabricated nanothermocouple works as the so-called T-type thermocouple and displays a quick response and high spatial and thermal resolutions. A generated thermoelectromotive force which reflects rapid temperature changes controlled by electron beam intensity alternations on a metal nanoelectrode proves the technique's usefulness for high-precision local temperature measurements. The developed method demonstrates the effectiveness while also measuring temperature changes in Joule heated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and in a modeled electrical conductive composite nanosystem.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  15. Achondrogenesis type I in three sibling fetuses. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Ornoy, A; Sekeles, E; Smith, P; Simkin, A; Kohn, G

    1976-01-01

    Three spontaneously aborted fetuses with Type I achondrogenesis in a family with a first cousin marriage are described. Studies by light microscopy revealed abnormal cartilage, enchondral, and periosteal bone, and normal tooth development with abnormal alveolar bone. Electron microscopic studies of cultured skin fibroblasts manifested structurally normal cells. Scanning electron microscopy studies had shown deficient intercartilaginous septa in the metaphysis, with abnormally large calcifying globules. In the diaphysis, the orientation of bone trabeculae and collagen fibers within the trabeculae was disturbed. The numerous osteocytic lucunae were wide and irregular in arrangement and shape. Type 2 achondrogenesis, as studied in these fetuses, is probably a widespread mesenchymal defect, manifested by abnormal calcification and ossification of enchondral and periosteal bone.

  16. The Wavelength-Dispersive Spectrometer and Its Proposed Use in the Analytical Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Lyman, Charles E.; Williams, David B.

    1989-01-01

    The Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) equipped with a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer (WDS) should have the ability to resolve peaks which normally overlap in the spectra from an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). With a WDS it should also be possible to measure lower concentrations of elements in thin foils due to the increased peak-to-background ratio compared with EDS. The WDS will measure X-ray from the light elements (4 less than Z less than 1O) more effectively. This paper addresses the possibility of interfacing a compact WDS with a focussing circle of approximately 4 cm to a modem AEM with a high-brightness (field emission) source of electrons.

  17. Balloon Observations of Relativistic Electron Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, R. M.; Woodger, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation events lasting from minutes to hours have been observed by balloon-borne instrumentation since 1996. This collection of observations, including the recent BARREL observations, all occur in the noon to midnight sector. EMIC waves have been suggested as the precipitation mechanism for this type of event [Lorentzen et al., 2000 and Millan et al., 2002]. A recent study by Li et al., [2014] performed a case study which modeled the radiation belt relativistic electron pitch angle diffusion from EMIC waves which showed convincing agreement between the modeled results and the BARREL x-ray observations. A survey of the BARREL REP events suggests this type of precipitation is a very localized phenomena with most events only being observed by a single balloon at a time despite the extensive L-value and local time coverage of observations during the campaign. This result is consistent with the findings of Blum et al., [2013]. Furthermore, the balloon observations show local time energy dependence consistent with the SAMPEX observations reported by Comess et al, [2013]. In this work we address the following questions: based on the REP events observed by balloon-borne instrumentation, are these characteristics true for all identified REP events and does this support EMIC waves as the precipitation mechanism? Due to the localized region of precipitation, do these events represent a significant radiation belt loss process?

  18. Strain mapping of semiconductor specimens with nm-scale resolution in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Bernier, Nicolas; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The last few years have seen a great deal of progress in the development of transmission electron microscopy based techniques for strain mapping. New techniques have appeared such as dark field electron holography and nanobeam diffraction and better known ones such as geometrical phase analysis have been improved by using aberration corrected ultra-stable modern electron microscopes. In this paper we apply dark field electron holography, the geometrical phase analysis of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images, nanobeam diffraction and precession diffraction, all performed at the state-of-the-art to five different types of semiconductor samples. These include a simple calibration structure comprising 10-nm-thick SiGe layers to benchmark the techniques. A SiGe recessed source and drain device has been examined in order to test their capabilities on 2D structures. Devices that have been strained using a nitride stressor have been examined to test the sensitivity of the different techniques when applied to systems containing low values of deformation. To test the techniques on modern semiconductors, an electrically tested device grown on a SOI wafer has been examined. Finally a GaN/AlN superlattice was tested in order to assess the different methods of measuring deformation on specimens that do not have a perfect crystalline structure. The different deformation mapping techniques have been compared to one another and the strengths and weaknesses of each are discussed.

  19. The nucleus of Darkschewitsch in the cat: a Nissl, Golgi, and electron microscope analysis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, R; Gioia, M

    1986-10-01

    A light and electron microscope study was carried out to elucidate the cytoarchitectural organization of the nucleus of Darkschewitsch (ND) in the cat. From the anatomical staining methods, including Nissl and Golgi-Cox, it appears that the ND shows a clear heterogeneity of shape and size of the neuronal population. The small or medium-sized neurons show a high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio and a modest basophilia. Spiny extrusions are present on many of the neurons, arranged either as varicosities giving a rosary feature or clumped in small groups over the dendritic processes; these are absent at the level of the soma. From the electron microscope analysis it appears that the neuropil is not very extensive because the neuronal bodies are numerous and compact. The synaptic complex is extensive both at the level of the nerve cell bodies and at the level of the neuropil. Since many of the synapses display the features typical of the inhibitory synapses, it is possible that they represent the anatomical basis of an inhibitory integrative function.

  20. Microscopic properties of degradation-free capped GdN thin films studied by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shimokawa, Tokuro; Fukuoka, Yohei; Fujisawa, Masashi; Zhang, Weimin; Okubo, Susumu; Ohta, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takahiro; Vidyasagar, Reddithota; Yoshitomi, Hiroaki; Kitayama, Shinya; Kita, Takashi

    2015-01-28

    The microscopic magnetic properties of high-quality GdN thin films have been investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements. Detailed temperature dependence ESR measurements have shown the existence of two ferromagnetic components at lower temperatures, which was not clear from the previous magnetization measurements. The temperature, where the resonance shift occurs for the major ferromagnetic component, seems to be consistent with the Curie temperature obtained from the previous magnetization measurement. On the other hand, the divergence of line width is observed around 57 K for the minor ferromagnetic component. The magnetic anisotropies of GdN thin films have been obtained by the analysis of FMR angular dependence observed at 4.2 K. Combining the X-ray diffraction results, the correlation between the magnetic anisotropies and the lattice constants is discussed.

  1. Deformation mechanisms in free-standing nanoscale thin films: a quantitative in situ transmission electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Haque, M A; Saif, M T A

    2004-04-27

    We have added force and displacement measurement capabilities in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) for in situ quantitative tensile experimentation on nanoscale specimens. Employing the technique, we measured the stress-strain response of several nanoscale free-standing aluminum and gold films subjected to several loading and unloading cycles. We observed low elastic modulus, nonlinear elasticity, lack of work hardening, and macroscopically brittle nature in these metals when their average grain size is 50 nm or less. Direct in situ TEM observation of the absence of dislocations in these films even at high stresses points to a grain-boundary-based mechanism as a dominant contributing factor in nanoscale metal deformation. When grain size is larger, the same metals regain their macroscopic behavior. Addition of quantitative capability makes the TEM a versatile tool for new fundamental investigations on materials and structures at the nanoscale.

  2. Deformation mechanisms in free-standing nanoscale thin films: A quantitative in situ transmission electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Haque, M. A.; Saif, M. T. A.

    2004-01-01

    We have added force and displacement measurement capabilities in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) for in situ quantitative tensile experimentation on nanoscale specimens. Employing the technique, we measured the stress–strain response of several nanoscale free-standing aluminum and gold films subjected to several loading and unloading cycles. We observed low elastic modulus, nonlinear elasticity, lack of work hardening, and macroscopically brittle nature in these metals when their average grain size is 50 nm or less. Direct in situ TEM observation of the absence of dislocations in these films even at high stresses points to a grain-boundary-based mechanism as a dominant contributing factor in nanoscale metal deformation. When grain size is larger, the same metals regain their macroscopic behavior. Addition of quantitative capability makes the TEM a versatile tool for new fundamental investigations on materials and structures at the nanoscale. PMID:15084745

  3. Detection of Single Atoms and Buried Defects in Three Dimensions by Aberration-corrected Electron Microscope with 0.5 ? Information Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kisielowski, Christian; Bischoff, Maarten; van Lin, Hans; Lazar, Sorin; Freitag, Bernhard; Knippels, Georg; Tiemeijer, Peter; van der Stam, Maarten; von Harrach, Sebastian; Stekelenburg, Michael; Haider, Maximilian; M�ller, Hans; Hartel, Peter; Kabius, Bernd; Miller, Dean; Petrov, Ivan; Olson, Eric; Donchev, Tomas; Kenik, Edward A; Lupini, Andrew R; Bentley, James; Pennycook, Stephen J; Minor, Andrew; Schmid, Andreas; Duden, Thomas; Radmilovic, Velimir; Ramasse, Quentin; Watanabe, Masashi; Stach, Eric; Denes, Peter; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The ability of electron microscopes to analyze all the atoms in individual nanostructures is limited by lens aberrations. However, recent advances in aberration-correcting electron optics have led to greatly enhanced instrument performance and new techniques of electron microscopy. The development of an ultrastable electron microscope with aberration-correcting optics and a monochromated high-brightness source has significantly improved instrument resolution and contrast. In the present work, we report information transfer beyond 50 pm and show images of single gold atoms with a signal-to-noise ratio as large as 10. The instrument's new capabilities were exploited to detect a buried Σ3 {112} grain boundary and observe the dynamic arrangements of single atoms and atom pairs with sub- ngstrom resolution. These results mark an important step toward meeting the challenge of determining the 3D atomic-scale structure of nanomaterials.

  4. Subcellular distribution of ( sup 3 H)-dexamethasone mesylate binding sites in Leydig cells using electron microscope radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The present view is that glucocorticoid hormones bind to their cytoplasmic receptors before reaching their nuclear target sites, which include specific DNA sequences. Although it is believed that cytoplasmic sequestration of steroid receptors and other transcription factors (such as NFKB) may regulate the overall activity of these factors, there is little information on the exact subcellular sites of steroid receptors or even of any other transcription factors. Tritiated (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) is an affinity label that binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thereby allowing morphological localization of the receptor at the light and electron microscope levels as well as for quantitative radioautographic (RAG) analysis. After injection of 3H-DM into the testis, a specific radioautographic signal was observed in Leydig cells, which correlated with a high level of immunocytochemically demonstrable GR in these cells at the light-microscope level. To localize the 3H-DM binding sites at the electron microscope (EM) level, the testes of 5 experimental and 3 control adrenalectomized rats were injected directly with 20 microCi 3H-DM; control rats received simultaneously a 25-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone; 15 min later, rats were fixed with glutaraldehyde and the tissue was processed for EM RAG analysis combined with quantitative morphometry. The radioautographs showed that the cytosol, nucleus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and mitochondria were labeled. Since the cytosol was always adjacent to tubules of the sER, the term sER-rich cytosol was used to represent label over sER networks, which may also represent cytosol labeling due to the limited resolution of the radioautographic technique. Labeling was highest in sER-rich cytosol and mitochondria, at 53% and 31% of the total, respectively.

  5. Uptake and processing of (/sup 3/H)retinoids in rat liver studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, H.F.; Elhanany, E.; Brouwer, A.; de Leeuw, A.M.; Knook, D.L.

    1988-03-01

    The role of rat liver cell organelles in retinoid uptake and processing was studied by electron microscopic autoradiography. (/sup 3/H)Retinoids were administered either orally, to make an inventory of the cell organelles involved, or intravenously as chylomicron remnant constituents to study retinoid processing by the liver with time. No qualitative differences were observed between the two routes of administration. Time-related changes in the distribution of grains were studied using chylomicron remnant (/sup 3/H)retinoids. The percentages of grains observed over cells and the space of Disse at 5 and 30 min after administration were, respectively: parenchymal cells, 72.6 and 70.4%; fat-storing cells, 5.0 and 18.1%, and the space of Disse, 14.4 and 8.9%. Low numbers of grains were observed over endothelial and Kupffer cells. The percentages of grains observed over parenchymal cell organelles were, respectively: sinusoidal area, 59.6 and 34.4%; smooth endoplasmic reticulum associated with glycogen, 13.8 and 13.4%; mitochondria, 5.4 and 13.6%; rough endoplasmic reticulum, 4.2 and 7.3%, and rough endoplasmic reticulum associated with mitochondria, 3.7 and 6.5%. It is concluded that chylomicron remnant (/sup 3/H)retinoids in combination with electron microscopic autoradiography provide a good system to study the liver processing of retinoids in vivo. These results, obtained in the intact liver under physiological conditions, further substantiate that retinoids are processed through parenchymal cells before storage occurs in fat-storing cell lipid droplets, that retinoid uptake is not mediated through lysosomes and that the endoplasmic reticulum is a major organelle in retinoid processing.

  6. Comparison of Light and Electron Microscopic Determinations of the Number of Bacteria and Algae in Lake Water

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Kerstin; Weibull, Claes; Cronberg, Gertrud

    1978-01-01

    Determinations of the number of microorganisms in lake water samples with the bright-field light microscope were performed using conventional counting chambers. Determinations with the fluorescence microscope were carried out after staining the organisms with acridine orange and filtering them onto Nuclepore filters. For transmission electron microscopy, a water sample was concentrated by centrifugation. The pellet was solidifed in agar, fixed, dehydrated, embedded in Epon, and cut into thin sections. The number and area of organism profiles per unit area of the sections were determined. The number of organisms per unit volume of the pellet was then calculated using stereological formulae. The corresponding number in the lake water was obtained from the ratio of volume of solidified pellet/volume of water sample. Control experiments with pure cultures of bacteria and algae showed good agreement between light and electron microscopic counts. This was also true for most lake water samples, but the electron microscopic preparations from some samples contained small vibrio-like bodies and ill-defined structures that made a precise comparison more difficult. Bacteria and small blue-green and green algae could not always be differentiated with the light microscope, but this was easily done by electron microscopy. Our results show that transmission electron microscopy can be used for checking light microscopic counts of microorganisms in lake water. Images PMID:16345279

  7. Laminated Specimens of Polystyrene Foams for Microscopic Observation of Two-Dimensional Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Yukio; Tamura, Kazuyuki

    We developed a teaching material for a microscopic observation of two-dimensional structure of polystyrene foams. The specimen is made with a thin slice of polystyrene foam laminated in between polyethylene terephthalate films. Using this teaching material, we practiced a series of learning activities for high school students to study structure and physical properties of polystyrene foams. Based on their learning, we conclude this teaching material is useful for understanding physical properties of foams in relation to everyday life and products at high school science classes.

  8. Observation results of actual phase defects using micro coherent EUV scatterometry microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hiraku; Harada, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Takeo

    2016-10-01

    One of the critical issue of EUV lithography is fabrication of defect-free mask. The origin of the defect is a particle inside the multilayer and bump or pit on glass substrate. This type of defect is called a phase defect. If there is a phase defect, the reflection phase is disordered. As a result, the phase structure is printed as a defect on a wafer. Thus, we have developed micro coherent EUV scatterometry microscope (we called micro-CSM) for phase defect characterization. Micro-CSM records scattering signal from a defect directly exposed by focused coherent EUV having a spot size of φ140-nm in diameter. An off-axis-type Fresnel zone plate was employed as a focusing optics. Phase distribution of the defect is reconstructed with the scattering image by the coherent-diffraction-imaging method. We observed actual phase defects in this work. Actual phase defects were on a mask blanks which was the same grade of the pre-production mask of the semiconductor devices. The positions of actual phase defects have been already inspected by the actinic blank inspection tool. And, the actual phase defects have been already observed using an atomic force microscope. A purpose of this work is observation of these actual defects using micro-CSM and comparison of the results.

  9. Possibility of microscopic liquid water formation at landing sites on Mars and their observational potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, B.; Kereszturi, Á.

    2017-01-01

    Microscopic liquid brines, especially calcium-perchlorate could emerge by deliquescence on Mars during night time hours. Using climate model computations and orbital humidity observations, the ideal periods and their annual plus daily characteristics at various past, current and future landing sites were compared. Such results provide context for future analysis and targeting the related observations by the next missions for Mars. Based on the analysis, at most (but not all) past missions' landing sites, microscopic brine could emerge during night time for different durations. Analysing the conditions at ExoMars rover's primary landing site at Oxia Planum, the best annual period was found to be between Ls 115-225, and in Local Time 2-5, after midnight. In an ideal case, 4 h of continuous liquid phase can emerge there. Local conditions might cause values to differ from those estimated by the model. Thermal inertia could especially make such differences (low TI values favour fast cooling and H2O cold trapping at loose surfaces) and the concentration of calcium-perchlorate salt in the regolith also influences the process (it might occur preferentially at long-term exposed surfaces without recent loose dust coverage). These factors should be taken into account while targeting future liquid water observations on Mars.

  10. Scanning electron microscope analysis of gunshot defects to bone: an underutilized source of information on ballistic trauma.

    PubMed

    Rickman, John M; Smith, Martin J

    2014-11-01

    Recent years have seen increasing involvement by forensic anthropologists in the interpretation of skeletal trauma. With regard to ballistic injuries, there is now a large literature detailing gross features of such trauma; however, less attention has been given to microscopic characteristics. This article presents analysis of experimentally induced gunshot trauma in animal bone (Bos taurus scapulae) using full metal jacket (FMJ), soft point (SP), and captive bolt projectiles. The results were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additional analysis was conducted on a purported parietal gunshot lesion in a human cranial specimen. A range of features was observed in these samples suggesting that fibrolamellar bone response to projectile impact is analogous to that observed in synthetic composite laminates. The results indicate that direction of bullet travel can be discerned microscopically even when it is ambiguous on gross examination. It was also possible to distinguish SP from FMJ lesions. SEM analysis is therefore recommended as a previously underexploited tool in the analysis of ballistic trauma.

  11. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications.

  12. Chemistry with the electron microscope: some highlights in a lifetime's journey.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John Meurig

    2002-02-01

    The supreme advantages of electron microscopy (EM) in the chemical sciences are briefly recalled: By judicious use of electron optical techniques, vital information of a structural, mechanistic, compositional, and often of an electronic kind may be retrieved. Not only are insights gained (through EM) into the existence of whole new families of structures hitherto unperceived, but one also uncovers the structural characteristics of imperfections in solids. And it is often the case that these imperfections reflect or suggest altogether new structures, hitherto unconceived. EM is , therefore, a powerful agent for aiding chemical synthesis of new materials. This is particularly important in the field of heterogeneous catalysis, since altogether new types of catalytic materials may be, on the one hand, defined, described, identified, and characterised, and, on the other, designed and synthesised. There is also the ever-improving role of the electron microscope as an analytical tool: Very few other techniques within reach of the chemist can rival it in tis sensitivity and detection limits. (Scanning instruments now permit the imaging and the identification of nanoclusters consisting of just a few atoms.) But there are numerous other branches of chemistry besides catalysis and surface science where EM proves invaluable, as we outline herein, in elucidating structure-property or composition and structure interrelationships.

  13. Measurement of the unstained biological sample by a novel scanning electron generation X-ray microscope based on SEM.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-08-07

    We introduced a novel X-ray microscope system based on scanning electron microscopy using thin film, which enables the measurement of unstained biological samples without damage. An unstained yeast sample was adsorbed under a titanium (Ti)-coated silicon nitride (Si3N4) film 90 nm thick. The X-ray signal from the film was detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. With an electron beam at 2.6 kV acceleration and 6.75 nA current, the yeast image is obtained using the X-ray PD. The image is created by soft X-rays from the Ti layer. The Ti layer is effective in generating the characteristic 2.7-nm wavelength X-rays by the irradiation of electrons. Furthermore, we investigated the electron trajectory and the generation of the characteristic X-rays within the Ti-coated Si3N4 film by Monte Carlo simulation. Our system can be easily utilized to observe various unstained biological samples of cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  14. Transient effects on electron spin observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, J.; Garraway, B. M.; Stenholm, S.

    2004-03-01

    In an earlier publication we addressed the problem of splitting an electron beam in the Stern-Gerlach experiment. In contrast to arguments put forward in the early days of quantum theory, we concluded that there are no issues of principle preventing the observation of electron spin during free flight. In that paper, however, we considered only a sudden switch off of the separating magnetic field. In this work we consider the possible effects of finite switching times at the beginning and the end of the interaction period. We consider a model where the coupling between the electron and the field is time dependent. As a result of the time dependence, the field also acquires an electric component, but this seems to cause no significant change of our conclusions. On the other hand, the smooth change of the interaction enforces the same longitudinal velocity on the electron both at the beginning and end of the interaction period because of conservation laws; this effect was missing in our earlier calculations. As the electrons are supposed to travel as a beam, this feature helps by restoring the beam quality after the interaction.

  15. Spoilage of chicken skin at 2 degrees C: electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C J; McMeekin, T A

    1981-01-01

    Microscopic techniques were used in conjunction with normal microbiological procedures to examine the development of the spoilage microflora on the skin of chicken carcasses held at 2 degrees C. Pigmented and nonpigmented psychrotrophic pseudomonads were the major spoilage bacteria isolated at all stages of storage examined. The spoilage microflora grow within a liquid film covering the skin surface, as well as in feather follicle shafts. Penetration and disruption of skin tissue were not observed even after onset of organoleptic spoilage. Bacteria were not attached to the skin by extracellular bridging substances. These data suggest a nonspecific histological-microbiological relationship between he spoilage association and the skin substrate. Images PMID:7195190

  16. ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; HUANG, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Since 2001 RHIC has experienced electron cloud effects, which have limited the beam intensity. These include dynamic pressure rises - including pressure instabilities, tune shifts, a reduction of the stability threshold for bunches crossing the transition energy, and possibly incoherent emittance growth. We summarize the main observations in operation and dedicated experiments, as well as countermeasures including baking, NEG coated warm beam pipes, solenoids, bunch patterns, anti-grazing rings, pre-pumped cold beam pipes, scrubbing, and operation with long bunches.

  17. Viking 2 electron observations at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Francis S.; Hanson, William B.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the electron mode sweeps made in Viking 2 above the ionosphere is presented. An observation of the electron energy spectrum over the range 0 to 78 eV was recorded in 1 s and observations were made at intervals of 4 or 8 s. The concentrations and temperatures were highly variable in the altitude range 14,000 to 9000 km. Evidence for two Maxwellian components were present in most of the records. The general trend of concentration and temperature for the predominant component was from 2/cu cm and 100,000 K at 15,600 km to 5/cu cm at 220,000 K and 900 km, in good agreement with the Mars 3 observations of Gringauz et al. (1974). The higher-temperature component was generally characterized by a temperature near 400,000 K and concentrations near 0.1/cu cm. The electron plasma pressures near 800 km were about a factor of 20 lower than those obtained from Viking 1, the difference being much greater than expected from the normal distribution around the stagnation point in the shocked solar wind.

  18. Using the Scanning Electron Microscope to Study Tracks in CR-39

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Kyle; Roberts, Samuel; McLean, James; Padalino, Steve

    2002-10-01

    CR-39 is a plastic used for high-energy charged particle detection. When particles hit the detector, they create tracks. These tracks can be enlarged with wet-chemical etching, and are useful in determining the energy and type of incident particle. To understand the etching process beyond the capabilities of an optical microscope, a scanning electron microscope investigation was undertaken. Preparation of a CR-39 sample involved exposing it to 5.5 MeV alpha particles, etching it in 6M NaOH at 80 degrees Celsius, and applying a thin conductive layer of gold-palladium. Three main areas of study were focused upon. It was found that the diameters of tracks increased linearly as a function of how long the samples were etched. A depth profile of a track was constructed by using the parallax that occurs between normal and tilted views. Techniques for scanning an entire sample were compared to optical methods used at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Although higher image quality can be achieved, factors, such as total scan time, decreased its appeal as a new way to scan CR-39. Research funded in part by the United States Department of Energy

  19. Electron-microscopic microstructural examination of glassy Ge-Se semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marikhin, V. A.; Mamontova, T. N.; Nikitin, V. A.

    1984-04-01

    The microstructure of glassy Ge-Se semiconductors was studied under an electron microscope, synthetic GeSe2 being an important representative of the Ge-Se system. Specimens of this material had been produced by heating a mixture of Ge with electrical resistivity of 50 ohm cm and 99.999% pure Se in a T-40-600 tubular vacuum furnace to 1000 C at a rate not exceeding 150 C/h and holding at this temperature for 40-50 h prior to quenching the melt at a rate within 100-200 C/s. Examination under a JEM-5Y microscope with an acceleration voltage up to 100 kV revealed microdomains (200-300 A) and minidomains (1000-2000 A) forming macrodomains (3-4 micron). This confirms the hypothesis, based on earlier laser spectrophotography and luminescence measurements, that these glassy materials are heterogeneous with inclusions of fine imperfect crystallites. The replicas indicate also that microdomains with unsaturated bonds and carrying electric charges may be forming during segregation of phases.

  20. Detailed Theoretical Preparation of the Drop Test of an Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paščenko, Petr; Kanický, V.

    The article deals with the preparation and execution of the drop test of the electron microscope assembly. Based on the finite element method (FEM), the simplified numerical model of the assembly is created for this purpose. The aim of the nonlinear dynamic analysis has been to obtain the size and direction of maximum inertia forces in the system during the simulated impact of the model on basis. Calculated values are verified by actual drop tests of the assembly, where the microscope is replaced by a dummy body with similar inertial characteristics. During the real tests, accelerations and strains have been measured by accelerometers and strain gauges placed in selected locations. Theoretical results are re-adjusted according to the test results. The conditions of the drop tests are governed by the internal regulations of the manufacturer. Based on the knowledge of the actual load, the load carrying structural parts of the assembly (supporting frame, horizontal frame) may be properly designed. Sufficient strength and rigidity must be guaranteed especially with regard to the transportation where rough treatment can be expected.

  1. Observation of magnetic multilayers by electron holography.

    PubMed

    Tanji, T; Hasebe, S; Nakagami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Ichihashi, M

    2004-02-01

    Magnetic structures of Co/Cu multilayers in cross section are observed by two kinds of electron holography: a Fourier method and a phase-shifting method, which is introduced briefly. The Fourier method can easily reconstruct wave functions and is applied to many specimens, whereas the phase-shifting method requires longer time for processing, but has a higher spatial resolution that permits us to discuss fine structures. Magnetization vectors in Co layers aligning parallel and separating into two blocks with antiparallel alignment are observed. Magnetic blurring on the boundary between Co and Cu in the reconstructed phase images is larger than the estimated atomic roughness.

  2. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Mishra, Bud; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  3. Transmission Electron Microscope Studies of Martian 'Iddingsite' in the Nakhlite Meteorite MIL 090032

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallis, L.; Ishii, H.; Bradley, J. P.; Taylor, J.

    2012-12-01

    As with the other nakhlites, MIL 090032 contains iddingsite-like alteration veins in the olivine phenocrysts that reportedly originated on Mars[1]. These 'iddingsite' veins have been analysed in a number of the nakhlite meteorites[2], and the presence of hydrous silicate gel, smectite clays, siderite, Fe-oxides, gypsum and carbonate have been reported. The presence and proportion of these phases in the different nakhlites appears to relate to the composition and concentration of the martian brine that flowed through each, thus supporting the theory that the nakhlite secondary alteration phases were produced by an evaporation sequence on the surface of Mars[3]. We analyzed these martian 'iddingsite' veins in MIL 090032 with the aim of placing it and its three paired meteorites within the nakhlite alteration sequence. By expanding our knowledge of this alteration sequence, we will gain extra insight into the conditions on the martian surface at the time these 'iddingsite' veins formed (<1.3 Ga). We utilized the 80-300 kV aberration-corrected FEI Titan (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscope (S-TEM) system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to analyse a ~15×8μm Focused Ion Beam (FIB) section of an 'iddingsite' vein in MIL 090032. To allow the electrons to be transmitted through the FIB section, it was milled down to ~150 nm thickness. Our initial TEM data indicate this FIB section contains hydrous amorphous silicate gel towards the center, with areas of phyllosilicate (possibly nontronite) interspersed within this central zone. Towards the outer edge of the vein jarosite and then gypsum sulfates were present. At the very edge only partially broken down olivine was observed. The presence of phyllosilicate and silicate gel in this vein suggests the 'iddingsite' in MIL 090032 was produced by water-rich brine, and the abundance of sulfates suggests the brine was enriched in sulfur. This assemblage of minerals is most in line with that of the 'iddingsite

  4. In-situ deformation studies of an aluminum metal-matrix composite in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Tensile specimens made of a metal-matrix composite (cast and extruded aluminum alloy-based matrix reinforced with Al2O3 particulate) were tested in situ in a scanning electron microscope equipped with a deformation stage, to directly monitor the crack propagation phenomenon. The in situ SEM observations revealed the presence of microcracks both ahead of and near the crack-tip region. The microcracks were primarily associated with cracks in the alumina particles. The results suggest that a region of intense deformation exists ahead of the crack and corresponds to the region of microcracking. As the crack progresses, a region of plastically deformed material and associated microcracks remains in the wake of the crack.

  5. [The enamel surface quality after interproximal stripping--a scanning electron microscopic assessment of different polishing procedures].

    PubMed

    Hein, C; Jost-Brinkmann, P G; Schillai, G

    1990-12-01

    The surface features of stripped human enamel were studied with the scanning electron microscope. The efficiency of rotating diamond and polishing discs was compared with that of diamond and polishing strips in a newly developed handpiece. Interproximal stripping with fine and superfine grit diamond coated discs and strips created furrows which were 10 microns in width. At the interface between treated and untreated enamel no hard tissue damage could be observed. Under in vitro conditions the furrows resulting from stripping were almost totally eliminated by using aluminum oxide coated strips or discs in automatically driven handpieces. After 60 s of polishing with each polishing strip/disc the treated enamel surfaces were nearly smooth. Only a few isolated furrows of 1 to maximum 3 microns were detected. As a result, we can state that it is possible to produce surfaces which are smoother than untreated natural enamel with the rotating or the oscillating polishing procedure.

  6. Quantitative Z-contrast imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope with size-selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. W.; Li, Z. Y.; Park, S. J.; Abdela, A.; Tang, D.; Palmer, R. E.

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes a new approach of quantification of annular-dark-field or Z-contrast image intensity as a function of inner acceptance angle of the detector in a scanning transmission electron microscope. By using size-selected nanoclusters of Pd (Z = 46) and Au (Z = 79), it is shown experimentally that the exponent in the power law I ˜ Zα varies strongly between 1.2 and 1.8 as the collection angle changes from 14 to 103 mrad. The result is discussed in line with existing theoretical models. Factors, such as cluster size, structure, and orientation as well as the detector geometry, are also discussed for potential use of the work.

  7. Time-resolved magnetic imaging in an aberration-corrected, energy-filtered photoemission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Nickel, F; Gottlob, D M; Krug, I P; Doganay, H; Cramm, S; Kaiser, A M; Lin, G; Makarov, D; Schmidt, O G; Schneider, C M

    2013-07-01

    We report on the implementation and usage of a synchrotron-based time-resolving operation mode in an aberration-corrected, energy-filtered photoemission electron microscope. The setup consists of a new type of sample holder, which enables fast magnetization reversal of the sample by sub-ns pulses of up to 10 mT. Within the sample holder current pulses are generated by a fast avalanche photo diode and transformed into magnetic fields by means of a microstrip line. For more efficient use of the synchrotron time structure, we developed an electrostatic deflection gating mechanism capable of beam blanking within a few nanoseconds. This allows us to operate the setup in the hybrid bunch mode of the storage ring facility, selecting one or several bright singular light pulses which are temporally well-separated from the normal high-intensity multibunch pulse pattern.

  8. Electron microscopic time-lapse visualization of surface pore filtration on particulate matter trapping process.

    PubMed

    Sanui, Ryoko; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2016-09-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to dynamically visualize the particulate matter (PM) trapping process on diesel particulate filter (DPF) walls at a micro scale as 'time-lapse' images corresponding to the increase in pressure drop simultaneously measured through the DPF. This visualization and pressure drop measurement led to the conclusion that the PM trapping in surface pores was driven by PM bridging and stacking at constricted areas in porous channels. This caused a drastic increase in the pressure drop during PM accumulation at the beginning of the PM trapping process. The relationship between the porous structure of the DPF and the depth of the surface pore was investigated in terms of the porosity distribution and PM penetration depth near the wall surface with respect to depth. The pressure drop calculated with an assumed surface pore depth showed a good correspondence to the measured pressure drop.

  9. Neurohistochemical and electron microscopic investigations of pathological and age-related changes in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Shvalev, V N; Guski, H; Fernández-Britto, J E; Sosunov, A A; Pavlovich, E R; Anikin AYu; Zhuchkova, N I; Kargina-Terentyeva, R A

    1992-01-01

    Neurohistochemical and electron microscopic investigations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) of man and animals suggest that its ontogenesis can be divided into the premediatory, mediatory and postmediatory periods of development. The postmediatory period begins heterochronically in various ganglia of the ANS. A normal process of early cardiac desympathization usually occurs at the age of 35 to 60 years. Specific changes of preceding sudden cardiac death are elicited in different parts of the ANS and adrenal glands. This is accompanied by focal myocardial desympathization. Coronary vessels and conducting system which may influence myocardial hypersensitivity zones to catecholamines are involved in the process of destabilization of the cardiac function. Moreover, relationships are demonstrated which exist between the atherosclerotic lesions of the aortic wall and the status of its nerve plexuses.

  10. Charge contrast imaging of biomaterials in a variable pressure scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Clode, Peta L

    2006-09-01

    Charge contrast imaging (CCI) is a dynamic phenomenon recently reported in insulating and semiconducting materials imaged with low vacuum or variable pressure scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Data presented in this paper illustrates that CCI can also be applied to biominerals and biological soft-tissues and that useful and unique structural information can be obtained from routine samples. Various resin-embedded samples were considered and example images from several different biomaterials are presented. Due to the diverse nature of samples that appear to exhibit charge contrast, this imaging technique has prospective application in a wide range of biological and biomedical research. This work represents the first application of CCI to biomaterials and in particular, highlights a new method for investigating the formation, structure and growth of biominerals.

  11. An analytical electron microscope study of airborne industrial particles in Sosnowiec, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Janeczek, Janusz

    The types and the relative amounts of airborne particles in the city of Sosnowiec (Poland) during 21-22 June, 1994 were identified by analytical electron microscope analyses. They are mostly aspherical angular Al-bearing silica particles (0.1-5.15 μm) and clusters thereof. Carbonaceous particles form sheets of soluble volatile-rich materials (0.3-33.9 μm) and rare soot. Numerous nanometer-sized Al-bearing silica grains and salt minerals are associated with the larger particles. They resulted from inefficient combustion of low-grade coals by the local industries whereby the silica particles are coal impurities that survived combustion. The total particle emission was constant during a 24 h period but silica shards dominated the nighttime emission while carbonaceous particles abounded during the daytime. This study showed that tropospheric particles in regions dominated by inefficient coal combustion are fundamentally different from typical coal fly ash spheres.

  12. Characteristic views of E. coli and B. stearothermophilus 30S ribosomal subunits in the electron microscope.

    PubMed Central

    van Heel, M; Stöffler-Meilicke, M

    1985-01-01

    Large sets of electron microscopic images of the 30S ribosomal subunits of Bacillus stearothermophilus (914 molecules) and Escherichia coli (422 molecules) were analysed with image processing techniques. Using computer alignment and a new multivariate statistical classification scheme, three predominant views of the subunit were found for both species. These views, which together account for approximately 90% of the population of images, were determined to a reproducible resolution of up to 1.7 nm, thus elucidating many new structural details. The angular spread of the molecular orientations around the three main stable positions is remarkably small (less than 8 degrees). Some of the current models for the small ribosomal subunit are incompatible with our new results. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3908096

  13. Multi-modal miniaturized microscope: successful merger of optical, MEMS, and electronic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Rahman, Mohammed; Christenson, Todd C.; Gaalema, Stephen; Dereniak, Eustace L.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Descour, Michael R.

    2005-12-01

    The multi-modal miniature microscope (4M) device for early cancer detection is based on micro-optical table (MOT) platform which accommodates on a chip: optical, micro-mechanical, and electronic components. The MOT is a zeroalignment optical-system concept developed for a wide variety of opto-mechanical instruments. In practical terms this concept translates into assembly errors that are smaller than the tolerances on the performance of the optical system. This paper discusses all major system elements: optical system, custom high speed CMOS detector and comb drive actuator. It also points to mutual relations between different technologies. The hybrid sol-gel lenses, their fabrication and assembling techniques, optical system parameters, and various operation modes are also discussed. A particularly interesting mode is a structured illumination technique that delivers confocal-imaging capabilities and may be used for optical sectioning. Structured illumination is produced with LIGA fabricated actuator scanning in resonance and reconstructed using sine approximation algorithm.

  14. Electron-microscopic cytochemical localization of diamine and polyamine oxidases in pea and maize tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Furey MJ, 3. d.

    1991-01-01

    An electron-microscopic cytochemical method was used to localize diamine oxidase (DAO) in pea and polyamine oxidase (PAO) in maize (Zea mays L.). The method, based on the precipitation of amine-oxidase-generated H2O2 by CeCl3, was shown to be specific for DAO and PAO and permitted their localization in plant tissues with a high degree of resolution. Both enzymes are localized exclusively in the cell wall. Both DAO- and PAO-activity staining is most intense in the middle lamellar region of the wall and in cells exhibiting highly lignified walls. The oxidases could provide H2O2 for peroxidase-mediated cross-linking reactions in the cell wall and may, in this capacity, play a role in the regulation of plant growth.

  15. Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies of the Pecten Oculi in the Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Pourlis, Aris F.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to extend the microscopic investigations of the pecten oculi in the quail in order to add some information on the unresolved functional anatomy of this unique avian organ. The pecten oculi of the quail was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Eighteen- to-twenty two highly vascularised accordion-like folds were joined apically by a heavily pigmented bridge of tissue, which holds the pecten in a fanlike shape, widest at the base. The structure of the double layered limiting membrane was recorded. The presence of hyalocytes with macrophage-like appearance was illustrated. It is assumed that the pecten oculi of the quail resembles that of the chicken. Illustrated morphological features of this species may add information on the active physiological role of the pecten. But still, the functional significance of this organ is a matter of controversies. PMID:24198967

  16. Synaptic endfeet in the 'acoustic nerve nucleus' of the rat. An electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Bolado, G; Merchán, J

    1988-01-01

    The medial portion of the cochlear nerve of the rat contains astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons. These neurons form what has been called the 'acoustic nerve nucleus'. This nucleus has been studied here at the electron microscopic level. Its neurons are large and round, showing an eccentric nucleus, fibrillary bodies and rough endoplasmic reticulum which is not arranged in stacks. The somata and dendrites receive synaptic endfeet which can be classified into three groups according to vesicle size and shape. In general, the ultrastructural characteristics of these cells are similar to those of bushy cells as reported by other authors. The 'acoustic nerve nucleus' can be considered to be the most peripheral part of the anterior ventral cochlear nucleus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:3248967

  17. Efficient elastic imaging of single atoms on ultrathin supports in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Muller, David A

    2012-12-01

    Mono-atomic-layer membranes such as graphene offer new opportunities for imaging and detecting individual light atoms in transmission electron microscopes (TEM). For such applications where multiple scattering and diffraction effects are weak, we evaluate the detection efficiency and interpretability of single atom images for the most common detector geometries using quantitative quantum mechanical simulations. For well-resolved and atomically-thin specimens, the low angle annular dark field (LAADF) detector can provide a significant increase in signal-to-noise over other common detector geometries including annular bright field and incoherent bright field. This dramatically improves the visibility of organic specimens on atomic-layer membranes. Simulations of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) imaged under ideal conditions indicate the minimal dose requirements for elastic imaging by STEM or conventional TEM still exceed previously reported dose limits.

  18. Dislocation structure in AlN films induced by in situ transmission electron microscope nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumoto, Yuki; Kutsukake, Kentaro; Ohno, Yutaka; Yonenaga, Ichiro

    2012-11-01

    To elucidate dislocation generation and propagation processes in AlN films containing a high density of grown-in threading dislocations (TDs), in situ nanoindentation (NI) was performed in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature. Dislocations with the Burgers vector b = 1/3<12¯10> were introduced not only on the primary slip plane, i.e., the (0001) basal planes, but also on the {101¯1} and {101¯2} pyramidal planes. The results are explained by considering the distribution of the resolved shear stress. It was found that the dislocations induced by NI interact with grown-in TDs: (1) for the NI-induced dislocations on pyramidal planes, edge grown-in TDs induce cross slip to basal planes, and (2) for the NI-induced dislocations on basal planes, screw grown-in TDs prevent their propagation, while edge grown-in TDs do not.

  19. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Veith, Gabriel M; Joy, David C; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-12-14

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory.

  20. Improved depth of field in the scanning electron microscope derived from through-focus image stacks.

    PubMed

    Boyde, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The depth of field limit in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) can be overcome by recording stacks of through-focus images (as in conventional and confocal optical microscopy) which are postprocessed to generate an all-in-focus image. Images are recorded under constant electron optical conditions by mechanical Z-axis movement of the sample. This gives rise to a change in magnification through the stack due to the perspective projection of the SEM image. Calculation of the necessary scaling as well as the derivation of best focus information at every patch in the image--and a contour map function derived from the selected patch depths--are incorporated in a new software package (Auto-Montage Pro). The utility of these procedures is demonstrated with examples from the study of human osteoporotic bone, where results show uncoupling of resorption and formation. The procedure can be combined with pseudo-colour coding for the direction of apparent illumination when using backscattered electron (BSE) detectors in contrasting positions.

  1. Quantifying Transient States in Materials with the Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G; LaGrange, T; Kim, J; Reed, B; Browning, N

    2009-09-21

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) offers a means of capturing rapid evolution in a specimen through in-situ microscopy experiments by allowing 15 ns electron micrograph exposure times. The rapid exposure time is enabled by creating a burst of electrons at the emitter by ultraviolet pulsed laser illumination. This burst arrives a specified time after a second laser initiates the specimen reaction. The timing of the two Q-switched lasers is controlled by high-speed pulse generators with a timing error much less than the pulse duration. Both diffraction and imaging experiments can be performed, just as in a conventional TEM. The brightness of the emitter and the total current control the spatial and temporal resolutions. We have demonstrated 7 nm spatial resolution in single 15 ns pulsed images. These single-pulse imaging experiments have been used to study martensitic transformations, nucleation and crystallization of an amorphous metal, and rapid chemical reactions. Measurements have been performed on these systems that are possible by no other experimental approaches currently available.

  2. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.

    2000-04-18

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles is brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscope as the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  3. Imaging flux vortices in type II superconductors with a commercial transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Loudon, J C; Midgley, P A

    2009-05-01

    Flux vortices in superconductors can be imaged using transmission electron microscopy because the electron beam is deflected by the magnetic flux associated with the vortices. This technique has a better spatial and temporal resolution than many other imaging techniques and is sensitive to the magnetic flux density within each vortex, not simply the fields at the sample surface. Despite these advantages, only two groups have successfully employed the technique using specially adapted instruments. Here we demonstrate that vortices can be imaged with a modern, commercial transmission electron microscope operating at 300kV equipped with a field emission gun, Lorentz lens and a liquid helium cooled sample holder. We introduce superconductivity for non-specialists and discuss techniques for simulating and optimising images of flux vortices. Sample preparation is discussed in detail as the main difficulty with the technique is the requirement for samples with very large (>10microm), flat areas so that the image is not dominated by diffraction contrast. We have imaged vortices in superconducting Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8-delta) and use correlation functions to investigate the ordered arrangements they adopt as a function of applied magnetic field.

  4. Detection efficiency and spatial resolution of the SIRAD ion electron emission microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, D.; Giubilato, P.; Kaminsky, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Nigro, M.; Pantano, D.; Silvestrin, L.; Tessaro, M.; Wyss, J.; Bertazzoni, S.; Mongiardo, L.; Salmeri, M.; Salsano, A.

    2009-06-01

    An axial ion electron emission microscope (IEEM) has been built at the SIRAD irradiation facility at the 15 MV Tandem accelerator of INFN Legnaro National Laboratory (Padova, Italy) to obtain a micrometric sensitivity map to single event effects (SEE) of electronic devices. In this contribution we report on two experiments performed with the IEEM. Si 3N 4 ultra-thin membranes with a gold deposition were placed on the device under test (DUT) to ensure a uniform and abundant secondary electron emission In the first experiment we measured an IEEM ion detection efficiency of 83% with a 58Ni (220 MeV) beam, in good agreement with the expected value. The second experiment allowed us to estimate the lateral resolution of the IEEM. The positions of ion induced single event upsets (SEU) in a synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM), used as a reference target, were compared with the corresponding ion impact points reconstructed by the IEEM. The result (FWHM ˜4.4 μm with a 79Br beam of 214 MeV) is encouraging because of the residual presence of distortions of the image and mechanical vibrations.

  5. Two-dimensional simulation and modeling in scanning electron microscope imaging and metrology research.

    PubMed

    Postek, Michael T; Vladár, András E; Lowney, Jeremiah R; Keery, William J

    2002-01-01

    Traditional Monte Carlo modeling of the electron beam-specimen interactions in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) produces information about electron beam penetration and output signal generation at either a single beam-landing location, or multiple landing positions. If the multiple landings lie on a line, the results can be graphed in a line scan-like format. Monte Carlo results formatted as line scans have proven useful in providing one-dimensional information about the sample (e.g., linewidth). When used this way, this process is called forward line scan modeling. In the present work, the concept of image simulation (or the first step in the inverse modeling of images) is introduced where the forward-modeled line scan data are carried one step further to construct theoretical two-dimensional (2-D) micrographs (i.e., theoretical SEM images) for comparison with similar experimentally obtained micrographs. This provides an ability to mimic and closely match theory and experiment using SEM images. Calculated and/or measured libraries of simulated images can be developed with this technique. The library concept will prove to be very useful in the determination of dimensional and other properties of simple structures, such as integrated circuit parts, where the shape of the features is preferably measured from a single top-down image or a line scan. This paper presents one approach to the generation of 2-D simulated images and presents some suggestions as to their application to critical dimension metrology.

  6. Closed-cell foam skin thickness measurement using a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Todd, Clifford S; Kuznetsova, Valentina

    2011-10-01

    Closed cell polymer foam skin thickness can be assessed by taking backscatter electron (BSE) images in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at a series of accelerating voltages. Under a given set of experimental conditions, the electron beam mostly passes through thin polymer skin cell walls. That cell appears dark compared to adjacent thicker-skinned cells. Higher accelerating voltages lead to a thicker skin being penetrated. Monte Carlo modeling of beam-sample interactions indicates that at 5 keV, skin less than ∼0.5 μm in thickness will appear dark, whereas imaging at 30 keV allows skin thicknesses up to ∼4 μm to be identified. The distribution of skin thickness can be assessed over square millimeters of foam surface in this manner. Qualitative comparisons of the skin thicknesses of samples can be made with a simple visual inspection of the images. A semiquantitative comparison is possible by applying image analysis. The proposed method is applied to two example foams. Characterizing foam skin thickness by this method is possible using any SEM that is capable of collecting useful BSE images over a range of accelerating voltages. Imaging in low vacuum, where an electrically conductive metal coating is not required, leads to more sensitivity in skin thickness characterization.

  7. Three-dimensional machining of carbon nanotube forests using water-assisted scanning electron microscope processing

    SciTech Connect

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Maschmann, Matthew R.; Kim, Sanha; Hart, A. John; Slinker, Keith; Ehlert, Gregory J.

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate that vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be precisely machined in a low pressure water vapor ambient using the electron beam of an environmental scanning electron microscope. The electron beam locally damages the irradiated regions of the CNT forest and also dissociates the water vapor molecules into reactive species including hydroxyl radicals. These species then locally oxidize the damaged region of the CNTs. The technique offers material removal capabilities ranging from selected CNTs to hundreds of cubic microns. We study how the material removal rate is influenced by the acceleration voltage, beam current, dwell time, operating pressure, and CNT orientation. Milled cuts with depths between 0–100 microns are generated, corresponding to a material removal rate of up to 20.1 μm{sup 3}/min. The technique produces little carbon residue and does not disturb the native morphology of the CNT network. Finally, we demonstrate direct machining of pyramidal surfaces and re-entrant cuts to create freestanding geometries.

  8. Electron-microscopic and electrophoretic studies of bovine femoral-head cartilage proteoglycan fractions.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, D J; Nieduszynski, I A; Oates, K; Sheehan, J K

    1986-01-01

    Proteoglycans (A1D1) extracted from bovine femoral-head cartilage were examined by electron microscopy using benzyldimethylammonium chloride as a spreading agent. The preparation contained a mixture of particles, some with a 'beaded' structure and a contiguous filamentous 'tail' at one end and others which appeared as round 'blobs', some of which also had filamentous tails. Previous electron-microscopic studies of proteoglycan monomers have indicated that their length distributions were apparently unimodal, a finding that contrasted with agarose/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis results, which generally indicated two bands. In the present study proteoglycans isolated from the slowly migrating electrophoretic band were shown to be predominantly the larger molecules of beaded appearance, whereas the rapidly migrating proteoglycans were predominantly molecules with the 'blob-like' appearance. Gel-filtration, isopycnic-density-gradient-centrifugation and rate-zonal-centrifugation techniques were evaluated as means of proteoglycan fractionation by electron microscopy and agarose-gel electrophoresis. Rate-zonal centrifugation in mixed-salt gradients of caesium chloride/4 M-guanidinium chloride yielded the most effective fractionation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3827853

  9. Solving the Accelerator-Condenser Coupling Problem in a Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; LaGrange, T; Shuttlesworth, R M; Gibson, D J; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D

    2009-12-29

    We describe a modification to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) that allows it to briefly (using a pulsed-laser-driven photocathode) operate at currents in excess of 10 mA while keeping the effects of condenser lens aberrations to a minimum. This modification allows real-space imaging of material microstructure with a resolution of order 10 nm over regions several {micro}m across with an exposure time of 15 ns. This is more than 6 orders of magnitude faster than typical video-rate TEM imaging. The key is the addition of a weak magnetic lens to couple the large-diameter high-current beam exiting the accelerator into the acceptance aperture of a conventional TEM condenser lens system. We show that the performance of the system is essentially consistent with models derived from ray tracing and finite element simulations. The instrument can also be operated as a conventional TEM by using the electron gun in a thermionic mode. The modification enables very high electron current densities in {micro}m-sized areas and could also be used in a non-pulsed system for high-throughput imaging and analytical TEM.

  10. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant.

  11. Strain mapping at the nanoscale using precession electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope with off axis camera

    SciTech Connect

    Vigouroux, M. P.; Delaye, V.; Bernier, N.; Lafond, D.; Audoit, G.; Bertin, F.; Cipro, R.; Baron, T.; Martin, M.; Rouvière, J. L.; Chenevier, B.

    2014-11-10

    Precession electron diffraction is an efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures by precessing the electron beam, while maintaining a few nanometre probe size. Here, we show that an advanced diffraction pattern treatment allows reproducible and precise strain measurements to be obtained using a default 512 × 512 DigiSTAR off-axis camera both in advanced or non-corrected transmission electron microscopes. This treatment consists in both projective geometry correction of diffraction pattern distortions and strain Delaunay triangulation based analysis. Precision in the strain measurement is improved and reached 2.7 × 10{sup −4} with a probe size approaching 4.2 nm in diameter. This method is applied to the study of the strain state in InGaAs quantum-well (QW) devices elaborated on Si substrate. Results show that the GaAs/Si mismatch does not induce in-plane strain fluctuations in the InGaAs QW region.

  12. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; ...

    2016-08-03

    The highly energetic electron beam from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from local knock-out and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and chemical/electrochemical reactions occuring at localized liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here we develop an automated liquid phase nanolithography method that is capable of directly writing nanometer scaled features within silicon nitride encapsulated liquid cells. An external beam control system, connected to the scan coilsmore » of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan velocity of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to controllably deposit palladium onto silicon nitride membranes. We determine the threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium, explore the influence of electron dose on the feature size and morphology of nanolithographically patterned nanostructures, and propose a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring. As a result, this approach enables both fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter, as well as opens a pathway to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid phase precursors.« less

  13. Comprehensive Characterization of Extended Defects in Semiconductor Materials by a Scanning Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Hieckmann, Ellen; Nacke, Markus; Allardt, Matthias; Bodrov, Yury; Chekhonin, Paul; Skrotzki, Werner; Weber, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Extended defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries have a strong influence on the performance of microelectronic devices and on other applications of semiconductor materials. However, it is still under debate how the defect structure determines the band structure, and therefore, the recombination behavior of electron-hole pairs responsible for the optical and electrical properties of the extended defects. The present paper is a survey of procedures for the spatially resolved investigation of structural and of physical properties of extended defects in semiconductor materials with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Representative examples are given for crystalline silicon. The luminescence behavior of extended defects can be investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. They are particularly valuable because spectrally and spatially resolved information can be obtained simultaneously. For silicon, with an indirect electronic band structure, CL measurements should be carried out at low temperatures down to 5 K due to the low fraction of radiative recombination processes in comparison to non-radiative transitions at room temperature. For the study of the electrical properties of extended defects, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique can be applied. The EBIC image reflects the local distribution of defects due to the increased charge-carrier recombination in their vicinity. The procedure for EBIC investigations is described for measurements at room temperature and at low temperatures. Internal strain fields arising from extended defects can be determined quantitatively by cross-correlation electron backscatter diffraction (ccEBSD). This method is challenging because of the necessary preparation of the sample surface and because of the quality of the diffraction patterns which are recorded during the mapping of the sample. The spatial resolution of the three experimental techniques is compared. PMID:27285177

  14. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Cullen, David A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-03

    The highly energetic electron beam from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from local knock-out and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and chemical/electrochemical reactions occuring at localized liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here we develop an automated liquid phase nanolithography method that is capable of directly writing nanometer scaled features within silicon nitride encapsulated liquid cells. An external beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan velocity of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to controllably deposit palladium onto silicon nitride membranes. We determine the threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium, explore the influence of electron dose on the feature size and morphology of nanolithographically patterned nanostructures, and propose a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring. As a result, this approach enables both fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter, as well as opens a pathway to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid phase precursors.

  15. The Sensura Neglecta in the Pigeon: A Scanning Electron and Light Microscope Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Both scanning electron and light microscopy have been used to observe the tiny sensura neglecta which is located in the inferior utricula sinus of...the vestibular labyrinth in the pigeon. Observations indicate that the sensura neglecta in the pigeon has both crista- and macula-like features. It is

  16. PAMELA observational capabilities of Jovian electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Felice, V.; Casolino, M.; de Simone, N.; Picozza, P.

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment that has been launched on June 15th, 2006. It is designed to make long duration measurements of cosmic radiation over an extended energy range. Specifically, PAMELA is able to measure the cosmic ray antiproton and positron spectra over the largest energy range ever achieved and will search for antinuclei with unprecedented sensitivity. Furthermore, it will measure the light nuclear component of cosmic rays and investigate phenomena connected with solar and earth physics. The apparatus consists of: a time of flight system, a magnetic spectrometer, an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter, a shower tail catcher scintillator, a neutron detector and an anticoincidence system. In this work a study of the PAMELA capabilities to detect electrons is presented. The Jovian magnetosphere is a powerful accelerator of electrons up to several tens of MeV as observed at first by Pioneer 10 spacecraft (1973). The propagation of Jovian electrons to Earth is affected by modulation due to Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR). Their flux at Earth is, moreover, modulated because every ˜13 months Earth and Jupiter are aligned along the average direction of the Parker spiral of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field. PAMELA will be able to measure the high energy tail of the Jovian electrons in the energy range from 50 up to 130 MeV. Moreover, it will be possible to extract the Jovian component reaccelerated at the solar wind termination shock (above 130 MeV up to 2 GeV) from the galactic flux.

  17. Microscopic driving force in electronic smectic-nematic transition in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jing; Sun, K.; Yin, W. G.; Pennycook, S. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Zhu, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Electronic liquid crystal (ELC) phases provide unique descriptions to characterize the electronic structures and elucidate the underlying physics in correlated materials from symmetry perspective. Although ELC phases have been proposed to play a key role in interpreting the structure-property relationship in a wide range of correlated materials, the experimental manifestations of the nature of the transition between such phases have been waiting to be explored. Using transmission electron microscopic tools with recently developed techniques, we studied the electronic smectic-nematic phase transition in La1/3Ca2/3MnO3 by monitoring the evolution of charge ordering and orbital ordering superstructures as a function of temperature. We observed that the transition is driven by the formation of defects and electronic phase separation. In addition, we found that charge inhomogeneity is responsible for the electronic smectic-nematic phase transition in this material.

  18. Evolution of dislocation loops in annealed iron pre-irradiated with hydrogen ion in high-voltage electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jin; Du, Yufeng; Ohnuki, Somei; Wan, Farong

    2016-12-01

    The nature of dislocation loops in the annealed pure iron pre-irradiated with hydrogen ion at room temperature was studied by the evolution of loops under electron irradiation in high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM). Only interstitial-type loops were observed when annealed and electron irradiated at 350 °C but only vacancy-type loops formed at temperature higher than 500 °C. When annealed at temperatures from 450 °C to 490 °C, both interstitial-type and vacancy-type loops formed simultaneously in the specimen and vacancy-type loops accounted for an increasing fraction with increasing annealing temperature, from 28.5% at 450 °C to 55% at 490 °C. The bias factor of interstitial-type and vacancy-type loops was compared based on the growth rate or shrinkage rate of the dislocation loops. The bias factor of interstitial-type loops was demonstrated to be higher than that of vacancy-type loops at all three annealing temperatures.

  19. Fabrication of bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film for electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taichi; Kanamori, Satoshi; Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-07-13

    We fabricated a bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film to serve as a nanometric light source for high-spatial-resolution optical microscopy based on electron beam excitation. The Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film was fabricated by annealing a ZnO film on a Si₃N₄ substrate at 1000 °C in N₂. The annealed film emitted bright cathodoluminescence compared with the as-deposited film. The film is promising for nano-imaging with electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy. We evaluated the spatial resolution of a microscope developed using this Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film. This is the first report of the investigation and application of ZnO/Si₃N₄ annealed at a high temperature (1000 °C). The fabricated Zn₂SiO₄ film is expected to enable high-frame-rate dynamic observation with ultra-high resolution using our electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

  20. Precise observation of C. elegans dynamic behaviours under controlled thermal stimulus using a mobile phone-based microscope.

    PubMed

    Yoon, T; Shin, D-M; Kim, S; Lee, S; Lee, T G; Kim, K

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the temperature-dependent locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans by using the mobile phone-based microscope. We developed the customized imaging system with mini incubator and smartphone to effectively control the thermal stimulation for precisely observing the temperature-dependent locomotory behaviours of C. elegans. Using the mobile phone-based microscope, we successfully followed the long-term progress of specimens of C. elegans in real time as they hatched and explored their temperature-dependent locomotory behaviour. We are convinced that the mobile phone-based microscope is a useful device for real time and long-term observations of biological samples during incubation, and can make it possible to carry out live observations via wireless communications regardless of location. In addition, this microscope has the potential for widespread use owing to its low cost and compact design.

  1. Macroscopic rates, microscopic observations, and molecular models of the dissolution of carbonate phases.

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Martin, Scot T.

    2004-05-01

    Bulk and surface energies are calculated for endmembers of the isostructural rhombohedral carbonate mineral family, including Ca, Cd, Co, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Zn compositions. The calculations for the bulk agree with the densities, bond distances, bond angles, and lattice enthalpies reported in the literature. The calculated energies also correlate with measured dissolution rates: the lattice energies show a log-linear relationship to the macroscopic dissolution rates at circumneutral pH. Moreover, the energies of ion pairs translated along surface steps are calculated and found to predict experimentally observed microscopic step retreat velocities. Finally, pit formation excess energies decrease with increasing pit size, which is consistent with the nonlinear dissolution kinetics hypothesized for the initial stages of pit formation.

  2. In-Situ atomic force microscopic observation of ion beam bombarded plant cell envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Brown, I. G.; Seprom, C.; Vilaithong, T.

    2007-04-01

    A program in ion beam bioengineering has been established at Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand, and ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) has been demonstrated. However, a good understanding of the fundamental physical processes involved is lacking. In parallel work, onion skin cells have been bombarded with Ar+ ions at energy 25 keV and fluence1-2 × 1015 ions/cm2, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures on the cell wall that could serve as channels for the transfer of large macromolecules into the cell interior. An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) system has been designed and installed in the CMU bio-implantation facility as a tool for the observation of these microcraters during ion beam bombardment. Here we describe some of the features of the in-situ AFM and outline some of the related work.

  3. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Hodgens, K J; Arena, J; Song, M J; McEwen, B F

    1996-02-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  4. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Arena, J.; Song, M. J.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  5. Transmission electron microscopic study of pyrochlore to defect-fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, Chinnathambi; Anderson, Thomas J.; Gout, Delphine; Ubic, Rick

    2012-10-15

    A structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates, Ln{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Yb and Lu), has been identified. Neutron diffraction showed that the structure transforms from well-ordered pyrochloric to fully fluoritic through the lanthanide series from La to Lu with a corresponding increase in the position parameter x of the 48f (Fd3{sup Macron }m) oxygen site from 0.330 to 0.375. As evidenced by the selected area electron diffraction, La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibited a well-ordered pyrocholoric structure with the presence of intense superlattice spots, which became weak and diffuse (in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}) before disappearing completely as the series progressed towards the Lu end. High resolution electron microscopic studies showed the breakdown of the pyrochlore ordering in the form of antiphase domains resulting in diffused smoke-like superlattice spots in the case of Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron microscopic studies showed the ordered pyrochlore to defect fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates to occur via the formation of anti-phase domains to start with. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrochlore to fluorite structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} showed well ordered pyrochlore structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Break down of pyrochlore ordering due to antiphase boundaries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rest of the series showed fluoritic structure.

  6. Novel scanning electron microscope bulge test technique integrated with loading function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanwei; Xie, Huimin E-mail: xiehm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Zhanwei E-mail: xiehm@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-10-15

    Membranes and film-on-substrate structures are critical elements for some devices in electronics industry and for Micro Electro Mechanical Systems devices. These structures are normally at the scale of micrometer or even nanometer. Thus, the measurement for the mechanical property of these membranes poses a challenge over the conventional measurements at macro-scales. In this study, a novel bulge test method is presented for the evaluation of mechanical property of micro thin membranes. Three aspects are discussed in the study: (a) A novel bulge test with a Scanning Electron Microscope system realizing the function of loading and measuring simultaneously; (b) a simplified Digital Image Correlation method for a height measurement; and (c) an imaging distortion correction by the introduction of a scanning Moiré method. Combined with the above techniques, biaxial modulus as well as Young's modulus of the polyimide film can be determined. Besides, a standard tensile test is conducted as an auxiliary experiment to validate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  7. [Regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Saccoglossus mereschkowskii (Enteropneusta, Hemichordata): electron microscopic and immunocytochemical study].

    PubMed

    Stoliarova, M V; Val'kovich, E I

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate the regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta which are supposed to be related to the chordate ancestors. Using electron microscopy, it was found that in the skin epithelium of a representative of enteropneusts Saccoglossus mereschkowskii, the basal parts of some epitheliocytes took part in formation of a nerve layer. These cells were considered as receptor ciliated cells. The granular epithelial cells were shown to release secretion according to both exocrine and endocrine mechanism; these cells were characterized as endocrine-like regulatory cells. Fine granular cells possibly represent special receptor-endocrine-like cell type. The immunocytochemical detection of FMRFamid neuropeptide localization in histological sections confirmed the electron microscopic data on the presence of receptor and endocrine-like cells in the epithelium. It is suggested that the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta contains a peculiar neuro-endocrine regulatory system that is represented by receptor cells, receptor-endocrine-like cells of an open type and nerve elements of the nerve layer.

  8. Correction and alignment strategies for the beam separator of the photoemission electron microscope 3 (PEEM3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Peter; Feng, Jun; Padmore, Howard; Robin, David; Rose, Harald; Schlueter, Ross; Wan, Weishi; Forest, Étienne; Wu, Ying

    2005-02-01

    A high-resolution aberration-corrected photoemission electron microscope (PEEM3) will be installed on an undulator beamline at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The aim of this instrument is to provide a substantial flux and resolution improvement by employing an electron mirror for correcting both the third-order spherical aberration and the primary chromatic aberration. In order to utilize this concept of correction, a beam separator is a prerequisite. Crucial to achieving a resolution of 5nm for the high-resolution mode, and a 16-fold increase in throughput at the same resolution as its predecessor, PEEM2, specified as 20nm at 2% transmission, for the high flux mode is the double-symmetric design of the beam separator, which eliminates all the second-order geometric aberrations. Nonetheless, substantial tuning capabilities must be incorporated into the PEEM3 design to compensate for both systematic and random errors. In this article, we investigate how to correct for nonsystematic imperfections and for systematic uncertainties in the accuracy of the magnetic fields and focus on how degradation of the resolution and the field of view can be minimized. Finally, we outline a tentative correction strategy for PEEM3.

  9. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  10. Feline cystic thymoma: a clinicopathologic, immunohistologic, and electron microscopic study of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, A K; Lieberman, P H; Erlandson, R A; Antonescu, C

    2003-02-01

    Cystic thymoma was diagnosed in 14 cats in a period of 6 years. The most common clinical sign was laboured breathing. The tumours were characterized by various-sized cystic spaces with central vessels. The epithelial cells varied from oval to spindle to polygonal cells enclosing cystic spaces or in pure epithelial cell components. The nuclei of the neoplastic cells had scattered chromatin and small nucleoli. The cytoplasm was pale eosinophilic. The concentration of mature lymphocytes varied from area to area with rare germinal centres. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial cells stained only with AE(1)/AE(3). The central vessels were positive for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, and factor VIII antigen. Electron microscopy revealed that the cyst walls were lined by epithelial cells that were joined by desmosomes, and the walls were well separated from the cystic spaces by a well-defined basement membrane. The neoplastic epithelial cells contained scattered tonofilaments. Three of the cats had metastasis to the lymph nodes and lungs. Two novel cases of ectopic cystic thymoma have also been described. Results of this study reveal that cystic thymoma is uncommon in cats, and that the histomorphologic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic features are similar to those of cystic thymoma in humans.

  11. Evaluation of the dentinal wall adaptation ability of MTA Fillapex using stereo electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Demiriz, Levent; Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Koçak, Sibel; Sağlam, Baran Can; Türker, Sevinç Aktemur

    2016-01-01

    Background: An ideal root canal obturation requires a complete dentinal wall adaptation of sealer and Gutta-percha combinations without any gap formations. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the dentinal wall adaptation ability of MTA Fillapex root canal sealer using stereo electron microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty-four, single-rooted, human maxillary incisor teeth were used. All canals were prepared with a rotary nickel–titanium (Ni–Ti) instrument to a size F3 file. Teeth divided into two equal groups and one of the experimental groups was filled with AH Plus, and the other group was filled with MTA Fillapex using Gutta-percha single cone as a core material. The roots were prepared for SEM evaluation, and serial scanning electron photomicrographs were taken at ×50, ×100, ×500, and ×1000 magnifications. The gaps between the root canal sealer and canal walls were detected and measured in coronal, middle, and apical thirds. For each section, the highest value among the detected gap formations was recorded. Statistical Analysis: Mann–Whitney U-test, Freidman, and Wilcoxon tests were used. Results: The statistical analysis showed no significant difference between two sealers in terms of gap formation (P > 0.05). Conclusions: MTA Fillapex has a similar dentinal wall adaptation ability as AH Plus does. PMID:27217633

  12. Skeletal growth phases of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa shown by scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchi, Vincent; Vonlanthen, Pierre; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Crowley, Quentin G.

    2016-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is a cold-water coral, which may form reefs by the association of multiple coralites within which a polyp lives. Each individual polyp builds an aragonite skeleton by an initial phase of early mineralization (traditionally referred to as centres of calcification) from which aragonite fibres grow in thickening deposits. The skeleton wall features successive optically opaque and translucent bands previously attributed to different regimes of growth as either uniform in crystal orientation (translucent bands) or with a chaotic organization (opaque bands). The processes involved in any organizational changes are still unknown. Microlayers in the coral wall, which represent separate periods of skeletal growth, have been recently identified and described. These growth patterns are readily visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after etching in dilute formic acid, but they do not necessarily form continuously visible structures. Here we present high quality SEM images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps to study aragonite fibre orientation across the wall of L. pertusa. Both microlayers and opaque and translucent bands are compared to the crystallographic orientation of the aragonite fibres. EBSD maps and SEM images indicate that aragonite fibres do not exhibit a chaotic orientation, even in opaque bands. The absence of continuity of microlayers is partially explained by an association of multiple crystallographic preferred orientations of aragonite fibres. In the case of L. pertusa, careful textural characterisation is necessary prior to elemental or isotope analysis in order to select a skeletal transect representing a linear and continuous time period.

  13. Mapping Atomic Orbitals with the Transmission Electron Microscope: Images of Defective Graphene Predicted from First-Principles Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Lorenzo; Löffler, Stefan; Biddau, Giulio; Hambach, Ralf; Kaiser, Ute; Draxl, Claudia; Schattschneider, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been a promising candidate for mapping atomic orbitals for a long time. Here, we explore its capabilities by a first-principles approach. For the example of defected graphene, exhibiting either an isolated vacancy or a substitutional nitrogen atom, we show that three different kinds of images are to be expected, depending on the orbital character. To judge the feasibility of visualizing orbitals in a real microscope, the effect of the optics' aberrations is simulated. We demonstrate that, by making use of energy filtering, it should indeed be possible to map atomic orbitals in a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope.

  14. Mapping Atomic Orbitals with the Transmission Electron Microscope: Images of Defective Graphene Predicted from First-Principles Theory.

    PubMed

    Pardini, Lorenzo; Löffler, Stefan; Biddau, Giulio; Hambach, Ralf; Kaiser, Ute; Draxl, Claudia; Schattschneider, Peter

    2016-07-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has been a promising candidate for mapping atomic orbitals for a long time. Here, we explore its capabilities by a first-principles approach. For the example of defected graphene, exhibiting either an isolated vacancy or a substitutional nitrogen atom, we show that three different kinds of images are to be expected, depending on the orbital character. To judge the feasibility of visualizing orbitals in a real microscope, the effect of the optics' aberrations is simulated. We demonstrate that, by making use of energy filtering, it should indeed be possible to map atomic orbitals in a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope.

  15. Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) imaging of planar deformation features and tectonic deformation lamellae in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamers, M. F.; Drury, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz are essential proof for the correct identification of meteorite impact structures and related ejecta layers, but can be confused with tectonic deformation lamellae. The only completely reliable method to demonstrate the shock origin of suspected (sub-) planar microstructures, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations, is costly and time consuming. We have used a cathodoluminescence (CL) detector attached to a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to image both PDFs and tectonic deformation lamellae in quartz to demonstrate the potential of a simple method to identify PDFs and define characteristics that allow their distinction from tectonic deformation lamellae. In both limited wavelength grayscale and composite color SEM-CL images, PDFs are easily identified. They are straight, narrow, well-defined features, whereas tectonic deformation lamellae are thicker, slightly curved, and there is often no clear boundary between lamella and host quartz. Composite color images reveal two types of CL behavior in PDFs: either they emit a red to infrared CL signal or they are nonluminescent. The color of the CL signal emitted by tectonic deformation lamellae ranges from blue to red. For comparison, we also imaged several shocked quartz grains at cryogenic temperature. In most cases, the PDF characteristics in cryo-CL images do not differ significantly from those in images recorded at room temperature. We conclude that SEM-CL imaging, especially when color composites are used, provides a promising, practical, low cost, and nondestructive method to distinguish between PDFs and tectonic lamellae, even when the simplest CL techniques available are used.

  16. Pamela observational capabilities of Jovian electrons component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Felice, V.; PAMELA Collaboration

    PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment that will be launched in the first half of 2006 It will make long duration measurements of cosmic radiation over an extended energy range 80Mev to 200 GeV Specifically PAMELA will measure the cosmic-ray antiproton and positron spectra over the largest energy range ever achieved 80MeV -- 190 GeV and will search for antinuclei with unprecedented sensitivity Furthermore it will measure the light nuclear component of cosmic rays and investigate phenomena connected with solar and earth physics The apparatus consists of a time of flight system a magnetic spectrometer an electromagnetic imaging calorimeter a shower tail catcher scintillator a neutron detector and an anticoincidence system In this work a study of the PAMELA capabilities to detect Jovian electrons is presented The Jovian magnetosphere is a powerful accelerator of electrons to several tens of MeV as observed at first by Pioneer 10 spacecraft 1973 The propagation of Jovian electrons to Earth is affected by modulation due to Corotating Interaction Regions CIR Their flux at Earth is moreover modulated because every sim 13 months Earth and Jupiter are aligned along the average direction of the Parker spiral of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field PAMELA will be able to measure the high energy tail of the Jovian electrons in the energy range from 50 MeV up to 130 MeV Moreover it will be possible to extract the Jovian component reaccelated at the solar wind termination shock above 130 MeV up to 2 GeV from the galactic flux

  17. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats using scanning electron microscope - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; Maghraby, Ahmed; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, 40 adult male albino rats were used to study the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues (enamel surface, dentinal tubules and the cementum surface). The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy gamma doses. The effects of irradiated hard dental tissues samples were investigated using a scanning electron microscope. For doses up to 0.5 Gy, there was no evidence of the existence of cracks on the enamel surface. With 1 Gy irradiation dose, cracks were clearly observed with localized erosive areas. At 2 Gy irradiation dose, the enamel showed morphological alterations as disturbed prismatic and interprismatic areas. An increase in dentinal tubules diameter and a contemporary inter-tubular dentine volume decrease were observed with higher irradiation dose. Concerning cementum, low doses,<0.5 Gy, showed surface irregularities and with increase in the irradiation dose to≥1 Gy, noticeable surface irregularities and erosive areas with decrease in Sharpey's fiber sites were observed. These observations could shed light on the hazardous effects of irradiation fields to the functioning of the human teeth.

  18. Electron microscopic examination of effects of bogma raki and walnut on cochlea: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Cevik, C; Ozler, G S; Arli, C; Tatar, I; Sargon, M F; Zeren, C; Yonden, Z; Akoglu, E

    2015-03-01

    Illegal alcohol beverages known as bogma raki in our country are consumed widely in our region. The studies investigating the relationship between alcohol consumption and hearing ability report different results. In this study, we aimed to investigate the toxic effects of bogma raki that contains neurotoxic substances on cochlea by electron microscopy. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first in the literature. A total of 48 Wistar male albino rats (aged 12-16 weeks and weighing 200-240 g) were used in the study. The rats were divided into 4 groups with 12 animals in each group. The groups include control, bogma raki, walnut, and walnut + bogma raki groups. Bogma raki (30% v/v, 9.2 ml kg(-1) day(-1)) is added to drinking water of rats in bogma raki group (n = 12) for 4 weeks. Walnut group rats (n = 12) are fed with standard rat food and walnut without limitation (10 g kg(-1) day(-1)). Bogma raki + walnut group rats (n = 12) are fed with standard rat food and walnut and bogma raki is added to drinking water. The cochleas were dissected and removed en bloc and examined by electron microscopy. Perineuronal oedema around neurons of spiral ganglion and hairy cells of organ of Corti were present in the bogma raki group, walnut group and bogma raki + walnut group under electron microscopic examination. Comparing these three groups, there were no differences in the ultrastructural pathological changes. In the ultrastructural examination of the myelinated axons forming cochlear nerve, no ultrastructural pathology was detected in all the groups.

  19. Observations of liver cancer cells in scanning probe acoustic microscope: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiaoyue; Xi, Qing; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM) can be used to acquire the morphology image as well as the non-destructive internal structures acoustic image. However, the observations of the morphology image as well as the internal structures acoustic image of liver cancer cells in SPAM are few. In this paper, we cultured 4 different types of liver cancer cells on the silicon wafer and coverslip to observe their morphology images as well as acoustic images in SPAM, and made a preliminary study of the 8 types of cells specimens (hereinafter referred to as the silicon specimens and coverslips specimens). The experimental measurement results showed that some cellular pseudopodium were observed in the morphology images of the coverslip specimens while no such cellular pseupodium were appeared in the morphology images of the silicon specimens, which concluded that the living liver cancer cells were less likely to grow on the silicon wafer. SPAM provides a rapid and sensitive visual method for studying the morphology and internal structures of the cancer cells. The proposed method can be also used to obtain the morphology and internal information in both solid and soft material wafers, such as silicon and cells, with the resolution of nanometer scale.

  20. Microscopic observation of pyrenoids in Order Ulvales (Chlorophyta) collected from Qingdao coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Linhong; Ding, Lanping; Lu, Qinqin

    2011-09-01

    Pyrenoids found in green algae Order Ulvales have taxonomical significance. Their morphology, microstructure, and the location and number in the cells have been widely used as identification criteria. As these traits can be affected by environmental conditions, it is necessary to look for other different characteristics. Here pyrenoids in several algae species collected along the Qingdao coast were studied for such purpose. The morphology and distribution of pyrenoids in the cells, as well as their change in different parts of the frond and at different times were studied with light microscope. The results are as follows. Pyrenoids appeared to be spherical or oval in observed Ulvales' algae cells. They were embedded in chloroplasts with the number of 1-3 per cell on average. The number of pyrenoids for Ulva pertusa could change drastically with continuing culture and could reach up to 10-20 per cell in late-growth stages. Generally, the pyrenoids in the marginal part were more observable than those in the central part for Ulva pertusa. In addition, the basal part of frond had more distinct pyrenoids with an average diameter of 2.42 μm for Enteromorpha linza. For some species the pyrenoids were difficult to be observed while dark treatment made them more distinguishable. The apoptosis rate of pyrenoids in different species varied under continuing dark treatment, which could be used to identify different species. Pyrenoids disappeared faster in E. linza than those in E. intestinalis.

  1. Microscopic-Observation Drug-Susceptibility Assay for the Diagnosis of TB

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David A.J.; Evans, Carlton A.W.; Gilman, Robert H.; Caviedes, Luz; Coronel, Jorge; Vivar, Aldo; Sanchez, Eduardo; Piñedo, Yvette; Saravia, Juan Carlos; Salazar, Cayo; Oberhelman, Richard; Hollm-Delgado, Maria-Graciela; LaChira, Doris; Escombe, A. Roderick; Friedland, Jon S.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND New diagnostic tools are urgently needed to interrupt the transmission of tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Rapid, sensitive detection of tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in sputum has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle studies of the microscopic-observation drug-susceptibility (MODS) assay, in which broth cultures are examined microscopically to detect characteristic growth. METHODS In an operational setting in Peru, we investigated the performance of the MODS assay for culture and drug-susceptibility testing in three target groups: unselected patients with suspected tuberculosis, prescreened patients at high risk for tuberculosis or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and unselected hospitalized patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. We compared the MODS assay head-to-head with two reference methods: automated mycobacterial culture and culture on Löwenstein–Jensen medium with the proportion method. RESULTS Of 3760 sputum samples, 401 (10.7%) yielded cultures positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Sensitivity of detection was 97.8% for MODS culture, 89.0% for automated mycobacterial culture, and 84.0% for Löwenstein–Jensen culture (P<0.001); the median time to culture positivity was 7 days, 13 days, and 26 days, respectively (P<0.001), and the median time to the results of susceptibility tests was 7 days, 22 days, and 68 days, respectively. The incremental benefit of a second MODS culture was minimal, particularly in patients at high risk for tuberculosis or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Agreement between MODS and the reference standard for susceptibility was 100% for rifampin, 97% for isoniazid, 99% for rifampin and isoniazid (combined results for multidrug resistance), 95% for ethambutol, and 92% for streptomycin (kappa values, 1.0, 0.89, 0.93, 0.71, and 0.72, respectively). CONCLUSIONS A single MODS culture of a sputum sample offers more rapid and sensitive detection of tuberculosis

  2. [Electron microscopic study of wedge-shaped defects of teeth on initial stage].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Biakova, S F; Chuev, V P; Sheveliuk, Iu V

    2009-01-01

    The aim of thes; study was to observe initial stage of wedge-shaped defects under scanning electron microscopy without prior samples preparation. There were revealed special features of structure of enamel and cement at initial stage of wedge-shaped defects in comparison to normal tissues.

  3. Development of high-brightness ultrafast electron microscope for studying nanoscale dynamics associated with strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng

    Strongly correlated-electron materials are a class of materials that exhibit numerous intriguing emergent phenomena, including metal-to-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, etc. These phenomena are beyond the reach of the conventional solid state physics, which is based on the band theory. Instead, strong electron-electron correlations are found to play important roles, which leads to complicated interplay between different degrees of freedoms (charge, lattice, spins...). In this thesis, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is used to investigate the photo-induced ultrafast structural dynamics of strongly correlated materials, among which VO2 is taken as an exemplar system, one that reveals the fundamental physics behind photo-induced phase transitions, electron-electron correlation on nanometer scales, and the electron-phonon coupling in this exotic class of materials. The phenomena presented here are expected to have more general significance as they may reflect the physics to which other strongly correlated materials also conform. In polycrystalline VO2 thin films, the structural changes resulting from photoexcitation with femtosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths are observed to lead to non-thermal phase transitions, which require less energy compared to the phase transitions induced by thermal excitation. The details of the structural change are extracted from the UED results revealing stepwise atomic movements after photoexcitation, which suggests the phase transition starts with a dilation of the correlated d electrons. On the other hand, the structural phase transition is found to be decoupled from the metal-to-insulator transition when the sample dimension is reduced to the sub-micrometer scale, which is attributed to the interface charge doping effects from different substrates. A new phase (M3, monoclinic metallic phase) is distinguished, which has not been discussed by the existing theoretical

  4. Observing microscopic structures of a relativistic object using a time-stretch strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, E.; Evain, C.; Le Parquier, M.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Cassinari, L.; Labat, M.; Couprie, M.-E.; Roy, P.

    2015-05-01

    Emission of light by a single electron moving on a curved trajectory (synchrotron radiation) is one of the most well-known fundamental radiation phenomena. However experimental situations are more complex as they involve many electrons, each being exposed to the radiation of its neighbors. This interaction has dramatic consequences, one of the most spectacular being the spontaneous formation of spatial structures inside electrons bunches. This fundamental effect is actively studied as it represents one of the most fundamental limitations in electron accelerators, and at the same time a source of intense terahertz radiation (Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, or CSR). Here we demonstrate the possibility to directly observe the electron bunch microstructures with subpicosecond resolution, in a storage ring accelerator. The principle is to monitor the terahertz pulses emitted by the structures, using a strategy from photonics, time-stretch, consisting in slowing-down the phenomena before recording. This opens the way to unpreceeded possibilities for analyzing and mastering new generation high power coherent synchrotron sources.

  5. Observing microscopic structures of a relativistic object using a time-stretch strategy

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, E.; Evain, C.; Le Parquier, M.; Szwaj, C.; Bielawski, S.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Ricaud, J.-P.; Cassinari, L.; Labat, M.; Couprie, M.-E; Roy, P.

    2015-01-01

    Emission of light by a single electron moving on a curved trajectory (synchrotron radiation) is one of the most well-known fundamental radiation phenomena. However experimental situations are more complex as they involve many electrons, each being exposed to the radiation of its neighbors. This interaction has dramatic consequences, one of the most spectacular being the spontaneous formation of spatial structures inside electrons bunches. This fundamental effect is actively studied as it represents one of the most fundamental limitations in electron accelerators, and at the same time a source of intense terahertz radiation (Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, or CSR). Here we demonstrate the possibility to directly observe the electron bunch microstructures with subpicosecond resolution, in a storage ring accelerator. The principle is to monitor the terahertz pulses emitted by the structures, using a strategy from photonics, time-stretch, consisting in slowing-down the phenomena before recording. This opens the way to unpreceeded possibilities for analyzing and mastering new generation high power coherent synchrotron sources. PMID:26020859

  6. Combined use of optical and electron microscopic techniques for the measurement of hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of individual aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kang-Ho; Kim, Sun-Man; Jung, Hae-Jin; Lee, Mi-Jung; Eom, Hyo-Jin; Maskey, Shila; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-10-01

    In this work, an analytical method for the characterization of the hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of individual aerosol particles is introduced. The method, which is based on the combined use of optical and electron microscopic techniques, is simple and easy to apply. An optical microscopic technique was used to perform the visual observation of the phase transformation and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles on a single particle level. A quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis, named low-Z particle EPMA, was used to perform a quantitative chemical speciation of the same individual particles after the measurement of the hygroscopic property. To validate the analytical methodology, the hygroscopic properties of artificially generated NaCl, KCl, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and Na(2)SO(4) aerosol particles of micrometer size were investigated. The practical applicability of the analytical method for studying the hygroscopic property, chemical composition, and morphology of ambient aerosol particles is demonstrated.

  7. Direct Microscopic And Microholographic Observations Of The Solidification Of Particles From Rapidly Stirred Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeulders, R. J.; Mischgofsky, F. H.; Frankena, H. J.

    1983-06-01

    A microscopic set-up to observe fast moving solidifying particles during stir casting is described. The set-up consists of a Ruby laser and a frequency doubled Nd3+:YAG laser, a model device of an actual stir casting apparatus filled with a transparent organic alloy, melting at a low temperature and three different recording systems. Using a neopentyl alcohol alloy as a model substance for metal alloys, the crystallization process is studied by direct observation. Pulses from both lasers are used to provide a sufficiently short exposure time to take (simultaneously) holograms, microphotographs and videorecordings of the fast moving (flow rates up to 10 ms-1) small particles with sizes in the order of 10-103 μm. Primarily solidified particles appear to have equiaxed dendritic shapes. The longest diameter of these particles attain a maximum for low stirring rates and high cooling rates. After a period of stirring, some of the dendrite tips grow and transform the particle shapes into more spherical ones. At this stage the morphology of the solidified particles shows a good similarity with stir casted metal alloys.

  8. Scanning electron microscopic study of the tongue in the Oriental scops owl (Otus scops).

    PubMed

    Emura, Shoichi; Okumura, Toshihiko; Chen, Huayue

    2009-05-01

    The dorsal lingual surface of an adult owl (Otus scops) was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The tongue of the adult owl was about 1 cm long. Three parts were distinguished in the dorsal surface of the tongue: the apex, the body and the root of the tongue. The conical region between the lingual apex and lingual root was very wide area. The conical papillae of the lingual body were inclined toward the posterior of the tongue. At low magnification of scanning electron microscopy, the desquamated cells were observed in the entire dorsal surface of the lingual apex. The connective tissue cores of the epithelium of the lingual apex showed the rod-shaped protrusions. The border between the lingual apex and body was clear and the small conical papillae were observed in the lingual body. The small and large conical papillae were observed on the lingual body. The many openings of the lingual glands existed in the lingual body and lingual root.

  9. Correlation between resistance-change effect in transition-metal oxides and secondary-electron contrast of scanning electron microscope images

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, K.; Kishida, S.; Yoda, T.

    2011-09-15

    Conductive atomic-force microscopy (C-AFM) writing is attracting attention as a technique for clarifying the switching mechanism of resistive random-access memory by providing a wide area filled with filaments, which can be regarded as one filament with large radius. The writing area on a nickel-oxide (NiO) film formed by conductive atomic-force microscopy was observed by scanning electron microscope, and a correlation between the contrast in a secondary-electron image (SEI) and the resistance written by C-AFM was revealed. In addition, the dependence of the SEI contrast on the beam accelerating voltage (V{sub accel}) suggests that the resistance-change effect occurs near the surface of the NiO film. As for the effects of electron irradiation and vacuum annealing on the C-AFM writing area, it was shown that the resistance-change effect is caused by exchange of oxygen with the atmosphere at the surface of the NiO film. This result suggests that the low-resistance and high-resistance areas are, respectively, p-type Ni{sub 1+{delta}}O ({delta} < 0) and insulating (stoichiometric) or n-type Ni{sub 1+{delta}}O ({delta}{>=} 0).

  10. Highly Stable Spatio-Temporal Mechanical Characterization of Nanocontact between Sharp Tips Using Electrostatic Microactuator inside Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Tadashi; Sato, Takaaki; Nabeya, Shinsuke; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    A microelectromechanical systems-in-transmission electron microscope (MEMS-in-TEM) setup was established to characterize mechanical properties of a nanostructure captured or generated between tips, while observing its shape and deformation. This setup achieved a stable actuation for several tens of minutes with sub-nm accuracy, and a precise TEM observation of 0.2 nm in spatial resolution. The displacements of a tip-moving actuator with and without the nanostructure were measured from TEM images; the difference between them indicates a force applied to the nanostructure. The force was obtained by multiplying the displacement difference with a spring constant of supporting beams of the tip. Here, we performed an approach-formation-retraction-fracture experiment of a gold nanocontact between tips under TEM observation over 10 min at the actuation speed of 0.1 nm/s. The force during the retraction-fracture process was measured. The maximum force was 66 nN due to the work hardening by the existence of dislocations. This setup will be a powerful tool to examine the role of atomic scale structure for the mechanical characteristics and the extremely-low-speed kinetics.

  11. Improvement of light collection efficiency of lens-coupled YAG screen TV system for a high-voltage electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Tanji, T; Hibino, M; Schauer, P; Autrata, R

    2000-06-15

    A new lens coupling television (TV) system using a YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet: Y(3)Al(5)O(12) : Ce(3+)) single crystal screen has been developed for a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM), and its performance is examined. The system, using a combination of YAG and lenses, is less damaged by high-energy electron irradiation and reduces the influence of X-rays on the image. YAG screens have not been used for lens-coupling systems, because the high refractive index (n = 1.84) of YAG results in a low light collection efficiency for emitted light. This disadvantage is overcome by combining a thin YAG disk screen (thickness; 100 microm) with a glass hemisphere whose refractive index is 1.81. We found that the light intensity is almost the same as that obtained with a conventional P22 powder screen and lenses system. The resolution is about 55 microm on the YAG screen, and this value is 1.3 times higher than that measured by the conventional system. Shading and distortion do not affect TV observation. Detection quantum efficiency, obtained after correction of the channel mixing effect, is about 0.1.

  12. A Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for In-Situ Mars Surface Sample Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Jerman, G. A.; Harvey, R. P.; Doloboff, I. J.; Neidholdt, E. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) project, funded by the NASA Planetary Instrument Concepts for the Advancement of Solar System Observations (PICASSO) Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES), will build upon previous miniaturized SEM designs and recent advancements in variable pressure SEM's to design and build a SEM to complete analyses of samples on the surface of Mars using the atmosphere as an imaging medium. This project is a collaboration between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), electron gun and optics manufacturer Applied Physics Technologies, and small vacuum system manufacturer Creare. Dr. Ralph Harvery and environmental SEM (ESEM) inventor Dr. Gerry Danilatos serve as advisors to the team. Variable pressure SEMs allow for fine (nm-scale) resolution imaging and micron-scale chemical study of materials without sample preparation (e.g., carbon or gold coating). Charging of a sample is reduced or eliminated by the gas surrounding the sample. It is this property of ESEMs that make them ideal for locations where sample preparation is not yet feasible, such as the surface of Mars. In addition, the lack of sample preparation needed here will simplify the sample acquisition process and allow caching of the samples for future complementary payload use.

  13. Scanning electron microscope examination of scale-like spines on the rostellumm of five Davaineinae (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea).

    PubMed

    Bâ, C T; Sene, T; Marchand, B

    1995-03-01

    The study by scanning electron microscope of the scolex of Cotugnia polyacantha, Raillietina (R.) echinobothrida, R (R.) tetragona, R. (R.) tunetensis and R. (Skrjabinia) cesticillus allowed us to demonstrate the presence, on the rostellum of each individual, of scale-like spines. We believe that these scale-like spines represent a new character of diagnosis for the whole of the Davaineidae.

  14. Toward structural/chemical cotailoring of phase-change Ge-Sb-Te in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Kim, J-G; Zheng, W T; Cui, X Q; Kim, Y-J; Song, S A

    2015-03-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5, as the prototype material for phase-change memory, can be transformed from amorphous phase into nanoscale rocksalt-type GeTe provided with an electron irradiation assisted by heating to 520°C in a 1250 kV transmission electron microscope. This sheds a new light into structural and chemical cotailoring of materials through coupling of thermal and electrical fields.

  15. Semi-automatic classification of cementitious materials using scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumetz, L.; Dalla Mura, M.; Meulenyzer, S.; Lombard, S.; Chanussot, J.

    2015-04-01

    A new interactive approach for segmentation and classification of cementitious materials using Scanning Electron Microscope images is presented in this paper. It is based on the denoising of the data with the Block Matching 3D (BM3D) algorithm, Binary Partition Tree (BPT) segmentation and Support Vector Machines (SVM) classification. The latter two operations are both performed in an interactive way. The BPT provides a hierarchical representation of the spatial regions of the data and, after an appropriate pruning, it yields a segmentation map which can be improved by the user. SVMs are used to obtain a classification map of the image with which the user can interact to get better results. The interactivity is twofold: it allows the user to get a better segmentation by exploring the BPT structure, and to help the classifier to better discriminate the classes. This is performed by improving the representativity of the training set, adding new pixels from the segmented regions to the training samples. This approach performs similarly or better than methods currently used in an industrial environment. The validation is performed on several cement samples, both qualitatively by visual examination and quantitatively by the comparison of experimental results with theoretical values.

  16. Ultra-structural hair alterations of drug abusers: a scanning electron microscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Turkmenoglu, Fatma Pinar; Kasirga, Ugur Baran; Celik, Hakan Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    As drug abuse carries a societal stigma, patients do not often report their history of drug abuse to the healthcare providers. However, drug abuse is highly co-morbid with a host of other health problems such as psychiatric disorders and skin diseases, and majority of individuals with drug use disorders seek treatment in the first place for other problems. Therefore, it is very important for physicians to be aware of clinical signs and symptoms of drug use. Recently diagnostic value of dermatologic tissue alterations associated with drug abuse has become a very particular interest because skin changes were reported to be the earliest noticeable consequence of drug abuse prompting earlier intervention and treatment. Although hair is an annex of skin, alterations on hair structure due to drug use have not been demonstrated. This study represents the first report on ultra-structural hair alterations of drug abusers. We have investigated ultra-structure of the hair samples obtained from 6 cocaine, 6 heroin, 7 cannabis and 4 lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) abusers by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM analysis of hair samples gave us drug-specific discriminating alterations. We suggest that results of this study will make a noteworthy contribution to cutaneous alterations associated with drug abuse which are regarded as the earliest clinical manifestations, and this SEM approach is a very specific and effective tool in the detection of abuse of respective drugs, leading early treatment. PMID:26309532

  17. Scanning electron microscope examination of shale in core from the Frio Formation, Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Alley-McReynolds, P.D.

    1994-09-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of additional core from shallower geopressured and nongeopressured Frio Formation wells in Brazoria County shows similar fracture patterns and clay textures to those reported earlier in the Skrabanek 1 well. The additional wells examined by SEM are 1-B Minnie Mettler, 2847 to 3254 m; Pleasant Bayou 1, 3532 to 4750 m; and Phillips Petroleum JJ 1, 4919 to 5128 m. We noted that shales occurring from 2744 to 5488 in have similar grain orientation and fracture patterns. Pleasant Bayou 1 is strikingly similar to Skrabanek 1, having coarse flakes and grains of quartz and feldspar disbursed throughout. Phillips Petroleum JJ 1 is more uniform in appearance, lacking distinct clay flakes and scattered grains. 1-B Minnie Mettler is similar in appearance to Phillips Petroleum JJ 1, having a uniform distribution of components; however, the clay flakes are less densely packed. Fractures are present in all three wells. The abundance of both horizontal and vertical fractures at varying depths could act as avenues of fluid flow within geopressured shales.

  18. Automated determination of size and morphology information from soot transmission electron microscope (TEM)-generated images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Chan, Qing N.; Zhang, Renlin; Kook, Sanghoon; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yeoh, Guan H.; Medwell, Paul R.

    2016-05-01

    The thermophoretic sampling of particulates from hot media, coupled with transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging, is a combined approach that is widely used to derive morphological information. The identification and the measurement of the particulates, however, can be complex when the TEM images are of low contrast, noisy, and have non-uniform background signal level. The image processing method can also be challenging and time consuming, when the samples collected have large variability in shape and size, or have some degree of overlapping. In this work, a three-stage image processing sequence is presented to facilitate time-efficient automated identification and measurement of particulates from the TEM grids. The proposed processing sequence is first applied to soot samples that were thermophoretically sampled from a laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame. The parameter values that are required to be set to facilitate the automated process are identified, and sensitivity of the results to these parameters is assessed. The same analysis process is also applied to soot samples that were acquired from an externally irradiated laminar non-premixed ethylene-air flame, which have different geometrical characteristics, to assess the morphological dependence of the proposed image processing sequence. Using the optimized parameter values, statistical assessments of the automated results reveal that the largest discrepancies that are associated with the estimated values of primary particle diameter, fractal dimension, and prefactor values of the aggregates for the tested cases, are approximately 3, 1, and 10 %, respectively, when compared with the manual measurements.

  19. Metabolically Biotinylated Reporters for Electron Microscopic Imaging of Cytoplasmic Membrane Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Krager, Kimberly J; Koland, John G

    2016-01-01

    The protein and lipid substituents of cytoplasmic membranes are not in general homogeneously distributed across the membrane surface. Many membrane proteins, including ion channels, receptors, and other signaling molecules, exhibit a profound submicroscopic spatial organization, in some cases clustering in submicron membrane subdomains having a protein and lipid composition distinct from that of the bulk membrane. In the case of membrane-associated signaling molecules, mounting evidence indicates that their nanoscale organization, for example the colocalization of differing signaling molecules in the same membrane microdomains versus their segregation into distinct microdomain species, can significantly impact signal transduction. Biochemical membrane fractionation approaches have been used to characterize membrane subdomains of unique protein and lipid composition, including cholesterol-rich lipid raft structures. However, the intrinsically perturbing nature of fractionation methods makes the interpretation of such characterization subject to question, and indeed the existence and significance of lipid rafts remain controversial. Electron microscopic (EM) imaging of immunogold-labeled proteins in plasma membrane sheets has emerged as a powerful method for visualizing the nanoscale organization and colocalization of membrane proteins, which is not as perturbing of membrane structure as are biochemical approaches. For the purpose of imaging putative lipid raft structures, we recently developed a streamlined EM membrane sheet imaging procedure that employs a unique genetically encoded and metabolically biotinylated reporter that is targeted to membrane inner leaflet lipid rafts. We describe here the principles of this procedure and its application in the imaging of plasma membrane inner leaflet lipid rafts.

  20. Determining Projections of Grain Boundaries from Diffraction Data in Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Lábár, János L

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) are characterized by disorientation of the neighboring grains and the direction of the boundary plane between them. A new approach presented here determines the projection of GB that can be used to determine the latter one. The novelty is that an additional parameter of GB is quantified in addition to the ones provided by the orientation maps, namely the width of the projection of the GB is measured from the same set of diffraction patterns that were recorded for the orientation map, without the need to take any additional images. The diffraction patterns are collected in nanobeam diffraction mode in a transmission electron microscope, pixel-by-pixel, from an area containing two neighboring grains and the boundary between them. In our case, the diffraction patterns were recorded using the beam scanning function of a commercially available system (ASTAR). Our method is based on non-negative matrix factorization applied to the mentioned set of diffraction patterns. The method is encoded in a MATLAB environment, making the results easy to interpret and visualize. The measured GB-projection width is used to determine the orientation of the GB-plane, as given in the study by Kiss et al.