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Sample records for electron microscopic observations

  1. Electron microscopic observation of preretinal membranes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Yamashita, H; Hori, S

    1989-01-01

    In this report, membranes removed during vitrectomy were observed by various methods of electron microscopy to determine their three-dimensional structure and the mechanism of the contraction of preretinal membranes. The vitreous side surface of the preretinal membranes was covered by two types of flat cells, cells with long, extended processes and cells in a pavement arrangement. The lamellae of the flat cells in the internal structures of the preretinal membranes were also observed. In each lamella, the cells appeared to have a connection with each other and formed networks. The retinal side surface of the preretinal membranes was smooth and acellular. The glycerinated preretinal membranes were exposed to ATP and Mg2+, which induced the contraction of the component cells of the preretinal membranes. When the cells on the vitreous side surface of the preretinal membranes contracted, the intercellular connections among them appeared to be preserved.

  2. Electron Microscopic Observations of Rabbit Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hall, C E; Nisonoff, A; Slayter, H S

    1959-12-01

    Electron micrographs were obtained showing the individual, shadow-cast macromolecules from solutions of purified anti-p-azobenzoate rabbit antibody and of normal gamma-globulin. The two materials look alike and consist mainly of asymmetrical rod-like particles about 30 to 40 A in diameter. Lengths are not constant but the weight average is about 250 A for the antibodies and about 200 A for the gamma-globulin. The average observed dimensions are reasonably consistent with values deduced from physical-chemical methods, although the shape is more nearly that of a cylindrical rod rather than the ellipsoid employed in hydrodynamical theory. Mixtures of antibody and specific dihaptenic dye were examined in attempts to establish the mode of the specific aggregation. At the high dilutions necessary for electron microscopy (0.1 mg./ml.), the effect of the dye was small and tended to be masked by non-specific aggregation on drying. The evidence suggests that under these conditions the specific reaction involves an end-to-end aggregation of the elementary particles to produce a weight average length about twice that of the pure antibody.

  3. Electron microscopic observations of amoeba proteus in growth and inanition.

    PubMed

    COHEN, A I

    1957-11-25

    Electron microscopic observations have been made on growing and dividing specimens of Amoeba proteus and also on starving animals. Structures presumably corresponding to the mitochondria, alpha particles, vacuoles, and Golgi material are described. A new entity, designated as a foamy particle, is noted. Descriptions are given of the cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes. During division the inner, thick nuclear membrane component is seen to vanish and the outer membrane persist. Measurements suggest a gradual reappearance of the inner component with growth. Starving animals show a loss of cytoplasmic granularity and an increase in the electron density of mitochondria, presumably due to lipide accumulation.

  4. Observation of Materials Processes in Liquids in the Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chong M.; Liao, Honggang; Ross, Frances M.

    2015-01-01

    Materials synthesis and the functioning of devices often indispensably involve liquid media. But direct visualization of dynamic process in liquids, especially with high spatial and temporal resolution, has been challenging. For solid materials, advances in aberration corrected electron microscopy have made observation of atomic level features a routine practice. Here we discuss the extent to which one can take advantage of the resolution of modern electron microscopes to image phenomenon occuring in liquids. We will describe the fundamentals of two different experimental approaches, closed and open liquid cells. We will illustrate the capabilities of each approach by considering processes in batteries and nucleation and growth of nanoparticles from solution. We conclude that liquid cell electron microscopy appears to be duly fulfilling its role for in situ studies of nanoscale processes in liquids, revealing physical and chemical processes otherwise difficult to observe.

  5. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS ON ACTINOPHAGES FOR STREPTOMYCES VENEZUELAE.

    PubMed

    PAINTER, B G; BRADLEY, S G

    1965-01-01

    Painter, B. G. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), and S. G. Bradley. Electron microscopic observations on actinophages for Streptomyces venezuelae. J. Bacteriol. 89:240-244. 1965.-Actinophages MSP2 and MSP8 were treated with various chemical agents to determine the phages' substructure. Normal MSP2 and MSP8, shadowed with uranium, or negatively stained with uranyl acetate or phosphotungstic acid, were tadpole-shaped. The average overall length of MSP2 was 245 mmu, and of MSP8, 206 mmu. The head width of both phages was approximately 58 mmu; the tail of MSP2 was 161 mmu long, and of MSP8, 137 mmu. Treatment of MSP2 and MSP8 with 7.5 m ammonium hydroxide at 56 C or 8 m urea at room temperature released some of the head contents, and revealed substructures in both the heads and the tails. The tails of phages treated with 7.5 m mercaptoethanol were destroyed.

  6. Observation of semiconductor superstructures with backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bosacchi, A.; Franchi, S.; Govoni, D.; Mattei, G.; Merli, P.G.; Migliori, A.; Nacucchi, M.

    1995-12-31

    Observations of semiconductor superstructures with backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope have been used to revisit the concept of resolution of the backscattering imaging mode. It will be shown that the generation volume doesn`t represent in itself a limit to the resolution, which depends only on the beam size and the signal to noise ratio.

  7. The human chromosome. Electron microscopic observations on chromatin fiber organization.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J G; Moore, D E

    1969-04-01

    Human lymphocytes were grown in short-term tissue culture and were arrested in metaphase with Colcemid. Their chromosomes were prepared by the Langmuir trough-critical point drying technique and were examined under the electron microscope. In addition, some chromosomes were digested with trypsin, Pronase, or DNase. The chromosomes consist entirely of tightly packed, 240 +/- 50-A chromatin fibers. Trypsin and Pronase treatments induce relaxation of fiber packing and reveal certain underlying fiber arrangements. Furthermore, trypsin treatment demonstrates that the chromatin fiber has a 25-50 A trypsin-resistant core surrounded by a trypsin-sensitive sheath. DNase digestion suggests that this core contains DNA.

  8. Observation of Dislocation Dynamics in the Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, B W; Robertson, I M; Jouiad, M; Lassila, D H; Lee, T C; Birnbaum, H K

    2001-08-21

    Deformation experiments performed in-situ in the transmission electron microscope have led to an increased understanding of dislocation dynamics. To illustrate the capability of this technique two examples will be presented. In the first example, the processes of work hardening in Mo at room temperature will be presented. These studies have improved our understanding of dislocation mobility, dislocation generation, and dislocation-obstacle interactions. In the second example, the interaction of matrix dislocations with grain boundaries will be described. From such studies predictive criteria for slip transfer through grain boundaries have been developed.

  9. Observation of dislocation dynamics in the electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, B W; Robertson, I M; Jouiad, M; Lassila, D H; Lee, T C; Birnbaum, H K

    2001-01-17

    Deformation experiments performed in-situ in the transmission electron microscope have led to an increased understanding of dislocation dynamics. To illustrate the capability of this technique two examples will be presented. In the first example, the processes of work hardening in Mo at room temperature will be presented. These studies have improved our understanding of dislocation mobility, dislocation generation, and dislocation-obstacle interactions. In the second example, the interaction of matrix dislocations with grain boundaries will be described. From such studies predictive criteria for slip transfer through grain boundaries have been developed.

  10. Electron microscopic observations on the epithelium of ram seminal vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Plöen, L

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the secretory cells of the ram seminal vesicle was studied on material fixed by immersion or by vascular perfusion. The signs of apocrine secretion seen after immersion fixation did not appear after perfusion fixation and are therefore interpreted as artefacts. Instead, vacuoles with a granule in them were seen. Such vacuoles were observed in the Golgi apparatus and in the apical cytoplasm. Further indications of merocrine secretion were also found. It therefore appears that protein secretion in the ram seminal vesicle follows the typical pattern of serous glands. The possibility that fructose is extruded with the protein as the vacuoles open at the luminal cell surface is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7410195

  11. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  12. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

  13. Scanning electron microscopic observation of the architecture of collagen fibres in chicken M. iliotibialis lateralis.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, H; Tabata, S; Kakakibara, K; Nishimura, S; Gotoh, T; Koga, Y

    2001-07-01

    1. The collagen architecture of M. iliotibialis lateralis in chicken was observed under the scanning electron microscope after muscle maceration in NaOH. 2. Immunohistochemical methods showed Type I and III collagens to be distributed over both perimysium and endomysium. 3. Thick perimysium around secondary myofibre fasciculi was composed of many large longitudinal collagen bundles and a few small circumferential bundles. In contrast, thin perimysium around primary myofibre fasciculi showed mainly circumferential bundles. 4. Endomysium had a honeycomb-like structure and consisted of a fine collagen mesh, its main fibre striation being circumferential. 5. It is suggested that functional demand differs between thick perimysium and thin endomysium.

  14. High resolution transmission electron microscopic in-situ observations of plastic deformation of compressed nanocrystalline gold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guoyong; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-09-14

    Nanocrystalline (nc) metals possess extremely high strength, while their capability to deform plastically has been debated for decades. Low ductility has hitherto been considered an intrinsic behavior for most nc metals, due to the lack of five independent slip systems actively operating during deformation in each nanograin. Here we report in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) observations of deformation process of nc gold under compression, showing the excellent ductility of individual and aggregate nanograins. Compression causes permanent change in the profile of individual nanograins, which is mediated by dislocation slip and grain rotation. The high rate of grain boundary sliding and large extent of widely exited grain rotation may meet the boundary compatibility requirements during plastic deformation. The in situ HRTEM observations suggest that nc gold is not intrinsically brittle under compressive loading.

  15. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  16. Scanning electron microscopic observations and differentiation of eggs of the Anopheles dirus complex.

    PubMed

    Damrongphol, P; Baimai, V

    1989-12-01

    Microscopic observations have revealed differences among the eggs of species A, B, C and D of the Anopheles dirus complex. The eggs of species A and C are similar in size and shape. They are intermediate in size between the eggs of species B, which is the largest, and that of species D, which is the smallest. The pattern of outer chorionic cells between the frill and the float is species specific. The pattern consists of rows of irregularly shaped cells in species D and different numbers of rows of regularly shaped cells in species A, B and C. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the deck tubercles are arranged in aggregates which are more widely spaced in species A than in species B. The aggregates are large in species C, of moderate size in species A and B, and small in species D. The egg characters may be useful in separating species A, B, C and D of the An. dirus complex.

  17. In-situ observation of xenon nanocrystals in aluminum under electron and ion irradiation in transmission electron microscope.

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, K.

    1998-11-11

    In-situ ion irradiation in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) is one of the unique techniques to investigate the structural evolution of materials induced by particle bombardments. In spite of many efforts to get clear results from in-situ ion irradiation, the results were sometimes unclear because of physical and technical problems associated with TEM and ion beam hardwares. This paper describes a newly developed ion beam interface with an ultra-high voltage TEM (HVTEM) for in-situ observation of ion implantation of metals and alloys in atomic scale.

  18. Electron Microscopic Observation of the Sporangial Structure of Strains of Actinoplanaceae

    PubMed Central

    Lechevalier, Hubert A.; Lechevalier, Mary P.; Holbert, Pauline E.

    1966-01-01

    Lechevalier, Hubert A. (Rutgers, The State University, New Brunswick, N.J.), Mary P. Lechevalier, and Pauline E. Holbert. Electron microscopic observation of the sporangial structure of strains of Actinoplanaceae. J. Bacteriol. 92:1228–1235. 1966.—Eight strains of Streptosporangium spp. and one strain each of Spirillospora albida and an Ampullariella-like Actinoplanes sp. were observed by electron microscopy. The sporangiospores of all these organisms had a smooth surface. All formed their sporangia by the ingrowth of a hypha inside a bag formed by the extension of the outer sheath of the sporangiophore. The sporogenic hypha was not branched in strains of Streptosporangium but was branched in S. albida and the Actinoplanes sp. Spore formation was by septation of the intrasporangial hyphae. When it occurred, septation took place by the same annular ingrowth of the cell wall common in gram-positive bacteria. The septum at the apex of the sporangiophore was formed before the others. Septation was seen to occur between two fully formed septa, indicating almost simultaneous formation of large segments dividing again, almost simultaneously, into smaller spore-sized segments. Images PMID:5926747

  19. [Electron microscopic observation of synaptonemal complexes in spermatocytes of six species of fishes].

    PubMed

    Lin, Y J; Yu, Q X

    1991-01-01

    The synaptonemal complexes (SCs) in spermatocytes of six species of fishes were detected with a combination of surface spreading and silver staining technique and observed under both light and electron microscopes. These fishes are Tilapia nilotica, T. mossambica and Mastacembelus sinensis of Perciformes. Sarcocheilichthys nigripinnis, Pseudorasbora parva and Hemibarbus maculatus of Gobioninae in Cypriniformes. The formation of SCs started in Zygotene and completed at Pachytene. During the pachytene, each SC was morphologically intact, preferentially stained and attached to the nuclear envelope by a dense terminal plaque. Interlock in SCs frequently occurred in Zygotene. In several cases breakage and disentangling of interlocked lateral elements were observed. SCs disappeared in diplotene. The pairing of the SCs started at telomeres and stretched towards kinetochore. The sex determination of Mastacembelus sinensis was xx/xy. The X and Y chromosomal SCs' axes had a distinctive morphology at pachytene and were clearly distinguishable from autosomal SCs. The X and Y chromosomes begain to pair at early pachytene. The X and Y chromosome axes paired to form a length of SC that is somewhat longer than the unpaired portion at the mid-pachytene. There was a dense substance at unpaired portion. Quantitatine evaluation demonstrated that relative length and arm ratio were distinctive characteristics for each autosomal SC. The consistency of relative length and arm ratio indicates the stability of the techniques. The idiograms of SC karyotypes of three species (Tilapia niloticus, T. mossambicus and Mastacembelus sinensis) have been constructed.

  20. Light and electron microscope observations on Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. (Prasinophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C. K.; Jiao-Fen, Chen; Zhe-Fu, Zhang; Hui-Qi, Zhang

    1994-09-01

    Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. is described on the basis of light and electron microscope observations of cultured material originally collected and isolated from seawater of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China. The periplasts on the cell body and flagella are covered by five types of scales, two types on the flagella and three on the body. Among these, the morphology and the number of spines of large stellate body scales differ remarkably from those of previously described species of Nephroselmis. Apart from these, the unusual fine structure of the eyespot (stigma) is very characteristic. As in the other species of Nephroselmis, the eyespot lies immediately under the two-membraned chloroplast envelope; unlike the others, however, it is not composed of a number of osmiophilic globules, but consists of about 14 curved rod-shaped osmiophilic bodies arranged loosely and randomly. This feature distinguishes the present new species not only from the other species of Nephroselmis but also from the other motile algal species, the eyespots structure of which had been previously described.

  1. Observation of the potential distribution in GaN-based devices by a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Karumi, Takahiro; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tanji, Takayoshi

    2014-11-01

    Mapping of the potential distribution using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been reported in recent years [1,2] for semiconductors such as Si, GaAs and InP. But, there are no such studies on GaN-based devices, to our knowledge. In this study, we observed two types of GaN-based devices by SEM to see if there is a condition that the contrast matches the potential distribution of the devices. The first device we studied was GaN p-n junction (p, n ∼5 × 10(17) cm(-3)). The device was cut, and polished from the cross-section to a flat surface. The cross-section was observed by SEM. Fig. 1(a) shows an SEM image taken at 3 kV. The p-region appears bright and the n-region appears dark. The image intensity changes at the position of p-n junction, for which we used electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique to determine the p-n junction position. Fig. 1(b) is a line profile across the p-n junction (broken line) of the SEM image together with a calculated potential distribution (solid line) using p and n concentrations. It can be seen that the contrast profile matches the potential distribution very well. The SEM observations were carried out for several accelerating voltages. But, best result was obtained at 3 kV. For lower accelerating voltages, the image seemed to reflect the surface potential. On the other hand, higher accelerating voltages resulted in blurred images. The second sample was a light emitting diode structure based on AlN where a multiple quantum well (MQW) structure was sandwiched by p- and n-AlGaN materials. In this case, the sample was obliquely polished from the surface (∼10°) to improve the lateral resolution. The SEM image could reveal the structure of MQW.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i22/DFU051F1F1DFU051F1Fig. 1.(a) SEM image of p-n GaN. (b) Comparison of line profile across the p-n junction (broken line) and a calculated potential distribution (solid line). AcknowledgementWe thank professor H. Amano (Nagoya University) for providing the

  2. Electron microscope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  3. Observation of the atomic structure of ß'-SiAlON using three generations of high resolution electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorel, A.; Ciston, J.; Bartel, T.; Song, C.-Y.; Dahmen, U.

    2013-04-01

    The structure of a ß‧-SiAlON (Si5.6Al0.4O0.4N7.6) has been observed using three generations of unique high resolution microscopes spanning over three decades of development in instrumentation - the Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), the One Angstrom Microscope (OAM) and the Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope (TEAM). The information limits of these microscopes are 0.16, 0.08 and 0.05 nm respectively. Observations along ⟨0 0 0 1⟩ at Scherzer defocus for each microscope demonstrate a drastic increase in structural information. Images taken on TEAM show clearly resolved atomic columns whereas the ARM images were only indirectly related to the structure. Nevertheless, the loss of the six-fold symmetry associated with the O/N and Al/Si substitutions was already visible on images taken on the ARM, and an associated ∼25 pm displacement of the O substituting for N in some of the 2c Wyckoff positions of the SiN unit cell was measured on exit wave reconstructions obtained from through focal series on the OAM. This paper illustrates how progress in instrumentation impacts our analysis and understanding of materials.

  4. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  5. Isolated microvesicles from peripheral blood and body fluids as observed by scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Mrvar-Brecko, Anita; Sustar, Vid; Jansa, Vid; Stukelj, Roman; Jansa, Rado; Mujagić, Emir; Kruljc, Peter; Iglic, Ales; Hägerstrand, Henry; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika

    2010-04-15

    Microvesicles are sub-micron structures shed from the cell membrane in a final step of the budding process. After being released into the microenvironment they are free to move and carry signaling molecules to distant cells, thereby they represent a communication system within the body. Since all cells shed microvesicles, it can be expected that they will be found in different body fluids. The potential diagnostic value of microvesicles has been suggested, however, a standardized protocol for isolation has not yet been agreed upon. It is unclear what is the content of the isolates and whether the isolated microvesicles were present in vivo or-have they been created within the isolation procedure. To present evidence in this direction, in this work we focus on the visualization of the material obtained by the microvesicle isolation procedure. We present scanning electronic microscope images of microvesicles isolated from blood, ascites, pleural fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, postoperative drainage fluid and chyloid fluid acquired from human and animal patients. Vesicular structures sized from 1microm downto 50nm are present in isolates of all considered body fluids, however, the populations differ in size and shape reflecting also the composition of the corresponding sediments. Isolates of microvesicles contain numerous cells which indicates that methods of isolation and determination of the number of microvesicles in the peripheral blood are to be elaborated and improved. PMID:20199878

  6. Isolated microvesicles from peripheral blood and body fluids as observed by scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Mrvar-Brecko, Anita; Sustar, Vid; Jansa, Vid; Stukelj, Roman; Jansa, Rado; Mujagić, Emir; Kruljc, Peter; Iglic, Ales; Hägerstrand, Henry; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika

    2010-04-15

    Microvesicles are sub-micron structures shed from the cell membrane in a final step of the budding process. After being released into the microenvironment they are free to move and carry signaling molecules to distant cells, thereby they represent a communication system within the body. Since all cells shed microvesicles, it can be expected that they will be found in different body fluids. The potential diagnostic value of microvesicles has been suggested, however, a standardized protocol for isolation has not yet been agreed upon. It is unclear what is the content of the isolates and whether the isolated microvesicles were present in vivo or-have they been created within the isolation procedure. To present evidence in this direction, in this work we focus on the visualization of the material obtained by the microvesicle isolation procedure. We present scanning electronic microscope images of microvesicles isolated from blood, ascites, pleural fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, postoperative drainage fluid and chyloid fluid acquired from human and animal patients. Vesicular structures sized from 1microm downto 50nm are present in isolates of all considered body fluids, however, the populations differ in size and shape reflecting also the composition of the corresponding sediments. Isolates of microvesicles contain numerous cells which indicates that methods of isolation and determination of the number of microvesicles in the peripheral blood are to be elaborated and improved.

  7. Electron microscope observations on the interaction of Mycoplasma fermentans with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Scholtyseck, E; Teras, J; Kasakova, I; Sethi, K K

    1985-01-01

    Cultures of Trichomonas vaginalis were found to be contaminated with Mycoplasma fermentans. By means of electron microscopy the interaction between the prokaryotic organisms and the trichomonads was examined. Cells of M. fermentans were observed in the medium; some of them were attached to the surface of the trichomonads and others were observed in membrane-bounded vacuoles of trichomonads. They were also present in the ground substance of the cytoplasm. The mycoplasmas divided by binary fission like other prokaryotes. The most obvious change occurring in the infected trichomonad cells was an increase in number of vacuoles containing mycoplasmas. PMID:3895766

  8. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  9. Visualizing preparation using asymmetrical choline-like ionic liquids for scanning electron microscope observation of non-conductive biological samples.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shigeaki; Hyono, Atsushi; Kawai, Koji; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated conductivity preparation for scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation that used novel asymmetrical choline-type room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL). By immersion in only an RTIL solution, clear SEM images of several types of biological samples were successfully observed. In addition, we could visualize protozoans using RTILs without any dilution. These results suggested that the asymmetrical choline-type RTILs used in this study are suitable for visualizing of biological samples by SEM. Treatment without the need for dilution can obviate the need for adjusting the RTIL concentration and provide for a rapid and easy conductivity treatment for insulating samples.

  10. Light and electron microscopic observations of the reproductive swarmer cells of nassellarian and spumellarian polycystines (Radiolaria).

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    We observed reproductive swarmer cells of the nassellarian and spumellarian polycystine radiolarians Didymocyrtis ceratospyris, Pterocanium praetextum, Tetrapyle sp., and Triastrum aurivillii using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The swarmer cells had subspherical to ovoid or spindle shapes with two unequal flagella tapered to whip-like ends. The cell size was approximately 2.5-5.5μm long and 1.6-2.2μm wide, which is significantly smaller than that of the collodarian (colonial or naked) polycystine radiolarians. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the swarmer cells possessed a nucleus, mitochondria with tubular cristae, Golgi body, and small lipid droplets in the cytoplasm; they also had a large vacuole in which a single crystalline inclusion (approx. 1.0-1.5μm) that was probably celestite (SrSO4) was enclosed. The swarmer cells were released directly from the parent cells. At that time, morphological change such as encystment was not observed in the parent cells, and the axopodia remained extended in a period of swarmer reproduction for floating existence. This may have prevented the polycystine swarmers from rapidly sinking down to great depths. Thus, we concluded that the polycystine radiolarians release the swarmer cells into the photic layer in the same way as the symbiotic acantharians.

  11. Light and electron microscopic observations of the reproductive swarmer cells of nassellarian and spumellarian polycystines (Radiolaria).

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Tomoko; Takahashi, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    We observed reproductive swarmer cells of the nassellarian and spumellarian polycystine radiolarians Didymocyrtis ceratospyris, Pterocanium praetextum, Tetrapyle sp., and Triastrum aurivillii using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The swarmer cells had subspherical to ovoid or spindle shapes with two unequal flagella tapered to whip-like ends. The cell size was approximately 2.5-5.5μm long and 1.6-2.2μm wide, which is significantly smaller than that of the collodarian (colonial or naked) polycystine radiolarians. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the swarmer cells possessed a nucleus, mitochondria with tubular cristae, Golgi body, and small lipid droplets in the cytoplasm; they also had a large vacuole in which a single crystalline inclusion (approx. 1.0-1.5μm) that was probably celestite (SrSO4) was enclosed. The swarmer cells were released directly from the parent cells. At that time, morphological change such as encystment was not observed in the parent cells, and the axopodia remained extended in a period of swarmer reproduction for floating existence. This may have prevented the polycystine swarmers from rapidly sinking down to great depths. Thus, we concluded that the polycystine radiolarians release the swarmer cells into the photic layer in the same way as the symbiotic acantharians. PMID:27023270

  12. Electron-microscopic observations of the gravity receptor epithelia of normal and spinner juvenile Octopus maya.

    PubMed

    Fermin, C D; Colmers, W F; Igarashi, M

    1985-01-01

    Light and electron microscopy of the gravity receptor epithelia (maculae) of statocysts of normal and "spinner" juvenile Octopus maya showed differences between the structures of the hair cells, supporting cells, and afferent neurons of these cephalopods. The maculae of spinner animals were approximately 30% smaller in their surface area and had 40% fewer hair cells. Moreover, the average distance between randomly-chosen hair bundles in scanning electron micrographs of maculae of normal animals was significantly greater (4.33 +/- 6.47 microns) than those of maculae of spinner animals (3.38 +/- 4.90 microns; P less than 0.0001). The sectional area of the supporting cell's microvilli in spinner maculae was larger (0.16 +/- 0.18 microns) than those of normal (0.10 +/- 0.10 micron; P less than 0.0001) O. maya. The morphological differences observed between certain structural components of the maculae of normal and spinner O. maya may be related to the absence and/or malformation of the neuroepithelial suprastructures in spinners. This may have direct or indirect effects to their inability to orient to gravity with these organs. PMID:2861903

  13. Observations of the Au/Si(111) System with a High-Resolution Ultrahigh-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira; Ino, Shozo

    1993-10-01

    Secondary electron (SE) imaging with a high-resolution ultrahigh-vacuum scanning electron microscope (UHV-SEM) has been applied to the observation of the Au/Si(111) system. Domains of the 5× 2-Au or \\sqrt{3}×\\sqrt{3}-Au structure partially covering a Si(111)-7× 7 surface are clearly observed. Domains of 5× 2-Au formed by Au deposition onto a substrate held at ˜870 K show threefold elongation corresponding to three equivalent kinds of domains rotated 120° to each other. On the other hand, 5× 2-Au regions formed by partial Au desorption by heating at ˜1270 K from an entirely covered surface display larger size without such elongation. Granular clusters, a few nm in size, of Au formed by deposition approximately at room temperature, and large three-dimensional islands formed in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode are also clearly imaged.

  14. Acinic cell carcinoma arising in the glossopalatine glands: a report of two cases with electron microscopic observations.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Shimono, M; Yamamura, T; Saito, I; Watanabe, O; Kawahara, H

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of acinic cell carcinoma arising in the glossopalatine glands were examined with the electron microscope by means of conventional thin sectioning and freeze-fracturing. Light and electron microscopic observation revealed that the tumors consisted of three types of cells: serous-type, ductlike, and vacuolated cells. Serous-type cells had numerous secretory granules, some of which were discharged into the intercellular spaces. Ductlike cells were smaller, usually lacked secretory granules, and were similar to intercalated duct cells. Vacuolated cells had electron-opaque vacuoles in the cytoplasm. Our findings supported the hypothesis that acinic cell carcinoma may represent a neoplasm of multipotential duct cells which have differentiated mainly into granulated serous cells. Freeze-fracture images of this tumor revealed that tight junctions were composed of ten or more interlinked strands with elongation of basal frontier strands. These findings suggested that the junctional morphology of the tumor resembled that of developing salivary glands and was associated with the degree of cellular differentiation.

  15. Electron microscope observations on Ca2+-ATPase microcrystals in detergent-solubilized sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K A; Mullner, N; Pikula, S; Dux, L; Peracchia, C; Varga, S; Martonosi, A

    1988-04-15

    Crystalline arrays of Ca2+-ATPase molecules develop in detergent-solubilized sarcoplasmic reticulum during incubation for several weeks at 2 degrees C under nitrogen in a medium of 0.1 M KCl, 10 mM K-3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonate, pH 6.0, 3 mM MgCl2, 20 mM CaCl2, 20% glycerol, 3 mM NaN3, 5 mM dithiothreitol, 25 IU/ml Trasylol, 2 micrograms/ml 1,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol, 2 mg/ml protein, and 2-4 mg of detergent/mg of protein. Electron microscopy of sectioned, negatively stained, freeze-fractured, and frozen-hydrated Ca2+-ATPase crystals indicates that they consist of stacked lamellar arrays of Ca2+-ATPase molecules. Prominent periodicities of ATPase molecules within the lamellae arise from a centered rectangular lattice of dimensions 164 x 55.5 A. The association of lamellae into three-dimensional stacks is assumed to involve interactions between the exposed hydrophilic headgroups of ATPase molecules, that is promoted by glycerol and 20 mM Ca2+. Similar Ca2+-induced crystals were observed with purified or purified and delipidated Ca2+-ATPase preparations at lower detergent/protein ratios. Cross-linking of Ca2+-ATPase crystals with glutaraldehyde protects the structure against conditions such as low Ca2+, high pH, elevated temperature, SH group reagents, high concentration of detergents, and removal of phospholipids by extraction with organic solvents that disrupt unfixed preparations. PMID:2965700

  16. Cell Aging of Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Observed by Light and Electron Microscopic Radioautography

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    The term “cell aging” initially means how the cells change due to their aging. There are two meanings, i.e. how a cell changes when it is isolated from original animals such as in vitro cells in cell culture, otherwise how all the cells of an animal change in vivo due to the aging of the individual animal. We have been studying the latter changes from the viewpoint of the cell nutrients, the precursors for the macromolecular synthesis such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), proteins, glucides and lipids, which are incorporated and synthesized into various cells of individual animals. Therefore, this article deals with only the cell aging of animal cells in vivo, how the metabolism, i.e. incorporations and syntheses of respective nutrient precursors in various kinds of cells change due to the aging of individual experimental animals such as mice by means of microscopic radioautography to localize the RI-labeled precursors. The incorporations and syntheses of various precursors for macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, proteins, glucides, lipids and others in various kinds of cells of various organs in the gastrointestinal tract such as the mouth, esophagus, stomach and intestines are reviewed referring many original papers already published from our laboratory during these 60 years since the late 20th century.

  17. Electron microscopic observations of structures associated with the flagella of Spirillum volutans.

    PubMed Central

    Swan, M A

    1985-01-01

    Electron microscopy of thin-sectioned Spirillum volutans (ATCC 19554) showed that at the insertion site of the flagellum there was a cylindrical structure with a diameter of ca. 36 nm which extended ca. 19 nm into the cytoplasm. This structure, termed a cytoplasmic flagellar base, enclosed a central rod which was continuous with the hook. There was a continuation of the flagellar base into the peptidoglycan layer, enclosing ringlike structures and the central rod. The flagellar hook and proximal part of the flagellar filament contained a central channel which was large enough to accommodate the flagellin subunit. The flagella of fixed cells may project perpendicularly from the outer membrane in a position corresponding to a trailing, swimming orientation or may bend almost parallel to the membrane in a leading orientation. Maximum bending occurred in the hook region, which may be the structure responsible for executing changes in swimming direction. Images PMID:3972771

  18. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    DOE PAGES

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation andmore » streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.« less

  19. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation and streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.

  20. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, B. M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-08-01

    In situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals. Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed. Typically, these processes are characterized postmortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional postmortem characterization, most notably time resolution of deformation and streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries; this result suggests that Basinki's dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in situ straining with traditional postmortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.

  1. Science 101: How Does an Electron Microscope Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion, electron microscopes are not used to look at electrons. They are used to look for structure in things that are too small to observe with an optical microscope, or to obtain images that are magnified much more than is obtainable with an optical microscope. To understand how electron microscopes work, it will help to go…

  2. Electron microscope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1991-06-01

    This year our laboratory has continued to make progress in the design of electron-optical systems, in the study of structure-function relationships of large multi-subunit proteins, in the development of new image processing software and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. We present an algebraic approach to the symmetrical Einzel (unipotential) lens wherein we simplify the analysis by specifying a field shape that meets some preferred set of boundary or other conditions and then calculate the fields. In a second study we generalize this approach to study of three element electrostatic lenses of which the symmetrical Einzel lens is a particular form. The purpose is to develop a method for assisting in the design of a lens for a particular purpose. In our biological work we study a stable and functional dodecameric complex of globin chains from the hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris. This is a complex lacking the linker'' subunit first imaged in this lab and required for maintenance of the native structure. In addition, we do a complete work-up on the hemoglobin of the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouverii demonstrating the presence of a hierarchy of globin complexes. We demonstrate stable field-emission in the sub-angstrom STEM and the preliminary alignment of the beam. We continue our exploration of a algorithms for alignment of sequences of protein and DNA. Our computer facilities now include four second generation RISC workstations and we continue to take increasing advantage of the floating-point and graphical performance of these devices.

  3. Electron microscope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crewe, A. V.; Kapp, O. H.

    1991-06-01

    This year our laboratory has continued to make progress in the design of electron-optical systems, in the study of structure-function relationships of large multi-subunit proteins, in the development of new image processing software and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. We present an algebraic approach to the symmetrical Einzel (unipotential) lens wherein we simplify the analysis by specifying a field shape that meets some preferred set of boundary or other conditions and then calculate the fields. In a second study we generalize this approach to study of three element electrostatic lenses of which the symmetrical Einzel lens is a particular form. The purpose is to develop a method for assisting in the design of a lens for a particular purpose. In our biological work we study a stable and functional dodecameric complex of globin chains from the hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris. This is a complex lacking the 'linker' subunit first imaged in this lab and required for maintenance of the native structure. In addition, we do a complete work-up on the hemoglobin of the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouverii, demonstrating the presence of a hierarchy of globin complexes. We demonstrate stable field-emission in the sub-angstrom STEM and the preliminary alignment of the beam. We continue our exploration of a algorithms for alignment of sequences of protein and DNA. Our computer facilities now include four second generation RISC workstations and we continue to take increasing advantage of the floating-point and graphical performance of these devices.

  4. Scanning electron microscopic observations of Basic Violet-1 induced changes in the gill morphology of Labeo rohita.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Kaur, Satinder; Kaur, Arvinder

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopic observations were made for the changes in the surface ultra morphology of gill of Labeo rohita as indicators of the stress of lethal (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mg/L dye) and sublethal (0.0225, 0.045, and 0.09 mg/L dye) doses of Basic Violet-1 (CI: 42535, Trade name- Methyl Violet-2B). Present study was taken up as insufficient data exist regarding safety of this dye. The dye was observed to be cytotoxic in nature during the short term (96 h) exposure to lethal doses and tumorogenic as well as cytotoxic during the long term (150 day) exposure to sublethal doses. The dye caused reduction or complete loss of microridges, proliferation of chloride cells, and degeneration of gill lamellae and rakers. The toxic effects became more pronounced with duration as 0.0225 mg/L dye caused remarkable distortion of the normal structure of gills after 150 days of exposure. Such changes may have become the underlying cause for 45-50 % mortality of fish exposed to even sublethal doses of dye as the gills of fish perform a range of vital functions. In the present study, changes in ultra morphology were observed on the 50th day whereas mortality was noticed between 100 and 150 days of subchronic exposure. Therefore, time to time monitoring of ultra morphology of gill will provide us early indicators for the stress of very low levels of pollutants which may later cause mortality of the fish.

  5. In-situ microscopic observation of GaAs surfaces during molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy by scanning microprobe reflection high energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isu, Toshiro; Watanabe, Akiyoshi; Hata, Masayuki; Katayama, Yoshifumi

    1990-03-01

    Microscopic observations of epitaxial growth layers of GaAs were made with a scanning microprobe reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). A scanning microprobe electron gun has been combined with a specially designed molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system with both solid sources and gas sources. Scanning reflection electron microscope (SREM) images using the specular beam spot revealed granular features over the entire surfaces of MBE-grown GaAs layers, which were thought to come from undulation of the surface. Similar features of the surface were observed on the layers grown by gas-source MBE using trimethylgallium and arsine. A microscopic surface morphology was found to be fairly rough and the features depended on the species of the sources and growth conditions.

  6. Observation of spatial distribution of vacancy defects in semiconductor by positron microscope and electron beam induced current measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.

    2013-06-01

    A complementary study of vacancy defects in Si substrates by using scanning positron microscope (SPM) and electron beam induced current (EBIC) method were demonstrated for the same samples and in the same chamber. Both the S parameter and EBIC contrast were found to be enhanced in the regions containing vacancy defects introduced by ion implantation. That is, the SPM provides a criterion if the spatially resolved carrier recombination centres by the EBIC method are originating from vacancy defects or not.

  7. Effect of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate in skin of fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala): observations with scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, V.; Chawla, G.; Kumar, V.; Lal, H.; Viswanathan, P.N.

    1987-04-01

    Pathomorphological changes in the skin was noticed under the scanning electron microscope in fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) exposed to 0.005 ppm (25% of the LC50) concentration to linear alkyl benzene sulfonate. The epithelial cells present in the epidermis of the skin were found to secrete more mucus with linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) than did controls. The presence or deposition of mucus on the surface of skin indicated likely molecular interaction between constituents of mucus and LAS.

  8. Effect of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate in skin of fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala): observations with scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Misra, V; Chawla, G; Kumar, V; Lal, H; Viswanathan, P N

    1987-04-01

    Pathomorphological changes in the skin was noticed under the scanning electron microscope in fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mrigala) exposed to 0.005 ppm (25% of the LC50) concentration to linear alkyl benzene sulfonate. The epithelial cells present in the epidermis of the skin were found to secrete more mucus with linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) than did controls. The presence or deposition of mucus on the surface of skin indicated likely molecular interaction between constituents of mucus and LAS.

  9. Carbon nanotube electron sources for electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Electron sources were made from individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes with closed caps and thoroughly cleaned surfaces. Nanotubes from both chemical vapor deposition growth and arc discharge growth were investigated. These emitters provide a highly stable emission current up to a threshold current of a few microamperes. At too large currents several processes take place such as splitting, breaking and cap closing. The emission process is field emission for a workfunction of 5 eV. The electron optical per-formance is highly beneficial for their use as high-brightness point sources in electron microscopes and advantageous with respect to state-of-the-art electron sources. The life-time is at least two years. We have tested the source successfully in a scanning electron microscope.

  10. Observation of Oscillating, Spin-Like Propagation in Reactive Multi-Layer Foils Using the Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonds, Marta Anna

    Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) in reactive multilayer foils (RMLFs) has been systematically studied in situ and ex situ. RMLFs are layered materials comprised of two constituents with a high enthalpy of mixing. The two constituents are deposited in an alternating fashion. The 10s--100s nanometer-thick layers produce short diffusion distances to enhance mixing. When initiated by an external heat source, the foils react in a self-propagating fashion driven by exothermic mixing. The propagation characteristics, namely velocity and maximum temperature, depend on the chemistries involved as well as the foil architecture. The Al/Ni 3:1 system was chosen because of its potential application in microelectronics and its lower reaction temperature. The foils were grown by magnetron sputtering with bilayers measuring 25 or 27nm and a final thickness of 125 and 189nm. In situ and ex situ experiments have yielded significant cumulative trends about RMLF behavior. Ex situ experiments rely on reaction quenching and post mortem examination with XRD to reveal intermetallic phase evolution. Quenching can introduce intermediate phases not necessarily native to the original process. In situ optical observation yield temperature and velocity information, but not necessarily phase information. In situ x-ray microdiffraction has been applied to study phase evolution but samples a large portion of the foil. The dynamic TEM (DTEM) has the spatial and temporal resolution to study these reactions in situ to better our understanding of the reaction process, which tends to be rather uncontrollable and occurs at very high temperatures. Using SHS of RMLFs as a novel method for intermetallic formation will be benefited by a more thorough understanding of the thermodynamics and kinetics involved, especially for heat-sensitive application. The dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) has been a unique instrument allowing for in situ examination of RMLFs during the

  11. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  12. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  13. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  14. Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Bell, L. Douglas

    1990-01-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscope (BEEM) employs scanning tunneling-microscopy (STM) methods for nondestructive, direct electrical investigation of buried interfaces, such as interface between semiconductor and thin metal film. In BEEM, there are at least three electrodes: emitting tip, biasing electrode, and collecting electrode, receiving current crossing interface under investigation. Signal-processing device amplifies electrode signals and converts them into form usable by computer. Produces spatial images of surface by scanning tip; in addition, provides high-resolution images of buried interface under investigation. Spectroscopic information extracted by measuring collecting-electrode current as function of one of interelectrode voltages.

  15. Non-destructive observation of in-grown stacking faults in 4H-SiC epitaxial layer using mirror electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Masaki; Ohno, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    Mirror electron microscope (MEM) observation has been conducted for a 4-{mu}m-thick n-doped 4H-SiC epitaxial layer. If the sample is simultaneously illuminated with ultraviolet (UV) light of a slightly greater energy than the bandgap energy of 4H-SiC, in-grown stacking faults (IGSFs) can be clearly observed in MEM images. These observations were performed non-destructively, as almost all irradiated electrons returned without impinging the sample surface due to the negative voltage applied to the sample. High spatial resolution observation via MEM showed that multiple IGSFs were stacked up. The phenomenon in which the contrast of the IGSFs vanished in the absence of UV illumination and under UV illumination with a lower energy than the bandgap energy revealed that the origin of the contrast was the negative charging of IGSFs trapping electrons excited by UV light.

  16. OBSERVATIONS WITH THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPE ON CELLS OF THE CHICK CHORIO-ALLANTOIC MEMBRANE INFECTED WITH INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J. S.; Bang, F. B.

    1952-01-01

    Preparations of influenza-infected chick chorio-allantoic membrane made by two types of tissue culture and by sectioning, have been studied in the electron microscope. Comparisons have been made of influenza A' (FM1), influenza A (PR8), and swine influenza (V15), three strains which produce different relative numbers of filaments. Normal surface projections which may be confused with influenza filaments are described. Extruded products of degenerating cells, usually bleb-shaped, may also be found both in uninfected allantoic fluid and tissue cultures. It appears that the filaments and spheres of influenza virus, concurrently projecting from the free cell surface, represent the only visible change in the cells until late in the infection,—how late the present work does not tell. No definite evidence of a generalized infection throughout the cytoplasm or of inclusions was found. Additional evidence is presented for the assumption that the filaments have a significant role in the final development of the free virus. PMID:14927791

  17. Electron Microscopic Observation and Biochemical Properties of Carp Myosin B during Frozen Storage at -8°C with Cryoprotectants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Norio; Oguni, Moritoshi; Yamamoto, Mika; Shinano, Haruo

    The cryoprotective effect of sorbitol (0.5M) and monosodium glutamate (0.3M) was examined on the freeze denaturation of carp myosin B filaments by observing the morphological changes in electron microscopy. Myosin B in the presence of 0.1 or 0.6M KCl was stored at -8°C that was higer temperature than the eutectic point of KCl and provided the concentrated KCl solution for causing the filamentous structure to deform. In the case of frozen storage in 0.1M KCl, the deformation of myosin B filaments was protected with both cryoprotectants. In the case of 0.6M KCl with monosodium glutamate, the deformation of the filaments was prevented. However, the granular matters deformed from myosin B were observed to some extent in 0.6M KCl with sorbitol. Morphological changes of the filaments in the electron microscopy agreed with the changes in biochemical properties of myosin B.

  18. Electron microscope observations of impact crater debris amongst contaminating particulates on materials surfaces exposed in space in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murr, L. E.; Rivas, J. M.; Quinones, S.; Niou, C.-S.; Advani, A. H.; Marquez, B.

    1993-01-01

    Debris particles extracted from a small sampling region on the leading edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft have been examined by analytical transmission electron microscopy and the elemental frequency observed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and compared with upper atmosphere (Earth) particle elemental frequency and the average elemental compositions of interplanetary dust particles. A much broader elemental distribution was observed for the exposed spacecraft surface debris milieu. Numerous metal microfragment analyses, particularly aluminum and stainless steel, were compared with scanning electron microscope observations-of impact crater features, and the corresponding elemental spectra on selected LDEF aluminium tray clamps and stainless steel bolts. The compositions and melt features for these impact craters and ejecta have been shown to be consistent with microcrystalline debris fragments in the case of aluminum, and these observations suggest an ever changing debris milieu on exposed surfaces for space craft and space system materials.

  19. Observation of deviation of electronic behaviour of indium tin oxide film at grain boundary using Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasiviswanathan, S.; Srinivas, V.; Kar, A. K.; Mathur, B. K.; Chopra, K. L.

    1997-03-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy investigations have been carried out on electron beam deposited indium tin oxide films. The STM images reveal a rather smooth surface, which appears to have been formed due to the coalescence of islands with different shapes. The spectroscopic data, in general, exhibit characteristics typical of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures, with a heavily doped semiconductor. From the I- V curves, a band gap of ≈3.5 eV is obtained, which is very close to the bulk value. The I- V studies at some grain boundary interfaces suggest the presence of regions showing electronic characteristics, that differ significantly from what is observed on the rest of the film surface.

  20. In situ observation on hydrogenation of Mg-Ni films using environmental transmission electron microscope with aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Junko; Yoshida, Kenta; Sasaki, Yukichi; Uchiyama, Naoki; Akiba, Etsuo

    2014-08-25

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to observe the hydrogenation of Mg-Ni films in a hydrogen atmosphere of 80–100 Pa. An aberration-corrected environmental TEM with a differential pumping system allows us to reveal the Angstrom-scale structure of the films in the initial stage of hydrogenation: first, nucleation and growth of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} crystals with a lattice spacing of 0.22 nm in an Mg-rich amorphous matrix of the film occurs within 20 s after the start of the high-resolution observation, then crystallization of MgH{sub 2} with a smaller spacing of 0.15 nm happens after approximately 1 min. Our in situ TEM method is also applicable to the analysis of other hydrogen-related materials.

  1. FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopic analysis of pretreated biosorbent to observe the effect on Cr (VI) remediation.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Bala; Rani, Nisha; Kaushik, Anubha

    2016-11-01

    Various chemical and physical treatments have been applied to indigenously isolated cyanobacterial strain, Lyngbya putealis HH-15, to observe the effect on chromium removal capacity. Pretreatment with hydrochloric acid (99.1%) and nitric acid (98.5%) resulted in enhanced chromium removal as compared to untreated control biosorbent (98.1%). Pretreatment with acetic acid (97.9%), methanol (97.0%), calcium chloride (96.0%), hot water (95.2%), and sodium hydroxide (93.9%) did not improve the chromium removal capacity of biosorbent. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis identified changes in biomass functionality and availability after physical and chemical modification-the results of which were in agreement with metal removal studies. In conclusion, this acid-treated biosorbent represents a suitable candidate to replace conventional removal technologies for metal-bearing wastewaters. PMID:27185214

  2. Light- and electron-microscopic observations on the mandibular condylar cartilages in growing rats on a low-calcium diet.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, F; Miyamoto, Y; Nagayama, M

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain more insight into the physiologic mechanism of endochondral ossification, histological changes occurring in the mandibular condylar cartilage of growing rats fed on a low-calcium diet were investigated by light and electron microscopy. Twenty-three-day-old rats were fed on a normal diet or a low-calcium diet for 8 weeks. For the histological observations the mandibular condyles were dissected from each animal at 1, 2, 4, 5 and 8 weeks after the initiation of the experiment. Histological changes occurring in the mandibular condylar cartilages of the rats fed on a low-calcium diet were as follows: (1) narrow proliferative and mature cell zones and a wide hypertrophic cell zone, (2) inhibition of development of cell organelles in the mature chondrocytes, (3) decrease in dead cells in the proliferative zone, (4) decrease in glycogen accumulation in the chondrocytes and (5) inhibition of calcification in the extracellular matrix of the hypertrophic cell zone. Additionally at the end of the experimental period, the following findings were observed: (1) appearance of small light cells in the mature cell zone and the hypertrophic cell zone and (2) decrease in proteoglycan granules and appearance of large collagen fibrils in the pericellular region of the hypertrophic cell zone.

  3. Electron microscopic observations concerning the in vivo uptake and release of the agent of guinea-pig inclusion conjunctivitis (Chlamydia psittaci) in guinea-pig exocervix.

    PubMed

    Soloff, B L; Rank, R G; Barron, A L

    1985-07-01

    This report details electron-microscopical observations concerning C. psittaci infection in vivo. The model employed was that of the guinea-pig infected at the exocervical region with the agent of guinea-pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Our observations indicate that chlamydial particles gain access to their target cells by the mechanism of endocytosis. Single GPIC elementary bodies were seen to be positioned within individual endosomes. The observations reported here provide evidence that chlamydial particles that had undergone their developmental cycle within the exocervical epithelial cells may leave the epithelium in 2 ways; within entire infected cells that had been shed into the lumen of the cervix and by means of the liberation of chlamydial particles from disrupted cells. The mechanism of cell disruption and shedding is thought to involve the large number of PMNs observed to be present within the enlarged intercellular spaces of the infected epithelium.

  4. Scanning electron microscopic observations on the head morphology of seven different leptocephali belonging to six eel families (Anguilliformes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, S.; Riehl, R.

    1993-02-01

    Scanning electron microscopy observation was carried out on head morphology, number and construction of teeth, nostril position and the presence of neuromasts of seven species of leptocephali from six families of the Anguilliformes. The number and form of the teeth vary within the different families, from 76 teeth in Gnathophis sp. (Congridae) to 32 teeth in Anarchias yoshiae (Muraenidae). In most of the genera the number of teeth on upper and lower jaws is almost equal, except in Gnathophis sp., Anguilla anguilla and Kaupichthys hyoproroides. The unusual size and form of the leptocephali's teeth led us to speculate on the feeding behaviour of these larvae. Tentatively we suggest that the tooth formation of the leptocephali may act as a filtering system, rather than as a predatory apparatus, as its vicious appearance might suggest. Given the largely passive nature of a filtering system, the larvae would be able to concentrate on their migration. Of all the investigated leptocephali, only Nemichthys scolopaceus shows one olfactory opening on each side of the head, whilst all the other species show two openings. The data obtained from these investigations suggest that teeth form as well as form and position of the nostrils are characteristics of the genera, and possibly also of the species.

  5. Electron microscopic observation of the early stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual multiplication and development in in vitro axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    The stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual exogenous development were investigated at high ultra-structural resolution in cell-free culture using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early C. parvum trophozoites were ovoid in shape, 1.07 × 1.47 μm(2) in size, and contained a large nucleus and adjacent Golgi complex. Dividing and mature meronts containing four to eight developing merozoites, 2.34 × 2.7 μm(2) in size, were observed within the first 24h of cultivation. An obvious peculiarity was found within the merozoite pellicle, as it was composed of the outer plasma membrane with underlying middle and inner membrane complexes. Further novel findings were vacuolization of the meront's residuum and extension of its outer pellicle, as parasitophorous vacuole-like membranes were also evident. The asexual reproduction of C. parvum was consistent with the developmental pattern of both eimerian coccidia and Arthrogregarinida (formerly Neogregarinida). The unique cell-free development of C. parvum described here, along with the establishment of meronts and merozoite formation, is the first such evidence obtained from in vitro cell-free culture at the ultrastructural level. PMID:26587578

  6. Electron microscopic observation of the early stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual multiplication and development in in vitro axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    The stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual exogenous development were investigated at high ultra-structural resolution in cell-free culture using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early C. parvum trophozoites were ovoid in shape, 1.07 × 1.47 μm(2) in size, and contained a large nucleus and adjacent Golgi complex. Dividing and mature meronts containing four to eight developing merozoites, 2.34 × 2.7 μm(2) in size, were observed within the first 24h of cultivation. An obvious peculiarity was found within the merozoite pellicle, as it was composed of the outer plasma membrane with underlying middle and inner membrane complexes. Further novel findings were vacuolization of the meront's residuum and extension of its outer pellicle, as parasitophorous vacuole-like membranes were also evident. The asexual reproduction of C. parvum was consistent with the developmental pattern of both eimerian coccidia and Arthrogregarinida (formerly Neogregarinida). The unique cell-free development of C. parvum described here, along with the establishment of meronts and merozoite formation, is the first such evidence obtained from in vitro cell-free culture at the ultrastructural level.

  7. Electron Microscope Center Opens at Berkeley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1981-01-01

    A 1.5-MeV High Voltage Electron Microscope has been installed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory which will help materials scientists and biologists study samples in more true-to-life situations. A 1-MeV Atomic Resolution Microscope will be installed at the same location in two years which will allow scientists to distinguish atoms. (DS)

  8. Neural differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells in a rat model of striatal lacunar infarction: light and electron microscopic observations

    PubMed Central

    Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma C.; Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Ana P.; Serrano, Julia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Vellosillo-Huerta, Lara; Taylor, Julian S.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The increased risk and prevalence of lacunar stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) makes the search for better experimental models an important requirement for translational research. In this study we assess ischemic damage of the nigrostriatal pathway in a model of lacunar stroke evoked by damaging the perforating arteries in the territory of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat after stereotaxic administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We hypothesized that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity of differentiating into diverse cell types such as neurons and glia, but with limited proliferation potential, would constitute an alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for lacunar stroke. These cells showed neuritogenic activity in vitro and a high potential for neural differentiation. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry was used to characterize GFP-positive neurons derived from the transplants. 48 h after ET-1 injection, we characterized an area of selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the nigrostriatal pathway characterized with tissue necrosis and glial scar formation, with subsequent behavioral signs of Parkinsonism. Light microscopy showed that grafted cells within the striatal infarction zone differentiated with a high yield into mature glial cells (GFAP-positive) and neuron types present in the normal striatum. Electron microscopy revealed that NSCs-derived neurons integrated into the host circuitry establishing synaptic contacts, mostly of the asymmetric type. Astrocytes were closely associated with normal small-sized blood vessels in the area of infarct, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of the blood brain barrier and angiogenesis. Our results encourage the use of NSCs as a cell-replacement therapy for the treatment of human vascular Parkinsonism. PMID:22876219

  9. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope.

  10. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. PMID:26998703

  11. Cellular components of the immune barrier in the spinal meninges and dorsal root ganglia of the normal rat: immunohistochemical (MHC class II) and electron-microscopic observations.

    PubMed

    Braun, J S; Kaissling, B; Le Hir, M; Zenker, W

    1993-08-01

    This report deals with the distribution, morphology and specific topical relationships of bone-marrow-derived cells (free cells) in the spinal meninges and dorsal root ganglia of the normal rat. The morphology of these cells has been studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Cells expressing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene product have been recognized by immunofluorescence. At the level of the transmission electron microscope, free cells are found in all layers of the meninges. Many of them display characteristic ultrastructural features of macrophages, whereas others show a highly vacuolated cytoplasm and are endowed with many processes. These elements lack a conspicuous lysosomal system and might represent dendritic cells. Scanning electron microscopy has revealed that free cells contact the cerebrospinal fluid via abundant cytoplasmic processes that cross the cell layers of the pia mater and of the arachnoid. Cells expressing the MHC class II antigen are also found in all layers of the meninges. They are particularly abundant in the layers immediately adjacent to the subarachnoid space, in the neighbourhood of dural vessels, along the spinal roots and in the dural funnels. In addition to the meninges, strong immunoreactivity for MHC class II antigen is observed in the dorsal root ganglia. The ultrastructural and immunohistochemical findings of this study suggest the existence of a well-developed system of immunological surveillance of the subarachnoid space and of the dorsal root ganglia.

  12. A new myxozoan parasite from the Amazonian fish Metynnis argenteus (Teleostei, Characidae): light and electron microscope observations.

    PubMed

    Casal, Graça; Matos, Edilson; Azevedo, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    Myxobolus metynnis n. sp. (Phylum Myxozoa) is described in the connective subcutaneous tissues of the orbicular region of the fish, Metynnis argenteus (Characidae), collected in the lower Amazon River, near the city of Peixe Boi, Pará State, Brazil. Polysporic, histozoic plasmodia were delimited by a double membrane with numerous microvilli on the peripheral cytoplasm. Several life-cycle stages, including mature spores, were observed. An envelope formed by numerous fine and anastomosed microfibrils was observed at the spore surface. The spore body presented an ellipsoidal shape and was about 13.1 microm long, 7.8 microm wide, and 3.9 microm thick. Elongated-pyriform polar capsules were of equal size, measuring 5.2 microm in length, 3.2 microm in width, and possessing a polar filament with 8-9 turns around the longitudinal axis. The binucleated sporoplasm contained a vacuole and numerous sporoplasmosomes. These were circular in cross-section, showing an adherent eccentric, dense structure, with a half-crescent section. Based on the morphological differences and host specificity, we propose that the parasite is a new species named Myxobolus metynnis n. sp.

  13. Quantification of the Information Limit of Transmission Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2008-11-14

    The resolving power of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes is characterized by the information limit, which reflects the size of the smallest object detail observable with a particular instrument. We introduce a highly accurate measurement method for the information limit, which is suitable for modern aberration-corrected electron microscopes. An experimental comparison with the traditionally applied Young's fringe method yields severe discrepancies and confirms theoretical considerations according to which the Young's fringe method does not reveal the information limit.

  14. An Entomopathogenic Strain of Beauveria bassiana against Frankliniella occidentalis with no Detrimental Effect on the Predatory Mite Neoseiulus barkeri: Evidence from Laboratory Bioassay and Scanning Electron Microscopic Observation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengyong; Gao, Yulin; Zhang, Yaping; Wang, Endong; Xu, Xuenong; Lei, Zhongren

    2014-01-01

    Among 28 isolates of Beauveria bassiana tested for virulence against F. occidentalis in laboratory bioassays, we found strain SZ-26 as the most potent, causing 96% mortality in adults at 1×107 mL−1conidia after 4 days. The effect of the strain SZ-26 on survival, longevity and fecundity of the predatory mite Neoseiulus (Amblyseius) barkeri Hughes were studied under laboratory conditions. The bioassay results showed that the corrected mortalities were less than 4 and 8% at 10 days following inoculation of the adult and the larvae of the predator, respectively, with 1×107 conidia mL−1 of SZ-26. Furthermore, no fungal hyphae were found in dead predators. The oviposition and postoviposition durations, longevity, and fecundity displayed no significant differences after inoculation with SZ-26 using first-instar larvae of F. occidentalis as prey in comparison with untreated predator. In contrast, the preoviposition durations were significantly longer. Observations with a scanning electron microscope, revealed that many conidia were attached to the cuticles of F. occidentalis at 2 h after treatment with germ tubes oriented toward cuticle at 24 h, penetration of the insect cuticle at 36 h, and finally, fungal colonization of the whole insect body at 60 h. In contrast, we never observed penetration of the predator's cuticle and conidia were shed gradually from the body, further demonstrating that B. bassiana strain SZ-26 show high toxicity against F. occidentalis but no pathogenicity to predatory mite. PMID:24454744

  15. Phase and electron microscopic observations of osmotically induced wrinkling and the role of endocytotic vesicles in the plasmolysis of the Gram-negative cell wall.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, H; Koch, A L

    1995-12-01

    When a Gram-negative bacterium is challenged with a sufficient concentration of a non-penetrating solute such as sucrose, water is sucked out of the cell. Plasmolysis spaces may form if the cell's cytoplasmic membrane (CM) separates from the murein wall (M) and the outer membrane (OM). However, we suggest that first wrinkling of the wall envelope, forced by dehydration of the cytoplasm, occurs. The cryofixation, freeze-substitution electron microscope studies used here are much too slow to study the kinetics of shrinkage, wrinkling and plasmolysis. However, they are consistent with faster phase microscope studies and previous stopflow experiments. For the electron microscopy studies reported here, only sucrose was used as the osmotic agent and under conditions that do not cause extreme plasmolysis. Plasmolysis spaces were associated with the formation of small membrane-bound vesicles in the nearby cytoplasm. Such vesicles formed by osmotic challenge are called 'endocytotic' in plant cell systems. They had been recorded in earlier plasmolysis studies in bacteria, but not interpreted as a concomitant part of plasmolysis space formation in certain locations of the cell. We suggest that the endocytotic vesicles form because the phospholipid membranes are capable of very little contraction so extra membrane must be disposed of when plasmolysis spaces form. In the case of plasmolysis spaces forming at poles and constriction sites, for geometric reasons the surface area of the CM may be conserved without disposition of excess membrane. We suggest that it is this biophysical property of lipid membranes that leads to the frequent formation of plasmolysis spaces at a pole and at the site of future division. We also observed a novel structure, this is seen only under mild osmotic up-shock, and consists of very thin, straight, uniform and long plasmolysis spaces which were called 'lamellar spaces'; these commonly formed inside the sidewalls and were usually associated with the

  16. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  17. Charge collection microscopy of in-situ switchable PRAM line cells in a scanning electron microscope: Technique development and unique observations

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Schuitema, R. W.; Brink, G. H. ten; Kooi, B. J.; Gravesteijn, D. J.

    2015-03-15

    An imaging method has been developed based on charge collection in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) that allows discrimination between the amorphous and crystalline states of Phase-change Random Access Memory (PRAM) line cells. During imaging, the cells are electrically connected and can be switched between the states and the resistance can be measured. This allows for electrical characterization of the line cells in-situ in the SEM. Details on sample and measurement system requirements are provided which turned out to be crucial for the successful development of this method. Results show that the amorphous or crystalline state of the line cells can be readily discerned, but the spatial resolution is relatively poor. Nevertheless, it is still possible to estimate the length of the amorphous mark, and also for the first time, we could directly observe the shift of the amorphous mark from one side of the line cell to the other side when the polarity of the applied (50 ns) RESET pulse was reversed.

  18. Charge collection microscopy of in-situ switchable PRAM line cells in a scanning electron microscope: Technique development and unique observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosthoek, J. L. M.; Schuitema, R. W.; ten Brink, G. H.; Gravesteijn, D. J.; Kooi, B. J.

    2015-03-01

    An imaging method has been developed based on charge collection in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) that allows discrimination between the amorphous and crystalline states of Phase-change Random Access Memory (PRAM) line cells. During imaging, the cells are electrically connected and can be switched between the states and the resistance can be measured. This allows for electrical characterization of the line cells in-situ in the SEM. Details on sample and measurement system requirements are provided which turned out to be crucial for the successful development of this method. Results show that the amorphous or crystalline state of the line cells can be readily discerned, but the spatial resolution is relatively poor. Nevertheless, it is still possible to estimate the length of the amorphous mark, and also for the first time, we could directly observe the shift of the amorphous mark from one side of the line cell to the other side when the polarity of the applied (50 ns) RESET pulse was reversed.

  19. Isotope analysis in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, Toma; Hofer, Christoph; Argentero, Giacomo; Leuthner, Gregor T.; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C.; Kotakoski, Jani

    2016-10-01

    The Ångström-sized probe of the scanning transmission electron microscope can visualize and collect spectra from single atoms. This can unambiguously resolve the chemical structure of materials, but not their isotopic composition. Here we differentiate between two isotopes of the same element by quantifying how likely the energetic imaging electrons are to eject atoms. First, we measure the displacement probability in graphene grown from either 12C or 13C and describe the process using a quantum mechanical model of lattice vibrations coupled with density functional theory simulations. We then test our spatial resolution in a mixed sample by ejecting individual atoms from nanoscale areas spanning an interface region that is far from atomically sharp, mapping the isotope concentration with a precision better than 20%. Although we use a scanning instrument, our method may be applicable to any atomic resolution transmission electron microscope and to other low-dimensional materials.

  20. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  1. Investigation of Fretting by Microscopic Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Douglas

    1951-01-01

    An experimental investigation, using microscopic observation and color motion photomicrographs of the action, was conducted to determine the cause of fretting. Glass and other noncorrosive materials, as well as metals, were used as specimens. A very simple apparatus vibrated convex surfaces in contact with stationary flat surfaces at frequencies of 120 cycles or less than l cycle per second, an amplitude of 0.0001 inch, and load of 0.2 pound.

  2. Scanning electron microscopic autoradiography of lung

    SciTech Connect

    Lauhala, K.E.; Sanders, C.L.; McDonald, K.E.

    1988-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) autoradiography of the lung is being used to determine the distribution of inhaled, alpha particle-emitting, plutonium dioxide particles. SEM autoradiography provides high visual impact views of alpha activity. Particles irradiating the bronchiolar epithelium were detected both on the bronchiolar surface and in peribronchiolar alveoli. The technique is being used to obtain quantitative data on the clearance rates of plutonium particles from bronchi and bronchioles.

  3. Three-dimensional X-ray observation of atmospheric biological samples by linear-array scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope system.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si₃N₄ thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields.

  4. Three-Dimensional X-ray Observation of Atmospheric Biological Samples by Linear-Array Scanning-Electron Generation X-ray Microscope System

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we developed a soft X-ray microscope called the scanning-electron generation X-ray microscope (SGXM), which consists of a simple X-ray detection system that detects X-rays emitted from the interaction between a scanning electron beam (EB) and the thin film of the sample mount. We present herein a three-dimensional (3D) X-ray detection system that is based on the SGXM technology and designed for studying atmospheric biological samples. This 3D X-ray detection system contains a linear X-ray photodiode (PD) array. The specimens are placed under a CuZn-coated Si3N4 thin film, which is attached to an atmospheric sample holder. Multiple tilt X-ray images of the samples are detected simultaneously by the linear array of X-ray PDs, and the 3D structure is calculated by a new 3D reconstruction method that uses a simulated-annealing algorithm. The resulting 3D models clearly reveal the inner structure of the bacterium. In addition, the proposed method can easily be used for diverse samples in a broad range of scientific fields. PMID:21731770

  5. The fragile X: a scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, C J; Jack, E M; Allen, T D; Harris, R

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been used to study the fragile X chromosome. The fragile site appears as an isochromatid gap in the majority of cases, confirming light microscope (LM) observations. SEM has allowed a more precise location of the fragile site to the Xq27 . 3 region. Images PMID:6684694

  6. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Andrew M.

    2002-12-02

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  7. Miniature electron microscope beam column optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Jody Stuart

    This investigation is in the area of electrostatic lens design with the overarching goal of contributing to the creation of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope (SEM) for use in mineralogical analysis or detection of signs of life on the surface of Mars. Such an instrument could also have application in the exploration of Earth's moon, planetary moons, asteroids, or comets. Other embodiments could include tabletop or field portable SEMs for use on Earth. The scope of this research is in the design of a beam column that attains focusing, demagnification, and aberration control within the smallest achievable package. The goals of planetary exploration and of spaceflight in general impose severe constraints on the instrument's mass and electrical power consumption, while favoring a robust design of small size and high rigidity that is also simple to align. To meet these requirements a design using electrostatic lenses was favored because of the lower power requirement and mass of electrostatic versus magnetic lenses, their relatively simple construction, as well as inherently easier shielding from extraneous fields. In modeling the lens field, a hybrid of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) and a Fourier series solution was employed, whereby an initial solution from the BEM is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain for the subsequent Fourier series solution. The approach is applicable to many problems in physics and combines the inherent precision of this series solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized electrode shapes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. A significant speed increase in tracing rays is also observed. The modeling technique has been validated by reproducing example ray-traces through

  8. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marder, A.; Barmak, K.; Williams, D.

    1998-11-01

    The Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) was acquired by a grant from the Department of Energy University Research Instrumentation Program and matching funds from Lehigh University and industry. The equipment is installed as part of the electron microscopy laboratories and is being utilized on a regular basis. Over 20 graduate and undergraduate students from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering as well as other department in the University have included this instrument in their research. In addition, the ESEM has been used in several courses including MAT 427 -- Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy, a graduate course offered every other year. Examples are given of how the ESEM has been included in the research programs.

  9. Electron irradiation-induced destruction of carbon nanotubes in electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Mølhave, Kristian; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Horsewell, Andy; Bøggild, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Observations of carbon nanotubes under exposure to electron beam irradiation in standard transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) systems show that such treatment in some cases can cause severe damage of the nanotube structure, even at electron energies far below the approximate 100 keV threshold for knock-on damage displacing carbon atoms in the graphene structure. We find that the damage we observe in one TEM can be avoided by use of a cold finger. This and the morphology of the damage imply that water vapour, which is present as a background gas in many vacuum chambers, can damage the nanotube structure through electron beam-induced chemical reactions. Though, the dependence on the background gas makes these observations specific for the presently used systems, the results demonstrate the importance of careful assessment of the level of subtle structural damage that the individual electron microscope system can do to nanostructures during standard use. PMID:17445986

  10. Complement-mediated bacteriolysis after binding of specific antibodies to drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: morphological changes observed by using a field emission scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Jun; Nakae, Takashi; Onoe, Takatoshi; Horiuchi, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Hiroyoshi; Adan-Kubo, Jun; Adachi, Hiroaki; Ono, Yasuo

    2010-12-01

    A bactericidal mechanism mediated by human serum was investigated by a field emission scanning electron microscope and a strain of drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When the bacteria were treated with meropenem, a carbapenem antibiotic, spheroplasts and bulges (spheroidization) appeared after 1-3 h. When 40% serum was added to the bacteria, the bacteria agglutinated within 2 min and then lysed after 5-30 min. Immunoelectron micrographic analyses showed dispositions of complement component C9 molecules on the cell surface of lysed bacteria by the serum treatment that might suggest formation of a membrane attack complex. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) depletion from the serum diminished the lytic activity and adding human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) restored it, suggesting that lysis was induced by specific IgG binding to the bacteria. IVIG may help patients with less IgG against bacteria to overcome severe infection.

  11. In-situ scanning electron microscope observation of electromigration-induced void growth in 30 nm ½ pitch Cu interconnect structures

    SciTech Connect

    Vanstreels, K. Czarnecki, P.; Siew, Y. K.; De Wolf, I.; Bömmels, J.; Tőkei, Zs.; Croes, K.; Kirimura, T.

    2014-02-21

    In-situ electromigration tests have been performed inside a scanning electron microscope on 30 nm wide single damascene interconnects without vias, where a good resolution was obtained and drift velocities during void growth could be measured at 300 °C. These tests showed direct evidence that the cathode end of the line, where a polycrystalline grain cluster encounters a bigger grain, can act as a flux divergent point of Cu diffusion. Moreover, it was found that a thicker barrier suppresses barrier/interface diffusivity of Cu atoms, thereby slowing down electromigration-induced void growth. It was also demonstrated that Cobalt based metal caps are beneficial to electromigration for advanced interconnects where thinner barriers are required.

  12. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  13. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  14. A combined apparatus of scanning reflection electron microscope and scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruno, S.; Nakahara, H.; Fujita, S.; Watanabe, H.; Kusumi, Y.; Ichikawa, M.

    1997-01-01

    A scanning reflection electron microscope (SREM) combined with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been developed for the purpose of nanoscale structure fabrication under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A STM unit consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner and an inch runner for coarse and fine approach of a STM tip. A sample holder and the STM unit have six drive axes relative to an electron gun for simultaneous observation by SREM and STM. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy equipment is also installed for surface sensitive elemental analysis. It has been demonstrated that on a Si(111)7×7 surface atomic steps and 7×7 unit, cells can be observed in the SREM and STM images, respectively, and that surface elements with less than 1 ML thickness are detectable.

  15. Lobular and cellular patterns of early hepatic glycogen deposition in the rat as observed by light and electron microscopic radioautography after injection of /sup 3/H-galactose

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, J.E.; Hung, J.T.; Garfield, S.A.; Cardell, R.R. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    Very low hepatic glycogen levels are achieved by overnight fasting of adrenalectomized (ADX) rats. Subsequent injection of dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, stimulates marked increases in glycogen synthesis. Using this system and injecting /sup 3/H-galactose as a glycogen precursor 1 hr prior to sacrifice, the intralobular and intracellular patterns of labeled glycogen deposition were studied by light (LM) and electron (EM) microscopic radioautography. LM radioautography revealed that 1 hr after DEX treatment, labeling patterns for both periportal and centrilobular hepatocytes resembled those in rats with no DEX treatment: 18% of the hepatocytes were unlabeled, and 82% showed light labeling. Two hours after treatment with DEX, 14% of the hepatocytes remained unlabeled, and 78% were lightly labeled; however, 8% of the cells, located randomly throughout the lobule, were intensely labeled. An increased number of heavily labeled cells (26%) appeared 3 hr after DEX treatment; and by 5 hr 91% of the hepatocytes were intensely labeled. Label over the periportal cells at this time was aggregated, whereas centrilobular cells displayed dispersed label. EM radioautographs showed that 2 to 3 hr after DEX injection initial labeling of hepatocytes, regardless of their intralobular location, occurred over foci of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and small electron-dense particles of presumptive glycogen, and in areas of SER and distinct glycogen particles. After 5 hrs of treatment with DEX, the intracellular distribution of label reflected the glycogen patterns characteristic of periportal or centrilobular regions.

  16. Intrinsic instability of aberration-corrected electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Schramm, S M; van der Molen, S J; Tromp, R M

    2012-10-19

    Aberration-corrected microscopes with subatomic resolution will impact broad areas of science and technology. However, the experimentally observed lifetime of the corrected state is just a few minutes. Here we show that the corrected state is intrinsically unstable; the higher its quality, the more unstable it is. Analyzing the contrast transfer function near optimum correction, we define an "instability budget" which allows a rational trade-off between resolution and stability. Unless control systems are developed to overcome these challenges, intrinsic instability poses a fundamental limit to the resolution practically achievable in the electron microscope.

  17. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage.

  18. Observation of living cells using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Kasas, S; Gotzos, V; Celio, M R

    1993-01-01

    We used an atomic force microscope (AFM) to image samples immersed in a fluid in order to study the dynamic behavior of the membranes of living cells. AFM images of cultured cells immersed in a buffer were obtained without any preliminary preparation. We observed surface changes and displacements which suggest that the cells were still alive during the measurements. Some membrane details imaged with the AFM have also been observed using a scanning electron microscope and their dynamic behavior has been confirmed by microcinematography. We believe that the AFM will offer new insights into the exploration of dynamic changes affecting cell membranes. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURES 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURES 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 PMID:8457678

  19. Nanotip electron gun for the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Vladár, András E; Radi, Zsolt; Postek, Michael T; Joy, David C

    2006-01-01

    Experimental nanotips have shown significant improvement in the resolution performance of a cold field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM). Nanotip electron sources are very sharp electron emitter tips used as a replacement for the conventional tungsten field emission (FE) electron sources. Nanotips offer higher brightness and smaller electron source size. An electron microscope equipped with a nanotip electron gun can provide images with higher spatial resolution and with better signal-to-noise ratio. This could present a considerable advantage over the current SEM electron gun technology if the tips are sufficiently long-lasting and stable for practical use. In this study, an older field-emission critical dimension (CD) SEM was used as an experimental test platform. Substitution of tungsten nanotips for the regular cathodes required modification of the electron gun circuitry and preparation of nanotips that properly fit the electron gun assembly. In addition, this work contains the results of the modeling and theoretical calculation of the electron gun performance for regular and nanotips, the preparation of the SEM including the design and assembly of a measuring system for essential instrument parameters, design and modification of the electron gun control electronics, development of a procedure for tip exchange, and tests of regular emitter, sharp emitter and nanotips. Nanotip fabrication and characterization procedures were also developed. Using a "sharp" tip as an intermediate to the nanotip clearly demonstrated an improvement in the performance of the test SEM. This and the results of the theoretical assessment gave support for the installation of the nanotips as the next step and pointed to potentially even better performance. Images taken with experimental nanotips showed a minimum two-fold improvement in resolution performance than the specification of the test SEM. The stability of the nanotip electron gun was excellent; the tip stayed useful

  20. [Microscopic observation on mycorrhiza of rare herb Dysosma versipellis].

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Ming; Yu, Li-Ying; Zhou, Ya-Qin; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Wei, Ying

    2013-12-01

    Endophytic fungi played an important role in the growth of its host plant. To investigate the mycorrhizal characteristics and the distribution of fungi in the root, an endangered wild plant-Dysosma versipellis was collected and observed by electron microscope. The results showed that the host was closely associated with endophytic fungi. The fungi were mainly distributed in the epidermis and cortex. The aseptate and septate fungi with swollen hyphae were observed in some cell of the cortex. The result provides a reference for the study of mycorrhizal structure of Dysosma genus and the interaction between the fungi and its host.

  1. Direct electron density modulation of surface plasmons with a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yuika; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) were modulated by direct electron injection using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The predictions of electromagnetic theory for LSPR on charged metal nanoparticles were experimentally verified using a novel microscopic system. Extinction spectra were obtained for gold nanostructures that were under intense electron irradiation using an SEM system equipped with an optical microscope. High-frequency shifts of LSPR were observed for a single gold nanosphere, nanodimer, and nanorod, and the amount of the shifts was explained with respect to their symmetry.

  2. Circular dichroism in the electron microscope: Progress and applications (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Schattschneider, P.; Loeffler, S.; Ennen, I.; Stoeger-Pollach, M.; Verbeeck, J.

    2010-05-15

    According to theory, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in a synchrotron is equivalent to energy loss magnetic chiral dichroism (EMCD) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). After a synopsis of the development of EMCD, the theoretical background is reviewed and recent results are presented, focusing on the study of magnetic nanoparticles for ferrofluids and Heusler alloys for spintronic devices. Simulated maps of the dichroic strength as a function of atom position in the crystal allow evaluating the influence of specimen thickness and sample tilt on the experimental EMCD signal. Finally, the possibility of direct observation of chiral electronic transitions with atomic resolution in a TEM is discussed.

  3. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  4. A sub-cm micromachined electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinerman, A. D.; Crewe, D. A.; Perng, D. C.; Shoaf, S. E.; Crewe, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach for fabricating macroscopic (approximately 10x10x10 mm(exp 3)) structures with micron accuracy has been developed. This approach combines the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies. A (100) silicon wafer is anisotropically etched to create four orthogonal v-grooves and an aperture on each 10x12 mm die. Precision 308 micron optical fibers are sandwiched between the die to align the v-grooves. The fiber is then anodically bonded to the die above and below it. This procedure is repeated to create thick structures and a stack of 5 or 6 die will be used to create a miniature scanning electron microscope (MSEM). Two die in the structure will have a segmented electrode to deflect the beam and correct for astigmatism. The entire structure is UHV compatible. The performance of an SEM improves as its length is reduced and a sub-cm 2 keV MSEM with a field emission source should have approximately 1 nm resolution. A low voltage high resolution MSEM would be useful for the examination of biological specimens and semiconductors with a minimum of damage. The first MSEM will be tested with existing 6 micron thermionic sources. In the future a micromachined field emission source will be used. The stacking technology presented in this paper can produce an array of MSEMs 1 to 30 mm in length with a 1 mm or larger period. A key question being addressed by this research is the optimum size for a low voltage MSEM which will be determined by the required spatial resolution, field of view, and working distance.

  5. Quantitative phase-sensitive imaging in a transmission electron microscope

    PubMed

    Bajt; Barty; Nugent; McCartney; Wall; Paganin

    2000-05-01

    This paper presents a new technique for forming quantitative phase and amplitude electron images applicable to a conventional transmission electron microscope. With magnetised cobalt microstructures used as a test object, we use electron holography to obtain an independent measurement of the phase shift. After a suitable calibration of the microscope, we obtain quantitative agreement of the phase shift imposed on the 200 keV electrons passing through the sample.

  6. Dynamic-scanning-electron-microscope study of friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1974-01-01

    A friction and wear apparatus was built into a real time scanning electron microscope (SEM). The apparatus and SEM comprise a system which provides the capability of performing dynamic friction and wear experiments in situ. When the system is used in conjunction with dispersive X-ray analysis, a wide range of information on the wearing process can be obtained. The type of wear and variation with speed, load, and time can be investigated. The source, size, and distribution of wear particles can be determined and metallic transferal observed. Some typical results obtained with aluminum, copper, and iron specimens are given.

  7. Simulation of magnetic circular dichroism in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Stefano; Schattschneider, Peter; Rusz, Jan; Verbeeck, Johan; Leifer, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    As electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe the same transitions from core-shell states to unoccupied states above the Fermi energy, it should always be possible to apply the two techniques to the same physical phenomena, such as magnetic dichroism, and obtain the same information. Indeed, the similarity in the expression of the electron and x-ray cross-sections had been already exploited to prove the equivalence of x-ray magnetic linear dichroism and anisotropy in EELS, by noting that the polarization vector of a photon plays the same role as the momentum transfer in electron scattering. Recently, the same was proven true for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) by establishing a new TEM technique called EMCD (electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism) (Schattschneider P et al 2006 Nature 441 486-8), which makes use of special electron scattering conditions to force the absorption of a circularly polarized virtual photon. The intrinsic advantage of EMCD over XMCD is the high spatial resolution of electron microscopes, which are readily available. Among the particular obstacles in EMCD that do not exist for synchrotron radiation, is the notoriously low signal and the very particular scattering conditions necessary to observe a chiral dichroic signal. In spite of that, impressive progress has been made in recent years. The signal strength could be considerably increased, and some innovations such as using a convergent beam have been introduced. EMCD has evolved into several techniques, which make full use of the versatility of the TEM and energy filtering, spectroscopy or STEM conditions (Rubino S 2007 Magnetic circular dichroism in the transmission electron microscope PhD Thesis Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria).

  8. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC STUDIES OF RENAL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Harrison

    1960-01-01

    The nephrotic syndrome, glomerulonephritis, disseminated lupus erythematosus and the Fanconi syndrome show characteristic changes with electron microscopy. Experimental studies of animals were carried out to determine the significance of such changes by observing reactions that occur under carefully controlled conditions. A lesion with collagen deposition that was found in the centrolobular region of glomeruli sheds new light on the function of this region. This evidence must be considered in developing an understanding of how the production of urine is controlled. Fluid-filled compartments and various bodies associated with the ultrastructure of tubule cells can be produced under conditions which suggest that these structures play a role in tubular resorption. ImagesFigure 1, 2.Figure 3.Figure 4, 5.Figure 6, 7.Figure 8, 9.Figure 10.Figure 11, 12.Figure 13, 14.Figure 15, 16.Figure 17. PMID:13759386

  9. How to operate a cryo-electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin

    2010-01-01

    We describe the basic principles for imaging frozen-hydrated specimens in a transmission electron microscope and provide a step-by-step guide to a new user, from starting up and aligning the microscope, to loading a cryo-grid into the specimen holder and inserting the holder into the microscope, to setting up the low dose mode for imaging, and eventually to shutting down the microscope. The procedure is based on a JEOL TEM; however, it is applicable to microscopes from other manufacturers with small modifications. We also give several tips on how to minimize specimen exposure before taking pictures; how to minimize the specimen drift and charging during exposure; how to estimate the thickness of the vitreous ice, and how to quickly estimate the electron exposure dose. Despite recent advances in instrumentation, the microscopist's patience and attention to detail may still be the key to acquiring a high quality cryo-electron micrograph. PMID:20887860

  10. The Scanning Electron Microscope and the Archaeologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponting, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Images from scanning electron microscopy are now quite common and they can be of great value in archaeology. Techniques such as secondary electron imaging, backscattered electron imaging and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis can reveal information such as the presence of weevils in grain in Roman Britain, the composition of Roman coins and the…

  11. Ultra low-K shrinkage behavior when under electron beam in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lorut, F.; Imbert, G.; Roggero, A.

    2013-08-28

    In this paper, we investigate the tendency of porous low-K dielectrics (also named Ultra Low-K, ULK) behavior to shrink when exposed to the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. Various experimental electron beam conditions have been used for irradiating ULK thin films, and the resulting shrinkage has been measured through use of an atomic force microscope tool. We report the shrinkage to be a fast, cumulative, and dose dependent effect. Correlation of the shrinkage with incident electron beam energy loss has also been evidenced. The chemical modification of the ULK films within the interaction volume has been demonstrated, with a densification of the layer and a loss of carbon and hydrogen elements being observed.

  12. Pathological features of cantharidin-induced toxic cardiomyopathy: lack of correlation between electron-microscopic and histopathologic myocardial damage.

    PubMed

    Friesen, J M; Ferris, J A; Rabkin, S S; Fung, H Y

    1979-01-01

    Electron-microscopic evidence of the cardiotoxic effects of cantharidin administered to rabbits was observed. No correlation was found between the electron-microscopic changes and the light-microscopic features as assessed by special histological stains. The reasons for this are discussed.

  13. Microcircuit testing and fabrication, using scanning electron microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are used to determine both user-induced damages and manufacturing defects subtle enough to be missed by conventional light microscopy. Method offers greater depth of field and increased working distances.

  14. Simultaneous specimen and stage cleaning device for analytical electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    1996-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are provided for cleaning both a specimen stage, a specimen and an interior of an analytical electron microscope (AEM). The apparatus for cleaning a specimen stage and specimen comprising a plasma chamber for containing a gas plasma and an air lock coupled to the plasma chamber for permitting passage of the specimen stage and specimen into the plasma chamber and maintaining an airtight chamber. The specimen stage and specimen are subjected to a reactive plasma gas that is either DC or RF excited. The apparatus can be mounted on the analytical electron microscope (AEM) for cleaning the interior of the microscope.

  15. Observation of surfaces by reflection electron holography.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, N

    1992-02-15

    Reflection electron holography is described as a method to observe sub-A surface morphology. Phase shift of a Bragg-reflected electron wave was measured by means of holographic interferometry using an electron microscope equipped with a field emission electron gun and an electron biprism. A short wavelength of high energy electrons is the essential key to the high vertical sensitivity of this method, since geometrical path differences produced by the surface topography are measured in units of wavelengths in interferometrical measuring. Phase shift at a monoatomic step and the displacement field around a dislocation emerging on the surface were observed.

  16. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  17. In situ formation of bismuth nanoparticles through electron-beam irradiation in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda-Guzman, S.; Elizondo-Villarreal, N.; Ferrer, D.; Torres-Castro, A.; Gao, X.; Zhou, J. P.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, bismuth nanoparticles were synthesized when a precursor, sodium bismuthate, was exposed to an electron beam at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The irradiation effects were investigated in situ using selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After the electron irradiation, bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 6 nm were observed. The average particle size increased with the irradiation time. The electron-induced reduction is attributed to the desorption of oxygen ions. This method offers a one-step route to synthesize bismuth nanoparticles using electron irradiation, and the particle size can be controlled by the irradiation time.

  18. Description and scanning electron microscopic observation of a new species of the genus Polycopetta (Crustacea, Ostracoda, Cladocopina) from an interstitial habitat in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hayato; Tsukagoshi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Polycopetta Chavtur, 1981, Polycopetta quadrispinata sp. n. is described from the interstitial environment of Mihomasaki Beach in Japan. These observations showed some morphological peculiarities of Polycopetta quadrispinata sp. n. compared with its congeners; Polycopetta monneroni Chavtur, 1979, Polycopetta curva Chavtur, 1979, Polycopetta bransfieldensis (Hartmann, 1987), and Polycopetta pax Kornicker and Harrison-Nelson, 2005. Three characteristics are described for the first time: (1) a seta with serrated tip on the male antennula, (2) the endopodite of the fifth limb consisting of two podomeres, (3) the long spermatozoa in the male posterior body. More detailed observations of the type species are needed in order to update the generic diagnosis. PMID:23794873

  19. Electron Microscope Studies of Cadmium Mercury Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyster, Martin

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Epitaxial layers of Cd_{x }Hg_{(1-x)}Te grown on various substrates by liquid phase epitaxy and metallo-organic vapour phase epitaxy have been studied using transmission and scanning electron microscopy, in a variety of contrast modes. Wavelength-dispersive X-ray microanalysis has been used to study interfaces in epitaxial specimens, and the results are used to derive diffusion coefficients for a range of values of x in Cd_ {x}Hg_{(1-x)} Te. Extensive use has been made of back-scattered electron contrast in the SEM as a means of compositional mapping, and defect structures are imaged by this technique. The back-scattered electron contrast at interfaces has been studied in detail and is modelled using the Monte Carlo approach. The modelling is combined with calculations and practical measurements of the probe size in the SEM instrument used in the work, to arrive at a quantitative explanation of this contrast. The SEM and scintillator detector used allow a spatial resolution of better than 1000A, but it is shown that improvements in this are possible with present technology. Scanning infra-red microscopy (SIRM) and high -resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) have been applied to the study of CdTe. SIRM images reveal information about Te precipitation, including particle size and density. HREM images provide results concerning dislocation structures in CdTe. Selected-area diffraction contrast TEM results are presented which illustrate the microstructure of LPE and MOVPE material; and TEM foil preparation techniques are discussed, including the choice of ion species for milling cross-sectional specimens. In view of the results obtained, suggestions are made for future work in this field.

  20. Integration of a high-NA light microscope in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Zonnevylle, A C; Van Tol, R F C; Liv, N; Narvaez, A C; Effting, A P J; Kruit, P; Hoogenboom, J P

    2013-10-01

    We present an integrated light-electron microscope in which an inverted high-NA objective lens is positioned inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM objective lens and the light objective lens have a common axis and focal plane, allowing high-resolution optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy on the same area of a sample simultaneously. Components for light illumination and detection can be mounted outside the vacuum, enabling flexibility in the construction of the light microscope. The light objective lens can be positioned underneath the SEM objective lens during operation for sub-10 μm alignment of the fields of view of the light and electron microscopes. We demonstrate in situ epifluorescence microscopy in the SEM with a numerical aperture of 1.4 using vacuum-compatible immersion oil. For a 40-nm-diameter fluorescent polymer nanoparticle, an intensity profile with a FWHM of 380 nm is measured whereas the SEM performance is uncompromised. The integrated instrument may offer new possibilities for correlative light and electron microscopy in the life sciences as well as in physics and chemistry.

  1. Influence of mechanical noise inside a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudenzi de Faria, Marcelo; Haddab, Yassine Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2015-04-15

    The scanning electron microscope is becoming a popular tool to perform tasks that require positioning, manipulation, characterization, and assembly of micro-components. However, some of these applications require a higher level of performance with respect to dynamics and precision of positioning. One limiting factor is the presence of unidentified noises and disturbances. This work aims to study the influence of mechanical disturbances generated by the environment and by the microscope, identifying how these can affect elements in the vacuum chamber. To achieve this objective, a dedicated setup, including a high-resolution vibrometer, was built inside the microscope. This work led to the identification and quantification of main disturbances and noise sources acting on a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, the effects of external acoustic excitations were analysed. Potential applications of these results include noise compensation and real-time control for high accuracy tasks.

  2. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  3. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  4. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  5. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging. PMID:27403922

  6. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging.

  7. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins' functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000-160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging. PMID:27403922

  8. Myofibroblasts in fibromatoses. An electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, H; Tsuneyoshi, M; Enjoji, M

    1985-05-01

    Fifteen cases of fibromatoses were analyzed by electron microscopy, the objective being to compare the incidence and frequency of myofibroblasts in each category. Myofibroblasts were identified in all 15 cases and a considerably large number of these cells appeared in palmar fibromatosis, plantar fibromatosis, and nodular fasciitis. In keloid and cicatricial fibromatosis, however, only a small number of these cells were evident. In seven cases of extra-abdominal desmoid fibromatosis, the frequency of myofibroblasts in the component cells ranged from 10% to 64%, with a mean of 30%. The frequency was high in hypercellular lesions and low in hypocellular lesions, assuming that it would be roughly in parallel to the cellularity of the lesion in extra-abdominal desmoid fibromatosis and in other fibromatoses as well. There appeared to be no particular correlation between the number of myofibroblasts and recurrence of the lesion.

  9. Electron microscope study of Sarcocystis sp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeve, V.H.; Price, D.L.; Herman, C.M.

    1966-01-01

    Sarcocystis sp. obtained from wild populations of grackles, Quiscalus quiscula (Linn.), were examined to clarify the effect of the parasite on the host. Electron micrographs are presented to show areas of muscle destruction adjacent to the parasite which appear to be mechanically produced by the parasite. The microtubules within the villus-like projections of the cyst suggest that their possible function is absorptive and/or conductive with regard to the production of a toxin or the conveyance of nutritive material to the developing cells. The proposed function of submembranous filaments and their relation to the conoid is discussed. Similarities in the ultrastructure to Toxoplasma and other protozoa tend to negate the relegation of Sarcocystis to the fungi and further emphasize its protozoan nature.

  10. Murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions: scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, R M; Hinsdill, R D; Sandok, P L; Horowitz, S D

    1978-01-01

    Light and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions involving the initial contact of peritoneal, spleen, or thymus lymphocytes with peritoneal macrophage processes or microprocesses followed by clustering of lymphocytes over the central nuclear area of the macrophages. Lymphocyte-lymphocyte clustering was not observed in the absence of macrophages. Attachment and subsequent clustering appeared not to require the presence of serum or antigen; the attachment of allogeneic or xenogeneic lymphocytes was comparable to that seen in the syngeneic system, but central clustering of these lymphocytes failed to occur. No attachment or clustering was observed when thymic lymphocytes were cultured with thymus derived fibroblasts rather than with peritoneal macrophages. Lymphocyte attachment to immune, antigen-activated, syngeneic macrophages occurred more rapidly than that to normal unstimulated syngeneic macrophages; however, lymphocytes attached to the "activated" macrophages appeared to be killed by a nonphagocytic mechanism. A similar increase in the rate of lymphocyte attachment to macrophages occurred in the presence of migration inhibitory factor. Subsequent lymphocyte clustering on macrophages was observed in the migration inhibitory factor-stimulated cultures. In addition, lymphocyte-macrophage interactions similar to those in vitro were observed to occur in vivo on intraperitoneally implanted cover slips. Images PMID:101458

  11. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  12. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.; Syed Asif, S. A.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-06-28

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were appliedmore » at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 106 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10–12 m·cycle–1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.« less

  13. High Cycle Fatigue in the Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Bufford, Daniel C; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M; Syed Asif, S A; Boyce, Brad L; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-08-10

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this study, the tension-tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were applied at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 10(6) cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ∼10(-12) m·cycle(-1). This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. These observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu. PMID:27351706

  14. Observation of biological samples using a scanning microwave microscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Jewook; Hyun, S; Kim, A; Kim, T; Char, K

    2005-01-01

    We present the application of a scanning microwave microscope technique to biological samples. Since dielectric properties of most biological samples originate mainly from the water they contain, we were able to obtain microscope images of biological samples by our scanning microwave microscope technique. As a model system, we have measured the electrical properties of water in the microwave region. The high dielectric constant and the large loss tangent of water were verified. Furthermore, we have measured the properties of water with differing amounts of sodium chloride concentration ranging from de-ionized water to the saturated solution. We have observed a significant change in the resonant frequency and Q value of the resonator as a function of sodium chloride concentration. The concentration dependence of the signals shows that our scanning microwave microscope technique can be useful for investigating the local electric behavior of biological samples with a simple model of ionic conduction.

  15. Direct current scanning field emission microscope integrated with existing scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Reece, Charles E.; Sundelin, Ronald M.

    2002-09-01

    Electron field emission (FE) from broad-area metal surfaces is known to occur at much lower electric field than predicted by Fowler-Nordheim law. Although micron or submicron particles are often observed at such enhanced field emission (EFE) sites, the strength and number of emitting sites and the causes of EFE strongly depend on surface preparation and handling, and the physical mechanism of EFE remains unknown. To systematically investigate the sources of this emission, a dc scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) has been built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer for emitter characterization. In the SFEM chamber of ultrahigh vacuum (approx10-9 Torr), a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern (2.5 mum step resolution) under a high voltage anode microtip for field emission detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum by a hermetic retractable linear transporter to the SEM chamber for individual emitter site characterization. Artificial marks on the sample surface serve as references to convert x, y coordinates of emitters in the SFEM chamber to corresponding positions in the SEM chamber with a common accuracy of plus-or-minus100-200 mum in x and y. Samples designed to self-align in sample holders are used in each chamber, allowing them to retain position registration after non-in situ processing to track interesting features. No components are installed inside the SEM except the sample holder, which does not affect the routine operation of the SEM. The apparatus is a system of low cost and maintenance and significant operational flexibility. Field emission sources from planar niobium--the material used in high-field rf superconducting cavities for particle accelerator--have been studied after different surface preparations, and significantly reduced field emitter density has been achieved by refining the preparation process based on scan

  16. Scanning electron microscope facility for examination of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.R.; Braski, D.N.

    1985-02-01

    An AMRAY model 1200B scanning electron microscope was modified to permit remote examination of radioactive specimens. Features of the modification include pneumatic vibration isolation of the column, motorized stage controls, improvements for monitoring vacuum, and a system for changing filaments without entering the hot cell.

  17. [A view of tropical biology through the electron microscope].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Chavarría, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    The first electron microscope in Costa Rica was a donation from the government of Japan through its International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 1974. This donation made possible the consolidation of what was to become the University of Costa Rica's Electron Microscope Unit (UME). Within three years the first scientific papers were published, dealing with ultrastructural aspects of "Corn's rayado fino virus" and rotavirus, viral agent of human diarrhea. Subsequent papers out of the UME were published for the most part in the Journal of Tropical Biology, totaling at least 50 in that journal alone by the year 2000. With the recent acquisition of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer to coupled in transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope to X ray analysis, the data acquisition of the UME has been greatly enhanced, making possible to analyze both structure and elemental chemical composition in a specimen. Other applications of this new technology include studies of environmental pollution with heavy metals, such as comparative analysis of residues on leaves from urban areas and those on leaves from primary forest. PMID:12947579

  18. [Microscope observation of the microbial distribution on the wall of different pipe material in water supply system].

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Hui; Cai, Yun-Long; Zhi, Xin-Hua; You, Jia-Yin

    2009-09-15

    Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and confocal laser scanning microscope were used to observe the microbial distribution and biofilm structure on the surface of stainless steel plugs and the wall of PPR pipe in the water distribution system. The results show that, it is not easy for microbial to attach on the surface of stainless steel plugs. Little bacteria was observed in a short period of time (less than 3 months). Bacteria can be easily observed in the sediment of the PPR pipe wall at the end of water supply system. Bacteria was tightly adhered to the surface of the PPR pipe wall. Combination of scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope is a practical way to observe the surface structure of discontinuous biofilm in the pipeline. The inner and three-dimensional structure of the pipe biofilm can be simultaneously observed by confocal laser scanning microscope.

  19. Examples of electrostatic electron optics: the Farrand and Elektros microscopes and electron mirrors.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, P W

    2012-08-01

    The role of Gertrude Rempfer in the design of the Farrand and Elektros microscopes is evoked. The study of electron mirror optics, aberration correction using mirrors and the development of microscopes employing electron mirrors are recapitulated, accompanied by a full bibliography, of earlier publications in particular.

  20. Crack Coalescence in Molded Gypsum and Carrara Marble: Part 2—Microscopic Observations and Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, L. N. Y.; Einstein, H. H.

    2009-06-01

    Experimental uniaxial compression loading tests were conducted on molded gypsum and Carrara marble prismatic specimens to study the cracking and coalescence processes between pre-existing artificial flaws. The study showed that material had an influence on the cracking and coalescence processes (see the companion paper in this issue). As reported in the companion paper, one of the pronounced features as observed in the high-speed video recordings was the development of macroscopic white patches prior to the development of observable cracks in marble, but not in gypsum. This paper (part 2) deals with the microscopic aspects of the study. Specifically, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) imaging techniques were used to study the microscopic development of white patches and their evolution into macroscopic tensile cracks and shear cracks in marble, and the microscopic initiation of hair-line tensile cracks and their evolution into macroscopic tensile cracks in gypsum. The microscopic imaging study in marble showed that the white patches were associated with extensive microcracking zones (process zones), while the extent of process zone development in gypsum was limited. The comparison of the macroscopic and microscopic results indicates that the different extent of microcracking zone development, related to the material textural properties, is a key factor leading to different macroscopic cracking behavior in gypsum and marble.

  1. Response function and optimum configuration of semiconductor backscattered-electron detectors for scanning electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, E. I.; Orlikovskiy, N. A.; Ivanova, E. S.

    2012-06-15

    A new highly efficient design for semiconductor detectors of intermediate-energy electrons (1-50 keV) for application in scanning electron microscopes is proposed. Calculations of the response function of advanced detectors and control experiments show that the efficiency of the developed devices increases on average twofold, which is a significant positive factor in the operation of modern electron microscopes in the mode of low currents and at low primary electron energies.

  2. Secondary electron imaging of monolayer materials inside a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cretu, Ovidiu Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2015-08-10

    A scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a backscattered and secondary electron detector is shown capable to image graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Secondary electron contrasts of the two lightest monolayer materials are clearly distinguished from the vacuum level. A signal difference between these two materials is attributed to electronic structure differences, which will influence the escape probabilities of the secondary electrons. Our results show that the secondary electron signal can be used to distinguish between the electronic structures of materials with atomic layer sensitivity, enhancing its applicability as a complementary signal in the analytical microscope.

  3. Interaction-Free Quantum Electron Microscope in Free-Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yujia; Kim, Chung-Soo; Hobbs, Richard; Manfrinato, Vitor; Celiker, Orhan; Kruit, Pieter; Berggren, Karl

    2015-03-01

    We propose the design and theoretical analysis of a quantum electron microscope (QEM), which utilizes interaction-free quantum measurement with electrons for nanoscale imaging. The QEM can be used to image electron-irradiation-sensitive materials, such as biological samples, with a high resolution and low radiation damage. Our QEM scheme is an electron interferometer with a storage resonator. The incoming electron beam is asymmetrically split into a strong reference beam and a weak sample beam, both of which are stored in the resonator. Only the weak sample beam transmits through the sample for multiple times. We propose to build the QEM with free-space electron optics. We develop a scattering matrix method to theoretically analyze the contrast mechanism, radiation damage, and measurement accuracy. We propose an electron-mirror-based storage resonator and we have performed electron optics simulation of electron trajectories within the resonator. We also report experimental implementation and characterization of the electron beam-splitter to be used in the QEM. Thin crystals fabricated with focused ion beam and nano-gratings fabricated with electron-beam lithography are two candidate beam-splitters, both of which are characterized by electron diffraction. This work is funded by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  4. Electron microscopic studies of mitosis in amebae. I. Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    ROTH, L E; OBETZ, S W; DANIELS, E W

    1960-09-01

    Individual organisms of Amoeba proteus have been fixed in buffered osmium tetroxide in either 0.9 per cent NaCl or 0.01 per cent CaCl(2), sectioned, and studied in the electron microscope in interphase and in several stages of mitosis. The helices typical of interphase nuclei do not coexist with condensed chromatin and thus either represent a DNA configuration unique to interphase or are not DNA at all. The membranes of the complex nuclear envelope are present in all stages observed but are discontinuous in metaphase. The inner, thick, honeycomb layer of the nuclear envelope disappears during prophase, reappearing after telophase when nuclear reconstruction is in progress. Nucleoli decrease in size and number during prophase and re-form during telophase in association with the chromatin network. In the early reconstruction nucleus, the nucleolar material forms into thin, sheet-like configurations which are closely associated with small amounts of chromatin and are closely applied to the inner, partially formed layer of the nuclear envelope. It is proposed that nucleolar material is implicated in the formation of the inner layer of the envelope and that there is a configuration of nucleolar material peculiar to this time. The plasmalemma is partially denuded of its fringe-like material during division.

  5. Computer measurement of particle sizes in electron microscope images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. L.; Thompson, W. B.; Varsi, G.; Gauldin, R.

    1976-01-01

    Computer image processing techniques have been applied to particle counting and sizing in electron microscope images. Distributions of particle sizes were computed for several images and compared to manually computed distributions. The results of these experiments indicate that automatic particle counting within a reasonable error and computer processing time is feasible. The significance of the results is that the tedious task of manually counting a large number of particles can be eliminated while still providing the scientist with accurate results.

  6. Electron microscopic study of an infected Foley catheter.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J C; Gristina, A G; Costerton, J W

    1985-01-01

    A scanning and transmission electron microscopic study was made of material from the surface of a Foley catheter removed from an 87-year-old woman with antibiotic-resistant bacteriuria. A thick, adherent bacterial biofilm was found. The sessile adherent bacteria were surrounded by an extensive exopolysaccharide glycocalyx that appears to be fundamental in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and their resistance to systemic antibiotic therapy.

  7. Electron microscope evidence of virus infection in cultured marine fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiu-Qin; Zhang, Jin-Xing; Qu, Ling-Yun

    2000-09-01

    Electron microscope investigation on the red sea bream ( Pagrosomus major), bastard halibut ( Paralichthys olivaceus) and stone flounder ( Kareius bicoloratus) in North China revealed virus infection in the bodies of the dead and diseased fish. These viruses included the lymphocystis disease virus (LDV), parvovirus, globular virus, and a kind of baculavirus which was not discovered and reported before and is now tentatively named baculavirus of stone flounder ( Kareius bicoloratus).

  8. Applications of the Analytical Electron Microscope to Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the analytical electron microscope (AEM) as allowed investigators to obtain chemical and structural information from less than 50 nanometer diameter regions in thin samples of materials and to explore problems where reactions occur at boundaries and interfaces or within small particles or phases in bulk samples. Examples of the application of the AEM to materials science problems are presented in this paper and demonstrate the usefulness and the future potential of this instrument.

  9. Achondrogenesis type I: light and electron-microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Molz, G; Spycher, M A

    1980-06-01

    The light- and electron-microscopic structure of articular and costal cartilage in a case of achondrogenesis type I has been described. The most characteristic ultrastructural change in the chondrocytes was conspicuous dilatation of the rough endoplasmatic reticulum (RER) which contained amorphous electronopaque material. This change in the RER was accompanied by marked hypertrophy of the Golgi apparatus; the matrix was basically unchanged. PMID:6250850

  10. Atomic force microscope observations of otoconia in the newt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallworth, R.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Campbell, J. B.; Steyger, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    Calcitic and aragonitic otoconia from the Japanese red-bellied newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, were examined using an atomic force microscope. The surface structure of both otoconial polymorphs consisted of arrays of elements approximately 50 nm in diameter. Elements were generally round and were separated by shallow depressions of no more than 20 nm. The elements are suggested to be single crystals of calcium carbonate. The relationship of these observations to theories of otoconial genesis is discussed.

  11. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. Electron microscopic and immunologic studies.

    PubMed

    Guccion, J G; Rohatgi, P K; Saini, N

    1984-04-01

    We present a case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG). On light microscopy, the pulmonary nodular lesions consisted of extracellular, eosinophilic hyaline lamellae. Histochemical stains of the hyaline lamellae for amyloid were focally positive and the diagnosis of amyloidosis was seriously considered; however, on electron microscopic examination, the hyaline lamellae consisted of electrondense, compact, amorphous material quite unlike fibrillar amyloid. Although circulating immune complexes containing IgA were detected in our patient, immunoperoxidase stains did not reveal immunoglobulins in the hyaline lamellae. This case illustrates the value of electron microscopy in differentiating PHG from amyloidosis and supports the hypothesis that PHG represents an exaggerated immune response. PMID:6200274

  12. STUDIES ON NUCLEI USING CORRELATED CYTOCHEMICAL, LIGHT, AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPE TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Montrose J.

    1956-01-01

    In this paper, a procedure for correlating electron microscope and light microscope cytochemical studies using immediately adjacent serial thin and thick sections has been described and discussed. This technique, combined with the Feulgen reaction for DNA, has been of particular value in framing and answering both general and specific questions about the nucleus. The results may be summarized as follows:— Apparent nuclear homogeneity in the electron microscope is not due to loss of DNA as evidenced by positive Feulgen reactions in such nuclei. Arrangement of Feulgen-positive material in chromosomes, heterochromatin, perinuclear and perinucleolar chromatin, etc., is similar to that customarily observed in the light microscope but this is not necessarily reflected in a cursory survey of the electron image. Careful comparison of light and electron images shows that fine differences in structure are associated with chromatin localization. Primary spermatocyte prophase chromosomes of crayfish have been positively identified by their Feulgen-positive nature. Core-like axial structures in such chromosomes have been observed (9) and are described further. A remarkable feature of spermiogenesis in the crayfish is an elaboration of the nuclear envelope of the spermatid accompanying the formation of what becomes a mass of convoluted membranes in the sperm. In the spermatid, perinuclear chromatin follows outpocketings of the nuclear envelope into the cytoplasm. In the early sperm, on the other hand, although the nuclear envelope is continuous with the system of convoluted membranes, the chromatin is distinct from it and is retained in the nucleus proper by some mechanism independent of the nuclear envelope. None of the above observations was apparent from the electron microscope images alone; they were possible only by virtue of the correlated cytochemical and electron microscope study of adjacent sections. The successful use of other cytochemical tests, such as the PAS

  13. A new clustering algorithm for scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr; Duraisamy, Prakash; Karim, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope that produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the sample atoms, producing various signals that are collected by detectors. The gathered signals contain information about the sample's surface topography and composition. The electron beam is generally scanned in a raster scan pattern, and the beam's position is combined with the detected signal to produce an image. The most common configuration for an SEM produces a single value per pixel, with the results usually rendered as grayscale images. The captured images may be produced with insufficient brightness, anomalous contrast, jagged edges, and poor quality due to low signal-to-noise ratio, grained topography and poor surface details. The segmentation of the SEM images is a tackling problems in the presence of the previously mentioned distortions. In this paper, we are stressing on the clustering of these type of images. In that sense, we evaluate the performance of the well-known unsupervised clustering and classification techniques such as connectivity based clustering (hierarchical clustering), centroid-based clustering, distribution-based clustering and density-based clustering. Furthermore, we propose a new spatial fuzzy clustering technique that works efficiently on this type of images and compare its results against these regular techniques in terms of clustering validation metrics.

  14. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  15. STEM electron tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, M.; Signoroni, A.; Sanzogni, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Christian, M.; Masini, L.; Morandi, V.

    2015-10-01

    The scanning-transmission imaging mode in the SEM allows for the threedimensional tomographic reconstruction of a specimen, starting from a set of projection images. Compressed sensing was used to solve the undetermined problem of structure reconstruction and was proven capable of overcoming the limitations arising from the sampling scheme. Reconstructions of cobalt particles within a carbon nanotube and collagen fibrils in a dermal tissue are presented, demonstrating the potential of this technique in the set of 3-D electron microscopy methods for both physical and biological science.

  16. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Andrew Murphy

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids. Chapter 2 details the unique specimen preparation techniques employed to meet the geometrical constraints of the in situ experiments. These techniques include bulk silicon micromachining and the use of a focused ion beam. In section 2.4 a method of voltage-controlled mechanical testing is derived theoretically and proven experimentally. This method enables the quantification of the mechanical behavior during in situ nanoindentation experiments. Three classes of material systems were studied with this new technique: (1) bulk single crystal, (2) a soft thin film on a harder substrate and (3) a hard thin film on a softer substrate. Section 3.2 provides the first direct evidence of dislocation nucleation in single crystal silicon at room temperature. In contrast to the observation of phase transformations during conventional indentation experiments, the unique geometry employed for the in situ experiments resulted in dislocation plasticity. In section 3.3 results from in situ nanoindentation of Al films on Si substrates are presented. These results include the correlation of the microstructural deformation behavior with load vs. displacement data. It is shown that a sharp change in the force-displacement response at the elastic-to-plastic transition signifies the nucleation of dislocations. Additionally, the softening of sub-micron grains with size is observed. Section 3.4 discussed the influence of the substrate on the indentation response of two thin film/substrate systems where the films were harder than the substrate. Amorphous diamond on Si and epitaxial TiN on MgO (001) systems were studied. It was found that the deformation in the harder films was controlled by the deformation in

  17. An innovative coating technique for light and electron microscopic autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Kornhauser, G V; Krum, J M; Rosenstein, J M

    1992-06-01

    We describe a modified nuclear emulsion coating technique for both electron and light microscopic autoradiography. We propose that by reversing the application of formvar film so that it adheres to and covers thin sections placed on grids, we have developed a technically accessible methodology that produces optimal conditions for the tracing of specific nuclear activity. A smooth, continuous base is formed over the sections on which a monolayer of evenly packed silver halide crystals can be applied by dip-coating. The same principle is applied to pre-stained 1-micron plastic sections of glass slides. We suggest that the application of formvar film over thin sections does not impede or interfere with the exposure of the emulsion by the labeled tissue. On the contrary, it virtually eliminates contamination and background radiation, enhancing the specificity and quality of resolution at even low magnifications. This technical modification, which facilitates the application of the emulsion, could render electron microscopic autoradiography a routine laboratory procedure, allowing for easily reproducible results and quantitative evaluation. At the light microscopic level, this technique prevents chemical fogging caused by certain stains, and thus allows routine pre-staining before coating with emulsion.

  18. Reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy and imaging for surface studies in transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z L; Bentley, J

    1992-02-15

    A review is given on the techniques and applications of high-energy reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) and reflection electron microscopy (REM) for surface studies in scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) and conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM). A diffraction method is introduced to identify a surface orientation in the geometry of REM. The surface dielectric response theory is presented and applied for studying alpha-alumina surfaces. Domains of the alpha-alumina (012) surface initially terminated with oxygen can be reduced by an intense electron beam to produce Al metal; the resistance to beam damage of surface domains initially terminated with Al+3 ions is attributed to the screening effect of adsorbed oxygen. Surface energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS), and microanalysis using REELS are illustrated based on the studies of TiO2 and MgO. Effects of surface resonances (or channeling) on the REELS signal-to-background ratio are described. The REELS detection of a monolayer of oxygen adsorption on diamond (111) surfaces is reported. It is shown that phase contrast REM image content can be significantly increased with the use of a field emission gun (FEG). Phase contrast effects close to the core of a screw dislocation are discussed and the associated Fresnel fringes around a surface step are observed. Finally, an in situ REM experiment is described for studying atomic desorption and diffusion processes on alpha-alumina surfaces at temperatures of 1,300-1,400 degrees C.

  19. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  20. A METHOD FOR INTRACELLULAR AUTORADIOGRAPHY IN THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPE.

    PubMed

    Silk, M H; Hawtrey, A O; Spence, I M; Gear, J H

    1961-08-01

    A technic is described for high resolution intracellular autoradiography in the electron microscope. Cultures of LLC-MK(2) monkey kidney cells were incubated for 72 hours in a medium containing 0.4 microcurie per ml of thymidine-H(3). After labeling, the cells were fixed with osmium tetroxide and embedded in methacrylate. Ultrathin sections of the labeled tissue were taken up on Formvar-coated and carbon-stabilized electron microscope grids. A 150 to 450 A layer of silver metal was then evaporated onto the tissue. The coated grids were exposed to bromine vapor for 1.5 to 2 minutes under red light, allowed to dry for 1 minute, and then covered with a thin film of 1 per cent aqueous gelatin applied by means of a fine wire loop lowered over the grid supported on a glass peg. For autoradiographic exposure, the grids were stored 50 days in a light-proof container at 4 degrees C with calcium chloride desiccant. Development was carried out for 5 minutes at 20 degrees C in Promicrol (May and Baker, England) diluted 1:1 with water, followed by a 1 minute water wash and fixation for 2.5 minutes in 15 per cent aqueous sodium thiosulphate. After removal of the gelatin by immersion for 16 hours in water at 37 degrees C, the autoradiograms were dried and examined in the electron microscope. Ultrastructural detail was fairly well defined and the cytoplasm of each labeled cell was covered with an electron opaque deposit of silver, suggesting that a polynucleotide containing thymidine may be synthesized in the cytoplasm. The matter is discussed.

  1. Comparison of Electron Imaging Modes for Dimensional Measurements in the Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Postek, Michael T; Vladár, András E; Villarrubia, John S; Muto, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    Dimensional measurements from secondary electron (SE) images were compared with those from backscattered electron (BSE) and low-loss electron (LLE) images. With the commonly used 50% threshold criterion, the lines consistently appeared larger in the SE images. As the images were acquired simultaneously by an instrument with the capability to operate detectors for both signals at the same time, the differences cannot be explained by the assumption that contamination or drift between images affected the SE, BSE, or LLE images differently. Simulations with JMONSEL, an electron microscope simulator, indicate that the nanometer-scale differences observed on this sample can be explained by the different convolution effects of a beam with finite size on signals with different symmetry (the SE signal's characteristic peak versus the BSE or LLE signal's characteristic step). This effect is too small to explain the >100 nm discrepancies that were observed in earlier work on different samples. Additional modeling indicates that those discrepancies can be explained by the much larger sidewall angles of the earlier samples, coupled with the different response of SE versus BSE/LLE profiles to such wall angles. PMID:27452278

  2. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be ‘safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope. PMID:26961578

  3. In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D.

    2012-07-15

    Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

  4. Voyager 2 Observes Energetic Electrons

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Voyager 2 observations of energetic electrons. Voyager 2 detected a dramatic drop of the flux of electrons as it left the sector region. The intense flux came back as soon ...

  5. Integrated windows-based control system for an electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shengyang; Kapp, Oscar H.

    1994-12-01

    A Windows application has been developed for management and operation of beam instruments such as electron or ion microscopes. It provides a facility that allows an operator to manage a complicated instrument with minimal effort, primarily under mouse control. The hardware control components used on similar instruments (e.g., the scanning transmission electron microscopes in our lab), such as toggles, buttons, and potentiometers for adjustments on various scales, are all replaced by the controls of the Windows application and are addressable on a single screen. The new controls in this program (via adjustable software settings) offer speed of response and smooth operation providing tailored control of various instrument parameters. Along with the controls offering single parameter adjustment, a two-dimensional control was developed that allows two parameters to be coupled and addressed simultaneously. This capability provides convenience for such tasks as ``finding the beam'' and directing it to a location of interest on the specimen. Using an icon-based display, this Windows application provides better integrated and more robust information for monitoring instrument status than the indicators and meters of the traditional instrument controls. As a Windows application, this program is naturally able to share the resources of the Windows system and is thus able to link to many other applications such as our image acquisition and processing programs. Computer control provides automatic protection and instant diagnostics for the experimental instrument. This Windows application is fully functional and is in daily use to control a new type of electron microscope developed in our lab.

  6. A transmission electron microscopical study of dysplastic naevi.

    PubMed

    Beitner, H; Nakatani, T; Hedblad, M A

    1990-01-01

    In this study those features of naevi that fulfil the clinical and light microscopical criteria of dysplastic naevi have been further examined with transmission electron microscopy. The results have been compared with the structure of normal control skin and compound naevi. In dysplastic naevi most melanosomes were abnormal, with spherical melansomes, an incomplete inner structure and uneven melanin deposit, cigar-shaped melanosomes and macromelanosomes. The intraepidermal border between the nests of dysplastic naevi were uneven and the dysplastic melanocytes extended their cell bodies among surrounding keratinocytes with a tendency to invade the epidermis in an upward direction. These findings will serve as additional criteria for dysplastic naevi.

  7. Sizing melamine-formaldehyde microspheres using an electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garee, M.; Sheridan, T. E.

    2006-03-01

    Melamine-formaldehyde (MF) microspheres are widely used in complex plasma experiments because they are nearly monodisperse and are available in a wide variety of diameters. The manufacturer of these particles characterizes their mean diameter and standard deviation using a Coulter multisizer. However, measurements in complex plasma experiments, particularly of gas drag forces, indicate that the particles are smaller than their stated diameter. We have measured particle sizes using a scanning electron microscope and will compare these to the nominal diameter of 9.62±0.09 μm.

  8. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, K. S. Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S.

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  9. Microcircuit failure analysis using the SEM. [Scanning Electron Microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope adds a new dimension to the knowledge that can be obtained from a failed microcircuit. When used with conventional techniques, SEM assists and clarifies the analysis, but it does not replace light microscopy. The most advantageous features for microcircuit analysis are long working distances and great depth of field. Manufacturer related failure modes of microcircuits are metallization defects, poor bonding, surface and particle contamination, and design and fabrication faults. User related failure modes are caused by abuse, such as overstress. The Physics of Failure Procedure followed by the Astrionics Laboratory in failure analysis is described, which is designed to obtain maximum information available from each step.

  10. Application of an ultrahigh-resolution scanning electron microscope (UHS-T1) to biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Mitsushima, A; Kashima, Y; Nakadera, T; Osatake, H

    1989-06-01

    In 1985 we developed an ultrahigh-resolution scanning electron microscope with a resolution of 0.5 nm. It is equipped with a field emission gun and an objective lens with a very short focal length. In this study we report a survey of some different preparation techniques and biological specimens using the new scanning electron microscope. Intracellular structures such as cell organelles were observed surprisingly sharper than those observed by ordinary scanning electron microscopes. However, at magnifications over 250,000 x, platinum particles could be discerned as scattered pebbles on the surface of all structures in coated materials. Using an uncoated but conductively stained specimen, we successfully observed ribosomes on a rough endoplasmic reticulum at a direct magnification of 1 million. In these images some protrusions were recognized on the ribosomes. Ferritin and immunoglobulin G were used as samples of biological macromolecules. These samples were observed without metal coating and conductive staining. The ferritin particles appeared as rounded bodies without any substructure on the surface and immunoglobulin G as complexes of three-unit bodies. In the latter the central body might correspond to the Fc fragment and two side ones to Fab fragments. We assume that ultrahigh-resolution scanning electron microscopy is an effective means for observation of the cell fine structures and biological macromolecules. It will open a new research field in biomedicine.

  11. Direct microscopic observation of forward osmosis membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yining; Wicaksana, Filicia; Tang, Chuyang Y; Fane, Anthony G

    2010-09-15

    This study describes the application of a noninvasive direct microscopic observation method for characterizing fouling of a forward osmosis (FO) membrane. The effect of the draw solution concentration, membrane orientation, and feed spacer on FO fouling was systematically investigated in a cross-flow setup using latex particles as model foulant in the feedwater. Higher draw solution (DS) concentrations (and thus increased flux levels) resulted in dramatic increase in the surface coverage by latex particles, suggesting that the critical flux concept might be applicable even for the osmotically driven FO process. Under identical draw solution concentrations, the active-layer-facing-the-feed-solution orientation (AL-FS) experienced significantly less fouling compared to the alternative orientation. This may be explained by the lower water flux in AL-FS, which is consistent with the critical flux concept. The use of a feed spacer not only dramatically enhanced the initial flux of the FO membrane, but also significantly improved the flux stability during FO fouling. Despite such beneficial effects of using the feed spacer, a significant amount of particle accumulation was found near the spacer filament, suggesting further opportunities for improved spacer design. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first direct microscopic observation study on FO fouling.

  12. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  13. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Buzzi, M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Raabe, J.; Nolting, F.

    2015-08-15

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg{sub 0.66}Nb{sub 0.33})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  14. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures. PMID:26329198

  15. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzi, M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Raabe, J.; Nolting, F.

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg0.66Nb0.33)O3-PbTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  16. A new apparatus for electron tomography in the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, V. Maccagnani, P.; Masini, L.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Pezza, A.; Del Marro, M.; Pallocca, G.; Vinciguerra, P.; Rossi, M.; Ferroni, M.; Sberveglieri, G.; Vittori-Antisari, M.

    2015-06-23

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of a microscopic specimen has been obtained by applying the tomographic algorithm to a set of images acquired in a Scanning Electron Microscope. This result was achieved starting from a series of projections obtained by stepwise rotating the sample under the beam raster. The Scanning Electron Microscope was operated in the scanning-transmission imaging mode, where the intensity of the transmitted electron beam is a monotonic function of the local mass-density and thickness of the specimen. The detection strategy has been implemented and tailored in order to maintain the projection requirement over the large tilt range, as required by the tomographic workflow. A Si-based electron detector and an eucentric-rotation specimen holder have been specifically developed for the purpose.

  17. Precession electron diffraction and its utility for structural fingerprinting in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeck, Peter; Rouvimov, Sergei; Nicolopoulos, Stavros

    2009-09-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed in order to illustrate its utility for structural fingerprinting of nanocrystals. While individual nanocrystals may be fingerprinted structurally from PED spot patterns, ensembles of nanocrystals may be fingerprinted from powder PED ring patterns.

  18. Observation of cell dynamics by laser scanning Raman microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Keisaku; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kobayashi, Minoru; Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-02-01

    We developed a Raman microscope using a slit-scanning technique for observation of biological samples. A sample was illuminated by a line-shaped laser light, and Raman spectra were measured at different points in the line simultaneously by a spectrometer equipped with a 2D detector. The parallel detection of the Raman spectra boosts the image acquisition rate, which enable us to observe a living biological sample with high temporal and spatial resolution. We also applied a noise reduction technique using singular value decomposition. We recorded motion of intracellular components of living HeLa cells as sequential Raman images in a spectral region between 600 - 3000 cm -1 with the temporal resolution of 3 minutes.

  19. Microscopic Observation of Pauli Blocking in Degenerate Fermionic Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilker, Timon; Omran, Ahmed; Boll, Martin; Salomon, Guillaume; Bloch, Immanuel; Gross, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide a powerful platform for the controlled study of quantum many-body physics. We present here the first studies with a new generation quantum gas microscope, which allows to observe the full atom number statistics on every site. The common problem of light induced losses during imaging is avoided by an additional small scale ``pinning lattice'' used for Raman sideband cooling in the imaging process. We report the local observation of the Pauli exclusion principle in a spin-polarized degenerate gas of 6 Li fermions in an optical lattice. In the band insulating regime, we measure a tenfold suppression of particle number fluctuations per site compared to classical particles. From the remaining fluctuations we extract a local entropy as low as 0.3 kB per atom. Our work opens an exciting avenue for studying local density and even magnetic correlations in fermionic quantum matter both in and out of equilibrium.

  20. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  1. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) evaluation of crystal and plaque formation associated with biocorrosion.

    PubMed

    Geiger, S L; Ross, T J; Barton, L L

    1993-08-01

    The biofilm attributed to Desulfovibrio vulgaris growing in the presence of ferrous metals was examined with an environmental scanning electron microscope. This novel microscope produced images of iron sulfide colloids and other iron containing structures that had not been reported previously. A plaque composed of iron sulfide enveloped the surface of the corroding metal while crystals containing magnesium, iron, sulfur, and phosphorus were present in the culture where corrosion was in progress. A structure resembling the tubercule found in aerobic corrosion was observed on stainless steel undergoing biocorrosion and the elements present in this structure included sulfur, iron, chloride, calcium, potassium, and chromium.

  2. Microscopic theory of the residual surface resistivity of Rashba electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaziz, Juba; Lounis, Samir; Blügel, Stefan; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    A microscopic expression of the residual electrical resistivity tensor is derived in linear response theory for Rashba electrons scattering at a magnetic impurity with cylindrical or noncylindrical potential. The behavior of the longitudinal and transversal residual resistivity is obtained analytically and computed for an Fe impurity at the Au(111) surface. We studied the evolution of the resistivity tensor elements as a function of the Rashba spin-orbit strength and the magnetization direction of the impurity. We found that the absolute values of longitudinal resistivity reduce with increasing spin-orbit strength of the substrate and that the scattering of the conduction electrons at magnetic impurities with magnetic moments pointing in directions not perpendicular to the surface plane produce a planar Hall effect and an anisotropic magnetoresistance even if the impurity carries no spin-orbit interaction. Functional forms are provided describing the anisotropy of the planar Hall effect and the anisotropic magnetoresistance with respect to the direction of the impurity moment. In the limit of no spin-orbit interaction and a nonmagnetic impurity of cylindrical symmetry, the expression of the residual resistivity of a two-dimensional electron gas has the same simplicity and form as for the three-dimensional electron gas [J. Friedel, J. Nuovo. Cim. 7, 287 (1958), 10.1007/BF02751483] and can also be expressed in terms of scattering phase shifts.

  3. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  4. A microscopic theory of desorption induced by electronic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Hideaki; Okiji, Ayao; Tsuchiura, Hiroki

    1996-08-01

    Desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) in two cases is investigated from a microscopic point of view. In case A, where a single electron in a state of the localized kind (localized around adsorbates) is excited into a state of the extended kind (extended into the bosom of the substrate), the shape of the excited-state potential-energy surface (PES) may differ markedly from that of the ground-state PES for adsorbate motion. The Franck-Condon factor then takes a finite value, giving rise to a finite desorption probability. In case B, where a single electron in a state of the extended kind is excited into another state of the extended kind, the shape of the excited-state PES is practically the same as that of the ground-state PES. The Frank-Condon factor is then zero. In such a case, one should take DIET as a single-step (coherent) process and take into account the adsorbate-position dependence of the matrix element for state transitions of the electron system in order to obtain a finite desorption probability.

  5. Miniature self-contained vacuum compatible electronic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Batson, Phillip J.; Denham, Paul E.; Jones, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    A vacuum compatible CCD-based microscopic camera with an integrated illuminator. The camera can provide video or still feed from the microscope contained within a vacuum chamber. Activation of an optional integral illuminator can provide light to illuminate the microscope subject. The microscope camera comprises a housing with a objective port, modified objective, beam-splitter, CCD camera, and LED illuminator.

  6. [Multiple transmission electron microscopic image stitching based on sift features].

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Lu, Yanmeng; Han, Shuaihu; Wu, Zhuobin; Chen, Jiajing; Liu, Zhexing; Cao, Lei

    2015-08-01

    We proposed a new stitching method based on sift features to obtain an enlarged view of transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images with a high resolution. The sift features were extracted from the images, which were then combined with fitted polynomial correction field to correct the images, followed by image alignment based on the sift features. The image seams at the junction were finally removed by Poisson image editing to achieve seamless stitching, which was validated on 60 local glomerular TEM images with an image alignment error of 62.5 to 187.5 nm. Compared with 3 other stitching methods, the proposed method could effectively reduce image deformation and avoid artifacts to facilitate renal biopsy pathological diagnosis. PMID:26403733

  7. Pigmentosis tubae, a new entity: light and electron microscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, G.A.; Reimann, B.E.; Greenberg, H.L.; Miles, P.A.

    1983-03-01

    The authors noted an unusual finding in the fallopian tubes of a 31-year-old woman who had received external and internal whole pelvis radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Aggregates of macrophages containing pigment, identified in a subepithelial location, were reminiscent of melanosis coli, which is caused by abuse of anthracene-containing laxatives. Electron microscopic examination of the pigment revealed cytoplasmic material with the appearance of lipofuscin, identical to the pigment described in cases of colonic melanosis. After a careful study of possible etiologic agents, it was concluded that the pigment most likely resulted from cellular damage caused by radiotherapy. The authors are not aware of any other reported case of this entity, which will be called pigmentosis tubae.

  8. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvimov, Sergei; Plachinda, Pavel; Moeck, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Three novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals in a transmission electron microscope are presented. Either a single high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image [1] or a single precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] may be employed. PEDs from fine-grained crystal powders may also be utilized. Automation of the former two strategies is in progress and shall lead to statistically significant results on ensembles of nanocrystals. Open-access databases such as the Crystallography Open Database which provides more than 81,500 crystal structure data sets [3] or its mainly inorganic and educational subsets [4] may be utilized. [1] http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals 2007/j/of/dissertation.htm [2] P. Moeck and S. Rouvimov, in: {Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences}, Vol. 191, 2009, 270-313 [3] http://cod.ibt.lt, http://www.crystallography.net, http://cod.ensicaen.fr, http://nanocrystallography.org, http://nanocrystallography.net, http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2009/04/00/kk5039/kk5039.pdf [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  9. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    PubMed

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  10. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    PubMed

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made. PMID:1659857

  11. Large area fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structure by conventional scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sudheer, Tiwari, P.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukharjee, C.

    2015-06-24

    Plasmonic nanoparticle grating (PNG) structure of different periods has been fabricated by electron beam lithography using silver halide based transmission electron microscope film as a substrate. Conventional scanning electron microscope is used as a fabrication tool for electron beam lithography. Optical microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) have been used for its morphological and elemental characterization. Optical characterization is performed by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique.

  12. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  13. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E.; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven `quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  14. A method for visualizing cytoskeletal structures by the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, I; Amakawa, Y

    1989-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of intestinal epithelial cells was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Tissues were treated with Triton X-100, stained to enhance conductivity, and freeze-fractured in liquid nitrogen. With these procedures, not only the localization of core filaments (actin-containing microfilaments) and intermediate filaments but also the relations between fibrous structures and cell organellae were clearly revealed. This conventional method is of great value in interpreting the three-dimensional organization of intracellular fine structures. PMID:2809464

  15. Visualization of macromolecular complexes using cryo-electron microscopy with FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Grassucci, Robert A; Taylor, Derek; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    This protocol details the steps used for visualizing the frozen-hydrated grids as prepared following the accompanying protocol entitled ‘Preparation of macromolecular complexes for visualization using cryo-electron microscopy.’ This protocol describes how to transfer the grid to the microscope using a standard cryo-transfer holder or, alternatively, using a cryo-cartridge loading system, and how to collect low-dose data using an FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscope. This protocol also summarizes and compares the various options that are available in data collection for three-dimensional (3D) single-particle reconstruction. These options include microscope settings, choice of detectors and data collection strategies both in situations where a 3D reference is available and in the absence of such a reference (random-conical and common lines). PMID:18274535

  16. Automatically-focusing microscope system for live tissue observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, M. N.; Chapman, C. P.; Wayland, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    System includes focus-sensing arrangement which controls servo to keep microscope constantly focused on target. Microscope objective is moved along optical axis. System includes two video cameras that are used as transducers for sensing focus. Incoming visual image is split by beam splitter so that one-half of information is fed to each camera.

  17. Microscopic Observation of Self-Propagation of Calcifying Nanoparticles (Nanobacteria)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, Grace; McKay, David S.; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    2007-01-01

    Biologists typically define living organisms as carbon and water-based cellular forms with :self-replication" as the fundamental trait of the life process. However, this standard dictionary definition of life does not help scientists to categorize self-replicators like viruses, prions, proteons and artificial life. CNP also named nanobacteria were discovered in early 1990s as about 100 nanometer-sized bacteria-like particles with unique apatite mineral-shells around them, and found to be associated with pathological-calcification related diseases. Although CNP have been isolated and cultured from mammalian blood and diseased calcified tissues, and their biomineralizing properties well established, their biological nature and self-replicating capability have always been severely challenged. The terms "self-replication", "self-assembly" or "self-propagation" have been widely used for all systems including nanomachines, crystals, computer viruses and memes. In a simple taxonomy, all biological and non-biological "self replicators", have been classified into "living" or "nonliving" based on the properties of the systems and the amount of support they require to self-replicate. To enhance our understanding about self-replicating nature of CNP, we have investigated their growth in specific culture conditions using conventional inverted light microscope and BioStation IM, Nikon s latest time-lapse imaging system. Their morphological structure was examined using scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. This present study, in conjunction with previous findings of metabolic activity, antibiotic sensitivity, antibody specificity, morphological aspects and infectivity, all concomitantly validate CNP as living self-replicators.

  18. A scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of the cerebral aqueduct in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Meller, S T; Dennis, B J

    1993-09-01

    An examination of the surface of the cerebral aqueduct with the scanning electron microscope revealed that the walls of the cerebral aqueduct were so heavily ciliated that most of the ependymal surface was obscured, yet certain specialized supraependymal structures could be discerned lying on (or embedded within) this matt of cilia. These structures were determined by transmission electron microscopy and Golgi analysis to be either macrophages, supraependymal neurons, dendrites from medial periaqueductal gray neurons, or axons of unknown origin. Some axons, which were found to contain vesicles, appeared to make synaptic contacts with ependymal cells. Using the transmission electron microscope, the ependymal lining was found to consist of two different cell types: normal ependymal cells and tanycytes which have a long tapering basal process that was observed to contact blood vessels or, more rarely, seemed to terminate in relation to neuronal elements. While there have been previous reports on the structure of the third and lateral ventricles in other species, there are limited reports in the rabbit. The present report is not only the first description for the rabbit, but it is the first complete scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of the cerebral aqueduct in any species.

  19. [Intracytoplasmic lumina of benign and malignant breast diseases--a light and electron microscopic study].

    PubMed

    Gu, C M

    1990-07-01

    Intracytoplasmic lumina (ICLs) of 70 cases with breast carcinoma and 29 cases with benign breast diseases were observed by light and electron microscopy. ICLs were morphologically divided into two types. Type A was characterized by the presence of secretory materials stained with eosin in the lumen and Type B by the cytoplasmic vacuoles under light microscope. Electron microscopic observation on Type A ICLs showed numerous filiform microvilli projecting towards the lumen and various amounts of secretory materials in the lumen. Type B of ICLs only had scanty and short microvilli and rarely secretory materials in the lumen. The results indicated that: 1. The frequency of ICLs in breast cancer was significantly higher than that in benign breast disease (P less than 0.01). 2. The frequency of ICLs in breast cancer showed strong negative correlation with its histological grades but not with its histological types. 3. ICLs had similar frequency under both light and electron microscopes. As a relatively specific structure in breast carcinoma cells, ICLs may be helpful in the diagnosis of breast carcinoma and establishment of the breast origin for metastatic carcinoma. PMID:2176965

  20. Chemically sensitive structure-imaging with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Boatner, L. A.

    1988-12-01

    Problems associated with the phase-contrast method of conventional high-resolution electron microscopy may be avoided, and high atomic-number contrast in the sample obtained, by using a high-angle detector in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Results of this technique applied to single crystals of the high-transition temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(7-x) and ErBa2Cu3O(7-x) are presented. The heavy-atom planes are directly imaged as bright lines, and the probable structure of an observed defect is directly inferred from its image.

  1. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  2. Solar cell evaluation using electron beam induced current with the large chamber scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Tara; Kintzel, Edward; Marienhoff, Peter; Klein, Martin

    2012-02-01

    An initial study using electron beam induced current (EBIC) to evaluate solar cells has been carried out with the large chamber scanning electron microscope (LC-SEM) at the Western Kentucky University Nondestructive Analysis Center. EBIC is a scanning electron microscope technique used for the characterization of semiconductors. To facilitate our studies, we developed a Solar Amplification System (SASY) for analyzing current distribution and defects within a solar cell module. Preliminary qualitative results will be shown for a solar cell module that demonstrates the viability of the technique using the LC-SEM. Quantitative EBIC experiments will be carried out to analyze defects and minority carrier properties. Additionally, a well-focused spot of light from an LED mounted at the side of the SEM column will scan the same area of the solar cell using the LC-SEM positioning system. SASY will then output the solar efficiency to be compared with the minority carrier properties found using EBIC.

  3. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. PMID:27179301

  4. Transmission electron microscopic characterization of hypersensitive human radicular dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiyama, M.; Noiri, Y.; Ozaki, K.; Uchida, A.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ishida, H. )

    1990-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray microanalysis (XMA) were used for the study of the ultrastructure of the lumens of dentinal tubules in superficial layers of dentin specimens obtained by use of a new biopsy technique from both hypersensitive and naturally desensitized areas of exposed root surfaces, in vivo. The TEM images showed clearly that the lumens of most of the tubules were occluded with mineral crystals in naturally desensitized areas, but such lumens were empty and surrounded with peritubular and intertubular dentin in hypersensitive areas. Moreover, electron-dense structures that lined peritubular dentin were observed in the empty lumens of dentinal tubules.

  5. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed.

  6. Semiautomatic classification of cementitious materials using scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumetz, Lucas; Mura, Mauro Dalla; Meulenyzer, Samuel; Lombard, Sébastien; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2015-11-01

    Segmentation and classification are prolific research topics in the image processing community. These topics have been increasingly used in the context of analysis of cementitious materials on images acquired with a scanning electron microscope. Indeed, there is a need to be able to detect and to quantify the materials present in a cement paste in order to follow the chemical reactions occurring in the material even days after the solidification. We propose a new approach for segmentation and classification of cementitious materials based on the denoising of the data with a block-matching three-dimensional (3-D) algorithm, binary partition tree (BPT) segmentation, support vector machines (SVM) classification, and interactivity with the user. The BPT provides a hierarchical representation of the spatial regions of the data, allowing a segmentation to be selected among the admissible partitions of the image. SVMs are used to obtain a classification map of the image. This approach combines state-of-the-art image processing tools with user interactivity to allow a better segmentation to be performed, or to help the classifier discriminate the classes better. We show that the proposed approach outperforms a previous method when applied to synthetic data and several real datasets coming from cement samples, both qualitatively with visual examination and quantitatively with the comparison of experimental results with theoretical ones.

  7. Visualizing bone porosities using a tabletop scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, D.; DaPonte, J.; Broadbridge, C. C.; Daniel, D.; Alter, L.

    2010-04-01

    Pores are naturally occurring entities in bone. Changes in pore size and number are often associated with diseases such as Osteoporosis and even microgravity during spaceflight. Studying bone perforations may yield great insight into bone's material properties, including bone density and may contribute to identifying therapies to halt or potentially reverse bone loss. Current technologies used in this field include nuclear magnetic resonance, micro-computed tomography and the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) 2, 5. However, limitations in each method limit further advancement. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using a new generation of analytical instruments, the TM-1000 tabletop, SEM with back-scatter electron (BSE) detector, to analyze cortical bone porosities. Hind limb unloaded and age-based controlled mouse femurs were extracted and tested in vitro for changes in pores on the periosteal surface. An important advantage of using the tabletop is the simplified sample preparation that excludes extra coatings, dehydration and fixation steps that are otherwise required for conventional SEM. For quantitative data, pores were treated as particles in order to use an analyze particles feature in the NIH ImageJ software. Several image-processing techniques for background smoothing, thresholding and filtering were employed to produce a binary image suitable for particle analysis. It was hypothesized that the unloaded bones would show an increase in pore area, as the lack of mechanical loading would affect bone-remodeling processes taking place in and around pores. Preliminary results suggest only a slight different in frequency but not in size of pores between unloaded and control femurs.

  8. Observation of phase defect on extreme ultraviolet mask using an extreme ultraviolet microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Tsuyoshi; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Toyoda, Mitsunori; Harada, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Takeo; Kinoshita, Hiroo

    2014-04-01

    Influences of phase defect structures on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscope images were examined. Phase defects on the bottom of a multilayer (ML) do not always propagate vertically upward to the ML's top surface. For this study, two types of masks were prepared. One was an EUV blank with programmed phase defects made of lines in order to analyze the inclination angle of the phase defects. The other was an EUV mask that consists of programmed dot type phase defects 80 nm wide and 2.4 nm high with absorber patterns of half-pitch 88-nm lines-and-spaces. The positions of the phase defects relative to the absorber lines were designed to be shifted accordingly. Transmission electron microscope observations revealed that the line type phase defects starting from the bottom surface of the ML propagated toward the ML's top surface, while inclined toward the center of the EUV blank. At the distances of 0 and 66 mm from the center of the EUV blank, the inclination angles varied from 0 to 4 deg. The impacts of the inclination angles on EUV microscope images were significant even though the positions of the phase defect relative to the absorber line, as measured by a scanning probe microscope, were the same.

  9. Microscopic observations of self-healing products in calcareous fly ash mortars.

    PubMed

    Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The results of microstructural characterization of mortars containing fly ash class C (High Calcium Fly Ash) from combustion of lignite are presented. The evaluation of the microstructure was performed using scanning electron microscope, optical, and confocal microscope. The tested beams were bent till the crack and microcracks opening, which were healed during the different curing time. The results showed that the replacement of cement with fly ash class C influenced the process of crack healing. The addition of HCFA, at both 30% and 60%, speeds up the self-healing process in cracks and particularly in micro-cracks. In the research, the completely filling up of the cracks by new phases has not been observed, only the beginning of such process has been noticed.

  10. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Wolf, Sharon G.; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an ‘aloof’ electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies o1 eV can be ‘safely’ investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C–H, N–H and C=O vibrational signatures with nomore » observable radiation damage. Furthermore, the technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ~10nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.« less

  11. An electron microscopic study of bacteriophages from marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Hermann; Moebus, Karlheinz

    1987-12-01

    The morphology of 75 bacteriophage strains isolated from water samples collected in the North Sea or in the northern Atlantic was studied by electron microscopy. Only tailed phages were observed (bradley groups A, B, and C). According to structural similarities, the strains are ascribed to 12 groups, 5 of which comprise types of marine phages not reported before. Four of these 5 groups include phage types that have not been detected from any other source. Among the phages isolated from northern Atlantic water a high incidence was observed of strains the particles of which have long appendages. Certain types of the northern Atlantic phages investigated were derived only from samples collected either east or west of the Azores. This finding agrees with former observations pointing to the existence of different populations of closely related bacteria east and west, respectively, of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  12. The Design and Construction of a Simple Transmission Electron Microscope for Educational Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearsey, Paul K.

    This document presents a model for a simple transmission electron microscope for educational purposes. This microscope could demonstrate thermonic emission, particle acceleration, electron deflection, and flourescence. It is designed to be used in high school science courses, particularly physics, taking into account the size, weight, complexity…

  13. Electron channeling contrast imaging studies of nonpolar nitrides using a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Naresh-Kumar, G.; Kraeusel, S.; Bruckbauer, J.; Edwards, P. R.; Hourahine, B.; Trager-Cowan, C.; Mauder, C.; Heuken, M.; Wang, K. R.; Trampert, A.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.; Giesen, C.; Day, A. P.

    2013-04-08

    Threading dislocations, stacking faults, and associated partial dislocations significantly degrade the optical and electrical properties of materials such as non-polar III-nitride semiconductor thin films. Stacking faults are generally difficult to detect and quantify with existing characterization techniques. We demonstrate the use of electron channeling contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope to non-destructively reveal basal plane stacking faults terminated by partial dislocations in m-plane GaN and InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures grown on {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy.

  14. Human Peripheral Lung Tumours: Light and Electron Microscopic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Mollo, Franco; Canese, Maria G.; Campobasso, Onofrio

    1973-01-01

    Thirteen human peripheral lung tumours have been studied in both light and electron microscopy. They were classified as epidermoid carcinoma, mucus-secreting cell adenocarcinoma, and alveolar cell adenocarcinoma, the latter made up of granular pneumocytes. Alveolar cell cancer, as defined by ultrastructural features, could assume different gross histological patterns in light microscopy, and therefore electron microscopy is required for its identification. Since neither squamous nor mucous metaplasia was observed in any alveolar cell tumour, it is tentatively suggested that all peripheral lung tumours which lack these features may be derived from granular pneumocytes, irrespective of whether they appear to be adenocarcinomata or large cell carcinomata when examined by light microscopy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:4348471

  15. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers. PMID:25971512

  16. Leakage radiation microscope for observation of non-transparent samples.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Juan M; Ye, Fan; Burns, Michael J; Naughton, Michael J

    2014-09-22

    We describe a leakage radiation microscope technique that can be used to extend the leakage radiation microscopy to optically non-transparent samples. In particular, two experiments are presented, first to demonstrate that acquired images with our configuration correspond to the leakage radiation phenomenon and second, to show possible applications by directly imaging a plasmonic structure that previously could only be imaged with a near-field scanning optical microscope. It is shown that the measured surface plasmon wavelength and propagation length agree with theoretically-calculated values. This configuration opens the possibility to study important effects where samples are optically non-transparent, as in plasmonic cavities and single hole plasmonic excitation, without the use of time-consuming near-field scanning optical microscopy.

  17. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: configuration and applications.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Koji; Kitamura, Shinich; Konyuba, Yuji; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2014-12-01

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240°C and sintered. PMID:25062041

  18. Electron microscopic examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components.

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T T; Maratea, D; Bishop, P L

    1983-01-01

    This research documents in situ wastewater biofilm formation, structure, and physiochemical properties as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cationized ferritin was used to label anionic sites of the biofilm glycocalyx for viewing in thin section. Wastewater biofilm formation paralleled the processes involved in marine biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dramatic increase in cell colonization and growth over a 144-h period. Constituents included a variety of actively dividing morphological types. Many of the colonizing bacteria were flagellated. Filaments were seen after primary colonization of the surface. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a dominant gram-negative cell wall structure in the biofilm constituents. At least three types of glycocalyces were observed. The predominant glycocalyx possessed interstices and was densely labeled with cationized ferritin. Two of the glycocalyces appeared to mediate biofilm adhesion to the substratum. The results suggest that the predominant glycocalyx of this thin wastewater biofilm serves, in part, to: (i) enclose the bacteria in a matrix and anchor the biofilm to the substratum and (ii) provide an extensive surface area with polyanionic properties. Images PMID:6881965

  19. In situ ion beam research in Argonne`s intermediate voltage electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.W.; Ryan, E.A.

    1996-11-01

    Since Fall 1995, a state-of-the-art intermediate voltage electron microscope (IVEM) has been operational in the HVEM-Tandem Facility with in situ ion irradiation capabilities similar to those of the HVEM of the Facility. A 300 kV Hitachi H-9000NAR is interfaced to the two ion accelerators of the Facility, with a demonstrated point-to-point spatial resolution for imaging of 0.25 nm with the ion beamline attached to the microscope. The IVEM incorporates a Faraday cup system for ion dosimetry with measurement aperture 6.5 cm from the TEM specimen, which was described in Symposium A of the 1995 MRS Fall Meeting. The IVEM is now employed for a variety of in situ ion beam studies ranging from low dose ion damage experiments with GaAs, in which damage zones individual displacement cascades are observed, to implantation studies in metals, in which irradiation-induced noble gas precipitate mobility is studied in real time. In this presentation, the new instrumentation and its specifications will be described briefly, several basic concepts relating to in situ experiments in transmission electron microscopes will be summarized and examples of in situ experiments will be presented which exploit the experimental capabilities of this new user facility instrumentation.

  20. Optical electronics for meteor observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafiev, R. I.; Mukhamednazarov, S.; Atamas, I. A.

    1987-01-01

    Spectral observations of meteors have been carried out for several years using an optical electronics facility. Interest has centered on faint meteors and their trails in the period of intensive meteor showers. Over 800 meteors were registered during the observation period, with spectrograms obtained for 170 of these. A total of 86 meteors were photographed from two sites and for 25 of these spectrograms of the meteors as well as their trails were obtained. All meteors have undergone routine processing in order to determine atmospheric characteristics. Results are discussed.

  1. Assessing the structure and function of single biomolecules with scanning transmission electron and atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Shirley A; Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) have provided a wealth of useful information on a wide variety of biological structures. These instruments have in common that they raster-scan a probe over a sample and are able to address single molecules. In the STEM the probe is a focused electron beam that is deflected by the scan-coils. Detectors collecting the scattered electrons provide quantitative information for each sub-nanometer sized sample volume irradiated. These electron scattering data can be reconstituted to images of single macromolecules or can be integrated to provide the mass of the macromolecules. Samples need to be dehydrated for such quantitative STEM imaging. In contrast, the AFM raster-scans a sharp tip over a sample surface submerged in a buffer solution to acquire information on the sample's surface topography at sub-nanometer resolution. Direct observation of function-related structural changes induced by variation of temperature, pH, ionic strength, and applied force provides insight into the structure-function relationship of macromolecules. Further, the AFM allows single molecules to be addressed and quantitatively unfolded using the tip as nano-tweezers. The performance of these two scanning probe approaches is illustrated by several examples including the chaperonin GroEL, bacterial surface layers, protein crystals, and bacterial appendices.

  2. An universal and accurate replica technique for scanning electron microscope study in clinical dentistry.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G; Davidson, C

    1981-09-01

    One of the main concerns of dental research is the observation of the oral tissues and the materials applied to the dentition. The changes in composition and structure of the outer surfaces and the materials deposited on these surfaces are of special interest. In the literature, a variety of replica techniques for these purposes is described (Grundy in 1971 [12]; Saxton in 1973 [25]). The use of these techniques is limited because of artifacts in the samples, and a restricted resolution power resulting from useful magnifications in the order of 800x. An accurate and universal replica technique for the examination of specimens to be viewed under the SEM has been developed. The first impression is made by a light body silicone elastomer (President Coltene). The positive replica is made by electrodeposition of copper in an electro plating bath (Acru plat 5 electronic, Dr. Th. Wieland, D-7530 Pforzheim). The reliability and accuracy of this replica technique was verified by a scanning electron microscopic comparison of the replicas and the actual structures of etched enamel. To illustrate the applicability of the replica technique to structures with much lower hardness, also high resolution images of dental plaque were produced. The copper surface offers a perfect, original and proper electroconductive medium that withstands the bombardment of electrons and the relatively severe conditions in the scanning electron microscope. Reproducibility was accurate as judged by the duplication in position, size, and shape of the fine detail at magnifications of 7500x offering a resolution of 25 nm.

  3. Microstructure characterization of Al matrix composite reinforced with Ti-6Al-4V meshes after compression by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Sun, D L; Han, X L; Cheng, S R; Chen, G Q; Jiang, L T; Wu, G H

    2012-02-01

    Compressive properties of Al matrix composite reinforced with Ti-6Al-4V meshes (TC4(m)/5A06 Al composite) under the strain rates of 10(-3)S(-1) and 1S(-1) at different temperature were measured and microstructure of composites after compression was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Compressive strength decreased with the test temperature increased and the strain-rate sensitivity (R) of composite increased with the increasing temperature. SEM observations showed that grains of Al matrix were elongated severely along 45° direction (angle between axis direction and fracture surface) and TC4 fibres were sheared into several parts in composite compressed under the strain rate of 10(-3)S(-1) at 25°C and 250°C. Besides, amounts of cracks were produced at the interfacial layer between TC4 fibre and Al matrix and in (Fe, Mn)Al(6) phases. With the compressive temperature increasing to 400°C, there was no damage at the interfacial layer between TC4 fibre and Al matrix and in (Fe, Mn)Al(6) phases, while equiaxed recrystal grains with sizes about 10 μm at the original grain boundaries of Al matrix were observed. However, interface separation of TC4 fibres and Al matrix occurred in composite compressed under the strain rate of 1S(-1) at 250°C and 400°C. With the compressive temperature increasing from 25°C to 100°C under the strain rate of 10(-3) S(-1), TEM microstructure in Al matrix exhibited high density dislocations and slipping bands (25°C), polygonized dislocations and dynamic recovery (100°C), equiaxed recrystals with sizes below 500 μm (250°C) and growth of equiaxed recrystals (400°C), respectively.

  4. Scanning-electron-microscope study of normal-impingement erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the erosion of annealed copper and aluminum surfaces produced by both single- and multiple-particle impacts. Macroscopic 3.2 mm diameter steel balls and microscopic, brittle erodant particles were projected by a gas gun system so as to impact at normal incidence at speeds up to 140 m/sec. During the impacts by the brittle erodant particles, at lower speeds the erosion behavior was similar to that observed for the larger steel balls. At higher velocities, particle fragmentation and the subsequent cutting by the radial wash of debris created a marked change in the erosion mechanism.

  5. Apparatus and methods for controlling electron microscope stages

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for generating an image of a specimen with a microscope (e.g., TEM) are disclosed. In one aspect, the microscope may generally include a beam generator, a stage, a detector, and an image generator. A plurality of crystal parameters, which describe a plurality of properties of a crystal sample, are received. In a display associated with the microscope, an interactive control sphere based at least in part on the received crystal parameters and that is rotatable by a user to different sphere orientations is presented. The sphere includes a plurality of stage coordinates that correspond to a plurality of positions of the stage and a plurality of crystallographic pole coordinates that correspond to a plurality of polar orientations of the crystal sample. Movement of the sphere causes movement of the stage, wherein the stage coordinates move in conjunction with the crystallographic coordinates represented by pole positions so as to show a relationship between stage positions and the pole positions.

  6. The assessment of microscopic charging effects induced by focused electron and ion beam irradiation of dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A; Levick, Katie J

    2007-03-01

    Energetic beams of electrons and ions are widely used to probe the microscopic properties of materials. Irradiation with charged beams in scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) systems may result in the trapping of charge at irradiation induced or pre-existing defects within the implanted microvolume of the dielectric material. The significant perturbing influence on dielectric materials of both electron and (Ga(+)) ion beam irradiation is assessed using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques. Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM) is an advanced SPM technique in which long-range Coulomb forces between a conductive atomic force probe and the silicon dioxide specimen enable the potential at the specimen surface to be characterized with high spatial resolution. KPM reveals characteristic significant localized potentials in both electron and ion implanted dielectrics. The potentials are observed despite charge mitigation strategies including prior coating of the dielectric specimen with a layer of thin grounded conductive material. Both electron- and ion-induced charging effects are influenced by a delicate balance of a number of different dynamic processes including charge-trapping and secondary electron emission. In the case of ion beam induced charging, the additional influence of ion implantation and nonstoichiometric sputtering from compounds is also important. The presence of a localized potential will result in the electromigration of mobile charged defect species within the irradiated volume of the dielectric specimen. This electromigration may result in local modification of the chemical composition of the irradiated dielectric. The implications of charging induced effects must be considered during the microanalysis and processing of dielectric materials using electron and ion beam techniques.

  7. Comparison of the myotoxic effects of levobupivacaine, bupivacaine, and ropivacaine: an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Öz Gergin, Özlem; Yıldız, Karamehmet; Bayram, Adnan; Sencar, Leman; Coşkun, Gülfidan; Yay, Arzu; Biçer, Cihangir; Özdamar, Saim; Polat, Sait

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the myotoxic effects of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and levobupivacaine which were applied intramuscularly to rat skeletal muscle. Forty Wistar-Albino rats were divided into four groups. In the study, .5% bupivacaine (Group B), .5% ropivacaine (Group R), .5% levobupivacaine (Group L), or .9% normal saline (Group SF) was applied intramuscularly to the right gastrocnemius muscle of rats. The rats in each group were sacrificed on the second day after injection. Sections of muscle samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin for light microscopic investigation and prepared for the evaluation of ultrastructural changes in the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy. All three local anesthetic agents caused qualitatively similar skeletal muscle damage. The most observed muscle damage was in Group B, muscle damage of Group R was less than that of Group B, and the least damage was seen in Group L quantitatively. Electron microscopic examination of each group that caused cellular damage was qualitatively similar. The most subcellular damage was observed in the group receiving bupivacaine, less was seen in the ropivacaine group, and the least was observed in the levobupivacaine group. The results indicated that bupivacaine caused more myotoxic damage than the other two agents in the skeletal muscle of rats and that levobupivacaine caused less myotoxic damage than both bupivacaine and ropivacaine at the cell and tissue levels.

  8. Observing secretory granules with a multiangle evanescent wave microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbach, A

    2000-01-01

    In total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), fluorophores near a surface can be excited with evanescent waves, which decay exponentially with distance from the interface. Penetration depths of evanescent waves from 60 nm to 300 nm were generated by varying the angle of incidence of a laser beam. With a novel telecentric multiangle evanescent wave microscope, we monitored and investigated both single secretory granules and pools of granules in bovine chromaffin cells. By measuring the fluorescence intensity as a function of penetration depth, it is possible through a Laplace transform to obtain the fluorophore distribution as a function of axial position. We discuss the extent to which it is possible to determine distances and diameters of granules with this microscopy technique by modeling the fluorescent volumes of spheres in evanescent fields. The anisotropic near-field detection of fluorophores and the influence of the detection point-spread function are considered. The diameters of isolated granules between 70 nm and 300 nm have been reconstructed, which is clearly beyond the resolution limit of a confocal microscope. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates how evanescent waves propagate along surfaces and scatter at objects with a higher refractive index. TIRFM will have a limited applicability for quantitative measurements when the parameters used to define evanescent waves are not optimally selected. PMID:10777760

  9. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics: Microscopic electronic configurations and ultrafast spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locht, I. L. M.; Di Marco, I.; Garnerone, S.; Delin, A.; Battiato, M.

    2015-08-01

    We provide an approach for the identification of the electronic and magnetic configurations of ferromagnetic Fe after an ultrafast decrease or increase of the magnetization. The model is based on the well-grounded assumption that, after an ultrafast variation of the magnetization, the system achieves a partial thermal equilibrium. With statistical arguments we show that the magnetic configurations are qualitatively different in the case of reduced or increased magnetization. The predicted magnetic configurations are then used to compute the dielectric response at the 3 p (M ) absorption edge, which is directly related to the changes observed in the experimental T-MOKE data. The good qualitative agreement between theory and experiment offers a substantial support for the validity of the model, and to the very existence of an ultrafast increase of the magnetization.

  10. Effects of X radiation on the retina of the albino rabbit as viewed with the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, J.C.; Barsa-Newton, M.C.; Wardly, J.

    1980-02-01

    The eyes of albino rabbits were exposed in vivo to 7000 rad of X radiation, and the retinas were examined with a scanning electron microscope 24 and 72 h after irradiation. The rods and cones of the retina were observed to show the most severe damage.

  11. A high-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope at Nagoya University.

    PubMed

    Hibino, M; Shimoyama, H; Maruse, S

    1989-07-01

    A high-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) H-1250ST of the maximum accelerating voltage of 1.25 MV was constructed at Nagoya University in 1983. The microscope, equipped with a field-emission gun, is designed with high-level STEM performance as well as conventional transmission microscopy mode operation. The aim of developing the microscope, basic design schemes, principal instrumentation, and techniques developed are described.

  12. Imaging Single Atoms Using Secondary Electrons with an Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Inada, H.; Nakamura, K.; Wall, J.

    2009-09-20

    Aberration correction has embarked on a new frontier in electron microscopy by overcoming the limitations of conventional round lenses, providing sub-angstrom-sized probes. However, improvement of spatial resolution using aberration correction so far has been limited to the use of transmitted electrons both in scanning and stationary mode, with an improvement of 20-40%. In contrast, advances in the spatial resolution of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs), which are by far the most widely used instrument for surface imaging at the micrometre-nanometre scale, have been stagnant, despite several recent efforts. Here, we report a new SEM, with aberration correction, able to image single atoms by detecting electrons emerging from its surface as a result of interaction with the small probe. The spatial resolution achieved represents a fourfold improvement over the best-reported resolution in any SEM. Furthermore, we can simultaneously probe the sample through its entire thickness with transmitted electrons. This ability is significant because it permits the selective visualization of bulk atoms and surface ones, beyond a traditional two-dimensional projection in transmission electron microscopy. It has the potential to revolutionize the field of microscopy and imaging, thereby opening the door to a wide range of applications, especially when combined with simultaneous nanoprobe spectroscopy.

  13. In vitro phagocytosis of exogenous collagen by fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament: an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, E L; Brunette, D M; Melcher, A H

    1979-01-01

    There have been numerous electron microscopic reports of apparent phagocytosis of collagen by fibroblasts and other cells in vivo. We have developed an in vitro system which, to the best of our knowledge, will permit for the first time the study of regulatory mechanisms governing phagocytosis and digestion of collagen fibres. Cells were cultured from explants of monkey periodontal ligament, subcultured, and grown to confluence in alpha-MEM plus 15% fetal calf serum plus antibiotics. The confluent cells were then cultured together with minced rat tail tendon collagen in alpha-MEM lacking proline, lysine, glycine and fetal calf serum for up to 7 days, after which they were processed for electron microscopy. Intracellular collagen profiles could be seen in cultured cells that were associated with exogenous collagen fibrils as early as 24 hours after addition of the collagen. Through electron microscopic examination of serial sections of the culture, we have demonstrated: (1) that fibroblasts can phagocytose collagen; (2) that the observed intracellular collagen is not the result of aggregation of endogenous synthesized collagen; (3) that it is not possible to base a decision as to whether a collagen fibril has been phagocytosed in whole or in part by the type of vesicle with which it is associated; (4) that cleavage of collagen into small pieces may not be a necessary prelude to its phagocytosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 (cont.) Fig. 4 Fig. 6 (cont.) Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:108237

  14. A photonic microscope for observing real-time vibrations of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Arthur W.; Zhang, Mian; Wiederhecker, Gustavo; Lipson, Michal; McEuen, Paul L.

    Vibrational modes in suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are incredibly responsive to small forces, which makes them a prime candidate as nano-mechanical sensors. However, transducing this mechanical motion into detectable signals is a considerable challenge. Electrical detection, which has been the prevailing method thus far, suffers a significant impedance mismatch to macroscopic electronics and is thus susceptible to noise. We demonstrate an alternative: optical readout of CNT vibrations in real-time. By combining a unique CNT microtweezer platform with a high-finesse optical microdisk resonator, we dramatically enhance the naturally small optical cross-section of CNTs and thereby achieve unprecedented detection sensitivity. With this novel photonic microscope, we directly measure the thermal Brownian motion of CNTs and observe marked spectral diffusion at room temperature, shedding light on CNTs unique thermal physics. By further enhancing the optical coupling, we demonstrate optical amplification of CNT vibrations and directly observe period-doubling in the amplified state.

  15. Electron microscopic visualization of complementary labeled DNA with platinum-containing guanine derivative.

    PubMed

    Loukanov, Alexandre; Filipov, Chavdar; Mladenova, Polina; Toshev, Svetlin; Emin, Saim

    2016-04-01

    The object of the present report is to provide a method for a visualization of DNA in TEM by complementary labeling of cytosine with guanine derivative, which contains platinum as contrast-enhanced heavy element. The stretched single-chain DNA was obtained by modifying double-stranded DNA. The labeling method comprises the following steps: (i) stretching and adsorption of DNA on the support film of an electron microscope grid (the hydrophobic carbon film holding negative charged DNA); (ii) complementary labeling of the cytosine bases from the stretched single-stranded DNA pieces on the support film with platinum containing guanine derivative to form base-specific hydrogen bond; and (iii) producing a magnified image of the base-specific labeled DNA. Stretched single-stranded DNA on a support film is obtained by a rapid elongation of DNA pieces on the surface between air and aqueous buffer solution. The attached platinum-containing guanine derivative serves as a high-dense marker and it can be discriminated from the surrounding background of support carbon film and visualized by use of conventional TEM observation at 100 kV accelerated voltage. This method allows examination of specific nucleic macromolecules through atom-by-atom analysis and it is promising way toward future DNA-sequencing or molecular diagnostics of nucleic acids by electron microscopic observation. PMID:26805035

  16. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-01

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.

  17. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-01

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field. PMID:27172892

  18. AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF CULTURED RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Bunge, Richard P.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Peterson, Edith R.

    1965-01-01

    Explants prepared from 17- to 18-day fetal rat spinal cord were allowed to mature in culture; such preparations have been shown to differentiate and myelinate in vitro (61) and to be capable of complex bioelectric activity (14–16). At 23, 35, or 76 days, the cultures were fixed (without removal from the coverslip) in buffered OsO4, embedded in Epon, sectioned, and stained for light and electron microscopy. These mature explants generally are composed of several strata of neurons with an overlying zone of neuropil. The remarkable cytological similarity between in vivo and in vitro nervous tissues is established by the following observations. Cells and processes in the central culture mass are generally closely packed together with little intervening space. Neurons exhibit well developed Nissl bodies, elaborate Golgi regions, and subsurface cisternae. Axosomatic and axodendritic synapses, including synaptic junctions between axons and dendritic spines, are present. Typical synaptic vesicles and increased membrane densities are seen at the terminals. Variations in synaptic fine structure (Type 1 and Type 2 synapses of Gray) are visible. Some characteristics of the cultured spinal cord resemble infrequently observed specializations of in vivo central nervous tissue. Neuronal somas may display minute synapse-bearing projections. Occasionally, synaptic vesicles are grouped in a crystal-like array. A variety of glial cells, many apparently at intermediate stages of differentiation, are found throughout the otherwise mature explant. There is ultrastructural evidence of extensive glycogen deposits in some glial processes and scattered glycogen particles in neuronal terminals. This is the first description of the ultrastructure of cultured spinal cord. Where possible, correlation is made between the ultrastructural data and the known physiological properties of these cultures. PMID:14326105

  19. Specimen-thickness effects on transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Rice, K P; Keller, R R; Stoykovich, M P

    2014-06-01

    We report the effects of varying specimen thickness on the generation of transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope. Diffraction patterns sufficient for automated indexing were observed from films spanning nearly three orders of magnitude in thickness in several materials, from 5 nm of hafnium dioxide to 3 μm of aluminum, corresponding to a mass-thickness range of ~5 to 810 μg cm(-2) . The scattering events that are most likely to be detected in transmission are shown to be very near the exit surface of the films. The energies, spatial distribution and trajectories of the electrons that are transmitted through the film and are collected by the detector are predicted using Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic study of the lung of the newt, Triturus alpestris Laur.

    PubMed

    Goniakowska-Witalińska, L

    1980-01-01

    The lungs of Triturus alpestris Laur. were investigated with the scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Dimensions of the cell bodies of pneumocytes and ciliated cells, as well as the thickness of the air-blood barrier, were determined. The lungs of the newt form two simple sacs without septa. A ciliated epithelium containing goblet cells lines the pulmonary vein and partially the pulmonary artery. The remainder of the lung surface is covered internally by respiratory epithelium consisting of one type of cell and only occasionally showing the presence of single ciliated cells. All cells, ciliated, goblet and pneumocytes, contain in their cytoplasm lamellar bodies. Multivesicular bodies and numerous vesicles of variable electron density also occur in the cytoplasm of pneumocytes. Atypical mitochondria can be found in all cell types of the lung. Fixation with addition of tannic acid reveals the surface lining film. Tubular myelin figures were not observed.

  1. In situ fatigue loading stage inside scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, Jack; Kantzos, Peter; Brewer, David

    1988-01-01

    A fatigue loading stage inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was developed. The stage allows dynamic and static high-magnification and high-resolution viewing of the fatigue crack initiation and crack propagation processes. The loading stage is controlled by a closed-loop servohydraulic system. Maximum load is 1000 lb (4450 N) with test frequencies ranging up to 30 Hz. The stage accommodates specimens up to 2 inches (50 mm) in length and tolerates substantial specimen translation to view the propagating crack. At room temperature, acceptable working resolution is obtainable for magnifications ranging up to 10,000X. The system is equipped with a high-temperature setup designed for temperatures up to 2000 F (1100 C). The signal can be videotaped for further analysis of the pertinent fatigue damage mechanisms. The design allows for quick and easy interchange and conversion of the SEM from a loading stage configuration to its normal operational configuration and vice versa. Tests are performed entirely in the in-situ mode. In contrast to other designs, the NASA design has greatly extended the life of the loading stage by not exposing the bellows to cyclic loading. The loading stage was used to investigate the fatigue crack growth mechanisms in the (100)-oriented PWA 1480 single-crystal, nickel-based supperalloy. The high-magnification observations revealed the details of the crack growth processes.

  2. Light microscope observations on the epididymis of paca (Agouti paca).

    PubMed

    Schimming, Bruno Cesar; Machado, Márcia Rita Fernandes; Simões, Karina; da Cruz, Claudinei; Domeniconi, Raquel Fantin

    2013-01-01

    The features of paca epididymis, based on its appearance in light microscope, is described in this paper. The cellular population of the epithelial lining comprises principal cells, basal cells, apical cells, narrows cells, and hallo cells. The epididymis is divided in five distinct and continuous regions, Zone I, or initial segment, and zone II, are both localized into the head. Zone III comprises the distal head and all the body. Zones IV and V are restricted to the tail, in the proximal and distal cauda epididymis respectively. Each zone can be readily distinguished on the basis of morphological characteristics. The height of epididymal epithelium is greater in zone I. There is a progressive increase in the diameter of the tubular lumen through the different areas, with the maximum in the zone V. The presence of a high epithelium, and the virtual absence of sperm in zone I suggest fast transit of spermatozoa in this region. Zone V comprises the distal tail, has smaller epithelial lining, greater luminal diameter, shorter stereocilia than the other zones, and contains spermatozoa packed inside the lumen, that characterizes this zone as a place of sperm storage. The findings are compared with other reports in rodents and other domestic animals, to contribute to the understanding of epididymal morphophysiology.

  3. Confocal laser scanning microscopic photoconversion: a new method to stabilize fluorescently labeled cellular elements for electron microscopic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colello, Raymond J.; Tozer, Jordan; Henderson, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Photoconversion, the method by which a fluorescent dye is transformed into a stable, osmiophilic product that can be visualized by electron microscopy, is the most widely used method to enable the ultrastructural analysis of fluorescently-labeled cellular structures. Nevertheless, the conventional method of photoconversion using widefield fluorescence microscopy requires long reaction times and results in low resolution cell targeting. Accordingly, we have developed a photoconversion method that ameliorates these limitations by adapting confocal laser scanning microscopy to the procedure. We have found that this method greatly reduces photoconversion times as compared to conventional wide field microscopy. Moreover, region of interest scanning capabilities of a confocal microscope facilitate the targeting of the photoconversion process to individual cellular or subcellular elements within a fluorescent field. This reduces the area of the cell exposed to light energy, thereby reducing the ultrastructural damage common to this process when widefield microscopes are employed. PMID:23042499

  4. A Microscopic Model for the Strongly Coupled Electron-Ion System in VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovorn, Timothy; Sarker, Sanjoy

    The metal-insulator transition (MIT) in vanadium dioxide (VO2) near 340 K is accompanied by a structural transition, suggesting strong coupling between electronic and lattice degrees of freedom. To help elucidate this relationship, we construct and analyze a microscopic model in which electrons, described by a tight-binding Hamiltonian, are dynamically coupled to Ising-like ionic degrees of freedom. A mean-field decoupling leads to an interacting two-component (pseudo) spin-1 Ising model describing the ions. An analysis of the minimal ionic model reproduces the observed M1 and M2 dimerized phases and rutile metal phase, occurring in the observed order with increasing temperature. All three transitions are first order, as observed. We further find that both dimerization and correlations play crucial roles in describing the insulating M1 phase. We discuss why dynamical coupling of electrons and ions is key to obtain a full understanding of the phenomenology of VO2, particularly in the context of the phase coexistence observed near the MIT. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR-1508680).

  5. Note: A scanning electron microscope sample holder for bidirectional characterization of atomic force microscope probe tips

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Alon; Goh, M. Cynthia

    2012-03-15

    A novel sample holder that enables atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips to be mounted inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the purpose of characterizing the AFM tips is described. The holder provides quick and easy handling of tips by using a spring clip to hold them in place. The holder can accommodate two tips simultaneously in two perpendicular orientations, allowing both top and side view imaging of the tips by the SEM.

  6. Neuroprotective Effects of Memantine in the Retina of Glaucomatous Rats: An Electron Microscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Celiker, Hande; Yuksel, Nursen; Solakoglu, Seyhun; Karabas, Levent; Aktar, Fadime; Caglar, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this experimental study, the effects of systemic memantine administration on the retinal ultrastructure of experimentally induced glaucomatous rats were investigated. Methods: Twenty-four Wistar albino rats were included in this study. Glaucoma was induced by injecting sodium hyaluronate into the anterior chamber of the rats for a period of three weeks. As a control, 8 rats were sham treated (Group C). Glaucoma induced animals were divided into two groups; Group M (n = 8) received a single daily dose of 10 mg/kg memantine, and Group G received the same volume of saline (n = 8), via intraperitoneal route for a period of six weeks, starting with the induction of glaucoma. Then, all rats were sacrificed and the retinas were prepared for electron microscopic examination. Electron microscopic damage findings were graded between 0 and 4 and mean damage scores for each cell or layer was calculated for each group. Statistical comparison was made between group G and group M. Results: Including the photoreceptor cells, marked ultrastructural changes were observed in the retinas of the animals in group G. The ultrastructural changes in group M were modest and there was no significant cell death. Statistical findings indicated these results. Conclusion: Results of the present study suggest that memantine treatment, when started in the early phase of glaucomatous process, may help to preserve the retinal ultrastructure and thus prevent neuronal injury in experimentally induced glaucoma. PMID:27413498

  7. Atomic-Scale Study Of Complex Cobalt Oxide Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulec, Ahmet

    Cobalt oxides offer a rich ?eld for the formation of novel phases, including superconductors and exotic magnetic phases, involving a mixed valence state for cobalt and/or the presence of oxygen vacancies. Having spin states, such as, low spin (LS), high spin (HS), and intermediate spin (IS), cobalt oxides differ from other 3d metal oxides The presence of such spin states make the physics of the cobalt oxides so complicated that it has not yet been completely understood. In order to improve our understanding of the various phase transitions observed in Cobalt oxides and to comprehend the relationship between crystal and electronic structure, both high energy resolution and high spatial resolution are essential. Fortunately, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a technique which is capable of ful?lling both of these requirements. In this thesis, I have utilized unique techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to analyze the atomic-scale structure-property relationship, both at room temperature and through insitu cooling to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In particular, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging, electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) and electron energy loss magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD), the structure, composition, bonding and magnetic behavior are characterized directly on the atomic scale.

  8. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Mirvish, Ezra D.; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  9. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Ezra D; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  10. Atomic force microscope observation on ultrastructures in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yuliang; Du, Kaihe; Fang, Xiaohong

    2010-10-01

    AFM is being applied in increasingly wide research fields and extracting more biochemical/biophysical information that is beyond the capability of traditional SEM and TEM. Due to its inherent features, AFM is rarely used to observe the subcellular details within cells. Although subcellular features were recently observed on thin sections of plant tissues using AFM, this method might introduce unexpected artifacts during sample processing. Here we try to observe plant cells still embedded in resin block. This modified method minimizes the possibility of artifacts. The comparison among outcomes of AFM, SEM, TEM and LM on the same single cell suggest that this modified method is a good, applicable, efficient and faithful way applying AFM on biological materials.

  11. Fibrous architecture of cementodentinal junction in disease: A scanning electron microscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, R; Pratebha, B

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cementodentinal junction (CDJ) forms a biological and structural link between cementum and dentin. This biological link is regarded as a distinct tissue in its own right. Certain important proteins responsible for periodontal regeneration are said to be present in this tissue. Few studies have described the structure and composition of this layer by light and electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopic studies pertaining to CDJ in health and disease are few and documentation of periodontal pathological changes of CDJ is unclear. In the first phase of our study, the collagenous architecture of CDJ of healthy teeth has been reported. Aim: The objective of this study is to observe and report periodontal pathological changes in the fibrous or collagenous architecture of CDJ of periodontitis-affected teeth and discuss the probable clinical implications of CDJ in disease. Materials and Methods: Twenty periodontitis-affected teeth were collected and processed for observing under a scanning electron microscope. Results: The results are as follows: Increased width of interface at CDJ in periodontitis samples (7.1 μ) compared to that of healthy samples; fewer areas of fiber intermingling at CDJ in periodontitis samples as compared to healthy samples; frequent detachment of cementum from dentin during sodium hydroxide maceration of samples. Conclusion: It may be inferred from results that there is a possibility of a definite weakening of CDJ in periodontally affected root surfaces and we believe that clinical procedures such as scaling and root planning may have a detrimental effect on the cementodentinal attachment of periodontally involved root surfaces. PMID:26980960

  12. High-resolution, high-throughput imaging with a multibeam scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    EBERLE, AL; MIKULA, S; SCHALEK, R; LICHTMAN, J; TATE, ML KNOTHE; ZEIDLER, D

    2015-01-01

    Electron–electron interactions and detector bandwidth limit the maximal imaging speed of single-beam scanning electron microscopes. We use multiple electron beams in a single column and detect secondary electrons in parallel to increase the imaging speed by close to two orders of magnitude and demonstrate imaging for a variety of samples ranging from biological brain tissue to semiconductor wafers. Lay Description The composition of our world and our bodies on the very small scale has always fascinated people, making them search for ways to make this visible to the human eye. Where light microscopes reach their resolution limit at a certain magnification, electron microscopes can go beyond. But their capability of visualizing extremely small features comes at the cost of a very small field of view. Some of the questions researchers seek to answer today deal with the ultrafine structure of brains, bones or computer chips. Capturing these objects with electron microscopes takes a lot of time – maybe even exceeding the time span of a human being – or new tools that do the job much faster. A new type of scanning electron microscope scans with 61 electron beams in parallel, acquiring 61 adjacent images of the sample at the same time a conventional scanning electron microscope captures one of these images. In principle, the multibeam scanning electron microscope’s field of view is 61 times larger and therefore coverage of the sample surface can be accomplished in less time. This enables researchers to think about large-scale projects, for example in the rather new field of connectomics. A very good introduction to imaging a brain at nanometre resolution can be found within course material from Harvard University on http://www.mcb80x.org/# as featured media entitled ‘connectomics’. PMID:25627873

  13. Electronic structure of hydrogenated diamond: Microscopical insight into surface conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Alippi, Paola; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Offi, F.; Petaccia, L.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    We have correlated the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated diamond to the electronic structure in the Fermi region. Significant density of electronic states (DOS) in proximity of the Fermi edge has been measured by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) on surfaces exposed to air, corresponding to a p -type electric conductive regime, while upon annealing a depletion of the DOS has been achieved, resembling the diamond insulating state. The surface and subsurface electronic structure has been determined, exploiting the different probing depths of PES applied in a photon energy range between 7 and 31 eV. Ab initio density functional calculations including surface charge depletion and band-bending effects favorably compare with electronic states measured by angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Such states are organized in the energy-momentum space in a twofold structure: one, bulk-derived, band disperses in the Γ -X direction with an average hole effective mass of (0.43 ±0.02 ) m0 , where m0 is the bare electron mass; a second flatter band, with an effective mass of (2.2 ±0.9 ) m0 , proves that a hole gas confined in the topmost layers is responsible for the conductivity of the (2 ×1 ) hydrogen-terminated diamond (100 ) surface.

  14. Nanometres-resolution Kikuchi patterns from materials science specimens with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, N; Demers, H; Gauvin, R

    2013-04-01

    A charge-coupled device camera of an electron backscattered diffraction system in a scanning electron microscope was positioned below a thin specimen and transmission Kikuchi patterns were collected. Contrary to electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron forward scatter diffraction provides phase identification and orientation mapping at the nanoscale. The minimum Pd particle size for which a Kikuchi diffraction pattern was detected and indexed reliably was 5.6 nm. An orientation mapping resolution of 5 nm was measured at 30 kV. The resolution obtained with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction was of the same order of magnitude than that reported in electron nanodiffraction in the transmission electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer X-ray map and a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction orientation map were acquired simultaneously. The high-resolution chemical, phase and orientation maps provided at once information on the chemical form, orientation and coherency of precipitates in an aluminium-lithium 2099 alloy.

  15. Transmission electron microscopic examination of phosphoric acid fuel cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pebler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to physically characterize tested and untested phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) components. Those examined included carbon-supported platinum catalysts, carbon backing paper, and Teflon-bonded catalyst layers at various stages of fabrication and after testing in pressurized PAFC's. Applicability of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy for identifying the various phases was explored. The discussion focuses on the morphology and size distribution of platinum, the morphology and structural aspects of Teflon in catalyst layers, and the structural evidence of carbon corrosion. Reference is made to other physical characterization techniques where appropriate. A qualitative model of the catalyst layer that emerged from the TEM studies is presented.

  16. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  17. Electron-microscopic study of Sn-chrisotile asbestos nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, L. M.; Kalmykov, A. E.; Fokin, A. V.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2014-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the structural state of tin in Sn-chrisotile asbestos nanocomposite. It is shown that tin in the nanocomposite forms a system of nanowires, which, in turn, consist of crystallites of different lengths. Various orientational relations between the matrix and crystallites are revealed.

  18. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    ScienceCinema

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2016-07-12

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  19. 2013 R&D 100 Award: Movie-mode electron microscope captures nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan

    2014-04-03

    A new instrument developed by LLNL scientists and engineers, the Movie Mode Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (MM-DTEM), captures billionth-of-a-meter-scale images with frame rates more than 100,000 times faster than those of conventional techniques. The work was done in collaboration with a Pleasanton-based company, Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions (IDES) Inc. Using this revolutionary imaging technique, a range of fundamental and technologically important material and biological processes can be captured in action, in complete billionth-of-a-meter detail, for the first time. The primary application of MM-DTEM is the direct observation of fast processes, including microstructural changes, phase transformations and chemical reactions, that shape real-world performance of nanostructured materials and potentially biological entities. The instrument could prove especially valuable in the direct observation of macromolecular interactions, such as protein-protein binding and host-pathogen interactions. While an earlier version of the technology, Single Shot-DTEM, could capture a single snapshot of a rapid process, MM-DTEM captures a multiframe movie that reveals complex sequences of events in detail. It is the only existing technology that can capture multiple electron microscopy images in the span of a single microsecond.

  20. Molecular electronics: Observation of molecular rectification

    SciTech Connect

    Waldeck, D.H.; Beratan, D.N. )

    1993-07-30

    The authors review some experiments in molecular rectification and their implication for commercial uses of molecular electronic devices. Two of the cases involve rectification by single molecules which consist of an electron donor on one side, an electron acceptor on the other side, and a bridge in between, coupled to electrodes. The third case involves rectification at a graphite electrode derivatized with a Cu phthalocyanine derivative, and probed with a Pt/Ir scanning tunneling microscope tip. Some potential applications of molecular devices are in high-density memory storage of holographic memory devices, neural networks, cellular automata, and chemical and biochemical sensors.

  1. Microscopic observations of osteoblast growth on micro-arc oxidized β titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsien-Te; Chung, Chi-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Ching; Tang, Chin-Hsin; He, Ju-Liang

    2013-02-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in orthopedic and dental implants, owing to their excellent physical properties and biocompatibility. By using the micro-arc oxidation (MAO), we generated anatase-rich (A-TiO2) and rutile-rich (R-TiO2) titanium dioxide coatings, individually on β-Ti alloy, in which the latter achieved an enhanced in vitro and in vivo performance. Thoroughly elucidating how the osteoblasts interact with TiO2 coatings is of worthwhile interest. This study adopts the focused ion beam (FIB) to section off the TiO2 coated samples for further scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation. The detailed crystal structures of the TiO2 coated specimens are also characterized. Experimental results indicate osteoblasts adhered more tenaciously and grew conformably with more lamellipodia extent on the R-TiO2 specimen than on the A-TiO2 and raw β-Ti specimens. FIB/SEM cross-sectional images of the cell/TiO2 interface revealed micro gaps between the cell membrane and contact surface of A-TiO2 specimen, while it was not found on the R-TiO2 specimen. Additionally, the number of adhered and proliferated cells on the R-TiO2 specimen was visually greater than the others. Closely examining EDS line scans and elemental mappings of the FIB/TEM cross-sectional images of the cell/TiO2 interface reveals both the cell body and interior space of the TiO2 coating contain nitrogen and sulfur (the biological elements in cell). This finding supports the assumption that osteoblast can grow into the porous structure of TiO2 coatings and demonstrating that the R-TiO2 coating formed by MAO serves the best for β-Ti alloys as orthopedic and dental implants.

  2. Serial Reconstruction and Montaging from Large-Field Electron Microscope Tomograms

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Sébastien; Terada, Masako; Lawrence, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscope tomography [1] has been proven as an essential technique for imaging the structure of cells beyond the range of the light microscope down to the molecular level. However, because of the extreme difference in spatial scales, there is a large gap to be bridged between light and electron microscopy. Various techniques have been developed, including increasing size of the sensor arrays, serial sectioning and montaging. Data sets and reconstructions obtained by the latter techniques generate many 3D reconstructions that need to be glued together to provide information at a larger spatial scale. However, during the course of data acquisition, thin slices may become warped in optical and electron microscope preparations. We review some procedures for de-warping sections and reassembling them into larger reconstructions, and present some data from electron microscopy. PMID:19963656

  3. [The evaluation of acrylic resins for the study of nondecalcified human teeth with the light and electronic microscopes].

    PubMed

    Botti, F; Martignoni, M; Scala, C; Cocchia, D

    1995-04-01

    Resin embedding of human teeth for light and transmission electron microscopic studies becomes difficult without previous decalcification. The limited and slow infiltration of the resin into hard tissues may cause problems during preparation and observation of the samples. Moreover the type of resin that is used may affect the morphologic preservation of both tissues and cellular elements. Recently there has been an increasing number of studies on the application of acrylic resins in light and electron microscopy, in order to overcome problems encountered with the use of epoxy resins still utilized in morphologic studies. We compared different acrylic resins (Technovit 7200 VLC, LR White, LR Gold, Bioacryl) in order to understand which one was more suitable for undecalcified human dental tissues under light and transmission electron microscope. Evaluation of such resins was performed using the following criteria: ease of cutting with ultramicrotome, soft and hard tissues infiltration, uptake of tissue stains for both light and electron microscopy, morphologic preservation and stability under electron beam. This study, carried out on the pulp area comprising predentin and dentin, showed excellent quality of Bioacryl and LR Gold, the two resins presenting, by far, the best results among all the different types tested. The optimal morphologic preservation obtained with such resins is indicated for light and electron microscopic studies, allowing their application in different fields of dental research.

  4. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F.; McDonald, Sarah M.

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  5. Electron microscopic identification of hydrogen peroxide detected in fixed human polymorphonuclear leukocytes during phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Keiichi; Ohno, Norikazu

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) engaged in phagocytosis produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as those that occur in an activated NADPH oxidase reaction, to eliminate ingested microorganisms. The translocation of NADPH oxidase components to produce antimicrobial free radicals from the vesicles to the phagosomes may be important. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) derived from O2- has been observed by electron microscopy using a cerium method. However, 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate can also detect H2O2 through fluorescence. The main objective of the present study was to measure the H2O2-dependent fluorescence of PMNs after opsonized zymosan A (OPZ) phagocytosis using a microplate reader under different fixation conditions, including 0.5, 1, and 10% glutaraldehyde (GA) individually for 1, 5, 10, or 30 min. An additional objective was to visualize, through the use of electron microscopic cytochemistry, the process of H2O2 generation in OPZ phagocytic fixed PMNs. The fixed PMNs showed that the largest fluorescent value was produced by a concentration of 0.5% GA for all fixation times. This suggested that the fixation of PMNs with a high concentration of GA inhibited phagocytosis and produced ROS. In the fixed PMNs, electron microscopic results showed that after 1 min of mixing, some PMNs attached to particles and exhibited mild deposits in their secretory vesicles. When PMNs engulfed particles, free radical-producing vesicles had enhanced reaction deposits 10 min later and fused to the phagosomal membrane, releasing numerous free radicals into the lumen. Time-dependent H2O2 production was enhanced in the secretory vesicles, some of which were fused exactly to the phagosome membranes.

  6. Germination, growth rates, and electron microscope analysis of tomato seeds flown on the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Bridgers, Kevin; Brown, Cecelia Wright

    1995-01-01

    The tomato seeds were flown in orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for nearly six years. During this time, the tomato seeds received an abundant exposure to cosmic radiation and solar wind. Upon the return of the LDEF to earth, the seeds were distributed throughout the United States and 30 foreign countries for analysis. The purpose of the experiment was to determine the long term effect of cosmic rays on living tissue. Our university analysis included germination and growth rates as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray analysis of the control as well as Space-exposed tomato seeds. In analyzing the seeds under the Electron Microscope, usual observations were performed on the nutritional and epidermis layer of the seed. These layers appeared to be more porous in the Space-exposed seeds than on the Earth-based control seeds. This unusual characteristic may explain the increases in the space seeds growth pattern. (Several test results show that the Space-exposed seeds germinate sooner than the Earth-Based seeds. Also, the Space-exposed seeds grew at a faster rate). The porous nutritional region may allow the seeds to receive necessary nutrients and liquids more readily, thus enabling the plant to grow at a faster rate. Roots, leaves and stems were cut into small sections and mounted. After sputter coating the specimens with Argon/Gold Palladium Plasma, they were ready to be viewed under the Electron Microscope. Many micrographs were taken. The X-ray analysis displayed possible identifications of calcium, potassium, chlorine, copper, aluminum, silicon, phosphate, carbon, and sometimes sulfur and iron. The highest concentrations were shown in potassium and calcium. The Space-exposed specimens displayed a high concentration of copper and calcium in the two specimens. There was a significantly high concentration of copper in the Earth-based specimens, whereas there was no copper in the Space-exposed specimens.

  7. Germination, growth rates, and electron microscope analysis of tomato seeds flown on the LDEF

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, E.C. Jr.; Bridgers, K.; Brown, C.W.

    1995-02-01

    The tomato seeds were flown in orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for nearly six years. During this time, the tomato seeds received an abundant exposure to cosmic radiation and solar wind. Upon the return of the LDEF to earth, the seeds were distributed throughout the United States and 30 foreign countries for analysis. The purpose of the experiment was to determine the long term effect of cosmic rays on living tissue. Our university analysis included germination and growth rates as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray analysis of the control as well as Space-exposed tomato seeds. In analyzing the seeds under the Electron Microscope, usual observations were performed on the nutritional and epidermis layer of the seed. These layers appeared to be more porous in the Space-exposed seeds than on the Earth-based control seeds. This unusual characteristic may explain the increases in the space seeds growth pattern. (Several test results show that the Space-exposed seeds germinate sooner than the Earth-Based seeds. Also, the Space-exposed seeds grew at a faster rate). The porous nutritional region may allow the seeds to receive necessary nutrients and liquids more readily, thus enabling the plant to grow at a faster rate. Roots, leaves and stems were cut into small sections and mounted. After sputter coating the specimens with Argon/Gold Palladium Plasma, they were ready to be viewed under the Electron Microscope. Many micrographs were taken. The X-ray analysis displayed possible identifications of calcium, potassium, chlorine, copper, aluminum, silicon, phosphate, carbon, and sometimes sulfur and iron. The highest concentrations were shown in potassium and calcium. The Space-exposed specimens displayed a high concentration of copper and calcium in the two specimens. There was a significantly high concentration of copper in the Earth-based specimens, whereas there was no copper in the Space-exposed specimens.

  8. Three-dimensional architecture of hair-cell linkages as revealedby electron-microscopic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Auer, Manfred; Koster, Bram; Ziese, Ulrike; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Volkmann, Niels; Wang, Da Neng; Hudspeth, A. James

    2006-07-28

    The senses of hearing and balance rest upon mechanoelectrical transduction by the hair bundles of hair cells in the inner ear. Located at the apical cellular surface, each hair bundle comprises several tens of stereocilia and a single kinocilium that are interconnected by extracellular proteinaceous links. Using electron-microscopic tomography of bullfrog saccular sensory epithelia, we examined the three-dimensional structures of ankle or basal links, kinociliary links, and tip links. We observed clear differences in the dimensions and appearances of the three links. We found two distinct populations of tip links suggestive of the involvement of two proteins or splice variants. We noted auxiliary links connecting the upper portions of tip links to the taller stereocilia. Tip links and auxiliary links show a tendency to adopt a globular conformation when disconnected from the membrane surface.

  9. Automated thin-film analyses of hydrated interplanetary dust particles in the analytical electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germani, M. S.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    A 200 keV electron microscope was used to obtain elemental analyses from over 4000 points on thin sections of eight 'layer silicate' class interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Major and minor element abundances from a volume approaching that of a cylinder 50 nm in diameter were observed. Mineral phases and their relative abundances in the thin sections were identified and petrographic characteristics were determined. Three of the particles contained smectite (1.0-1.2 nm basal spacing) and two contained serpentine (0.7 nm basal spacing). The point count analyses and Mg-Si-Fe ternary diagrams show that one of the serpentine-containing IDPs is similar to CI and CM chondritic meteorites. The IDPs exhibit evidence of aqueous processing, but they have typically experienced only short range, submicrometer scale alteration. The IDPs may provide a broad sampling of the asteroid belt.

  10. Construction of a new type of low-energy scanning electron microscope with atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, D. A.; Edmondson, P.; Donnelly, S.; Olsson, E.; Svensson, K.; Bleloch, A.

    2009-05-01

    We describe a new type of scanning electron microscope which works by directly imaging the electron field-emission sites on a nanotip. Electrons are extracted from the nanotip through a nanoscale aperture, accelerated in a high electric field and focussed to a spot using a microscale einzel lens. If the whole microscope (accelerating section and lens) and the focal length are both restricted in size to below 10 microns, then computer simulations show that the effects of aberration are extremely small and it is possible to have a system with approximately unit magnification, at electron energies as low as 300 eV. Thus a typical emission site of 1 nm diameter will produce an image of the same size and an atomic emission site with give a resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm (1-2 Å), and because the beam is not allowed to expand beyond 100nm in diameter the depth of field is large and the contribution to the beam spot size from chromatic aberrations is less than 0.02 nm (0.2 Å) for 500 eV electrons. Since it is now entirely possible to make stable atomic sized emitters (nanopyramids) it is expected that this instrument will have atomic resolution. Furthermore the brightness of the beam is determined only by the field-emission and can be up to a million times larger than in a typical (high-energy) electron microscope. The construction of this microscope, based on using a nanotip electron source which is mounted on a nanopositioner so that it can be positioned at the correct point adjacent to the microscope, entrance aperture, is described. In this geometry the scanning is achieved by moving the sample using piezos. Two methods for the construction of the microscope column are reviewed and the results of preliminary tests are described. The advantages of this low energy, bright-beam, electron microscope with atomic resolution are described. It can be used in either scanning mode or diffraction mode. The major advantage over existing microscopes is that because it works at very low

  11. Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Navajo Sandstone aquifer, Black Mesa, Arizona: Electron microscopic characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Chen; Veblen, D.R.; Blum, A.E.; Chipera, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Naturally weathered feldspar surfaces in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone at Black Mesa, Arizona, was characterized with high-resolution transmission and analytical electron microscope (HRTEM-AEM) and field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). Here, we report the first HRTEM observation of a 10-nm thick amorphous layer on naturally weathered K-feldspar in currently slightly alkaline groundwater. The amorphous layer is probably deficient in K and enriched in Si. In addition to the amorphous layer, the feldspar surfaces are also partially coated with tightly adhered kaolin platelets. Outside of the kaolin coatings, feldspar grains are covered with a continuous 3-5 ??m thick layer of authigenic smectite, which also coats quartz and other sediment grains. Authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth and etch pits were also found on feldspar grains. These characteristics of the aged feldspar surfaces accentuate the differences in reactivity between the freshly ground feldspar powders used in laboratory experiments and feldspar grains in natural systems, and may partially contribute to the commonly observed apparent laboratory-field dissolution rate discrepancy. At Black Mesa, feldspars in the Navajo Sandstone are dissolving at ???105 times slower than laboratory rate at comparable temperature and pH under far from equilibrium condition. The tightly adhered kaolin platelets reduce the feldspar reactive surface area, and the authigenic K-feldspar overgrowth reduces the feldspar reactivity. However, the continuous smectite coating layer does not appear to constitute a diffusion barrier. The exact role of the amorphous layer on feldspar dissolution kinetics depends on the origin of the layer (leached layer versus re-precipitated silica), which is uncertain at present. However, the nanometer thin layer can be detected only with HRTEM, and thus our study raises the possibility of its wide occurrence in geological systems. Rate laws and proposed mechanisms should consider the

  12. Faecal viruses of dogs--an electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Finlaison, D S

    1995-09-01

    Faecal samples from 112 dogs both with and without diarrhoea were screened for parvovirus by a haemagglutination titration test and then examined by electron microscopy for the presence of viruses and virus-like particles. On the basis of morphology eight distinct viruses or virus-like particles were identified. Particles identified were coronaviruses, coronavirus-like particles, rotavirus-like particles, papovavirus-like particles, torovirus-like particles, picornavirus-like particles, 27 nm virus-like particles with projections and parvovirus-like particles which did not cause haemagglutination.

  13. Faecal viruses of dogs--an electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Finlaison, D S

    1995-09-01

    Faecal samples from 112 dogs both with and without diarrhoea were screened for parvovirus by a haemagglutination titration test and then examined by electron microscopy for the presence of viruses and virus-like particles. On the basis of morphology eight distinct viruses or virus-like particles were identified. Particles identified were coronaviruses, coronavirus-like particles, rotavirus-like particles, papovavirus-like particles, torovirus-like particles, picornavirus-like particles, 27 nm virus-like particles with projections and parvovirus-like particles which did not cause haemagglutination. PMID:8545969

  14. Acute hyperuricemic nephropathy in rats. An electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Waisman, J.; Mwasi, L. M.; Bluestone, R.; Klinenberg, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Hyperuricemia and uricosuria were induced in rats fed uric acid and oxonic acid. Kidneys then were studied by light and electron microscopy. After 1 day of hyperuricemia, animals had deposits of uric acid and urate crystals within collecting tubules of the renal papillae, and tubular cells were altered. By 10 days, there was an exudative response with further injury to epithelium. Clear spaces within lumens, epithelium, and neutrophils suggested the presence of crystals; however, there was no direct ultrastructural evidence that neutrophils or epithelial cells ingested crystals and suffered injury. Presumably, crystals readily seen in frozen, unfixed tissue were lost during preparation for electron microscopy. Nonetheless, the ultrastructural findings indicated that hyperuricemic nephropathy was initiated in a fashion analogous to urate arthropathy. Urate crystals formed within collecting tubules, epithelial cells were altered, and most likely there was chemotaxis of neutrophils which underwent degranulation and vacuolation followed by lysis freeing any ingested urate. Release of ingested crystals plus precipitation of new crystals both might serve to sustain the nephritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:1190294

  15. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Jesson, D. E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. S states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z.

  16. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki Shimakura, Tomokazu; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Furutsu, Tadao; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Müller, Heiko; Haider, Maximilian; Tonomura, Akira

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44 pm.

  17. Transmission electron microscope cells for use with liquid samples

    DOEpatents

    Khalid, Waqas; Alivisatos, Paul A.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-08-09

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and devices related to transmission electron microscopy cells for use with liquids. In one aspect a device includes a substrate, a first graphene layer, and a second graphene layer. The substrate has a first surface and a second surface. The first surface defines a first channel, a second channel, and an outlet channel. The first channel and the second channel are joined to the outlet channel. The outlet channel defines a viewport region forming a though hole in the substrate. The first graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including an interior area of the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel. The second graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including open regions defined by the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel.

  18. Scanning electron microscope observations of sublimates from Merapi Volcano, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.

    1993-01-01

    Sublimates were sampled from high-temperature (up to 800??C) fumaroles at Merapi volcano in January 1984. Sampling is accomplished by inserting silica tubes into high-temperature vents. Volcanic glass flows through the tubes and sublimates precipitate on the inner walls in response to the temperature gradient. With decreasing temperature (800-500??C) in the tubes, there are five sublimate zones. Texturally, the sublimate phases grade from large, well-formed crystals at their highest-temperature occurrence to more numerous, smaller crystals that are less perfect at lower temperatures. These changes imply that the crystal nucleation and growth rates increase and decrease, respectively, as temperature decreases. Overall, the textural data suggest that the gas is saturated or slightly super-saturated with the phases at their hottest occurrence, but that the gas becomes increasingly super-saturated with the phases at lower temperatures. -from Author

  19. Natural geometric representation for electron local observables

    SciTech Connect

    Minogin, V.G.

    2014-03-15

    An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: •Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. •Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. •Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

  20. A plastic scintillator film for an electron beam-excitation assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Wataru; Fukuta, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuriko; Nawa, Yasunori; Ono, Atsushi; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-04-01

    A plastic scintillator film for use in an electron beam excitation-assisted (EXA) optical microscope is characterized. The thin film scatters an incident electron beam weakly and generates high intensity nanoscale luminescence excited by the beam spot. For high spatial resolution and signal to noise, an EXA microscope requires a thin high-efficiency scintillator film. Homogeneous plastic scintillators with thicknesses ranging from 60 to 2800 nm were fabricated on silicon nitride via spin coating. The emission intensity was examined as a function of film thickness and the accelerating voltage of the incident electron beam. The emission wavelength can be tuned by changing scintillator materials in the film matrix. To demonstrate a plastic scintillator film performance with an EXA microscope, time-lapse images of yeast cells were acquired.

  1. Tip alignment system in a sextupole-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shengyang; Kapp, Oscar H.

    1993-03-01

    Tip alignment and replacement in ultrahigh vacuum field-emission electron microscopes is traditionally a time-consuming endeavor. A convenient autodrive system for the 200 kV scanning transmission electron microscope was developed to facilitate the alignment of field-emission tips, thus saving a great deal of experimenter time. Under computer control, a series of automatic electrical and mechanical processes are initiated to systematically adjust various parameters to effect passage of the electron beam through the various apertures of the microscope column. The task of ``finding the beam'' is thus performed automatically. In this process the tip holder is moved in a raster parallel to the first anode. Feedback from various detectors placed throughout the column direct the positioning of the tip for optimal alignment. This process is routinely performed in about 45 min.

  2. Sub-Angstrom Low Voltage Performance of a Monochromated, Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Russo, Christopher J.; Benner, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Lowering the electron energy in the transmission electron microscope allows for a significant improvement in contrast of light elements, and reduces knock-on damage for most materials. If low-voltage electron microscopes are defined as those with accelerating voltages below 100 kV, the introduction of aberration correctors and monochromators to the electron microscope column enables Ångstrom-level resolution, which was previously reserved for higher voltage instruments. Decreasing electron energy has three important advantages: 1) knock-on damage is lower, which is critically important for sensitive materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes; 2) cross sections for electron-energy-loss spectroscopy increase, improving signal-to-noise for chemical analysis; 3) elastic scattering cross sections increase, improving contrast in high-resolution, zero-loss images. The results presented indicate that decreasing the acceleration voltage from 200 kV to 80 kV in a monochromated, aberration-corrected microscope enhances the contrast while retaining sub-angstrom resolution. These improvements in low-voltage performance are expected to produce many new results and enable a wealth of new experiments in materials science. PMID:20598206

  3. Electron microscopic structure of human umbilical cord blood lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.; Davis, P.A.; Nordhausen, R.W.; Glueck, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Neonatal VLDL, LDL, HDL/sub 2/ and HDL/sub 3/ were isolated from umbilical cord blood by preparative ultracentrifugation and analyzed by electron microscopy. Cord blood VLDL were round particles that were heterogeneous in size, mean diameter 49.5 +/- 10.3 nm. This size was very similar to that of the normal adult population. Cord blood LDL had a mean diameter of 25.9 +/- 3.4 nm. Most LDL particles were round in profile, but there was always a small fraction of particles which had flattened sides and formed short, linear aggregates. Cord blood HDL/sub 3/ were homogeneous round particles indistinguishable from those of the adult. HDL/sub 2/ from cord blood had a mean diameter of 11.5 +/- 1.7 nm and are larger than the adult population. The HDL/sub 2/ were characterized by the presence of small amounts of rectangular-shaped structures, 14.0 by 10.0 nm in size. These latter particles are enriched in the density fraction d 1.095 g/ml and are unique to the cord blood HDL. The presence of these unusual particles suggests that cord blood HDL may transport lipids in a somewhat different fashion from that of normal adult HDL.

  4. [Examination of the uterine cervix using the scanning electron microscope].

    PubMed

    Lerat, M F; Magre, J; Connehaye, P; Lerat, H; Barreau, A

    1975-01-01

    Scanning by electron microscopy of the cervix of the uterus allows us to study the various aspects, both normal and pathological, as well as the architecture of sections of the organ. All the same, as in all practical examinations carried out using scanning we have to beware of pictures that are but artefacts due to the method of preparation. The views obtained from a normal cervix of from pathological cervices show very different aspects. In the normal cervix the surfaces are more or less smooth and the architecture of the deeper levels shows a thick and regular texture. Infectious lesions of the outer aspect of the cervix show punched-out patterns, like craters, which penetrate more or less deeply into the sub-epithelial plane. While cervical dysplasia shows little except perhaps a more or less bossed-up epithelial surface, cancer of the cervix on the other hand shows a pavement pattern which is irregular. The pavements are formed by buds which are separated by faults which are more or less deep. In section the structures show a degree of disorientation in the texture. After treatment with radium the appearance is rather like ground glass of spiders webs and the architecture of the structures seems to be pock-marked and chaotic.

  5. [Infectious genesis of nephroliths (electron-microscopic study)].

    PubMed

    Didenko, L V; Perepanova, T S; Tolordava, É R; Borovaia, T G; Shevliagina, N V; Égamberdiev, D K; Golovanov, S A; Romanova, Iu M

    2012-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microstructural analysis were employed in the study of nephroliths from patients suffering from nephrolithiasis. Bacterial biofilms, urease producing microorganisms, alkaline reaction of the urine are basic factors for local urine crystallization, formation of the base of the nephroliths and its rigid fixation to the pelvic mucosa. Mechanic trauma of the pelvic tissues by the concrement results in destruction of the pelvic mucosa epithelium at the site of the nephrolith. Subsequent inflammation in the underlying connective tissue contributes to formation of connective tissue commissures fixing the conrement in the kidney. It is shown that bacteria as a part of a biofilm are capable to persist in nephroliths for a long time. Destruction of the stones during operation or lithotripsy can trigger activation of growth of bacteria integrated in the biofilm and cause septic complications. Preservation of commissures with elements of the destroyed stone after lithotripsy or surgical removal is one of the leading causes of recurrent nephrolithiasis. PMID:23074923

  6. Quantum Phenomena Observed Using Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tonomura, Akira

    2011-05-06

    Electron phase microscopy based on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect principle has been used to illuminate fundamental phenomena concerning magnetism and superconductivity by visualizing quantitative magnetic lines of force. This paper deals with confirmation experiments on the AB effect, the magnetization process of tiny magnetic heads for perpendicular recording, and vortex behaviors in high-Tc superconductors.

  7. A transmission electron microscope study of Itokawa regolith grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, Eve L.

    2014-12-01

    Analyses of two olivine-rich particles from asteroid 25143 Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa mission (RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211) show evidence for space weathering processes that occurred in the Itokawa regolith. Submicrometer impact-derived crystalline and glassy grains are observed adhering to the surfaces of the particles, including albite, orthopyroxene, olivine, augite, pyrrhotite, troilite, melt splashes, and melt spherules. Both particles are surrounded by 50- to 100-nm-thick disordered rims that are nanocrystalline, not amorphous, and compositionally similar to the grain cores. A pyrrhotite grain attached to RA-QD02-0125 also shows a disordered rim that is sulfur-depleted with nanophase Fe metal grains decorating the outermost surface. The structurally disordered rims on the Hayabusa particles likely result from atomic displacement damage from solar wind ions given the similarity of the rim thickness compared to the implantation depth of solar wind ions. The outermost few nanometers of the disordered rims are more Si-rich and Mg- and Fe-depleted relative to the cores of the grains and likely represent a minor accumulation of impact-generated vapors or sputter deposits. Nanophase Fe metal particles are present in the rim on RA-QD02-0211 but were not detected in the rim on RA-QD02-0125. Solar flare particle tracks are observed in RA-QD02-0211 but were not observed in RA-QD02-0125, suggesting short surface exposure times for the particles, on the order of approximately 103 to 104 years. This result implies that the optical effects of space weathering develop far more rapidly than was previously recognized.

  8. Germination, growth rates, and electron microscope analysis of tomato seeds flown on the LDEF.

    PubMed

    Hammond, E C; Bridgers, K; Berry, F D

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to determine cosmic rays long-term effects on living tissue. A batch of tomato seeds were flown in orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for almost 6 y. During this time, the seeds received an abundant exposure to cosmic radiation. Upon the return of the LDEF to Earth, the seeds were distributed throughout the United States and 30 foreign countries for analysis. Our university analysis included germination and growth rates as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray analysis of the control as well as space exposed tomato seeds. In analyzing the seeds under the electron microscope, usual observations were performed on the nutritional and epidermis layer of the seed. These layers appeared to be more porous in the space exposed seeds than on Earth-based control seeds. This unusual characteristic may explain the increases in the space seeds growth pattern. (Several test results showed that the space-exposed seeds germinated sooner than Earth-based seeds. Also, the space-exposed seeds grew at a faster rate.) The porous nutritional region may allow the seeds to receive necessary nutrients and liquids more readily, thus enabling the plant to grow at a faster rate. Roots, leaves and stems were cut into small sections and mounted. After sputter coating the specimens with argon/gold palladium plasma, they were viewed under the electron microscope. Many micrographs were taken. The X-ray analysis displayed possible identifications of calcium, potassium, chlorine, copper, aluminum, silicon, phosphate, carbon, and sometimes sulfur and iron. The highest concentrations were shown in potassium and calcium. As a result of the electron interaction and X-ray production within the open seeds, the traditional layers of the space-exposed seed gave peaks of Mg, P and S, while the Earth seed gave an iron peak, which was not detected in the space-exposed seed because of electron beam positioning difference. The space

  9. The scanning electron microscope as a tool in space biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Normal erythrocytes are disc-shaped and are referred to here descriptively as discocytes. Several morphologically variant forms occur nomally but in rather small amounts, usually less than one percent of total. It has been shown though, that spiculed variant forms referred to as echinocytes are generated in significant amounts at zero g. Normal red cells have been stressed in vitro in an effort to duplicate the observed discocyte-echinocyte transformation at zero g. The significance of this transformation to extended stay in space and some of the plausible reasons for this transformation are discussed.

  10. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  11. Quantitative Nanostructure Characterization Using Atomic Pair Distribution Functions Obtained From Laboratory Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Abeykoon M.; Billinge S.; Malliakas, C.D.; Juhas, P.; Bozin, E.S.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

    2012-05-01

    Quantitatively reliable atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) have been obtained from nanomaterials in a straightforward way from a standard laboratory transmission electron microscope (TEM). The approach looks very promising for making electron derived PDFs (ePDFs) a routine step in the characterization of nanomaterials because of the ubiquity of such TEMs in chemistry and materials laboratories. No special attachments such as energy filters were required on the microscope. The methodology for obtaining the ePDFs is described as well as some opportunities and limitations of the method.

  12. Electron microscopic analysis of partially replicated bacteriophage T7 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Burck, K B; Scraba, D G; Miller, R C

    1979-01-01

    Partially replicated bacteriophage T7 DNA was isolated from Escherichia coli infected with UV-irradiated T7 bacteriophage and was analyzed by electron microscopy. The analysis determined the distribution of eye forms and forks in the partially replicated molecules. Eye forms and forks in unit length molecules were aligned with respect to the left end of the T7 genome, and segments were scored for replication in each molecule. The resulting histogram showed that only the left 25 to 30% of the molecules was replicated. Several different origins of DNA replication were used to initiate replication in the UV-irradiated experiments in which 32P-labeled progeny DNA from UV-irradiated phage was annealed with ordered restriction fragments of T7 DNA (K. B. Burck and R. C. Miller, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75:6144--6148, 1978). Both analyses support partial-replica hypotheses (N. A. Barricelli and A. H. Doermann, Virology 13:460--476, 1961; Doermann et al., J. Cell. comp. Physiol. 45[Suppl.]:51--74, 1955) as an explanation for the distribution of marker rescue frequencies during cross-reactivation; i.e., replication proceeds in a bidirectional manner from an origin to a site of UV damage, and those regions of the genome which replicate most efficiently are rescued most efficiently by a coinfecting phage. In addition, photoreactivation studies support the hypothesis that thymine dimers are the major UV damage blocking cross-reactivation in the right end of the T7 genome. Images PMID:291738

  13. Correcting for 3D distortion when using backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) can produce a topographic surface relief of a physical object under examination, in addition to its two-dimensional (2D) image. This topographic surface relief is especially helpful when dealing with porous rock because it may elucidate the pore-space structure as well as grain shape and size. Whether the image accurately reproduces the physical object depends on the management of the hardware, acquisition, and postprocessing. Two problems become apparent during testing: (a) a topographic surface relief of a precision ball bearing is distorted and does not correspond to the physical dimensions of the actual sphere and (b) an image of a topographic surface relief of a Berea sandstone is geometrically tilted and topographically distorted even after standard corrections are applied. The procedure presented here is to ensure the veracity of the image, and includes: (a) adjusting the brightness and contrast levels originally provided by the manufacturer and (b) tuning the amplifiers of the backscatter detector plates to be equal to each other, and producing zero voltage when VPSEM is idle. This procedure is tested and verified on the said two physical samples. SCANNING 31: 59-64, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D.; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2010-05-21

    We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

  15. Ion and electron beam nanofabrication of the which-way double-slit experiment in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Frabboni, Stefano

    2010-12-27

    We have realized a which-way experiment closely resembling the original Feynman's proposal exploiting focused ion beam milling to prepare two nanoslits and electron beam induced deposition to grow, selectively over one of them, electron transparent layers of low atomic number amorphous material to realize a which-way detector for high energy electrons. By carrying out the experiment in an electron microscope equipped with an energy filter, we show that the inelastic scattering of electron transmitted through amorphous layers of different thicknesses provides the control of the dissipative interaction process responsible for the localization phenomena which cancels out the interference effects.

  16. Electronic Single Molecule Measurements with the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Jong One

    Richard Feynman said "There's plenty of room at the bottom". This inspired the techniques to improve the single molecule measurements. Since the first single molecule study was in 1961, it has been developed in various field and evolved into powerful tools to understand chemical and biological property of molecules. This thesis demonstrates electronic single molecule measurement with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and two of applications of STM; Break Junction (BJ) and Recognition Tunneling (RT). First, the two series of carotenoid molecules with four different substituents were investigated to show how substituents relate to the conductance and molecular structure. The measured conductance by STM-BJ shows that Nitrogen induces molecular twist of phenyl distal substituents and conductivity increasing rather than Carbon. Also, the conductivity is adjustable by replacing the sort of residues at phenyl substituents. Next, amino acids and peptides were identified through STM-RT. The distribution of the intuitive features (such as amplitude or width) are mostly overlapped and gives only a little bit higher separation probability than random separation. By generating some features in frequency and cepstrum domain, the classification accuracy was dramatically increased. Because of large data size and many features, supporting vector machine (machine learning algorithm for big data) was used to identify the analyte from a data pool of all analytes RT data. The STM-RT opens a possibility of molecular sequencing in single molecule level. Similarly, carbohydrates were studied by STM-RT. Carbohydrates are difficult to read the sequence, due to their huge number of possible isomeric configurations. This study shows that STM-RT can identify not only isomers of mono-saccharides and disaccharides, but also various mono-saccharides from a data pool of eleven analytes. In addition, the binding affinity between recognition molecule and analyte was investigated by comparing with

  17. A new method of magnifying photographic images using the scanning electron microscope in the backscattered electron detection mode

    SciTech Connect

    Frasca, P.; Galkin, B.; Feig, S.; Muir, H.; Soriano, R.; Kaufman, H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a new method of magnifying small images in photographic film by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) operated in the backscattered electron detection mode. The study included tests of several types of radiographic film, transmission electron microscopy film, and black and white 35 mm film. The electron optical enlargement method is particularly useful in situations where the film sample is opaque to light and for generating enlarged images at magnifications beyond the reach of light optical enlargement methods, i.e. up to approximately 2000X with ease and rapidity in a single step. The electron optical enlargements compare favorably in contrast and detail with the enlargements made with a light microscope and with a darkroom enlarger.

  18. Effects of microscopic transport coefficients on fission observables calculated by the Langevin equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usang, M. D.; Ivanyuk, F. A.; Ishizuka, C.; Chiba, S.

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear fission is treated by using the Langevin dynamical description with macroscopic and microscopic transport coefficients (mass and friction tensors), and it is elucidated how the microscopic (shell and pairing) effects in the transport coefficients, especially their dependence on temperature, affects various fission observables. We found that the microscopic transport coefficients, calculated by linear response theory, change drastically as a function of temperature: in general, the friction increases with growing temperature while the mass tensor decreases. This temperature dependence brings a noticeable change in the mass distribution and kinetic energies of fission fragments from nuclei around 236U at an excitation energy of 20 MeV. The prescission kinetic energy decreases from 25 MeV at low temperature to about 2.5 MeV at high temperature. In contrast, the Coulomb kinetic energy increases as the temperature increases. Interpolating the microscopic transport coefficients among the various temperatures enabled our Langevin equation to use the microscopic transport coefficients at a deformation-dependent local temperature of the dynamical evolution. This allowed us to compare directly the fission observables of both macroscopic and microscopic calculations, and we found almost identical results under the conditions considered in this work.

  19. Embryonic development of rat diaphragm. An electron-microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Angelov, D N; Manolov, S A

    1989-01-01

    Ultrastructural aspects of white Wistar rats diaphragm during part of its embryonic development (from the 13th embryonic day till birth) have been studied. The dominating structures observed in the period of the thirteenth embryonic day (ED 13) are undifferentiated cells, their cytoplasm being poor in organelles but rich in ribosomes. The close examination of these cells reveals that some of them possess a kind of thin filaments near their Golgi zones. At ED 14-15 clusters of myoblasts are readily detected (their cytoplasm containing a lot of glycogen granules and myofibrils, some of them even with Z-line material); contact sites between their cell membranes appear, somewhere forming specialized junctions; in this period the myoblasts start to fuse giving rise to the primary generation of myotubes. At ED 16-17 the quantity of myofilaments and glycogen granules increases alongside with the initiation of a basal-lamina formation; occasionally some oval, undifferentiated cells very similar to those viewed at ED 13 are found. At ED 18-19 the cytoplasm of the myotubes contains a lot of myofibrils and a well-developed endoplasmic reticulum; at some places the adjacent membranes still form deep interdigitations. At the end of the prenatal myogenesis (ED 20-21) most of the muscle cells are close to their mature morphological appearance--the sarcomers are well-organized and some nuclei present a peripheral localization; nevertheless, in this period new generations of myotubes can be also distinguished.

  20. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged.

  1. Microscopic investigation of electronic inhomogeneity induced by substitutions in quantum critical CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Sakai, Hironori; Zhu, Jianxin; Wakeham, Nicholas; Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Yo; Kambe, Shin; Bauer, Eric; Thompson, Joe

    In Cd-doped CeCoIn5 magnetic order can be suppressed by pressure giving rise to a dome of superconductivity surrounding a quantum critical point (QCP). However, the typical non-Fermi liquid (NFL) signatures expected at this QCP are absent. In contrast, in Sn-doped CeRhIn5, pressure also suppresses magnetism giving rise to a dome of superconductivity, but in this case, the NFL signatures ARE observed at the QCP. We presents results using nuclear quadrupole resonance to probe microscopically the response of the prototypical quantum-critical metal CeCoIn5 to substitutions of small amounts of Sn and Cd for In. These substituents induce very different local electronic environments as observed by site dependent spin lattice relaxation rates 1/T1. Cd-doped samples generate a much more inhomogeneous spin environment than observed in Sn-doped samples. This difference naturally explains the presence and absence of NFL signatures at the respective QCPs mentioned above. The effects found here illustrate the need for care in general when interpreting NFL properties determined by macroscopic measurements achieved by chemical substitutions.

  2. Cryoscanning electron microscopic study of the surface amorphous layer of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S; Yonekubo, S; Kurogouchi, Y

    1995-01-01

    In order to elucidate the structure near the articular surface, frozen unfixed hydrated articular cartilage with subchondral bone from the pig knee was examined using a cryoscanning electron microscope (cryo-SEM). This method is considered to reduce the introduction of artefacts due to fixation and drying. An amorphous layer, without a collagen-fibril network or chondrocytes, covered most of the surface of the cartilage. This layer was termed the surface amorphous layer. It showed various appearances, which were classified into 4 groups. The average thickness of the layer did not differ among the 8 anatomical regions from which the specimens were taken. The thickness of the layer was found to correlate with the type of appearance of the layer. The 4 appearances associated with thicknesses in descending order are: 'streaked', 'foliate', 'spotted', and 'vestigial'. The surface layer observed in the cryo-SEM was thicker than that observed by a conventional SEM. This difference may be attributable to dehydration of the specimen used in specimen preparation for the latter technique. The layer was also observed in articular cartilage taken from human and rabbit knees. The layer was found to be unstable and to have very variable features. Its thickness and appearance may be influenced by various factors such as dehydration, fluid absorption or mechanical stress. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:7592006

  3. Copper thick film sintering studies in an environmental scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Link, L F; Gerristead, W R; Tamhankar, S

    1993-08-01

    The significance of the ElectroScan environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) as a processing tool for studying dynamic morphological changes under controlled temperature/atmosphere conditions was evaluated. The ability to observe dynamic processes in situ, which cannot be achieved by other means, is critical to understanding microstructural formation. Processing of printed copper thick films on ceramics was used as a test case, wherein morphological changes associated with the steps of organic binder removal and sintering of copper particles were observed/examined in real time. Good agreement was seen between microstructures obtained in the ESM and those achieved in a belt furnace when similar process variables were used. When processed in atmospheres which were proven to induce sintering in a conventional belt furnace, sintering was evident in both cases, and the microstructural changes were documented on video-tapes in real time. Determination of critical event temperatures was achieved--that is, binder burnout occurring between 270 degrees and 350 degrees C, onset of oxidation at 520 degrees C, and sintering starting at 770 degrees C. It was thus verified that the microstructural changes during the copper thick film sintering process can be observed in situ using an ESEM.

  4. Conductive resins improve charging and resolution of acquired images in electron microscopic volume imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huy Bang; Thai, Truc Quynh; Saitoh, Sei; Wu, Bao; Saitoh, Yurika; Shimo, Satoshi; Fujitani, Hiroshi; Otobe, Hirohide; Ohno, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in serial block-face imaging using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have enabled the rapid and efficient acquisition of 3-dimensional (3D) ultrastructural information from a large volume of biological specimens including brain tissues. However, volume imaging under SEM is often hampered by sample charging, and typically requires specific sample preparation to reduce charging and increase image contrast. In the present study, we introduced carbon-based conductive resins for 3D analyses of subcellular ultrastructures, using serial block-face SEM (SBF-SEM) to image samples. Conductive resins were produced by adding the carbon black filler, Ketjen black, to resins commonly used for electron microscopic observations of biological specimens. Carbon black mostly localized around tissues and did not penetrate cells, whereas the conductive resins significantly reduced the charging of samples during SBF-SEM imaging. When serial images were acquired, embedding into the conductive resins improved the resolution of images by facilitating the successful cutting of samples in SBF-SEM. These results suggest that improving the conductivities of resins with a carbon black filler is a simple and useful option for reducing charging and enhancing the resolution of images obtained for volume imaging with SEM. PMID:27020327

  5. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha Ropers, Claus

    2015-11-07

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal growing on pyroxene crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of a four-micron size iron crystal growing on a pyroxene crystal (calcium-magnesium-iron silicate) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The well developed crystal faces indicate that the crystal was formed from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling.

  7. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  8. Practical application of HgI2 detectors to a space-flight scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.; Albee, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric iodide X-ray detectors have been undergoing tests in a prototype scanning electron microscope system being developed for unmanned space flight. The detector program addresses the issues of geometric configuration in the SEM, compact packaging that includes separate thermoelectric coolers for the detector and FET, X-ray transparent hermetic encapsulation and electrical contacts, and a clean vacuum environment.

  9. The microscopic world: A demonstration of electron microscopy for younger students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Linda L.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose is to excite students about the importance of scientific investigation and demonstrate why they should look at things in greater detail, extending beyond superficial examination. The topics covered include: microscopy, scanning electron microscopes, high magnification, and the scientific method.

  10. Transmission electron microscope specimen preparation for exploring the buried interfaces in plan view.

    PubMed

    Radnóczi, G Z; Pécz, B

    2006-12-01

    A relatively easy and convenient process for the preparation of transmission electron microscope specimens of buried interfaces is described. The method is based on the alignment and realignment of the specimen rotation centre during ion milling. The ion-milling time interval in which good samples are obtained is substantially extended in this way.

  11. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses work done to assess the design of a focusing column in a miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for use in-situ on the Moon-in particular for mineralogical analysis. The MSFC beam column design uses purely electrostatic fields for focusing, because of the severe constraints on mass and electrical power consumption imposed by the goals of lunar exploration and of spaceflight in general. The resolution of an SEM ultimately depends on the size of the focused spot of the scanning beam probe, for which the stated goal here is a diameter of 10 nanometers. Optical aberrations are the main challenge to this performance goal, because they blur the ideal geometrical optical image of the electron source, effectively widening the ideal spot size of the beam probe. In the present work the optical aberrations of the mini SEM focusing column were assessed using direct tracing of non-paraxial rays, as opposed to mathematical estimates of aberrations based on paraxial ray-traces. The geometrical ray-tracing employed here is completely analogous to ray-tracing as conventionally understood in the realm of photon optics, with the major difference being that in electron optics the lens is simply a smoothly varying electric field in vacuum, formed by precisely machined electrodes. Ray-tracing in this context, therefore, relies upon a model of the electrostatic field inside the focusing column to provide the mathematical description of the "lens" being traced. This work relied fundamentally on the boundary element method (BEM) for this electric field model. In carrying out this research the authors discovered that higher accuracy in the field model was essential if aberrations were to be reliably assessed using direct ray-tracing. This led to some work in testing alternative techniques for modeling the electrostatic field. Ultimately, the necessary accuracy was attained using a BEM

  12. Facilities for in situ ion beam studies in transmission electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.W.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and electron diffraction from very small regions to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are ten such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the USA. General specifications of facilities which are operational in 1993 are summarized, and additional facilities which are planned or being proposed are briefly described.

  13. Towards native-state imaging in biological context in the electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Anne E.; Armer, Hannah E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Modern cell biology is reliant on light and fluorescence microscopy for analysis of cells, tissues and protein localisation. However, these powerful techniques are ultimately limited in resolution by the wavelength of light. Electron microscopes offer much greater resolution due to the shorter effective wavelength of electrons, allowing direct imaging of sub-cellular architecture. The harsh environment of the electron microscope chamber and the properties of the electron beam have led to complex chemical and mechanical preparation techniques, which distance biological samples from their native state and complicate data interpretation. Here we describe recent advances in sample preparation and instrumentation, which push the boundaries of high-resolution imaging. Cryopreparation, cryoelectron microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy strive to image samples in near native state. Advances in correlative microscopy and markers enable high-resolution localisation of proteins. Innovation in microscope design has pushed the boundaries of resolution to atomic scale, whilst automatic acquisition of high-resolution electron microscopy data through large volumes is finally able to place ultrastructure in biological context. PMID:19916039

  14. Design and implementation of a fs-resolved transmission electron microscope based on thermionic gun technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, L.; Masiel, D. J.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the design and implementation of a femtosecond-resolved ultrafast transmission electron microscope is presented, based on a thermionic gun geometry. Utilizing an additional magnetic lens between the electron acceleration and the nominal condenser lens system, a larger percentage of the electrons created at the cathode are delivered to the specimen without degrading temporal, spatial and energy resolution significantly, while at the same time maintaining the femtosecond temporal resolution. Using the photon-induced near field electron microscopy effect (PINEM) on silver nanowires the cross-correlation between the light and electron pulses was measured, showing the impact of the gun settings and initiating laser pulse duration on the electron bunch properties. Tuneable electron pulses between 300 fs and several ps can be obtained, and an overall energy resolution around 1 eV was achieved.

  15. Equine laryngeal hemiplegia. Part II. An electron microscopic study of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Cahill, J I; Goulden, B E

    1986-10-01

    The recurrent laryngeal nerves were examined by electron microscopy in five control, four subclinical and four clinical laryngeal hemiplegic horses. In addition, the peroneal nerve was examined in two horses in the latter group. The distally distributed loss of large myelinated fibres in the left recurrent laryngeal nerve seen by light microscopy was confirmed. In addition, active axonal pathology was found to be more evident than indicated by light microscopic investigations. The onion bulb formations observed indicated the repetitive nature of the damaging influence to nerve fibres. Although the pathological changes were most obvious in the distal left recurrent laryngeal nerve, alterations similar in type and distribution were present in other areas of the left and right nerves, and in the distal hindlimb nerves. The observation of fibres with inappropriately thick myelin sheaths relative to their axonal calibre, was confirmed statistically by determining the regressions of axis cylinder perimeter against the number of myelin lamellae. In conclusion, the peripheral nerve pathology of equine laryngeal hemiplegia was demonstrated to be a distally distributed loss of myelinated fibres, with considerable active axonal damage, in conjunction with axonal atrophy. These features suggest that this disease may be classified as a distal axonopathy.

  16. Electron microscopic studies of damage evolution in fission neutron-irradiated metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Kiritani, M.; Kitagawa, K.; Yamakawa, K.

    1985-08-01

    The same kinds of specimens of both foil and bulk of metals, as those irradiated previously with D-T neutrons at RTNS-II, were irradiated with fission neutrons at KUR. The irradiations were performed at 20 and 350 K to fluences of 5 × 10 16 and 1 × 10 19 n/cm 2(E > 0.1 MeV), respectively. The results on pure gold are described to exemplify the typical value of cascade defects. A cascade in fission neutron irradiated gold consists of 2.2 small defects on average. This is compared with 6.7 small defects for the fusion neutron irradiation. The cross section for the formation of observed cascade defects is 0.15 barn, which is a twelveth of that in fusion neutron irradiation. The cryotransfer of the thin foil to the electron microscope was carried out to observe the cascade defects at low temperatures. The average size of cascade defects in fission neutron-irradiated gold was much smaller than that in fusion irradiation. The damage evolution in the bulk specimen was also examined.

  17. Scanning electron microscopic study on the lingual papillae of the Japanese insectivora.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Arai, S; Tomo, S; Shimoda, T; Shimamura, A; Yamada, H

    1989-03-01

    The tongue and lingual papillae of the Japanese Insectivora, the Shinto shrew (Sorex caecuiens saevus), the long-clawed shrew (S. unguiculatus), the dsinezumi shrew (Crocidura dsinezumi dsinezumi) and the Japanese water shrew (Chimarrogale himalyica platycephala), were observed by scanning electron microscope. The tongue of these animals had two vallate papillae. In two species of the Sorex a papilla in the vallate papilla was surrounded by two separated trenches, but in the other species it was surrounded by only a continuous trench and a clear vallum. The fungiform papillae in the Sorex were less developed than those of the other species. In the Sorex and Crocidura, there was no filiform papilla on the lingual apex. These genera, however, have papillary projections in the margin of the lingual apex. The results of this investigation suggest that the Sorex and Crocidura indicate an ancient form of the mammalian tongue. These characters, furthermore, were compared among seven species in six genera added three species observed by Kobayashi et al. (1983) to this study.

  18. Ultra-structural hair alterations in Friedreich's ataxia: A scanning electron microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Turkmenoglu, F Pinar; Kasirga, U Baran; Celik, H Hamdi

    2015-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder involving progressive damage to the central and peripheral nervous systems and cardiomyopathy. FRDA is caused by the silencing of the FXN gene and reduced levels of the encoded protein, frataxin. Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that functions primarily in iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. Skin disorders including hair abnormalities have previously been reported in patients with mitochondrial disorders. However, to our knowledge, ultra-structural hair alterations in FRDA were not demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to determine ultra-structural alterations in the hairs of FRDA patients as well as carriers. Hair specimen from four patients, who are in different stages of the disease, and two carriers were examined by scanning electron microscope. Thin and weak hair follicles with absence of homogeneities on the cuticular surface, local damages of the cuticular layer, cuticular fractures were detected in both carriers and patients, but these alterations were much more prominent in the hair follicles of patients. In addition, erosions on the surface of the cuticle and local deep cavities just under the cuticular level were observed only in patients. Indistinct cuticular pattern, pores on the cuticular surface, and presence of concavities on the hair follicle were also detected in patients in later stages of the disease. According to our results, progression of the disease increased the alterations on hair structure. We suggest that ultra-structural alterations observed in hair samples might be due to oxidative stress caused by deficient frataxin expression in mitochondria.

  19. A light and electron microscope study on the origin of Foà-Kurloff cells.

    PubMed

    Kittas, C; Parsons, M A; Henry, L

    1979-06-01

    Numerous Foà-Kurloff (FK) cells have been found in the circulation, spleen, bone marrow, thymus and placenta of guinea pigs under endogenous or exogenous oestrogenic stimulation. The origin of these cells is obscure. In the present experiment, the distribution of FK cells in organs other than those stated above was studied following gonadectomy and hexoestrol administration in guinea pigs of both sexes for either 1 or 10 weeks. More FK cells than those expected from the vascularity of the organ were found in the liver and lungs of male and female animals. The number of FK cells in these organs was larger after the long-term treatment with hexoestrol and it was accompanied by a significant decrease in the number of Kupffer cells of the liver. The latter observation is in contrast to previous reports of increased numbers of Kupffer cells in the liver of oestrogen-receiving mice, a species not producing FK cells. These observations suggest a relation between the two types of cells. No transformation of mature Kupffer cells into FK cells was seen with the electron microscope. However, other findings suggest that both Kupffer cells and FK cells may well be derived from a common precursor of MPS in the bone marrow.

  20. Electron microscope studies. Progress report, 1 July 1964--1 June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  1. A STUDY OF THE ULTRASTRUCTURAL LOCALIZATION OF HAIR KERATIN SYNTHESIS UTILIZING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC AUTORADIOGRAPHY IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Takashi

    1964-01-01

    The sites of the incorporation of labeled cystine into keratinizing structures were studied in electron microscopic autoradiographs. The tracer used was cystine labeled with S35 emitting long-range ionizing particles. During exposure for 1 to 2 months, according to our method of electron microscopic autoradiography, emulsion-coated specimens were exposed to a static magnetic field which appeared to result in a marked increase in the number of reacted silver grains. In young Swiss mice receiving intraperitoneal injections at 1, 3, and 6 hours before biopsy, conventional autoradiography demonstrated that S35-cystine was intensely localized in the keratogenous zone of anagen hair follicles, and that the radioactivity there increased in intensity progressively with time while the radioactivity in the hair bulb always remained very low. Our observations with electron microscopic autoradiography in a magnetic field appeared to indicate that at 3 and 6 hours after injection the S35-cystine was directly and specifically incorporated into tonofibrils in the hair cortex and into amorphous keratin granules of the hair cuticle layer, possibly without any particular concentration of this substance in the other cellular components. There seemed to be an appreciable concentration of cystine in tonofibrils of the cuticle of the inner root sheath. However, trichohyalin granules in the hair medulla and inner root sheath failed to show any evidence of cystine concentration. The improved sensitivity of the electron microscopic autoradiography with S35-cystine appeared to be partly due to the application of a static magnetic field. However, the reason for this could not be explained theoretically. PMID:14154496

  2. In Situ Microstructural Control and Mechanical Testing Inside the Transmission Electron Microscope at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    With atomic-scale imaging and analytical capabilities such as electron diffraction and energy-loss spectroscopy, the transmission electron microscope has allowed access to the internal microstructure of materials like no other microscopy. It has been mostly a passive or post-mortem analysis tool, but that trend is changing with in situ straining, heating and electrical biasing. In this study, we design and demonstrate a multi-functional microchip that integrates actuators, sensors, heaters and electrodes with freestanding electron transparent specimens. In addition to mechanical testing at elevated temperatures, the chip can actively control microstructures (grain growth and phase change) of the specimen material. Using nano-crystalline aluminum, nickel and zirconium as specimen materials, we demonstrate these novel capabilities inside the microscope. Our approach of active microstructural control and quantitative testing with real-time visualization can influence mechanistic modeling by providing direct and accurate evidence of the fundamental mechanisms behind materials behavior.

  3. In Situ Observation and Selective Electrochemical Deposition of Polypyrrole by Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Kazunori; Kaneto, Keiichi

    1993-06-01

    Electrodeposition of polypyrrole and its selective deposition on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate was observed in situ by means of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in an electrochemical cell. The results indicated that the STM can be used to manipulate the electrodeposition of conducting polymers.

  4. Transformation of diamond nanoparticles into onion-like carbon by electron irradiation studied directly inside an ultrahigh-vacuum transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, J.; Mori, H.; Taguchi, E.; Yasuda, H.; Kinoshita, H.; Ohmae, N.

    2005-05-30

    In situ observation of the transformation of diamond nanoparticles (DNP) into onion-like carbon (OLC) was made during electron-beam irradiation inside an ultrahigh-vacuum transmission electron microscope at 300 kV with 8.5x10{sup 23} e/m{sup 2}. 5 nm DNP changed into OLC within about 10 min of irradiation, while 20 nm DNP did not change to OLC but to graphite. Therefore, the size effect is critical to the formation of OLC. The mechanism of formation of OLC from DNP is discussed.

  5. Observation of organelle by a laser plasma x-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Kishimoto, Maki; Ishino, Masahiko; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Shinohara, Kunio

    2012-07-01

    Contact x-ray microscopy has a potential to image wet biological specimens in natural condition. It is very important to identify obtained features in the x-ray images, since x-ray microscopes have potential to image features that have not been visualized yet. We have proposed to compare the x-ray images of the biological specimens with the fluorescence images and to identify the features found in the x-ray images. We have succeeded to observe fine structures of the cellular organelles such as mitochondria by the soft x-ray microscope.

  6. Scanning image detection (SID) system for conventional transmission electron microscope (CTEM) images.

    PubMed

    Tanji, T; Tomita, M; Kobayashi, H

    1990-08-01

    A new image detection system has been developed to display transmission electron microscope (TEM) images on a CRT without a video camera system. Deflection coils placed in both the upper space of an objective lens and in the lower space of the first intermediate lens scan a small electron probe simultaneously. The electrical signal acquired through an improved scintillator and a photomultiplier is synchronized with the scanning signal and displayed in a similar fashion to a conventional scanning TEM (STEM) instrument. A preliminary system using a 100 kV conventional TEM (CTEM) equipped with a hairpin-type electron gun, produced an image with a spatial resolution of 1 nm.

  7. Analysis with electron microscope of multielement samples using pure element standards

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne E.

    1987-01-01

    A method and modified analytical electron microscope for determining the concentration of elements in a multielement sample by exposing samples with differing thicknesses for each element to a beam of electrons, simultaneously measuring the electron dosage and x-ray intensities for each sample of element to determine a "K.sub.AB " value to be used in the equation ##EQU1## where I is intensity and C is concentration for elements A and B, and exposing the multielement sample to determine the concentrations of the elements in the sample.

  8. Analysis with electron microscope of multielement samples using pure element standards

    DOEpatents

    King, W.E.

    1986-01-06

    This disclosure describes a method and modified analytical electron microscope for determining the concentration of elements in a multielement sample by exposing samples with differing thicknesses for each element to a beam of electrons. Simultaneously the electron dosage and x-ray intensities are measured for each sample of element to determine a ''K/sub AB/'' value to be used in the equation (I/sub A/I/sub B/) = K/sub AB/ (C/sub A//C/sub B/), where I is intensity and C is concentration for elements A and B. The multielement sample is exposed to determine the concentrations of the elements in the sample.

  9. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  10. Enhanced contrast separation in scanning electron microscopes via a suspended-thin sample approach.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuan; Wang, Li; Guo, Zhenxi; Wei, Bin; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yinqi; Sui, Manling; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    A suspended-thin-sample (STS) approach for signal selection and contrast separation is developed in scanning electron microscopes with commonly used primary beam energies and traditional detectors. Topography contrast, electron channeling contrast and composition contrast are separated and largely enhanced from suspended thin samples of several hundred nanometers in thickness, which is less than the escape depth of backscattered electrons. This imaging technique enables to detect relatively pure secondary electron and elastic backscattered electron singles, whereas suppress multiple inelastic scattering effects. The provided contrast features are different from those of bulk samples, which are largely mixed with inelastic scattering effects. The STS imaging concept and method could be expected to have more applications in distinguishing materials of nanostructures, multilayers, compounds and composites, as well as in SEM-based electron backscatter diffraction, cathodoluminesence, and x-ray microanalysis.

  11. Confocal microscope observations of the cornea after excimer laser refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierek-Lapinska, Ariadna; Gierek-Ciaciura, Stanislawa; Mrukwa, Ewa; Rokita-Wala, Iwona; Sarzynski, Adam

    1998-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to observe human corneas after Photorefractive keratectomy, in vivo, using the Scanning Slit Confocal Microscope `Confoscan P4' (Tomey). Material and method: The material consists of 80 corneas of 45 patients where in vivo, non-invasive evaluation of the corneal structures was performed with a confocal microscope. The confocal microscopic examination was performed in cases after excimer laser refractive surgery and analyzed together with the type of the procedure (myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism correction), and with the patients' age and sex. The results obtained in the right and left eye of each patient after bilateral procedures were compared. The state of the cornea was analyzed in relation to follow-up time. Results: The observations consist of the structure of corneal epithelium, stromal keratocytes, topography of nerve fibers, appearance of Bowman's and Descemet's membranes and condition of endothelial cells. Conclusion: The confocal microscope allows non-invasive in vivo observations of the corneal structures and is capable of the evaluation of corneal healing after excimer laser refractive procedures.

  12. Observation of Wet Biological Specimen by Soft X-Ray Microscope with Zone Plates at UVSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Taniguchi, Mieko; Shimanuki, Yoshio; Sugiyama, Masaru; Ohba, Akira; Kihara, Hiroshi

    1992-11-01

    With an environmental chamber (wet cell) using polypropylene foils as windows, wet specimens were observed at a wavelength of 4.6 nm with a zone plate imaging X-ray microscope installed at the beamline 8 A of UVSOR (synchrotron radiation facility at Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Japan). Images of spicule of trepang, human blood cells and cultured protoplast of plant cell stained by methyl mercury were observed with good contrast.

  13. Theoretical aspects of image formation in the aberration-corrected electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Rose, H

    2010-04-01

    The theoretical aspects of image formation in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) are outlined and revisited in detail by taking into account the elastic and inelastic scattering. In particular, the connection between the exit wave and the scattering amplitude is formulated for non-isoplanatic conditions. Different imaging modes are investigated by utilizing the scattering amplitude and employing the generalized optical theorem. A novel obstruction-free anamorphotic phase shifter is proposed which enables one to shift the phase of the scattered wave by an arbitrary amount over a large range of spatial frequencies. In the optimum case, the phase of the scattered wave and the introduced phase shift add up to -pi/2 giving negative contrast. We obtain these optimum imaging conditions by employing an aberration-corrected electron microscope operating at voltages below the knock-on threshold for atom displacement and by shifting optimally the phase of the scattered electron wave. The optimum phase shift is achieved by adjusting appropriately the constant phase shift of the phase plate and the phase shift resulting from the defocus and the spherical aberration of the corrected objective lens. The realization of this imaging mode is the aim of the SALVE project (Sub-A Low-Voltage Electron microscope).

  14. Prevalence and Scanning Electron Microscopic Identification of Anoplocephalid Cestodes among Small Ruminants in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Tetsuya; Ba, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anoplocephalid cestodes in sheep and goats in Senegal. Intestines of 462 sheep and 48 goats were examined; 47.4% of sheep and 6.2% of goats were infected. The species identified and their prevalence were, among sheep, Avitellina centripunctata 38.7%, Moniezia expansa 15.4%, Stilesia globipunctata 16.7%, and Thysaniezia ovilla 0.4%. Among goats, they were M. expansa 6.2% and T. ovilla 2.1%. The prevalence of all species was not statistically different between dry and rainy seasons. The infections were single or multiple. Indeed, 56.2% of sheep were infected by a single species, 37.4% by two species, and 6.4% by three species. For goats, 66.7% were infected by M. expansa and 33.3% by both M. expansa and T. ovilla. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations of tapeworms show the general diagnosis characters of these species. PMID:27597893

  15. Viability of in-situ liquid reactions inside a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Kaustav

    Atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) analysis of bismuth nanoparticles was conducted using a single tilt holder and a fluid sample holder. There was a good correlation of the average size of the nanoparticles seen in the single tilt holder (11 +/- 2nm) and those viewed in the fluid stage were (10 +/- 3nm). The smallest particle viewed in the fluid stage was ˜6nm. An in-situ TEM reaction involving the growth of PbSe nanowires was successfully performed using the fluid stage. Nanostructures were observed during the reaction. Post-mortem analysis of SiN windows revealed the formation of crystalline nano-clusters and nano-tubular structures having an average diameter of 4.02 +/- 0.4nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy from the SiN windows that make up the cell in the fluid stage showed the presence of Pb and Se which proves that the fluid stage is capable of performing in-situ TEM chemical reactions. With that evidence, controlled in-situ TEM reactions can be carried out to further expand the capabilities (such as resolution) of the fluid stage.

  16. Anchoring structure of the calvarial periosteum revealed by focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Shingo; Ohta, Keisuke; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Uemura, Kei-ichiro; Togo, Akinobu; Yoshitomi, Munetake; Okayama, Satoko; Kusukawa, Jingo; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    An important consideration in regeneration therapy is the fact that the tissue surrounding an organ supports its function. Understanding the structure of the periosteum can contribute to more effective bone regeneration therapy. As a cellular source, the periosteum also assists bone growth and fracture healing; this further necessitates its direct contact with the bone. However, its anchoring strength appears to be inexplicably stronger than expected. In this study, we used focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography to investigate ultrathin serial sections as well as the three dimensional ultrastructure of the periosteum to clarify the architecture of its anchoring strength, as such assessments are challenging using conventional methods. We discovered perforating fibres that arise from the bone surface at 30 degree angles. Additionally, the fibres across the osteoblast layer were frequently interconnected to form a net-like structure. Fibroblast processes were observed extending into the perforating fibres; their morphologies were distinct from those of typical fibroblasts. Thus, our study revealed novel ultrastructures of the periosteum that support anchorage and serve as a cellular source as well as a mechanical stress transmitter. PMID:26627533

  17. Electron Microscopic Alterations in Pediculus humanus capitis Exposed to Some Pediculicidal Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Akkad, Dina M H El; El-Gebaly, Naglaa Saad M; Yousof, Hebat-Allah Salah A; Ismail, Mousa A M

    2016-08-01

    Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, infestation is an important public health problem in Egypt. Inadequate application of topical pediculicides and the increasing resistance to the commonly used pediculicides made the urgent need for the development of new agents able to induce irreversible changes in the exposed lice leading to their mortality. The aim of the present work is to evaluate pediculicidal efficacy of some natural products such as olive oil, tea tree oil, lemon juice, and ivermectin separately in comparison with tetramethrin-piperonyl butoxide (licid), as a standard pediculicide commonly used in Egypt. The effects of these products were evaluated by direct observation using dissecting and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Results showed that after 1 hr exposure time in vitro, absolute (100%) mortalities were recorded after exposure to 1% ivermectin and fresh concentrate lemon juice. The mortalities were decreased to 96.7% after exposure to tea tree oil. Very low percentage of mortality (23.3%) was recorded after 1 hr of exposure to extra virgin olive oil. On the other hand, the reference pediculicide (licid) revealed only mortality rate of 93.3%. On the contrary, no mortalities were recorded in the control group exposed to distilled water. By SEM examination, control lice preserved outer smooth architecture, eyes, antenna, respiratory spiracles, sensory hairs, and legs with hook-like claws. In contrast, dead lice which had been exposed to pediculicidal products showed damage of outer smooth architecture, sensory hairs, respiratory spiracles and/or clinching claws according to pediculicidal products used. PMID:27658606

  18. Prevalence and Scanning Electron Microscopic Identification of Anoplocephalid Cestodes among Small Ruminants in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Ndom, Mallé; Diop, Gora; Quilichini, Yann; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Ba, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anoplocephalid cestodes in sheep and goats in Senegal. Intestines of 462 sheep and 48 goats were examined; 47.4% of sheep and 6.2% of goats were infected. The species identified and their prevalence were, among sheep, Avitellina centripunctata 38.7%, Moniezia expansa 15.4%, Stilesia globipunctata 16.7%, and Thysaniezia ovilla 0.4%. Among goats, they were M. expansa 6.2% and T. ovilla 2.1%. The prevalence of all species was not statistically different between dry and rainy seasons. The infections were single or multiple. Indeed, 56.2% of sheep were infected by a single species, 37.4% by two species, and 6.4% by three species. For goats, 66.7% were infected by M. expansa and 33.3% by both M. expansa and T. ovilla. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations of tapeworms show the general diagnosis characters of these species. PMID:27597893

  19. Prevalence and Scanning Electron Microscopic Identification of Anoplocephalid Cestodes among Small Ruminants in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Tetsuya; Ba, Cheikh Tidiane; Marchand, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anoplocephalid cestodes in sheep and goats in Senegal. Intestines of 462 sheep and 48 goats were examined; 47.4% of sheep and 6.2% of goats were infected. The species identified and their prevalence were, among sheep, Avitellina centripunctata 38.7%, Moniezia expansa 15.4%, Stilesia globipunctata 16.7%, and Thysaniezia ovilla 0.4%. Among goats, they were M. expansa 6.2% and T. ovilla 2.1%. The prevalence of all species was not statistically different between dry and rainy seasons. The infections were single or multiple. Indeed, 56.2% of sheep were infected by a single species, 37.4% by two species, and 6.4% by three species. For goats, 66.7% were infected by M. expansa and 33.3% by both M. expansa and T. ovilla. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations of tapeworms show the general diagnosis characters of these species.

  20. In Situ Wear Test on Thermal Spray Coatings in a Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weifeng; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Selvadurai, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the determination of the mass loss is usually used for a quantitative evaluation of wear tests, while the analysis of wear tracks is utilized for a qualitative evaluation of wear. Both evaluation methods can only be used after the wear testing process and their results only present the final outcome of the wear test. However, the changes during the wear test and the time-dependent wear mechanisms are of great interest as well. A running wear test in a large chamber scanning electron microscope (SEM) offers the first opportunity to observe the wear process in situ. Different wear mechanisms, such as the adhesive, abrasive wear, surface fatigue and tribochemical reaction, can be recorded with high magnification. Within this research, a special pin-on-disk testing device is designed for a vacuum environment. Using this device, arc-sprayed NiCrBSi coatings and high-velocity-oxygen-fuel-sprayed WC-12Co coatings were tested in a large chamber SEM with Al2O3 ceramic balls as wear counterparts. During the wear testing, different wear mechanisms were determined and the processes were recorded in short video streams.

  1. Electron Microscopic Alterations in Pediculus humanus capitis Exposed to Some Pediculicidal Plant Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Akkad, Dina M. H. El; El-Gebaly, Naglaa Saad M.; Yousof, Hebat-Allah Salah A.; Ismail, Mousa A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, infestation is an important public health problem in Egypt. Inadequate application of topical pediculicides and the increasing resistance to the commonly used pediculicides made the urgent need for the development of new agents able to induce irreversible changes in the exposed lice leading to their mortality. The aim of the present work is to evaluate pediculicidal efficacy of some natural products such as olive oil, tea tree oil, lemon juice, and ivermectin separately in comparison with tetramethrin-piperonyl butoxide (licid), as a standard pediculicide commonly used in Egypt. The effects of these products were evaluated by direct observation using dissecting and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Results showed that after 1 hr exposure time in vitro, absolute (100%) mortalities were recorded after exposure to 1% ivermectin and fresh concentrate lemon juice. The mortalities were decreased to 96.7% after exposure to tea tree oil. Very low percentage of mortality (23.3%) was recorded after 1 hr of exposure to extra virgin olive oil. On the other hand, the reference pediculicide (licid) revealed only mortality rate of 93.3%. On the contrary, no mortalities were recorded in the control group exposed to distilled water. By SEM examination, control lice preserved outer smooth architecture, eyes, antenna, respiratory spiracles, sensory hairs, and legs with hook-like claws. In contrast, dead lice which had been exposed to pediculicidal products showed damage of outer smooth architecture, sensory hairs, respiratory spiracles and/or clinching claws according to pediculicidal products used. PMID:27658606

  2. Effect of Laser Treatment on Surface Morphology of Indirect Composite Resin: Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaie, Mansore; Garshasbzadeh, Nazanin Zeinab; Yassini, Esmaeil; Shahabi, Sima; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the Scanning electron microscope (SEM) of indirect composite conditioned by Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser, Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) laser. Methods: 18 indirect composite blocks (GC Gradia DA2, Japan) with 15 × 10 × 10 mm dimensions were made. The bonding surface of these blocks were polished, then the samples were divided into six groups as follow: Er:YAG laser with output power of 0.5 W and frequency of 10 Hz, Nd:YAG laser with output power of 0.25, 0.5 W and frequency of 10 Hz, CO2 laser with output power of 0.5 W and frequency of 10 Hz and 5 Hz, and no treatment. Then, the surfaces were evaluated by SEM. Results: Irregularities were observed in Er:YAG laser samples compared to control group that produced suitable retention for adhesion of cements. Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers showed melting areas. Conclusion: Among different lasers, Er:YAG laser can be used as an alternative technique for surface treatment of indirect composites. PMID:25606314

  3. [The influence of local anesthetics on corneal epithelium. A scanning electron microscopic study (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brewitt, H; Honegger, H

    1978-09-01

    The effect of different local anesthetics (Cocain 4%, Lidocaine 2%, Proparacain) on the corneal epithelium in rabbits was examined under scanning electron microscope. The experiment was divided into three groups. Group 1 received one application of two drops of the given local anesthetic for a reaction time of 5 minutes. Group 2 received two drops of the given anesthetic after 0, 5 and 10 minutes. The cornea was excised after 15 minutes. Group 3 were measured after a single application of Proparacain using a Schiötz or hand applanation tonometer according to Draeger. After a single dose of a local anesthetic principally the same changes in the surface of the cornea were observed with all the preparations used: a distinct decrease in the number of microvilli and microplicae, disruption of the intercellular spaces and the prominence of the cell nuclei which under normal conditions are not visible. After several applications the greater toxicity of Cocain compared with the other preparations was clearly seen through the disruption of the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm. The damage effected several layers of cells. Tonometry when correctly performed causes no additional damage to the cell surface.- The effect of local anesthetics on the cell membrane can only take place after the disruption of the tear film. The results emphasize that local anesthetics should only be applied when absolutely essential.

  4. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  5. Modelling and observing Jovian electron propagation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toit Strauss, Du; Potgieter, Marius; Kopp, Andreas; Heber, Bernd

    2012-07-01

    During the Pioneer 10 Jovian encounter, it was observed that the Jovian magnetosphere is a strong source of low energy electrons. These electrons are accelerated in the Jovian magnetosphere and then propagate through the interplanetary medium to reach Earth, sampling the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) and its embedded turbulence. With the current constellation of near Earth spacecraft (STEREO, SOHO, ACE, ect.) various aspects of Jovian electron transport at/near Earth can be studied in 3D (spatially). During a CME, the plasma between the Earth and Jupiter becomes more disturbed, inhibiting the transport of these electrons to Earth. With the passage of the CME beyond Jupiter, quite-time transport conditions persist and increases of the electron flux at Earth are observed (so-called quite time increases). Using multi-spacecraft observation during such an event, we are able to infer the propagation time of these electrons from Jupiter to Earth. Using a state-of-the-art electron transport model, we study the transport of these electrons from Jupiter and Earth, focusing on their propagation times. These computed values are also compared with observations. We discuss the implications of these results from a particle transport point-of-view.

  6. Observation of the Birefringence in the Friction Interface with Polarizing Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Naoya; Gong, Jin; Wada, Masato; Makino, Masato; Hasnat Kabir, M.; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    Gels have some unique characteristics such as low frictional properties [1][2], high water content and materials permeability. Double Network (DN) gels having a mechanical strength of 30 MPa for the maximum breaking stress in compression was developed [3] in the last decade. Their frictional coefficient and mechanical strength are comparable to human cartilages. Gels are prospective materials that could be used for the parts of the human body. In this study, we focus on the dynamic frictional interface of the friction of polymer gels and aim to develop a new apparatus with a polarized microscope for in-situ observation and frictional measurement. We first rubbed hydrogel and glass plate sandwiching hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) solution on the stage of a polarization microscope. The birefringence flow of HPC polymer solution enabled the observation of the dynamical interface. After the experiment, we designed an observation instrument that included an inverted microscope and a friction-measuring machine. This new instrument can observe the frictional interface and measure the frictional coefficient at the same time. We hope the comparison between direct observation with this instrument and the measurement of friction coefficient will become a foothold to elucidate distinctive frictional phenomena that can be seen in soft and wet materials.

  7. Artificial submicron or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and electron microscope speckle photography

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhanwei; Xie Huimin; Fang Daining; Dai Fulong; Wang Weining; Fang Yan

    2007-03-15

    In this article, a novel artificial submicro- or nanometer speckle fabricating technique is proposed by taking advantage of submicro or nanometer particles. In the technique, submicron or nanometer particles were adhered to an object surface by using ultrasonic dispersing technique. The particles on the object surface can be regarded as submicro or nanometer speckle by using a scanning electronic microscope at a special magnification. In addition, an electron microscope speckle photography (EMSP) method is developed to measure in-plane submicron or nanometer deformation of the object coated with the artificial submicro or nanometer speckles. The principle of artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and the EMSP method are discussed in detail in this article. Some typical applications of this method are offered. The experimental results verified that the artificial submicro or nanometer speckle fabricating technique and EMSP method is feasible.

  8. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections. PMID:27646194

  9. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections.

  10. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections. PMID:27646194

  11. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-09-20

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections.

  12. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, Albina Y; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed.

  13. Glass for parenteral products: a surface view using the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Roseman, T J; Brown, J A; Scothorn, W W

    1976-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope was utilized to explore the internal surface of glass ampuls and vials used in parenteral products. The surface topography of USP Type I borosilicate glass containers was viewed after exposure to "sulfur," ammonium bifluoride, and sulfuric acid treatments. The scanning electron micrographs showed startling differences in the appearance of the surface regions. "Sulfur treatment" of ampuls was associated with a pitting of the surface and the presence of sodium sulfate crystals. The sulfur treatment of vials altered the glass surface in a characteristically different manner. The dissimilarity between the surface appearances was attributed to the method of sulfur treatment. Ampuls exposed to sulfuric acid solutions at room temperature did not show the pitting associated with the sulfur treatment. Scanning electron micrographs of ammonium bifluoride-treated ampuls showed a relief effect, suggesting that the glass was affected by the bifluoride solution but that sufficient stripping of the surface layer did not occur to remove the pits associated with the sulfur treatment. Flakes emanating from the glass were identified with the aid of the electron microprobe. Scanning electron micrographs showed that these vitreous flakes resulted from a delamination of a thin layer of the glass surface. It is concluded that the scanning electron microscope, in conjunction with other analytical techniques, is a valuable tool in assessing the quality of glass used for parenteral products. The techniques studied should be of particular importance to the pharmaceutical industry where efforts are being made to reduce the levels of particulate matter in parenteral dosage forms.

  14. Separation of image-distortion sources and magnetic-field measurement in scanning electron microscope (SEM).

    PubMed

    Płuska, Mariusz; Czerwinski, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Jacek; Katcki, Jerzy; Oskwarek, Lukasz; Rak, Remigiusz

    2009-01-01

    The electron-microscope image distortion generated by electromagnetic interference (EMI) is an important problem for accurate imaging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Available commercial solutions to this problem utilize sophisticated hardware for EMI detection and compensation. Their efficiency depends on the complexity of distortions influence on SEM system. Selection of a proper method for reduction of the distortions is crucial. The current investigations allowed for a separation of the distortions impact on several components of SEM system. A sum of signals from distortion sources causes wavy deformations of specimen shapes in SEM images. The separation of various reasons of the distortion is based on measurements of the periodic deformations of the images for different electron beam energies and working distances between the microscope final aperture and the specimen. Using the SEM images, a direct influence of alternating magnetic field on the electron beam was distinguished. Distortions of electric signals in the scanning block of SEM were also separated. The presented method separates the direct magnetic field influence on the electron beam below the SEM final aperture (in the chamber) from its influence above this aperture (in the electron column). It also allows for the measurement of magnetic field present inside the SEM chamber. The current investigations gave practical guidelines for selecting the most efficient solution for reduction of the distortions.

  15. Impermeability of newt cerebral and pial capillaries to exogenous peroxidase. A light and electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Ciani, F; Del Grande, P; Franceschini, V; Caniato, G; Minelli, G

    1983-01-01

    The permeability of cerebral vessels to exogenous peroxidase was studied in the newt. The reaction product was found only inside the cerebral or pial blood vessels. Electron microscope investigations revealed the presence of reaction product along the luminal area of vessels and in some parts of the intercellular spaces at the level of tight junctions joining endothelial cells. On the basis of the ultrastructural peroxidase localization, the presence of a brain-blood barrier in Triturus is discussed.

  16. [Electron microscopic and immunological study of influenza virus interaction with murine peritoneal microphages].

    PubMed

    Kirillova, F M; Berdinskikh, M S; Kiseleva, A S; Avakian, A A; Kosiakov, P N

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopic and immunological investigations of influenza virus HONI interactions with peritoneal macrophages of intact and immune mice were carried out. Both intact and immune macrophages exert phagocytosis and disintegration of virions in phagolysosomes as early as 10 and 30 min after the end of adsorption. This process is most active with eosinophils, less in neutrophils and the least in basophils. Titration of the infectious virus in chick embryos showed that immune macrophages contained considerably less virus than the intact ones.

  17. A sample holder with integrated laser optics for an ELMITEC photoemission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gierster, L.; Pape, L.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.

    2015-02-15

    We present a new sample holder compatible with ELMITEC Photoemission Electron Microscopes (PEEMs) containing an optical lens and a mirror. With the integrated optical elements, a laser beam is focused from the back side of the sample at normal incidence, yielding a minimum spot size of about 1 μm. This opens up new possibilities for local laser excitations in PEEM experiments such as imaging all-optical magnetization switching at a small length scale.

  18. A Transmission Electron Microscope Investigation of Space Weathering Effects in Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, Eve L.

    2014-01-01

    The Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa successfully returned the first direct samples of the regolith from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special opportunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal surfaces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the more complex effects of space weathering. Here we describe the mineralogy, microstructure and composition of three Hayabusa mission particles using transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques

  19. Defect tracking for nanoimprint lithography using optical surface scanner and scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaoning; Kurataka, Nobuo; Tran, Hieu; Gauzner, Gene

    2016-09-01

    Fast optical surface scanners are used in combination with high-resolution scanning electron microscopes to facilitate the identification and tracking of nanoimprint defects. We have confirmed that hard particles cause permanent template damages during imprint, resulting in repeating imprint defects. Since contaminants encountered during imprint are dominated by hard metal oxide particles capable of causing such damage, stringent pre-imprint substrate screening is a critical requirement in a manufacturing environment.

  20. Electron microscope and low-angle x-ray diffraction studies of the nerve myelin sheath.

    PubMed

    FERNANDEZ-MORAN, H; FINEAN, J B

    1957-09-25

    systems, and internal rearrangements of the layer components. Alcohol extraction leads to a more extensive structural breakdown, but in certain areas collapsed layer systems can still be observed. The components of the lipide extracts could be identified by means of x-ray diffraction. These modifications emphasize the importance of cholesterol in the myelin structure, and disclose a resistance of the dense osmiophilic lines to lipide solvents. 6. The significance of these structures is discussed in relation to present concepts of the molecular organization of myelin. The available evidence is consistent with the suggestion that the primary site of osmium deposition is at the lipoprotein interfaces and that the light bands probably represent regions occupied by lipide chains. The electron microscope and x-ray diffraction data also indicate the possibility of a regular organization within the plane of the layers, probably involving units of 60 to 80 A. The myelin sheath is regarded as a favourable cell membrane model for detailed analysis by combined application of x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy.

  1. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube structure tailoring and time-resolved transport measurements in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro MFJ; Golberg, Dmitri; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio

    2007-11-01

    A dynamical response of the current-voltage characteristics of ropes and individual structures of multiwalled nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes has been observed inside a transmission electron microscope. The drastic change of the current transport properties is thought to be due to purging of contaminating gaseous surface adsorbed species. In addition, an in situ methodology was developed to obtain individually pure and length-tailored nanotubes. By carefully controlling the current flow across the nanotubes, residual surface-decorating and encapsulated catalyst particles were eliminated, and short sections of the nanotubes (200to500nm) were cut.

  2. Microscopic investigation of electronic inhomogeneity induced by substitutions in a quantum critical metal CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, H.; Ronning, F.; Zhu, J.-X.; Wakeham, N.; Yasuoka, H.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kambe, S.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-09-01

    Chemical substitutions are used commonly to tune a magnetic transition to zero temperature, but the resulting non-Fermi-liquid (NFL) behavior is nonuniversal. We have used nuclear quadrupole resonance to probe microscopically the response of a prototypical quantum critical metal CeCoIn5 to substitutions of small amounts of Sn and Cd for In. These substituents induce very different local electronic environments as observed by site-dependent spin lattice relaxation rates 1 /T1 that influence the NFL behavior. The effects found here illustrate the need for care in interpreting NFL properties determined by macroscopic measurements.

  3. The Scanning Electron Microscope As An Accelerator For The Undergraduate Advanced Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Randolph S.; Berggren, Karl K.; Mondol, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator for the undergraduate, advanced physics laboratory, the SEM is an excellent substitute for an ion accelerator. Although there are no nuclear physics experiments that can be performed with a typical 30 kV SEM, there is an opportunity for experimental work on accelerator physics, atomic physics, electron-solid interactions, and the basics of modern e-beam lithography.

  4. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in linear integrated circuits. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.; Gauthier, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    A successful diagnostic technique was developed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a precision tool to determine ionization effects in integrated circuits. Previous SEM methods radiated the entire semiconductor chip or major areas. The large area exposure methods do not reveal the exact components which are sensitive to radiation. To locate these sensitive components a new method was developed, which consisted in successively irradiating selected components on the device chip with equal doses of electrons /10 to the 6th rad (Si)/, while the whole device was subjected to representative bias conditions. A suitable device parameter was measured in situ after each successive irradiation with the beam off.

  5. Dissipative electron transfer dynamics in mixed valence dimers: Microscopic approach to the solid state problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palii, Andrew; Bosch-Serrano, Cristian; Clemente-Juan, Juan Modesto; Coronado, Eugenio; Tsukerblat, Boris

    2013-07-01

    We propose a microscopic analytical approach to the description of the low-temperature dissipative intracluster electron transfer dynamics in centrosymmetric one-electron mixed-valence (MV) dimers. The dissipative system (bath) is supposed to consist of the acoustic phonons of the crystal surrounding that are coupled to the delocalized electron(s) of a MV dimer. Although the concept of the bath is the spin-boson model is more generic, the present consideration is relevant, for example, to a MV bi-center impurity in an ionic crystal. The model allows us to develop an approximate microscopic approach within which the relaxation processes are explicitly taken into account without additional assumption regarding spectral function of the bath. It is assumed that initially the extra electron is localized on a certain center and then the time-dependent localization probability (averaged value of the electron dipole moment) is evaluated with the emphasis on the damping of the amplitude of the Rabi oscillations. The approach assumes the following conditions: (i) the vibrational spectrum of the crystal does not show the presence of local modes; (ii) the itinerant electron is weakly coupled to the long-waves acoustic phonons which is peculiar to fully delocalized Robin and Day class III MV systems; (iii) the Debye energy ℏωD exceeds the electronic resonance energy gap 2β (β is the electron transfer parameter). We have demonstrated that the dissipation in this case is super-ohmic with the low-frequency spectral function J(ω) ∝ ω5. The time dependences of the localization probabilities show nearly picosecond damped oscillations. The longitudinal relaxation time T1 has been shown to be two times shorter than the decoherence time T2 thus giving the upper bound for T2, T2 ≤ 2T1.

  6. Use of Rectangular Capillary Chambers for Nondestructive Microscopic Observation of Biofilm on Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, N.; Dragila, M.; Parke, J.

    2005-12-01

    Slow sand filter removal of bacterial and fungal pathogens from water has been shown to depend on development of biofilms on sand near the filter surface. Over time, hydraulic conductivity of slow sand filters is considerably reduced, presumably due to excessive biofilm development or plugging of surface pores by particulate matter. Microscopic observation of biofilms in porous media typically requires destructive sampling of media or use of micromodels to simulate pore systems. We are developing a flow-thru chamber consisting of a thin-walled rectangular capillary attached to a mount that can be manipulated with a conventional microscope stage. Capillaries are easily packed with granular media and allow continuous, non-destructive observation of pore systems over time. Initial trials using epi-fluorescence microscopy demonstrate the potential to monitor biofilm development on pore faces or adsorption of particulate matter at the water-solid or air-water interface.

  7. A review of transmission electron microscopes with in situ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinks, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with in situ ion irradiation is unique amongst experimental techniques in allowing the direct observation of the internal microstructure of materials on the nanoscale whilst they are being subjected to bombardment with energetic particles. Invaluable insights into the underlying atomistic processes at work can be gained through direct investigation of radiation induced and enhanced effects such as: phase changes and segregation; mechanical and structural changes; atomic/layer mixing and chemical disorder; compositional changes; chemical reactions; grain growth and shrinkage; precipitation and dissolution; defect/bubble formation, growth, motion, coalescence, removal and destruction; ionisation; diffusion; and collision cascades. The experimental results obtained can be used to validate the predictions of computational models which in turn can elucidate the mechanisms behind the phenomena seen in the microscope. It is 50 years since the first TEM observations of in situ ion irradiation were made by D.W. Pashley, A.E.B. Presland and J.W. Menter at the Tube Investment Laboratories in Cambridge, United Kingdom and 40 years since the first interfacing of an ion beam system with a TEM by P.A. Thackery, R.S. Nelson and H.C. Sansom at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell, United Kingdom. In that time the field has grown with references in the literature to around thirty examples of such facilities. This paper gives an overview of the importance of the technique, especially with regard to the current challenges faced in understanding radiation damage in nuclear environments; a description of some of the important construction elements and design considerations of TEMs with in situ ion irradiation; a brief history of the development of this type of instrument; a summary of the facilities built around the world over the last half century; and finally a focus on the instruments in operation today.

  8. Experimental evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopes at high chamber pressure.

    PubMed

    Fitzek, H; Schroettner, H; Wagner, J; Hofer, F; Rattenberger, J

    2015-11-01

    In environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) high pressure applications have become increasingly important. Wet or biological samples can be investigated without time-consuming sample preparation and potential artefacts from this preparation can be neglected. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio strongly decreases with increasing chamber pressure. To evaluate the high pressure performance of ESEM and to compare different electron microscopes, information about spatial resolution and detector type is not enough. On the one hand, the scattering of the primary electron beam increases, which vanishes the contrast in images; and on the other hand, the secondary electrons (SE) signal amplification decreases. The stagnation gas thickness (effective distance the beam has to travel through the imaging gas) as well as the SE detection system depend on the microscope and for a complete and serious evaluation of an ESEM or low vacuum SEM it is necessary to specify these two parameters. A method is presented to determine the fraction of scattered and unscattered electrons and to calculate the stagnation gas thickness (θ). To evaluate the high pressure performance of the SE detection system, a method is presented that allows for an analysis of a single image and the calculation of the signal-to-noise ratio of this image. All investigations are performed on an FEI ESEM Quanta 600 (field emission gun) and an FEI ESEM Quanta 200 (thermionic gun). These methods and measurements should represent opportunities for evaluating the high pressure performance of an ESEM.

  9. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam. PMID:27587179

  10. Note: Electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface with scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Xu, Chunkai; Zhang, Panke; Li, Zhean; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel scanning probe electron energy spectrometer (SPEES) which combines a double toroidal analyzer with a scanning tunneling microscope to achieve both topography imaging and electron energy spectroscopy mapping of surface in situ. The spatial resolution of spectroscopy mapping is determined to be better than 0.7 ± 0.2 μm at a tip sample distance of 7 μm. Meanwhile, the size of the field emission electron beam spot on the surface is also measured, and is about 3.6 ± 0.8 μm in diameter. This unambiguously demonstrates that the spatial resolution of SPEES technique can be much better than the size of the incident electron beam.

  11. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Conley, Raymond; Anderson, Erik H; Barber, Samuel K; Bouet, Nathalie; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z; Voronov, Dmitriy L

    2010-09-17

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality x-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47(7), 073602-1-5 (2008)} and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 616, 172-82 (2010)]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize x-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with x-ray microscopes is in progress.

  12. Characterization of electron microscopes with binary pseudo-random multilayer test samples

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V.V.; Conley, R.; Anderson, E.H.; Barber, S.K.; Bouet, N.; McKinney, W.R.; Takacs, P.Z. and Voronov, D.L.

    2010-12-08

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binarypseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested and and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer. Here we describe the details of development of binarypseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi{sub 2}/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML testsamples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  13. Characterization of Electron Microscopes with Binary Pseudo-random Multilayer Test Samples

    SciTech Connect

    V Yashchuk; R Conley; E Anderson; S Barber; N Bouet; W McKinney; P Takacs; D Voronov

    2011-12-31

    Verification of the reliability of metrology data from high quality X-ray optics requires that adequate methods for test and calibration of the instruments be developed. For such verification for optical surface profilometers in the spatial frequency domain, a modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays has been suggested [1] and [2] and proven to be an effective calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes, a phase shifting Fizeau interferometer, and a scatterometer [5]. Here we describe the details of development of binary pseudo-random multilayer (BPRML) test samples suitable for characterization of scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopes. We discuss the results of TEM measurements with the BPRML test samples fabricated from a WiSi2/Si multilayer coating with pseudo-randomly distributed layers. In particular, we demonstrate that significant information about the metrological reliability of the TEM measurements can be extracted even when the fundamental frequency of the BPRML sample is smaller than the Nyquist frequency of the measurements. The measurements demonstrate a number of problems related to the interpretation of the SEM and TEM data. Note that similar BPRML test samples can be used to characterize X-ray microscopes. Corresponding work with X-ray microscopes is in progress.

  14. Central GABAergic innervation of the pituitary in goldfish: a radioautographic and immunocytochemical study at the electron microscope level

    SciTech Connect

    Kah, O.; Dubourg, P.; Martinoli, M.G.; Rabhi, M.; Gonnet, F.; Geffard, M.; Calas, A.

    1987-09-01

    The GABAergic innervation of the goldfish pituitary was studied at the light and electron microscope levels by means of radioautography after in vitro incubation in tritiated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and immunocytochemistry using antibodies against GABA. Following incubation of pituitary fragments in a medium containing tritiated GABA, a selective uptake of the tracer was observed within the digitations of the neurohypophysis. Silver grain clusters were also observed in the adenohypophyseal tissue. At the electron microscope level, this uptake was found to correspond to nerve endings containing small clear and dense-core vesicles. These labeled profiles were located mainly in neurohypophyseal digitations in close apposition with the basement membrane separating the neurohypophysis from the adenohypophysis. However, they were also encountered in direct contact with most adenohypophyseal cell types in the different lobes. These results were confirmed by immunocytochemical data demonstrating the presence of numerous GABA immunoreactive fibers in both anterior and neurointermediate lobes. They were found either in the digitations of the neurohypophysis or in the adenohypophysis in direct contact with the glandular cells with a distribution and an ultrastructural aspect similar to those observed by radioautography. These data demonstrate that the pituitary of teleosts receives a massive GABAergic innervation. Although physiological data providing a functional significance for such an innervation are lacking, the present study suggests that, as already documented in mammals, GABA may be involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of pituitary functions in teleosts.

  15. High angular resolution measurements of K shell x-ray emission created by electron channeling in the analytical electron microscope.

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-03-10

    Since the original observations by Duncumb in 1962, a number of studies have been conducted on the effects of electron channel on characteristic x-ray emission and microanalysis. Most of the recent studies have concentrated upon using the phenomenon to perform site specific distributions of impurity elements in ordered compounds using the ALCHEMI methodology. Very few studies have attempted to accurately measure the effect as a function of orientation and compare these results to theories. In this study, two dimensional high angular resolution studies of channeling enhance x-ray emission were performed and herein the results are compared to theoretical calculations of Allen et al. All experimental measurements presented here were conducted on a Philips EM 420T analytical electron microscope. The instrument was operated in the TEM mode, at 120 kV using an LaB6 electron source. The characteristic x-ray emission was measured using an EDAX ultra thin window Si(Li) detector having a FWHM of {approximately}145 eV at Mn Km Nominal probe sizes used during the study were 200-500 nm with beam convergence half angle defined by the Condenser apertures. Control of the relative orientation of the incident probe was accomplished via direct computer control of the beam tilt coils, after the specimen was first manually oriented to an appropriate zone axis using the specimen tilt stage. Two dimensional measurements were carried out using a 128 x 100 pixel scan corresponding to an angular range of {approximately}100 by 80 mR using customized computer program running on a EDAX 9900 microanalyzer system. Careful alignment and manual optimization/adjustments of beam tilt pivot coils, minimized probe wobble during data acquisition. The effects of this were additionally mitigated due to the relative uniformity of the specimen thickness in the analyzed zone. Typical acquisition times for a complete two dimensional scan were 18-24 hours. Essential to the success of these measurements was

  16. Spatially resolved quantum nano-optics of single photons using an electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tizei, L H G; Kociak, M

    2013-04-12

    We report on the experimental demonstration of single-photon state generation and characterization in an electron microscope. In this aim we have used low intensity relativistic (energy between 60 and 100 keV) electrons beams focused in a ca. 1 nm probe to excite diamond nanoparticles. This triggered individual neutral nitrogen-vacancy centers to emit photons which could be gathered and sent to a Hanbury Brown-Twiss intensity interferometer. The detection of a dip in the correlation function at small time delays clearly demonstrates antibunching and thus the creation of nonclassical light states. Specifically, we have also demonstrated single-photon states detection. We unveil the mechanism behind quantum states generation in an electron microscope, and show that it clearly makes cathodoluminescence the nanometer scale analog of photoluminescence. By using an extremely small electron probe size and the ability to monitor its position with subnanometer resolution, we also show the possibility of measuring the quantum character of the emitted beam with deep subwavelength resolution. PMID:25167267

  17. High and low molecular weight tracers for the electron microscopical detection of sialoglycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Mureşan, V; Simionescu, N

    1987-03-01

    Hydrazide-derivative tracers of different molecular weights have been synthesized for use in the electron microscopical detection of sodium periodate-oxidized sialyl residues of glycoconjugates in various tissues and cells. Haemundecapeptide hydrazide, horseradish peroxidase hydrazide, and Limulus polyphemus haemocyanin hydrazide were obtained by coupling adipic acid dihydrazide to the tracers with the aid of water-soluble carbodiimide. The enzymatic tracers thus prepared retained their peroxidatic activity. On conversion to the hydrazide derivative, the haemocyanin molecule dissociated into its hexameric subunits. In order to test by transmission electron microscopy the ability of the conjugates to bind to the sialoglycoconjugates of endothelial cell surfaces, each tracer was perfused in situ into rat pancreatic vasculature previously oxidized with 1 mM sodium periodate. The three tracers characteristically labelled the various microdomains of the luminal cell coat of the capillary endothelial cell. The electron opacity of the haemocyanin subunits allowed their easy detection when bound to the cell surface or to components of the extracellular matrix. The bound markers were not displaced by a high ionic strength buffer, and did not label desialylated cell surfaces. These results indicate that the three hydrazide-derivative tracers may be useful tools for the electron microscopical detection of cellular and extracellular sialoglycoconjugates. PMID:3597134

  18. ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; HUAN, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.; IRISO, U.

    2007-03-01

    Since 2081 MIC has experienced electron cloud effects, which have limited the beam intensity. These include dynamic pressure rises - including pressure instabilities, tune shifts: electrons, a reduction of the stability threshold for bunches crossing the transition energy, and possibly slow emittance growth. We summarize the main observations in operation and dedicated experiments, as well as countermeasures including baking, NEG coated warm beam pipes, solenoids, bunch patterns, anti-grazing rings, pre-pumped cold beam pipes, and scrubbing.

  19. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-19

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  20. Macroscopic observables experimentally linked to microscopic processes in the explosive fracture and fragmentation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Lawrence M

    2010-12-16

    The response of a metal element to explosive loading depends on a broad spectrum of explosive and metal properties, macroscopic geometry plays a crucial role in defining the localized loading history and the resulting gradients of interest, while microscopic effects and defects are generally believed responsible for damage nucleation. Certain experiments reduce the complexity by producing conditions that are uniform in some sense, allowing dynamic measurement of variables that can be correlated with corresponding microscopic effects observed in recovery experiments. Spherical expansion of thin shells, that eventually fragment, and steady wave loading of flat plates are two such experiments. Proton radiography, x-radiography, laser velocimetry, imaging IR, and visible light photography all have produced dynamic measurements in 4340 steel, copper, uranium alloys, tantalum, and titanium. Correlation of the macroscopic measurements with microscopy on recovered samples has been done with a statistical approach.

  1. Observation of a Soft Tissue by a Zernike Phase Contrast Hard X-ray Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Namikawa, Tadahiro; Hoshino, Masato; Watanabe, Norio

    2007-01-01

    A Zernike-type phase contrast hard X-ray microscope was constructed at the Photon Factory BL3C2 (KEK). A white beam from a bending magnet was monochromatized by a silicon double crystal monochromator. Monochromatic parallel X-ray beam illuminated a sample, and transmitted and diffracted X-ray beams were imaged by a Fresnel zone plate (FZP) which had the outer zone width of 100 nm. A phase plate made of a thin aluminum foil with a pinhole was set at the back focal plane of the FZP. The phase plate modulated the diffraction beam from the FZP, whereas a direct beam passed through the pinhole. The resolution of the microscope was measured by observing a tantalum test pattern at an X-ray energy of 9 keV. A 100nm line-and-space pattern could be resolved. X-ray montage pictures of growing eggs of artemia (plankton) were obtained.

  2. Light and electron microscopic study on the pineal complex of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae Smith.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, M A; Merhige, M E

    1977-03-01

    The pineal complex of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae was studied light and electron microscopically. It consists of two vesicles representing parapineal and pineal organs. Both occur intracranially and openly communicate with each other and the brain ventricle. The entire complex shows a striking photoreceptor morphology with sensory, ependymal and nerve cells. The last cell type is more abundant in the parapineal vesicle than in the pineal organ. The following ultrastructural details of the parapineal are noteworthy: 1. The sensory cells possess large inner and outer segments protruding freely in the vesicular cavity. The outer segments measure 8-10 mum in length and consist of as many as 275 lamellae. The basal processes of these cells terminate in neuropil-like regions. Occasionally, dense granules (500-1000 A) of uncertain identity occur in the perinuclear and inner segment cytoplasm of the cells. 2. The supporting cells are of the ependymal type. Their cytoplasm contains a filamentous feltwork and pinocytotic vesicles, but lacks secretory granules. Cytosomes are particularly abundant in cell processes in the neuropil-like zones. The basal end-feet of these cells isolate the receptor and nerve cells from the perivascular space. 3. In the neuropil-like regions, terminals of sensory cells make synaptic contacts with neuronal dendrites. Synaptic ribbon-like profiles in the terminals characterize the contact zones. Only unmyelinated nerve fibers could be observed in the small area of the tissue examined. The results are discussed with regard to photoreceptive and secretory functions of the pineal complex and its evolution in lower vertebrates.

  3. The atrioventricular valves of the mouse. I. A scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed Central

    Icardo, J M; Arrechedera, H; Colvee, E

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports a scanning electron microscope study of the morphology of the atrioventricular (AV) valves in the mouse. The leaflet tissue of the 2 AV valves consists of a continuous veil that shows no commissures or clefts. In all instances, the chordae that arise from the papillary system merge with the free border of the leaflet tissue. No distinct terminations of chordae were observed on the ventricular face of the valves. The leaflet tissue of the right AV valve can be divided into parietal and septal components on the basis of the insertion into the ventricular wall and of the papillary system. While the septal component is similar in shape, location and tension apparatus to the septal tricuspid leaflet in man, the parietal component appears to correspond to the anterior and posterior human leaflets. This segment of the valve is served by 3 papillary muscles that arise from the septal wall. The right AV valve is not a tricuspid structure from the morphological standpoint, but appears to function as such because of the particular attachment of the papillary muscles. The leaflet tissue of the mitral valve is served by 2 papillary muscles, anterior and posterior, which consist of muscular trabeculae extending from the heart apex to the base of the valve. These muscles remain associated with the ventricular wall. The leaflet tissue attaches directly to these papillary muscles, which give rise to a very small number of slender chordae. There are thus several important differences between the AV valves of the mouse and man.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Figs 4-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:8509303

  4. Scanning electron microscope and statistical analysis of suspended heavy metal particles in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Fernández, M. Monroy; Luszczewski Kudra, A.; Leyva Ramos, R.

    Three hundred samples of urban aerosol were collected in high-volume samplers from five urban locations situated near an important metallurgical plant in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Whole samples were analyzed by atomic absorption (AA) for Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Ni, Fe and Cr. One hundred eighty of these samples were subjected to X-ray microanalysis (EDS) coupled with a scanning electron microscope to classify individual particles according to their chemical or mineralogical composition. The principal component analysis (PCA) obtained from the bulk sample analysis, and X-ray microanalysis from individual particles, confirmed chemical associations among elements directly and indirectly. PCA from bulk assays made the most effective use of X-ray microanalysis to characterize major particle types. Some chemical associations would be difficult to detect using microanalysis, alone, for example, in anthropogenic complex phases. In this work, the combined use of microanalysis and statistical methods permitted identification of associations among elements. We observed an association of Pb-As-Cd and Fe-Mn among the samples. In a second order, Pb-Fe, Pb-Mn, Fe-As, Fe-Cd, Cd-Mn and As-Mn showed a lower association. Only Ni and Cu appeared unassociated with any other element analyzed by AA. We characterized the mineral phases by size range, morphology and chemical composition using SEM-EDS to obtain a compositional approach of anthropogenic phases and peculiar morphology and size. A high percentage of heavy metal particles smaller than 2 μm were detected.

  5. [Morton's disease: optic and electron microscopy observations].

    PubMed

    De Palma, L; Tulli, A

    1991-01-01

    The authors performed an optic and electron-microscope investigation above the common digital nerve of the foot, whose fragments had been surgically removed from patients suffering from "Morton metatarsalgia" (neuroma). Histological sections were taken from pre-stenotic swelling in patients with clinical symptoms persisting for one year; perineural thickening without evidence of fibroblastic proliferation could be demonstrated, together with an intraneural deposition of an amorphous substance. In other patients suffering from Morton's disease for a longer time, a more pronounced epineural thickening in the pre-stenotic zone could be shown, with partial replacement of nerve fibers by amorphous substance. In the same patients endoneural fibrositis was seen at the level of the stenosis. Electron-microscopy in patients after one year showed an increase in collagenous endoneural fibers and microfibrils. These histopathological findings suggest a compressive mechanism in the pathogenesis of the damage to the common interdigital nerve in Morton's disease, caused by the extrinsic anatomical structures surrounding the nerve. The so-called "neuroma" can be identified with the pre-stenotic swelling.

  6. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; Dehope, William J; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M

    2016-06-21

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  7. In situ nanomechanical testing in focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Gianola, D S; Sedlmayr, A; Mönig, R; Volkert, C A; Major, R C; Cyrankowski, E; Asif, S A S; Warren, O L; Kraft, O

    2011-06-01

    The recent interest in size-dependent deformation of micro- and nanoscale materials has paralleled both technological miniaturization and advancements in imaging and small-scale mechanical testing methods. Here we describe a quantitative in situ nanomechanical testing approach adapted to a dual-beam focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope. A transducer based on a three-plate capacitor system is used for high-fidelity force and displacement measurements. Specimen manipulation, transfer, and alignment are performed using a manipulator, independently controlled positioners, and the focused ion beam. Gripping of specimens is achieved using electron-beam assisted Pt-organic deposition. Local strain measurements are obtained using digital image correlation of electron images taken during testing. Examples showing results for tensile testing of single-crystalline metallic nanowires and compression of nanoporous Au pillars will be presented in the context of size effects on mechanical behavior and highlight some of the challenges of conducting nanomechanical testing in vacuum environments.

  8. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachtel, J. A.; Marvinney, C.; Mouti, A.; Mayo, D.; Mu, R.; Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A. R.; Chisholm, M. F.; Haglund, R. F.; Pantelides, S. T.

    2016-04-01

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. The approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications.

  9. An aberration corrected photoemission electron microscope at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; MacDowell, A.A.; Duarte, R.; Doran, A.; Forest, E.; Kelez, N.; Marcus, M.; Munson, D.; Padmore, H.; Petermann, K.; Raoux, S.; Robin, D.; Scholl, A.; Schlueter, R.; Schmid, P.; Stohr, J.; Wan, W.; Wei, D.H.; Wu, Y.

    2003-11-01

    Design of a new aberration corrected Photoemission electron microscope PEEM3 at the Advanced Light Source is outlined. PEEM3 will be installed on an elliptically polarized undulator beamline and will be used for the study of complex materials at high spatial and spectral resolution. The critical components of PEEM3 are the electron mirror aberration corrector and aberration-free magnetic beam separator. The models to calculate the optical properties of the electron mirror are discussed. The goal of the PEEM3 project is to achieve the highest possible transmission of the system at resolutions comparable to our present PEEM2 system (50 nm) and to enable significantly higher resolution, albeit at the sacrifice of intensity. We have left open the possibility to add an energy filter at a later date, if it becomes necessary driven by scientific need to improve the resolution further.

  10. High-speed multi-frame dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2016-02-23

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses each being of a programmable pulse duration, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has a plurality of plates. A control system having a digital sequencer controls the laser and a plurality of switching components, synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to enable programmable pulse durations and programmable inter-pulse spacings.

  11. High-speed multiframe dynamic transmission electron microscope image acquisition system with arbitrary timing

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Bryan W.; DeHope, William J.; Huete, Glenn; LaGrange, Thomas B.; Shuttlesworth, Richard M.

    2015-10-20

    An electron microscope is disclosed which has a laser-driven photocathode and an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) laser system ("laser"). The laser produces a train of temporally-shaped laser pulses of a predefined pulse duration and waveform, and directs the laser pulses to the laser-driven photocathode to produce a train of electron pulses. An image sensor is used along with a deflector subsystem. The deflector subsystem is arranged downstream of the target but upstream of the image sensor, and has two pairs of plates arranged perpendicular to one another. A control system controls the laser and a plurality of switching components synchronized with the laser, to independently control excitation of each one of the deflector plates. This allows each electron pulse to be directed to a different portion of the image sensor, as well as to be provided with an independently set duration and independently set inter-pulse spacings.

  12. The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL) and Recent Applications of an Aberration-Corrected Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope**

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Robert; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Chin, Richard; Koh, Ai Leen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the establishment, over a period of ten years or so, of a multi-user, institution-wide facility for the characterization of materials and devices at the nano-scale. Emphasis is placed on the type of equipment that we have found to be most useful for our users, and the business strategy that maintains its operations. A central component of our facility is an aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscope and its application is summarized in the studies of plasmon energies of silver nanoparticles, the band gap of PbS quantum dots, atomic site occupancy near grain boundaries in yttria stabilized zirconia, the lithiation of silicon nanoparticles, in situ observations on carbon nanotube oxidation and the electron tomography of varicella zoster virus nucleocapsids. PMID:25364299

  13. Electron microscopic studies on intracellular phage development--history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kellenberger, E; Wunderli-Allenspach, H

    1995-01-01

    This review is centered on the applications of thin sections to the study of intracellular precursors of bacteriophage heads. Results obtained with other preparation methods are included in so far as they are essential for the comprehension of the biological problems. This type of work was pioneered with phage T4, which contributed much to today's understanding of morphogenesis and form determination. The T4 story is rich in successes, but also in many fallacies. Due to its large size, T4 is obviously prone to preparation artefacts such as emptying, flattening and others. Many of these artefacts were first encountered in T4. Artefacts are mostly found in lysates, however, experience shows that they are not completely absent from thin sections. This can be explained by the fact that permeability changes induced by fixatives occur. The information gained from T4 was profitably used for the study of other phages. They are included in this review as far as electron microscopic studies played a major role in the elucidation of their morphogenetic pathways. Research on phage assembly pathways and form determination is a beautiful illustration for the power of the integrated approach which combines electron microscopy with biochemistry, genetics and biophysics. As a consequence, we did not restrict ourselves to the review of electron microscopic work but tried to integrate pertinent data which contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms acting in determining the form of supramolecular structures.

  14. Acquisition of a High Resolution Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope for the Analysis of Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant furnished funds to purchase a state-of-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support our analytical facilities for extraterrestrial samples. After evaluating several instruments, we purchased a JEOL 6500F thermal field emission SEM with the following analytical accessories: EDAX energy-dispersive x-ray analysis system with fully automated control of instrument and sample stage; EDAX LEXS wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for high sensitivity light-element analysis; EDAX/TSL electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system with software for phase identification and crystal orientation mapping; Robinson backscatter electron detector; and an in situ micro-manipulator (Kleindiek). The total price was $550,000 (with $150,000 of the purchase supported by Carnegie institution matching funds). The microscope was delivered in October 2002, and most of the analytical accessories were installed by January 2003. With the exception of the wavelength spectrometer (which has been undergoing design changes) everything is working well and the SEM is in routine use in our laboratory.

  15. A Laboratory-Scale Coaxial Fluorescence and Soft X-ray Microscope for Biological Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaba, K.; Aoki, S.

    2011-09-01

    A laboratory-scale coaxial fluorescence and soft x-ray microscope for biological observation was developed. The characteristic features of a fluorescence microscope were introduced to the conventional soft x-ray microscope, which was developed in our previous study, where the specimens can be set in air. One of the technical difficulties in detecting visible fluorescence is the chromatic aberration. This was overcome by applying a reflective optics, Wolter mirror, to the coaxial optical system. The coaxial optical system offers experimental simplicity and makes it possible to obtain soft x-ray images and fluorescence images of an identical specimen, which can be more informative than applying either imaging modality alone. Therefore, the newly developed optical system offers high-quality structural and morphological details of biological specimens with the ability to localize specific cells and other important sub-cellular targets. Soft x-ray images and fluorescence images of an identical DNA, which were derived from redfish testes and stained with DAPI (4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole), were obtained by the newly developed coaxial optical system.

  16. Electron microscopic study of soot particulate matter emissions from aircraft turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Liati, Anthi; Brem, Benjamin T; Durdina, Lukas; Vögtli, Melanie; Dasilva, Yadira Arroyo Rojas; Eggenschwiler, Panayotis Dimopoulos; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-16

    The microscopic characteristics of soot particulate matter (PM) in gas turbine exhaust are critical for an accurate assessment of the potential impacts of the aviation industry on the environment and human health. The morphology and internal structure of soot particles emitted from a CFM 56-7B26/3 turbofan engine were analyzed in an electron microscopic study, down to the nanoscale, for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65%, and ∼ 7% static engine thrust as a proxy for takeoff, cruising, and taxiing, respectively. Sampling was performed directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with a state-of-the-art sampling system designed for nonvolatile particulate matter. The electron microscopy results reveal that ∼ 100% thrust produces the highest amount of soot, the highest soot particle volume, and the largest and most crystalline primary soot particles with the lowest oxidative reactivity. The opposite is the case for soot produced during taxiing, where primary soot particles are smallest and most reactive and the soot amount and volume are lowest. The microscopic characteristics of cruising condition soot resemble the ones of the ∼ 100% thrust conditions, but they are more moderate. Real time online measurements of number and mass concentration show also a clear correlation with engine thrust level, comparable with the TEM study. The results of the present work, in particular the small size of primary soot particles present in the exhaust (modes of 24, 20, and 13 nm in diameter for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65% and ∼ 7% engine thrust, respectively) could be a concern for human health and the environment and merit further study. This work further emphasizes the significance of the detailed morphological characteristics of soot for assessing environmental impacts. PMID:25180674

  17. Electron microscopic study of soot particulate matter emissions from aircraft turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Liati, Anthi; Brem, Benjamin T; Durdina, Lukas; Vögtli, Melanie; Dasilva, Yadira Arroyo Rojas; Eggenschwiler, Panayotis Dimopoulos; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-16

    The microscopic characteristics of soot particulate matter (PM) in gas turbine exhaust are critical for an accurate assessment of the potential impacts of the aviation industry on the environment and human health. The morphology and internal structure of soot particles emitted from a CFM 56-7B26/3 turbofan engine were analyzed in an electron microscopic study, down to the nanoscale, for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65%, and ∼ 7% static engine thrust as a proxy for takeoff, cruising, and taxiing, respectively. Sampling was performed directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with a state-of-the-art sampling system designed for nonvolatile particulate matter. The electron microscopy results reveal that ∼ 100% thrust produces the highest amount of soot, the highest soot particle volume, and the largest and most crystalline primary soot particles with the lowest oxidative reactivity. The opposite is the case for soot produced during taxiing, where primary soot particles are smallest and most reactive and the soot amount and volume are lowest. The microscopic characteristics of cruising condition soot resemble the ones of the ∼ 100% thrust conditions, but they are more moderate. Real time online measurements of number and mass concentration show also a clear correlation with engine thrust level, comparable with the TEM study. The results of the present work, in particular the small size of primary soot particles present in the exhaust (modes of 24, 20, and 13 nm in diameter for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65% and ∼ 7% engine thrust, respectively) could be a concern for human health and the environment and merit further study. This work further emphasizes the significance of the detailed morphological characteristics of soot for assessing environmental impacts.

  18. Electron microscopic visualization of autophagosomes induced by infection of human papillomavirus pseudovirions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Yoshiyuki

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •HPV16 pseudovirions (16PsVs) infection induces an autophagy response. •The autophagy was analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). •TEM showed the double-membrane vesicles in HeLa cells inoculated with 16PsVs. •These vesicles incorporated 16PsVs particles in the lumen. •These results imply that autophagosomes are generated from the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Autophagy is a bulk degradation process for subcellular proteins and organelles to manage cell starvation. Autophagy is associated with the formation of autophagosomes and further functions as a defense mechanism against infection by various pathogens. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection induces an autophagy response, such as up-regulation of marker proteins for autophagy, in host keratinocytes. However, direct microscopic evidence for autophagy induction by HPV infection is still lacking. Here, I report an electron microscopic analysis of autophagosomes elicited by the entry of HPV pseudovirions (PsVs). HeLa cells showed enhanced infectivity for PsVs of HPV type 16 (16PsVs) when treated with an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting the involvement of autophagy in HPV infection. In HeLa cells inoculated with 16PsVs, transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of cup-shaped, double-membrane vesicles (phagophores) and double-membrane-bound vesicles, which are typical structures of autophagosomes. These double-membrane vesicles displayed a large lumen volume and incorporated 10–50 16PsVs particles in the lumen. These results demonstrate that autophagy is indeed induced during the HPV16 entry process and imply that autophagosomes are generated from the plasma membrane by HPV infection.

  19. Balloon Observations of Relativistic Electron Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, R. M.; Woodger, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic electron precipitation events lasting from minutes to hours have been observed by balloon-borne instrumentation since 1996. This collection of observations, including the recent BARREL observations, all occur in the noon to midnight sector. EMIC waves have been suggested as the precipitation mechanism for this type of event [Lorentzen et al., 2000 and Millan et al., 2002]. A recent study by Li et al., [2014] performed a case study which modeled the radiation belt relativistic electron pitch angle diffusion from EMIC waves which showed convincing agreement between the modeled results and the BARREL x-ray observations. A survey of the BARREL REP events suggests this type of precipitation is a very localized phenomena with most events only being observed by a single balloon at a time despite the extensive L-value and local time coverage of observations during the campaign. This result is consistent with the findings of Blum et al., [2013]. Furthermore, the balloon observations show local time energy dependence consistent with the SAMPEX observations reported by Comess et al, [2013]. In this work we address the following questions: based on the REP events observed by balloon-borne instrumentation, are these characteristics true for all identified REP events and does this support EMIC waves as the precipitation mechanism? Due to the localized region of precipitation, do these events represent a significant radiation belt loss process?

  20. Manipulation of nanoparticles of different shapes inside a scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Polyakov, Boris; Dorogin, Leonid M; Butikova, Jelena; Antsov, Mikk; Oras, Sven; Lõhmus, Rünno; Kink, Ilmar

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work polyhedron-like gold and sphere-like silver nanoparticles (NPs) were manipulated on an oxidized Si substrate to study the dependence of the static friction and the contact area on the particle geometry. Measurements were performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) that was equipped with a high-precision XYZ-nanomanipulator. To register the occurring forces a quartz tuning fork (QTF) with a glued sharp probe was used. Contact areas and static friction forces were calculated by using different models and compared with the experimentally measured force. The effect of NP morphology on the nanoscale friction is discussed. PMID:24605279

  1. [The electron microscopic study of tumour-like structures on the vocal cords].

    PubMed

    Il'inskaia, E V; Stepanova, Iu E; Koren', E E; Kosenko, V A

    2015-01-01

    We have undertaken the electron microscopic investigation into peculiarities of six tumour-like structures on the vocal cords. The study has demonstrated changes in the number and distribution patterns of intercellular junctions, keratin and tonofilament contents in epithelial cells, basal membrane structure, and composition of the basic substance in lamina propria. All the examined tumour-like structures contained bacteria an two of them had viral particles in vacuoles of fibroblasts. Moreover, the bacteria were found on the surface of epithelium, between epithelial cells and in the basic substance in lamina propria. Cytoplasm of epithelial cells and fibroblasts not infrequently contained bacteria in the phase of division.

  2. Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    Crewe, Albert V.

    1996-01-01

    A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

  3. Imaging free carriers in electronic material using a scanning probe microscope: Scanning capacitance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, A.; Adderton, D.; Day, T.; Alvis, R.

    1996-12-31

    The development of methods electrical properties, which are suitable to directly yield the desired carrier distributions on a nanometer scale has greatly benefited from the development of scanning probe technology over the last decade. Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) offer inherent two-dimensionality and have been shown to have applications ranging from Magnet force to electro-chemistry. We have used an SPM in contact mode to simultaneously measure topography (and therefore physical structure) and capacitance variations (due to an applied bias) of various electronic materials such as doped silicon, poly silicon, SiC, and III-V materials.

  4. Electron microscopic and optical studies of prism faces of synthetic quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzek, B. C.; Vagh, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    Application of electron and optical microscopic techniques to the study of growth spirals on quartz crystal faces is described. Attention is centered on the centers of the spirals and on screw ledges; overhanging kinks are revealed on one side of the spiral centers. The possibility that these special features may have developed after growth of the crystals went to completion is explored. The conjecture is raised that such structures might result from adsorption of growth-inhibiting impurities at the center of the growth spiral on the quartz habit faces.

  5. Light and scanning electron microscopic investigations on MiteStop-treated poultry red mites.

    PubMed

    Locher, Nina; Klimpel, Sven; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Al Rasheid, Khaled A S; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies of the neem seed product MiteStop showed that it has a good acaricidal effect against all developmental stages of the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae. In vitro tests proved an efficacy at direct contact, as well as by fumigant toxicity. Light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) investigations showed no clear, morphologically visible signs of an effect caused by fumigant toxicity. Direct contact with the neem product, however, seemed to be of great impact. Chicken mites turned dark brown or even black after being treated with the neem product. SEM analysis showed damages along the body surface of the mites. PMID:20563823

  6. PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN THE VISUAL CELLS OF THE HONEYBEE DRONE AS STUDIED WITH ELECTRON MICROSCOPE RADIOAUTOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Perrelet, Alain

    1972-01-01

    Protein synthesis was studied in the visual cells of an insect (honeybee drone, Apis mellifera) by electron microscope radioautography. After a single injection of tritiated leucine, the radioactivity first appears in the cytoplasm of the visual cell which contains ribosomes. Later, part of this radioactivity migrates to the rhabdome, the visual cell region which is specialized in light absorption. A maximal concentration of radioactivity is reached there 48 hr after the injection of leucine. This pattern of protein synthesis and transport resembles that described in vertebrate visual cells (rods and cones), where newly synthesized proteins have been shown to contribute to the renewal of the photoreceptor membrane. PMID:4656703

  7. Protein synthesis in the visual cells of the honeybee drone as studied with electron microscope radioautography.

    PubMed

    Perrelet, A

    1972-12-01

    Protein synthesis was studied in the visual cells of an insect (honeybee drone, Apis mellifera) by electron microscope radioautography. After a single injection of tritiated leucine, the radioactivity first appears in the cytoplasm of the visual cell which contains ribosomes. Later, part of this radioactivity migrates to the rhabdome, the visual cell region which is specialized in light absorption. A maximal concentration of radioactivity is reached there 48 hr after the injection of leucine. This pattern of protein synthesis and transport resembles that described in vertebrate visual cells (rods and cones), where newly synthesized proteins have been shown to contribute to the renewal of the photoreceptor membrane.

  8. Nanoscale diffraction gratings and electron vortex beams in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachtner, Alexander; Wright, Carly; McMorran, Benjamin; Harvey, Tyler; Yahn, Tyler; Pierce, Jordan

    2012-10-01

    We use focused ion beam nanofabrication to manufacture forked diffraction gratings capable of producing electron beams with helical wavefronts and orbital angular momentum (OAM). A vast number of unique beam modes carrying OAM can be produced through manipulation of grating fork number or position. Generally these gratings are milled such that they produce a phase shift in the beam and are used with high energy electrons (300keV) in a TEM to investigate the quantum or magnetic properties of the electron or image magnetic materials. Our latest work focuses on manufacturing sub-100-nm pitch binary transmission gratings that produce only an amplitude modulation, which opens up imaging capability to lower energy electrons (5-30 keV) and thus expands their use to a wider range of commercially available SEMs. We use these amplitude gratings to show the relationship between the number/position of forks and OAM inherited by the beam. This work could lead to advances in imaging capability, and also creates a widely accessible and scalable demonstration of the quantum properties of the electron which can be leveraged by any science program with SEM access.

  9. Light and electron microscopic changes in the myocardium of influenza-infected turkeys.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, B E; Easterday, B C; Will, J A

    1972-11-01

    Virus isolation and titration, electrocardiography, enzyme assays and light and electron microscopic studies were undertaken in male turkeys infected with influenza A/turkey/Ontario/7732/66 virus to determine its potential role in the genesis of heart disease. Virus was isolated from the heart initially before a demonstrable viremia and terminally in declining serum viral titer. Virus was isolated from the heart muscle as early as 1 day postinoculation. Highest viral titers were found in the heart at 6 days postinoculation and coincided with maximum elevations of serum glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase and lactic acid dehydrogenase, microscopic lesions in the heart and cardiac arrhythmias. Microscopic lesions in the heart were first detected at 4 days postinoculation and consisted of disseminated areas of necrosis, focal myocarditis, pericarditis and endocarditis. Alterations in myocardial ultrastructure which followed viral infection included fragmentation and dissolution of myofibrils, dilation of the sarcotubular system, increase in membrane vesicle formation in the region of the endoplasmic reticulum, discontinuity of the sarcolemma, proliferation of mitochondrial population, swelling of mitochondria with separation and disruption of the cristae, and the presence of intramitochondrial and perinuclear densities.

  10. Electron microscopic demonstration of Romhányi's aldehyde-bisulphite-toluidine blue (ABT)-topo-optical staining reaction.

    PubMed

    Sótonyi, Peter; Tátrai, Enikö

    2009-01-01

    Romhányi's aldehyde-bisulphite-toluidine blue (ABT) topo-optical reaction was checked electron microscopically. The reaction product was found localized on the sarcolemma membrane and intercalated disc. The findings suggest that the topo-optical ABT-reaction is suitable for molecular analysis. In addition to confirming the electron microscopic suitability of the ABT-reaction it has also offered ultrastructural evidence for the reliability of the topo-optical method.

  11. Observation of sperm-head vacuoles and sperm morphology under light microscope

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sol; Ko, Duck Sung; Park, Dong Wook; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The presence of sperm-head vacuoles has been suspected to be deleterious to the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART). It is difficult to accurately distinguish morphologically abnormal sperm with vacuoles under a light microscope. This study was performed to analyze the result of the observation of sperm-head vacuoles using Papanicolaou staining under a light microscope and whether the male partner's age affects these vacuoles. Methods Sperm morphology with vacuoles was evaluated using Papanicolaou staining and observed under a light microscope (400×) in 980 men. The normal morphology was divided into three categories (group A, <4% of normal morphology; group B, 4%-14% of normal morphology; and group C, >14% of normal morphology). The criteria for the sperm-head vacuoles were those given in the World Health Organization manual. For the analysis of the age factor, the participants were divided into the following groups: 26-30 years, 31-35 years, 36-40 years, 41-45 years, and 46-50 years. Results The percentage of sperm-head vacuoles increased with normal sperm morphology (group A vs. groups B, C) (p<0.05). In the case of the age factor, a statistically significant difference was not observed across any of the age groups. Conclusion A majority of the sperm-head vacuoles showed a statistically significant difference among normal morphology groups. Therefore, we should consider the probability of the percentage of sperm-head vacuoles not increasing with age but with abnormal sperm morphology. A further study is required to clarify the effect of the sperm-head vacuoles on ART outcomes. PMID:25309858

  12. Electron-beam-enhanced oxidation processes in II-VI compound semiconductors observed by high-resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, N.; Wessels, B.W.

    1990-02-01

    Enhanced oxidation of ZnS and ZnSe semiconductor surfaces has been observed in situ during electron irradiation in a high-resolution electron microscope. The phase present at the surface region has been identified as ZnO by optical diffractogram and selected area electron diffraction techniques. For ZnS oxidation, both hexagonal ZnO having a random orientation and cubic ZnO in perfect epitaxial relationship with the bulk ZnS were observed. Enhanced oxidation of ZnSe to ZnO has also been observed under electron beam irradiation. However, only the hexagonal form was observed. The oxidation rates for both ZnS and ZnSe depended on electron flux but was independent of orientation. A model in which the oxidation process is limited by diffusion through the oxide film is proposed. By electron irradiation the diffusion rate is enhanced presumably by a nonthermal process.

  13. Putting structure into context: fitting of atomic models into electron microscopic and electron tomographic reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels

    2012-02-01

    A complete understanding of complex dynamic cellular processes such as cell migration or cell adhesion requires the integration of atomic level structural information into the larger cellular context. While direct atomic-level information at the cellular level remains inaccessible, electron microscopy, electron tomography and their associated computational image processing approaches have now matured to a point where sub-cellular structures can be imaged in three dimensions at the nanometer scale. Atomic-resolution information obtained by other means can be combined with this data to obtain three-dimensional models of large macromolecular assemblies in their cellular context. This article summarizes some recent advances in this field.

  14. Self-assembled stripes on the anodic aluminum oxide by atomic force microscope observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. W.; Guo, H. M.; Wang, Y. L.; Wang, Y. T.; Shen, C. M.; Wei, L.

    2003-12-01

    Non-polished aluminum sheets were anodized. The nanostructures were investigated in details using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The coexistence of self-assembled stripes and porous arrays on the Al surface was observed. The formation mechanism of the stripes is discussed based on the Brusselator model. We suggest that the self-assembled patterns on the Al surface strongly depend on the competition of the formation and the dissolution rate of alumina film during the reaction process. It is also found that this type of ordered structure can only form in certain conditions.

  15. EUV mask observations using a coherent EUV scatterometry microscope with a high-harmonic-generation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yusuke; Harada, Tetsuo; Nagata, Yutaka; Watanabe, Takeo; Kinoshita, Hiroo

    2015-07-01

    In extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the EUV mask, which has an absorber layer and a Mo/Si multilayer on a glass substrate, strongly affects the EUV phase. EUV actinic metrology is required to evaluate the feature of defect printability and the critical dimension (CD) value. The 3D structure modulates the EUV phase, causing the pattern position and focus shift. A microscope that observes in phase contrast necessary. We have developed a coherent EUV scatterometry microscope (CSM) for observing EUV patterns with quantitative phase contrast. The exposure light is coherent EUV light. For the industrial use, we have developed a laboratory coherent source of high-harmonic-generation (HHG) EUV light. High harmonics is pumped by a scale of a Ti:Sapphire laser. In the previous study, a very long exposure time of 1000 s was necessary to detect We upgraded the relay optics. The detection performance of an absorber defect using the new relay optics is We observed the line-end oversize defect and the oversize defect in the 112 nm hole pattern and 180 nm hole pattern. The upgraded system has a detection size limit of a line-end 24-nm-oversize defect with 10 s exposure time, which is 2,688 nm2 (52 × 52 nm2) absorber defect. This result shows high performance capability of HHG-CSM for detecting small defect.

  16. Electron microscope study on the hepatic sinusoidal wall and fat-storing cells in the bat.

    PubMed

    Tanuma, Y; Ito, T

    1978-02-01

    The three cell types known to form the hepatic sinusoidal wall were electron microscopically observed in three kinds of bats captured in winter and summer. 1. The cytoplasmic extensions of sinusoidal endothelial cells consisted of continuous thicker parts ("cytoplasmic processes") and discontinuous thinner parts ("sieve plates"). The alternate disposition of the two parts was rather irregular, and the sizes, shapes and spacings of the fenestrae were variable. In the thinner parts with numerous small fenestrae, larger gaps were also mingled. The endothelium was simple-layered and devoid of basal lamina. Interendothelial junctions were found mainly between closely apposed margins of the "cytoplasmic processes" and agreed in structure with the "junctional complex" of WISSE (1970). 2. Kupffer cells, morphologically distinct from the endothelial cells, bulged strongly into the sinusoidal lumen. Provided with many microvillous pseudopods, they were stellate in appearance. They were fixed to the endothelial lining by small junctional areas which occurred between the Kupffer cell body and the "cytoplasmic processes" of the endothelium. 3. Fat-storing cells were located in the Disse's space. They generally contained only smaller amounts of lipid in a few droplets. So-called empty fat-storing cells were numerous, especially in winter bats. The perikaryonal cytoplasm revealed a large Golgi complex and well-developed granular endoplasmic reticulum. The three mesenchymal cell types of the sinusoidal wall possessed the centriole in common within the Golgi complex, but only the fat-storing cell was provided with the single cilium. Fat-storing cells extended cytoplasmic processes ramifying beneath the endothelial lining occasionally surrounding the sinusoids almost completely, and which seemed to reinforce the endothelial lining and to bring about the constriction of the sinusoid. In hypervitaminotic bats that daily received 6,000 I.U. vitamin A for three days, remarkable increase

  17. The interaction of point defects with line dislocations in HVEM (high voltage electron microscope) irradiated Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.L.; Jenkins, M.L. . Dept. of Materials); Kirk, M.A. ); English, C.A. . Materials Development Div.)

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the interaction of point defects produced by high voltage electron microscope (HVEM) irradiation with pre-existing dislocations in austenitic Fe-15% 25%Ni-17%Cr alloys, aimed at the determination of the mechanisms of climb of dissociated dislocations. Dislocations were initially characterized at sub-threshold voltages (here 200kV) using the weak-beam technique. These dislocations were then irradiated with 1MeV electrons in the Argonne HVEM before being returned to a lower voltage microscope for post-irradiation characterization. Interstitial climb was seen only at particularly favorable sites, such as pre-existing jogs, whilst vacancies clustered near dislocations, forming stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). Partial separations were also observed to have decreased after irradiation. The post-irradiation configuration was found to depend strongly on both dislocation character and pre-irradiation dislocation configuration. These results, and their relevance to the void swelling problem, are discussed. 52 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Electron microscopic studies of macrophages in Wallerian degeneration of rat optic nerve after intravenous injection of colloidal carbon.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, E A

    1978-01-01

    The origin of macrophages in the degenerating optic nerve of rats after eye enucleation was investigated electron microscopically following intravenous labelling of mononuclear leucoytes with colloidal carbon. In the various post-operative periods studied carbon-labelled macrophages were seen at the site of lesion. At 4 and 7 days after enucleation carbon-labelled cells were seen at the site of Wallerian degeneration of the optic nerve over 4 mm distal to the site of the lesion. In the electron microscope these cells showed a flattened nucleus bearing coarse chromatin clumps, their cytoplasm contained a prominent Golgi complex and long isolate profiles of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Clusters of carbon particles in the cytoplasms were membrane-bound. Lysosomal bodies embedded with carbon particles were also observed. In relation to the blood vessels of the optic nerve, endothelial cells and pericytes with ingested carbon were seen. Macrophages in the meninges covering the optic nerve were also labelled. The results suggest that some macrophages in the region of Wallerian degeneration in the optic nerve, as well as those at the actual site of the lesion, were transformed blood leucocytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:649492

  19. Gross and microscopic observations on the lingual structure of the Florida Manatee Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Levin, M J; Pfeiffer, C J

    2002-10-01

    The tongue of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) was studied macroscopically, light and electron microscopically. The tongue was slender, muscular and firmly fixed in the oral cavity; only the cranial tip was free and mobile. Numerous filiform papillae were distributed over the dorsal surface of the rostral tongue. Multiple raised, round fungiform-like papillae were distributed over most of the dorsum. Typical fungiform papillae were restricted to the lateral margins of the tongue. Foliate papillae, presenting as multi-fossulate openings, were noted on the caudolateral margins. Open pits were located on the dorsocaudal surface and lateral walls. Microscopic examination showed that most of the lingual dorsum was covered with a thick stratified squamous epithelium. Open pits led to well-developed mucous salivary glands. Glands within the foliate papillae were mostly mucous, although some seromucous glands were present. Taste buds were restricted to the epithelium of the foliate papillae. Throughout the tongue, striated muscle was abundant below the epithelium. Blood vessels, lymph channels and nerve fibres were freely distributed throughout the intermuscular stroma. Nerve fibres reacted positively with neurone specific enolase (NSE) antibody throughout the tongue, including nerve bundles, glands and taste buds. Clear to translucent vacuoles were found juxtaposed to nuclei in the stratum spinosum in the foliate papillae epithelium.

  20. Biochemical and electron microscopic evidence that cell nucleus negatively controls mitochondrial genomic activity in early sea urchin development.

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, A M; De Leo, G; Arzone, A; Salcher, I; Storace, A; Mutolo, V

    1979-01-01

    Enucleated halves of sea urchin eggs obtained by centrifugation contain almost all the mitochondrial population of the egg. Removal of the nucleus followed by parthenogenetic activation stimulates the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the mitochondrial DNA, whereas no such incorportion is observed in activated whole eggs. The block is not the result of a modification in the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane. Electron microscopic observations demonstrated duplication of mitochondrial DNA molecules in activated enucleated halves. No duplication was found in the mitochondrial DNA from activated whole eggs or from nonactivated enucleated halves. We conclude that the cell nucleus exerts a negative control on the activity of the mitochondrial genome through some short-lived nuclear substance(s). Images PMID:287031

  1. Microscopic properties of degradation-free capped GdN thin films studied by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shimokawa, Tokuro; Fukuoka, Yohei; Fujisawa, Masashi; Zhang, Weimin; Okubo, Susumu; Ohta, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takahiro; Vidyasagar, Reddithota; Yoshitomi, Hiroaki; Kitayama, Shinya; Kita, Takashi

    2015-01-28

    The microscopic magnetic properties of high-quality GdN thin films have been investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements. Detailed temperature dependence ESR measurements have shown the existence of two ferromagnetic components at lower temperatures, which was not clear from the previous magnetization measurements. The temperature, where the resonance shift occurs for the major ferromagnetic component, seems to be consistent with the Curie temperature obtained from the previous magnetization measurement. On the other hand, the divergence of line width is observed around 57 K for the minor ferromagnetic component. The magnetic anisotropies of GdN thin films have been obtained by the analysis of FMR angular dependence observed at 4.2 K. Combining the X-ray diffraction results, the correlation between the magnetic anisotropies and the lattice constants is discussed.

  2. The organization of collagen in cryofractured rabbit articular cartilage: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Clark, J M

    1985-01-01

    Adult rabbit articular cartilage was prepared for scanning electron microscopy using, in order, glutaraldehyde fixation, enzymatic removal of proteoglycan, dehydration in ethanol, cryofracture in liquid nitrogen, and critical-point drying. Enzymes were effective in fixed material. Fixation, cryofracture, alignment of fracture surfaces with "split lines," and retention of subchondral bone were found to be necessary steps for the preservation of collagen detail. The fibrous framework was found to be similar to that proposed by Benninghoff and favored by more recent phase-contrast microscopic studies. Vertical fibers extending from subchondral bone and a network of tangentially oriented superficial fibrils converge in the transitional zone. No random layer is seen. Pericellular capsules interdigitate with the vertical fibers. When cartilage is prepared in a manner that minimizes tissue damage, scanning electron microscopy provides useful, unique information. PMID:3981292

  3. The Microstructure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Aerogels as Revealed by Transmission Electron Microscope Tomography.

    PubMed

    Buesch, Christian; Smith, Sean W; Eschbach, Peter; Conley, John F; Simonsen, John

    2016-09-12

    The microstructure of highly porous cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels is investigated via transmission electron microscope (TEM) tomography. The aerogels were fabricated by first supercritically drying a carboxylated CNC organogel and then coating via atomic layer deposition with a thin conformal layer of Al2O3 to protect the CNCs against prolonged electron beam exposure. A series of images was then acquired, reconstructed, and segmented in order to generate a three-dimensional (3D) model of the aerogel. The model agrees well with theory and macroscopic measurements, indicating that a thin conformal inorganic coating enables TEM tomography as an analysis tool for microstructure characterization of CNC aerogels. The 3D model also reveals that the aerogels consist of randomly orientated CNCs that attach to one another primarily in three ways: end to end contact, "T″ contact, and "X″ contact.

  4. Nanocrystal Phase Identification by Lattice Fringe Fingerprinting from High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorge, Ruben; Seipel, Bjoern; Moeck, Peter; Fraundorf, Philip

    2006-05-01

    Lattice fringe fingerprinting is a novel and powerful method of identifying and characterizing nanocrystalline structures or materials based on images from direct space high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We examine Fourier transformed HRTEM images of nanocrystals in certain orientations (i.e. lattice fringes and cross fringes) in order to obtain a lattice fringe fingerprint plot. Such plots are used to identify a crystalline nanoparticle by comparing the experimental data with data that are derived from a comprehensive database. A lattice fringe fingerprint plot is similar to a classical X-ray powder diffractogram, but an important advantage is that the intersection angles of lattice fringes give us additional information. When transmission electron microscope image acquisition and data interpretation are automated and connected to a comprehensive database (such as our Nano-Crystallography Database, http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/), fringe fingerprinting will be able to compete with powder X-ray diffraction in identifying unknown nanocrystals on a routine basis.

  5. The Microstructure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Aerogels as Revealed by Transmission Electron Microscope Tomography.

    PubMed

    Buesch, Christian; Smith, Sean W; Eschbach, Peter; Conley, John F; Simonsen, John

    2016-09-12

    The microstructure of highly porous cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels is investigated via transmission electron microscope (TEM) tomography. The aerogels were fabricated by first supercritically drying a carboxylated CNC organogel and then coating via atomic layer deposition with a thin conformal layer of Al2O3 to protect the CNCs against prolonged electron beam exposure. A series of images was then acquired, reconstructed, and segmented in order to generate a three-dimensional (3D) model of the aerogel. The model agrees well with theory and macroscopic measurements, indicating that a thin conformal inorganic coating enables TEM tomography as an analysis tool for microstructure characterization of CNC aerogels. The 3D model also reveals that the aerogels consist of randomly orientated CNCs that attach to one another primarily in three ways: end to end contact, "T″ contact, and "X″ contact. PMID:27500897

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  7. The Wavelength-Dispersive Spectrometer and Its Proposed Use in the Analytical Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Lyman, Charles E.; Williams, David B.

    1989-01-01

    The Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) equipped with a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer (WDS) should have the ability to resolve peaks which normally overlap in the spectra from an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). With a WDS it should also be possible to measure lower concentrations of elements in thin foils due to the increased peak-to-background ratio compared with EDS. The WDS will measure X-ray from the light elements (4 less than Z less than 1O) more effectively. This paper addresses the possibility of interfacing a compact WDS with a focussing circle of approximately 4 cm to a modem AEM with a high-brightness (field emission) source of electrons.

  8. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barthel, J; Thust, A

    2013-11-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state.

  9. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Fumio; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shinkawa, Takao; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2016-08-01

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field's components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field's derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope.

  10. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the retroperitoneum: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Konishi, I; Okamura, H; Mori, T

    1986-05-01

    A large, ovarian-type, retroperitoneal cystic tumor existing in the presence of normal ovaries was studied morphologically by light and electron microscopy. The cyst was monolocular, having several papillary nodules which measured 0.2-2.0 cm in diameter, and protruded into the lumen. Histologically, most of the tumor wall was covered by mesothelium-like cells which showed signs of differentiation into either a benign endocervical type mucinous epithelium or a mucinous epithelium of borderline malignancy, particularly around the nodules. The papillary nodules themselves had the histological features of a well-differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma. These light and electron microscopic features resembled those of ovarian mucinous tumors. Histogenetically, the tumor appeared to be derived from a mesothelial inclusion cyst; some of the mesothelium being transformed by metaplastic change into the endocervical type mucinous epithelium and undergoing further transformation into either the mucinous epithelium of borderline malignancy or the well-differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma by some unknown factors.

  11. Modification of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Measurement of Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Satcher; Hong, Jeongmin; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic memory and logic devices show great promise for integration with, and even replacement of, conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) architectures. In order to characterize materials and deposition techniques for these devices, ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) is used. BEEM is a spatially resolved metrological tool most commonly used for subsurface interface structures at the nanometer scale. We modify a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform BEEM measurement via design and fabrication of a novel sample stage. Furthermore, we design and fabricate an external magnetic field source that encapsulates the sample stage, setting the foundation for future measurement of ballistic electron magnetic microscopy (BEMM). Instrumentation of the device and characterization of a sample with an ohmic interface, Ni-Si, are implemented and discussed. With support from National Science Foundation Award ECCS-0939514.

  12. Instrumental developments for in situ breakdown experiments inside a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muranaka, T.; Blom, T.; Leifer, K.; Ziemann, V.

    2011-11-01

    Electrical discharges in accelerating structures are one of the key issues limiting the performance of future high energy accelerators such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Fundamental understanding of breakdown phenomena is an important part of the CLIC feasibility study. The present work concerns the experimental study of breakdown using Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEMs). An SEM gives us the opportunity to achieve high electrical gradients of 1 kV/ μm which corresponds to 1 GV/m by exciting a probe needle with a high voltage power supply and controlling the positioning of the needle with a linear piezo motor. The gap between the needle tip and the surface is controlled with sub-micron precision. A second electron microscope equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) is used to create surface corrugations and to sharpen the probe needle to a tip radius of about 50 nm. Moreover it is used to prepare cross-sections of a voltage breakdown area in order to study the geometrical surface damages as well as the elemental composition of the breakdown.

  13. Subcellular distribution of ( sup 3 H)-dexamethasone mesylate binding sites in Leydig cells using electron microscope radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The present view is that glucocorticoid hormones bind to their cytoplasmic receptors before reaching their nuclear target sites, which include specific DNA sequences. Although it is believed that cytoplasmic sequestration of steroid receptors and other transcription factors (such as NFKB) may regulate the overall activity of these factors, there is little information on the exact subcellular sites of steroid receptors or even of any other transcription factors. Tritiated (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) is an affinity label that binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thereby allowing morphological localization of the receptor at the light and electron microscope levels as well as for quantitative radioautographic (RAG) analysis. After injection of 3H-DM into the testis, a specific radioautographic signal was observed in Leydig cells, which correlated with a high level of immunocytochemically demonstrable GR in these cells at the light-microscope level. To localize the 3H-DM binding sites at the electron microscope (EM) level, the testes of 5 experimental and 3 control adrenalectomized rats were injected directly with 20 microCi 3H-DM; control rats received simultaneously a 25-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone; 15 min later, rats were fixed with glutaraldehyde and the tissue was processed for EM RAG analysis combined with quantitative morphometry. The radioautographs showed that the cytosol, nucleus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and mitochondria were labeled. Since the cytosol was always adjacent to tubules of the sER, the term sER-rich cytosol was used to represent label over sER networks, which may also represent cytosol labeling due to the limited resolution of the radioautographic technique. Labeling was highest in sER-rich cytosol and mitochondria, at 53% and 31% of the total, respectively.

  14. Strain mapping of semiconductor specimens with nm-scale resolution in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Bernier, Nicolas; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The last few years have seen a great deal of progress in the development of transmission electron microscopy based techniques for strain mapping. New techniques have appeared such as dark field electron holography and nanobeam diffraction and better known ones such as geometrical phase analysis have been improved by using aberration corrected ultra-stable modern electron microscopes. In this paper we apply dark field electron holography, the geometrical phase analysis of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images, nanobeam diffraction and precession diffraction, all performed at the state-of-the-art to five different types of semiconductor samples. These include a simple calibration structure comprising 10-nm-thick SiGe layers to benchmark the techniques. A SiGe recessed source and drain device has been examined in order to test their capabilities on 2D structures. Devices that have been strained using a nitride stressor have been examined to test the sensitivity of the different techniques when applied to systems containing low values of deformation. To test the techniques on modern semiconductors, an electrically tested device grown on a SOI wafer has been examined. Finally a GaN/AlN superlattice was tested in order to assess the different methods of measuring deformation on specimens that do not have a perfect crystalline structure. The different deformation mapping techniques have been compared to one another and the strengths and weaknesses of each are discussed.

  15. Uptake and processing of (/sup 3/H)retinoids in rat liver studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, H.F.; Elhanany, E.; Brouwer, A.; de Leeuw, A.M.; Knook, D.L.

    1988-03-01

    The role of rat liver cell organelles in retinoid uptake and processing was studied by electron microscopic autoradiography. (/sup 3/H)Retinoids were administered either orally, to make an inventory of the cell organelles involved, or intravenously as chylomicron remnant constituents to study retinoid processing by the liver with time. No qualitative differences were observed between the two routes of administration. Time-related changes in the distribution of grains were studied using chylomicron remnant (/sup 3/H)retinoids. The percentages of grains observed over cells and the space of Disse at 5 and 30 min after administration were, respectively: parenchymal cells, 72.6 and 70.4%; fat-storing cells, 5.0 and 18.1%, and the space of Disse, 14.4 and 8.9%. Low numbers of grains were observed over endothelial and Kupffer cells. The percentages of grains observed over parenchymal cell organelles were, respectively: sinusoidal area, 59.6 and 34.4%; smooth endoplasmic reticulum associated with glycogen, 13.8 and 13.4%; mitochondria, 5.4 and 13.6%; rough endoplasmic reticulum, 4.2 and 7.3%, and rough endoplasmic reticulum associated with mitochondria, 3.7 and 6.5%. It is concluded that chylomicron remnant (/sup 3/H)retinoids in combination with electron microscopic autoradiography provide a good system to study the liver processing of retinoids in vivo. These results, obtained in the intact liver under physiological conditions, further substantiate that retinoids are processed through parenchymal cells before storage occurs in fat-storing cell lipid droplets, that retinoid uptake is not mediated through lysosomes and that the endoplasmic reticulum is a major organelle in retinoid processing.

  16. ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; HUANG, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Since 2001 RHIC has experienced electron cloud effects, which have limited the beam intensity. These include dynamic pressure rises - including pressure instabilities, tune shifts, a reduction of the stability threshold for bunches crossing the transition energy, and possibly incoherent emittance growth. We summarize the main observations in operation and dedicated experiments, as well as countermeasures including baking, NEG coated warm beam pipes, solenoids, bunch patterns, anti-grazing rings, pre-pumped cold beam pipes, scrubbing, and operation with long bunches.

  17. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    PubMed Central

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications. PMID:26525841

  18. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications.

  19. Scanning electron microscope analysis of gunshot defects to bone: an underutilized source of information on ballistic trauma.

    PubMed

    Rickman, John M; Smith, Martin J

    2014-11-01

    Recent years have seen increasing involvement by forensic anthropologists in the interpretation of skeletal trauma. With regard to ballistic injuries, there is now a large literature detailing gross features of such trauma; however, less attention has been given to microscopic characteristics. This article presents analysis of experimentally induced gunshot trauma in animal bone (Bos taurus scapulae) using full metal jacket (FMJ), soft point (SP), and captive bolt projectiles. The results were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additional analysis was conducted on a purported parietal gunshot lesion in a human cranial specimen. A range of features was observed in these samples suggesting that fibrolamellar bone response to projectile impact is analogous to that observed in synthetic composite laminates. The results indicate that direction of bullet travel can be discerned microscopically even when it is ambiguous on gross examination. It was also possible to distinguish SP from FMJ lesions. SEM analysis is therefore recommended as a previously underexploited tool in the analysis of ballistic trauma.

  20. Palisade pattern of mormyrid Purkinje cells: a correlated light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Meek, J; Nieuwenhuys, R

    1991-04-01

    The present study is devoted to a detailed analysis of the structural and synaptic organization of mormyrid Purkinje cells in order to evaluate the possible functional significance of their dendritic palisade pattern. For this purpose, the properties of Golgi-impregnated as well as unimpregnated Purkinje cells in lobe C1 and C3 of the cerebellum of Gnathonemus petersii were light and electron microscopically analyzed, quantified, reconstructed, and mutually compared. Special attention was paid to the degree of regularity of their dendritic trees, their relations with Bergmann glia, and the distribution and numerical properties of their synaptic connections with parallel fibers, stellate cells, "climbing" fibers, and Purkinje axonal boutons. The highest degree of palisade specialization was encountered in lobe C1, where Purkinje cells have on average 50 palisade dendrites with a very regular distribution in a sagittal plane. Their spine density decreases from superficial to deep (from 14 to 6 per micron dendritic length), a gradient correlated with a decreasing parallel fiber density but an increasing parallel fiber diameter. Each Purkinje cell makes on average 75,000 synaptic contacts with parallel fibers, some of which are rather coarse (0.45 microns), and provided with numerous short collaterals. Climbing fibers do not climb, since their synaptic contacts are restricted to the ganglionic layer (i.e., the layer of Purkinje and eurydendroid projection cells), where they make about 130 synaptic contacts per cell with 2 or 3 clusters of thorns on the proximal dendrites. These clusters contain also a type of "shunting" elements that make desmosome-like junctions with both the climbing fiber boutons and the necks of the thorns. The axons of Purkinje cells in lobe C1 make small terminal arborizations, with about 20 boutons, that may be substantially (up to 500 microns) displaced rostrally or caudally with respect to the soma. Purkinje axonal boutons were observed to

  1. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Mishra, Bud; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  2. Model-independent quantitative measurement of nanomechanical oscillator vibrations using electron-microscope linescans

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huan; Fenton, J. C.; Chiatti, O.; Warburton, P. A.

    2013-07-15

    Nanoscale mechanical resonators are highly sensitive devices and, therefore, for application as highly sensitive mass balances, they are potentially superior to micromachined cantilevers. The absolute measurement of nanoscale displacements of such resonators remains a challenge, however, since the optical signal reflected from a cantilever whose dimensions are sub-wavelength is at best very weak. We describe a technique for quantitative analysis and fitting of scanning-electron microscope (SEM) linescans across a cantilever resonator, involving deconvolution from the vibrating resonator profile using the stationary resonator profile. This enables determination of the absolute amplitude of nanomechanical cantilever oscillations even when the oscillation amplitude is much smaller than the cantilever width. This technique is independent of any model of secondary-electron emission from the resonator and is, therefore, applicable to resonators with arbitrary geometry and material inhomogeneity. We demonstrate the technique using focussed-ion-beam–deposited tungsten cantilevers of radius ∼60–170 nm inside a field-emission SEM, with excitation of the cantilever by a piezoelectric actuator allowing measurement of the full frequency response. Oscillation amplitudes approaching the size of the primary electron-beam can be resolved. We further show that the optimum electron-beam scan speed is determined by a compromise between deflection of the cantilever at low scan speeds and limited spatial resolution at high scan speeds. Our technique will be an important tool for use in precise characterization of nanomechanical resonator devices.

  3. Intracellular forms of pox viruses as shown by the electron microscope (Vaccinia, Ectromelia, Molluscum Contagiosum).

    PubMed

    GAYLORD, W H; MELNICK, J L

    1953-08-01

    The intracellular development of three pox viruses has been studied with the electron microscope using thin sections of infected tissue. Cells infected with vaccinia, ectromelia, and molluscum contagiosum viruses all form developmental bodies preliminary to the production of mature virus. Developmental bodies, believed to be virus precursors, are round to oval, slightly larger than mature virus particles, less dense to electrons, and have a more varied morphology. It is suggested as a working hypothesis that the process of maturation of a virus particle takes place as follows. In the earliest form the developmental bodies appear as hollow spheres, imbedded in a very dense cytoplasmic mass constituting an inclusion body, or in a less dense matrix near the nucleus in cells without typical inclusion bodies. The spheres become filled with a homogeneous material of low electron density. A small, dense granule appears in each developmental body and grows in size at the expense of the low density material. Following growth of the granule, particles are found with the dimensions of mature virus and having complex internal structure resembling bars or dumbells. Mature virus is ovoid and very dense to electrons. An "empty" interior may be found within its thick walls.

  4. Contrast and decay of cathodoluminescence from phosphor particles in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    den Engelsen, Daniel; Harris, Paul G; Ireland, Terry G; Fern, George R; Silver, Jack

    2015-10-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies are reported on phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). ZnO: Zn and other luminescent powders manifest a bright ring around the periphery of the particles: this ring enhances the contrast. Additionally, particles resting on top of others are substantially brighter than underlying ones. These phenomena are explained in terms of the combined effects of electrons backscattered out of the particles, together with light absorption by the substrate. The contrast is found to be a function of the particle size and the energy of the primary electrons. Some phosphor materials exhibit a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates in a CL-image, because the particle continues to emit light after the electron beam has moved to a position without phosphor material. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. The effect of phosphor saturation on the determination of decay times by CL-microscopy was also investigated.

  5. Development of a classification system for extrinsic hair damage: standard grading of electron microscopic findings of damaged hairs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn-Duk; Jeon, Soo-Young; Ji, Jae Hong; Lee, Won-Soo

    2010-07-01

    Human hairs experience damage and restoration processes consistently because of various external and internal factors. To analyze degrees of hair damage, morphological studies based on electron microscopy (EM), and biochemical studies based on protein and lipid analysis have been proposed and are widely used. Among them, morphological analysis through EM is a fundamental method in understanding the degree of damage and restoration. EM has been very useful in assessing extrinsic and intrinsic damage of hair and various pathological alopecias and also in estimating the efficacy of various kinds of products related to hair care. However, morphological studies have some limitations because they have been described using varying terms and subjective descriptions by different researchers. To establish an objective classification of damaged hair using uniform terms and standardizations. We analyzed over 2000 scanning electron microscopic and transmission electron microscopic findings of normal and of various kinds of damaged hairs to develop a standard grading system for the damaged hairs. After reviewing the results of the electron microscopic pictures, we proposed a standard grading system based on scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. We developed and proposed an easy, objective, and useful standard grading system of damaged hairs.

  6. Measurement of the unstained biological sample by a novel scanning electron generation X-ray microscope based on SEM.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2009-08-01

    We introduced a novel X-ray microscope system based on scanning electron microscopy using thin film, which enables the measurement of unstained biological samples without damage. An unstained yeast sample was adsorbed under a titanium (Ti)-coated silicon nitride (Si3N4) film 90 nm thick. The X-ray signal from the film was detected by an X-ray photodiode (PD) placed below the sample. With an electron beam at 2.6 kV acceleration and 6.75 nA current, the yeast image is obtained using the X-ray PD. The image is created by soft X-rays from the Ti layer. The Ti layer is effective in generating the characteristic 2.7-nm wavelength X-rays by the irradiation of electrons. Furthermore, we investigated the electron trajectory and the generation of the characteristic X-rays within the Ti-coated Si3N4 film by Monte Carlo simulation. Our system can be easily utilized to observe various unstained biological samples of cells, bacteria, and viruses.

  7. STEM imaging of 47-pm-separated atomic columns by a spherical aberration-corrected electron microscope with a 300-kV cold field emission gun.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hidetaka; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Ohashi, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kaneyama, Toshikatsu; Kondo, Yukihito; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2009-12-01

    A spherical aberration-corrected electron microscope has been developed recently, which is equipped with a 300-kV cold field emission gun and an objective lens of a small chromatic aberration coefficient. A dumbbell image of 47 pm spacing, corresponding to a pair of atomic columns of germanium aligned along the [114] direction, is resolved in high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a 0.4-eV energy spread of the electron beam. The observed image was compared with a simulated image obtained by dynamical calculation.

  8. Light- and electron-microscopic studies of transplanted human dystrophic muscles to nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Y; Ohbu, S

    1982-07-01

    Light-microscopic study of muscles from 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and 9 control cases transplanted into nude mice showed the formation of cross-striations and peripheral nuclei in regenerating muscle fibers of both DMD and control grafts up to 4 weeks. Quantitative study of the diameter of myotubes and myoblasts in grafted muscles showed that the group mean diameters of DMD myotubes and myoblasts were 13.4 +/- 0.8 (SE) micrometers, 15.6 +/- 0.7 micrometers, 17.1 +/- 0.9 micrometers and 16.2 +/- 1.0 micrometers after 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks of transplantation, respectively, whereas those of control myotubes and myoblasts were 14.9 +/- 0.6 (SE) micrometers, 19.9 +/- 0.5 micrometers, 21.3 +/- 0.7 micrometers and 20.7 +/- 0.7 micrometers after the same intervals. The group mean diameters of the DMD regenerating myotubes and myoblasts were significantly smaller than those of control myotubes and myoblasts at 2 (P less than 0.001), 3 (P less than 0.005) and 4 (P less than 0.005) weeks after transplantation. Electron-microscopic findings of DMD muscle grafts were morphologically similar to those seen in control muscle grafts at all stages of this experiment.

  9. Monitoring Synaptic Vesicle Protein Sorting with Enhanced Horseradish Peroxidase in the Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Schikorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Protein sorting is the fundamental cellular process that creates and maintains cell organelles and subcellular structures. The synaptic vesicle (SV) is a unique cell organelle that contains a plethora of specific SV proteins and its protein composition is crucial for its function. Thus understanding the mechanisms that sort proteins to SVs and other cell organelles is central to neuroscience and cell biology.While in the past protein sorting was studied in the fluorescence and confocal microscope, we here present a protocol that reveals SV protein trafficking and sorting in the electron microscope (EM). The protocol exploits tagging SV proteins with a new genetically encoded label for EM: enhanced horseradish peroxidase (eHRP). eHRP gained its high sensitivity through direct evolution of its catalytic activity and is detectable in the EM and LM after expression in neurons and other mammalian cells. The protocol describes the use of eHRP, labeling of SVs in cultured hippocampal neurons, and analysis via serial section reconstruction. PMID:27515091

  10. In situ electron microscope study of the phase transformation, structure and growth of thin Te1-xSex films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaak, J. S.; Raubenheimer, D.

    1988-01-01

    An in-situ electron microscope technique was utilized to observe directly the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation, the isothermal growth rates, as well as the orientation and structure of the recrystallized films for the Te1-xSex alloy system for x=0.2, 0.3 and 0.4. Activation energies of E=0.91, 0.93 and 0.96 eV and crystallization temperatures of Tc=-14, 81.5 and 85°C for the three alloys, respectively, were found. In all three cases the crystallization process originated from single crystalline nuclei with a hexagonal structure and with the c-axis in general parallel to the substrate surface.

  11. Electron microscopic time-lapse visualization of surface pore filtration on particulate matter trapping process.

    PubMed

    Sanui, Ryoko; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2016-09-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to dynamically visualize the particulate matter (PM) trapping process on diesel particulate filter (DPF) walls at a micro scale as 'time-lapse' images corresponding to the increase in pressure drop simultaneously measured through the DPF. This visualization and pressure drop measurement led to the conclusion that the PM trapping in surface pores was driven by PM bridging and stacking at constricted areas in porous channels. This caused a drastic increase in the pressure drop during PM accumulation at the beginning of the PM trapping process. The relationship between the porous structure of the DPF and the depth of the surface pore was investigated in terms of the porosity distribution and PM penetration depth near the wall surface with respect to depth. The pressure drop calculated with an assumed surface pore depth showed a good correspondence to the measured pressure drop.

  12. Fundamentals of overlay measurement and inspection using scanning electron-microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Okagawa, Y.; Inoue, O.; Arai, K.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2013-04-01

    Scanning electron-microscope (SEM) has been successfully applied to CD measurement as promising tools for qualifying and controlling quality of semiconductor devices in in-line manufacturing process since 1985. Furthermore SEM is proposed to be applied to in-die overlay monitor in the local area which is too small to be measured by optical overlay measurement tools any more, when the overlay control limit is going to be stringent and have un-ignorable dependence on device pattern layout, in-die location, and singular locations in wafer edge, etc. In this paper, we proposed new overlay measurement and inspection system to make an effective use of in-line SEM image, in consideration of trade-off between measurement uncertainty and measurement pattern density in each SEM conditions. In parallel, we make it clear that the best hybrid overlay metrology is in considering each tool's technology portfolio.

  13. The carotid siphon: a scanning electron microscope assessment of its embolic potential.

    PubMed

    Saunders, F W; Shedden, P

    1985-08-01

    The role of the carotid siphon as a source of embolic material has had limited morphological or clinical study. The morphologic data available suggests that the siphon plays only a small role in embolic cerebrovascular disease. Clinical studies, however, suggest that it has a significant ischemic potential. To clarify this apparent discrepancy, we have designed a scanning electron microscope study of the carotid siphon. Eighty percent of the specimens from the carotid bifurcation and 30% of the siphon specimens showed evidence of damaged endothelium with attached red cell and platelet debris. The embolic potential of the siphon is estimated to be between 1/3 to 1/2 that of the carotid bifurcation. This supports the most recent clinical studies.

  14. Raman spectroscopic and scanning electron microscopic analysis of a novel biological colonisation of volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge Villar, Susana E.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Benning, Liane G.

    2006-09-01

    A novel type of colonisation of a basaltic rock, collected on the Arctic island of Svalbard, Norway, during the AMASE expedition in 2004, was characterised using Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The sample contains two different types of extremophile communities, one occurring behind a radial white crystallisation and the other occurring inside a dark vacuole. Several types of minerals and microbial colonies have been identified by both Raman spectroscopy and SEM analyses. It is the first time that photosynthetic communities have been documented to colonise the inside of dark basaltic rocks. Our discovery has important implications for planetary exploration because it extends the analytical capability and our understanding of microbial rock colonisations to subaerial volcanic outcrops and has wide implications towards the search for life in extraterrestrial planets. In this work we also demonstrate that the use of different laser wavelengths for Raman spectroscopic studies and complementary microscopic analysis are critical for a comprehensive organic and inorganic compound identification.

  15. Scanning electron microscope study of Torulopsis ethanolitolerans prepared by glutaraldehyde--thiosemicarbohydrazide procedure.

    PubMed

    Hulínská, D; Mohelská, H; Adámek, L; Rut, M

    1989-01-01

    Torulopsis ethanolitolerans subject to both the sparing and coarse heat treatment were studied in the scanning electron microscope. The reduction of adhesivity, increased permeability and higher rigidity of the yeast wall was achieved by an original glutaraldehyde-paraformaldehyde fixation, low osmolarity in vacuo and subsequent thiosemicarbohydrazide incubation, followed by addition of metal salt. The impregnation of the metal throughout the specimen due to the reaction of the thiosemicarbohydrazide with glutaraldehyde allowed viewing of small or intricate surface details of the yeast. Structural differences of the yeast processed by sparing and coarse heat treatment were shown to be better from the thiosemicarbohydrazide incubated samples compared to those that were prepared with osmium tetroxide. PMID:2509313

  16. Quantitative scanning electron microscopic autoradiography of inhaled /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; McDonald, K.E.

    1989-03-01

    We have applied the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to obtain autoradiographs of particles of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ deposited in rat lung. The technique was used to obtain quantitative information on the clearance rates of particles from the alveoli, bronchioles and trachea up to 240 d after exposure. At all times, the concentration of particles on the surface of the bronchioles was an order of magnitude greater than on the tracheal surface. The clearance of Pu from both regions followed a biphasic pattern, similar to that obtained by radiometric analysis of the whole lung. Most of the radiation dose to the bronchiolar epithelium originated from Pu particles in peribronchiolar alveoli in which they were preferentially retained, compared to other alveolar regions. The prolonged retention of particles in the peribronchiolar alveoli may be a significant factor in the induction of lung carcinomas.

  17. Charge contrast imaging of biomaterials in a variable pressure scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Clode, Peta L

    2006-09-01

    Charge contrast imaging (CCI) is a dynamic phenomenon recently reported in insulating and semiconducting materials imaged with low vacuum or variable pressure scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Data presented in this paper illustrates that CCI can also be applied to biominerals and biological soft-tissues and that useful and unique structural information can be obtained from routine samples. Various resin-embedded samples were considered and example images from several different biomaterials are presented. Due to the diverse nature of samples that appear to exhibit charge contrast, this imaging technique has prospective application in a wide range of biological and biomedical research. This work represents the first application of CCI to biomaterials and in particular, highlights a new method for investigating the formation, structure and growth of biominerals.

  18. An analytical electron microscope study of airborne industrial particles in Sosnowiec, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Janeczek, Janusz

    The types and the relative amounts of airborne particles in the city of Sosnowiec (Poland) during 21-22 June, 1994 were identified by analytical electron microscope analyses. They are mostly aspherical angular Al-bearing silica particles (0.1-5.15 μm) and clusters thereof. Carbonaceous particles form sheets of soluble volatile-rich materials (0.3-33.9 μm) and rare soot. Numerous nanometer-sized Al-bearing silica grains and salt minerals are associated with the larger particles. They resulted from inefficient combustion of low-grade coals by the local industries whereby the silica particles are coal impurities that survived combustion. The total particle emission was constant during a 24 h period but silica shards dominated the nighttime emission while carbonaceous particles abounded during the daytime. This study showed that tropospheric particles in regions dominated by inefficient coal combustion are fundamentally different from typical coal fly ash spheres.

  19. Image accumulation, storage, and display system for a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubin, J. A.; Wiggins, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a high resolution scanning transmission electron microscope data collection, storage, and display system. Included are a novel analog-to-digital converter, a digital hardware divider, a direct memory access interface to a PDP 11/20, a flicker-free gray scale TV display, two new gray scale hardcopy devices, and a software description of the system. The system described here accepts three 8-bit channels of image data from a single picture element every 30 μs. Each picture element intensity is measured simultaneously by three detectors. Scans of 64, 128, 256, or 512 lines of picture elements are provided. All the data are stored on one of eight disk files, and one of the three simultaneous data channels is displayed on a digitally refreshed TV screen in real time. Production of hard-copy images and magnetic tape images, and other manipulations of the data are provided after data accumulation is terminated.

  20. Synaptic endfeet in the 'acoustic nerve nucleus' of the rat. An electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Bolado, G; Merchán, J

    1988-01-01

    The medial portion of the cochlear nerve of the rat contains astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons. These neurons form what has been called the 'acoustic nerve nucleus'. This nucleus has been studied here at the electron microscopic level. Its neurons are large and round, showing an eccentric nucleus, fibrillary bodies and rough endoplasmic reticulum which is not arranged in stacks. The somata and dendrites receive synaptic endfeet which can be classified into three groups according to vesicle size and shape. In general, the ultrastructural characteristics of these cells are similar to those of bushy cells as reported by other authors. The 'acoustic nerve nucleus' can be considered to be the most peripheral part of the anterior ventral cochlear nucleus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:3248967

  1. Method of improving image sharpness for annular-illumination scanning electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyama, Momoyo; Hamada, Koichi; Fukuda, Muneyuki; Kazumi, Hideyuki

    2016-06-01

    Annular illumination is effective in enhancing the depth of focus for scanning electron microscopes (SEMs). However, owing to high side lobes of the point-spread function (PSF), annular illumination results in poor image sharpness. The conventional deconvolution method, which converts the PSF to a delta function, can improve image sharpness, but results in artifacts due to noise amplification. In this paper, we propose an image processing method that can reduce the deterioration of image sharpness. With this method, the PSF under annular illumination is converted to that under standard illumination. Through simulations, we verified that the image sharpness of SEM images under annular illumination with the proposed method can be improved without noise amplification.

  2. Charge contrast imaging of biomaterials in a variable pressure scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Clode, Peta L

    2006-09-01

    Charge contrast imaging (CCI) is a dynamic phenomenon recently reported in insulating and semiconducting materials imaged with low vacuum or variable pressure scanning electron microscopes (SEM). Data presented in this paper illustrates that CCI can also be applied to biominerals and biological soft-tissues and that useful and unique structural information can be obtained from routine samples. Various resin-embedded samples were considered and example images from several different biomaterials are presented. Due to the diverse nature of samples that appear to exhibit charge contrast, this imaging technique has prospective application in a wide range of biological and biomedical research. This work represents the first application of CCI to biomaterials and in particular, highlights a new method for investigating the formation, structure and growth of biominerals. PMID:16737830

  3. [Biphasic mesothelioma in a Swiss Braunvieh cow: clinical, histological, immunohistochemical and electron microscopical findings].

    PubMed

    Braun, Ueli; Rütten, M; Bleul, U; Previtali, M; Krüger, S; Gerspach, C; Geiger, S; Sydler, T

    2012-01-01

    A 10-year-old Swiss Braunvieh cow near term was referred to our clinic because of severe abdominal distension, which caused loss of demarcation between the udder and ventral abdominal wall. Ultrasonographic examination revealed marked ascites and multiple echogenic nodules in the greater omentum. Based on the findings, non-inflammatory ascites attributable to neoplasia was diagnosed. Rupture of the prepubic tendon from the pubic symphysis was also suspected. Because of a grave prognosis, parturition was induced and a live calf was delivered. The cow was euthanized and a postmortem examination was carried out. The abdominal cavity contained 248.5 litres of clear fluid. The greater omentum was thickened and oedematous and regionally contained fluid-filled cystic structures, which varied in size with a maximum diameter of 10 centimetres. Based on the histological, immunohistochemical and electron microscopical findings, biphasic mesothelioma with cyst formation affecting the entire abdominal cavity was diagnosed.

  4. Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies of the Pecten Oculi in the Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica)

    PubMed Central

    Pourlis, Aris F.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to extend the microscopic investigations of the pecten oculi in the quail in order to add some information on the unresolved functional anatomy of this unique avian organ. The pecten oculi of the quail was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Eighteen- to-twenty two highly vascularised accordion-like folds were joined apically by a heavily pigmented bridge of tissue, which holds the pecten in a fanlike shape, widest at the base. The structure of the double layered limiting membrane was recorded. The presence of hyalocytes with macrophage-like appearance was illustrated. It is assumed that the pecten oculi of the quail resembles that of the chicken. Illustrated morphological features of this species may add information on the active physiological role of the pecten. But still, the functional significance of this organ is a matter of controversies. PMID:24198967

  5. Development of a quantification method for x-ray microanalysis with an electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horny, Paula

    The overview of the history of quantitative x-ray microanalysis shows the efficiency of the use of standards to achieve the most reliable quantification. State-of-the-art cold field emission gun scanning electron microscopes offer excellent resolution but lack a sufficient level of beam current stability essential for reliable quantitative microanalysis. The purpose of this work is to develop a new method for quantitative x-ray microanalysis adapted to unstable beam current conditions. In the Cliff and Lorimer method, which was developed for the analytical transmission electron microscope, the composition was calculated from the ratio of the characteristic x-ray intensities of two elements in the same spectrum. In this work, this ratio method is applied to bulk specimens in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In order to reduce the amplitude of error propagation, the proposed ratio for SEM quantitative microanalysis is the intensity of a x-ray divided by the sum of intensities of one or more characteristic lines of each of tire elements found in the specimen. Moreover, the calculated x-ray intensities are corrected for the effects of absorption, fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields, and other physical factors normally considered in microbeam analysis. Uncertainties in physical parameters and models, clue to the lack of exhaustive measurements as well as their scattering, revealed by a disaggrement between the measured and calculated ratios, are minimized by the use of a calibration factor inserted into the ratio. This calibration factor is determined using a standard for a given element. It can be used as often as needed and allows for the correction of uncertainties in the x-ray detector efficiency. In order to quantify the specimen, the measured experimental ratio is compared to a simulated ratio with the appropriate calibration factor. The composition is interpolated from the theoretical ratio curves. Two methods of calculation of emitted x-ray intensity are

  6. Electron-microscopic cytochemical localization of diamine and polyamine oxidases in pea and maize tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Furey MJ, 3. d.

    1991-01-01

    An electron-microscopic cytochemical method was used to localize diamine oxidase (DAO) in pea and polyamine oxidase (PAO) in maize (Zea mays L.). The method, based on the precipitation of amine-oxidase-generated H2O2 by CeCl3, was shown to be specific for DAO and PAO and permitted their localization in plant tissues with a high degree of resolution. Both enzymes are localized exclusively in the cell wall. Both DAO- and PAO-activity staining is most intense in the middle lamellar region of the wall and in cells exhibiting highly lignified walls. The oxidases could provide H2O2 for peroxidase-mediated cross-linking reactions in the cell wall and may, in this capacity, play a role in the regulation of plant growth.

  7. Macroscopic rates, microscopic observations, and molecular models of the dissolution of carbonate phases.

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Martin, Scot T.

    2004-05-01

    Bulk and surface energies are calculated for endmembers of the isostructural rhombohedral carbonate mineral family, including Ca, Cd, Co, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Zn compositions. The calculations for the bulk agree with the densities, bond distances, bond angles, and lattice enthalpies reported in the literature. The calculated energies also correlate with measured dissolution rates: the lattice energies show a log-linear relationship to the macroscopic dissolution rates at circumneutral pH. Moreover, the energies of ion pairs translated along surface steps are calculated and found to predict experimentally observed microscopic step retreat velocities. Finally, pit formation excess energies decrease with increasing pit size, which is consistent with the nonlinear dissolution kinetics hypothesized for the initial stages of pit formation.

  8. In-Situ atomic force microscopic observation of ion beam bombarded plant cell envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Brown, I. G.; Seprom, C.; Vilaithong, T.

    2007-04-01

    A program in ion beam bioengineering has been established at Chiang Mai University (CMU), Thailand, and ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) has been demonstrated. However, a good understanding of the fundamental physical processes involved is lacking. In parallel work, onion skin cells have been bombarded with Ar+ ions at energy 25 keV and fluence1-2 × 1015 ions/cm2, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures on the cell wall that could serve as channels for the transfer of large macromolecules into the cell interior. An in-situ atomic force microscope (AFM) system has been designed and installed in the CMU bio-implantation facility as a tool for the observation of these microcraters during ion beam bombardment. Here we describe some of the features of the in-situ AFM and outline some of the related work.

  9. Microscopic examination of endometrial biopsies of retired sports mares: an explanation for the clinically observed subfertility?

    PubMed

    Kilgenstein, Helen J; Schöniger, Sandra; Schoon, Doris; Schoon, Heinz-Adolf

    2015-04-01

    After their retirement from sports, performance mares often show a poor breeding success. The objective of this study was the microscopic evaluation of endometrial biopsies of retired sports mares (n = 189) to search for alterations that may explain subfertility. Mares of this study aged 3-23 years showed endometritis (30%) and endometrosis (77%); mild forms predominated. In regard to those mares biopsied during the breeding season (n = 99), 50% had glandular differentiation disorders, i.e. glandular inactivity (8%) or irregular glandular differentiation (42%). Compared to literature data retrieved from mainly non-performance mares, the sports mares of this study showed a similar prevalence of endometrosis and endometritis, but a much higher prevalence of glandular differentiation disorders. The most common cause of the latter is an ovarian dysfunction. Results of this study indicate an association between glandular maldifferentiation of the endometrium and the clinically observed reduced fertility of retired sports mares.

  10. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Veith, Gabriel M; Joy, David C; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-12-14

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory.

  11. In situ transmission electron microscope studies of irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced phase changes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Motivated at least initially by materials needs for nuclear reactor development, extensive irradiation effects studies employing TEMs have been performed for several decades, involving irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced, microstructural changes, including phase transformations such as precipitation, dissolution, crystallization, amorphization, and order-disorder phenomena. From the introduction of commercial high voltage electron microscopes (HVEM) in the mid-1960s, studies of electron irradiation effects have constituted a major aspect of HVEM application in materials science. For irradiation effects studies two additional developments have had particularly significant impact: (1) The availability of TEM specimen holders in which specimen temperature can be controlled in the range 10--2200 K; and (2) the interfacing of ion accelerators which allows in situ TEM studies of irradiation effects and the ion beam modification of materials within this broad temperature range. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies of electron and ion beam-induced and enhanced phase changes, including the current state of in situ ion beam capability internationally, and presents two case studies involving in situ experiments performed in an HVEM to illustrate the dynamics of such an approach in materials research.

  12. In situ transmission electron microscope studies of irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced phase changes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated at least initially by materials needs for nuclear reactor development, extensive irradiation effects studies employing TEMs have been performed for several decades, involving irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced, microstructural changes, including phase transformations such as precipitation, dissolution, crystallization, amorphization, and order-disorder phenomena. From the introduction of commercial high voltage electron microscopes (HVEM) in the mid-1960s, studies of electron irradiation effects have constituted a major aspect of HVEM application in materials science. For irradiation effects studies two additional developments have had particularly significant impact: (1) The availability of TEM specimen holders in which specimen temperature can be controlled in the range 10--2200 K; and (2) the interfacing of ion accelerators which allows in situ TEM studies of irradiation effects and the ion beam modification of materials within this broad temperature range. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies of electron and ion beam-induced and enhanced phase changes, including the current state of in situ ion beam capability internationally, and presents two case studies involving in situ experiments performed in an HVEM to illustrate the dynamics of such an approach in materials research.

  13. Solving the Accelerator-Condenser Coupling Problem in a Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; LaGrange, T; Shuttlesworth, R M; Gibson, D J; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D

    2009-12-29

    We describe a modification to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) that allows it to briefly (using a pulsed-laser-driven photocathode) operate at currents in excess of 10 mA while keeping the effects of condenser lens aberrations to a minimum. This modification allows real-space imaging of material microstructure with a resolution of order 10 nm over regions several {micro}m across with an exposure time of 15 ns. This is more than 6 orders of magnitude faster than typical video-rate TEM imaging. The key is the addition of a weak magnetic lens to couple the large-diameter high-current beam exiting the accelerator into the acceptance aperture of a conventional TEM condenser lens system. We show that the performance of the system is essentially consistent with models derived from ray tracing and finite element simulations. The instrument can also be operated as a conventional TEM by using the electron gun in a thermionic mode. The modification enables very high electron current densities in {micro}m-sized areas and could also be used in a non-pulsed system for high-throughput imaging and analytical TEM.

  14. Nanoscale Imaging of Whole Cells Using a Liquid Enclosure and a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Peckys, Diana B.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Joy, David C.; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory. PMID:20020038

  15. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant.

  16. Scanning electron microscope studies of bone samples: Influence of simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rahul; Chowdhury, Parimal; Ali, Nawab

    2007-08-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with backscatter and secondary electron emission detectors plus a Si(Li) detector for photon yield measurements was used to study bone samples from skull and leg of mice and rats. These animals were either suspended by their tail to induce simulated microgravity, characterized as hind-limb suspension (HLS) or not suspended (control). Analyses of the SEM images and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) spectra using Si(Li) detector indicate variation in the lattice structures, and in intensities of the characteristics X-rays, produced from the exposed bone surface due to its interaction with the electron beam. Using Flame software, the X-ray spectra were analyzed and normalized ratios of the elements determined. The elemental analysis indicated a variation in the density of calcium, potassium, and oxygen near the knee joints and near the sutures in the skull bones. The comparison of simulated microgravity subjected samples of the rat skull bones with that of the control samples revealed that in the suture region there was a large increase in the ratio of calcium, and to some degree for phosphorus, suggesting simulated microgravity affects distribution of these elements. Elemental composition for control samples with depth (within the cross section of the leg bones) revealed decrease of oxygen and increase of calcium in the first millimeter of the bone depth after which the relative percentage of elements stayed constant.

  17. Structural and Physicochemical Characterization of Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) Nanoparticles by High-Resolution Electron Microscopic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Neri-Torres, Elier Ekberg; Chanona-Pérez, Jorge J; Calderón, Hector A; Torres-Figueredo, Neil; Chamorro-Cevallos, German; Calderón-Domínguez, Georgina; Velasco-Bedrán, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain Spirulina (Arthrospira maxima) nanoparticles (SNPs) by using high-impact mechanical milling and to characterize them by electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The milling products were analyzed after various processing times (1-4 h), and particle size distribution and number mean size (NMS) were determined by analysis of high-resolution scanning electron microscopic images. The smallest particles are synthesized after 3 h of milling, had an NMS of 55.6±3.6 nm, with 95% of the particles being smaller than 100 nm. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed lattice spacing of ~0.27±0.015 nm for SNPs. The corresponding chemical composition was obtained by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and showed the presence of Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, and Zn. The powder flow properties showed that the powder density was higher when the average nanoparticle size is smaller. They showed free flowability and an increase in their specific surface area (6.89±0.23 m2/g) up to 12-14 times larger than the original material (0.45±0.02 m2/g). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that chemical damage related to the milling is not significant. PMID:27515227

  18. Three-dimensional machining of carbon nanotube forests using water-assisted scanning electron microscope processing

    SciTech Connect

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Maschmann, Matthew R.; Kim, Sanha; Hart, A. John; Slinker, Keith; Ehlert, Gregory J.

    2015-10-05

    We demonstrate that vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be precisely machined in a low pressure water vapor ambient using the electron beam of an environmental scanning electron microscope. The electron beam locally damages the irradiated regions of the CNT forest and also dissociates the water vapor molecules into reactive species including hydroxyl radicals. These species then locally oxidize the damaged region of the CNTs. The technique offers material removal capabilities ranging from selected CNTs to hundreds of cubic microns. We study how the material removal rate is influenced by the acceleration voltage, beam current, dwell time, operating pressure, and CNT orientation. Milled cuts with depths between 0–100 microns are generated, corresponding to a material removal rate of up to 20.1 μm{sup 3}/min. The technique produces little carbon residue and does not disturb the native morphology of the CNT network. Finally, we demonstrate direct machining of pyramidal surfaces and re-entrant cuts to create freestanding geometries.

  19. Quantifying Transient States in Materials with the Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G; LaGrange, T; Kim, J; Reed, B; Browning, N

    2009-09-21

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) offers a means of capturing rapid evolution in a specimen through in-situ microscopy experiments by allowing 15 ns electron micrograph exposure times. The rapid exposure time is enabled by creating a burst of electrons at the emitter by ultraviolet pulsed laser illumination. This burst arrives a specified time after a second laser initiates the specimen reaction. The timing of the two Q-switched lasers is controlled by high-speed pulse generators with a timing error much less than the pulse duration. Both diffraction and imaging experiments can be performed, just as in a conventional TEM. The brightness of the emitter and the total current control the spatial and temporal resolutions. We have demonstrated 7 nm spatial resolution in single 15 ns pulsed images. These single-pulse imaging experiments have been used to study martensitic transformations, nucleation and crystallization of an amorphous metal, and rapid chemical reactions. Measurements have been performed on these systems that are possible by no other experimental approaches currently available.

  20. Three-dimensional machining of carbon nanotube forests using water-assisted scanning electron microscope processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Kim, Sanha; Slinker, Keith; Ehlert, Gregory J.; Hart, A. John; Maschmann, Matthew R.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be precisely machined in a low pressure water vapor ambient using the electron beam of an environmental scanning electron microscope. The electron beam locally damages the irradiated regions of the CNT forest and also dissociates the water vapor molecules into reactive species including hydroxyl radicals. These species then locally oxidize the damaged region of the CNTs. The technique offers material removal capabilities ranging from selected CNTs to hundreds of cubic microns. We study how the material removal rate is influenced by the acceleration voltage, beam current, dwell time, operating pressure, and CNT orientation. Milled cuts with depths between 0-100 microns are generated, corresponding to a material removal rate of up to 20.1 μm3/min. The technique produces little carbon residue and does not disturb the native morphology of the CNT network. Finally, we demonstrate direct machining of pyramidal surfaces and re-entrant cuts to create freestanding geometries.

  1. Comprehensive Characterization of Extended Defects in Semiconductor Materials by a Scanning Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Hieckmann, Ellen; Nacke, Markus; Allardt, Matthias; Bodrov, Yury; Chekhonin, Paul; Skrotzki, Werner; Weber, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Extended defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries have a strong influence on the performance of microelectronic devices and on other applications of semiconductor materials. However, it is still under debate how the defect structure determines the band structure, and therefore, the recombination behavior of electron-hole pairs responsible for the optical and electrical properties of the extended defects. The present paper is a survey of procedures for the spatially resolved investigation of structural and of physical properties of extended defects in semiconductor materials with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Representative examples are given for crystalline silicon. The luminescence behavior of extended defects can be investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. They are particularly valuable because spectrally and spatially resolved information can be obtained simultaneously. For silicon, with an indirect electronic band structure, CL measurements should be carried out at low temperatures down to 5 K due to the low fraction of radiative recombination processes in comparison to non-radiative transitions at room temperature. For the study of the electrical properties of extended defects, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique can be applied. The EBIC image reflects the local distribution of defects due to the increased charge-carrier recombination in their vicinity. The procedure for EBIC investigations is described for measurements at room temperature and at low temperatures. Internal strain fields arising from extended defects can be determined quantitatively by cross-correlation electron backscatter diffraction (ccEBSD). This method is challenging because of the necessary preparation of the sample surface and because of the quality of the diffraction patterns which are recorded during the mapping of the sample. The spatial resolution of the three experimental techniques is compared. PMID:27285177

  2. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Cullen, David A; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-25

    The highly energetic electron beam (e-beam) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from knock-on and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and to localized chemical/electrochemical reactions. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional STEM e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here, an automated liquid phase nanolithography method has been developed that enables the direct writing of nanometer scaled features within microfabricated liquid cells. An external e-beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan rate of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to deposit palladium nanocrystals onto silicon nitride membranes in a highly controlled manner. The threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium has been determined, the influence of electron dose on the nanolithographically patterned feature size and morphology is explored, and a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring is proposed. This approach enables fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter in liquid cells and opens new pathways to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid-phase precursors. PMID:27510435

  3. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Cullen, David A; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-25

    The highly energetic electron beam (e-beam) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from knock-on and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and to localized chemical/electrochemical reactions. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional STEM e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here, an automated liquid phase nanolithography method has been developed that enables the direct writing of nanometer scaled features within microfabricated liquid cells. An external e-beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan rate of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to deposit palladium nanocrystals onto silicon nitride membranes in a highly controlled manner. The threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium has been determined, the influence of electron dose on the nanolithographically patterned feature size and morphology is explored, and a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring is proposed. This approach enables fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter in liquid cells and opens new pathways to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid-phase precursors.

  4. Comprehensive Characterization of Extended Defects in Semiconductor Materials by a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Hieckmann, Ellen; Nacke, Markus; Allardt, Matthias; Bodrov, Yury; Chekhonin, Paul; Skrotzki, Werner; Weber, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Extended defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries have a strong influence on the performance of microelectronic devices and on other applications of semiconductor materials. However, it is still under debate how the defect structure determines the band structure, and therefore, the recombination behavior of electron-hole pairs responsible for the optical and electrical properties of the extended defects. The present paper is a survey of procedures for the spatially resolved investigation of structural and of physical properties of extended defects in semiconductor materials with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Representative examples are given for crystalline silicon. The luminescence behavior of extended defects can be investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. They are particularly valuable because spectrally and spatially resolved information can be obtained simultaneously. For silicon, with an indirect electronic band structure, CL measurements should be carried out at low temperatures down to 5 K due to the low fraction of radiative recombination processes in comparison to non-radiative transitions at room temperature. For the study of the electrical properties of extended defects, the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique can be applied. The EBIC image reflects the local distribution of defects due to the increased charge-carrier recombination in their vicinity. The procedure for EBIC investigations is described for measurements at room temperature and at low temperatures. Internal strain fields arising from extended defects can be determined quantitatively by cross-correlation electron backscatter diffraction (ccEBSD). This method is challenging because of the necessary preparation of the sample surface and because of the quality of the diffraction patterns which are recorded during the mapping of the sample. The spatial resolution of the three experimental techniques is compared.

  5. Strain mapping at the nanoscale using precession electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope with off axis camera

    SciTech Connect

    Vigouroux, M. P.; Delaye, V.; Bernier, N.; Lafond, D.; Audoit, G.; Bertin, F.; Cipro, R.; Baron, T.; Martin, M.; Rouvière, J. L.; Chenevier, B.

    2014-11-10

    Precession electron diffraction is an efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures by precessing the electron beam, while maintaining a few nanometre probe size. Here, we show that an advanced diffraction pattern treatment allows reproducible and precise strain measurements to be obtained using a default 512 × 512 DigiSTAR off-axis camera both in advanced or non-corrected transmission electron microscopes. This treatment consists in both projective geometry correction of diffraction pattern distortions and strain Delaunay triangulation based analysis. Precision in the strain measurement is improved and reached 2.7 × 10{sup −4} with a probe size approaching 4.2 nm in diameter. This method is applied to the study of the strain state in InGaAs quantum-well (QW) devices elaborated on Si substrate. Results show that the GaAs/Si mismatch does not induce in-plane strain fluctuations in the InGaAs QW region.

  6. Movies of molecular motions and reactions: the single-molecule, real-time transmission electron microscope imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Eiichi

    2013-01-01

    "The truth is, the Science of Nature has been already too long made only a work of the Brain and the Fancy: It is now high time that it should return to the plainness and soundness of Observations on material and obvious things," proudly declared Robert Hooke in his highly successful picture book of microscopic and telescopic images, "Micrographia" in 1665. Hooke's statement has remained true in chemistry, where a considerable work of the brain and the fancy is still necessary. Single-molecule, real-time transmission electron microscope (SMRT-TEM) imaging at an atomic resolution now allows us to learn about molecules simply by watching movies of them. Like any dream come true, the new analytical technique challenged the old common sense of the communities, and offers new research opportunities that are unavailable by conventional methods. With its capacity to visualize the motions and the reactions of individual molecules and molecular clusters, the SMRT-TEM technique will become an indispensable tool in molecular science and the engineering of natural and synthetic substances, as well as in science education. PMID:23280645

  7. Movies of molecular motions and reactions: the single-molecule, real-time transmission electron microscope imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Eiichi

    2013-01-01

    "The truth is, the Science of Nature has been already too long made only a work of the Brain and the Fancy: It is now high time that it should return to the plainness and soundness of Observations on material and obvious things," proudly declared Robert Hooke in his highly successful picture book of microscopic and telescopic images, "Micrographia" in 1665. Hooke's statement has remained true in chemistry, where a considerable work of the brain and the fancy is still necessary. Single-molecule, real-time transmission electron microscope (SMRT-TEM) imaging at an atomic resolution now allows us to learn about molecules simply by watching movies of them. Like any dream come true, the new analytical technique challenged the old common sense of the communities, and offers new research opportunities that are unavailable by conventional methods. With its capacity to visualize the motions and the reactions of individual molecules and molecular clusters, the SMRT-TEM technique will become an indispensable tool in molecular science and the engineering of natural and synthetic substances, as well as in science education.

  8. The heterogeneous composition of working place aerosols in a nickel refinery: a transmission and scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Weinbruch, Stephan; van Aken, Peter; Ebert, Martin; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Chashchin, Valery P; Nikonov, Alexander

    2002-06-01

    Size, morphology and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles collected in a nickel refinery were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The phase composition was determined by selected area electron diffraction and EDX in a transmission electron microscope. Most particles are heterogeneous on a nanometer scale and consist of various phases. Nickel phases observed in the roasting and anode casting departments include metallic nickel, bunsenite (NiO), trevorite (Ni,Cu)Fe2O4, heazlewoodite Ni3S2, godlevskite (Ni,Cu)9S8, orthorhombic NiSO4 and an amorphous Ni,Cu.Al,Pb sulfate of variable composition. Additional phases encountered include corundum (Al2O3), murdochite (PbCu6O8), hexagonal Na2SO4, anhydrite (CaSO4), graphite (C) and amorphous carbon. The implications of the occurrence of the different Ni phases and their nanometer size for the study of adverse health effects are explored. PMID:12094927

  9. Observations of liver cancer cells in scanning probe acoustic microscope: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiaoyue; Xi, Qing; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM) can be used to acquire the morphology image as well as the non-destructive internal structures acoustic image. However, the observations of the morphology image as well as the internal structures acoustic image of liver cancer cells in SPAM are few. In this paper, we cultured 4 different types of liver cancer cells on the silicon wafer and coverslip to observe their morphology images as well as acoustic images in SPAM, and made a preliminary study of the 8 types of cells specimens (hereinafter referred to as the silicon specimens and coverslips specimens). The experimental measurement results showed that some cellular pseudopodium were observed in the morphology images of the coverslip specimens while no such cellular pseupodium were appeared in the morphology images of the silicon specimens, which concluded that the living liver cancer cells were less likely to grow on the silicon wafer. SPAM provides a rapid and sensitive visual method for studying the morphology and internal structures of the cancer cells. The proposed method can be also used to obtain the morphology and internal information in both solid and soft material wafers, such as silicon and cells, with the resolution of nanometer scale.

  10. Early and Efficient Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum by Microscopic Observation of Broth Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kidenya, Benson R.; Kabangila, Rodrick; Peck, Robert N.; Mshana, Stephen E.; Webster, Lauren E.; Koenig, Serena P.; Johnson, Warren D.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Early, efficient and inexpensive methods for the detection of pulmonary tuberculosis are urgently needed for effective patient management as well as to interrupt transmission. These methods to detect M. tuberculosis in a timely and affordable way are not yet widely available in resource-limited settings. In a developing-country setting, we prospectively evaluated two methods for culturing and detecting M. tuberculosis in sputum. Sputum samples were cultured in liquid assay (micro broth culture) in microplate wells and growth was detected by microscopic observation, or in Löwenstein–Jensen (LJ) solid media where growth was detected by visual inspection for colonies. Sputum samples were collected from 321 tuberculosis (TB) suspects attending Bugando Medical Centre, in Mwanza, Tanzania, and were cultured in parallel. Pulmonary tuberculosis cases were diagnosed using the American Thoracic Society diagnostic standards. There were a total of 200 (62.3%) pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Liquid assay with microscopic detection detected a significantly higher proportion of cases than LJ solid culture: 89.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.7% to 93.3%) versus 77.0% (95% CI, 71.2% to 82.8%) (p = 0.0007). The median turn around time to diagnose tuberculosis was significantly shorter for micro broth culture than for the LJ solid culture, 9 days (interquartile range [IQR] 7–13), versus 21 days (IQR 14–28) (p<0.0001). The cost for micro broth culture (labor inclusive) in our study was US $4.56 per sample, versus US $11.35 per sample for the LJ solid culture. The liquid assay (micro broth culture) is an early, feasible, and inexpensive method for detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in resource limited settings. PMID:23469014

  11. Microscopic-Observation Drug-Susceptibility Assay for the Diagnosis of TB

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David A.J.; Evans, Carlton A.W.; Gilman, Robert H.; Caviedes, Luz; Coronel, Jorge; Vivar, Aldo; Sanchez, Eduardo; Piñedo, Yvette; Saravia, Juan Carlos; Salazar, Cayo; Oberhelman, Richard; Hollm-Delgado, Maria-Graciela; LaChira, Doris; Escombe, A. Roderick; Friedland, Jon S.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND New diagnostic tools are urgently needed to interrupt the transmission of tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Rapid, sensitive detection of tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in sputum has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle studies of the microscopic-observation drug-susceptibility (MODS) assay, in which broth cultures are examined microscopically to detect characteristic growth. METHODS In an operational setting in Peru, we investigated the performance of the MODS assay for culture and drug-susceptibility testing in three target groups: unselected patients with suspected tuberculosis, prescreened patients at high risk for tuberculosis or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, and unselected hospitalized patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. We compared the MODS assay head-to-head with two reference methods: automated mycobacterial culture and culture on Löwenstein–Jensen medium with the proportion method. RESULTS Of 3760 sputum samples, 401 (10.7%) yielded cultures positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Sensitivity of detection was 97.8% for MODS culture, 89.0% for automated mycobacterial culture, and 84.0% for Löwenstein–Jensen culture (P<0.001); the median time to culture positivity was 7 days, 13 days, and 26 days, respectively (P<0.001), and the median time to the results of susceptibility tests was 7 days, 22 days, and 68 days, respectively. The incremental benefit of a second MODS culture was minimal, particularly in patients at high risk for tuberculosis or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Agreement between MODS and the reference standard for susceptibility was 100% for rifampin, 97% for isoniazid, 99% for rifampin and isoniazid (combined results for multidrug resistance), 95% for ethambutol, and 92% for streptomycin (kappa values, 1.0, 0.89, 0.93, 0.71, and 0.72, respectively). CONCLUSIONS A single MODS culture of a sputum sample offers more rapid and sensitive detection of tuberculosis

  12. A microscopic two-band model for the electron-hole asymmetry in high-Tc superconductors and reentering behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, J.-B.; Pedra, W. de Siqueira; Dömel, A.-S.

    2011-07-01

    To our knowledge there is no rigorously analyzed microscopic model explaining the electron-hole asymmetry of the critical temperature seen in high-Tc cuprate superconductors - at least no model not breaking artificially this symmetry. We present here a microscopic two-band model based on the structure of energetic levels of holes in CuO2 conducting layers of cuprates. In particular, our Hamiltonian does not contain ad hoc terms implying - explicitly - different masses for electrons and holes. We prove that two energetically near-lying interacting bands can explain the electron-hole asymmetry. Indeed, we rigorously analyze the phase diagram of the model and show that the critical temperatures for fermion densities below half-filling can manifest a very different behavior as compared to the case of densities above half-filling. This fact results from the inter-band interaction and intra-band Coulomb repulsion in interplay with thermal fluctuations between two energetic levels. So, if the energy difference between bands is too big (as compared to the energy scale defined by the critical temperatures of superconductivity) then the asymmetry disappears. Moreover, the critical temperature turns out to be a non-monotonic function of the fermion density and the phase diagram of our model shows "superconducting domes" as in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. This explains why the maximal critical temperature is attained at donor densities away from the maximal one. Outside the superconducting phase and for fermion densities near half-filling the thermodynamics governed by our Hamiltonian corresponds, as in real high-Tc materials, to a Mott-insulating phase. The nature of the inter-band interaction can be electrostatic (screened Coulomb interaction), magnetic (for instance, some Heisenberg-type one-site spin-spin interaction), or a mixture of both. If the inter-band interaction is predominately magnetic then - additionally to the electron-hole asymmetry - we observe a

  13. Solitary fibrous tumor of the inguinal region: a clinicopathological, light-microscopic, immunohistochemical, electron microscopic and flow-cytometric DNA study.

    PubMed

    Cafiero, F; Gipponi, M; Peressini, A; Barabino, P; Queirolo, P; Nicolò, M; Solari, N; Nicolò, G

    2001-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare neoplasms with a probable mesenchymal origin that were first reported in the pleura but can occur in different sites. We report a case of SFT arising in the inguinal region of a 55-year-old woman. The patient presented with a mass in the left groin; she underwent wide excision of the lesion which was well-circumscribed and without evidence of adjacent soft tissue involvement. The histological, immunohistochemical and electron microscopic criteria for SFT were found. She had an uneventful recovery and she is alive without evidence of disease five years after operation. To our knowledge, this neoplasm has never been reported in this location.

  14. Transmission electron microscopic study of pyrochlore to defect-fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, Chinnathambi; Anderson, Thomas J.; Gout, Delphine; Ubic, Rick

    2012-10-15

    A structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates, Ln{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Yb and Lu), has been identified. Neutron diffraction showed that the structure transforms from well-ordered pyrochloric to fully fluoritic through the lanthanide series from La to Lu with a corresponding increase in the position parameter x of the 48f (Fd3{sup Macron }m) oxygen site from 0.330 to 0.375. As evidenced by the selected area electron diffraction, La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibited a well-ordered pyrocholoric structure with the presence of intense superlattice spots, which became weak and diffuse (in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}) before disappearing completely as the series progressed towards the Lu end. High resolution electron microscopic studies showed the breakdown of the pyrochlore ordering in the form of antiphase domains resulting in diffused smoke-like superlattice spots in the case of Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron microscopic studies showed the ordered pyrochlore to defect fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates to occur via the formation of anti-phase domains to start with. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrochlore to fluorite structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} showed well ordered pyrochlore structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Break down of pyrochlore ordering due to antiphase boundaries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rest of the series showed fluoritic structure.

  15. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Arena, J.; Song, M. J.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  16. Miniature Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope for In-Situ Imaging and Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory; Gregory, Don; Sampson, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is leading an effort to develop a Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for in-situ imaging and chemical analysis of uncoated samples. This instrument development will be geared towards operation on Mars and builds on a previous MSFC design of a mini-SEM for the moon (funded through the NASA Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program). Because Mars has a dramatically different environment than the moon, modifications to the MSFC lunar mini-SEM are necessary. Mainly, the higher atmospheric pressure calls for the use of an electron gun that can operate at High Vacuum, rather than Ultra-High Vacuum. The presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere also allows for the incorporation of a variable pressure system that enables the in-situ analysis of nonconductive geological specimens. Preliminary testing of Mars meteorites in a commercial Environmental SEM(Tradmark) (FEI) confirms the usefulness of lowcurrent/low-accelerating voltage imaging and highlights the advantages of using the Mars atmosphere for environmental imaging. The unique capabilities of the MVP-SEM make it an ideal tool for pursuing key scientific goals of NASA's Flagship Mission Max-C; to perform in-situ science and collect and cache samples in preparation for sample return from Mars.

  17. [Regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Saccoglossus mereschkowskii (Enteropneusta, Hemichordata): electron microscopic and immunocytochemical study].

    PubMed

    Stoliarova, M V; Val'kovich, E I

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate the regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta which are supposed to be related to the chordate ancestors. Using electron microscopy, it was found that in the skin epithelium of a representative of enteropneusts Saccoglossus mereschkowskii, the basal parts of some epitheliocytes took part in formation of a nerve layer. These cells were considered as receptor ciliated cells. The granular epithelial cells were shown to release secretion according to both exocrine and endocrine mechanism; these cells were characterized as endocrine-like regulatory cells. Fine granular cells possibly represent special receptor-endocrine-like cell type. The immunocytochemical detection of FMRFamid neuropeptide localization in histological sections confirmed the electron microscopic data on the presence of receptor and endocrine-like cells in the epithelium. It is suggested that the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta contains a peculiar neuro-endocrine regulatory system that is represented by receptor cells, receptor-endocrine-like cells of an open type and nerve elements of the nerve layer. PMID:24707736

  18. Development and hatching mechanism of Fasciola eggs, light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdel-Nasser A; Hassan, Ismael M; Khalifa, Refaat M A

    2010-07-01

    Both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used in the description. There were variable measurements of eggs from the same fluke and there was no relationship between the size of the fluke and size of eggs. Light microscopy revealed that the operculum has different shapes in Fasciola gigantica and F. hepatica. Under normal laboratory conditions of temperature (26 ± 1 °C), miracidia of F. gigantica developed within 12-16 days period, but those of F. hepatica developed within a period of 13-15 days. The miracidia of F. gigantica measured 110 × 70 μm and that of F. hepatica measured 136 × 74 μm. The life span of the miracidium in F. gigantica ranged between 9 and 12 h, while in F. hepatica the life span did not exceed 10 h. Miracidial epidermal plates in miracidium of F. gigantica were found to be 20 plates arranged in four tiers of six, four, six and four. Hatching process was recorded using scanning electron microscope, and it indicated partially opened operculum. PMID:23961086

  19. [Regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Saccoglossus mereschkowskii (Enteropneusta, Hemichordata): electron microscopic and immunocytochemical study].

    PubMed

    Stoliarova, M V; Val'kovich, E I

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate the regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta which are supposed to be related to the chordate ancestors. Using electron microscopy, it was found that in the skin epithelium of a representative of enteropneusts Saccoglossus mereschkowskii, the basal parts of some epitheliocytes took part in formation of a nerve layer. These cells were considered as receptor ciliated cells. The granular epithelial cells were shown to release secretion according to both exocrine and endocrine mechanism; these cells were characterized as endocrine-like regulatory cells. Fine granular cells possibly represent special receptor-endocrine-like cell type. The immunocytochemical detection of FMRFamid neuropeptide localization in histological sections confirmed the electron microscopic data on the presence of receptor and endocrine-like cells in the epithelium. It is suggested that the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta contains a peculiar neuro-endocrine regulatory system that is represented by receptor cells, receptor-endocrine-like cells of an open type and nerve elements of the nerve layer.

  20. Preparation of human formalin-fixed brain slices for electron microscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin; Brüne, Martin; Theiss, Carsten

    2016-07-01

    Ultra-structural analysis of human post-mortem brain tissue is important for investigations into the pathomechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders, especially those lacking alternative models of studying human-specific morphological features. For example, Von Economo Neurons (VENs) mainly located in the anterior cingulate cortex and in the anterior part of the insula, which seem to play a role in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions, including frontotemporal dementia, autism and schizophrenia, can hardly be studied in nonhuman animals. Accordingly, little is known about the ultra-structural alterations of these neurons, though important research using qualitative stereological methods has revealed that protein expression of the VENs assigns them a role in immune function. Formaldehyde, which is the most common fixative in human pathology, interferes with the immunoreactivity of the tissue, possibly leading to unreliable results. Therefore, a method for ultra-structural investigations independent of antigenic properties of the fixated tissue is needed. Here, we propose an approach using electron microscopy to examine cytoskeletal structures, synapses and mitochondria in these cells. We also show that our methodology is able to keep tissue consumption to a minimum, while still allowing for the specimens to be handled with ease by using agar embedded slices in contrast to blocks for the embedding procedure. Accordingly, a stepwise protocol utilising 60μm thick human post mortem brain sections for electron microscopic ultra-structural investigations is presented. PMID:27136748