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Sample records for electron tomography tilt-series

  1. Accurate marker-free alignment with simultaneous geometry determination and reconstruction of tilt series in electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hanspeter; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2006-02-01

    An image alignment method for electron tomography is presented which is based on cross-correlation techniques and which includes a simultaneous refinement of the tilt geometry. A coarsely aligned tilt series is iteratively refined with a procedure consisting of two steps for each cycle: area matching and subsequent geometry correction. The first step, area matching, brings into register equivalent specimen regions in all images of the tilt series. It determines four parameters of a linear two-dimensional transformation, not just translation and rotation as is done during the preceding coarse alignment with conventional methods. The refinement procedure also differs from earlier methods in that the alignment references are now computed from already aligned images by reprojection of a backprojected volume. The second step, geometry correction, refines the initially inaccurate estimates of the geometrical parameters, including the direction of the tilt axis, a tilt angle offset, and the inclination of the specimen with respect to the support film or specimen holder. The correction values serve as an indicator for the progress of the refinement. For each new iteration, the correction values are used to compute an updated set of geometry parameters by a least squares fit. Model calculations show that it is essential to refine the geometrical parameters as well as the accurate alignment of the images to obtain a faithful map of the original structure.

  2. Fast auto-acquisition tomography tilt series by using HD video camera in ultra-high voltage electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Ryuji; Cao, Meng; Kanaji, Atsuko; Nishida, Tomoki; Yoshida, Kiyokazu; Isakozawa, Shigeto

    2014-11-01

    The ultra-high voltage electron microscope (UHVEM) H-3000 with the world highest acceleration voltage of 3 MV can observe remarkable three dimensional microstructures of microns-thick samples[1]. Acquiring a tilt series of electron tomography is laborious work and thus an automatic technique is highly desired. We proposed the Auto-Focus system using image Sharpness (AFS)[2,3] for UHVEM tomography tilt series acquisition. In the method, five images with different defocus values are firstly acquired and the image sharpness are calculated. The sharpness are then fitted to a quasi-Gaussian function to decide the best focus value[3]. Defocused images acquired by the slow scan CCD (SS-CCD) camera (Hitachi F486BK) are of high quality but one minute is taken for acquisition of five defocused images.In this study, we introduce a high-definition video camera (HD video camera; Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. C9721S) for fast acquisition of images[4]. It is an analog camera but the camera image is captured by a PC and the effective image resolution is 1280×1023 pixels. This resolution is lower than that of the SS-CCD camera of 4096×4096 pixels. However, the HD video camera captures one image for only 1/30 second. In exchange for the faster acquisition the S/N of images are low. To improve the S/N, 22 captured frames are integrated so that each image sharpness is enough to become lower fitting error. As countermeasure against low resolution, we selected a large defocus step, which is typically five times of the manual defocus step, to discriminate different defocused images.By using HD video camera for autofocus process, the time consumption for each autofocus procedure was reduced to about six seconds. It took one second for correction of an image position and the total correction time was seven seconds, which was shorter by one order than that using SS-CCD camera. When we used SS-CCD camera for final image capture, it took 30 seconds to record one tilt image. We can obtain a tilt

  3. The benefit of thresholding carbon layers in electron tomographic tilt series by intensity downshifting.

    PubMed

    Gontard, Lionel C; Cintas, Jesús; Borkowski, Rafal E Dunin

    2017-03-01

    When performing electron tomography, tilt series of images are often acquired from samples that contain unwanted carbonaceous material, such as an embedding resin, a thin carbon support film or hydrocarbon contamination. The presence of such layers can introduce artefacts in reconstructions, obscuring features of interest. Here, we illustrate the benefit of preprocessing a high-angle annular dark-field tomographic tilt series by thresholding unwanted low-density materials using a simple intensity downshifting procedure. The resulting tomograms have fewer artefacts and segmentation can be performed more accurately. We present two representative examples taken from studies of catalyst nanoparticles and amyloid plaque core material from the human brain.

  4. Scanning transmission electron microscopy through-focal tilt-series on biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Trepout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cédric; Perrot, Sylvie; Bastin, Philippe; Marco, Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Since scanning transmission electron microscopy can produce high signal-to-noise ratio bright-field images of thick (≥500 nm) specimens, this tool is emerging as the method of choice to study thick biological samples via tomographic approaches. However, in a convergent-beam configuration, the depth of field is limited because only a thin portion of the specimen (from a few nanometres to tens of nanometres depending on the convergence angle) can be imaged in focus. A method known as through-focal imaging enables recovery of the full depth of information by combining images acquired at different levels of focus. In this work, we compare tomographic reconstruction with the through-focal tilt-series approach (a multifocal series of images per tilt angle) with reconstruction with the classic tilt-series acquisition scheme (one single-focus image per tilt angle). We visualised the base of the flagellum in the protist Trypanosoma brucei via an acquisition and image-processing method tailored to obtain quantitative and qualitative descriptors of reconstruction volumes. Reconstructions using through-focal imaging contained more contrast and more details for thick (≥500 nm) biological samples.

  5. A Method for 3D-Reconstruction of a Muscle Thick Filament Using the Tilt Series Images of a Single Filament Electron Tomogram

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, G.; Pinto, A.; Alamo, L.; Baumann, B.; Ye, F.; Winkler, H.; Taylor, K.; Padrón, R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Myosin interacting-heads (MIH) motifs are visualized in 3D-reconstructions of thick filaments from striated muscle. These reconstructions are calculated by averaging methods using images from electron micrographs of grids prepared using numerous filament preparations. Here we propose an alternative method to calculate the 3D-reconstruction of a single thick filament using only a tilt series images recorded by electron tomography. Relaxed thick filaments, prepared from tarantula leg muscle homogenates, were negatively stained. Single-axis tilt series of single isolated thick filaments were obtained with the electron microscope at a low electron dose, and recorded on a CCD camera by electron tomography. An IHRSR 3D-recontruction was calculated from the tilt series images of a single thick filament. The reconstruction was enhanced by including in the search stage dual tilt image segments while only single tilt along the filament axis is usually used, as well as applying a band pass filter just before the back projection. The reconstruction from a single filament has a 40 Å resolution and clearly shows the presence of MIH motifs. In contrast, the electron tomogram 3D-reconstruction of the same thick filament –calculated without any image averaging and/or imposition of helical symmetry- only reveals MIH motifs infrequently. This is –to our knowledge- the first application of the IHRSR method to calculate a 3D reconstruction from tilt series images. This single filament IHRSR reconstruction method (SF-IHRSR) should provide a new tool to assess structural differences between well-ordered thick (or thin) filaments in a grid by recording separately their electron tomograms. PMID:24727133

  6. A method for 3D-reconstruction of a muscle thick filament using the tilt series images of a single filament electron tomogram.

    PubMed

    Márquez, G; Pinto, A; Alamo, L; Baumann, B; Ye, F; Winkler, H; Taylor, K; Padrón, R

    2014-05-01

    Myosin interacting-heads (MIH) motifs are visualized in 3D-reconstructions of thick filaments from striated muscle. These reconstructions are calculated by averaging methods using images from electron micrographs of grids prepared using numerous filament preparations. Here we propose an alternative method to calculate the 3D-reconstruction of a single thick filament using only a tilt series images recorded by electron tomography. Relaxed thick filaments, prepared from tarantula leg muscle homogenates, were negatively stained. Single-axis tilt series of single isolated thick filaments were obtained with the electron microscope at a low electron dose, and recorded on a CCD camera by electron tomography. An IHRSR 3D-recontruction was calculated from the tilt series images of a single thick filament. The reconstruction was enhanced by including in the search stage dual tilt image segments while only single tilt along the filament axis is usually used, as well as applying a band pass filter just before the back projection. The reconstruction from a single filament has a 40 Å resolution and clearly shows the presence of MIH motifs. In contrast, the electron tomogram 3D-reconstruction of the same thick filament - calculated without any image averaging and/or imposition of helical symmetry - only reveals MIH motifs infrequently. This is - to our knowledge - the first application of the IHRSR method to calculate a 3D reconstruction from tilt series images. This single filament IHRSR reconstruction method (SF-IHRSR) should provide a new tool to assess structural differences between well-ordered thick (or thin) filaments in a grid by recording separately their electron tomograms.

  7. Chromatic aberration-corrected tilt series transmission electron microscopy of nanoparticles in a whole mount macrophage cell.

    PubMed

    Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Jinschek, Joerg R; Boothroyd, Chris B; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron tomography is widely used to obtain nanometer scale three-dimensional (3D) structural information about biological samples. However, studies of whole eukaryotic cells are limited in resolution and/or contrast on account of the effect of chromatic aberration of the TEM objective lens on electrons that have been scattered inelastically in the specimen. As a result, 3D information is usually obtained from sections and not from whole cells. Here, we use chromatic aberration-corrected TEM to record bright-field TEM images of nanoparticles in a whole mount macrophage cell. Tilt series of images are used to generate electron tomograms, which are analyzed to assess the spatial resolution that can be achieved for different vertical positions in the specimen. The uptake of gold nanoparticles coated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is studied. The LDL is found to assemble in clusters. The clusters contain nanoparticles taken up on different days, which are joined without mixing their nanoparticle cargo.

  8. Atomic resolution tomography reconstruction of tilt series based on a GPU accelerated hybrid input-output algorithm using polar Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiangwen; Gao, Wenpei; Zuo, Jian-Min; Yuan, Jiabin

    2015-02-01

    Advances in diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have greatly improved the prospect of three-dimensional (3D) structure reconstruction from two-dimensional (2D) images or diffraction patterns recorded in a tilt series at atomic resolution. Here, we report a new graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated iterative transformation algorithm (ITA) based on polar fast Fourier transform for reconstructing 3D structure from 2D diffraction patterns. The algorithm also applies to image tilt series by calculating diffraction patterns from the recorded images using the projection-slice theorem. A gold icosahedral nanoparticle of 309 atoms is used as the model to test the feasibility, performance and robustness of the developed algorithm using simulations. Atomic resolution in 3D is achieved for the 309 atoms Au nanoparticle using 75 diffraction patterns covering 150° rotation. The capability demonstrated here provides an opportunity to uncover the 3D structure of small objects of nanometers in size by electron diffraction.

  9. Marker-free dual-axis tilt series alignment

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Hanspeter; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Dual-axis tilt series in electron tomography are collected by successively tilting the object about two approximately orthogonal tilt axes. Here we report on the extension of marker-free image registration based on cross-correlation techniques to dual-axis tilt series. A simultaneous geometry refinement yields accurate parameters for the computati on of the final reconstruction. Both, image registration and 3D-reconstruction operate on the combined data from the paired single axis series rather than computing individual single axis tomograms followed by a separate combination step. We show that with simultaneous registration and reconstruction of dual-axis tilt series, tomograms with higher resolution are obtained than by merging separately computed tomograms. PMID:23435123

  10. Automated batch fiducial-less tilt-series alignment in Appion using Protomo

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Alex J.; Stagg, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The field of electron tomography has benefited greatly from manual and semi-automated approaches to marker-based tilt-series alignment that have allowed for the structural determination of multitudes of in situ cellular structures as well as macromolecular structures of individual protein complexes. The emergence of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor detectors capable of detecting individual electrons has enabled the collection of low dose, high contrast images, opening the door for reliable correlation-based tilt-series alignment. Here we present a set of automated, correlation-based tilt-series alignment, contrast transfer function (CTF) correction, and reconstruction workflows for use in conjunction with the Appion/Leginon package that are primarily targeted at automating structure determination with cryogenic electron microscopy. PMID:26455557

  11. Rapid low dose electron tomography using a direct electron detection camera

    PubMed Central

    Migunov, Vadim; Ryll, Henning; Zhuge, Xiaodong; Simson, Martin; Strüder, Lothar; Batenburg, K. Joost; Houben, Lothar; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to record a tomographic tilt series containing 3487 images in only 3.5 s by using a direct electron detector in a transmission electron microscope. The electron dose is lower by at least one order of magnitude when compared with that used to record a conventional tilt series of fewer than 100 images in 15–60 minutes and the overall signal-to-noise ratio is greater than 4. Our results, which are illustrated for an inorganic nanotube, are important for ultra-low-dose electron tomography of electron-beam-sensitive specimens and real-time dynamic electron tomography of nanoscale objects with sub-ms temporal resolution. PMID:26434767

  12. Cryo-electron tomography for structural characterization of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Cope, Julia; Heumann, John; Hoenger, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is an emerging 3-D reconstruction technology that combines the principles of tomographic 3-D reconstruction with the unmatched structural preservation of biological matter embedded in vitreous ice. Cryo-ET is particularly suited to investigating cell-biological samples and large macromolecular structures that are too polymorphic to be reconstructed by classical averaging-based 3-D reconstruction procedures. This unit aims to make cryo-ET accessible to newcomers and discusses the specialized equipment required, as well as relevant advantages and hurdles associated with sample preparation by vitrification and cryo-ET. Protocols describe specimen preparation, data recording and 3-D data reconstruction for cryo-ET, with a special focus on macromolecular complexes. A step-by-step procedure for specimen vitrification by plunge freezing is provided, followed by the general practicalities of tilt-series acquisition for cryo-ET, including advice on how to select an area appropriate for acquiring a tilt series. A brief introduction to the underlying computational reconstruction principles applied in tomography is described, along with instructions for reconstructing a tomogram from cryo-tilt series data. Finally, a method is detailed for extracting small subvolumes containing identical macromolecular structures from tomograms for alignment and averaging as a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminate missing wedge effects inherent in tomographic reconstructions.

  13. EPiK-a Workflow for Electron Tomography in Kepler*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwu; Crawl, Daniel; Phan, Sébastien; Lawrence, Albert; Ellisman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Scientific workflows integrate data and computing interfaces as configurable, semi-automatic graphs to solve a scientific problem. Kepler is such a software system for designing, executing, reusing, evolving, archiving and sharing scientific workflows. Electron tomography (ET) enables high-resolution views of complex cellular structures, such as cytoskeletons, organelles, viruses and chromosomes. Imaging investigations produce large datasets. For instance, in Electron Tomography, the size of a 16 fold image tilt series is about 65 Gigabytes with each projection image including 4096 by 4096 pixels. When we use serial sections or montage technique for large field ET, the dataset will be even larger. For higher resolution images with multiple tilt series, the data size may be in terabyte range. Demands of mass data processing and complex algorithms require the integration of diverse codes into flexible software structures. This paper describes a workflow for Electron Tomography Programs in Kepler (EPiK). This EPiK workflow embeds the tracking process of IMOD, and realizes the main algorithms including filtered backprojection (FBP) from TxBR and iterative reconstruction methods. We have tested the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction process using EPiK on ET data. EPiK can be a potential toolkit for biology researchers with the advantage of logical viewing, easy handling, convenient sharing and future extensibility. PMID:25621086

  14. EPiK-a Workflow for Electron Tomography in Kepler.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruijuan; Wan, Xiaohua; Altintas, Ilkay; Wang, Jianwu; Crawl, Daniel; Phan, Sébastien; Lawrence, Albert; Ellisman, Mark

    Scientific workflows integrate data and computing interfaces as configurable, semi-automatic graphs to solve a scientific problem. Kepler is such a software system for designing, executing, reusing, evolving, archiving and sharing scientific workflows. Electron tomography (ET) enables high-resolution views of complex cellular structures, such as cytoskeletons, organelles, viruses and chromosomes. Imaging investigations produce large datasets. For instance, in Electron Tomography, the size of a 16 fold image tilt series is about 65 Gigabytes with each projection image including 4096 by 4096 pixels. When we use serial sections or montage technique for large field ET, the dataset will be even larger. For higher resolution images with multiple tilt series, the data size may be in terabyte range. Demands of mass data processing and complex algorithms require the integration of diverse codes into flexible software structures. This paper describes a workflow for Electron Tomography Programs in Kepler (EPiK). This EPiK workflow embeds the tracking process of IMOD, and realizes the main algorithms including filtered backprojection (FBP) from TxBR and iterative reconstruction methods. We have tested the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction process using EPiK on ET data. EPiK can be a potential toolkit for biology researchers with the advantage of logical viewing, easy handling, convenient sharing and future extensibility.

  15. Zernike Phase Contrast Electron Cryo-Tomography Applied to Marine Cyanobacteria Infected with Cyanophages

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Fu, Caroline; Khant, Htet A.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Advances in electron cryo-tomography have provided a new opportunity to visualize the internal 3D structures of a bacterium. An electron microscope equipped with Zernike phase contrast optics produces images with dramatically increased contrast compared to images obtained by conventional electron microscopy. Here we describe a protocol to apply Zernike phase plate technology for acquiring electron tomographic tilt series of cyanophage-infected cyanobacterial cells embedded in ice, without staining or chemical fixation. We detail the procedures for aligning and assessing phase plates for data collection, and methods to obtain 3D structures of cyanophage assembly intermediates in the host, by subtomogram alignment, classification and averaging. Acquiring three to four tomographic tilt series takes approximately 12 h on a JEM2200FS electron microscope. We expect this time requirement to decrease substantially as the technique matures. Time required for annotation and subtomogram averaging varies widely depending on the project goals and data volume. PMID:25321408

  16. Electron tomography of viruses.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sriram; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Liu, Jun; Bennett, Adam E; Sougrat, Rachid

    2007-10-01

    Understanding the molecular architectures of enveloped and complex viruses is a challenging frontier in structural biology. In these viruses, the structural and compositional variation from one viral particle to another generally precludes the use of either crystallization or image averaging procedures that have been successfully implemented in the past for highly symmetric viruses. While advances in cryo electron tomography of unstained specimens provide new opportunities for identification and molecular averaging of individual subcomponents such as the surface glycoprotein spikes on purified viruses, electron tomography of stained and plunge-frozen cells is being used to visualize the cellular context of viral entry and replication. Here, we review recent developments in both areas as they relate to our understanding of the biology of heterogeneous and pleiomorphic viruses.

  17. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M. C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  18. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Barnaby D.A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M.C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data. PMID:27272459

  19. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  20. Secondary signal imaging (SSI) electron tomography (SSI-ET): A new three-dimensional metrology for mesoscale specimens in transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Wan; Ortalan, Volkan

    2015-09-01

    We have demonstrated a new electron tomography technique utilizing the secondary signals (secondary electrons and backscattered electrons) for ultra thick (a few μm) specimens. The Monte Carlo electron scattering simulations reveal that the amount of backscattered electrons generated by 200 and 300keV incident electrons is a monotonic function of the sample thickness and this causes the thickness contrast satisfying the projection requirement for the tomographic reconstruction. Additional contribution of the secondary electrons emitted from the edges of the specimens enhances the visibility of the surface features. The acquired SSI tilt series of the specimen having mesoscopic dimensions are successfully reconstructed verifying that this new technique, so called the secondary signal imaging electron tomography (SSI-ET), can directly be utilized for 3D structural analysis of mesoscale structures.

  1. Unraveling the structure of membrane proteins in situ by transfer function corrected cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Eibauer, Matthias; Hoffmann, Christian; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan; Engelhardt, Harald

    2012-12-01

    Cryo-electron tomography in combination with subtomogram averaging allows to investigate the structure of protein assemblies in their natural environment in a close to live state. To make full use of the structural information contained in tomograms it is necessary to analyze the contrast transfer function (CTF) of projections and to restore the phases of higher spatial frequencies. CTF correction is however hampered by the difficulty of determining the actual defocus values from tilt series data, which is due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of electron micrographs. In this study, an extended acquisition scheme is introduced that enables an independent CTF determination. Two high-dose images are recorded along the tilt axis on both sides of each projection, which allow an accurate determination of the defocus values of these images. These values are used to calculate the CTF for each image of the tilt series. We applied this scheme to the mycobacterial outer membrane protein MspA reconstituted in lipid vesicles and tested several variants of CTF estimation in combination with subtomogram averaging and correction of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The 3D electron density map of MspA was compared with a structure previously determined by X-ray crystallography. We were able to demonstrate that structural information up to a resolution of 16.8Å can be recovered using our CTF correction approach, whereas the uncorrected 3D map had a resolution of only 26.2Å.

  2. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  3. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    PubMed Central

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets. PMID:27291259

  4. Protein secondary structure determination by constrained single-particle cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-12-05

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations necessary for 3D reconstruction. Here, we propose "constrained single-particle tomography" as a general strategy for 3D structure determination in cryo-EM. A key component of our approach is the effective use of images recorded in tilt series to extract high-resolution information and correct for the contrast transfer function. By incorporating geometric constraints into the refinement to improve orientational accuracy of images, we reduce model bias and overrefinement artifacts and demonstrate that protein structures can be determined at resolutions of ∼8 Å starting from low-dose tomographic tilt series.

  5. The Caltech Tomography Database and Automatic Processing Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Ding, H Jane; Oikonomou, Catherine M; Jensen, Grant J

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe the Caltech Tomography Database and automatic image processing pipeline, designed to process, store, display, and distribute electron tomographic data including tilt-series, sample information, data collection parameters, 3D reconstructions, correlated light microscope images, snapshots, segmentations, movies, and other associated files. Tilt-series are typically uploaded automatically during collection to a user's "Inbox" and processed automatically, but can also be entered and processed in batches via scripts or file-by-file through an internet interface. As with the video website YouTube, each tilt-series is represented on the browsing page with a link to the full record, a thumbnail image and a video icon that delivers a movie of the tomogram in a pop-out window. Annotation tools allow users to add notes and snapshots. The database is fully searchable, and sets of tilt-series can be selected and re-processed, edited, or downloaded to a personal workstation. The results of further processing and snapshots of key results can be recorded in the database, automatically linked to the appropriate tilt-series. While the database is password-protected for local browsing and searching, datasets can be made public and individual files can be shared with collaborators over the Internet. Together these tools facilitate high-throughput tomography work by both individuals and groups.

  6. The Caltech Tomography Database and Automatic Processing Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Ding, H. Jane; Oikonomou, Catherine M.; Jensen, Grant J.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the Caltech Tomography Database and automatic image processing pipeline, designed to process, store, display, and distribute electron tomographic data including tilt-series, sample information, data collection parameters, 3D reconstructions, correlated light microscope images, snapshots, segmentations, movies, and other associated files. Tilt-series are typically uploaded automatically during collection to a user’s “Inbox” and processed automatically, but can also be entered and processed in batches via scripts or file-by-file through an internet interface. As with the video website YouTube, each tilt-series is represented on the browsing page with a link to the full record, a thumbnail image and a video icon that delivers a movie of the tomogram in a pop-out window. Annotation tools allow users to add notes and snapshots. The database is fully searchable, and sets of tilt-series can be selected and re-processed, edited, or downloaded to a personal workstation. The results of further processing and snapshots of key results can be recorded in the database, automatically linked to the appropriate tilt-series. While the database is password-protected for local browsing and searching, datasets can be made public and individual files can be shared with collaborators over the Internet. Together these tools facilitate high-throughput tomography work by both individuals and groups. PMID:26087141

  7. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  8. A fast cross-validation method for alignment of electron tomography images based on Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rui; Edwards, Thomas J; Pankratz, Logan M; Kuhn, Richard J; Lanman, Jason K; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Wen

    2015-11-01

    In electron tomography, accurate alignment of tilt series is an essential step in attaining high-resolution 3D reconstructions. Nevertheless, quantitative assessment of alignment quality has remained a challenging issue, even though many alignment methods have been reported. Here, we report a fast and accurate method, tomoAlignEval, based on the Beer-Lambert law, for the evaluation of alignment quality. Our method is able to globally estimate the alignment accuracy by measuring the goodness of log-linear relationship of the beam intensity attenuations at different tilt angles. Extensive tests with experimental data demonstrated its robust performance with stained and cryo samples. Our method is not only significantly faster but also more sensitive than measurements of tomogram resolution using Fourier shell correlation method (FSCe/o). From these tests, we also conclude that while current alignment methods are sufficiently accurate for stained samples, inaccurate alignments remain a major limitation for high resolution cryo-electron tomography.

  9. A fast cross-validation method for alignment of electron tomography images based on Beer-Lambert law

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rui; Edwards, Thomas J.; Pankratz, Logan M.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Lanman, Jason K.; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    In electron tomography, accurate alignment of tilt series is an essential step in attaining high-resolution 3D reconstructions. Nevertheless, quantitative assessment of alignment quality has remained a challenging issue, even though many alignment methods have been reported. Here, we report a fast and accurate method, tomoAlignEval, based on the Beer-Lambert law, for the evaluation of alignment quality. Our method is able to globally estimate the alignment accuracy by measuring the goodness of log-linear relationship of the beam intensity attenuations at different tilt angles. Extensive tests with experimental data demonstrated its robust performance with stained and cryo samples. Our method is not only significantly faster but also more sensitive than measurements of tomogram resolution using Fourier shell correlation method (FSCe/o). From these tests, we also conclude that while current alignment methods are sufficiently accurate for stained samples, inaccurate alignments remain a major limitation for high resolution cryo-electron tomography. PMID:26455556

  10. Quantum tomography of an electron.

    PubMed

    Jullien, T; Roulleau, P; Roche, B; Cavanna, A; Jin, Y; Glattli, D C

    2014-10-30

    The complete knowledge of a quantum state allows the prediction of the probability of all possible measurement outcomes, a crucial step in quantum mechanics. It can be provided by tomographic methods which have been applied to atomic, molecular, spin and photonic states. For optical or microwave photons, standard tomography is obtained by mixing the unknown state with a large-amplitude coherent photon field. However, for fermions such as electrons in condensed matter, this approach is not applicable because fermionic fields are limited to small amplitudes (at most one particle per state), and so far no determination of an electron wavefunction has been made. Recent proposals involving quantum conductors suggest that the wavefunction can be obtained by measuring the time-dependent current of electronic wave interferometers or the current noise of electronic Hanbury-Brown/Twiss interferometers. Here we show that such measurements are possible despite the extreme noise sensitivity required, and present the reconstructed wavefunction quasi-probability, or Wigner distribution function, of single electrons injected into a ballistic conductor. Many identical electrons are prepared in well-controlled quantum states called levitons by repeatedly applying Lorentzian voltage pulses to a contact on the conductor. After passing through an electron beam splitter, the levitons are mixed with a weak-amplitude fermionic field formed by a coherent superposition of electron-hole pairs generated by a small alternating current with a frequency that is a multiple of the voltage pulse frequency. Antibunching of the electrons and holes with the levitons at the beam splitter changes the leviton partition statistics, and the noise variations provide the energy density matrix elements of the levitons. This demonstration of quantum tomography makes the developing field of electron quantum optics with ballistic conductors a new test-bed for quantum information with fermions. These results may

  11. Separation of three-dimensional scattering effects in tilt-series Fourier ptychography.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Batey, Darren J; Edo, Tega B; Rodenburg, John M

    2015-11-01

    We investigate a strategy for separating the influence of three-dimensional scattering effects in tilt-series reconstruction, a method for computationally increasing the resolution of a transmission microscope with an objective lens of small numerical aperture, as occurs in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Recent work with visible light refers to the method as Fourier ptychography. To date, reconstruction methods presume that the object is thin enough so that the beam tilt induces only a shift of the diffraction pattern in the back focal plane. In fact, it is well known that the diffraction pattern changes as a function of beam tilt when the object is thick. In this paper, we use a simple visible light model to demonstrate a proof-of-principle of a new reconstruction algorithm that can cope with this difficulty and compare it with the aperture-scanning method. Although the experiment uses a model specimen with just two distinct layers separated along the optic axis, it should in principle be extendable to continuous objects.

  12. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  13. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru; Arai, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2014-11-01

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ~3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology.

  14. A method for observing silver-stained osteocytes in situ in 3-microm sections using ultra-high voltage electron microscopy tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamioka, Hiroshi; Murshid, Sakhr A; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Kajimura, Naoko; Hasegawa, Toshiaki; Ando, Ryoko; Sugawara, Yasuyo; Yamashiro, Takashi; Takaoka, Akio; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2009-10-01

    Osteocytes are surrounded by hard bone matrix, and it has not been possible previously to directly observe the in situ architecture of osteocyte morphology in bone. Electron microscope tomography, however, is a technique that has the unique potential to provide three-dimensional (3D) visualization of cellular ultrastructure. This approach is based on reconstruction of 3D volumes from a tilt series of electron micrographs of cells, and resolution at the nanometer level has been achieved. We applied electron microscope tomography to thick sections of silver-stained osteocytes in bone using a Hitachi H-3000 ultra-high voltage electron microscope equipped with a 360 degrees tilt specimen holder, at an accelerating voltage of 2 MeV. Osteocytes with numerous processes and branches were clearly seen in the serial tilt series acquired from 3-microm-thick sections. Reconstruction of young osteocytes showed the 3D topographic morphology of the cell body and processes at high resolution. This morphological data on osteocytes should provide useful information to those who study osteocyte physiology and the several models used to explain their mechanosensory properties.

  15. Cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Phoebe L

    2017-03-01

    Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM or cryo-EM) and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) offer robust and powerful ways to visualize nanoparticles. These techniques involve imaging of the sample in a frozen-hydrated state, allowing visualization of nanoparticles essentially as they exist in solution. Cryo-TEM grid preparation can be performed with the sample in aqueous solvents or in various organic and ionic solvents. Two-dimensional (2D) cryo-TEM provides a direct way to visualize the polydispersity within a nanoparticle preparation. Fourier transforms of cryo-TEM images can confirm the structural periodicity within a sample. While measurement of specimen parameters can be performed with 2D TEM images, determination of a three-dimensional (3D) structure often facilitates more spatially accurate quantization. 3D structures can be determined in one of two ways. If the nanoparticle has a homogeneous structure, then 2D projection images of different particles can be averaged using a computational process referred to as single particle reconstruction. Alternatively, if the nanoparticle has a heterogeneous structure, then a structure can be generated by cryo-ET. This involves collecting a tilt-series of 2D projection images for a defined region of the grid, which can be used to generate a 3D tomogram. Occasionally it is advantageous to calculate both a single particle reconstruction, to reveal the regular portions of a nanoparticle structure, and a cryo-electron tomogram, to reveal the irregular features. A sampling of 2D cryo-TEM images and 3D structures are presented for protein based, DNA based, lipid based, and polymer based nanoparticles. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1417. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1417 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  16. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray F.; Bergen, Michael; Li, Peng

    2014-08-15

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  17. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: a comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Bergen, Michael; Egerton, Ray F; Li, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  18. Electron Tomography: A Three-Dimensional Analytic Tool for Hard and Soft Materials Research

    PubMed Central

    Alaidi, Osama; Rames, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis is essential to understand the relationship between the structure and function of an object. Many analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, neutron spectroscopy, and electron microscopy imaging, are used to provide structural information. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), one of the most popular analytic tools, has been widely used for structural analysis in both physical and biological sciences for many decades, in which 3D objects are projected into two-dimensional (2D) images. In many cases, 2D-projection images are insufficient to understand the relationship between the 3D structure and the function of nanoscale objects. Electron tomography (ET) is a technique that retrieves 3D structural information from a tilt series of 2D projections, and is gradually becoming a mature technology with sub-nanometer resolution. Distinct methods to overcome sample-based limitations have been separately developed in both physical and biological science, although they share some basic concepts of ET. This review discusses the common basis for 3D characterization, and specifies difficulties and solutions regarding both hard and soft materials research. It is hoped that novel solutions based on current state-of-the-art techniques for advanced applications in hybrid matter systems can be motivated. PMID:26087941

  19. Electron Tomography: A Three-Dimensional Analytic Tool for Hard and Soft Materials Research.

    PubMed

    Ercius, Peter; Alaidi, Osama; Rames, Matthew J; Ren, Gang

    2015-10-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) structural analysis is essential to understand the relationship between the structure and function of an object. Many analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, neutron spectroscopy, and electron microscopy imaging, are used to provide structural information. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), one of the most popular analytic tools, has been widely used for structural analysis in both physical and biological sciences for many decades, in which 3D objects are projected into two-dimensional (2D) images. In many cases, 2D-projection images are insufficient to understand the relationship between the 3D structure and the function of nanoscale objects. Electron tomography (ET) is a technique that retrieves 3D structural information from a tilt series of 2D projections, and is gradually becoming a mature technology with sub-nanometer resolution. Distinct methods to overcome sample-based limitations have been separately developed in both physical and biological science, although they share some basic concepts of ET. This review discusses the common basis for 3D characterization, and specifies difficulties and solutions regarding both hard and soft materials research. It is hoped that novel solutions based on current state-of-the-art techniques for advanced applications in hybrid matter systems can be motivated.

  20. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkill, Kenton P.; Mantell, Judith M.; Plant, Simon R.; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-03-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7 nm (Au561 +/- 14), ~3.2 nm (Au923 +/- 22), and ~4.3 nm (Au2057 +/- 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2 nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2-5 nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy.

  1. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment

    PubMed Central

    Arkill, Kenton P.; Mantell, Judith M.; Plant, Simon R.; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7 nm (Au561 ± 14), ~3.2 nm (Au923 ± 22), and ~4.3 nm (Au2057 ± 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2 nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2–5 nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:25783049

  2. Conical Fourier shell correlation applied to electron tomograms.

    PubMed

    Diebolder, C A; Faas, F G A; Koster, A J; Koning, R I

    2015-05-01

    The resolution of electron tomograms is anisotropic due to geometrical constraints during data collection, such as the limited tilt range and single axis tilt series acquisition. Acquisition of dual axis tilt series can decrease these effects. However, in cryo-electron tomography, to limit the electron radiation damage that occurs during imaging, the total dose should not increase and must be fractionated over the two tilt series. Here we set out to determine whether it is beneficial fractionate electron dose for recording dual axis cryo electron tilt series or whether it is better to perform single axis acquisition. To assess the quality of tomographic reconstructions in different directions here we introduce conical Fourier shell correlation (cFSCe/o). Employing cFSCe/o, we compared the resolution isotropy of single-axis and dual-axis (cryo-)electron tomograms using even/odd split data sets. We show that the resolution of dual-axis simulated and cryo-electron tomograms in the plane orthogonal to the electron beam becomes more isotropic compared to single-axis tomograms and high resolution peaks along the tilt axis disappear. cFSCe/o also allowed us to compare different methods for the alignment of dual-axis tomograms. We show that different tomographic reconstruction programs produce different anisotropic resolution in dual axis tomograms. We anticipate that cFSCe/o can also be useful for comparisons of acquisition and reconstruction parameters, and different hardware implementations.

  3. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Baertling, Y.; Hoppe, D.; Kuksanov, N.; Fadeev, S.; Salimov, R.

    2012-09-15

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  4. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography.

    PubMed

    Hampel, U; Bärtling, Y; Hoppe, D; Kuksanov, N; Fadeev, S; Salimov, R

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  5. Using Tomoauto: A Protocol for High-throughput Automated Cryo-electron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Morado, Dustin R; Hu, Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-30

    Cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET) is a powerful three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique for visualizing macromolecular complexes in their native context at a molecular level. The technique involves initially preserving the sample in its native state by rapidly freezing the specimen in vitreous ice, then collecting a series of micrographs from different angles at high magnification, and finally computationally reconstructing a 3-D density map. The frozen-hydrated specimen is extremely sensitive to the electron beam and so micrographs are collected at very low electron doses to limit the radiation damage. As a result, the raw cryo-tomogram has a very low signal to noise ratio characterized by an intrinsically noisy image. To better visualize subjects of interest, conventional imaging analysis and sub-tomogram averaging in which sub-tomograms of the subject are extracted from the initial tomogram and aligned and averaged are utilized to improve both contrast and resolution. Large datasets of tilt-series are essential to understanding and resolving the complexes at different states, conditions, or mutations as well as obtaining a large enough collection of sub-tomograms for averaging and classification. Collecting and processing this data can be a major obstacle preventing further analysis. Here we describe a high-throughput cryo-ET protocol based on a computer-controlled 300kV cryo-electron microscope, a direct detection device (DDD) camera and a highly effective, semi-automated image-processing pipeline software wrapper library tomoauto developed in-house. This protocol has been effectively utilized to visualize the intact type III secretion system (T3SS) in Shigella flexneri minicells. It can be applicable to any project suitable for cryo-ET.

  6. Recent advances in the application of electron tomography to materials chemistry.

    PubMed

    Leary, Rowan; Midgley, Paul A; Thomas, John Meurig

    2012-10-16

    Nowadays, tomography plays a central role in pureand applied science, in medicine, and in many branches of engineering and technology. It entails reconstructing the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an object from a tilt series of two-dimensional (2D) images. Its origin goes back to 1917, when Radon showed mathematically how a series of 2D projection images could be converted to the 3D structural one. Tomographic X-ray and positron scanning for 3D medical imaging, with a resolution of ∼1 mm, is now ubiquitous in major hospitals. Electron tomography, a relatively new chemical tool, with a resolution of ∼1 nm, has been recently adopted by materials chemists as an invaluable aid for the 3D study of the morphologies, spatially-discriminating chemical compositions, and defect properties of nanostructured materials. In this Account, we review the advances that have been made in facilitating the recording of the required series of 2D electron microscopic images and the subsequent process of 3D reconstruction of specimens that are vulnerable, to a greater or lesser degree, to electron beam damage. We describe how high-fidelity 3D tomograms may be obtained from relatively few 2D images by incorporating prior structural knowledge into the reconstruction process. In particular, we highlight the vital role of compressed sensing, a recently developed procedure well-known to information theorists that exploits ideas of image compression and "sparsity" (that the important image information can be captured in a reduced data set). We also touch upon another promising approach, "discrete" tomography, which builds into the reconstruction process a prior assumption that the object can be described in discrete terms, such as the number of constituent materials and their expected densities. Other advances made recently that we outline, such as the availability of aberration-corrected electron microscopes, electron wavelength monochromators, and sophisticated specimen goniometers

  7. Three-dimensional shapes and distribution of FePd nanoparticles observed by electron tomography using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazuhisa; Aoyagi, Kenta; Konno, Toyohiko J.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied three-dimensional shapes and distribution of FePd nanoparticles, prepared by electron beam deposition and postdeposition annealing, by means of single-axis tilt tomography using atomic number contrasts obtained by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Particle size, shape, and locations were reconstructed by weighted backprojection (WBP), as well as by simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). We have also estimated the particle size by simple extrapolation of tilt-series original data sets, which proved to be quite powerful. The results of the two algorithms for reconstruction have been compared quantitatively with those obtained by the extrapolation method and those independently reported by electron holography. It was found that the reconstructed intensity map by WBP contains a small amount of dotlike artifacts, which do not exist in the results by SIRT, and that the particle surface obtained by WBP is rougher than that by SIRT. We demonstrate, on the other hand, that WBP yields a better estimation of the particle size in the z direction than SIRT does, most likely due to the presence of a "missing wedge" in the original data set.

  8. Using tomoauto – a protocol for high-throughput automated cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Morado, Dustin R.; Hu, Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We present a protocol on how to utilize high-throughput cryo-electron tomography to determine high resolution in situ structures of molecular machines. The protocol permits large amounts of data to be processed, avoids common bottlenecks and reduces resource downtime, allowing the user to focus on important biological questions. Cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET) is a powerful three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technique for visualizing macromolecular complexes in their native context at a molecular level. The technique involves initially preserving the sample in its native state by rapidly freezing the specimen in vitreous ice, then collecting a series of micrographs from different angles at high magnification, and finally computationally reconstructing a 3-D density map. The frozen-hydrated specimen is extremely sensitive to the electron beam and so micrographs are collected at very low electron doses to limit the radiation damage. As a result, the raw cryo-tomogram has a very low signal to noise ratio characterized by an intrinsically noisy image. To better visualize subjects of interest, conventional imaging analysis and sub-tomogram averaging in which sub-tomograms of the subject are extracted from the initial tomogram and aligned and averaged are utilized to improve both contrast and resolution. Large datasets of tilt-series are essential to understanding and resolving the complexes at different states, conditions, or mutations as well as obtaining a large enough collection of sub-tomograms for averaging and classification. Collecting and processing this data can be a major obstacle preventing further analysis. Here we describe a high-throughput cryo-ET protocol based on a computer-controlled 300kV cryo-electron microscope, a direct detection device (DDD) camera and a highly effective, semi-automated image-processing pipeline software wrapper library tomoauto developed in-house. This protocol has been effectively utilized to visualize the intact type III

  9. Electron Tomography: Seeing Atoms in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-11-01

    Our eyes - a parallel lens system - have the phenomenal ability to observe and "reconstruct" the three-dimensional world, relaying a 3-D image to our brains. Imaging of the nanoworld is best done with electrons rather than photons because of their lower wavelengths and higher resolution. The advent of aberration-correction has led to transmission electron microscopes with sub-Angstrom resolution that can resolve single atoms. Yet, no matter what detector is used, the resulting images are only two-dimensional projections of three-dimensional objects. Electron tomography is a technique that allows reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure and morphology of nanomaterials from such projections. X-ray tomography has been used in many branches of science for nearly half a century, and in the biological sciences electron tomography has been a powerful tool for understanding ultrastructure. However, for many years crystalline materials posed a challenge to electron tomography because diffraction contrast (a change in intensity in the image at particular crystal orientations) creates artifacts in the 3-D reconstruction. In 2003, with advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy, Midgley and colleagues obtained the first electron tomograms of crystalline materials. Shortly thereafter, Arslan et al. showed that the spatial resolution could be improved to 1 nm in all three spatial dimensions and visualized the formation of faceted 3.5-nm quantum dots embedded in a Si matrix. However, with that work existing reconstruction algorithms appeared to have reached their limit. To attain a resolution of 1 nm, a total of 140 images over ±78 degrees of tilt were needed. Writing in Nature Materials, Goris et al. now report a novel algorithm for 3-D reconstruction of the atomic structure of free-standing Au nanorods, using only four projection images. I.A. acknowledges collaboration with J.D. Roehling, K.J. Batenburg, B.C. Gates and A. Katz for Figure 1, supported in

  10. Local electron tomography using angular variations of surface tangents: Stomo version 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, T. C.; Ringer, S. P.

    2012-03-01

    In a recent publication, we investigated the prospect of measuring the outer three-dimensional (3D) shapes of nano-scale atom probe specimens from tilt-series of images collected in the transmission electron microscope. For this purpose alone, an algorithm and simplified reconstruction theory were developed to circumvent issues that arise in commercial "back-projection" computations in this context. In our approach, we give up the difficult task of computing the complete 3D continuum structure and instead seek only the 3D morphology of internal and external scattering interfaces. These interfaces can be described as embedded 2D surfaces projected onto each image in a tilt series. Curves and other features in the images are interpreted as inscribed sets of tangent lines, which intersect the scattering interfaces at unknown locations along the direction of the incident electron beam. Smooth angular variations of the tangent line abscissa are used to compute the surface tangent intersections and hence the 3D morphology as a "point cloud". We have published the explicit details of our alternative algorithm along with the source code entitled "stomo_version_1". For this work, we have further modified the code to efficiently handle rectangular image sets, perform much faster tangent-line "edge detection" and smoother tilt-axis image alignment using simple bi-linear interpolation. We have also adapted the algorithm to detect tangent lines as "ridges", based upon 2nd order partial derivatives of the image intensity; the magnitude and orientation of which is described by a Hessian matrix. Ridges are more appropriate descriptors for tangent-line curves in phase contrast images outlined by Fresnel fringes or absorption contrast data from fine-scale objects. Improved accuracy, efficiency and speed for "stomo_version_2" is demonstrated in this paper using both high resolution electron tomography data of a nano-sized atom probe tip and simulated absorption-contrast images

  11. Calibration method of tilt and azimuth angles for alignment of TEM tomographic tilt series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, Misa; Terauchi, Shinya; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the calibration method of the tilt and azimuth angles of specimen using a digital protractor and a laser autocollimator for alignment of electron tomography. It also suggests an easy method to check whether the specimen is tilted by 180.0°, and whether the azimuth angle is 0.0°; the method involves the use of two images of a rod-shaped specimen collected before and after a 180.0° tilt. The method is based on the assumption that these images are symmetric about the tilt axis when the azimuth angle is 0.0°. In addition, we used an experiment to demonstrate the effect of the incorrect angles on reconstructed images and simulated the image quality against distance away from tilt axis.

  12. A negative stain for electron microscopic tomography.

    PubMed

    Fera, Andrea; Farrington, Jane E; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Reese, Thomas S

    2012-04-01

    While negative staining can provide detailed, two-dimensional images of biological structures, the potential of combining tomography with negative staining to provide three-dimensional views has yet to be fully realized. Basic requirements of a negative stain for tomography are that the density and atomic number of the stain are optimal, and that the stain does not degrade or rearrange with the intensive electron dose (~10⁶ e/nm²) needed to collect a full set of tomographic images. A commercially available, tungsten-based stain appears to satisfy these prerequisites. Comparison of the surface structure of negatively stained influenza A virus with previous structural results served to evaluate this negative stain. The combination of many projections of the same structure yielded detailed images of single proteins on the viral surface. Corresponding surface renderings are a good fit to images of the viral surface derived from cryomicroscopy as well as to the shapes of crystallized surface proteins. Negative stain tomography with the appropriate stain yields detailed images of individual molecules in their normal setting on the surface of the influenza A virus.

  13. Cryo-electron tomography of bacterial viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Wright, Elizabeth R.

    2013-01-05

    Bacteriophage particles contain both simple and complex macromolecular assemblages and machines that enable them to regulate the infection process under diverse environmental conditions with a broad range of bacterial hosts. Recent developments in cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) make it possible to observe the interactions of bacteriophages with their host cells under native-state conditions at unprecedented resolution and in three-dimensions. This review describes the application of cryo-ET to studies of bacteriophage attachment, genome ejection, assembly and egress. Current topics of investigation and future directions in the field are also discussed.

  14. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  15. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Hodgens, K J; Arena, J; Song, M J; McEwen, B F

    1996-02-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  16. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Arena, J.; Song, M. J.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  17. Alignment of fiducial marks in a tomographic tilt series with an unknown rotation axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary H.; Volkovitsky, Alex; Hung, Howard K.

    2007-06-01

    Alignment for tomography using a transmission electron microscopy frequently uses colloidal gold particles as fiducial reference marks. Typically, there is an implicit assumption that the tilt axis of the tomographic series is orthogonal to the beam direction. However, this may not be true, either intentionally, if a tilt-rotate stage is used, or unintentionally, because of mechanical errors in the rotation stage or the sample fixture. Here, we provide a computer code which takes as input a set of two-dimensional (2D) observations of fiducial reference marks at various tilt angles and the values of those tilt angles. It produces as output a three-dimensional model of the observations, 2D shifts for each view, and the tilt axis direction. Program summaryTitle of program: particleTilt Catalogue identifier: ADYW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYW_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: IBM compatible desktop PC; SGI Octane Operating system: Red Hat WS 3 Linux (with 2.4.21-40.EL kernel); IRIX 6.5 IP30 Program language used: Fortran 90 No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: one Has the code been vectorized: no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2397 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 47 017 Distribution format: tar.gz Peripherals used: one Typical running time: 350 ms (larger included example, on 2.8 GHz 32-bit PC) Nature of problem: The program is used to assist the alignment step in tomography. The samples should be prepared with spherical particles (typically gold beads) which are observed in several views. (Not every particle need be observed in every view.) The program reports coordinates of a 3D model of the particles as well as the direction of the tilt axis as a point on the unit sphere. Method of solution: Our package minimizes an objective function whose free variables are a set of 3D model points and

  18. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging. PMID:27403922

  19. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-11

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins' functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000-160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging.

  20. Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxin; Li, Hongchang; Zhang, Lei; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yadong; Peng, Bo; Celis, César Díaz; Xu, April; Zou, Qin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Xuefeng; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures of each individual particles of asymmetric and flexible proteins is essential in understanding those proteins’ functions; but their structures are difficult to determine. Electron tomography (ET) provides a tool for imaging a single and unique biological object from a series of tilted angles, but it is challenging to image a single protein for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction due to the imperfect mechanical control capability of the specimen goniometer under both a medium to high magnification (approximately 50,000–160,000×) and an optimized beam coherence condition. Here, we report a fully mechanical control method for automating ET data acquisition without using beam tilt/shift processes. This method could reduce the accumulation of beam tilt/shift that used to compensate the error from the mechanical control, but downgraded the beam coherence. Our method was developed by minimizing the error of the target object center during the tilting process through a closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm. The validations by both negative staining (NS) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) suggest that this method has a comparable capability to other ET methods in tracking target proteins while maintaining optimized beam coherence conditions for imaging.

  1. Combined scanning transmission electron microscopy tilt- and focal series.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Lupini, Andrew R; Kübel, Christian; Slusallek, Philipp; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt-focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller "missing wedge" artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  2. Protein Secondary Structure Determination by Constrained Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations necessary for 3D reconstruction. Here, we propose “constrained single-particle tomography” as a general strategy for 3D structure determination in cryo-EM. A key component of our approach is the effective use of images recorded in tilt series to extract high-resolution information and correct for the contrast transfer function. By incorporating geometric constraints into the refinement to improve orientational accuracy of images, we reduce model bias and overrefinement artifacts and demonstrate that protein structures can be determined at resolutions of ~8 Å starting from low-dose tomographic tilt series. PMID:23217682

  3. Quantitative determination of the mineral distribution in different collagen zones of calcifying tendon using high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, B. F.; Song, M. J.; Landis, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    High voltage electron microscopic tomography was used to make the first quantitative determination of the distribution of mineral between different regions of collagen fibrils undergoing early calcification in normal leg tendons of the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. The tomographic 3-D reconstruction was computed from a tilt series of 61 different views spanning an angular range of +/- 60 degrees in 2 degrees intervals. Successive applications of an interactive computer operation were used to mask the collagen banding pattern of either hole or overlap zones into separate versions of the reconstruction. In such 3-D volumes, regions specified by the mask retained their original image density while the remaining volume was set to background levels. This approach was also applied to the mineral crystals present in the same volumes to yield versions of the 3-D reconstructions that were masked for both the crystal mass and the respective collagen zones. Density profiles from these volumes contained a distinct peak corresponding only to the crystal mass. A comparison of the integrated density of this peak from each profile established that 64% of the crystals observed were located in the collagen hole zones and 36% were found in the overlap zones. If no changes in crystal stability occur once crystals are formed, this result suggests the possibilities that nucleation of mineral is preferentially and initially associated with the hole zones, nucleation occurs more frequently in the hole zones, the rate of crystal growth is more rapid in the hole zones, or a combination of these alternatives. All lead to the conclusion that the overall accumulation of mineral mass is predominant in the collagen hole zones compared to overlap zones during early collagen fibril calcification.

  4. Application of electron tomography to fungal ultrastructure studies.

    PubMed

    Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F; Uchida, Maho; van de Meene, Allison M L; Garret, Matthew; Hjelm, Brooke E; Kokoori, Shylaja; Roberson, Robert W

    2006-01-01

    Access to structural information at the nanoscale enables fundamental insights into many complex biological systems. The development of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) has vastly increased our understanding of multiple biological systems. However, when attempting to visualize and understand the organizational and functional complexities that are typical of cells and tissues, the standard 2-D analyses that TEM affords often fall short. In recent years, high-resolution electron tomography methods, coupled with advances in specimen preparation and instrumentation and computational speed, have resulted in a revolution in the biological sciences. Electron tomography is analogous to medical computerized axial tomography (CAT-scan imaging) except at a far finer scale. It utilizes the TEM to assemble multiple projections of an object which are then combined for 3-D analyses. For biological specimens, tomography enables the highest 3-D resolution (5 nm spatial resolution) of internal structures in relatively thick slices of material (0.2-0.4 microm) without requiring the collection and alignment of large numbers of thin serial sections. Thus accurate and revealing 3-D reconstructions of complex cytoplasmic entities and architecture can be obtained. Electron tomography is now being applied to a variety of biological questions with great success. This review gives a brief introduction into cryopreservation and electron tomography relative to aspects of cytoplasmic organization in the hyphal tip of Aspergillus nidulans.

  5. Cryo-scanning transmission electron tomography of vitrified cells.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sharon Grayer; Houben, Lothar; Elbaum, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) of fully hydrated, vitrified biological specimens has emerged as a vital tool for biological research. For cellular studies, the conventional imaging modality of transmission electron microscopy places stringent constraints on sample thickness because of its dependence on phase coherence for contrast generation. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using scanning transmission electron microscopy for cryo-tomography of unstained vitrified specimens (CSTET). We compare CSTET and CET for the imaging of whole bacteria and human tissue culture cells, finding favorable contrast and detail in the CSTET reconstructions. Particularly at high sample tilts, the CSTET signals contain more informative data than energy-filtered CET phase contrast images, resulting in improved depth resolution. Careful control over dose delivery permits relatively high cumulative exposures before the onset of observable beam damage. The increase in acceptable specimen thickness broadens the applicability of electron cryo-tomography.

  6. Characterization of Septin Ultrastructure in Budding Yeast Using Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Aurélie; Nogales, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Summary Septins are essential for the completion of cytokinesis. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, septins are located at the bud neck during mitosis and are closely connected to the inner plasma membrane. In vitro, yeast septins have been shown to self-assemble into a variety of filamentous structures, including rods, paired filaments, bundles and rings [1–3]. Using electron tomography of freeze-substituted section and cryo-electron tomography of frozen sections, we determined the three dimensional organization of the septin cytoskeleton in dividing budding yeast with molecular resolution [4,5]. Here we describe the detailed procedures used for our characterization of the septin cellular ultrastructure. PMID:26519309

  7. Self-assembly of biaxial discorectangular lead carbonate nanosheets into stacked ribbons studied by SAXS and HAADF-STEM tomographic tilt series.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Vad, T; Heidelmann, M; Weirich, T E; Sager, W F C

    2014-12-21

    The self-assembling behaviour of 2.6 nm thin PbCO3 nanoplatelets with discorectangular shape and uniform width and thickness occurring after their formation in nonionic water-in-oil microemulsions has been investigated using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). The presence of attractive depletion forces originating from the ubiquitous microemulsion droplets triggers a new type of superstructure at low particle concentration. Instead of the universally observed formation of face-to-face assembled lamellar mesostructures, the nanosheets self-organise into extended ribbon structures, whereby each on top lying sheet is displaced by a constant shift in the length and width directions leading to a so far unprecedented staggered zigzag-type stack assembly with restricted height. This type of stacking gives rise to a complex interference pattern in the isotropic small angle scattering of the stacked ribbon assemblies (SRAs) in reverse micellar solution. Different to the, for lamellar-structured nanosheets typical, diffraction peaks at multiples of the wave vector corresponding to one particular repeat distance, the scattering peaks measured in this study are asymmetric, displaying a shoulder on their low wave vector side. The asymmetric shape of the observed face-to-face correlation peaks indicates that the SRAs do not extend in one direction only. Their scattering behaviour is analysed by expanding the Kratky-Porod structure factor for stacking plates into three dimensions. High-angle annular dark-field (HAADF)-STEM tilt series have complementary been acquired to retrieve three-dimensional structural information on the SRAs in the dry state and to confirm the model used for the refinement of the SAXS data.

  8. Cryo-electron tomography of motile cilia and flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography has been a valuable tool in the analysis of 3D structures of cilia at molecular and cellular levels. It opened a way to reconstruct 3D conformations of proteins in cilia at 3-nm resolution, revealed networks of a number of component proteins in cilia, and has even allowed the study of component dynamics. In particular, we have identified the locations and conformations of all the regular inner and outer dyneins, as well as various regulators such as radial spokes. Since the mid 2000s, cryo-electron tomography has provided us with new knowledge, concepts, and questions in the area of cilia research. Now, after nearly 10 years of application of this technique, we are turning a corner and are at the stage to discuss the next steps. We expect further development of this technique for specimen preparation, data acquisition, and analysis. While combining this tool with other methodologies has already made cryo-electron tomography more biologically significant, we need to continue this cooperation using recently developed biotechnology and cell biology approaches. In this review, we will provide an up-to-date overview of the biological insights obtained by cryo-electron tomography and will discuss future possibilities of this technique in the context of cilia research.

  9. Non-rigid alignment in electron tomography in materials science.

    PubMed

    Printemps, Tony; Bernier, Nicolas; Bleuet, Pierre; Mula, Guido; Hervé, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    Electron tomography is a key technique that enables the visualization of an object in three dimensions with a resolution of about a nanometre. High-quality 3D reconstruction is possible thanks to the latest compressed sensing algorithms and/or better alignment and preprocessing of the 2D projections. Rigid alignment of 2D projections is routine in electron tomography. However, it cannot correct misalignments induced by (i) deformations of the sample due to radiation damage or (ii) drifting of the sample during the acquisition of an image in scanning transmission electron microscope mode. In both cases, those misalignments can give rise to artefacts in the reconstruction. We propose a simple-to-implement non-rigid alignment technique to correct those artefacts. This technique is particularly suited for needle-shaped samples in materials science. It is initiated by a rigid alignment of the projections and it is then followed by several rigid alignments of different parts of the projections. Piecewise linear deformations are applied to each projection to force them to simultaneously satisfy the rigid alignments of the different parts. The efficiency of this technique is demonstrated on three samples, an intermetallic sample with deformation misalignments due to a high electron dose typical to spectroscopic electron tomography, a porous silicon sample with an extremely thin end particularly sensitive to electron beam and another porous silicon sample that was drifting during image acquisitions.

  10. Cryo-electron tomography of vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Cyrklaff, Marek; Risco, Cristina; Fernández, Jose Jesús; Jiménez, Maria Victoria; Estéban, Mariano; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Carrascosa, José L.

    2005-01-01

    The combination of cryo-microscopy and electron tomographic reconstruction has allowed us to determine the structure of one of the more complex viruses, intracellular mature vaccinia virus, at a resolution of 4–6 nm. The tomographic reconstruction allows us to dissect the different structural components of the viral particle, avoiding projection artifacts derived from previous microscopic observations. A surface-rendering representation revealed brick-shaped viral particles with slightly rounded edges and dimensions of ≈360 × 270 × 250 nm. The outer layer was consistent with a lipid membrane (5–6 nm thick), below which usually two lateral bodies were found, built up by a heterogeneous material without apparent ordering or repetitive features. The internal core presented an inner cavity with electron dense coils of presumptive DNA–protein complexes, together with areas of very low density. The core was surrounded by two layers comprising an overall thickness of ≈18–19 nm; the inner layer was consistent with a lipid membrane. The outer layer was discontinuous, formed by a periodic palisade built by the side interaction of T-shaped protein spikes that were anchored in the lower membrane and were arranged into small hexagonal crystallites. It was possible to detect a few pore-like structures that communicated the inner side of the core with the region outside the layer built by the T-shaped spike palisade. PMID:15699328

  11. Electron beam tomography of magnetic recording head fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, R. P.; Liu, Y.; Martin, J. L.; Arnoldussen, T. C.

    1995-09-01

    The quantitative evaluation of the 3D form of the magnetic field from a thin film recording head has been achieved by electron beam tomography. The data sets for tomographic reconstruction were obtained using the differential phase contrast mode of Lorentz electron microscopy applied in a 200 kV (scanning) transmission instrument. The high accelerating voltage and a novel method of mounting the head in the microscope offer advantages over previous experiments. The two reconstruction algorithms, which have been used previously, have been implemented and the results of their application are compared for theoretical data derived from a model head field and for data obtained experimentally from a production recording head.

  12. Robust membrane detection based on tensor voting for electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sanchez, Antonio; Garcia, Inmaculada; Asano, Shoh; Lucic, Vladan; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus

    2014-04-01

    Electron tomography enables three-dimensional (3D) visualization and analysis of the subcellular architecture at a resolution of a few nanometers. Segmentation of structural components present in 3D images (tomograms) is often necessary for their interpretation. However, it is severely hampered by a number of factors that are inherent to electron tomography (e.g. noise, low contrast, distortion). Thus, there is a need for new and improved computational methods to facilitate this challenging task. In this work, we present a new method for membrane segmentation that is based on anisotropic propagation of the local structural information using the tensor voting algorithm. The local structure at each voxel is then refined according to the information received from other voxels. Because voxels belonging to the same membrane have coherent structural information, the underlying global structure is strengthened. In this way, local information is easily integrated at a global scale to yield segmented structures. This method performs well under low signal-to-noise ratio typically found in tomograms of vitrified samples under cryo-tomography conditions and can bridge gaps present on membranes. The performance of the method is demonstrated by applications to tomograms of different biological samples and by quantitative comparison with standard template matching procedure.

  13. Physically motivated global alignment method for electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Sanders, Toby; Prange, Micah; Akatay, Cem; ...

    2015-04-08

    Electron tomography is widely used for nanoscale determination of 3-D structures in many areas of science. Determining the 3-D structure of a sample from electron tomography involves three major steps: acquisition of sequence of 2-D projection images of the sample with the electron microscope, alignment of the images to a common coordinate system, and 3-D reconstruction and segmentation of the sample from the aligned image data. The resolution of the 3-D reconstruction is directly influenced by the accuracy of the alignment, and therefore, it is crucial to have a robust and dependable alignment method. In this paper, we develop amore » new alignment method which avoids the use of markers and instead traces the computed paths of many identifiable ‘local’ center-of-mass points as the sample is rotated. Compared with traditional correlation schemes, the alignment method presented here is resistant to cumulative error observed from correlation techniques, has very rigorous mathematical justification, and is very robust since many points and paths are used, all of which inevitably improves the quality of the reconstruction and confidence in the scientific results.« less

  14. Physically motivated global alignment method for electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Toby; Prange, Micah; Akatay, Cem; Binev, Peter

    2015-04-08

    Electron tomography is widely used for nanoscale determination of 3-D structures in many areas of science. Determining the 3-D structure of a sample from electron tomography involves three major steps: acquisition of sequence of 2-D projection images of the sample with the electron microscope, alignment of the images to a common coordinate system, and 3-D reconstruction and segmentation of the sample from the aligned image data. The resolution of the 3-D reconstruction is directly influenced by the accuracy of the alignment, and therefore, it is crucial to have a robust and dependable alignment method. In this paper, we develop a new alignment method which avoids the use of markers and instead traces the computed paths of many identifiable ‘local’ center-of-mass points as the sample is rotated. Compared with traditional correlation schemes, the alignment method presented here is resistant to cumulative error observed from correlation techniques, has very rigorous mathematical justification, and is very robust since many points and paths are used, all of which inevitably improves the quality of the reconstruction and confidence in the scientific results.

  15. Understanding Cellulose Through Molecular Simulation and Electron Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution cellulose crystal structures have been determined from diffraction experiments using large diameter microfibrils as the sample material. However, cellulose microfibrils in plants are much smaller in diameter, and are more difficult to directly examine experimentally. Molecular dynamics simulation combined with quantum chemical calculations can help to elucidate the structure and dynamics of small diameter cellulose microfibrils. These simulation techniques also aid in the interpretation of electron tomography volumetric structural data from maize cell walls, where pretreatment with dilute acid or ammonia reveals microfibril geometry.

  16. Correlated cryogenic photoactivated localization microscopy and cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Songye; Tocheva, Elitza I; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Löbach, Stephanie; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-07-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) produces three-dimensional images of cells in a near-native state at macromolecular resolution, but identifying structures of interest can be challenging. Here we describe a correlated cryo-PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy)-CET method for localizing objects within cryo-tomograms to beyond the diffraction limit of the light microscope. Using cryo-PALM-CET, we identified multiple and new conformations of the dynamic type VI secretion system in the crowded interior of Myxococcus xanthus.

  17. Recent Advances in Electron Tomography: TEM and HAADF-STEM Tomography for Materials Science and IC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kubel, C; Voigt, A; Schoenmakers, R; Otten, M; Su, D; Lee, T; Carlsson, A; Engelmann, H; Bradley, J

    2005-11-09

    Electron tomograph tomography is a well y well-established technique for three-dimensional structure determination of (almost) amorphous specimens in life science applications. With the recent advances in nanotechnology and the semiconductor industry, there is also an increasing need for high-resolution 3D structural information in physical sciences. In this paper, we evaluate the capabilities and limitations of TEM and HAADF-STEM tomography for the 3D structural characterization of partially crystalline to highly crystalline materials. Our analysis of catalysts, a hydrogen storage material, and different semiconductor devices shows that features with a diameter as small as 1-2 nm can be resolved in 3D by electron tomography. For partially crystalline materials with small single crystalline domains, TEM tomography provides reliable 3D structural information. HAADF-STEM tomography is more versatile and can also be used for high-resolution 3D imaging of highly crystalline materials such as semiconductor devices.

  18. Mineral and organic matrix interaction in normally calcifying tendon visualized in three dimensions by high-voltage electron microscopic tomography and graphic image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Song, M. J.; Leith, A.; McEwen, L.; McEwen, B. F.

    1993-01-01

    To define the ultrastructural accommodation of mineral crystals by collagen fibrils and other organic matrix components during vertebrate calcification, electron microscopic 3-D reconstructions were generated from the normally mineralizing leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Embedded specimens containing initial collagen mineralizing sites were cut into 0.5-micron-thick sections and viewed and photographed at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high-voltage electron microscope. Tomographic 3-D reconstructions were computed from a 2 degree tilt series of micrographs taken over a minimum angular range of +/- 60 degrees. Reconstructions of longitudinal tendon profiles confirm the presence of irregularly shaped mineral platelets, whose crystallographic c-axes are oriented generally parallel to one another and directed along the collagen long axes. The reconstructions also corroborate observations of a variable crystal length (up to 170 nm measured along crystallographic c-axes), the presence of crystals initially in either the hole or overlap zones of collagen, and crystal growth in the c-axis direction beyond these zones into adjacent overlap and other hole regions. Tomography shows for the first time that crystal width varies (30-45 nm) but crystal thickness is uniform (approximately 4-6 nm at the resolution limit of tomography); more crystals are located in the collagen hole zones than in the overlap regions at the earliest stages of tendon mineralization; the crystallographic c-axes of the platelets lie within +/- 15-20 degrees of one another rather than being perfectly parallel; adjacent platelets are spatially separated by a minimum of 4.2 +/- 1.0 nm; crystals apparently fuse in coplanar alignment to form larger platelets; development of crystals in width occurs to dimensions beyond single collagen hole zones; and a thin envelope of organic origin may be present along or just beneath the surfaces of individual mineral platelets. Implicit in the

  19. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  20. Mapping synapses by conjugate light-electron array tomography.

    PubMed

    Collman, Forrest; Buchanan, JoAnn; Phend, Kristen D; Micheva, Kristina D; Weinberg, Richard J; Smith, Stephen J

    2015-04-08

    Synapses of the mammalian CNS are diverse in size, structure, molecular composition, and function. Synapses in their myriad variations are fundamental to neural circuit development, homeostasis, plasticity, and memory storage. Unfortunately, quantitative analysis and mapping of the brain's heterogeneous synapse populations has been limited by the lack of adequate single-synapse measurement methods. Electron microscopy (EM) is the definitive means to recognize and measure individual synaptic contacts, but EM has only limited abilities to measure the molecular composition of synapses. This report describes conjugate array tomography (AT), a volumetric imaging method that integrates immunofluorescence and EM imaging modalities in voxel-conjugate fashion. We illustrate the use of conjugate AT to advance the proteometric measurement of EM-validated single-synapse analysis in a study of mouse cortex.

  1. 3D Observation of GEMS by Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, Junya; Miyake, Akira; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Messenger, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous silicates in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) coming from comets are dominated by glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS). GEMS grains are submicron-sized rounded objects (typically 100-500) nm in diameter) with anaometer-sized (10-50 nm) Fe-Ni metal and sulfide grains embedded in an amorphous silicate matrix. Several formation processes for GEMS grains have been proposed so far, but these models are still being debated [2-5]. Bradley et al. proposed that GEMS grains are interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk and that they are amorphiation products of crystalline silicates in the interstellar medium by sputter-deposition of cosmic ray irradiation, similar to space weathering [2,4]. This consideration is based on the observation of nano-sized crystals (approximately 10 nm) called relict grains in GEMS grains and their shapes are pseudomorphs to the host GEMS grains. On the other hand, Keller and Messenger proposed that most GEMS formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas [3,5]. This model is based on the fact that most GEMS grains have solar isotopic compositions and have extremely heterogeneous and non-solar elemental compositions. Keller and Messenger (2011) also reported that amorphous silicates in GEMS grains are surrounded by sulfide grains, which formed as sulfidization of metallic iron grains located on the GEMS surface. The previous studies were performed with 2D observation by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). In order to understand the structure of GEMS grains described above more clearly, we observed 3D structure of GEMS grains by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL) at Kyoto University. Electron tomography gives not only 3D structures but also gives higher spatial resolution (approximately a few nm) than that in conventional 2D image, which is restricted by

  2. Model based iterative reconstruction for Bright Field electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, Singanallur V.; Drummy, Lawrence F.; De Graef, Marc; Simmons, Jeff P.; Bouman, Charles A.

    2013-02-01

    Bright Field (BF) electron tomography (ET) has been widely used in the life sciences to characterize biological specimens in 3D. While BF-ET is the dominant modality in the life sciences it has been generally avoided in the physical sciences due to anomalous measurements in the data due to a phenomenon called "Bragg scatter" - visible when crystalline samples are imaged. These measurements cause undesirable artifacts in the reconstruction when the typical algorithms such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT) are applied to the data. Model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) provides a powerful framework for tomographic reconstruction that incorporates a model for data acquisition, noise in the measurement and a model for the object to obtain reconstructions that are qualitatively superior and quantitatively accurate. In this paper we present a novel MBIR algorithm for BF-ET which accounts for the presence of anomalous measurements from Bragg scatter in the data during the iterative reconstruction. Our method accounts for the anomalies by formulating the reconstruction as minimizing a cost function which rejects measurements that deviate significantly from the typical Beer's law model widely assumed for BF-ET. Results on simulated as well as real data show that our method can dramatically improve the reconstructions compared to FBP and MBIR without anomaly rejection, suppressing the artifacts due to the Bragg anomalies.

  3. Electron Tomography Reveals the Steps in Filovirus Budding

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Sonja; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Krähling, Verena; Riches, James D.; Becker, Stephan; Briggs, John A. G.

    2010-01-01

    The filoviruses, Marburg and Ebola, are non-segmented negative-strand RNA viruses causing severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality rates in humans and nonhuman primates. The sequence of events that leads to release of filovirus particles from cells is poorly understood. Two contrasting mechanisms have been proposed, one proceeding via a “submarine-like” budding with the helical nucleocapsid emerging parallel to the plasma membrane, and the other via perpendicular “rocket-like” protrusion. Here we have infected cells with Marburg virus under BSL-4 containment conditions, and reconstructed the sequence of steps in the budding process in three dimensions using electron tomography of plastic-embedded cells. We find that highly infectious filamentous particles are released at early stages in infection. Budding proceeds via lateral association of intracellular nucleocapsid along its whole length with the plasma membrane, followed by rapid envelopment initiated at one end of the nucleocapsid, leading to a protruding intermediate. Scission results in local membrane instability at the rear of the virus. After prolonged infection, increased vesiculation of the plasma membrane correlates with changes in shape and infectivity of released viruses. Our observations demonstrate a cellular determinant of virus shape. They reconcile the contrasting models of filovirus budding and allow us to describe the sequence of events taking place during budding and release of Marburg virus. We propose that this represents a general sequence of events also followed by other filamentous and rod-shaped viruses. PMID:20442788

  4. Noninvasive coronary artery angiography using electron beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberger, John A.; Rensing, Benno J.; Reed, Judd E.; Ritman, Erik L.; Sheedy, Patrick F., II

    1996-04-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), also known as ultrafast-CT or cine-CT, uses a unique scanning architecture which allows for multiple high spatial resolution electrocardiographic triggered images of the beating heart. A recent study has demonstrated the feasibility of qualitative comparisons between EBCT derived 3D coronary angiograms and invasive angiography. Stenoses of the proximal portions of the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries were readily identified, but description of atherosclerotic narrowing in the left circumflex artery (and distal epicardial disease) was not possible with any degree of confidence. Although these preliminary studies support the notion that this approach has potential, the images overall were suboptimal for clinical application as an adjunct to invasive angiography. Furthermore, these studies did not examine different methods of EBCT scan acquisition, tomographic slice thicknesses, extent of scan overlap, or other segmentation, thresholding, and interpolation algorithms. Our laboratory has initiated investigation of these aspects and limitations of EBCT coronary angiography. Specific areas of research include defining effects of cardiac orientation; defining the effects of tomographic slice thickness and intensity (gradient) versus positional (shaped based) interpolation; and defining applicability of imaging each of the major epicardial coronary arteries for quantitative definition of vessel size, cross-sectional area, taper, and discrete vessel narrowing.

  5. Advanced prior modeling for 3D bright field electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreehari, Suhas; Venkatakrishnan, S. V.; Drummy, Lawrence F.; Simmons, Jeffrey P.; Bouman, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Many important imaging problems in material science involve reconstruction of images containing repetitive non-local structures. Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) could in principle exploit such redundancies through the selection of a log prior probability term. However, in practice, determining such a log prior term that accounts for the similarity between distant structures in the image is quite challenging. Much progress has been made in the development of denoising algorithms like non-local means and BM3D, and these are known to successfully capture non-local redundancies in images. But the fact that these denoising operations are not explicitly formulated as cost functions makes it unclear as to how to incorporate them in the MBIR framework. In this paper, we formulate a solution to bright field electron tomography by augmenting the existing bright field MBIR method to incorporate any non-local denoising operator as a prior model. We accomplish this using a framework we call plug-and-play priors that decouples the log likelihood and the log prior probability terms in the MBIR cost function. We specifically use 3D non-local means (NLM) as the prior model in the plug-and-play framework, and showcase high quality tomographic reconstructions of a simulated aluminum spheres dataset, and two real datasets of aluminum spheres and ferritin structures. We observe that streak and smear artifacts are visibly suppressed, and that edges are preserved. Also, we report lower RMSE values compared to the conventional MBIR reconstruction using qGGMRF as the prior model.

  6. STEM Tomography Imaging of Hypertrophied Golgi Stacks in Mucilage-Secreting Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Because of the weak penetrating power of electrons, the signal-to-noise ratio of a transmission electron micrograph (TEM) worsens as section thickness increases. This problem is alleviated by the use of the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Tomography analyses using STEM of thick sections from yeast and mammalian cells are of higher quality than are bright-field (BF) images. In this study, we compared regular BF tomograms and STEM tomograms from 500-nm thick sections from hypertrophied Golgi stacks of alfalfa root cap cells. Due to their thickness and intense heavy metal staining, BF tomograms of the thick sections suffer from poor contrast and high noise levels. We were able to mitigate these drawbacks by using STEM tomography. When we performed STEM tomography of densely stained chloroplasts of Arabidopsis cotyledon, we observed similar improvements relative to BF tomograms. A longer time is required to collect a STEM tilt series than similar BF TEM images, and dynamic autofocusing required for STEM imaging often fails at high tilt angles. Despite these limitations, STEM tomography is a powerful method for analyzing structures of large or dense organelles of plant cells.

  7. Formation of bimetallic clusters in superfluid helium nanodroplets analysed by atomic resolution electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haberfehlner, Georg; Thaler, Philipp; Knez, Daniel; Volk, Alexander; Hofer, Ferdinand; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Kothleitner, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Structure, shape and composition are the basic parameters responsible for properties of nanoscale materials, distinguishing them from their bulk counterparts. To reveal these in three dimensions at the nanoscale, electron tomography is a powerful tool. Advancing electron tomography to atomic resolution in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope remains challenging and has been demonstrated only a few times using strong constraints or extensive filtering. Here we demonstrate atomic resolution electron tomography on silver/gold core/shell nanoclusters grown in superfluid helium nanodroplets. We reveal morphology and composition of a cluster identifying gold- and silver-rich regions in three dimensions and we estimate atomic positions without using any prior information and with minimal filtering. The ability to get full three-dimensional information down to the atomic scale allows understanding the growth and deposition process of the nanoclusters and demonstrates an approach that may be generally applicable to all types of nanoscale materials. PMID:26508471

  8. [Value and future of electron beam computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Kirchgeorg, M; Plainfossé, M C; Hernigou, A

    1994-12-01

    Mecanic computed tomography would probably never reach the acquisition brevity obtained by EBT. This machine is the best for exploration of cardiovascular diseases, and non cooperative patients, and for cine and flow studies. Morever, there are never tube cooling delays or interruptions in any procedures. Its disadvantages are the price, the impossibility to tilt the gantry, and the computer which are to be improved. With "Evolution", Siemens proposes now improvements with the CVS mode and a computer release without increasing of the price.

  9. Assessment of coronary bypass graft patency by electron-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Abdel Aziz, Tarek A; Kumar, Pramod; Bazargani, Nooshin; Al-Hato, Eman; Al Khaja, Najib

    2003-06-01

    Twenty-one patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively evaluated by conventional selective coronary angiography and electron-beam computed tomography. Eighty bypass grafts (60 saphenous vein and 20 left or right internal mammary artery) were evaluated for patency. The sensitivity and specificity of electron-beam computed tomography were 72% and 100%, respectively; positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 92.5%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity according to coronary region were: left anterior descending artery, 33% and 100%; diagonal artery, 67% and 100%; circumflex artery, 75% and 100%; right coronary artery, 100% and 100%. Electron-beam computed tomography is relatively accurate and a promising tool for noninvasive evaluation of graft patency after coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

  10. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged.

  11. TEM, HRTEM, electron holography and electron tomography studies of gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles in Inconel 718 superalloy.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, B; Kruk, A; Stepniowska, E; Cempura, G; Geiger, D; Formanek, P; Hernandez, J; Midgley, P; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the study was the identification of gamma' and gamma'' strengthening precipitates in a commercial nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 (Ni-19Fe-18Cr-5Nb-3Mo-1Ti-0.5Al-0.04C, wt %) using TEM dark-field, HRTEM, electron holography and electron tomography imaging. To identify gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles unambiguously, a systematic analysis of experimental and theoretical diffraction patterns were performed. Using HRTEM method it was possible to analyse small areas of precipitates appearance. Electron holography and electron tomography techniques show new possibilities of visualization of gamma' and gamma'' nanoparticles. The analysis by means of different complementary TEM methods showed that gamma'' particles exhibit a shape of thin plates, while gamma' phase precipitates are almost spherical.

  12. Telocytes and putative stem cells in the lungs: electron microscopy, electron tomography and laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Suciu, Laura C; Manole, Catalin G; Hinescu, Mihail E

    2011-09-01

    This study describes a novel type of interstitial (stromal) cell - telocytes (TCs) - in the human and mouse respiratory tree (terminal and respiratory bronchioles, as well as alveolar ducts). TCs have recently been described in pleura, epicardium, myocardium, endocardium, intestine, uterus, pancreas, mammary gland, etc. (see www.telocytes.com ). TCs are cells with specific prolongations called telopodes (Tp), frequently two to three per cell. Tp are very long prolongations (tens up to hundreds of μm) built of alternating thin segments known as podomers (≤ 200 nm, below the resolving power of light microscope) and dilated segments called podoms, which accommodate mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum and caveolae. Tp ramify dichotomously, making a 3-dimensional network with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. Confocal microscopy reveals that TCs are c-kit- and CD34-positive. Tp release shed vesicles or exosomes, sending macromolecular signals to neighboring cells and eventually modifying their transcriptional activity. At bronchoalveolar junctions, TCs have been observed in close association with putative stem cells (SCs) in the subepithelial stroma. SCs are recognized by their ultrastructure and Sca-1 positivity. Tp surround SCs, forming complex TC-SC niches (TC-SCNs). Electron tomography allows the identification of bridging nanostructures, which connect Tp with SCs. In conclusion, this study shows the presence of TCs in lungs and identifies a TC-SC tandem in subepithelial niches of the bronchiolar tree. In TC-SCNs, the synergy of TCs and SCs may be based on nanocontacts and shed vesicles.

  13. Annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography of polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kangbo; Sourty, Erwan; Loos, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    We have utilized bright-field conventional transmission electron microscopy tomography and annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography to characterize a well-defined carbon black (CB)-filled polymer nanocomposite with known CB volume concentration. For both imaging methods, contrast can be generated between the CB and the surrounding polymer matrix. The involved contrast mechanisms, in particular for ADF-STEM, will be discussed in detail. The obtained volume reconstructions were analysed and the CB volume concentrations were carefully determined from the reconstructed data. For both imaging modes, the measured CB volume concentrations are substantially different and only quantification based on the ADF-STEM data revealed about the same value as the known CB loading. Moreover, when applying low-convergence angles for imaging ADF-STEM tomography, data can be obtained of micrometre-thick samples.

  14. Scanning precession electron tomography for three-dimensional nanoscale orientation imaging and crystallographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eggeman, Alexander S.; Krakow, Robert; Midgley, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from electron tomography provide important morphological, compositional, optical and electro-magnetic information across a wide range of materials and devices. Precession electron diffraction, in combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy, can be used to elucidate the local orientation of crystalline materials. Here we show, using the example of a Ni-base superalloy, that combining these techniques and extending them to three dimensions, to produce scanning precession electron tomography, enables the 3D orientation of nanoscale sub-volumes to be determined and provides a one-to-one correspondence between 3D real space and 3D reciprocal space for almost any polycrystalline or multi-phase material. PMID:26028514

  15. A novel dual-axis reconstruction algorithm for electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Jenna; Midgley, Paul

    2006-02-01

    A new algorithm for computing electron microscopy tomograms which combines iterative methods with dual-axis geometry is presented. Initial modelling using test data shows several improvements over both the weighted back-projection (WBP) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT) method, and, with increased stability and tomogram fidelity under high-noise conditions.

  16. In-situ straining and time-resolved electron tomography data acquisition in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hata, S; Miyazaki, S; Gondo, T; Kawamoto, K; Horii, N; Sato, K; Furukawa, H; Kudo, H; Miyazaki, H; Murayama, M

    2016-12-18

    This paper reports the preliminary results of a new in-situ three-dimensional (3D) imaging system for observing plastic deformation behavior in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) as a directly relevant development of the recently reported straining-and-tomography holder [Sato K et al (2015) Development of a novel straining holder for transmission electron microscopy compatible with single tilt-axis electron tomography. Microsc. 64: 369-375]. We designed an integrated system using the holder and newly developed straining and image-acquisition software and then developed an experimental procedure for in-situ straining and time-resolved electron tomography (ET) data acquisition. The software for image acquisition and 3D visualization was developed based on the commercially available ET software TEMography(TM) We achieved time-resolved 3D visualization of nanometer-scale plastic deformation behavior in a Pb-Sn alloy sample, thus demonstrating the capability of this system for potential applications in materials science.

  17. Computational resources for cryo-electron tomography in Bsoft.

    PubMed

    Heymann, J Bernard; Cardone, Giovanni; Winkler, Dennis C; Steven, Alasdair C

    2008-03-01

    The Bsoft package [Heymann, J.B., Belnap, D.M., 2007. Bsoft: image processing and molecular modeling for electron microscopy. J. Struct. Biol. 157, 3-18] has been enhanced by adding utilities for processing electron tomographic (ET) data; in particular, cryo-ET data characterized by low contrast and high noise. To handle the high computational load efficiently, a workflow was developed, based on the database-like parameter handling in Bsoft, aimed at minimizing user interaction and facilitating automation. To the same end, scripting elements distribute the processing among multiple processors on the same or different computers. The resolution of a tomogram depends on the precision of projection alignment, which is usually based on pinpointing fiducial markers (electron-dense gold particles). Alignment requires accurate specification of the tilt axis, and our protocol includes a procedure for determining it to adequate accuracy. Refinement of projection alignment provides information that allows assessment of its precision, as well as projection quality control. We implemented a reciprocal space algorithm that affords an alternative to back-projection or real space algorithms for calculating tomograms. Resources are also included that allow resolution assessment by cross-validation (NLOO2D); denoising and interpretation; and the extraction, mutual alignment, and averaging of tomographic sub-volumes.

  18. High-pressure freezing for scanning transmission electron tomography analysis of cellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Walther, Paul; Schmid, Eberhard; Höhn, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Using an electron microscope's scanning transmission mode (STEM) for collection of tomographic datasets is advantageous compared to bright field transmission electron microscopic (TEM). For image formation, inelastic scattering does not cause chromatic aberration, since in STEM mode no image forming lenses are used after the beam has passed the sample, in contrast to regular TEM. Therefore, thicker samples can be imaged. It has been experimentally demonstrated that STEM is superior to TEM and energy filtered TEM for tomography of samples as thick as 1 μm. Even when using the best electron microscope, adequate sample preparation is the key for interpretable results. We adapted protocols for high-pressure freezing of cultivated cells from a physiological state. In this chapter, we describe optimized high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution protocols for STEM tomography in order to obtain high membrane contrast.

  19. 'Big Bang' tomography as a new route to atomic-resolution electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Dirk; Jinschek, Joerg R; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2012-06-13

    Until now it has not been possible to image at atomic resolution using classical electron tomographic methods, except when the target is a perfectly crystalline nano-object imaged along a few zone axes. The main reasons are that mechanical tilting in an electron microscope with sub-ångström precision over a very large angular range is difficult, that many real-life objects such as dielectric layers in microelectronic devices impose geometrical constraints and that many radiation-sensitive objects such as proteins limit the total electron dose. Hence, there is a need for a new tomographic scheme that is able to deduce three-dimensional information from only one or a few projections. Here we present an electron tomographic method that can be used to determine, from only one viewing direction and with sub-ångström precision, both the position of individual atoms in the plane of observation and their vertical position. The concept is based on the fact that an experimentally reconstructed exit wave consists of the superposition of the spherical waves that have been scattered by the individual atoms of the object. Furthermore, the phase of a Fourier component of a spherical wave increases with the distance of propagation at a known 'phase speed'. If we assume that an atom is a point-like object, the relationship between the phase and the phase speed of each Fourier component is linear, and the distance between the atom and the plane of observation can therefore be determined by linear fitting. This picture has similarities with Big Bang cosmology, in which the Universe expands from a point-like origin such that the distance of any galaxy from the origin is linearly proportional to the speed at which it moves away from the origin (Hubble expansion). The proof of concept of the method has been demonstrated experimentally for graphene with a two-layer structure and it will work optimally for similar layered materials, such as boron nitride and molybdenum disulphide.

  20. Electron Tomography of Nascent Herpes Simplex Virus Virions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Joel D.; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Wills, Elizabeth; Mannella, Carmen; Marko, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were conventionally embedded or freeze substituted after high-pressure freezing and stained with uranyl acetate. Electron tomograms of capsids attached to or undergoing envelopment at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), capsids within cytoplasmic vesicles near the nuclear membrane, and extracellular virions revealed the following phenomena. (i) Nucleocapsids undergoing envelopment at the INM, or B capsids abutting the INM, were connected to thickened patches of the INM by fibers 8 to 19 nm in length and ≤5 nm in width. The fibers contacted both fivefold symmetrical vertices (pentons) and sixfold symmetrical faces (hexons) of the nucleocapsid, although relative to the respective frequencies of these subunits in the capsid, fibers engaged pentons more frequently than hexons. (ii) Fibers of similar dimensions bridged the virion envelope and surface of the nucleocapsid in perinuclear virions. (iii) The tegument of perinuclear virions was considerably less dense than that of extracellular virions; connecting fibers were observed in the former case but not in the latter. (iv) The prominent external spikes emanating from the envelope of extracellular virions were absent from perinuclear virions. (v) The virion envelope of perinuclear virions appeared denser and thicker than that of extracellular virions. (vi) Vesicles near, but apparently distinct from, the nuclear membrane in single sections were derived from extensions of the perinuclear space as seen in the electron tomograms. These observations suggest very different mechanisms of tegumentation and envelopment in extracellular compared with perinuclear virions and are consistent with application of the final tegument to unenveloped nucleocapsids in a compartment(s) distinct from the perinuclear space. PMID:17215293

  1. Three dimensional mapping of Fe dopants in ceria nanocrystals using direct spectroscopic electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Goris, Bart; Meledina, Maria; Turner, Stuart; Zhong, Zhichao; Batenburg, K Joost; Bals, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Electron tomography is a powerful technique for the 3D characterization of the morphology of nanostructures. Nevertheless, resolving the chemical composition of complex nanostructures in 3D remains challenging and the number of studies in which electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is combined with tomography is limited. During the last decade, dedicated reconstruction algorithms have been developed for HAADF-STEM tomography using prior knowledge about the investigated sample. Here, we will use the prior knowledge that the experimental spectrum of each reconstructed voxel is a linear combination of a well-known set of references spectra in a so-called direct spectroscopic tomography technique. Based on a simulation experiment, it is shown that this technique provides superior results in comparison to conventional reconstruction methods for spectroscopic data, especially for spectrum images containing a relatively low signal to noise ratio. Next, this technique is used to investigate the spatial distribution of Fe dopants in Fe:Ceria nanoparticles in 3D. It is shown that the presence of the Fe(2+) dopants is correlated with a reduction of the Ce atoms from Ce(4+) towards Ce(3+). In addition, it is demonstrated that most of the Fe dopants are located near the voids inside the nanoparticle.

  2. Mapping fullerene crystallization in a photovoltaic blend: an electron tomography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R.; Müller, Christian; Olsson, Eva

    2015-04-01

    The formation of fullerene crystals represents a major degradation pathway of polymer/fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films that inexorably deteriorates their photovoltaic performance. Currently no tools exist that reveal the origin of fullerene crystal formation vertically through the film. Here, we show that electron tomography can be used to study nucleation and growth of fullerene crystals. A model bulk-heterojunction blend based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative is examined after controlled annealing above the glass transition temperature. We image a number of fullerene nanocrystals, ranging in size from 70 to 400 nanometers, and observe that their center is located close to the free-surface of spin-coated films. The results show that the nucleation of fullerene crystals predominately occurs in the upper part of the films. Moreover, electron tomography reveals that the nucleation is preceded by more pronounced phase separation of the blend components.

  3. Mapping fullerene crystallization in a photovoltaic blend: an electron tomography study.

    PubMed

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Olsson, Eva

    2015-05-14

    The formation of fullerene crystals represents a major degradation pathway of polymer/fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films that inexorably deteriorates their photovoltaic performance. Currently no tools exist that reveal the origin of fullerene crystal formation vertically through the film. Here, we show that electron tomography can be used to study nucleation and growth of fullerene crystals. A model bulk-heterojunction blend based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative is examined after controlled annealing above the glass transition temperature. We image a number of fullerene nanocrystals, ranging in size from 70 to 400 nanometers, and observe that their center is located close to the free-surface of spin-coated films. The results show that the nucleation of fullerene crystals predominately occurs in the upper part of the films. Moreover, electron tomography reveals that the nucleation is preceded by more pronounced phase separation of the blend components.

  4. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella in a quiescent state revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Daniela; McIntosh, J. Richard; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    We have used cryo-electron tomography to investigate the 3D structure and macromolecular organization of intact, frozen-hydrated sea urchin sperm flagella in a quiescent state. The tomographic reconstructions provide information at a resolution better than 6 nm about the in situ arrangements of macromolecules that are key for flagellar motility. We have visualized the heptameric rings of the motor domains in the outer dynein arm complex and determined that they lie parallel to the plane that contains the axes of neighboring flagellar microtubules. Both the material associated with the central pair of microtubules and the radial spokes display a plane of symmetry that helps to explain the planar beat pattern of these flagella. Cryo-electron tomography has proven to be a powerful technique for helping us understand the relationships between flagellar structure and function and the design of macromolecular machines in situ. PMID:16246999

  5. Studying synapses in human brain with array tomography and electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Kevin R.; Smith, Colin; Wright, Ann K.; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Pooler, Amy M.; Koffie, Robert; Bastin, Mark E.; Bak, Thomas H.; Abrahams, Sharon; Kopeikina, Katherine J.; McGuone, Declan; Frosch, Matthew P.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Spires-Jones, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    Postmortem studies of synapses in human brain are problematic due to the axial resolution limit of light microscopy and the difficulty preserving and analyzing ultrastructure with electron microscopy. Array tomography overcomes these problems by embedding autopsy tissue in resin and cutting ribbons of ultrathin serial sections. Ribbons are imaged with immunofluorescence, allowing high-throughput imaging of tens of thousands of synapses to assess synapse density and protein composition. The protocol takes approximately 3 days per case, excluding image analysis, which is done at the end of the study. Parallel processing for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a protocol modified to preserve structure in human samples allows complimentary ultrastructural studies. Incorporation of array tomography and TEM into brain banking is a potent way of phenotyping synapses in well-characterized clinical cohorts to develop clinico-pathological correlations at the synapse level. This will be important for research in neurodegenerative disease, developmental diseases, and psychiatric illness. PMID:23787894

  6. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex.

  7. 3-D structures of crack-tip dislocations and their shielding effect revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masaki; Honda, Masaki; Sadamatsu, Sunao; Higashida, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    Three-dimensional structures of crack-tip dislocations in silicon crystals have been examined by combining scanning transmission electron microscopy and computed tomography. Cracks were introduced by a Vickers hardness tester at room temperature, and the sample was heated at 823 K for 1 h in order to introduce dislocations around the crack tips. Dislocation segments cut out from loops were observed around the crack tip, the three-dimensional structure of which was characterized by using by electron tomography. Their Burgers vectors including the sings were also determined by oscillating contrasts along dislocations. In order to investigate the effect of the dislocations on fracture behaviours, local stress intensity factor due to one dislocation was calculated, which indicates the dislocations observed were shielding type to increase fracture toughness.

  8. Classification and 3D averaging with missing wedge correction in biological electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, A.; Sprechmann, P.; Liu, J.; Randall, G.; Sapiro, G.; Subramaniam, S.

    2008-01-01

    Strategies for the determination of 3D structures of biological macromolecules using electron crystallography and single-particle electron microscopy utilize powerful tools for the averaging of information obtained from 2D projection images of structurally homogeneous specimens. In contrast, electron tomographic approaches have often been used to study the 3D structures of heterogeneous, one-of-a-kind objects such as whole cells where image-averaging strategies are not applicable. Complex entities such as cells and viruses, nevertheless, contain multiple copies of numerous macromolecules that can individually be subjected to 3D averaging. Here we present a complete framework for alignment, classification, and averaging of volumes derived by electron tomography that is computationally efficient and effectively accounts for the missing wedge that is inherent to limited-angle electron tomography. Modeling the missing data as a multiplying mask in reciprocal space we show that the effect of the missing wedge can be accounted for seamlessly in all alignment and classification operations. We solve the alignment problem using the convolution theorem in harmonic analysis, thus eliminating the need for approaches that require exhaustive angular search, and adopt an iterative approach to alignment and classification that does not require the use of external references. We demonstrate that our method can be successfully applied for 3D classification and averaging of phantom volumes as well as experimentally obtained tomograms of GroEL where the outcomes of the analysis can be quantitatively compared against the expected results. PMID:18440828

  9. Electron tomography: a short overview with an emphasis on the absorption potential model for the forward problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, D.; Öktem, O.

    2008-02-01

    This review of the development and current status of electron tomography deals mainly with the mathematical and algorithmic aspects. After a very brief description of the role of electron tomography in structural biology, we turn our attention to the derivation of the forward operator. Starting from the Schrödinger equation, the electron-specimen interaction is modelled as a diffraction tomography problem and the picture is completed by adding a description of the optical system of the transmission electron microscope. The first-order Born approximation enables one to explicitly express the intensity for any finite wavenumber in terms of the propagation operator acting on the specimen convolved with a point spread function, derived from the optics in the transmission electron microscope. Next, we focus on the difficulties that cause the reconstruction problem to be quite challenging. Special emphasis is put on explaining the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio in the data combined with the incomplete data problems, which lead to severe ill-posedness. The next step is to derive the standard phase contrast model used in the electron tomography community. The above-mentioned expression for the intensity generalizes the standard phase contrast model which can be obtained by replacing the propagation operator by its high-energy limit, the x-ray transform, as the wavenumber tends to infinity. The importance of more carefully including the wave nature of the electron-specimen interaction is supported by performing an asymptotic analysis of the intensity as the wavenumber tends to infinity. Next we provide an overview of the various reconstruction methods that have been employed in electron tomography and we conclude by mentioning a number of open problems. Besides providing an introduction to electron tomography written in the 'language of inverse problems', the authors hope to raise interest among experts in integral geometry and regularization theory for the

  10. An 8×8 Row-Column Summing Readout Electronics for Preclinical Positron Emission Tomography Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Y. C.; Sun, F. W.; MacDonald, L. R.; Otis, B. P.; Miyaoka, R. S.; McDougald, W.; Lewellen, T. K.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a row/column summing readout electronics for an 8×8 silicon photomultiplier array. The summation circuit greatly reduces the number of electronic channels, which is desirable for pursuing higher resolution positron emission tomography scanners. By using a degenerated common source topology in the summation circuit, more fan-in is possible and therefore a greater reduction in the number of electronic channels can be achieved. The timing signal is retrieved from a common anode, which allows the use of a single fast-sampling analog to digital converter (ADC) for the timing channel and slower, lower power ADCs for the 64 spatial channels. Preliminary results of one row summation of the 8×8 readout electronics exhibited FWHM energy resolution of 17.8% and 18.3% with and without multiplexing, respectively. The measured timing resolution is 2.9ns FWHM. PMID:20729983

  11. Comparisons of ionospheric electron density distributions reconstructed by GPS computerized tomography, backscatter ionograms, and vertical ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Lei, Yong; Li, Bofeng; An, Jiachun; Zhu, Peng; Jiang, Chunhua; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong; Ni, Binbin; Wang, Zemin; Zhou, Xuhua

    2015-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) computerized ionosphere tomography (CIT) and ionospheric sky wave ground backscatter radar are both capable of measuring the large-scale, two-dimensional (2-D) distributions of ionospheric electron density (IED). Here we report the spatial and temporal electron density results obtained by GPS CIT and backscatter ionogram (BSI) inversion for three individual experiments. Both the GPS CIT and BSI inversion techniques demonstrate the capability and the consistency of reconstructing large-scale IED distributions. To validate the results, electron density profiles obtained from GPS CIT and BSI inversion are quantitatively compared to the vertical ionosonde data, which clearly manifests that both methods output accurate information of ionopsheric electron density and thereby provide reliable approaches to ionospheric soundings. Our study can improve current understanding of the capability and insufficiency of these two methods on the large-scale IED reconstruction.

  12. Ultrafast Electron Diffraction Tomography for Structure Determination of the New Zeolite ITQ-58

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this work a new ultrafast data collection strategy for electron diffraction tomography is presented that allows reducing data acquisition time by one order of magnitude. This methodology minimizes the radiation damage of beam-sensitive materials, such as microporous materials. This method, combined with the precession of the electron beam, provides high quality data enabling the determination of very complex structures. Most importantly, the implementation of this new electron diffraction methodology is easily affordable in any modern electron microscope. As a proof of concept, we have solved a new highly complex zeolitic structure named ITQ-58, with a very low symmetry (triclinic) and a large unit cell volume (1874.6 Å3), containing 16 silicon and 32 oxygen atoms in its asymmetric unit, which would be very difficult to solve with the state of the art techniques. PMID:27478889

  13. Electron Tomography of Nanoparticle Clusters: Implications for Atmospheric Lifetimes and Radiative Forcing of Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanPoppel, Laura H.; Friedrich, Heiner; Spinsby, Jacob; Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld, John H.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in nature. Their large surface areas and consequent chemical reactivity typically result in their aggregation into clusters. Their chemical and physical properties depend on cluster shapes, which are commonly complex and unknown. This is the first application of electron tomography with a transmission electron microscope to quantitatively determine the three-dimensional (3D) shapes, volumes, and surface areas of nanoparticle clusters. We use soot (black carbon, BC) nanoparticles as an example because it is a major contributor to environmental degradation and global climate change. To the extent that our samples are representative, we find that quantitative measurements of soot surface areas and volumes derived from electron tomograms differ from geometrically derived values by, respectively, almost one and two orders of magnitude. Global sensitivity studies suggest that the global burden and direct radiative forcing of fractal BC are only about 60% of the value if it is assumed that BC has a spherical shape.

  14. Immuno- and correlative light microscopy-electron tomography methods for 3D protein localization in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mari, Muriel; Geerts, Willie J C; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2014-10-01

    Compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells is created and maintained through membrane rearrangements that include membrane transport and organelle biogenesis. Three-dimensional reconstructions with nanoscale resolution in combination with protein localization are essential for an accurate molecular dissection of these processes. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key model system for identifying genes and characterizing pathways essential for the organization of cellular ultrastructures. Electron microscopy studies of yeast, however, have been hampered by the presence of a cell wall that obstructs penetration of resins and cryoprotectants, and by the protein dense cytoplasm, which obscures the membrane details. Here we present an immuno-electron tomography (IET) method, which allows the determination of protein distribution patterns on reconstructed organelles from yeast. In addition, we extend this IET approach into a correlative light microscopy-electron tomography procedure where structures positive for a specific protein localized through a fluorescent signal are resolved in 3D. These new investigative tools for yeast will help to advance our understanding of the endomembrane system organization in eukaryotic cells.

  15. Analysis of the 3D distribution of stacked self-assembled quantum dots by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 3D distribution of self-assembled stacked quantum dots (QDs) is a key parameter to obtain the highest performance in a variety of optoelectronic devices. In this work, we have measured this distribution in 3D using a combined procedure of needle-shaped specimen preparation and electron tomography. We show that conventional 2D measurements of the distribution of QDs are not reliable, and only 3D analysis allows an accurate correlation between the growth design and the structural characteristics. PMID:23249477

  16. Three-dimensional visualization of forming Hepatitis C virus-like particles by electron-tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Badia-Martinez, Daniel; Peralta, Bibiana; Andres, German; Guerra, Milagros; Gil-Carton, David; Abrescia, Nicola G.A.

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus infects almost 170 million people per year but its assembly pathway, architecture and the structures of its envelope proteins are poorly understood. Using electron tomography of plastic-embedded sections of insect cells, we have visualized the morphogenesis of recombinant Hepatitis C virus-like particles. Our data provide a three-dimensional sketch of viral assembly at the endoplasmic reticulum showing different budding stages and contiguity of buds. This latter phenomenon could play an important role during the assembly of wt-HCV and explain the size-heterogeneity of its particles.

  17. All-optical tomography of electron spins in (In,Ga)As quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varwig, S.; René, A.; Economou, Sophia E.; Greilich, A.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; Reinecke, T. L.; Bayer, M.

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the basic features of an all-optical spin tomography on picosecond time scale. The magnetization vector associated with a mode-locked electron spin ensemble in singly charged quantum dots is traced by ellipticity measurements using picosecond laser pulses. After optical orientation the spins precess about a perpendicular magnetic field. By comparing the dynamics of two interacting ensembles with the dynamics of a single ensemble we find buildup of a spin component along the magnetic field in the two-ensemble case. This component arises from a Heisenberg-like spin-spin interaction.

  18. Markov Random Field Based Automatic Image Alignment for ElectronTomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi, Farshid; Amat, Fernando; Comolli, Luis R.; Elidan, Gal; Downing, Kenneth H.; Horowitz, Mark

    2007-11-30

    Cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) is the primary method for obtaining 3D reconstructions of intact bacteria, viruses, and complex molecular machines ([7],[2]). It first flash freezes a specimen in a thin layer of ice, and then rotates the ice sheet in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) recording images of different projections through the sample. The resulting images are aligned and then back projected to form the desired 3-D model. The typical resolution of biological electron microscope is on the order of 1 nm per pixel which means that small imprecision in the microscope's stage or lenses can cause large alignment errors. To enable a high precision alignment, biologists add a small number of spherical gold beads to the sample before it is frozen. These beads generate high contrast dots in the image that can be tracked across projections. Each gold bead can be seen as a marker with a fixed location in 3D, which provides the reference points to bring all the images to a common frame as in the classical structure from motion problem. A high accuracy alignment is critical to obtain a high resolution tomogram (usually on the order of 5-15nm resolution). While some methods try to automate the task of tracking markers and aligning the images ([8],[4]), they require user intervention if the SNR of the image becomes too low. Unfortunately, cryogenic electron tomography (or cryo-ET) often has poor SNR, since the samples are relatively thick (for TEM) and the restricted electron dose usually results in projections with SNR under 0 dB. This paper shows that formulating this problem as a most-likely estimation task yields an approach that is able to automatically align with high precision cryo-ET datasets using inference in graphical models. This approach has been packaged into a publicly available software called RAPTOR-Robust Alignment and Projection estimation for Tomographic Reconstruction.

  19. Electron holographic tomography for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of electrostatic potential in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, D.; Lichte, H.; Pozzi, G.; Prete, P.; Lovergine, N.

    2011-06-01

    Electron holographic tomography (EHT), the combination of off-axis electron holography with electron tomography, is a technique, which can be applied to the quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) mapping of electrostatic potential at the nanoscale. Here, we show the results obtained in the EHT investigation of GaAs and GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires grown by Au-catalysed metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The unique ability of EHT of disentangling the materials mean inner potential (MIP) from the specimen projected thickness allows reconstruction of the nanowire 3D morphology and inner compositional structure as well as the measurement of the MIP.

  20. Electron holographic tomography for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of electrostatic potential in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, D.; Lichte, H.; Pozzi, G.; Lovergine, N.

    2011-06-27

    Electron holographic tomography (EHT), the combination of off-axis electron holography with electron tomography, is a technique, which can be applied to the quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) mapping of electrostatic potential at the nanoscale. Here, we show the results obtained in the EHT investigation of GaAs and GaAs-AlGaAs core-shell nanowires grown by Au-catalysed metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The unique ability of EHT of disentangling the materials mean inner potential (MIP) from the specimen projected thickness allows reconstruction of the nanowire 3D morphology and inner compositional structure as well as the measurement of the MIP.

  1. A new apparatus for electron tomography in the scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, V. Maccagnani, P.; Masini, L.; Migliori, A.; Ortolani, L.; Pezza, A.; Del Marro, M.; Pallocca, G.; Vinciguerra, P.; Rossi, M.; Ferroni, M.; Sberveglieri, G.; Vittori-Antisari, M.

    2015-06-23

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of a microscopic specimen has been obtained by applying the tomographic algorithm to a set of images acquired in a Scanning Electron Microscope. This result was achieved starting from a series of projections obtained by stepwise rotating the sample under the beam raster. The Scanning Electron Microscope was operated in the scanning-transmission imaging mode, where the intensity of the transmitted electron beam is a monotonic function of the local mass-density and thickness of the specimen. The detection strategy has been implemented and tailored in order to maintain the projection requirement over the large tilt range, as required by the tomographic workflow. A Si-based electron detector and an eucentric-rotation specimen holder have been specifically developed for the purpose.

  2. The challenge of determining handedness in electron tomography and the use of DNA origami gold nanoparticle helices as molecular standards

    PubMed Central

    Briegel, Ariane; Pilhofer, Martin; Mastronarde, David N.; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    The apparent handedness of an EM-tomography reconstruction depends on a number of conventions and can be confused in many ways. As the number of different hardware and software combinations being used for electron tomography continue to climb, and the reconstructions being produced reach higher and higher resolutions, the need to verify the hand of the results has increased. Here we enumerate various steps in a typical tomography experiment that affect handedness and show that DNA origami gold nanoparticle helices can be used as convenient and fail-safe handedness standards. PMID:23639902

  3. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; ...

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  4. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  5. Deciphering the molecular architecture of membrane contact sites by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Collado, Javier; Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén

    2017-03-19

    At membrane contact sites (MCS) two cellular membranes form tight appositions that play critical roles in fundamental phenomena such as lipid metabolism or Ca(2+) homeostasis. The interest for these structures has surged in recent years, bringing about the characterization of a plethora of MCS-resident molecules. How those molecules are structurally organized at MCS remains enigmatic, limiting our understanding of MCS function. Whereas such molecular detail is obscured by conventional electron microscopy sample preparation, cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is uniquely positioned to address this challenge by allowing high resolution imaging of cellular landscapes in close-to-native conditions. Here we briefly review the fundamentals of cryo-ET and how recent developments in this technique are beginning to unveil the molecular architecture of MCS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Contact Sites edited by Christian Ungermann and Benoit Kornmann.

  6. Whole cell cryo-electron tomography suggests mitochondria divide by budding.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Bin

    2014-08-01

    Eukaryotes rely on mitochondrial division to guarantee that each new generation of cells acquires an adequate number of mitochondria. Mitochondrial division has long been thought to occur by binary fission and, more recently, evidence has supported the idea that binary fission is mediated by dynamin-related protein (Drp1) and the endoplasmic reticulum. However, studies to date have depended on fluorescence microscopy and conventional electron microscopy. Here, we utilize whole cell cryo-electron tomography to visualize mitochondrial division in frozen hydrated intact HeLa cells. We observe a large number of relatively small mitochondria protruding from and connected to large mitochondria or mitochondrial networks. Therefore, this study provides evidence that mitochondria divide by budding.

  7. 3D mapping of nanoscale electric potentials in semiconductor structures using electron-holographic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Daniel; Lubk, Axel; Prete, Paola; Lovergine, Nico; Lichte, Hannes

    2016-09-01

    Off-axis electron holography (EH) is a powerful method for mapping projected electric potentials, such as built-in potentials in semiconductor devices, in two dimensions (2D) at nanometer resolution. However, not well-defined thickness profiles, surface effects, and composition changes of the sample under investigation complicate the interpretation of the projected potentials. Here, we demonstrate how these problems can be overcome by combining EH with tomographic techniques, that is, electron holographic tomography (EHT), reconstructing electric potentials in 3D. We present EHT reconstructions of an n-type MOSFET including its dopant-related built-in potentials inside the device, as well as of a GaAs/AlGaAs core-multishell nanowire containing a 5 nm thick quantum well tube.

  8. Recovering fine details from under-resolved electron tomography data using higher order total variation ℓ1 regularization

    DOE PAGES

    Sanders, Toby; Gelb, Anne; Platte, Rodrigo B.; ...

    2017-01-03

    Over the last decade or so, reconstruction methods using ℓ1 regularization, often categorized as compressed sensing (CS) algorithms, have significantly improved the capabilities of high fidelity imaging in electron tomography. The most popular ℓ1 regularization approach within electron tomography has been total variation (TV) regularization. In addition to reducing unwanted noise, TV regularization encourages a piecewise constant solution with sparse boundary regions. In this paper we propose an alternative ℓ1 regularization approach for electron tomography based on higher order total variation (HOTV). Like TV, the HOTV approach promotes solutions with sparse boundary regions. In smooth regions however, the solution ismore » not limited to piecewise constant behavior. We demonstrate that this allows for more accurate reconstruction of a broader class of images – even those for which TV was designed for – particularly when dealing with pragmatic tomographic sampling patterns and very fine image features. In conclusion, we develop results for an electron tomography data set as well as a phantom example, and we also make comparisons with discrete tomography approaches.« less

  9. The internal architecture of leukocyte lipid body organelles captured by three-dimensional electron microscopy tomography.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rossana C N; Paganoti, Guillherme F; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, are complex organelles of all eukaryotic cells linked to a variety of biological functions as well as to the development of human diseases. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, neutrophils and macrophages, LBs are rapidly formed in the cytoplasm in response to inflammatory and infectious diseases and are sites of synthesis of eicosanoid lipid mediators. However, little is known about the structural organization of these organelles. It is unclear whether leukocyte LBs contain a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids as found in lipid droplets from adipocytes and how diverse proteins, including enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs. Here, leukocyte LB ultrastructure was studied in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunogold EM and electron tomography. By careful analysis of the two-dimensional ultrastructure of LBs from human blood eosinophils under different conditions, we identified membranous structures within LBs in both resting and activated cells. Cyclooxygenase, a membrane inserted protein that catalyzes the first step in prostaglandin synthesis, was localized throughout the internum of LBs. We used fully automated dual-axis electron tomography to study the three-dimensional architecture of LBs in high resolution. By tracking 4 nm-thick serial digital sections we found that leukocyte LBs enclose an intricate system of membranes within their "cores". After computational reconstruction, we showed that these membranes are organized as a network of tubules which resemble the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our findings explain how membrane-bound proteins interact and are spatially arranged within LB "cores" and support a model for LB formation by incorporating cytoplasmic membranes of the ER, instead of the conventional view that LBs emerge from the ER leaflets. This is important to understand the functional capabilities of leukocyte LBs in health and

  10. Developing a denoising filter for electron microscopy and tomography data in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Starosolski, Zbigniew; Szczepanski, Marek; Wahle, Manuel; Rusu, Mirabela; Wriggers, Willy

    2012-09-01

    The low radiation conditions and the predominantly phase-object image formation of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) result in extremely high noise levels and low contrast in the recorded micrographs. The process of single particle or tomographic 3D reconstruction does not completely eliminate this noise and is even capable of introducing new sources of noise during alignment or when correcting for instrument parameters. The recently developed Digital Paths Supervised Variance (DPSV) denoising filter uses local variance information to control regional noise in a robust and adaptive manner. The performance of the DPSV filter was evaluated in this review qualitatively and quantitatively using simulated and experimental data from cryo-EM and tomography in two and three dimensions. We also assessed the benefit of filtering experimental reconstructions for visualization purposes and for enhancing the accuracy of feature detection. The DPSV filter eliminates high-frequency noise artifacts (density gaps), which would normally preclude the accurate segmentation of tomography reconstructions or the detection of alpha-helices in single-particle reconstructions. This collaborative software development project was carried out entirely by virtual interactions among the authors using publicly available development and file sharing tools.

  11. Ultrastructure of compacted DNA in cyanobacteria by high-voltage cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Hagiwara, Sayuri; Kimori, Yoshitaka; Kaneko, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria exhibit compaction of DNA in synchrony with their circadian rhythms accompanying cell division. Since the structure is transient, it has not yet been described in detail. Here, we successfully visualize the ultrastructure of compacted DNA in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under rigorous synchronized cultivation by means of high-voltage cryo-electron tomography. In 3D reconstructions of rapidly frozen cells, the compacted DNA appears as an undulating rod resembling a eukaryotic condensed chromosome. The compacted DNA also includes many small and paired polyphosphate bodies (PPBs), some of which seem to maintain contact with DNA that appears to twist away from them, indicating that they may act as interactive suppliers and regulators of phosphate for DNA synthesis. These observations throw light on the duplication and segregation mechanisms of cyanobacterial DNA and point to an important role for PPBs. PMID:27731339

  12. Three-dimensional architecture of hair-cell linkages as revealedby electron-microscopic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Auer, Manfred; Koster, Bram; Ziese, Ulrike; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Volkmann, Niels; Wang, Da Neng; Hudspeth, A. James

    2006-07-28

    The senses of hearing and balance rest upon mechanoelectrical transduction by the hair bundles of hair cells in the inner ear. Located at the apical cellular surface, each hair bundle comprises several tens of stereocilia and a single kinocilium that are interconnected by extracellular proteinaceous links. Using electron-microscopic tomography of bullfrog saccular sensory epithelia, we examined the three-dimensional structures of ankle or basal links, kinociliary links, and tip links. We observed clear differences in the dimensions and appearances of the three links. We found two distinct populations of tip links suggestive of the involvement of two proteins or splice variants. We noted auxiliary links connecting the upper portions of tip links to the taller stereocilia. Tip links and auxiliary links show a tendency to adopt a globular conformation when disconnected from the membrane surface.

  13. A methodology for finding the optimal iteration number of the SIRT algorithm for quantitative Electron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Okariz, Ana; Guraya, Teresa; Iturrondobeitia, Maider; Ibarretxe, Julen

    2017-02-01

    The SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm is commonly used in Electron Tomography to calculate the original volume of the sample from noisy images, but the results provided by this iterative procedure are strongly dependent on the specific implementation of the algorithm, as well as on the number of iterations employed for the reconstruction. In this work, a methodology for selecting the iteration number of the SIRT reconstruction that provides the most accurate segmentation is proposed. The methodology is based on the statistical analysis of the intensity profiles at the edge of the objects in the reconstructed volume. A phantom which resembles a a carbon black aggregate has been created to validate the methodology and the SIRT implementations of two free software packages (TOMOJ and TOMO3D) have been used.

  14. Electron tomography of the nucleoid of Gemmata obscuriglobus reveals complex liquid crystalline cholesteric structure

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Benjamin; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Morgan, Garry P.; Webb, Richard I.; Fuerst, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleoid of the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus is unique within the Bacteria in being both highly condensed and enclosed by a double-membrane nuclear envelope, seemingly analogous to the nucleus of eukaryotes. Here we have applied electron tomography to study high-pressure frozen, cryosubstituted cells of G. obscuriglobus and found multiple nested orders of DNA organization within the condensed nucleoid structure. Detailed examination of the nucleoid revealed a series of nested arcs characteristic of liquid crystalline cholesteric DNA structure. The finest fibers were arranged in parallel concentrically in a double-twist organization. At the highest order of nucleoid organization, several of these structures come together to form the core of the G. obscuriglobus nucleoid. The complex structure of DNA within this nucleoid may have implications for understanding the evolutionary significance of compartmentalized planctomycete cells. PMID:22993511

  15. Visualization of bacteriophage P1 infection by cryo-electron tomography of tiny Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jun; Chen Chengyen; Shiomi, Daisuke; Niki, Hironori; Margolin, William

    2011-09-01

    Bacteriophage P1 has a contractile tail that targets the conserved lipopolysaccharide on the outer membrane surface of the host for initial adsorption. The mechanism by which P1 DNA enters the host cell is not well understood, mainly because the transient molecular interactions between bacteriophage and bacteria have been difficult to study by conventional approaches. Here, we engineered tiny E. coli host cells so that the initial stages of P1-host interactions could be captured in unprecedented detail by cryo-electron tomography. Analysis of three-dimensional reconstructions of frozen-hydrated specimens revealed three predominant configurations: an extended tail stage with DNA present in the phage head, a contracted tail stage with DNA, and a contracted tail stage without DNA. Comparative analysis of various conformations indicated that there is uniform penetration of the inner tail tube into the E. coli periplasm and a significant movement of the baseplate away from the outer membrane during tail contraction.

  16. Direct visualization of dispersed lipid bicontinuous cubic phases by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demurtas, Davide; Guichard, Paul; Martiel, Isabelle; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Hébert, Cécile; Sagalowicz, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bulk and dispersed cubic liquid crystalline phases (cubosomes), present in the body and in living cell membranes, are believed to play an essential role in biological phenomena. Moreover, their biocompatibility is attractive for nutrient or drug delivery system applications. Here the three-dimensional organization of dispersed cubic lipid self-assembled phases is fully revealed by cryo-electron tomography and compared with simulated structures. It is demonstrated that the interior is constituted of a perfect bicontinuous cubic phase, while the outside shows interlamellar attachments, which represent a transition state between the liquid crystalline interior phase and the outside vesicular structure. Therefore, compositional gradients within cubosomes are inferred, with a lipid bilayer separating at least one water channel set from the external aqueous phase. This is crucial to understand and enhance controlled release of target molecules and calls for a revision of postulated transport mechanisms from cubosomes to the aqueous phase. PMID:26573367

  17. Analysis of Iron Meteorites Using Computed Tomography and Electron-probe Microanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, P. K.; Gillies, D. C.

    2005-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging and electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA) have been used to study samples of the Mundrabilla and Colomera iron meteorites in order to perform structural, textural, and mineralogical analysis. Both gamma-ray (Co-60 source, essentially monochromatic 1.25MeV avg.) and x-ray (420 KeV, continuous) sources have been used, with effective resolution of approximately 1 mm and 0.25 mm, respectively. The gamma-ray source provides approx. 15 cm penetration through steel and is used for larger samples, whereas the x-ray source provides superior resolution at reduced penetration but exhibits beam hardening artifacts. Here we present a combined approach where CT and EPMA imaging and microanalysis aid in the identification of structural and compositional features in iron meteorites.

  18. Heterogeneities of the nanostructure of platinum/zeolite y catalysts revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Zečević, Jovana; van der Eerden, Ad M J; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jongh, Petra E; de Jong, Krijn P

    2013-04-23

    To develop structure-performance relationships for important catalysts, a detailed characterization of their morphology is essential. Using electron tomography, we determined in three dimensions the structure of Pt/zeolite Y bifunctional catalysts. Optimum experimental conditions enabled for the first time high-resolution 3D imaging of Pt particles as small as 1 nm located inside zeolite micropores. Semiautomated image analysis of 3D reconstructions provided an efficient study of numbers, size distributions, and interparticle distances of thousands of Pt particles within individual zeolite crystals. Upon extending this approach to a number of zeolite crystals of one batch of Pt/zeolite Y catalyst, heterogeneities were revealed. The Pt loading, an important parameter for catalyst performance, varied between zeolite crystals up to a factor of 35. This discovery calls for re-evaluation of catalyst preparation methods and suggests potential for lowering the nominal loading with noble metals.

  19. Electron tomography reveals the fibril structure and lipid interactions in amyloid deposits

    PubMed Central

    Kollmer, Marius; Meinhardt, Katrin; Haupt, Christian; Liberta, Falk; Wulff, Melanie; Linder, Julia; Handl, Lisa; Heinrich, Liesa; Loos, Cornelia; Schmidt, Matthias; Syrovets, Tatiana; Simmet, Thomas; Westermark, Per; Westermark, Gunilla T.; Horn, Uwe; Schmidt, Volker; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography is an increasingly powerful method to study the detailed architecture of macromolecular complexes or cellular structures. Applied to amyloid deposits formed in a cell culture model of systemic amyloid A amyloidosis, we could determine the structural morphology of the fibrils directly in the deposit. The deposited fibrils are arranged in different networks, and depending on the relative fibril orientation, we can distinguish between fibril meshworks, fibril bundles, and amyloid stars. These networks are frequently infiltrated by vesicular lipid inclusions that may originate from the death of the amyloid-forming cells. Our data support the role of nonfibril components for constructing fibril deposits and provide structural views of different types of lipid–fibril interactions. PMID:27140609

  20. FcRn-mediated antibody transport across epithelial cells revealed by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    He, Wanzhong; Ladinsky, Mark S.; Huey-Tubman, Kathryn E.; Jensen, Grant J.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Björkman, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) transports maternal IgG across epithelial barriers1,2, thereby providing the fetus or newborn with humoral immunity before its immune system is fully functional. In newborn rodents, FcRn transfers IgG from milk to blood by apical-to-basolateral transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells. The pH difference between the apical (pH 6.0-6.5) and basolateral (pH 7.4) sides of intestinal epithelial cells facilitates efficient unidirectional transport of IgG, since FcRn binds IgG at pH 6.0-6.5 but not pH ≥7 1,2. As milk passes through the neonatal intestine, maternal IgG is removed by FcRn-expressing cells in the proximal small intestine (duodenum, jejunum); remaining proteins are absorbed and degraded by FcRn-negative cells in the distal small intestine (ileum)3-6. We used electron tomography to directly visualize jejunal transcytosis in space and time, developing new labeling and detection methods to map individual nanogold-labeled Fc within transport vesicles7 and to simultaneously characterize these vesicles by immunolabeling. Combining electron tomography with a non-perturbing endocytic label allowed us to conclusively identify receptor-bound ligands, resolve interconnecting vesicles, determine if a vesicle was microtubule-associated, and accurately trace FcRn-mediated transport of IgG. Our results present a complex picture in which Fc moved through networks of entangled tubular and irregular vesicles, only some of which were microtubule-associated, as it migrated to the basolateral surface. New features of transcytosis were elucidated, including transport involving multivesicular body inner vesicles/tubules and exocytosis via clathrin-coated pits. Markers for early, late, and recycling endosomes each labeled vesicles in different and overlapping morphological classes, revealing unexpected spatial complexity in endo-lysosomal trafficking. PMID:18818657

  1. Cryo-electron tomography of Marburg virus particles and their morphogenesis within infected cells.

    PubMed

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Riches, James D; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Welsch, Sonja; Krähling, Verena; Davey, Norman; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Becker, Stephan; Briggs, John A G

    2011-11-01

    Several major human pathogens, including the filoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and rhabdoviruses, package their single-stranded RNA genomes within helical nucleocapsids, which bud through the plasma membrane of the infected cell to release enveloped virions. The virions are often heterogeneous in shape, which makes it difficult to study their structure and assembly mechanisms. We have applied cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging methods to derive structures of Marburg virus, a highly pathogenic filovirus, both after release and during assembly within infected cells. The data demonstrate the potential of cryo-electron tomography methods to derive detailed structural information for intermediate steps in biological pathways within intact cells. We describe the location and arrangement of the viral proteins within the virion. We show that the N-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein contains the minimal assembly determinants for a helical nucleocapsid with variable number of proteins per turn. Lobes protruding from alternate interfaces between each nucleoprotein are formed by the C-terminal domain of the nucleoprotein, together with viral proteins VP24 and VP35. Each nucleoprotein packages six RNA bases. The nucleocapsid interacts in an unusual, flexible "Velcro-like" manner with the viral matrix protein VP40. Determination of the structures of assembly intermediates showed that the nucleocapsid has a defined orientation during transport and budding. Together the data show striking architectural homology between the nucleocapsid helix of rhabdoviruses and filoviruses, but unexpected, fundamental differences in the mechanisms by which the nucleocapsids are then assembled together with matrix proteins and initiate membrane envelopment to release infectious virions, suggesting that the viruses have evolved different solutions to these conserved assembly steps.

  2. Application of δ recycling to electron automated diffraction tomography data from inorganic crystalline nanovolumes.

    PubMed

    Rius, Jordi; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Vallcorba, Oriol; Kolb, Ute

    2013-07-01

    δ Recycling is a simple procedure for directly extracting phase information from Patterson-type functions [Rius (2012). Acta Cryst. A68, 399-400]. This new phasing method has a clear theoretical basis and was developed with ideal single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. On the other hand, introduction of the automated diffraction tomography (ADT) technique has represented a significant advance in electron diffraction data collection [Kolb et al. (2007). Ultramicroscopy, 107, 507-513]. When combined with precession electron diffraction, it delivers quasi-kinematical intensity data even for complex inorganic compounds, so that single-crystal diffraction data of nanometric volumes are now available for structure determination by direct methods. To check the tolerance of δ recycling to missing data-collection corrections and to deviations from kinematical behaviour of ADT intensities, δ recycling has been applied to differently shaped nanocrystals of various inorganic materials. The results confirm that it can phase ADT data very efficiently. In some cases even more complete structure models than those derived from conventional direct methods and least-squares refinement have been found. During this study it has been demonstrated that the Wilson-plot scaling procedure is largely insensitive to sample thickness variations and missing absorption corrections affecting electron ADT intensities.

  3. Structural analysis of vimentin and keratin intermediate filaments by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Norlen, Lars . E-mail: lars.norlen@ki.se; Masich, Sergej; Goldie, Kenneth N.; Hoenger, Andreas

    2007-06-10

    Intermediate filaments are a large and structurally diverse group of cellular filaments that are classified into five different groups. They are referred to as intermediate filaments (IFs) because they are intermediate in diameter between the two other cytoskeletal filament systems that is filamentous actin and microtubules. The basic building block of IFs is a predominantly {alpha}-helical rod with variable length globular N- and C-terminal domains. On the ultra-structural level there are two major differences between IFs and microtubules or actin filaments: IFs are non-polar, and they do not exhibit large globular domains. IF molecules associate via a coiled-coil interaction into dimers and higher oligomers. Structural investigations into the molecular building plan of IFs have been performed with a variety of biophysical and imaging methods such as negative staining and metal-shadowing electron microscopy (EM), mass determination by scanning transmission EM, X-ray crystallography on fragments of the IF stalk and low-angle X-ray scattering. The actual packing of IF dimers into a long filament varies between the different families. Typically the dimers form so called protofibrils that further assemble into a filament. Here we introduce new cryo-imaging methods for structural investigations of IFs in vitro and in vivo, i.e., cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, as well as associated techniques such as the preparation and handling of vitrified sections of cellular specimens.

  4. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: theory and implementation.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Petříček, Václav; Corrêa, Cinthia Antunes

    2015-03-01

    Accurate structure refinement from electron-diffraction data is not possible without taking the dynamical-diffraction effects into account. A complete three-dimensional model of the structure can be obtained only from a sufficiently complete three-dimensional data set. In this work a method is presented for crystal structure refinement from the data obtained by electron diffraction tomography, possibly combined with precession electron diffraction. The principle of the method is identical to that used in X-ray crystallography: data are collected in a series of small tilt steps around a rotation axis, then intensities are integrated and the structure is optimized by least-squares refinement against the integrated intensities. In the dynamical theory of diffraction, the reflection intensities exhibit a complicated relationship to the orientation and thickness of the crystal as well as to structure factors of other reflections. This complication requires the introduction of several special parameters in the procedure. The method was implemented in the freely available crystallographic computing system Jana2006.

  5. Three dimensional accurate morphology measurements of polystyrene standard particles on silicon substrate by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Misa; Kumagai, Kazuhiro; Malac, Marek

    2015-12-01

    Polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticle (NP) sample is one of the most widely used standard materials. It is used for calibration of particle counters and particle size measurement tools. It has been reported that the measured NP sizes by various methods, such as Differential Mobility Analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), differ from each other. Deformation of PSL NPs on mica substrate has been reported in AFM measurements: the lateral width of PSL NPs is smaller than their vertical height. To provide a reliable calibration standard, the deformation must be measured by a method that can reliably visualize the entire three dimensional (3D) shape of the PSL NPs. Here we present a method for detailed measurement of PSL NP 3D shape by means of electron tomography in a transmission electron microscope. The observed shape of the PSL NPs with 100 nm and 50 nm diameter were not spherical, but squished in direction perpendicular to the support substrate by about 7.4% and 12.1%, respectively. The high difference in surface energy of the PSL NPs and that of substrate together with their low Young modulus appear to explain the squishing of the NPs without presence of water film.

  6. New hardware and workflows for semi-automated correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy/tomography.

    PubMed

    Schorb, Martin; Gaechter, Leander; Avinoam, Ori; Sieckmann, Frank; Clarke, Mairi; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Bykov, Yury S; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Lihl, Reinhard; Briggs, John A G

    2017-02-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy allows features of interest defined by fluorescence signals to be located in an electron micrograph of the same sample. Rare dynamic events or specific objects can be identified, targeted and imaged by electron microscopy or tomography. To combine it with structural studies using cryo-electron microscopy or tomography, fluorescence microscopy must be performed while maintaining the specimen vitrified at liquid-nitrogen temperatures and in a dry environment during imaging and transfer. Here we present instrumentation, software and an experimental workflow that improves the ease of use, throughput and performance of correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. The new cryo-stage incorporates a specially modified high-numerical aperture objective lens and provides a stable and clean imaging environment. It is combined with a transfer shuttle for contamination-free loading of the specimen. Optimized microscope control software allows automated acquisition of the entire specimen area by cryo-fluorescence microscopy. The software also facilitates direct transfer of the fluorescence image and associated coordinates to the cryo-electron microscope for subsequent fluorescence-guided automated imaging. Here we describe these technological developments and present a detailed workflow, which we applied for automated cryo-electron microscopy and tomography of various specimens.

  7. Cellular uptake mechanisms of functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes by 3D electron tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.; Nerl, Hannah; Müller, Karin H.; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Li, Shouping; Haynes, Peter D.; Jinschek, Joerg R.; Prato, Maurizio; Bianco, Alberto; Kostarelos, Kostas; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2011-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. Despite numerous studies, the pathways by which carbon nanotubes enter cells and their subsequent intracellular trafficking and distribution remain poorly determined. Here, we use 3-D electron tomography techniques that offer optimum enhancement of contrast between carbon nanotubes and the plasma membrane to investigate the mechanisms involved in the cellular uptake of shortened, functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-NH3+). Both human lung epithelial (A549) cells, that are almost incapable of phagocytosis and primary macrophages, capable of extremely efficient phagocytosis, were used. We observed that MWNT-NH3+ were internalised in both phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells by any one of three mechanisms: (a) individually via membrane wrapping; (b) individually by direct membrane translocation; and (c) in clusters within vesicular compartments. At early time points following intracellular translocation, we noticed accumulation of nanotube material within various intracellular compartments, while a long-term (14-day) study using primary human macrophages revealed that MWNT-NH3+ were able to escape vesicular (phagosome) entrapment by translocating directly into the cytoplasm.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. Despite numerous studies, the pathways by which carbon nanotubes enter cells and their subsequent intracellular trafficking and distribution remain poorly determined. Here, we use 3-D electron tomography techniques that offer optimum enhancement of contrast between carbon nanotubes and the plasma membrane to investigate the mechanisms involved in the cellular uptake of shortened, functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT-NH3+). Both human lung epithelial (A549) cells, that are almost incapable of phagocytosis and primary macrophages, capable of extremely efficient phagocytosis, were used. We observed

  8. Unique thylakoid membrane architecture of a unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium revealed by electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Liberton, Michelle; Austin II, Jotham R; Berg, R. Howard; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  9. Unique Thylakoid Membrane Architecture of a Unicellular N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Revealed by Electron Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Austin, Jotham R.; Berg, R. H.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  10. Unique thylakoid membrane architecture of a unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Liberton, Michelle; Austin, Jotham R; Berg, R Howard; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  11. FPGA-Based Front-End Electronics for Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Haselman, Michael; Dewitt, Don; McDougald, Wendy; Lewellen, Thomas K; Miyaoka, Robert; Hauck, Scott

    2009-02-22

    Modern Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are capable of performing complex discrete signal processing algorithms with clock rates above 100MHz. This combined with FPGA's low expense, ease of use, and selected dedicated hardware make them an ideal technology for a data acquisition system for positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Our laboratory is producing a high-resolution, small-animal PET scanner that utilizes FPGAs as the core of the front-end electronics. For this next generation scanner, functions that are typically performed in dedicated circuits, or offline, are being migrated to the FPGA. This will not only simplify the electronics, but the features of modern FPGAs can be utilizes to add significant signal processing power to produce higher resolution images. In this paper two such processes, sub-clock rate pulse timing and event localization, will be discussed in detail. We show that timing performed in the FPGA can achieve a resolution that is suitable for small-animal scanners, and will outperform the analog version given a low enough sampling period for the ADC. We will also show that the position of events in the scanner can be determined in real time using a statistical positioning based algorithm.

  12. Lamin B distribution and association with peripheral chromatin revealed by optical sectioning and electron microscopy tomography

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have used a combination of immunogold staining, optical sectioning light microscopy, intermediate voltage electron microscopy, and EM tomography to examine the distribution of lamin B over the nuclear envelope of CHO cells. Apparent inconsistencies between previously published light and electron microscopy studies of nuclear lamin staining were resolved. At light microscopy resolution, an apparent open fibrillar network is visualized. Colocalization of lamin B and nuclear pores demonstrates that these apparent fibrils, separated by roughly 0.5 micron, are anti-correlated with the surface distribution of nuclear pores; pore clusters lie between or adjacent to regions of heavy lamin B staining. Examination at higher, EM resolution reveals that this apparent lamin B network does not correspond to an actual network of widely spaced, discrete bundles of lamin filaments. Rather it reflects a quantitative variation in lamin staining over a roughly 0.5-micron size scale, superimposed on a more continuous but still complex distribution of lamin filaments, spatially heterogeneous on a 0.1-0.2-micron size scale. Interestingly, lamin B staining at this higher resolution is highly correlated to the underlying chromatin distribution. Heavy concentrations of lamin B directly "cap" the surface of envelope associated, large-scale chromatin domains. PMID:8276889

  13. The ultrastructure of Chlorobaculum tepidum revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Kudryashev, Misha; Aktoudianaki, Aikaterini; Dedoglou, Dimitrios; Stahlberg, Henning; Tsiotis, Georgios

    2014-10-01

    Chlorobaculum (Cba) tepidum is a green sulfur bacterium that oxidizes sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate for photosynthetic growth. As other anoxygenic green photosynthetic bacteria, Cba tepidum synthesizes bacteriochlorophylls for the assembly of a large light-harvesting antenna structure, the chlorosome. Chlorosomes are sac-like structures that are connected to the reaction centers in the cytoplasmic membrane through the BChl α-containing Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein. Most components of the photosynthetic machinery are known on a biophysical level, however, the structural integration of light harvesting with charge separation is still not fully understood. Despite over two decades of research, gaps in our understanding of cellular architecture exist. Here we present an in-depth analysis of the cellular architecture of the thermophilic photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium of Cba tepidum by cryo-electron tomography. We examined whole hydrated cells grown under different electron donor conditions. Our results reveal the distribution of chlorosomes in 3D in an unperturbed cell, connecting elements between chlorosomes and the cytoplasmic membrane and the distribution of reaction centers in the cytoplasmic membrane.

  14. Breaking the Crowther limit: combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Ercius, Peter; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D; Elser, Veit; Muller, David A

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability.

  15. Three-dimensional structural dynamics and fluctuations of DNA-nanogold conjugates by individual-particle electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Lei, Dongsheng; Smith, Jessica M.; Zhang, Meng; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Xing; Lu, Zhuoyang; Liu, Jiankang; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    DNA base pairing has been used for many years to direct the arrangement of inorganic nanocrystals into small groupings and arrays with tailored optical and electrical properties. The control of DNA-mediated assembly depends crucially on a better understanding of three-dimensional structure of DNA-nanocrystal-hybridized building blocks. Existing techniques do not allow for structural determination of these flexible and heterogeneous samples. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy and negative-staining electron tomography approaches to image, and three-dimensionally reconstruct a single DNA-nanogold conjugate, an 84-bp double-stranded DNA with two 5-nm nanogold particles for potential substrates in plasmon-coupling experiments. By individual-particle electron tomography reconstruction, we obtain 14 density maps at ∼2-nm resolution. Using these maps as constraints, we derive 14 conformations of dsDNA by molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational variation is consistent with that from liquid solution, suggesting that individual-particle electron tomography could be an expected approach to study DNA-assembling and flexible protein structure and dynamics. PMID:27025159

  16. Electron tomography, three-dimensional Fourier analysis and colour prediction of a three-dimensional amorphous biophotonic nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Shawkey, Matthew D.; Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Pálsdóttir, Hildur; Crum, John; Ellisman, Mark H.; Auer, Manfred; Prum, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    Organismal colour can be created by selective absorption of light by pigments or light scattering by photonic nanostructures. Photonic nanostructures may vary in refractive index over one, two or three dimensions and may be periodic over large spatial scales or amorphous with short-range order. Theoretical optical analysis of three-dimensional amorphous nanostructures has been challenging because these structures are difficult to describe accurately from conventional two-dimensional electron microscopy alone. Intermediate voltage electron microscopy (IVEM) with tomographic reconstruction adds three-dimensional data by using a high-power electron beam to penetrate and image sections of material sufficiently thick to contain a significant portion of the structure. Here, we use IVEM tomography to characterize a non-iridescent, three-dimensional biophotonic nanostructure: the spongy medullary layer from eastern bluebird Sialia sialis feather barbs. Tomography and three-dimensional Fourier analysis reveal that it is an amorphous, interconnected bicontinuous matrix that is appropriately ordered at local spatial scales in all three dimensions to coherently scatter light. The predicted reflectance spectra from the three-dimensional Fourier analysis are more precise than those predicted by previous two-dimensional Fourier analysis of transmission electron microscopy sections. These results highlight the usefulness, and obstacles, of tomography in the description and analysis of three-dimensional photonic structures. PMID:19158016

  17. Direct visualization of vaults within intact cells by electron cryo-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Cora L.; Mendonça, Luiza M.

    2016-01-01

    The vault complex is the largest cellular ribonucleoprotein complex ever characterized and is present across diverse Eukarya. Despite significant information regarding the structure, composition and evolutionary conservation of the vault, little is know about the complex’s actual biological function. To determine if intracellular vaults are morphologically similar to previously studied purified and recombinant vaults, we have used electron cryo-tomography to characterize the vault complexes found in the thin edges of primary human cells growing in tissue culture. Our studies confirm that intracellular vaults are similar in overall size and shape to purified and recombinant vaults previously analyzed. Results from subtomogram averaging indicate that densities within the vault lumen are not ordered, but randomly distributed. We also observe that vaults located in the extreme periphery of the cytoplasm predominately associate with granule-like structures and actin. Our ultrastructure studies augment existing biochemical, structural and genetic information on the vault, and provide important intracellular context for the ongoing efforts to understand the biological function of the native cytoplasmic vault. PMID:25864047

  18. Optimization of a solid-state electron spin qubit using gate set tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehollain, Juan P.; Muhonen, Juha T.; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Rudinger, Kenneth M.; King Gamble, John; Nielsen, Erik; Laucht, Arne; Simmons, Stephanie; Kalra, Rachpon; Dzurak, Andrew S.; Morello, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    State of the art qubit systems are reaching the gate fidelities required for scalable quantum computation architectures. Further improvements in the fidelity of quantum gates demands characterization and benchmarking protocols that are efficient, reliable and extremely accurate. Ideally, a benchmarking protocol should also provide information on how to rectify residual errors. Gate set tomography (GST) is one such protocol designed to give detailed characterization of as-built qubits. We implemented GST on a high-fidelity electron-spin qubit confined by a single 31P atom in 28Si. The results reveal systematic errors that a randomized benchmarking analysis could measure but not identify, whereas GST indicated the need for improved calibration of the length of the control pulses. After introducing this modification, we measured a new benchmark average gate fidelity of 99.942(8) % , an improvement on the previous value of 99.90(2) % . Furthermore, GST revealed high levels of non-Markovian noise in the system, which will need to be understood and addressed when the qubit is used within a fault-tolerant quantum computation scheme.

  19. Molecular architecture of axonemal microtubule doublets revealedby cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Haixin; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2006-05-22

    The axoneme, which forms the core of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, is one of the largest macromolecular machines with a structure that is largely conserved from protists to mammals. Microtubule doublets are structural components of axonemes containing a number of proteins besides tubulin, and are usually found in arrays of nine doublets arranged around two singlet microtubules. Coordinated sliding of adjacent doublets, which involves a host of other proteins in the axoneme, produces periodic beating movements of the axoneme. We have obtained a 3D density map of intact microtubule doublets using cryo-electron tomography and image averaging. Our map, with a resolution of about 3 nm, provides insights into locations of particular proteins within the doublets and the structural features of the doublets that define their mechanical properties. We identify likely candidates for several of these non-tubulin components of the doublets. This work offers novel insight on how tubulin protofilaments and accessory proteins attach together to form the doublets and provides a structural basis for understanding doublet function in axonemes.

  20. Structure enhancement diffusion and contour extraction for electron tomography of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle; Blomgren, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The interpretation and measurement of the architectural organization of mitochondria depend heavily upon the availability of good software tools for filtering, segmenting, extracting, measuring, and classifying the features of interest. Images of mitochondria contain many flow-like patterns and they are usually corrupted by large amounts of noise. Thus, it is necessary to enhance them by denoising and closing interrupted structures. We introduce a new approach based on anisotropic nonlinear diffusion and bilateral filtering for electron tomography of mitochondria. It allows noise removal and structure closure at certain scales, while preserving both the orientation and magnitude of discontinuities without the need for threshold switches. This technique facilitates image enhancement for subsequent segmentation, contour extraction, and improved visualization of the complex and intricate mitochondrial morphology. We perform the extraction of the structure-defining contours by employing a variational level set formulation. The propagating front for this approach is an approximate signed distance function which does not require expensive re-initialization. The behavior of the combined approach is tested for visualizing the structure of a HeLa cell mitochondrion and the results we obtain are very promising. PMID:19254765

  1. Electron tomography of early melanosomes: Implications for melanogenesis and the generation of fibrillar amyloid sheets

    PubMed Central

    Hurbain, Ilse; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Boudier, Thomas; Marco, Sergio; Verkleij, Arie J.; Marks, Michael S.; Raposo, Graç

    2008-01-01

    Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles (LROs) in which melanins are synthesized and stored. Early stage melanosomes are characterized morphologically by intralumenal fibrils upon which melanins are deposited in later stages. The integral membrane protein Pmel17 is a component of the fibrils, can nucleate fibril formation in the absence of other pigment cell-specific proteins, and forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. Before fibril formation Pmel17 traffics through multivesicular endosomal compartments, but how these compartments participate in downstream events leading to fibril formation is not fully known. By using high-pressure freezing of MNT-1 melanoma cells and freeze substitution to optimize ultrastructural preservation followed by double tilt 3D electron tomography, we show that the amyloid-like fibrils begin to form in multivesicular compartments, where they radiate from the luminal side of intralumenal membrane vesicles. The fibrils in fully formed stage II premelanosomes organize into sheet-like arrays and exclude the remaining intralumenal vesicles, which are smaller and often in continuity with the limiting membrane. These observations indicate that premelanosome fibrils form in association with intralumenal endosomal membranes. We suggest that similar processes regulate amyloid formation in pathological models. PMID:19033461

  2. Examination of Scanning Electron Microscope and Computed Tomography Images of PICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, John W.; Stackpoole, Margaret M.; Shklover, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Micrographs of PICA (Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator) taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D images taken with a Computed Tomography (CT) system are examined. PICA is a carbon fiber based composite (Fiberform ) with a phenolic polymer matrix. The micrographs are taken at different surface depths and at different magnifications in a sample after arc jet testing and show different levels of oxidative removal of the charred matrix (Figs 1 though 13). CT scans, courtesy of Xradia, Inc. of Concord CA, were captured for samples of virgin PICA, charred PICA and raw Fiberform (Fig. 14). We use these images to calculate the thermal conductivity (TC) of these materials using correlation function (CF) methods. CF methods give a mathematical description of how one material is embedded in another and is thus ideally suited for modeling composites like PICA. We will evaluate how the TC of the materials changes as a function of surface depth. This work is in collaboration with ETH-Zurich, which has expertise in high temperature materials and TC modeling (including CF methods).

  3. Health behavior modification after electron beam computed tomography and physician consultation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Allison, Mathew; Wright, C Michael

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to determine whether participants reported altering health behaviors (physical activity, diet, and alcohol consumption) after seeing results from an electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) scan for coronary artery calcium and reviewing these results with a physician. Clinicians attempt to motivate patients to control cardiovascular risk factors by adopting healthy behaviors and reducing harmful actions. Asymptomatic patients (N = 510) were evaluated by EBCT for the extent of coronary artery calcium. Information pertaining to demographics, health history, and lifestyle/health behaviors was obtained from each participant at the time of the EBCT scan. Patients were given their numerical calcium score, shown images of their coronary arteries, and counseled by a physician for lifestyle and medical risk modification based on their coronary artery calcium score. Approximately 6 years after the scan, participants completed a follow-up questionnaire related to lifestyle modifications. In multivariable analysis, the presence and extent of coronary artery calcium was significantly associated with beneficial health behavior modifications. Specifically, the greater a patient's coronary artery calcium score, the more likely they were to report increasing exercise (odds ratio = 1.34, P = 0.02), changing diet (odds ratio = 1.40, P < 0.01), and changing alcohol intake (odds ratio = 1.46, P = 0.05). This study suggests that seeing and being counseled on the presence and extent of coronary artery calcium is significantly associated with behavior change.

  4. 3D Magnetic Induction Maps of Nanoscale Materials Revealed by Electron Holographic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of three-dimensional (3D) ferromagnetic nanoscale materials constitutes one of the key research areas of the current magnetism roadmap and carries great potential to impact areas such as data storage, sensing, and biomagnetism. The properties of such nanostructures are closely connected with their 3D magnetic nanostructure, making their determination highly valuable. Up to now, quantitative 3D maps providing both the internal magnetic and electric configuration of the same specimen with high spatial resolution are missing. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the dominant axial component of the magnetic induction and electrostatic potential within a cobalt nanowire (NW) of 100 nm in diameter with spatial resolution below 10 nm by applying electron holographic tomography. The tomogram was obtained using a dedicated TEM sample holder for acquisition, in combination with advanced alignment and tomographic reconstruction routines. The powerful approach presented here is widely applicable to a broad range of 3D magnetic nanostructures and may trigger the progress of novel spintronic nonplanar nanodevices. PMID:27182110

  5. Native architecture of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast revealed by in situ cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Kuhn Cuellar, Luis; Villa, Elizabeth; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast function is orchestrated by the organelle's intricate architecture. By combining cryo-focused ion beam milling of vitreous Chlamydomonas cells with cryo-electron tomography, we acquired three-dimensional structures of the chloroplast in its native state within the cell. Chloroplast envelope inner membrane invaginations were frequently found in close association with thylakoid tips, and the tips of multiple thylakoid stacks converged at dynamic sites on the chloroplast envelope, implicating lipid transport in thylakoid biogenesis. Subtomogram averaging and nearest neighbor analysis revealed that RuBisCO complexes were hexagonally packed within the pyrenoid, with ∼15 nm between their centers. Thylakoid stacks and the pyrenoid were connected by cylindrical pyrenoid tubules, physically bridging the sites of light-dependent photosynthesis and light-independent carbon fixation. Multiple parallel minitubules were bundled within each pyrenoid tubule, possibly serving as conduits for the targeted one-dimensional diffusion of small molecules such as ATP and sugars between the chloroplast stroma and the pyrenoid matrix. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04889.001 PMID:25584625

  6. Three-dimensional coordinates of individual atoms in materials revealed by electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Chen, Chien-Chun; Wu, Li; Scott, M. C.; Theis, W.; Ophus, Colin; Bartels, Matthias; Yang, Yongsoo; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Sawaya, Michael R.; Heinz, Hendrik; Marks, Laurence D.; Ercius, Peter; Miao, Jianwei

    2015-11-01

    Crystallography, the primary method for determining the 3D atomic positions in crystals, has been fundamental to the development of many fields of science. However, the atomic positions obtained from crystallography represent a global average of many unit cells in a crystal. Here, we report, for the first time, the determination of the 3D coordinates of thousands of individual atoms and a point defect in a material by electron tomography with a precision of ~19 pm, where the crystallinity of the material is not assumed. From the coordinates of these individual atoms, we measure the atomic displacement field and the full strain tensor with a 3D resolution of ~1 nm3 and a precision of ~10-3, which are further verified by density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. The ability to precisely localize the 3D coordinates of individual atoms in materials without assuming crystallinity is expected to find important applications in materials science, nanoscience, physics, chemistry and biology.

  7. Localize.pytom: a modern webserver for cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hrabe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Localize.pytom, available through http://localize.pytom.org is a webserver for the localize module in the PyTom package. It is a free website and open to all users and there is no login requirement. The server accepts tomograms as they are imaged and reconstructed by Cryo-Electron Tomography (CET) and returns densities and coordinates of candidate-macromolecules in the tomogram. Localization of macromolecules in cryo-electron tomograms is one of the key procedures to unravel structural features of imaged macromolecules. Positions of localized molecules are further used for structural analysis by single particle procedures such as fine alignment, averaging and classification. Accurate localization can be furthermore used to generate molecular atlases of whole cells. Localization uses a cross-correlation-based score and requires a reference volume as input. A reference can either be a previously detected macromolecular structure or extrapolated on the server from a specific PDB chain. Users have the option to use either coarse or fine angular sampling strategies based on uniformly distributed rotations and to accurately compensate for the CET common ‘Missing Wedge’ artefact during sampling. After completion, all candidate macromolecules cut out from the tomogram are available for download. Their coordinates are stored and available in XML format, which can be easily integrated into successive analysis steps in other software. A pre-computed average of the first one hundred macromolecules is also available for immediate download, and the user has the option to further analyse the average, based on the detected score distribution in a novel web-density viewer. PMID:25934806

  8. Sub-micron resolution high-speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography in quality inspection for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Lauri, J.; Sliz, R.; Fält, P.; Fabritius, T.; Myllylä, R.; Cense, B.

    2012-04-01

    We present the use of sub-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) in quality inspection for printed electronics. The device used in the study is based on a supercontinuum light source, Michelson interferometer and high-speed spectrometer. The spectrometer in the presented spectral-domain optical coherence tomography setup (SD-OCT) is centered at 600 nm and covers a 400 nm wide spectral region ranging from 400 nm to 800 nm. Spectra were acquired at a continuous rate of 140,000 per second. The full width at half maximum of the point spread function obtained from a Parylene C sample was 0:98 m. In addition to Parylene C layers, the applicability of sub-micron SD-OCT in printed electronics was studied using PET and epoxy covered solar cell, a printed RFID antenna and a screen-printed battery electrode. A commercial SD-OCT system was used for reference measurements.

  9. Three-Dimensional Morphological Analysis of ALH84001 Magnetite Using Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Shimmin, Joel; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2003-01-01

    We report here the crystal morphologies of MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites as calculated by back-projection using electron tomography. In the present study, we used a 300 keV TEM with a field emission gun (Tecnai F-30 from FEI Inc.), equipped with a 2048 x 2048 pixel CCD camera from Gatan Inc. to image magnetite crystals over tilt ranges of approx. +/- 72 deg in 2 deg tilt intervals. The images were aligned for back-projection, either manually, or through the use of fiducial 5 nm Au spheres affixed to the specimen prior to microscopy. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were computed using weighted back-projection of the tilted views. The tomograms were viewed and analyzed as a series of slices 1.0 nm thick, taken parallel to the specimen-supporting grid, using the IMOD software package. The shape of each magnetite crystal was determined by defining the external contour of a given magnetite in each slice and assembling a stack of these contours in 3-D. To aid in visualization, the stacked contour array was reduced to an optimal mesh by Delaunay triangulation. The surface normal to each of the triangles in the mesh was calculated and the triangle faces colored according to the orientation of that surface normal relative to the principal crystallographic axis of magnetite. Green surfaces correspond to {111} orientations, blue surfaces to {100} orientations, and red surfaces to {110} orientations. Triangles whose surface normal did not correspond to one of the principal axes were colored gray. Within the experimental and numerical uncertainties of the deconvolution, the tomographic reconstruction of both MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites are equivalent and correspond to a truncated hexa-octahedral morphology.

  10. Structure of reconstituted bacterial membrane efflux pump by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Trépout, Sylvain; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Granier, Thierry; Ducruix, Arnaud; Frangakis, Achilleas S; Lambert, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Complexes of OprM and MexA, two proteins of the MexA-MexB-OprM multidrug efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterium, were reconstituted into proteoliposomes by detergent removal. Stacks of protein layers with a constant height of 21nm, separated by lipid bilayers, were obtained at stoichiometry of 1:1 (w/w). Using cryo-electron microscopy and tomography, we showed that these protein layers were composed of MexA-OprM complexes self-assembled into regular arrays. Image processing of extracted sub-tomograms depicted the architecture of the bipartite complex sandwiched between two lipid bilayers, representing an environment close to that of the native whole pump (i.e. anchored between outer and inner membranes of P. aeruginosa). The MexA-OprM complex appeared as a cylindrical structure in which we were able to identify the OprM molecule and the MexA moiety. MexA molecules have a cylindrical shape prolonging the periplasmic helices of OprM, and widening near the lipid bilayer. The flared part is likely composed of two MexA domains adjacent to the lipid bilayer, although their precise organization was not reachable mainly due to their flexibility. Moreover, the intermembrane distance of 21nm indicated that the height of the bipartite complex is larger than that of the tripartite AcrA-AcrB-TolC built-up model in which TolC and AcrB are docked into contact. We proposed a model of MexA-OprM taking into account features of previous models based on AcrA-AcrB-TolC and our structural results providing clues to a possible mechanism of tripartite system assembly.

  11. Structure of a Conserved Retroviral RNA Packaging Element by NMR Spectroscopy and Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Irobalieva, Rossitza N.; Tolbert, Blanton; Smalls-Mantey, Adjoa; Iyalla, Kilali; Loeliger, Kelsey; D’Souza, Victoria; Khant, Htet; Schmid, Michael F.; Garcia, Eric; Telesnitsky, Alice; Chiu, Wah; Summers, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTRs) of all gammaretroviruses contain a conserved “double hairpin motif” (ΨCD) that is required for genome packaging. Both hairpins (SL-C and SL-D) contain GACG tetraloops that, in isolated RNAs, are capable of forming “kissing” interactions stabilized by two intermolecular G-C base pairs. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the double hairpin from the Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MoMuLV) ([ΨCD]2, 132-nucleotides, 42.8 kDaltons) using a 2H-edited NMR spectroscopy-based approach. This approach enabled the detection of 1H-1H dipolar interactions that were not observed in previous studies of isolated SL-C and SL-D hairpin RNAs using traditional 1H-1H correlated and 1H-13C-edited NMR methods. The hairpins participate in intermolecular cross-kissing interactions (SL-C to SL-D’ and SLC’ to SL-D), and stack in an end-to-end manner (SL-C to SL-D and SL-C’ to SL-D’) that gives rise to an elongated overall shape (ca. 95 Å by 45 Å by 25 Å). The global structure was confirmed by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET), making [ΨCD]2 simultaneously the smallest RNA to be structurally characterized to date by cryo-ET and among the largest to be determined by NMR. Our findings suggest that, in addition to promoting dimerization, [ΨCD]2 functions as a scaffold that helps initiate virus assembly by exposing a cluster of conserved UCUG elements for binding to the cognate nucleocapsid domains of assembling viral Gag proteins. PMID:20933521

  12. Automatic detection of mitochondria from electron microscope tomography images: a curve fitting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasel, Serdar F.; Hassanpour, Reza; Mumcuoglu, Erkan U.; Perkins, Guy C.; Martone, Maryann

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are sub-cellular components which are mainly responsible for synthesis of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) and involved in the regulation of several cellular activities such as apoptosis. The relation between some common diseases of aging and morphological structure of mitochondria is gaining strength by an increasing number of studies. Electron microscope tomography (EMT) provides high-resolution images of the 3D structure and internal arrangement of mitochondria. Studies that aim to reveal the correlation between mitochondrial structure and its function require the aid of special software tools for manual segmentation of mitochondria from EMT images. Automated detection and segmentation of mitochondria is a challenging problem due to the variety of mitochondrial structures, the presence of noise, artifacts and other sub-cellular structures. Segmentation methods reported in the literature require human interaction to initialize the algorithms. In our previous study, we focused on 2D detection and segmentation of mitochondria using an ellipse detection method. In this study, we propose a new approach for automatic detection of mitochondria from EMT images. First, a preprocessing step was applied in order to reduce the effect of nonmitochondrial sub-cellular structures. Then, a curve fitting approach was presented using a Hessian-based ridge detector to extract membrane-like structures and a curve-growing scheme. Finally, an automatic algorithm was employed to detect mitochondria which are represented by a subset of the detected curves. The results show that the proposed method is more robust in detection of mitochondria in consecutive EMT slices as compared with our previous automatic method.

  13. Synaptic vesicle populations in saccular hair cells reconstructed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, D; Runyeon, J W; Crum, J; Ellisman, M H; Roberts, W M

    1999-01-01

    We used electron tomography to map the three-dimensional architecture of the ribbon-class afferent synapses in frog saccular hair cells. The synaptic body (SB) at each synapse was nearly spherical (468 +/- 65 nm diameter; mean +/- SD) and was covered by a monolayer of synaptic vesicles (34.3 nm diameter; 8.8% coefficient of variation), many of them tethered to it by approximately 20-nm-long filaments, at an average density of 55% of close-packed (376 +/- 133 vesicles per SB). These vesicles could support approximately 900 msec of exocytosis at the reported maximal rate, which the cells can sustain for at least 2 sec, suggesting that replenishment of vesicles on the SB is not rate limiting. Consistent with this interpretation, prolonged K+ depolarization did not deplete vesicles on the SB. The monolayer of SB-associated vesicles remained after cell lysis in the presence of 4 mM Ca2+, indicating that the association is tight and Ca2+-resistant. The space between the SB and the plasma membrane contained numerous vesicles, many of which ( approximately 32 per synapse) were in contact with the plasma membrane. This number of docked vesicles could support maximal exocytosis for at most approximately 70 msec. Additional docked vesicles were seen within a few hundred nanometers of the synapse and occasionally at greater distances. The presence of omega profiles on the plasma membrane around active zones, in the same locations as coated pits and coated vesicles labeled with an extracellular marker, suggests that local membrane recycling may contribute to the three- to 14-fold greater abundance of vesicles in the cytoplasm (not associated with the SB) near synapses than in nonsynaptic regions.

  14. Visualization of the herpes simplex virus portal in situ by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardone, Giovanni; Winkler, Dennis C.; Trus, Benes L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Heuser, John E.; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.; Steven, Alasdair C. . E-mail: Alasdair_Steven@nih.gov

    2007-05-10

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), the prototypical herpesvirus, has an icosahedral nucleocapsid surrounded by a proteinaceous tegument and a lipoprotein envelope. As in tailed bacteriophages, the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid is broken at one of the 12 vertices, which is occupied by a dodecameric ring of portal protein, UL6, instead of a pentamer of the capsid protein, UL19. The portal ring serves as a conduit for DNA entering and exiting the capsid. From a cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids immuno-gold-labeled with anti-UL6 antibodies, we confirmed that UL6 resides at a vertex. To visualize the portal in the context of the assembled capsid, we used cryo-electron tomography to determine the three-dimensional structures of individual A-capsids (empty, mature capsids). The similarity in size and overall shape of the portal and a UL19 pentamer - both are cylinders of {approx} 800 kDa - combined with residual noise in the tomograms, prevented us from identifying the portal vertices directly; however, this was accomplished by a computational classification procedure. Averaging the portal-containing subtomograms produced a structure that tallies with the isolated portal, as previously reconstructed by cryo-EM. The portal is mounted on the outer surface of the capsid floor layer, with its narrow end pointing outwards. This disposition differs from that of known phage portals in that the bulk of its mass lies outside, not inside, the floor. This distinction may be indicative of divergence at the level of portal-related functions other than its role as a DNA channel.

  15. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu–Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmaier, A.; Aboulfadl, H.; Pfaff, M.; Mücklich, F.; Motz, C.

    2015-02-15

    A Cu–Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu–26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain. - Highlights: • Structural evolution in a deformed Cu–Co composite is studied on all length scales. • Amount of intermixing is examined by atom-probe tomography. • Supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in Cu are observed.

  16. In vitro atherosclerotic plaque and calcium quantitation by intravascular ultrasound and electron-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gutfinger, D E; Leung, C Y; Hiro, T; Maheswaran, B; Nakamura, S; Detrano, R; Kang, X; Tang, W; Tobis, J M

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) in quantitating human atherosclerotic plaque and calcium. In experiment 1, 12 human atherosclerotic arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS and EBCT. The plaque from each arterial segment was dissected and a volume measurement of the dissected plaque was obtained by water displacement. The plaque from each arterial segment was ashed at 700 degrees F, and the weight of the remaining ashes was used as an estimate of the calcium mass. In experiment II, 11 calcified arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS at one site along the artery. A corresponding histologic cross section stained with Masson's trichrome was prepared. In experiment I, the mean plaque volume measured by water displacement was 165.3 +/- 118.4 microliters. The mean plaque volume calculated by IVUS was 166.1 +/- 114.4 microliters and correlated closely with that by water displacement (r = 0.98, p < 0.0001). The mean calcium mass measured by ashing was 19.4 +/- 15.8 mg. The mean calculated calcium mass by EBCT was 19.9 mg and correlated closely with that by ashing (r=0.98, p<0.001). The mean calculated calcium volume by IVUS was 18.6 +/- 11.2 microliters and correlated linearly with the calcium mass by ashing (r = 0.87, p < 0.0003). In experiment II, the mean cross-sectional area of the calcified matrix was 1.71 +/- 0.66 mm2 by histologic examination compared with 1.44 +/- 0.66 mm2 by IVUS. There was a good correlation between the calcified cross-sectional area by histologic examination and IVUS (r = 0.76, p < 0.007); however, IVUS may underestimate the amount of calcium present depending on the intralesional calcium morphologic characteristics. In conclusion, IVUS accurately quantitates atherosclerotic plaque volume as well as the cross-sectional area and volume of intralesional calcium, especially if the

  17. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  18. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2015-08-11

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of lipid vesicles embedded in vitreous ice and investigated by automated electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Dierksen, K; Typke, D; Hegerl, R; Walz, J; Sackmann, E; Baumeister, W

    1995-04-01

    Automated electron tomography is shown to be a suitable means to visualize the shape of phospholipid vesicles embedded in vitrified ice. With a slow-scan charge-coupled device camera as a recording device, the cumulative electron dose needed to record a data set of 60 projections at a magnification of 20,000X can be kept as low as 15 e-/A2 (or 1500 electrons/nm2). The membrane of the three-dimensionally reconstructed vesicles is clearly visible in two-dimensional sections through the three-dimensionally reconstructed volume. Some edges indicating a polygonal shape of the vesicles, frozen from the gel phase, are also clearly recognized. Because of the presently limited tilt angle range (+/- 60 degrees), the upper and lower "caps" of the vesicles (representing about 35% of the surface of the ellipsoidal particles) remain invisible in the three-dimensional reconstruction.

  20. Direct observation of stacking faults and pore connections in ordered cage-type mesoporous silica FDU-12 by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ersen, Ovidiu; Parmentier, Julien; Solovyov, Leonid A; Drillon, Marc; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Werckmann, Jacques; Schultz, Patrick

    2008-12-10

    The porous structure and the periodic array of cavities in ordered mesoporous materials with large, three-dimensionally arranged and interconnected pores is thoroughly described by combining electron tomography, small-angle X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen sorption techniques. We used the ability of the electron tomography to provide local three-dimensional information of a nano-object and compared the results to those of the other characterization techniques which furnish global information. We showed thus that the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure usually assigned to the FDU-12 materials is in fact an intergrowth of cubic and hexagonal close-packing structures. This agrees with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) modeling, but for the first time a direct visualization of these stacking faults was achieved. Three-dimensional transmission electron microscopy (3D-TEM) provides also a direct and unique evidence of peculiar stacking defects ("z-shifted [111] areas"), as well as an estimate of their density, which have never been reported elsewhere. In addition, interstitial cavities were also observed, revealing the complex defective structure of this material. A direct observation of the nature of the connecting pores was also achieved for the first time, with a resolution limit of 2 nm. Finally, the characteristics of the porous network evidenced by 3D-TEM are used to explain and validate the results obtained by nitrogen sorption experiments.

  1. Correlating Atom Probe Tomography with Atomic-Resolved Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy: Example of Segregation at Silicon Grain Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Stoffers, Andreas; Barthel, Juri; Liebscher, Christian H; Gault, Baptiste; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Scheu, Christina; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-02-20

    In the course of a thorough investigation of the performance-structure-chemistry interdependency at silicon grain boundaries, we successfully developed a method to systematically correlate aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The correlative approach is conducted on individual APT and TEM specimens, with the option to perform both investigations on the same specimen in the future. In the present case of a Σ9 grain boundary, joint mapping of the atomistic details of the grain boundary topology, in conjunction with chemical decoration, enables a deeper understanding of the segregation of impurities observed at such grain boundaries.

  2. Characterizing the Three-Dimensional Structure of Block Copolymers via Sequential Infiltration Synthesis and Scanning Transmission Electron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Winterstein, Jonathan; Doxastakis, Manolis; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Biswas, Mahua; Ren, Jiaxing; Suh, Hyo Seon; Darling, Seth B; Liddle, J Alexander; Elam, Jeffrey W; de Pablo, Juan J; Zaluzec, Nestor J; Nealey, Paul F

    2015-05-26

    Understanding and controlling the three-dimensional structure of block copolymer (BCP) thin films is critical for utilizing these materials for sub-20 nm nanopatterning in semiconductor devices, as well as in membranes and solar cell applications. Combining an atomic layer deposition (ALD)-based technique for enhancing the contrast of BCPs in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) together with scanning TEM (STEM) tomography reveals and characterizes the three-dimensional structures of poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) thin films with great clarity. Sequential infiltration synthesis (SIS), a block-selective technique for growing inorganic materials in BCPs films in an ALD tool and an emerging technique for enhancing the etch contrast of BCPs, was harnessed to significantly enhance the high-angle scattering from the polar domains of BCP films in the TEM. The power of combining SIS and STEM tomography for three-dimensional (3D) characterization of BCP films was demonstrated with the following cases: self-assembled cylindrical, lamellar, and spherical PS-b-PMMA thin films. In all cases, STEM tomography has revealed 3D structures that were hidden underneath the surface, including (1) the 3D structure of defects in cylindrical and lamellar phases, (2) the nonperpendicular 3D surface of grain boundaries in the cylindrical phase, and (3) the 3D arrangement of spheres in body-centered-cubic (BCC) and hexagonal-closed-pack (HCP) morphologies in the spherical phase. The 3D data of the spherical morphologies was compared to coarse-grained simulations and assisted in validating the simulations' parameters. STEM tomography of SIS-treated BCP films enables the characterization of the exact structure used for pattern transfer and can lead to a better understating of the physics that is utilized in BCP lithography.

  3. A study of 3D structure of nighttime electron density enhancement in the mid-latitude ionosphere by GPS tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Saito, A.

    2011-12-01

    The mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) is a feature that the nighttime electron density larger than that in the daytime mid-latitude ionosphere. This anomaly was first detected in the southern hemisphere five decades ago and observed in the northern hemisphere recently by ionosondes and satellites. Previous studies presented the electron density structure of MSNA by using COSMIC occultation data and found that MSNA is clearly seen around 300 km altitude during local summer. However, due to lack of observation, the day-to-day variation of MSNA was not investigated. A GPS tomography method by SPEL of Kyoto University using the total electron content (TEC) data measured by the ground-based GPS receiver network is employed in this study. The wide coverage and continuous observation of GPS receivers are suitable for investigating the spatial and day-to-day variations of ionospheric electron densities. The algorithm of the GPS tomography developed by SPEL of Kyoto University use a constraint condition that the gradient of election density tends to be smooth in the horizontal direction and steep in the vicinity of the F2 peak, instead of inputting the initial conditions. Therefore, the algorithm is independent of any ionospheric and plasmaspheric electron density distribution models. The dense ground-based GPS receiver network around European region is used to study the three dimensional (3D) structure of MSNA with GPS tomography. Results show that the MSNA usually appear around the geomagnetic mid-latitude region during local summer nighttime. The feature of MSNA is most obvious at the ionospheric F2-peak altitudes. The result also shows a day-to-day variation in the formation of MSNA, in terms of the occurrence time, intensity, and spatial extent. The tomographic results are compared with the ionosondes, satellites, and radar measurements. A theoretical model simulation, SAMI2, is also used to further discuss the mechanism of MSNA. The comparison with other

  4. A Closed-Loop Proportional-Integral (PI) Control Software for Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    REN, GANG; LIU, JINXIN; LI, HONGCHANG; CHEN, XUEFENG

    2016-06-23

    A closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control software is provided for fully mechanically controlled automated electron microscopic tomography. The software is developed based on Gatan DigitalMicrograph�, and is compatible with Zeiss LIBRA� 120 transmission electron microscope. However, it can be expanded to other TEM instrument with modification. The software consists of a graphical user interface, a digital PI controller, an image analyzing unit, and other drive units (i.e.: image acquire unit and goniometer drive unit). During a tomography data collection process, the image analyzing unit analyzes both the accumulated shift and defocus value of the latest acquired image, and provides the results to the digital PI controller. The digital PI control compares the results with the preset values and determines the optimum adjustments of the goniometer. The goniometer drive unit adjusts the spatial position of the specimen according to the instructions given by the digital PI controller for the next tilt angle and image acquisition. The goniometer drive unit achieves high precision positioning by using a backlash elimination method. The major benefits of the software are: 1) the goniometer drive unit keeps pre-aligned/optimized beam conditions unchanged and achieves position tracking solely through mechanical control; 2) the image analyzing unit relies on only historical data and therefore does not require additional images/exposures; 3) the PI controller enables the system to dynamically track the imaging target with extremely low system error.

  5. Reconstructing virus structures from nanometer to near-atomic resolutions with cryo-electron microscopy and tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Juan; Liu, Xiangan; Rochat, Ryan H.; Baker, Matthew L.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    The past few decades have seen tremendous advances in single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM). The field has matured to the point that near-atomic resolution density maps can be generated for icosahedral viruses without the need for crystallization. In parallel, substantial progress has been made in determining the structures of non-icosahedrally arranged proteins in viruses by employing either single particle cryo-EM or cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Implicit in this course has been the availability of a new generation of electron cryo-microscopes and the development of the computational tools that are essential for generating these maps and models. This methodology has enabled structural biologists to analyze structures in increasing detail for virus particles that are in different morphogenetic and biochemical states. Furthermore, electron imaging of frozen, hydrated cells, in the process of being infected by viruses, has also opened up a new avenue for studying virus structures “in situ”. Here we present the common techniques used to acquire and process cryo-EM and cryo-ET data and discuss their implications for structural virology both now and in the future. PMID:22297510

  6. Structural evolution and strain induced mixing in Cu-Co composites studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Bachmaier, A; Aboulfadl, H; Pfaff, M; Mücklich, F; Motz, C

    2015-02-01

    A Cu-Co composite material is chosen as a model system to study structural evolution and phase formations during severe plastic deformation. The evolving microstructures as a function of the applied strain were characterized at the micro-, nano-, and atomic scale-levels by combining scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The amount of intermixing between the two phases at different strains was examined at the atomic scale using atom probe tomography as complimentary method. It is shown that Co particles are dissolved in the Cu matrix during severe plastic deformation to a remarkable extent and their size, number, and volume fraction were quantitatively determined during the deformation process. From the results, it can be concluded that supersaturated solid solutions up to 26 at.% Co in a fcc Cu-26 at.% Co alloy are obtained during deformation. However, the distribution of Co was found to be inhomogeneous even at the highest degree of investigated strain.

  7. Minerals and aligned collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scales: structural analysis using dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tagaya, Motohiro; Chen, Song; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    The mineralized structure of aligned collagen fibrils in a tilapia fish scale was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques after a thin sample was prepared using aqueous techniques. Electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy data indicated that a mineralized internal layer consisting of aligned collagen fibrils contains hydroxyapatite crystals. Bright-field imaging, dark-field imaging, and energy-filtered TEM showed that the hydroxyapatite was mainly distributed in the hole zones of the aligned collagen fibrils structure, while needle-like materials composed of calcium compounds including hydroxyapatite existed in the mineralized internal layer. Dark-field imaging and three-dimensional observation using electron tomography revealed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were mainly found in the matrix between the collagen fibrils. It was observed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were preferentially distributed on the surface of the hole zones in the aligned collagen fibrils structure and in the matrix between the collagen fibrils in the mineralized internal layer of the scale.

  8. Online monitoring of printed electronics by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alarousu, Erkki; AlSaggaf, Ahmed; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is an optical method capable of 3D imaging of object's internal structure with micron-scale resolution. Modern SD-OCT tools offer the speed capable of online monitoring of printed devices. This paper demonstrates the use of SD-OCT in a simulated roll-to-roll (R2R) process through monitoring some structural properties of moving screen printed interdigitated electrodes. It is shown that structural properties can be resolved for speeds up to ca. 1 m/min, which is the first step towards application of this method in real manufacturing processes, including roll-to-roll (R2R) printing. PMID:23536206

  9. Online monitoring of printed electronics by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Alarousu, Erkki; AlSaggaf, Ahmed; Jabbour, Ghassan E

    2013-01-01

    Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is an optical method capable of 3D imaging of object's internal structure with micron-scale resolution. Modern SD-OCT tools offer the speed capable of online monitoring of printed devices. This paper demonstrates the use of SD-OCT in a simulated roll-to-roll (R2R) process through monitoring some structural properties of moving screen printed interdigitated electrodes. It is shown that structural properties can be resolved for speeds up to ca. 1 m/min, which is the first step towards application of this method in real manufacturing processes, including roll-to-roll (R2R) printing.

  10. High-voltage electron microscopy tomography and structome analysis of unique spiral bacteria from the deep sea.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masashi; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Kimitaka; Yamamoto, Yuta; Arai, Shigeo; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Mori, Yuko; Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Uddin, Mohammad Shorif; Chibana, Hiroji

    2016-08-01

    Structome analysis is a useful tool for identification of unknown microorganisms that cannot be cultured. In 2012, we discovered a unique deep-sea microorganism with a cell structure intermediate between those of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and described its features using freeze-substitution electron microscopy and structome analysis (quantitative and three-dimensional structural analysis of a whole cell at the electron microscopic level). We named it Myojin parakaryote Here we describe, using serial ultrathin sectioning and high-voltage electron microscopy tomography of freeze-substituted specimens, the structome analysis and 3D reconstruction of another unique spiral bacteria, found in the deep sea off the coast of Japan. The bacteria, which is named as 'Myojin spiral bacteria' after the discovery location and their morphology, had a total length of 1.768 ± 0.478 µm and a total diameter of 0.445 ± 0.050 µm, and showed either clockwise or counter-clockwise spiral. The cells had a cell surface membrane, thick fibrous layer, ribosomes and inner fibrous structures (most likely DNA). They had no flagella. The bacteria had 322 ± 119 ribosomes per cell. This ribosome number is only 1.2% of that of Escherichia coli and 19.3% of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and may reflect a very slow growth rate of this organism in the deep sea.

  11. Preparation of primary neurons for visualizing neurites in a frozen-hydrated state using cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Shahmoradian, Sarah H; Galiano, Mauricio R; Wu, Chengbiao; Chen, Shurui; Rasband, Matthew N; Mobley, William C; Chiu, Wah

    2014-02-12

    Neurites, both dendrites and axons, are neuronal cellular processes that enable the conduction of electrical impulses between neurons. Defining the structure of neurites is critical to understanding how these processes move materials and signals that support synaptic communication. Electron microscopy (EM) has been traditionally used to assess the ultrastructural features within neurites; however, the exposure to organic solvent during dehydration and resin embedding can distort structures. An important unmet goal is the formulation of procedures that allow for structural evaluations not impacted by such artifacts. Here, we have established a detailed and reproducible protocol for growing and flash-freezing whole neurites of different primary neurons on electron microscopy grids followed by their examination with cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). This technique allows for 3-D visualization of frozen, hydrated neurites at nanometer resolution, facilitating assessment of their morphological differences. Our protocol yields an unprecedented view of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurites, and a visualization of hippocampal neurites in their near-native state. As such, these methods create a foundation for future studies on neurites of both normal neurons and those impacted by neurological disorders.

  12. Native Immunogold Labeling of Cell Surface Proteins and Viral Glycoproteins for Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Cryo-Electron Tomography Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hong; Strauss, Joshua D.; Ke, Zunlong; Alonas, Eric; Dillard, Rebecca S.; Hampton, Cheri M.; Lamb, Kristen M.; Hammonds, Jason E.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Spearman, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for immunogold labeling of thick, cryo-preserved biological specimens. However, most of the methods are permutations of chemical fixation and sample sectioning, which select and isolate the immunolabeled region of interest. We describe a method for combining immunogold labeling with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) of the surface proteins of intact mammalian cells or the surface glycoproteins of assembling and budding viruses in the context of virus-infected mammalian cells cultured on EM grids. In this method, the cells were maintained in culture media at physiologically relevant temperatures while sequentially incubated with the primary and secondary antibodies. Subsequently, the immunogold-labeled specimens were vitrified and observed under cryo-conditions in the transmission electron microscope. Cryo-EM and cryo-ET examination of the immunogold-labeled cells revealed the association of immunogold particles with the target antigens. Additionally, the cellular structure was unaltered by pre-immunolabeling chemical fixation and retained well-preserved plasma membranes, cytoskeletal elements, and macromolecular complexes. We think this technique will be of interest to cell biologists for cryo-EM and conventional studies of native cells and pathogen-infected cells. PMID:26069287

  13. Electron tomography of negatively stained complex viruses: application in their diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Jan; Demeestere, Lien

    2009-01-01

    Background Electron tomographic analysis can be combined with the simple and rapid negative staining technique used in electron microscopy based virus diagnosis. Methods Standard negative staining of representative examples of parapoxviruses and paramyxoviruses was combined with electron tomographic analysis. Results Digital sectioning of reconstructions of these viruses at a selected height demonstrated the viral ultrastructure in detail, including the characteristic diagnostic features like the surface threads on C-particles of a parapoxvirus and individual glycoproteins and the internal nucleoprotein strand of Newcastle disease virus. For both viruses, deformation and flattening were observed. Conclusion The combination of negative staining of complex viruses with electron tomographic analysis, allows visualizing and measuring artifacts typical for negative staining. This approach allows sharp visualisation of structures in a subnanometer-thick plane, avoiding blurring due to superposition which is inherent to TEM. In selected examples, such analyses can improve diagnosis of viral agents. PMID:19208223

  14. Gold nanoparticles generated in ethosome bilayers, as revealed by cryo-electron-tomography.

    PubMed

    de la Presa, Patricia; Rueda, Tatiana; del Puerto Morales, María; Javier Chichón, F; Arranz, Rocío; Valpuesta, José María; Hernando, Antonio

    2009-03-12

    Gold nanoparticles have been synthesized inside ethosomes, vesicles composed of phospholipid, ethanol, and water, which could be very efficient not only in delivery probes to the skin but also as diagnostic and therapeutic multimodal agents. High efficiency encapsulation of gold nanoparticles is achieved by a simple strategy: the nanoparticles synthesis occurs simultaneously with the ethosomes formation in the absence of any undesirable reducing agents. A three-dimensional reconstruction of a gold-embedded ethosome generated by cryoelectron tomography reveals that the gold particle is localized inside the lipid bilayer, leaving the ethosome surface and core free for further functionalization. The resulting gold nanoparticles are homogeneous in size and shape and, depending on synthesis temperature, the size ranges from 10 to 20 nm, as revealed by TEM. The ethosome-nanoparticles hybrids' size has been investigated by means of dynamic light scattering and has been found to vary with temperature and gold salt concentration from 700 to 400 nm. Gold nanoparticles-encapsulated ethosomes offer a versatile platform for the enhancement of pharmacological efficacy in transdermal and dermal delivery systems.

  15. Zernike Phase Contrast Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Tomography for Structure Determination at Nanometer and Sub-Nanometer Resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Liu, Xiangan; Danev, Radostin; Jakana, Joanita; Schmid, Michael F.; King, Jonathan; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Chiu, Wah

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Zernike phase contrast cryo-electron microscopy (ZPC-cryoEM) is an emerging technique which is capable of producing higher image contrast than conventional cryoEM. By combining this technique with advanced image processing methods, we achieved subnanometer resolution for two biological specimens: 2-D bacteriorhodopsin crystal and epsilon15 bacteriophage. For an asymmetric reconstruction of epsilon15 bacteriophage, ZPC-cryoEM can reduce the required amount of data by a factor of ~3 compared to conventional cryoEM. The reconstruction was carried out to 13 Å resolution without the need to correct the contrast transfer function. New structural features at the portal vertex of the epsilon15 bacteriophage are revealed in this reconstruction. Using ZPC cryo-electron tomography (ZPC-cryoET), a similar level of data reduction and higher resolution structures of epsilon15 bacteriophage can be obtained relative to conventional cryoET. These results show quantitatively the benefits of ZPC-cryoEM and -cryoET for structural determinations of macromolecular machines at nanometer and subnanometer resolutions. PMID:20696391

  16. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections.

  17. Biological application of Compressed Sensing Tomography in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Matteo; Signoroni, Alberto; Sanzogni, Andrea; Masini, Luca; Migliori, Andrea; Ortolani, Luca; Pezza, Alessandro; Morandi, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of a biological sample, namely collagen fibrils in human dermal tissue, was obtained from a set of projection-images acquired in the Scanning Electron Microscope. A tailored strategy for the transmission imaging mode was implemented in the microscope and proved effective in acquiring the projections needed for the tomographic reconstruction. Suitable projection alignment and Compressed Sensing formulation were used to overcome the limitations arising from the experimental acquisition strategy and to improve the reconstruction of the sample. The undetermined problem of structure reconstruction from a set of projections, limited in number and angular range, was indeed supported by exploiting the sparsity of the object projected in the electron microscopy images. In particular, the proposed system was able to preserve the reconstruction accuracy even in presence of a significant reduction of experimental projections. PMID:27646194

  18. Validation of minimally invasive measurement of myocardial perfusion using electron beam computed tomography and application in human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Bell, M; Lerman, L; Rumberger, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To measure myocardial perfusion using an estimate of intramyocardial vascular volume obtained by electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) in an animal model; to assess the feasibility and validity of measuring regional myocardial perfusion in human volunteers using the techniques developed and validated in the animal studies.
METHODS—Measurements of myocardial perfusion with EBCT employing intravenous contrast injections were compared with radioactive microsphere measurements (flow 57 to 346 ml/100 g/min) in seven closed chest dogs. Fourteen human volunteers then underwent EBCT scans using intravenous contrast injections.
RESULTS—Mean (SEM) global intramyocardial vascular volume by EBCT was 7.6 (1.1)%. The correlation between global EBCT (y) and microsphere (x) perfusion was y = 0.59x + 15.56 (r = 0.86) before, and y = 0.72x + 6.06 (r = 0.88) after correcting for intramyocardial vascular volume. Regional perfusion correlation was y = 0.75x + 23.84 (r = 0.82). Corresponding improvements in agreement between the two techniques were also seen using Bland-Altman plots. In the human subjects, mean resting global myocardial flow was 98 (6) ml/100 g/min, with homogeneous flow across all regions. In 10 of these subjects, perfusion was studied during coronary vasodilatation using intravenous adenosine. Global flow increased from 93 (5) ml/100 g/min at rest to 250 (19) ml/100 g/min during adenosine (p < 0.001), with an average perfusion reserve ratio of 2.8 (0.2). Similar changes in regional perfusion were observed and were uniform throughout all regions, with a mean regional perfusion reserve ratio of 2.8 (0.3).
CONCLUSIONS—Accounting for intramyocardial vascular volume improves the accuracy of EBCT measurements of myocardial perfusion when using intravenous contrast injections. The feasibility of providing accurate measurements of global and regional myocardial perfusion and perfusion reserve in people using this

  19. 3D reconstruction of VZV infected cell nuclei and PML nuclear cages by serial section array scanning electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Mike; Joubert, Lydia; Perrino, John; Koh, Ai Leen; Phanwar, Ibanri; Arvin, Ann M

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM) and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity), what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency) and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the single cell

  20. 3D Reconstruction of VZV Infected Cell Nuclei and PML Nuclear Cages by Serial Section Array Scanning Electron Microscopy and Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Mike; Joubert, Lydia; Perrino, John; Koh, Ai Leen; Phanwar, Ibanri; Arvin, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) and herpes zoster (shingles). Like all herpesviruses, the VZV DNA genome is replicated in the nucleus and packaged into nucleocapsids that must egress across the nuclear membrane for incorporation into virus particles in the cytoplasm. Our recent work showed that VZV nucleocapsids are sequestered in nuclear cages formed from promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in vitro and in human dorsal root ganglia and skin xenografts in vivo. We sought a method to determine the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of nucleocapsids in the nuclei of herpesvirus-infected cells as well as the 3D shape, volume and ultrastructure of these unique PML subnuclear domains. Here we report the development of a novel 3D imaging and reconstruction strategy that we term Serial Section Array-Scanning Electron Microscopy (SSA-SEM) and its application to the analysis of VZV-infected cells and these nuclear PML cages. We show that SSA-SEM permits large volume imaging and 3D reconstruction at a resolution sufficient to localize, count and distinguish different types of VZV nucleocapsids and to visualize complete PML cages. This method allowed a quantitative determination of how many nucleocapsids can be sequestered within individual PML cages (sequestration capacity), what proportion of nucleocapsids are entrapped in single nuclei (sequestration efficiency) and revealed the ultrastructural detail of the PML cages. More than 98% of all nucleocapsids in reconstructed nuclear volumes were contained in PML cages and single PML cages sequestered up to 2,780 nucleocapsids, which were shown by electron tomography to be embedded and cross-linked by an filamentous electron-dense meshwork within these unique subnuclear domains. This SSA-SEM analysis extends our recent characterization of PML cages and provides a proof of concept for this new strategy to investigate events during virion assembly at the single cell

  1. Reverse Monte Carlo reconstruction algorithm for discrete electron tomography based on HAADF-STEM atom counting.

    PubMed

    Moyon, F; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Robertson, M D; Etienne, A; Castro, C; Lefebvre, W

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm to obtain a three-dimensional reconstruction of a single nanoparticle based on the method of atom counting. The location of atoms in three dimensions has been successfully performed using simulations of high-angle-annular-dark-field images from only three zone-axis projections, [110], [310] and [211], for a face-centred cubic particle. These three orientations are typically accessible by low-tilt holders often used in high-performance scanning transmission electron microscopes.

  2. Spectral optimization for measuring electron density by the dual-energy computed tomography coupled with balanced filter method.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2009-08-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has the potential for measuring electron density distribution in a human body to predict the range of particle beams for treatment planning in proton or heavy-ion radiotherapy. However, thus far, a practical dual-energy method that can be used to precisely determine electron density for treatment planning in particle radiotherapy has not been developed. In this article, another DECT technique involving a balanced filter method using a conventional x-ray tube is described. For the spectral optimization of DECT using balanced filters, the author calculates beam-hardening error and air kerma required to achieve a desired noise level in electron density and effective atomic number images of a cylindrical water phantom with 50 cm diameter. The calculation enables the selection of beam parameters such as tube voltage, balanced filter material, and its thickness. The optimized parameters were applied to cases with different phantom diameters ranging from 5 to 50 cm for the calculations. The author predicts that the optimal combination of tube voltages would be 80 and 140 kV with Tb/Hf and Bi/Mo filter pairs for the 50-cm-diameter water phantom. When a single phantom calibration at a diameter of 25 cm was employed to cover all phantom sizes, maximum absolute beam-hardening errors were 0.3% and 0.03% for electron density and effective atomic number, respectively, over a range of diameters of the water phantom. The beam-hardening errors were 1/10 or less as compared to those obtained by conventional DECT, although the dose was twice that of the conventional DECT case. From the viewpoint of beam hardening and the tube-loading efficiency, the present DECT using balanced filters would be significantly more effective in measuring the electron density than the conventional DECT. Nevertheless, further developments of low-exposure imaging technology should be necessary as well as x-ray tubes with higher outputs to apply DECT coupled with the

  3. Comparison of F-region electron density observations by satellite radio tomography and incoherent scatter methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygrén, T.; Markkanen, M.; Lehtinen, M.; Tereshchenko, E. D.; Khudukon, B. Z.; Evstafiev, O. V.; Pollari, P.

    1996-12-01

    In November 1995 a campaign of satellite radiotomography supported by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar and several other instruments was arranged in Scandinavia. A chain of four satellite receivers extending from the north of Norway to the south of Finland was installed approximately along a geomagnetic meridian. The receivers carried out difference Doppler measurements using signals from satellites flying along the chain. The EISCAT UHF radar was simultaneously operational with its beam swinging either in geomagnetic or in geographic meridional plane. With this experimental set-up latitudinal scans of F-region electron density are obtained both from the radar observations and by tomographic inversion of the phase observations given by the difference Doppler experiment. This paper shows the first results of the campaign and compares the electron densities given by the two methods. Acknowledgements. This work has been supported by the UK Particle-Physics and Astronomy Research Council. The assistance of the director and staff of the EISCAT Scientific Association, the staff of the Norsk Polarinstitutt and the director and staff of the Swedish Institute of Space Physics is gratefully acknowledged. In addition the authors would like to thank Professor Evgeny Tereshchenko of the Polar Geophysical Institute in Mumansk, Russia and Dr Tuomo Nygrén of the University of Oulu, Finland for provision of data from EISCAT special program time during the November 1995 campaign. Topical Editor D. Alcaydé thanks E. J. Fremouw and another referee for their help in evaluating this paper.--> Correspondence to: I. K. Walker-->

  4. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-08-30

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions.

  5. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: tests on experimental data.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Corrêa, Cinthia Antunes; Steciuk, Gwladys; Jacob, Damien; Roussel, Pascal; Boullay, Philippe; Klementová, Mariana; Gemmi, Mauro; Kopeček, Jaromír; Domeneghetti, M Chiara; Cámara, Fernando; Petříček, Václav

    2015-12-01

    The recently published method for the structure refinement from three-dimensional precession electron diffraction data using dynamical diffraction theory [Palatinus et al. (2015). Acta Cryst. A71, 235-244] has been applied to a set of experimental data sets from five different samples - Ni2Si, PrVO3, kaolinite, orthopyroxene and mayenite. The data were measured on different instruments and with variable precession angles. For each sample a reliable reference structure was available. A large series of tests revealed that the method provides structure models with an average error in atomic positions typically between 0.01 and 0.02 Å. The obtained structure models are significantly more accurate than models obtained by refinement using kinematical approximation for the calculation of model intensities. The method also allows a reliable determination of site occupancies and determination of absolute structure. Based on the extensive tests, an optimal set of the parameters for the method is proposed.

  6. Electronic stopping power calculation for water under the Lindhard formalism for application in proton computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, A. F.; Mesa, J.

    2016-07-01

    Because of the behavior that charged particles have when they interact with biological material, proton therapy is shaping the future of radiation therapy in cancer treatment. The planning of radiation therapy is made up of several stages. The first one is the diagnostic image, in which you have an idea of the density, size and type of tumor being treated; to understand this it is important to know how the particles beam interacts with the tissue. In this work, by using de Lindhard formalism and the Y.R. Waghmare model for the charge distribution of the proton, the electronic stopping power (SP) for a proton beam interacting with a liquid water target in the range of proton energies 101 eV - 1010 eV taking into account all the charge states is calculated.

  7. Three-dimensional imaging of copper pillars using x-ray tomography within a scanning electron microscope: A simulation study based on synchrotron data

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, N.; Bertheau, J.; Charbonnier, J.; Hugonnard, P.; Lorut, F.; Bleuet, P.; Tabary, J.; Laloum, D.

    2013-02-15

    While microelectronic devices are frequently characterized with surface-sensitive techniques having nanometer resolution, interconnections used in 3D integration require 3D imaging with high penetration depth and deep sub-micrometer spatial resolution. X-ray tomography is well adapted to this situation. In this context, the purpose of this study is to assess a versatile and turn-key tomographic system allowing for 3D x-ray nanotomography of copper pillars. The tomography tool uses the thin electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to provoke x-ray emission from specific metallic targets. Then, radiographs are recorded while the sample rotates in a conventional cone beam tomography scheme that ends up with 3D reconstructions of the pillar. Starting from copper pillars data, collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we build a 3D numerical model of a copper pillar, paying particular attention to intermetallics. This model is then used to simulate physical radiographs of the pillar using the geometry of the SEM-hosted x-ray tomography system. Eventually, data are reconstructed and it is shown that the system makes it possible the quantification of 3D intermetallics volume in copper pillars. The paper also includes a prospective discussion about resolution issues.

  8. Three-dimensional ultrastructural analysis of cells in the periodontal ligament using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Shingo; Ohta, Keisuke; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Okayama, Satoko; Togo, Akinobu; Uchimura, Naohisa; Kusukawa, Jingo; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The accurate comprehension of normal tissue provides essential data to analyse abnormalities such as disease and regenerative processes. In addition, understanding the proper structure of the target tissue and its microenvironment may facilitate successful novel treatment strategies. Many studies have examined the nature and structure of periodontal ligaments (PDLs); however, the three-dimensional (3D) structure of cells in normal PDLs remains poorly understood. In this study, we used focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography to investigate the whole 3D ultrastructure of PDL cells along with quantitatively analysing their structural properties and ascertaining their orientation to the direction of the collagen fibre. PDL cells were shown to be in contact with each other, forming a widespread mesh-like network between the cementum and the alveolar bone. The volume of the cells in the horizontal fibre area was significantly larger than in other areas, whereas the anisotropy of these cells was lower than in other areas. Furthermore, the orientation of cells to the PDL fibres was not parallel to the PDL fibres in each area. As similar evaluations are recognized as being challenging using conventional two-dimensional methods, these novel 3D findings may contribute necessary knowledge for the comprehensive understanding and analysis of PDLs. PMID:27995978

  9. Laboratory-Based Cryogenic Soft X-ray Tomography with Correlative Cryo-Light and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David B.; Gelb, Jeff; Palshin, Vadim; Evans, James E.

    2013-02-01

    Here we present a novel laboratory-based cryogenic soft X-ray microscope for whole cell tomography of frozen hydrated samples. We demonstrate the capabilities of this compact cryogenic microscope by visualizing internal sub-cellular structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The microscope is shown to achieve better than 50 nm spatial resolution with a Siemens star test sample. For whole biological cells, the microscope can image specimens up to 5 micrometers thick. Structures as small as 90 nm can be detected in tomographic reconstructions at roughly 70 nm spatial resolution following a low cumulative radiation dose of only 7.2 MGy. Furthermore, the design of the specimen chamber utilizes a standard sample support that permits multimodal correlative imaging of the exact same unstained yeast cell via cryo-fluorescence light microscopy, cryo-soft x-ray microscopy and cryo-transmission electron microscopy. This completely laboratory-based cryogenic soft x-ray microscope will therefore enable greater access to three-dimensional ultrastructure determination of biological whole cells without chemical fixation or physical sectioning.

  10. Longitudinal imaging of HIV-1 spread in humanized mice with parallel 3D immunofluorescence and electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, Collin; Ladinsky, Mark S; Ninh, Allen; Galimidi, Rachel P; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2017-01-01

    Dissemination of HIV-1 throughout lymphoid tissues leads to systemic virus spread following infection. We combined tissue clearing, 3D-immunofluorescence, and electron tomography (ET) to longitudinally assess early HIV-1 spread in lymphoid tissues in humanized mice. Immunofluorescence revealed peak infection density in gut at 10–12 days post-infection when blood viral loads were low. Human CD4+ T-cells and HIV-1–infected cells localized predominantly to crypts and the lower third of intestinal villi. Free virions and infected cells were not readily detectable by ET at 5-days post-infection, whereas HIV-1–infected cells surrounded by pools of free virions were present in ~10% of intestinal crypts by 10–12 days. ET of spleen revealed thousands of virions released by individual cells and discreet cytoplasmic densities near sites of prolific virus production. These studies highlight the importance of multiscale imaging of HIV-1–infected tissues and are adaptable to other animal models and human patient samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23282.001 PMID:28198699

  11. Electron Tomography Analysis of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Infection in Human Neurons.

    PubMed

    Bílý, Tomáš; Palus, Martin; Eyer, Luděk; Elsterová, Jana; Vancová, Marie; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-06-15

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) causes serious, potentially fatal neurological infections that affect humans in endemic regions of Europe and Asia. Neurons are the primary target for TBEV infection in the central nervous system. However, knowledge about this viral infection and virus-induced neuronal injury is fragmental. Here, we directly examined the pathology that occurs after TBEV infection in human primary neurons. We exploited the advantages of advanced high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution techniques to achieve optimal preservation of infected cell architecture. Electron tomographic (ET) reconstructions elucidated high-resolution 3D images of the proliferating endoplasmic reticulum, and individual tubule-like structures of different diameters in the endoplasmic reticulum cisternae of single cells. ET revealed direct connections between the tubule-like structures and viral particles in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, ET showed connections between cellular microtubules and vacuoles that harbored the TBEV virions in neuronal extensions. This study was the first to characterize the 3D topographical organization of membranous whorls and autophagic vacuoles in TBEV-infected human neurons. The functional importance of autophagy during TBEV replication was studied in human neuroblastoma cells; stimulation of autophagy resulted in significantly increased dose-dependent TBEV production, whereas the inhibition of autophagy showed a profound, dose-dependent decrease of the yield of infectious virus.

  12. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-02-27

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer's. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer's disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50-100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell.

  13. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer’s. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer’s disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50–100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell. PMID:28240273

  14. Exploring the benefits of electron tomography to characterize the precise morphology of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles and its implications on their plasmonic properties.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Garrido, J C; Moreno, M S; Ducati, C; Pérez, L A; Midgley, P A; Coronado, E A

    2014-11-07

    In the design and engineering of functional core-shell nanostructures, material characterization at small length scales remains one of the major challenges. Here we show how electron tomography in high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) mode can be applied successfully to perform nano-metrological characterization of Au@Ag core-shell nanostructures. This work stresses the benefits of HAADF-STEM tomography and its use as a novel and rigorous tool for understanding the physical-chemical properties of complex 3D core-shell nanostructures. The reconstructed Au@Ag core-shell architecture was used as an input for discrete dipole approximation (DDA)-based electrodynamics simulations of the optical properties of the nanostructures. The implications of localized surface plasmon spectroscopy as well as Raman-enhanced spectroscopy are analysed.

  15. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  16. Development of novel three-dimensional reconstruction method for porous media for polymer electrolyte fuel cells using focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Takeshi; Inoue, Gen; Kawase, Motoaki; Kubo, Norio; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yokoyama, Kouji; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Shinohara, Kazuhiko; Hara, Yuka; Hara, Toru

    2017-04-01

    An accurate method for three-dimensional reconstruction of microstructures is developed to analyse mass transport phenomena in microporous layers (MPLs). The proposed method involves the use of focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope tomography. Numerical calculations of the structural and mass transport properties of MPLs are conducted using the reconstruction results and these results are found to be in good agreement with experimental results, demonstrating the accuracy of the new method.

  17. Breast Patient Setup Error Assessment: Comparison of Electronic Portal Image Devices and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Matching Results

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the differences in setup errors measured with the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and electronic portal image devices (EPID) in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Repeat CBCT scan were acquired for routine offline setup verification in 20 breast cancer patients. During the CBCT imaging fractions, EPID images of the treatment beams were recorded. Registrations of the bony anatomy for CBCT to planning CT and EPID to digitally reconstructed-radiographs (DRRs) were compared. In addition, similar measurements of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were acquired. Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis were performed for clinical and phantom registrations. Systematic and random setup errors were quantified for CBCT and EPID-driven correction protocols in the EPID coordinate system (U, V), with V parallel to the cranial-caudal axis and U perpendicular to V and the central beam axis. Results: Bland-Altman analysis of clinical EPID and CBCT registrations yielded 4 to 6-mm limits of agreement, indicating that both methods were not compatible. The EPID-based setup errors were smaller than the CBCT-based setup errors. Phantom measurements showed that CBCT accurately measures setup error whereas EPID underestimates setup errors in the cranial-caudal direction. In the clinical measurements, the residual bony anatomy setup errors after offline CBCT-based corrections were {Sigma}{sub U} = 1.4 mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 1.7 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.6 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 3.1 mm. Residual setup errors of EPID driven corrections corrected for underestimation were estimated at {Sigma}{sub U} = 2.2mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 3.3 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.9 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 2.9 mm. Conclusion: EPID registration underestimated the actual bony anatomy setup error in breast cancer patients by 20% to 50%. Using CBCT decreased setup uncertainties significantly.

  18. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Syncytial-Type Cell Plates during Endosperm Cellularization Visualized by High Resolution Electron Tomography W⃞

    PubMed Central

    Otegui, Marisa S.; Mastronarde, David N.; Kang, Byung-Ho; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    2001-01-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of syncytial-type cell plates in the endosperm of Arabidopsis has been analyzed at ∼6-nm resolution by means of dual-axis high-voltage electron tomography of high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted samples. Mini-phragmoplasts consisting of microtubule clusters assemble between sister and nonsister nuclei. Most Golgi-derived vesicles appear connected to these microtubules by two molecules that resemble kinesin-like motor proteins. These vesicles fuse with each other to form hourglass-shaped intermediates, which become wide (∼45 nm in diameter) tubules, the building blocks of wide tubular networks. New mini-phragmoplasts also are generated de novo around the margins of expanding wide tubular networks, giving rise to new foci of cell plate growth, which later become integrated into the main cell plate. Spiral-shaped rings of the dynamin-like protein ADL1A constrict but do not fission the wide tubules at irregular intervals. These rings appear to maintain the tubular geometry of the network. The wide tubular network matures into a convoluted fenestrated sheet in a process that involves increases of 45 and 130% in relative membrane surface area and volume, respectively. The proportionally larger increase in volume appears to reflect callose synthesis. Upon fusion with the parental plasma membrane, the convoluted fenestrated sheet is transformed into a planar fenestrated sheet. This transformation involves clathrin-coated vesicles that reduce the relative membrane surface area and volume by ∼70%. A ribosome-excluding matrix encompasses the cell plate membranes from the fusion of the first vesicles until the onset of the planar fenestrated sheet formation. We postulate that this matrix contains the molecules that mediate cell plate assembly. PMID:11549762

  19. A model based iterative reconstruction algorithm for high angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscope (HAADF-STEM) tomography.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, S V; Drummy, Lawrence F; Jackson, Michael A; De Graef, Marc; Simmons, Jeff; Bouman, Charles A

    2013-11-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF)-scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) data is increasingly being used in the physical sciences to research materials in 3D because it reduces the effects of Bragg diffraction seen in bright field TEM data. Typically, tomographic reconstructions are performed by directly applying either filtered back projection (FBP) or the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) to the data. Since HAADF-STEM tomography is a limited angle tomography modality with low signal to noise ratio, these methods can result in significant artifacts in the reconstructed volume. In this paper, we develop a model based iterative reconstruction algorithm for HAADF-STEM tomography. We combine a model for image formation in HAADF-STEM tomography along with a prior model to formulate the tomographic reconstruction as a maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) estimation problem. Our formulation also accounts for certain missing measurements by treating them as nuisance parameters in the MAP estimation framework. We adapt the iterative coordinate descent algorithm to develop an efficient method to minimize the corresponding MAP cost function. Reconstructions of simulated as well as experimental data sets show results that are superior to FBP and SIRT reconstructions, significantly suppressing artifacts and enhancing contrast.

  20. Determination of molecular structures of HIV envelope glycoproteins using cryo-electron tomography and automated sub-tomogram averaging.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joel R; White, Tommi A; Bliss, Donald; Moran, Amy; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Borgnia, Mario J; de la Cruz, M Jason V; Schauder, David; Hartnell, Lisa M; Nandwani, Rachna; Dawood, Moez; Kim, Brianna; Kim, Jun Hong; Sununu, John; Yang, Lisa; Bhatia, Siddhant; Subramaniam, Carolyn; Hurt, Darrell E; Gaudreault, Laurent; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2011-12-01

    Since its discovery nearly 30 years ago, more than 60 million people have been infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (www.usaid.gov). The virus infects and destroys CD4+ T-cells thereby crippling the immune system, and causing an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (2). Infection begins when the HIV Envelope glycoprotein "spike" makes contact with the CD4 receptor on the surface of the CD4+ T-cell. This interaction induces a conformational change in the spike, which promotes interaction with a second cell surface co-receptor (5,9). The significance of these protein interactions in the HIV infection pathway makes them of profound importance in fundamental HIV research, and in the pursuit of an HIV vaccine. The need to better understand the molecular-scale interactions of HIV cell contact and neutralization motivated the development of a technique to determine the structures of the HIV spike interacting with cell surface receptor proteins and molecules that block infection. Using cryo-electron tomography and 3D image processing, we recently demonstrated the ability to determine such structures on the surface of native virus, at ˜20 Å resolution (9,14). This approach is not limited to resolving HIV Envelope structures, and can be extended to other viral membrane proteins and proteins reconstituted on a liposome. In this protocol, we describe how to obtain structures of HIV envelope glycoproteins starting from purified HIV virions and proceeding stepwise through preparing vitrified samples, collecting, cryo-electron microscopy data, reconstituting and processing 3D data volumes, averaging and classifying 3D protein subvolumes, and interpreting results to produce a protein model. The computational aspects of our approach were adapted into modules that can be accessed and executed remotely using the Biowulf GNU/Linux parallel processing cluster at the NIH (http://biowulf.nih.gov). This remote access, combined with low-cost computer hardware and

  1. Determination of Molecular Structures of HIV Envelope Glycoproteins using Cryo-Electron Tomography and Automated Sub-tomogram Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Joel R.; White, Tommi A.; Bliss, Donald; Moran, Amy; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Borgnia, Mario J.; de la Cruz, M. Jason V.; Schauder, David; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Nandwani, Rachna; Dawood, Moez; Kim, Brianna; Kim, Jun Hong; Sununu, John; Yang, Lisa; Bhatia, Siddhant; Subramaniam, Carolyn; Hurt, Darrell E.; Gaudreault, Laurent; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery nearly 30 years ago, more than 60 million people have been infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (www.usaid.gov). The virus infects and destroys CD4+ T-cells thereby crippling the immune system, and causing an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) 2. Infection begins when the HIV Envelope glycoprotein "spike" makes contact with the CD4 receptor on the surface of the CD4+ T-cell. This interaction induces a conformational change in the spike, which promotes interaction with a second cell surface co-receptor 5,9. The significance of these protein interactions in the HIV infection pathway makes them of profound importance in fundamental HIV research, and in the pursuit of an HIV vaccine. The need to better understand the molecular-scale interactions of HIV cell contact and neutralization motivated the development of a technique to determine the structures of the HIV spike interacting with cell surface receptor proteins and molecules that block infection. Using cryo-electron tomography and 3D image processing, we recently demonstrated the ability to determine such structures on the surface of native virus, at ˜20 Å resolution 9,14. This approach is not limited to resolving HIV Envelope structures, and can be extended to other viral membrane proteins and proteins reconstituted on a liposome. In this protocol, we describe how to obtain structures of HIV envelope glycoproteins starting from purified HIV virions and proceeding stepwise through preparing vitrified samples, collecting, cryo-electron microscopy data, reconstituting and processing 3D data volumes, averaging and classifying 3D protein subvolumes, and interpreting results to produce a protein model. The computational aspects of our approach were adapted into modules that can be accessed and executed remotely using the Biowulf GNU/Linux parallel processing cluster at the NIH (http://biowulf.nih.gov). This remote access, combined with low-cost computer hardware and high

  2. Structural insights into M2O-Al2O3-WO3 (M = Na, K) system by electron diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Andrusenko, Iryna; Krysiak, Yaşar; Mugnaioli, Enrico; Gorelik, Tatiana E; Nihtianova, Diana; Kolb, Ute

    2015-06-01

    The M2O-Al2O3-WO3 (M = alkaline metals) system has attracted the attention of the scientific community because some of its members showed potential applications as single crystalline media for tunable solid-state lasers. These materials behave as promising laser host materials due to their high and continuous transparency in the wide range of the near-IR region. A systematic investigation of these phases is nonetheless hampered because it is impossible to produce large crystals and only in a few cases a pure synthetic product can be achieved. Despite substantial advances in X-ray powder diffraction methods, structure investigation on nanoscale is still challenging, especially when the sample is polycrystalline and the structures are affected by pseudo-symmetry. Electron diffraction has the advantage of collecting data from single nanoscopic crystals, but it is frequently limited by incompleteness and dynamical effects. Automated diffraction tomography (ADT) recently emerged as an alternative approach able to collect more complete three-dimensional electron diffraction data and at the same time to significantly reduce dynamical scattering. ADT data have been shown to be suitable for ab initio structure solution of phases with large cell parameters, and for detecting pseudo-symmetry that was undetected in X-ray powder data. In this work we present the structure investigation of two hitherto undetermined compounds, K5Al(W3O11)2 and NaAl(WO4)2, by a combination of electron diffraction tomography and precession electron diffraction. We also stress how electron diffraction tomography can be used to obtain direct information about symmetry and pseudo-symmetry for nanocrystalline phases, even when available only in polyphasic mixtures.

  3. Characterization of electrical properties in axial Si-Ge nanowire heterojunctions using off-axis electron holography and atom-probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Zhaofeng; Perea, Daniel E.; Yoo, Jinkyoung; He, Yang; Colby, Robert J.; Barker, Josh E.; Gu, Meng; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chongmin; Picraux, S. T.; Smith, David J.; McCartney, Martha R.

    2016-09-13

    Doped Si-Ge nanowire (NW) heterojunctions were grown using the vapor-liquid-solid method with AuGa and Au catalyst particles. Transmission electron microscopy and off-axis electron holography (EH) were used to characterize the nanostructure and to measure the electrostatic potential profile across the junction resulting from electrically active dopants, while atom-probe tomography (APT) was used to determine the Si, Ge and total (active and inactive) dopant concentration profiles. A comparison of the measured potential profile with simulations indicated that Ga dopants unintentionally introduced during AuGa catalyst growth were electronically inactive despite APT results that showed considerable amounts of Ga in the Si region. 10% P in Ge and 100% B in Si were estimated to be activated, which was corroborated by in situ electron-holography biasing experiments. This combination of EH, APT, in situ biasing and simulations allows a better knowledge and understanding of the electrically active dopant distributions in NWs.

  4. Computed Tomography of Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    FORNEY, Chief Nondestructive Evaluion Branch Nondestructive Eva ation ranch Metals and Ceramics Division Metals and Ceramics ision FOR THE COMMANDER...DR. NORMAN M. TALLAN, Director Metals and Ceramics Division If your address has changed, if you wish to be removed from our mailing list, or if the...on transformers of various sizes and compositions ranging in cost from $700 to $5000. Their criticality to the mission was, in some cases, estimated

  5. Ultra-structural study of insulin granules in pancreatic β-cells of db/db mouse by scanning transmission electron microscopy tomography.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yanhong; Zhao, Wei; Du, Wen; Zhang, Xiang; Ji, Gang; Ying, Wang; Xu, Tao

    2012-07-01

    Insulin granule trafficking is a key step in the secretion of glucose-stimulated insulin from pancreatic β-cells. The main feature of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the failure of pancreatic β-cells to secrete sufficient amounts of insulin to maintain normal blood glucose levels. In this work, we developed and applied tomography based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to image intact insulin granules in the β-cells of mouse pancreatic islets. Using three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, we found decreases in both the number and the grey level of insulin granules in db/db mouse pancreatic β-cells. Moreover, insulin granules were closer to the plasma membrane in diabetic β-cells than in control cells. Thus, 3D ultra-structural tomography may provide new insights into the pathology of insulin secretion in T2D.

  6. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  7. Digital retrospective motion-mode display and processing of electron beam cine-computed tomography and other cross-sectional cardiac imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Judd E.; Rumberger, John A.; Buithieu, Jean; Behrenbeck, Thomas; Breen, Jerome F.; Sheedy, Patrick F., II

    1995-05-01

    Electron beam computed tomography is unparalleled in its ability to consistently produce high quality dynamic images of the human heart. Its use in quantification of left ventricular dynamics is well established in both clinical and research applications. However, the image analysis tools supplied with the scanners offer a limited number of analysis options. They are based on embedded computer systems which have not been significantly upgraded since the scanner was introduced over a decade ago in spite of the explosive improvements in available computer power which have occured during this period. To address these shortcomings, a workstation-based ventricular analysis system has been developed at our institution. This system, which has been in use for over five years, is based on current workstation technology and therefore has benefited from the periodic upgrades in processor performance available to these systems. The dynamic image segmentation component of this system is an interactively supervised, semi-automatic surface identification and tracking system. It characterizes the endocardial and epicardial surfaces of the left ventricle as two concentric 4D hyper-space polyhedrons. Each of these polyhedrons have nearly ten thousand vertices which are deposited into a relational database. The right ventricle is also processed in a similar manner. This database is queried by other custom components which extract ventricular function parameters such as regional ejection fraction and wall stress. The interactive tool which supervises dynamic image segmentation has been enhanced with a temporal domain display. The operator interactively chooses the spatial location of the endpoints of a line segment while the corresponding space/time image is displayed. These images, with content resembling M-Mode echocardiography, benefit form electron beam computed tomography's high spatial and contrast resolution. The segmented surfaces are displayed along with the imagery. These

  8. Argon broad ion beam tomography in a cryogenic scanning electron microscope: a novel tool for the investigation of representative microstructures in sedimentary rocks containing pore fluid.

    PubMed

    Desbois, G; Urai, J L; Pérez-Willard, F; Radi, Z; Offern, S; Burkart, I; Kukla, P A; Wollenberg, U

    2013-03-01

    The contribution describes the implementation of a broad ion beam (BIB) polisher into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) functioning at cryogenic temperature (cryo). The whole system (BIB-cryo-SEM) provides a first generation of a novel multibeam electron microscope that combines broad ion beam with cryogenic facilities in a conventional SEM to produce large, high-quality cross-sections (up to 2 mm(2)) at cryogenic temperature to be imaged at the state-of-the-art SEM resolution. Cryogenic method allows detecting fluids in their natural environment and preserves samples against desiccation and dehydration, which may damage natural microstructures. The investigation of microstructures in the third dimension is enabled by serial cross-sectioning, providing broad ion beam tomography with slices down to 350 nm thick. The functionalities of the BIB-cryo-SEM are demonstrated by the investigation of rock salts (synthetic coarse-grained sodium chloride synthesized from halite-brine mush cold pressed at 150 MPa and 4.5 GPa, and natural rock salt mylonite from a salt glacier at Qom Kuh, central Iran). In addition, results from BIB-cryo-SEM on a gas shale and Boom Clay are also presented to show that the instrument is suitable for a large range of sedimentary rocks. For the first time, pore and grain fabrics of preserved host and reservoir rocks can be investigated at nm-scale range over a representative elementary area. In comparison with the complementary and overlapping performances of the BIB-SEM method with focused ion beam-SEM and X-ray tomography methods, the BIB cross-sectioning enables detailed insights about morphologies of pores at greater resolution than X-ray tomography and allows the production of large representative surfaces suitable for FIB-SEM investigations of a specific representative site within the BIB cross-section.

  9. Direct atomic-scale imaging of hydrogen and oxygen interstitials in pure niobium using atom-probe tomography and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Tao, Runzhe; Klie, Robert F; Seidman, David N

    2013-01-22

    Imaging the three-dimensional atomic-scale structure of complex interfaces has been the goal of many recent studies, due to its importance to technologically relevant areas. Combining atom-probe tomography and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we present an atomic-scale study of ultrathin (~5 nm) native oxide layers on niobium (Nb) and the formation of ordered niobium hydride phases near the oxide/Nb interface. Nb, an elemental type-II superconductor with the highest critical temperature (T(c) = 9.2 K), is the preferred material for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in next-generation particle accelerators. Nb exhibits high solubilities for oxygen and hydrogen, especially within the RF-field penetration depth, which is believed to result in SRF quality factor losses. STEM imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy followed by ultraviolet laser-assisted local-electrode atom-probe tomography on the same needle-like sample reveals the NbO(2), Nb(2)O(5), NbO, Nb stacking sequence; annular bright-field imaging is used to visualize directly hydrogen atoms in bulk β-NbH.

  10. Electron tomography of (In,Ga)N insertions in GaN nanocolumns grown on semi-polar (112{sup -}2) GaN templates

    SciTech Connect

    Niehle, M. Trampert, A.; Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Calleja, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present results of scanning transmission electron tomography on GaN/(In,Ga)N/GaN nanocolumns (NCs) that grew uniformly inclined towards the patterned, semi-polar GaN(112{sup -}2) substrate surface by molecular beam epitaxy. For the practical realization of the tomographic experiment, the nanocolumn axis has been aligned parallel to the rotation axis of the electron microscope goniometer. The tomographic reconstruction allows for the determination of the three-dimensional indium distribution inside the nanocolumns. This distribution is strongly interrelated with the nanocolumn morphology and faceting. The (In,Ga)N layer thickness and the indium concentration differ between crystallographically equivalent and non-equivalent facets. The largest thickness and the highest indium concentration are found at the nanocolumn apex parallel to the basal planes.

  11. Structure resolution by electron diffraction tomography of the complex layered iron-rich Fe-2234-type Sr5Fe6O15.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepoittevin, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    The crystal structure of the strontium ferrite Sr5Fe6O15.4, was solved by direct methods on electron diffraction tomography data acquired on a transmission electron microscope. The refined cell parameters are a=27.4047(3) Å, b=5.48590(7) Å and c=42.7442(4) Å in Fm2m symmetry. Its structure is built up from the intergrowth sequence between a quadruple perovskite-type layer with a complex rock-salt (RS)-type block. In the latter iron atoms are found in two different environments : tetragonal pyramid and tetrahedron. The structural model was refined by Rietveld method based on the powder X-ray diffraction pattern.

  12. Characterization of electrical properties in axial Si-Ge nanowire heterojunctions using off-axis electron holography and atom-probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhaofeng; Perea, Daniel E.; Yoo, Jinkyoung; He, Yang; Colby, Robert J.; Barker, Josh E.; Gu, Meng; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chongmin; Picraux, S. T.; Smith, David J.; McCartney, Martha R.

    2016-09-01

    Nanowires (NWs) consisting of P-doped Si/B-doped Ge axial heterojunctions were grown via vapor-liquid-solid synthesis using a combination of Au and AuGa catalyst particles. Off-axis electron holography (EH) was used to measure the electrostatic potential profile across the junction resulting from electrically active dopants, and atom-probe tomography (APT) was used to map total dopant concentration profiles. A comparison of the electrostatic potential profile measured from EH with simulations that were based on the APT results indicates that Ga atoms unintentionally introduced during AuGa catalyst growth were mostly electronically inactive. This finding was also corroborated by in situ electron-holography biasing experiments. Electronic band structure simulations guided by the experimental results helped to provide a much better explanation of the NW electrical behavior. Overall, this work demonstrates that the combination of EH, APT, in situ biasing, and simulations allows a more complete understanding of NW electrical properties to be developed.

  13. The Stack: A New Bacterial Structure Analyzed in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas deceptionensis M1T by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Lidia; Carrión, Ornella; Martínez, Gema; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Mercadé, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, improvements in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques and the use of tomography have provided a more accurate view of the complexity of the ultrastructure of prokaryotic cells. Cryoimmobilization of specimens by rapid cooling followed by freeze substitution (FS) and sectioning, freeze fracture (FF) and observation of replica, or cryoelectron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS) now allow visualization of biological samples close to their native state, enabling us to refine our knowledge of already known bacterial structures and to discover new ones. Application of these techniques to the new Antarctic cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonasdeceptionensis M1T has demonstrated the existence of a previously undescribed cytoplasmic structure that does not correspond to known bacterial inclusion bodies or membranous formations. This structure, which we term a “stack”, was mainly visualized in slow growing cultures of P. deceptionensis M1T and can be described as a set of stacked membranous discs usually arranged perpendicularly to the cell membrane, but not continuous with it, and found in variable number in different locations within the cell. Regardless of their position, stacks were mostly observed very close to DNA fibers. Stacks are not exclusive to P. deceptionensis M1T and were also visualized in slow-growing cultures of other bacteria. This new structure deserves further study using cryoelectron tomography to refine its configuration and to establish whether its function could be related to chromosome dynamics. PMID:24039905

  14. Electron tomography of cryo-immobilized plant tissue: a novel approach to studying 3D macromolecular architecture of mature plant cell walls in situ.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼ 2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  15. Electron Tomography of Cryo-Immobilized Plant Tissue: A Novel Approach to Studying 3D Macromolecular Architecture of Mature Plant Cell Walls In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G.; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  16. Experimental study of heavy-ion computed tomography using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device camera for human head imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraishi, Hiroshi; Hara, Hidetake; Abe, Shinji; Yokose, Mamoru; Watanabe, Takara; Takeda, Tohoru; Koba, Yusuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a heavy-ion computed tomography (IonCT) system using a scintillation screen and an electron-multiplying charged coupled device (EMCCD) camera that can measure a large object such as a human head. In this study, objective with the development of the system was to investigate the possibility of applying this system to heavy-ion treatment planning from the point of view of spatial resolution in a reconstructed image. Experiments were carried out on a rotation phantom using 12C accelerated up to 430 MeV/u by the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). We demonstrated that the reconstructed image of an object with a water equivalent thickness (WET) of approximately 18 cm was successfully achieved with the spatial resolution of 1 mm, which would make this IonCT system worth applying to the heavy-ion treatment planning for head and neck cancers.

  17. Influence of the Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of CeO2 and UO2 for Characterization with UV-Laser Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Billy Valderrama; H.B. Henderson; C. Yablinsky; J. Gan; T.R. Allen; M.V. Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Oxide materials are used in numerous applications such as thermal barrier coatings, nuclear fuels, and electrical conductors and sensors, all applications where nanometer-scale stoichiometric changes can affect functional properties. Atom probe tomography can be used to characterize the precise chemical distribution of individual species and spatially quantify the oxygen to metal ratio at the nanometer scale. However, atom probe analysis of oxides can be accompanied by measurement artifacts caused by laser-material interactions. In this investigation, two technologically relevant oxide materials with the same crystal structure and an anion to cation ratio of 2.00, pure cerium oxide (CeO2) and uranium oxide (UO2) are studied. It was determined that electronic structure, optical properties, heat transfer properties, and oxide stability strongly affect their evaporation behavior, thus altering their measured stoichiometry, with thermal conductance and thermodynamic stability being strong factors.

  18. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Chemical Roughness Of Buried ZrO2/In2O3 Interfaces Via Energy-Filtered Electron Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, X. Y.; Kabius, B.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Eastman, J. A.; Fong, D. D.; Petford-Long, Amanda K.

    2012-04-26

    The protocol to calculate the chemical roughness from three-dimensional (3-D) data cube acquired by energy-filtered electron tomography has been developed and applied to analyze the 3-D Zr distribution at the arbitrarily shaped interfaces in the ZrO2/In2O3 multilayer films. The calculated root-mean-square roughness quantitatively revealed the chemical roughness at the buried ZrO2/In2O3 interfaces, which is the deviation of Zr distribution from the ideal flat interface. Knowledge of the chemistry and structure of oxide interfaces in 3-D provides information useful for understanding changes in the behavior of a model ZrO2/In2O3 heterostructure that has potential to exhibit mixed conduction behavior. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  19. The mechanism of DNA ejection in the Bacillus anthracis spore-binding phage 8a revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaofeng; Walter, Michael H.; Paredes, Angel; Morais, Marc C.; Liu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the Bacillus anthracis spore-binding phage 8a was determined by cryo-electron tomography. The phage capsid forms a T=16 icosahedron attached to a contractile tail via a head–tail connector protein. The tail consists of a six-start helical sheath surrounding a central tail tube, and a structurally novel baseplate at the distal end of the tail that recognizes and attaches to host cells. The parameters of the icosahedral capsid lattice and the helical tail sheath suggest protein folds for the capsid and tail-sheath proteins, respectively, and indicate evolutionary relationships to other dsDNA viruses. Analysis of 2518 intact phage particles show four distinct conformations that likely correspond to four sequential states of the DNA ejection process during infection. Comparison of the four observed conformations suggests a mechanism for DNA ejection, including the molecular basis underlying coordination of tail sheath contraction and genome release from the capsid. PMID:22018785

  20. Atomic arrangement at ZnTe/CdSe interfaces determined by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bonef, Bastien; Rouvière, Jean-Luc; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Bellet-Amalric, Edith; Gérard, Lionel; Mariette, Henri; André, Régis; Bougerol, Catherine; Grenier, Adeline

    2015-02-02

    High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography experiments reveal the presence of an intermediate layer at the interface between two binary compounds with no common atom, namely, ZnTe and CdSe for samples grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy under standard conditions. This thin transition layer, of the order of 1 to 3 atomic planes, contains typically one monolayer of ZnSe. Even if it occurs at each interface, the direct interface, i.e., ZnTe on CdSe, is sharper than the reverse one, where the ZnSe layer is likely surrounded by alloyed layers. On the other hand, a CdTe-like interface was never observed. This interface knowledge is crucial to properly design superlattices for optoelectronic applications and to master band-gap engineering.

  1. High-resolution three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy characterization of oxide-nitride-oxide layer interfaces in Si-based semiconductors using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sadayama, Shoji; Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Bright, Alexander; Suzuki, Naohisa; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Oxide-nitride-oxide (ONO) layer structures are widely used for charge storage in flash memory devices. The ONO layer interfaces should be as flat as possible, so measurement of the nanoscale roughness of those interfaces is needed. In this study, quantification of an ONO film from a commercially available flash memory device was carried out with a pillar-shaped specimen using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computed tomography. The ONO area contained only low Z- and low STEM-contrast materials, which makes high-quality reconstruction difficult. The optimum three-dimensional reconstruction was achieved with an STEM annular dark-field detector inner collection angle of 32 mrad, a sample tilt range from -78° to +78° and 25 iterations for the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique.

  2. The mechanism of DNA ejection in the Bacillus anthracis spore-binding phage 8a revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiaofeng; Walter, Michael H.; Paredes, Angel; Morais, Marc C.; Liu, Jun

    2011-12-20

    The structure of the Bacillus anthracis spore-binding phage 8a was determined by cryo-electron tomography. The phage capsid forms a T = 16 icosahedron attached to a contractile tail via a head-tail connector protein. The tail consists of a six-start helical sheath surrounding a central tail tube, and a structurally novel baseplate at the distal end of the tail that recognizes and attaches to host cells. The parameters of the icosahedral capsid lattice and the helical tail sheath suggest protein folds for the capsid and tail-sheath proteins, respectively, and indicate evolutionary relationships to other dsDNA viruses. Analysis of 2518 intact phage particles show four distinct conformations that likely correspond to four sequential states of the DNA ejection process during infection. Comparison of the four observed conformations suggests a mechanism for DNA ejection, including the molecular basis underlying coordination of tail sheath contraction and genome release from the capsid.

  3. Working Length Determination Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography, Periapical Radiography and Electronic Apex Locator in Teeth with Apical Periodontitis: A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, André Luiz Gomide; de Alencar, Ana Helena Gonçalves; Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues de Araújo; Decurcio, Daniel Almeida; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this clinical study was to compare the accuracy of working length (WL) determination using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), conventional periapical radiographies and electronic apex locator. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted during root canal treatment of 19 patients with a total of 30 single-rooted teeth diagnosed with apical periodontitis. After taking the initial parallel periapical radiographies, the initial file was advanced into the canal until the WL was detected by the apex locator. Subsequently, the WL was measured and WL radiographies were taken with the file set in the canal. Afterwards, CBCT images were acquired. These three measurements were tabulated and compared and the data were analyzed using the Friedman test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The mean values for WL determination by electronic apex locator, periapical radiograph and CBCT images were 22.25, 22.43 and 22.65, respectively which was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Working length determination using CBCT images was precise when compared to radiographic method and electronic apex locator. PMID:27471524

  4. The Electron Density Features Revealed by the GNSS-Based Radio Tomography in the Different Latitudinal and Longitudinal Sectors of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Tereshchenko, Evgeniy; Nazarenko, Marina; Nesterov, Ivan; Kozharin, Maksim; Padokhin, Artem; Tumanova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    The ionospheric radio tomography is an efficient method for electron density imaging in the different geographical regions of the world under different space weather conditions. The input for the satellite-based ionospheric radio tomography is provided by the signals that are transmitted from the navigational satellites and recorded by the chains or networks of ground receivers. The low-orbiting (LO) radio tomography employs the 150/400 MHz radio transmissions from the Earth's orbiters (like the Russian Tsikada/Parus and American Transit) flying at a height of ~1000 km above the Earth in the nearly polar orbits. The phases of the signals from a moving satellite which are recorded by the chains of ground receivers oriented along the satellite path form the families of linear integrals of electron density along the satellite-receiver rays that are used as the input data for LORT. The LO tomographic inversion of these data by phase difference method yields the 2D distributions of the ionospheric plasma in the vertical plane containing the receiving chain and the satellite path. LORT provides vertical resolution of 20-30 km and horizontal resolution of 30-40 km. The high-orbiting (HO) radio tomography employs the radio transmissions from the GPS/GLONASS satellites and enables 4D imaging of the ionosphere (3 spatial coordinates and time). HORT has a much wider spatial coverage (almost worldwide) and provides continuous time series of the reconstructions. However, the spatial resolution of HORT is lower (~100 km horizontally with a time step 60-20 min). In the regions with dense receiving networks (Europe, USA, Alaska, Japan), the resolution can be increased to 30-50 km with a time interval of 30-10 min. To date, the extensive RT data collected from the existing RT chains and networks enable a thorough analysis of both the regular and sporadic ionospheric features which are observed systematically or appear spontaneously, whose origin is fairly well understood or

  5. Electron tomography provides a direct link between the Payne effect and the inter-particle spacing of rubber composites

    PubMed Central

    Staniewicz, Lech; Vaudey, Thomas; Degrandcourt, Christophe; Couty, Marc; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Midgley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Rubber-filler composites are a key component in the manufacture of tyres. The filler provides mechanical reinforcement and additional wear resistance to the rubber, but it in turn introduces non-linear mechanical behaviour to the material which most likely arises from interactions between the filler particles, mediated by the rubber matrix. While various studies have been made on the bulk mechanical properties and of the filler network structure (both imaging and by simulations), there presently does not exist any work directly linking filler particle spacing and mechanical properties. Here we show that using STEM tomography, aided by a machine learning image analysis procedure, to measure silica particle spacings provides a direct link between the inter-particle spacing and the reduction in shear modulus as a function of strain (the Payne effect), measured using dynamic mechanical analysis. Simulations of filler network formation using attractive, repulsive and non-interacting potentials were processed using the same method and compared with the experimental data, with the net result being that an attractive inter-particle potential is the most accurate way of modelling styrene-butadiene rubber-silica composite formation. PMID:25487130

  6. Extracellular vesicles of calcifying turkey leg tendon characterized by immunocytochemistry and high voltage electron microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; McKee, M. D.; Nanci, A.; Song, M. J.; Kiyonaga, S.; Arena, J.; McEwen, B.

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the structure and possible function of extracellular vesicles in certain calcifying vertebrate tissues, normally mineralizing leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, have been studied in two separate investigations, one concerning the electron microscopic immunolocalization of the 66 kDa phosphoprotein, osteopontin, and the other detailing the organization and distribution of mineral crystals associated with the vesicles as determined by high voltage microscopic tomography and 3-D graphic image reconstruction. Immunolabeling shows that osteopontin is related to extracellular vesicles of the tendon in the sense that its initial presence appears coincident with the development of mineral associated with the vesicle loci. By high voltage electron microscopy and 3-D imaging techniques, mineral crystals are found to consist of small irregularly shaped particles somewhat randomly oriented throughout individual vesicles sites. Their appearance is different from that found for the mineral observed within calcifying tendon collagen, and their 3-D disposition is not regularly ordered. Possible spatial and temporal relationships of vesicles, osteopontin, mineral, and collagen are being examined further by these approaches.

  7. Dengue virus-induced autophagosomes and changes in endomembrane ultrastructure imaged by electron tomography and whole-mount grid-cell culture techniques.

    PubMed

    Gangodkar, Shobha; Jain, Preksha; Dixit, Nishikant; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Basu, Atanu

    2010-01-01

    The biogenesis events and formation of dengue virus (DENV) in the infected host cells remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we examined the ultrastructural changes associated with DENV-2 replication in three susceptible host cells, C6/36, Vero and SK Hep1, a cell line of human endothelial origin, using transmission electron microscopy, whole-mount grid-cell culture techniques and electron tomography (ET). The prominent feature in C6/36 cells was the formation of large perinuclear vacuoles with mature DENV particles, and on-grid whole-mount examination of the infected Vero cells showed different forms of DENV core structures associated with cellular membranes within 48 h after infection. Distinct multivesicular structures and prominent autophagic vesicles were seen in the infected SK Hep1 cells when compared with the other two cell lines. ET showed the three-dimensional organization of these vesicles as a continuous system. This is the first report of ET-based analysis of DENV-2 replication in a human endothelial cell line. These results further emphasizes the strong role played by intracellular host membranes-virus interactions in the biogenesis of DENV and strongly argues for the possibility of targeting compounds to block such structure formation as key anti-dengue agents.

  8. Microaspiration for high-pressure freezing: a new method for ultrastructural preservation of fragile and sparse tissues for TEM and electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Auer, Manfred; Triffo, W.J.; Palsdottir, H.; McDonald, K.L.; Inman, J.L.; Bissell, M.J.; Raphael, R.M.; Auer, M.; Lee, J.K.

    2008-02-13

    High-pressure freezing is the preferred method to prepare thick biological specimens for ultrastructural studies. However, the advantages obtained by this method often prove unattainable for samples that are difficult to handle during the freezing and substitution protocols. Delicate and sparse samples are difficult to manipulate and maintain intact throughout the sequence of freezing, infiltration, embedding, and final orientation for sectioning and subsequent TEM imaging. An established approach to surmount these difficulties is the use of cellulose microdialysis tubing to transport the sample. With an inner diameter of 200 micrometers, the tubing protects small and fragile samples within the thickness constraints of high-pressure freezing, and the tube ends can be sealed to avoid loss of sample. Importantly, the transparency of the tubing allows optical study of the specimen at different steps in the process. Here, we describe the use of a micromanipulator and microinjection apparatus to handle and position delicate specimens within the tubing. We report two biologically significant examples that benefit from this approach, 3D cultures of mammary epithelial cells and cochlear outer hair cells. We illustrate the potential for correlative light and electron microscopy as well as electron tomography.

  9. Golgi apparatus dis- and reorganizations studied with the aid of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and visualized by 3D-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ranftler, Carmen; Meisslitzer-Ruppitsch, Claudia; Neumüller, Josef; Ellinger, Adolf; Pavelka, Margit

    2017-04-01

    We studied Golgi apparatus disorganizations and reorganizations in human HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells by using the nonmetabolizable glucose analogue 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and analyzing the changes in Golgi stack architectures by 3D-electron tomography. Golgi stacks remodel in response to 2DG-treatment and are replaced by tubulo-glomerular Golgi bodies, from which mini-Golgi stacks emerge again after removal of 2DG. The Golgi stack changes correlate with the measured ATP-values. Our findings indicate that the classic Golgi stack architecture is impeded, while cells are under the influence of 2DG at constantly low ATP-levels, but the Golgi apparatus is maintained in forms of the Golgi bodies and Golgi stacks can be rebuilt as soon as 2DG is removed. The 3D-electron microscopic results highlight connecting regions that interlink membrane compartments in all phases of Golgi stack reorganizations and show that the compact Golgi bodies mainly consist of continuous intertwined tubules. Connections and continuities point to possible new transport pathways that could substitute for other modes of traffic. The changing architectures visualized in this work reflect Golgi stack dynamics that may be essential for basic cell physiologic and pathologic processes and help to learn, how cells respond to conditions of stress.

  10. Electron energy-loss spectroscopic tomography of FexCo(3-x)O4 impregnated Co3O4 mesoporous particles: unraveling the chemical information in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Yedra, L; Eljarrat, A; Arenal, R; López-Conesa, L; Pellicer, E; López-Ortega, A; Estrader, M; Sort, J; Baró, M D; Estradé, S; Peiró, F

    2016-08-02

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy-spectrum image (EELS-SI) tomography is a powerful tool to investigate the three dimensional chemical configuration in nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, the possibility to characterize the spatial distribution of Fe and Co cations in a complex FexCo(3-x)O4/Co3O4 ordered mesoporous system. This hybrid material is relevant because of the ferrimagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupling and high surface area. We unambiguously prove that the EELS-SI tomography shows a sufficiently high resolution to simultaneously unravel the pore structure and the chemical signal.

  11. Holography and tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.

    1997-02-01

    This session includes a collection of outlines of pertinent information, diagrams, graphs, electron micrographs, and color photographs pertaining to historical aspects and recent advances in the development of X-ray Gabor Holography. Many of the photographs feature or pertain to instrumentation used in holography, tomography, and cryo-holography.

  12. Visco-plasticity of polycrystalline olivine at high pressure and 900°C: fresh outcomes from high resolution EBSD and electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S. A.; Mussi, A.; Barou, F.; Tommasi, A.; Cordier, P.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of olivine-rich rocks at lithospheric temperatures (<1000°C) remains poorly constrained, in contrast to the extensive experimental dataset on creep of olivine single crystals and aggregates at high temperature (T > 1200°C). Consequently, we have performed tri-axial compression experiments (in a Paterson's press) on two fine-grained polycrystalline olivine (San Carlos olivine) specimens at 900°C, under a confining pressure of 300 MPa. Two dense samples were deformed at constant strain rates of 1.0 × 10-5 s-1 and 3.4 × 10-5 s-1. Mechanical curves show continuous hardening, with a decrease of hardening rate with increasing strain. Both samples failed just before 10% of finite strain and yield final differential stresses of 930 and 1076 MPa. Recovered samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). High resolution EBSD maps (step size 0.15 and 0.2 microns) permit to quantify accurately the microstructure (grain size, shape, aspect ratio, and angle distribution of the grain ellipse relative to the compression axis). Weak crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) developed in the deformed olivine aggregates, where [010] axes are mostly parallel to the compression axis; [100] and [001] axes are more dispersed, but tend to be oriented at high angle to the compression axis. Misorientations across grain boundaries and sub-grain boundaries were analyzed as well, evidencing common subgrain boundaries parallel to (100) and rotations dominantly around [001], that is an ';ideal' tilt boundary of the [100](010) system. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy, involving electron tomography of dislocations has identified dislocations with [100] and [001] Burgers vectors gliding on multiple planes, evidence for cross-slip, and dislocation entanglements. These data permit to better constrain the active deformation mechanisms and slip systems involved in the

  13. Biodegradable radiopaque microspheres for the evaluation of regional pulmonary blood flow distribution using electron-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Michael J.; Tajik, Jehangir K.; Robinson, Miguel T.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate measurement of regional pulmonary blood flow distribution is of interest both as a research and diagnostic tool. Measurements of regional pulmonary perfusion via x-ray CT offer the possibility of detecting perfusion deficits due to pulmonary embolus while maintaining a high degree of anatomic detail. Use of bolus injection of conventional radiopaque contrast with associated short mean transit times (5 - 7 seconds), requires a high degree of temporal resolution offered clinically only by electron beam x-ray CT (Imatron). The present study was intended to characterize biodegradable radiopaque microspheres as an alternative contrast agent which would allow for measurement of regional pulmonary blood flow with scanning times associated with conventional or spiral thin slice, volumetric x-ray CT protocols. To test this, a dog was scanned at 6 slice levels and 13 time points with image acquisition gated to the cardiac cycle. Lung volumes were maintained at functional residual capacity.

  14. Understanding Atom Probe Tomography of Oxide-Supported Metal Nanoparticles by Correlation with Atomic-Resolution Electron Microscopy and Field Evaporation Simulation.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Arun; Colby, Robert; Vurpillot, François; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2014-04-17

    Oxide-supported metal nanoparticles are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis. The increasingly detailed design of such catalysts necessitates three-dimensional characterization with high spatial resolution and elemental selectivity. Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) is uniquely suited to the task but faces challenges with the evaporation of metal/insulator systems. Correlation of APT with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), for Au nanoparticles embedded in MgO, reveals preferential evaporation of the MgO and an inaccurate assessment of nanoparticle composition. Finite element field evaporation modeling is used to illustrate the evolution of the evaporation front. Nanoparticle composition is most accurately predicted when the MgO is treated as having a locally variable evaporation field, indicating the importance of considering laser-oxide interactions and the evaporation of various molecular oxide ions. These results demonstrate the viability of APT for analysis of oxide-supported metal nanoparticles, highlighting the need for developing a theoretical framework for the evaporation of heterogeneous materials.

  15. Analysis of a New High-Toughness Ultra-high-Strength Martensitic Steel by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartshorne, Matthew I.; McCormick, Caroline; Schmidt, Michael; Novotny, Paul; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure of a new martensitic high-strength steel (Fe-0.40C-3.81Ni-1.31Cr-1.50Si-0.75Mn-0.52Mo-0.51Cu-0.30V) with high fracture toughness is characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT). MC, M6C, and M23C6 precipitates form inside the martensitic lath matrix. The fracture toughness is insensitive to the dissolution of M23C6 precipitates at austenitizing temperatures above 1164 K (891 °C). APT reveals that solute segregation at the prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGB) is not uniform, with C, Mo, Si, Ni, and/or P enrichment varying at different areas of the PAGB. Si depletion is detected in the same area as the highest C enrichment. Carbon also segregates at lath boundaries. Segregation of C indicates the presence of retained austenite films at both PAGB and lath boundaries. Regions enriched in C up to 10 pct were found within the laths; however, no regions were enriched to the level expected of cementite or ɛ-carbide. The observed C distribution and high fracture toughness indicates that the tempering behavior is significantly different than that observed in 300M steel. The effect of Si, Ni, and Cu on the formation and stabilization of the regions of C enrichment and retained austenite require further study, as it may be key to the increased toughness.

  16. Quantification of artifacts in scanning electron microscopy tomography: Improving the reliability of calculated transport parameters in energy applications such as fuel cell and battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingele, Matthias; Zengerle, Roland; Thiele, Simon

    2015-02-01

    Focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy tomography (FIB-SEMt) is commonly used to extract reactant transport relevant parameters from nano-porous materials in energy applications, such as fuel cells or batteries. Here we present an approach to virtually model the errors in FIB-SEMt which are caused by the FIB cutting distance. The errors are evaluated in terms of connectivity, solid volume fraction (SVF), conductivity, diffusivity, as well as mean grain and pore sizes. For state-of-the-art FIB-SEMt experiments, where a hydrogen fuel cell catalyst layer with 60 nm mean grain size and 40% SVF is sectioned with a cutting distance of 15 nm, the error in our simulation ranges up to 51% (conductivity), whereas other parameters remain largely unaffected (Laplace diffusivity, 4%). We further present a method, employing virtual coarsening and back interpolation, to reduce FIB cutting distance errors in all investigated parameters. Both error evaluation and correction are applicable to sphere based porous materials with relevance for the energy conversion and storage sector such as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell catalyst layer (PEMFC CL), battery carbon binder domain (CBD) or supercapacitor electrodes.

  17. The micro-architecture of mitochondria at active zones: electron tomography reveals novel anchoring scaffolds and cristae structured for high-rate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Guy A; Tjong, Jonathan; Brown, Joshua M; Poquiz, Patrick H; Scott, Raymond T; Kolson, Douglas R; Ellisman, Mark H; Spirou, George A

    2010-01-20

    Mitochondria are integral elements of many nerve terminals. They must be appropriately positioned to regulate microdomains of Ca(2+) concentration and metabolic demand, but structures that anchor them in place have not been described. By applying the high resolution of electron tomography (ET) to the study of a central terminal, the calyx of Held, we revealed an elaborate cytoskeletal superstructure that connected a subset of mitochondria to the presynaptic membrane near active zones. This cytoskeletal network extended laterally and was well integrated into the nerve terminal cytoskeleton, which included filamentous linkages among synaptic vesicles. ET revealed novel features of inner membrane for these mitochondria. Crista structure was polarized in that crista junctions, circular openings of the inner membrane under the outer membrane, were aligned with the cytoskeletal superstructure and occurred at higher density in mitochondrial membrane facing the presynaptic membrane. These characteristics represent the first instance where a subcomponent of an organelle is shown to have a specific orientation relative to the polarized structure of a cell. The ratio of cristae to outer membrane surface area is large in these mitochondria relative to other tissues, indicating a high metabolic capacity. These observations suggest general principles for cytoskeletal anchoring of mitochondria in all tissues, reveal potential routes for nonsynaptic communication between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners using this novel cytoskeletal framework, and indicate that crista structure can be specialized for particular functions within cellular microdomains.

  18. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT).

    PubMed

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J; Scott, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK's first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600-1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment.

  19. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT)

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK’s first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600–1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment. PMID:26575374

  20. The Combination of Chemical Fixation Procedures with High Pressure Freezing and Freeze Substitution Preserves Highly Labile Tissue Ultrastructure for Electron Tomography Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sosinsky, Gina E.; Crum, John; Jones, Ying Z.; Lanman, Jason; Smarr, Benjamin; Terada, Masako; Martone, Maryann E.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Johnson, John E.; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of electron tomography as a tool for three dimensional structure determination of cells and tissues has brought its own challenges for the preparation of thick sections. High pressure freezing in combination with freeze substitution provides the best method for obtaining the largest volume of well-preserved tissue. However, for deeply embedded, heterogeneous, labile tissues needing careful dissection, such as brain, the damage due to anoxia and excision before cryofixation is significant. We previously demonstrated that chemical fixation prior to high pressure freezing preserves fragile tissues and produces superior tomographic reconstructions compared to equivalent tissue preserved by chemical fixation alone. Here, we provide further characterization of the technique, comparing the ultrastructure of Flock House Virus infected DL1 insect cells that were 1) high pressure frozen without fixation, 2) high pressure frozen following fixation, and 3) conventionally prepared with aldehyde fixatives. Aldehyde fixation prior to freezing produces ultrastructural preservation superior to that obtained through chemical fixation alone that is close to that obtained when cells are fast frozen without fixation. We demonstrate using a variety of nervous system tissues, including neurons that were injected with a fluorescent dye and then photooxidized, that this technique provides excellent preservation compared to chemical fixation alone and can be extended to selectively stained material where cryofixation is impractical. PMID:17962040

  1. Probing Grain-Boundary Chemistry and Electronic Structure in Proton-Conducting Oxides by Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Clark, Daniel R; Zhu, Huayang; Diercks, David R; Ricote, Sandrine; Kee, Robert J; Almansoori, Ali; Gorman, Brian P; O'Hayre, Ryan P

    2016-11-09

    A laser-assisted atom-probe-tomographic (LAAPT) method has been developed and applied to measure and characterize the three-dimensional atomic and electronic nanostructure at an yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BaZr0.9Y0.1O3-δ, BZY10) grain boundary. Proton-conducting perovskites, such as BZY10, are attracting intense interest for a variety of energy conversion applications. However, their implementation has been hindered, in part, because of high grain-boundary (GB) resistance that is attributed to a positive GB space-charge layer (SCL). In this study, LAAPT is used to analyze BZY10 GB chemistry in three dimensions with subnanometer resolution. From this analysis, maps of the charge density and electrostatic potential arising at the GBs are derived, revealing for the first time direct chemical evidence that a positive SCL indeed exists at these GBs. These maps reveal new insights on the inhomogeneity of the SCL region and produce an average GB potential barrier of approximately 580 mV, agreeing with previous indirect electrochemical measurements.

  2. Respirator triggering of electron beam computed tomography (EBCT): evaluation of dynamic changes during mechanical expiration in the traumatized patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recheis, Wolfgang A.; Kleinsasser, Axel; Hatschenberger, Robert; Knapp, Rudolf; zur Nedden, Dieter; Hoermann, Christoph

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate the dynamic changes during expiration at different levels of positive end- expiratory pressure (PEEP) in the ventilated patient. We wanted to discriminate between normal lung function and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). After approval by the local Ethic Committee we studied two ventilated patients: (1) with normal lung function; (2) ARDS). We used the 50 ms scan mode of the EBCT. The beam was positioned 1 cm above the diaphragm. The table position remained unchanged. An electronic trigger was developed, that utilizes the respirators synchronizing signal to start the EBCT at the onset of expiration. During controlled mechanical expiration at two levels of PEEP (0 and 15 cm H2O), pulmonary aeration was rated as: well-aerated (-900HU/-500HU), poorly- aerated (-500HU/-100HU) and non-aerated (-100HU/+100HU). Pathological and normal lung function showed different dynamic changes (FIG.4-12). The different PEEP levels resulted in a significant change of pulmonary aeration in the same patient. Although we studied only a very limited number of patients, respirator triggered EBCT may be accurate in discriminating pathological changes due to the abnormal lung function in the mechanically ventilated patient.

  3. Determination of the Three-Dimensional Morphology of ALH84001 and Biogenic MV-1 Magnetite: Comparison of Results from Electron Tomography and Classical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Schwartz, Cindy; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2004-01-01

    Dated at approximately 3.9 billion years of age, carbonate disks, found within fractures of the host rock of Martian meteorite ALH84001, have been interpreted as secondary minerals that formed at low temperature in an aqueous medium. Heterogeneously distributed within these disks are magnetite nanocrystals that are of Martian origin. Approximately one quarter of these magnetites have morphological and chemical similarities to magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, which are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats on Earth. Moreover, these types of magnetite particles are not known or expected to be produced by abiotic means either through geological processes or synthetically in the laboratory. The remaining three quarters of the ALH84001 magnetites are likely products of multiple processes including, but not limited to, precipitation from a hydrothermal fluid, thermal decomposition of the carbonate matrix in which they are embedded, and extracellular formation by dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria. We have proposed that the origins of magnetites in ALH84001 can be best explained as the products of multiple processes, one of which is biological. Recently the three-dimensional (3-D) external morphology of the purported biogenic fraction of the ALH84001 magnetites has been the subject of considerable debate. We report here the 3-D geometry of biogenic magnetite crystals extracted from MV-1 and of those extracted from ALH84001 carbonate disks using a combination of high resolution classical and tomographic transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We focus on answering the following questions: (1) which technique provides adequate information to deduce the 3-D external crystal morphology?; and, (2) what is the precise 3-D geometry of the ALH84001 and MV-1 magnetites?

  4. Structure of the colcemid-treated PtK1 kinetochore outer plate as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    High voltage electron microscopic tomography was used to determine the organization of the kinetochore plate and its attachment to the underlying chromosome. Six reconstructions were computed from thick sections of Colcemid-treated PtK1 cells and analyzed by a number of computer graphics methods including extensive thin slicing, three- dimensional masking, and volume rendering. When viewed en-face the kinetochore plate appeared to be constructed from a scaffold of numerous 10-20-nm thick fibers or rods. Although the fibers exhibited regions of parallel alignment and hints of a lattice, they were highly variable in length, orientation and spacing. When viewed in stereo, groups of these fibers were often seen oriented in different directions at different depths to give an overall matted appearance to the structure. When viewed "on edge," the plate was 35-40 nm thick, and in thin slices many regions were tripartite with electron-opaque domains, separated by a more translucent middle layer, forming the inner and outer plate boundaries. These domains were joined at irregular intervals. In some slices, each domain appeared as a linear array of 10- 20-nm dots or rods embedded in a less electron-opaque matrix, and adjacent dots within or between domains often appeared fused to form larger blocks. The plate was connected to the underlying chromosome by less densely arrayed 10-20-nm thick fibers that contacted the chromosome-facing (i.e., inner) surface of the plate in numerous patches. These patches tended to be arrayed in parallel rows perpendicular to the long axis of the chromosome. In contrast to connecting fibers, corona fibers were more uniformly distributed over the cytoplasmic-facing (i.e., outer) surface of the plate. When large portions of the reconstructions were viewed, either en-face or in successive slices parallel to the long axis of the chromosome, the edges of the plate appeared splayed into multiple "fingers" that partly encircled the primary constriction

  5. Structure of the colcemid-treated PtK1 kinetochore outer plate as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography.

    PubMed

    McEwen, B F; Arena, J T; Frank, J; Rieder, C L

    1993-01-01

    High voltage electron microscopic tomography was used to determine the organization of the kinetochore plate and its attachment to the underlying chromosome. Six reconstructions were computed from thick sections of Colcemid-treated PtK1 cells and analyzed by a number of computer graphics methods including extensive thin slicing, three-dimensional masking, and volume rendering. When viewed en-face the kinetochore plate appeared to be constructed from a scaffold of numerous 10-20-nm thick fibers or rods. Although the fibers exhibited regions of parallel alignment and hints of a lattice, they were highly variable in length, orientation and spacing. When viewed in stereo, groups of these fibers were often seen oriented in different directions at different depths to give an overall matted appearance to the structure. When viewed "on edge," the plate was 35-40 nm thick, and in thin slices many regions were tripartite with electron-opaque domains, separated by a more translucent middle layer, forming the inner and outer plate boundaries. These domains were joined at irregular intervals. In some slices, each domain appeared as a linear array of 10-20-nm dots or rods embedded in a less electron-opaque matrix, and adjacent dots within or between domains often appeared fused to form larger blocks. The plate was connected to the underlying chromosome by less densely arrayed 10-20-nm thick fibers that contacted the chromosome-facing (i.e., inner) surface of the plate in numerous patches. These patches tended to be arrayed in parallel rows perpendicular to the long axis of the chromosome. In contrast to connecting fibers, corona fibers were more uniformly distributed over the cytoplasmic-facing (i.e., outer) surface of the plate. When large portions of the reconstructions were viewed, either en-face or in successive slices parallel to the long axis of the chromosome, the edges of the plate appeared splayed into multiple "fingers" that partly encircled the primary constriction

  6. Mapping of Ebolavirus Neutralization by Monoclonal Antibodies in the ZMapp Cocktail Using Cryo-Electron Tomography and Studies of Cellular Entry

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Erin E. H.; Nelson, Elizabeth A.; Bonagiri, Pranay; Simmons, James A.; Shoemaker, Charles J.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Kobinger, Gary P.; Zeitlin, Larry; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ZMapp, a cocktail of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs; c2G4, c4G7, and c13C6) against the ebolavirus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP), shows promise for combatting outbreaks of EBOV, as occurred in West Africa in 2014. Prior studies showed that Fabs from these MAbs bind a soluble EBOV GP ectodomain and that MAbs c2G4 and c4G7, but not c13C6, neutralize infections in cell cultures. Using cryo-electron tomography, we extended these findings by characterizing the structures of c2G4, c4G7, and c13C6 IgGs bound to native, full-length GP from the West African 2014 isolate embedded in filamentous viruslike particles (VLPs). As with the isolated ectodomain, c13C6 bound to the glycan cap, whereas c2G4 and c4G7 bound to the base region of membrane-bound GP. The tomographic data suggest that all three MAbs bind with high occupancy and that the base-binding antibodies can potentially bridge neighboring GP spikes. Functional studies indicated that c2G4 and c4G7, but not c13C6, competitively inhibit entry of VLPs bearing EBOV GP into the host cell cytoplasm, without blocking trafficking of VLPs to NPC1+ endolysosomes, where EBOV fuses. Moreover, c2G4 and c4G7 bind to and can block entry mediated by the primed (19-kDa) form of GP without impeding binding of the C-loop of NPC1, the endolysosomal receptor for EBOV. The most likely mode of action of c2G4 and c4G7 is therefore by inhibiting conformational changes in primed, NPC1-bound GP that initiate fusion between the viral and target membranes, similar to the action of certain broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza hemagglutinin and HIV Env. IMPORTANCE The recent West African outbreak of ebolavirus caused the deaths of more than 11,000 individuals. Hence, there is an urgent need to be prepared with vaccines and therapeutics for similar future disasters. ZMapp, a cocktail of three MAbs directed against the ebolavirus glycoprotein, is a promising anti-ebolavirus therapeutic. Using cryo-electron tomography, we provide

  7. Effect of acid etching on marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate to apical dentin: microcomputed tomography and scanning electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Fouzan, Khalid; Al-Garawi, Ziad; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Javed, Fawad; Al-Shalan, Thakib; Rotstein, Ilan

    2012-12-01

    The present investigation assessed the effect of acid etching on marginal adaptation of white- and gray-colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to apical dentin using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sixty-four extracted single-rooted human maxillary teeth were used. Following root-end resection and apical preparation, the teeth were equally divided into four groups according to the following root end filling materials: (i) white-colored MTA (WMTA), (ii) etched WMTA (EWMTA), (iii) gray-colored MTA (GMTA) and (iv) etched GMTA (EGMTA). After 48 h, the interface between root-end filling materials and the dentinal walls was assessed using micro-CT and SEM. Data were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. Micro-CT analysis revealed gap volumes between the apical cavity dentin walls and EGMTA, GMTA, EWMTA and WMTA of (0.007 1±0.004) mm(3), (0.053±0.002) mm(3), (0.003 6±0.001) mm(3) and (0.005 9±0.002) mm(3) respectively. SEM analysis revealed gap sizes for EGMTA, WMTA, EWMTA and GMTA to be (492.3±13.8) µm, (594.5±17.12) µm, (543.1±15.33) µm and (910.7±26.2) µm respectively. A significant difference in gap size between root end preparations filled with GMTA and EGMTA was found (P<0.05). No significance difference in gap size between WMTA and EWMTA were found in either SEM or micro-CT analysis. In conclusion, pre-etching of apical dentin can provide a better seal for GMTA but not for WMTA.

  8. Expedited Approaches to Whole Cell Electron Tomography and Organelle Mark-Up in Situ in High-Pressure Frozen Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Noske, Andrew B.; Costin, Adam J.; Morgan, Garry P.; Marsh, Brad J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a simplified, efficient approach for the 3D reconstruction and analysis of mammalian cells in toto by electron microscope tomography (ET), to provide quantitative information regarding ‘global’ cellular organization at ~15–20 nm resolution. Two insulin-secreting beta cells - deemed ‘functionally equivalent’ by virtue of their location at the periphery of the same pancreatic islet - were reconstructed in their entirety in 3D after fast-freezing/freeze-substitution/plastic embedment in situ within a glucose-stimulated islet of Langerhans isolated intact from mouse pancreata. These cellular reconstructions have afforded several unique insights into fundamental structure-function relationships among key organelles involved in the biosynthesis and release of the crucial metabolic hormone, insulin, that could not be provided by other methods. The Golgi ribbon, mitochondria and insulin secretory granules in each cell were segmented for comparative analysis. We propose that relative differences between the two cells in terms of the number, dimensions and spatial distribution (and for mitochondria, also the extent of branching) of these organelles per cubic micron of cellular volume reflects differences in the two cells’ individual capacity (and/or readiness) to respond to secretagogue stimulation, reflected by an apparent inverse relationship between the number/size of insulin secretory granules versus the number/size of mitochondria and the Golgi ribbon. We discuss the advantages of this approach for quantitative cellular ET of mammalian cells, briefly discuss its application relevant to other complementary techniques, and summarize future strategies for overcoming some of its current limitations. PMID:18069000

  9. Pseudolocal tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomographic data is used to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. The relative attenuation data is input to a pseudo-local tomography function, where the difference between the internal density and the pseudo-local tomography function is computed across the discontinuity. The pseudo-local tomography function outputs the location of the discontinuity and the difference in density between the first density and the second density.

  10. Electron tomography of IFT particles.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Cantele, Francesca; Vannuccini, Elisa; Lanzavecchia, Salvatore; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Lupetti, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    Cilia and flagella play very important roles in eukaryotic cells, ranging from cell motility to chemo- and mechanosensation with active involvement in embryonic development and control of cell division. Cilia and flagella are highly dynamic organelles undergoing constant turnover at their tip, where multiprotein precursors synthesized in the cell cytoplasm are assembled, turnover products are released and carried back for recycling. Such bidirectional trafficking is maintained by an ATP-dependent active transport that is carried out by intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles. Despite our knowledge of the cell biology, the genomic, and the biochemistry of IFT, high-resolution 3D models for IFT are still missing. To date, the only information on the 3D structure of IFT come from our analysis of full-length flagella from the biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: the model organism where IFT was discovered and first characterized. In this chapter, we describe and discuss the strategy we implemented to produce the first 3D models of in situ IFT trains in flat-embedded flagella. We provide detailed information about the acquisition of tomographic images, the simultaneous alignment of the double-tilt tomographic series, and the analysis of the tomograms by subtomogram averaging for the generation of detailed 3D models of IFT particles.

  11. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  12. NOTE: Cone beam computerized tomography: the effect of calibration of the Hounsfield unit number to electron density on dose calculation accuracy for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Joan; McCurdy, Boyd; Greer, Peter B.

    2009-08-01

    The availability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images at the time of treatment has opened possibilities for dose calculations representing the delivered dose for adaptive radiation therapy. A significant component in the accuracy of dose calculation is the calibration of the Hounsfield unit (HU) number to electron density (ED). The aim of this work is to assess the impact of HU to ED calibration phantom insert composition and phantom volume on dose calculation accuracy for CBCT. CBCT HU to ED calibration curves for different commercial phantoms were measured and compared. The effect of the scattering volume of the phantom on the HU to ED calibration was examined as a function of phantom length and radial diameter. The resulting calibration curves were used at the treatment planning system to calculate doses for geometrically simple phantoms and a pelvic anatomical phantom to compare against measured doses. Three-dimensional dose distributions for the pelvis phantom were calculated using the HU to ED curves and compared using Chi comparisons. The HU to ED calibration curves for the commercial phantoms diverge at densities greater than that of water, depending on the elemental composition of the phantom insert. The effect of adding scatter material longitudinally, increasing the phantom length from 5 cm to 26 cm, was found to be up to 260 HU numbers for the high-density insert. The change in the HU value, by increasing the diameter of the phantom from 18 to 40 cm, was found to be up to 1200 HU for the high-density insert. The effect of phantom diameter on the HU to ED curve can lead to dose differences for 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays under bone inhomogeneities of up to 20% in extreme cases. These results show significant dosimetric differences when using a calibration phantom with materials which are not tissue equivalent. More importantly, the amount of scattering material used with the HU to ED calibration phantom has a significant effect on the dosimetric

  13. A distributed multi-GPU system for high speed electron microscopic tomographic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shawn Q; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W; Agard, David A

    2011-07-01

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 4096(2) × 512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 4096(2) pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 s of which 1032 s are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 s total to reconstruct 1024(2) × 256 voxels from 122 1024(2) pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment.

  14. A Distributed Multi-GPU System for High Speed Electron Microscopic Tomographic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shawn Q.; Branlund, Eric; Kesthelyi, Bettina; Braunfeld, Michael B.; Cheng, Yifan; Sedat, John W.; Agard, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Full resolution electron microscopic tomographic (EMT) reconstruction of large-scale tilt series requires significant computing power. The desire to perform multiple cycles of iterative reconstruction and realignment dramatically increases the pressing need to improve reconstruction performance. This has motivated us to develop a distributed multi-GPU (graphics processing unit) system to provide the required computing power for rapid constrained, iterative reconstructions of very large three-dimensional (3D) volumes. The participating GPUs reconstruct segments of the volume in parallel, and subsequently, the segments are assembled to form the complete 3D volume. Owing to its power and versatility, the CUDA (NVIDIA, USA) platform was selected for GPU implementation of the EMT reconstruction. For a system containing 10 GPUs provided by 5 GTX295 cards, 10 cycles of SIRT reconstruction for a tomogram of 40962 × 512 voxels from an input tilt series containing 122 projection images of 40962 pixels (single precision float) takes a total of 1845 seconds of which 1032 seconds are for computation with the remainder being the system overhead. The same system takes only 39 seconds total to reconstruct 10242 × 256 voxels from 122 10242 pixel projections. While the system overhead is non-trivial, performance analysis indicates that adding extra GPUs to the system would lead to steadily enhanced overall performance. Therefore, this system can be easily expanded to generate superior computing power for very large tomographic reconstructions and especially to empower iterative cycles of reconstruction and realignment. PMID:21741915

  15. Correction of absorption-edge artifacts in polychromatic X-ray tomography in a scanning electron microscope for 3D microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Laloum, D.; Printemps, T.; Bleuet, P.; Lorut, F.

    2015-01-15

    X-ray tomography is widely used in materials science. However, X-ray scanners are often based on polychromatic radiation that creates artifacts such as dark streaks. We show this artifact is not always due to beam hardening. It may appear when scanning samples with high-Z elements inside a low-Z matrix because of the high-Z element absorption edge: X-rays whose energy is above this edge are strongly absorbed, violating the exponential decay assumption for reconstruction algorithms and generating dark streaks. A method is proposed to limit the absorption edge effect and is applied on a microelectronic case to suppress dark streaks between interconnections.

  16. Correction of absorption-edge artifacts in polychromatic X-ray tomography in a scanning electron microscope for 3D microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Laloum, D; Printemps, T; Lorut, F; Bleuet, P

    2015-01-01

    X-ray tomography is widely used in materials science. However, X-ray scanners are often based on polychromatic radiation that creates artifacts such as dark streaks. We show this artifact is not always due to beam hardening. It may appear when scanning samples with high-Z elements inside a low-Z matrix because of the high-Z element absorption edge: X-rays whose energy is above this edge are strongly absorbed, violating the exponential decay assumption for reconstruction algorithms and generating dark streaks. A method is proposed to limit the absorption edge effect and is applied on a microelectronic case to suppress dark streaks between interconnections.

  17. Diffractive molecular-orbital tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Chunyang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Wang, Feng; He, Lixin; Shi, Wenjing; Li, Yang; Li, Min; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-03-01

    High-order-harmonic generation in the interaction of femtosecond lasers with atoms and molecules opens the path to molecular-orbital tomography and to probe the electronic dynamics with attosecond-Ångström resolutions. Molecular-orbital tomography requires both the amplitude and phase of the high-order harmonics. Yet the measurement of phases requires sophisticated techniques and represents formidable challenges at present. Here we report a scheme, called diffractive molecular-orbital tomography, to retrieve the molecular orbital solely from the amplitude of high-order harmonics without measuring any phase information. We have applied this method to image the molecular orbitals of N2, CO2, and C2H2 . The retrieved orbital is further improved by taking account the correction of Coulomb potential. The diffractive molecular-orbital tomography scheme, removing the roadblock of phase measurement, significantly simplifies the molecular-orbital tomography procedure and paves an efficient and robust way to the imaging of more complex molecules.

  18. Correlation of microphotoluminescence spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography on a single nano-object containing an InGaN/GaN multiquantum well system.

    PubMed

    Rigutti, Lorenzo; Blum, Ivan; Shinde, Deodatta; Hernández-Maldonado, David; Lefebvre, Williams; Houard, Jonathan; Vurpillot, François; Vella, Angela; Tchernycheva, Maria; Durand, Christophe; Eymery, Joël; Deconihout, Bernard

    2014-01-08

    A single nanoscale object containing a set of InGaN/GaN nonpolar multiple-quantum wells has been analyzed by microphotoluminescence spectroscopy (μPL), high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). The correlated measurements constitute a rich and coherent set of data supporting the interpretation that the observed μPL narrow emission lines, polarized perpendicularly to the crystal c-axis and with energies in the interval 2.9-3.3 eV, are related to exciton states localized in potential minima induced by the irregular 3D In distribution within the quantum well (QW) planes. This novel method opens up interesting perspectives, as it will be possible to apply it on a wide class of quantum confining emitters and nano-objects.

  19. Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) refers to imaging that is based on the photoacoustic effect. Although the photoacoustic effect as a physical phenomenon was first reported on by Alexander Graham Bell in 1880 [1], PAT as an imaging technology was developed only after the advent of ultrasonic transducers, computers, and lasers [2-31]. A review on biomedical photoacoustics is available [32]. The motivation for PAT is to combine optical-absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution for deep imaging in the optical quasi-diffusive or diffusive regime. In PAT, the tissue is irradiated by usually a short-pulsed laser beam to achieve a thermal and acoustic impulse response (Fig. 19.1). Locally absorbed light is converted into heat, which is further converted to a pressure rise via thermo-elastic expansion. The initial pressure rise - determined by the local optical absorption coefficient (μ â ), fluence (ψ) and other thermal and mechanical properties - propagates as an ultrasonic wave, which is referred to as a photoacoustic wave.

  20. High resolution IVEM tomography of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, J.W.; Agard, D.A.

    1997-02-01

    Electron tomography is a powerful tool for elucidating the three-dimensional architecture of large biological complexes and subcellular organelles. The introduction of intermediate voltage electron microscopes further extended the technique by providing the means to examine very large and non-symmetrical subcellular organelles, at resolutions beyond what would be possible using light microscopy. Recent studies using electron tomography on a variety of cellular organelles and assemblies such as centrosomes, kinetochores, and chromatin have clearly demonstrated the power of this technique for obtaining 3D structural information on non-symmetric cell components. When combined with biochemical and molecular observations, these 3D reconstructions have provided significant new insights into biological function.

  1. Array tomography: semiautomated image alignment.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. Successful array tomography requires that the captured images be properly stacked and aligned, and the software to achieve these ends is freely available. This protocol describes the construction of volumetric image stacks from images of fluorescently labeled arrays for three-dimensional image visualization, analysis, and archiving.

  2. Dependence Of The Computerized Tomography (CT) Number - Electron Density Relationship On Patient Size And X-Ray Beam Filtration For Fan Beam CT Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, M. E.; Thomason, C. L.; McGary, R.; Hunt, M. A.; Simpson, L. D.; Miller, D. W.; Laughlin, J. S.

    1981-07-01

    The applicability of quantitative information contained in CT scans to diagnostic radiology and to radiation therapy treatment planning and the heterogeneity problem has been recognized by members of the radiological community and by manufacturers. Determination of the relationship between electron density and CT number is important for these applications. As CT technology has evolved, CT number generation has changed. CT number variation was limited in the early water bag systems. However, later generation "air" scanners may exhibit variation in CT numbers across a reconstructed image which are re-lated to positioning within the scan circle and scan field size. Results of experimental investigations using tissue-equivalent phantoms of different cross-sectional shapes and areas on the Technicare Delta 2020 are presented. Investigations also cover the effect of "shaped" and "flat" x-ray beam filters. A variation in CT number is demonstrated on this fan beam geometry scanner for phantoms of different sizes and for different scan circle diameters. An explanation of these effects is given. Differences of as much as 20% in determination of tissue electron density relative to water under different experimental conditions are obtained and reported. A family of curves (electron density vs. CT number) is presented for different patient cross-sectional areas and different scanner settings.

  3. The 3D-tomography of the nano-clusters formed by Fe-coating and annealing of diamond films for enhancing their surface electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang-Chin; Lo, Shen-Chuan; Lin, Li-Jiaun; Huang, Pin-Chang; Shih, Wen-Ching; Lin, I.-Nan; Lee, Chi-Young

    2012-09-01

    The Fe-coating and H2-annealed processes markedly increased the conductivity and enhanced the surface electron field emission (s-EFE) properties for the diamond films. The enhancement on the s-EFE properties for the diamond films is presumably owing to the formation of nano-graphite clusters on the surface of the films via the Fe-to-diamond interaction. However, the extent of enhancement varied with the granular structure of the diamond films. For the microcrystalline (MCD) films, the s-EFE process can be turned on at (E0)MCD = 1.9 V/μm, achieving a large s-EFE current density of (Je)MCD = 315 μA/cm2 at an applied field of 8.8 V/μm. These s-EFE properties are markedly better than those for Fe-coated/annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films with (E0)UNCD = 2.0 V/μm and (Je)UNCD = 120 μA/cm2. The transmission electron microscopy showed that the nano-graphite clusters formed an interconnected network for MCD films that facilitated the electron transport more markedly, as compared with the isolated nano-graphitic clusters formed at the surface of the UNCD films. Therefore, the Fe-coating/annealing processes improved the s-EFE properties for the MCD films more markedly than that for the UNCD films. The understanding on the distribution of the nano-clusters is of critical importance in elucidating the authentic factor that influences the s-EFE properties of the diamond films. Such an understanding is possible only through the 3D-tomographic investigations.

  4. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy.

  5. Interventional video tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truppe, Michael J.; Pongracz, Ferenc; Ploder, Oliver; Wagner, Arne; Ewers, Rolf

    1995-05-01

    Interventional Video Tomography (IVT) is a new imaging modality for Image Directed Surgery to visualize in real-time intraoperatively the spatial position of surgical instruments relative to the patient's anatomy. The video imaging detector is based on a special camera equipped with an optical viewing and lighting system and electronic 3D sensors. When combined with an endoscope it is used for examining the inside of cavities or hollow organs of the body from many different angles. The surface topography of objects is reconstructed from a sequence of monocular video or endoscopic images. To increase accuracy and speed of the reconstruction the relative movement between objects and endoscope is continuously tracked by electronic sensors. The IVT image sequence represents a 4D data set in stereotactic space and contains image, surface topography and motion data. In ENT surgery an IVT image sequence of the planned and so far accessible surgical path is acquired prior to surgery. To simulate the surgical procedure the cross sectional imaging data is superimposed with the digitally stored IVT image sequence. During surgery the video sequence component of the IVT simulation is substituted by the live video source. The IVT technology makes obsolete the use of 3D digitizing probes for the patient image coordinate transformation. The image fusion of medical imaging data with live video sources is the first practical use of augmented reality in medicine. During surgery a head-up display is used to overlay real-time reformatted cross sectional imaging data with the live video image.

  6. EDITORIAL: Industrial Process Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton Johansen, Geir; Wang, Mi

    2008-09-01

    There has been tremendous development within measurement science and technology over the past couple of decades. New sensor technologies and compact versatile signal recovery electronics are continuously expanding the limits of what can be measured and the accuracy with which this can be done. Miniaturization of sensors and the use of nanotechnology push these limits further. Also, thanks to powerful and cost-effective computer systems, sophisticated measurement and reconstruction algorithms previously only accessible in advanced laboratories are now available for in situ online measurement systems. The process industries increasingly require more process-related information, motivated by key issues such as improved process control, process utilization and process yields, ultimately driven by cost-effectiveness, quality assurance, environmental and safety demands. Industrial process tomography methods have taken advantage of the general progress in measurement science, and aim at providing more information, both quantitatively and qualitatively, on multiphase systems and their dynamics. The typical approach for such systems has been to carry out one local or bulk measurement and assume that this is representative of the whole system. In some cases, this is sufficient. However, there are many complex systems where the component distribution varies continuously and often unpredictably in space and time. The foundation of industrial tomography is to conduct several measurements around the periphery of a multiphase process, and use these measurements to unravel the cross-sectional distribution of the process components in time and space. This information is used in the design and optimization of industrial processes and process equipment, and also to improve the accuracy of multiphase system measurements in general. In this issue we are proud to present a selection of the 145 papers presented at the 5th World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography in Bergen

  7. Computer programs for unit-cell determination in electron diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, X Z

    2005-03-01

    A set of computer programs for unit-cell determination from an electron diffraction tilt series and pattern indexing has been developed on the basis of several well-established algorithms. In this approach, a reduced direct primitive cell is first determined from experimental data, in the means time, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. The derived primitive cell is then checked for possible higher lattice symmetry and transformed into a proper conventional cell. Finally a least-squares refinement procedure is adopted to generate optimum lattice parameters on the basis of the lengths of basic reflections in each diffraction pattern and the indices of these reflections. Examples are given to show the usage of the programs.

  8. Turbocharging Quantum Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Scholten, Travis L.; Rudinger, Kenneth Michael

    2015-01-01

    Quantum tomography is used to characterize quantum operations implemented in quantum information processing (QIP) hardware. Traditionally, state tomography has been used to characterize the quantum state prepared in an initialization procedure, while quantum process tomography is used to characterize dynamical operations on a QIP system. As such, tomography is critical to the development of QIP hardware (since it is necessary both for debugging and validating as-built devices, and its results are used to influence the next generation of devices). But tomography suffers from several critical drawbacks. In this report, we present new research that resolves several of these flaws. We describe a new form of tomography called gate set tomography (GST), which unifies state and process tomography, avoids prior methods critical reliance on precalibrated operations that are not generally available, and can achieve unprecedented accuracies. We report on theory and experimental development of adaptive tomography protocols that achieve far higher fidelity in state reconstruction than non-adaptive methods. Finally, we present a new theoretical and experimental analysis of process tomography on multispin systems, and demonstrate how to more effectively detect and characterize quantum noise using carefully tailored ensembles of input states.

  9. A model for quantitative correction of coronary calcium scores on multidetector, dual source, and electron beam computed tomography for influences of linear motion, calcification density, and temporal resolution: A cardiac phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Greuter, M. J. W.; Groen, J. M.; Nicolai, L. J.; Dijkstra, H.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to quantify the influence of linear motion, calcification density, and temporal resolution on coronary calcium determination using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), dual source CT (DSCT), and electron beam tomography (EBT) and to find a quantitative method which corrects for the influences of these parameters using a linear moving cardiac phantom. Methods: On a robotic arm with artificial arteries with four calcifications of increasing density, a linear movement was applied between 0 and 120 mm/s (step of 10 mm/s). The phantom was scanned five times on 64-slice MDCT, DSCT, and EBT using a standard acquisition protocol. The average Agatston, volume, and mass scores were determined for each velocity, calcification, and scanner. Susceptibility to motion was quantified using a cardiac motion susceptibility (CMS) index. Resemblance to EBT and physical volume and mass was quantified using a {Delta} index. Results: Increasing motion artifacts were observed at increasing velocities on all scanners, with increasing severity from EBT to DSCT to 64-slice MDCT. The calcium score showed a linear dependency on motion from which a correction factor could be derived. This correction factor showed a linear dependency on the mean calcification density with a good fit for all three scoring methods and all three scanners (0.73{<=}R{sup 2}{<=}0.95). The slope and offset of this correction factor showed a linear dependency on temporal resolution with a good fit for all three scoring methods and all three scanners (0.83{<=}R{sup 2}{<=}0.98). CMS was minimal for EBT and increasing values were observed for DSCT and highest values for 64-slice MDCT. CMS was minimal for mass score and increasing values were observed for volume score and highest values for Agatston score. For all densities and scoring methods DSCT showed on average the closest resemblance to EBT calcium scores. When using the correction factor, CMS index decreased on average by

  10. Meaning of Interior Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2013-01-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for collection of un-truncated projections and reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it has been elevated as a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as “omni-tomography” is being developed for grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features. PMID:23912256

  11. MO-A-BRD-07: Feasibility of X-Ray Acoustic Computed Tomography as a Tool for Calibration and In Vivo Dosimetry of Radiotherapy Electron and Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hickling, S; Hobson, M; El Naqa, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work simulates radiation-induced acoustic waves to assess the feasibility of x-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT) as a dosimeter. XACT exploits the phenomenon that acoustic waves with amplitude proportional to the dose deposited are induced following a radiation pulse. After detecting these acoustic waves with an ultrasound transducer, an image of the dose distribution can be reconstructed in realtime. Methods: Monte Carlo was used to simulate the dose distribution for monoenergetic 6 MeV photon and 9 MeV electron beams incident on a water tank. The dose distribution for a prostate patient planned with a photon 4-field box technique was calculated using clinical treatment planning software. All three dose distributions were converted into initial pressure distributions, and transportation of the induced acoustic waves was simulated using an open-source toolkit. Ideal transducers were placed around the circumference of the target to detect the acoustic waves, and a time reversal reconstruction algorithm was used to obtain an XACT image of the dose for each radiation pulse. Results: For the photon water tank relative dosimetry case, it was found that the normalized acoustic signal amplitude agreed with the normalized dose at depths from 0 cm to 10 cm, with an average percent difference of 0.5%. For the reconstructed in-plane dose distribution of an electron water tank irradiation, all pixels passed a 3%–3 mm 2D gamma test. The reconstructed prostate dose distribution closely resembled the plan, with 89% of pixels passing a 3%–3 mm 2D gamma test. For all situations, the amplitude of the induced acoustic waves ranged from 0.01 Pa to 1 Pa. Conclusion: Based on the amplitude of the radiation-induced acoustic waves and accuracy of the reconstructed dose distributions, XACT is a feasible technique for dosimetry in both calibration and in vivo environments for photon and electron beams and merits further investigation. Funding from NSERC, CIHR and Mc

  12. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  13. Advanced instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underly modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost. 71 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated.

  15. In Situ Localization of N and C Termini of Subunits of the Flagellar Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (N-DRC) Using SNAP Tag and Cryo-electron Tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kangkang; Awata, Junya; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Witman, George B.; Porter, Mary E.; Nicastro, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) has reached nanoscale resolution for in situ three-dimensional imaging of macromolecular complexes and organelles. Yet its current resolution is not sufficient to precisely localize or identify most proteins in situ; for example, the location and arrangement of components of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), a key regulator of ciliary/flagellar motility that is conserved from algae to humans, have remained elusive despite many cryo-ET studies of cilia and flagella. Here, we developed an in situ localization method that combines cryo-ET/subtomogram averaging with the clonable SNAP tag, a widely used cell biological probe to visualize fusion proteins by fluorescence microscopy. Using this hybrid approach, we precisely determined the locations of the N and C termini of DRC3 and the C terminus of DRC4 within the three-dimensional structure of the N-DRC in Chlamydomonas flagella. Our data demonstrate that fusion of SNAP with target proteins allowed for protein localization with high efficiency and fidelity using SNAP-linked gold nanoparticles, without disrupting the native assembly, structure, or function of the flagella. After cryo-ET and subtomogram averaging, we localized DRC3 to the L1 projection of the nexin linker, which interacts directly with a dynein motor, whereas DRC4 was observed to stretch along the N-DRC base plate to the nexin linker. Application of the technique developed here to the N-DRC revealed new insights into the organization and regulatory mechanism of this complex, and provides a valuable tool for the structural dissection of macromolecular complexes in situ. PMID:25564608

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  17. Nasal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Ned F

    2006-05-01

    Chronic nasal disease is often a challenge to diagnose. Computed tomography greatly enhances the ability to diagnose chronic nasal disease in dogs and cats. Nasal computed tomography provides detailed information regarding the extent of disease, accurate discrimination of neoplastic versus nonneoplastic diseases, and identification of areas of the nose to examine rhinoscopically and suspicious regions to target for biopsy.

  18. Biomass accessibility analysis using electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Hinkle, Jacob D.; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Gruchalla, Kenny; ...

    2015-12-25

    Substrate accessibility to catalysts has been a dominant theme in theories of biomass deconstruction. Furthermore, current methods of quantifying accessibility do not elucidate mechanisms for increased accessibility due to changes in microstructure following pretreatment.

  19. Three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2 - 3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original data set. The precision of the height determination was 0.2 nm. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved data set.

  20. Three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset.

  1. Computerised Axial Tomography (CAT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    OF COMPUTERISED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY Paragraph 1.1 ORIGIN, DEVELOPMENT AND MARKET OF CAT Paragraph 1.2 EQUIPMENT Chapter 2 OPERATIONAL PRINCIPLE OF A CT...DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPUTERISED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY 1.1 Origin, development and marketing of the CAT The origin of the CAT goes back to 1961 when...count on wide commercial possibilities, in the international market . In particular, EMI entered, very forcefully, the American market , always

  2. Parallel acoustic delay lines for photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yapici, Murat Kaya; Kim, Chulhong; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Jeon, Mansik; Guo, Zijian; Cai, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Achieving real-time photoacoustic (PA) tomography typically requires multi-element ultrasound transducer arrays and their associated multiple data acquisition (DAQ) electronics to receive PA waves simultaneously. We report the first demonstration of a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system using optical fiber-based parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs). By employing PADLs to introduce specific time delays, the PA signals (on the order of a few micro seconds) can be forced to arrive at the ultrasonic transducers at different times. As a result, time-delayed PA signals in multiple channels can be ultimately received and processed in a serial manner with a single-element transducer, followed by single-channel DAQ electronics. Our results show that an optically absorbing target in an optically scattering medium can be photoacoustically imaged using the newly developed PADL-based PAT system. Potentially, this approach could be adopted to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of ultrasonic array receiver systems. PMID:23139043

  3. Mesoscale ionospheric tomography at the Auroral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntama, J.; Kokkatil, G. V.

    2008-12-01

    FMI (Finnish Meteorological Institute) has used observations from the dense GNSS network in Finland for high resolution regional ionospheric tomography. The observation system used in this work is the VRS (Virtual Reference Station) network in Finland operated by Geotrim Ltd. This network contains 86 GNSS ground stations providing two frequency GPS and GLONASS observations with the sampling rate of 1 Hz. The network covers the whole Finland and the sampling of the ionosphere is very good for observing mesoscale ionospheric structures at the Auroral region. The ionospheric tomography software used by FMI is the MIDAS (Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System) algorithm developed and implemented by the University of Bath (Mitchell and Spencer, 2003). MIDAS is a 3-D extension of the 2-D tomography algorithm originally presented by Fremouw et al. (1992). The research at FMI is based on ground based GNSS data collected in December 2006. The impacts of the two geomagnetic storms during the month are clearly visible in the retrieved electron density and TEC maps and they can be correlated with the magnetic field disturbances measured by the IMAGE magnetometer network. This is the first time that mesoscale structures in the ionospheric plasma can be detected from ground based GNSS observations at the Auroral region. The continuous high rate observation data from the Geotrim network allows monitoring of the temporal evolution of these structures throughout the storms. Validation of the high resolution electron density and TEC maps is a challenge as independent reference observations with a similar resolution are not available. FMI has compared the 3-D electron density maps against the 2-D electron density plots retrieved from the observations from the Ionospheric Tomography Chain operated by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (SGO). Additional validation has been performed with intercomparisons with observations from the ground based magnetometer and auroral camera network

  4. Experimental adaptive process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, I. A.; Struchalin, G. I.; Straupe, S. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Kravtsov, K. S.; Kulik, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive measurements were recently shown to significantly improve the performance of quantum state tomography. Utilizing information about the system for the online choice of optimal measurements allows one to reach the ultimate bounds of precision for state reconstruction. In this article we generalize an adaptive Bayesian approach to the case of process tomography and experimentally show its superiority in the task of learning unknown quantum operations. Our experiments with photonic polarization qubits cover all types of single-qubit channels. We also discuss instrumental errors and the criteria for evaluation of the ultimate achievable precision in an experiment. It turns out that adaptive tomography provides a lower noise floor in the presence of strong technical noise.

  5. Emission tomography of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Teates, C.D.; Croft, B.Y.; Brenbridge, N.A.; Bray, S.T.; Williamson, B.R.

    1983-12-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was done on two patients with suspected renal masses. Nuclear scintigraphy was equivocal on two tumors readily identified by SPECT. Single photon tomography is cost effective and increases the reliability of nuclear scintigraphy.

  6. Array tomography: rodent brain fixation and embedding.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the fixation and processing required to prepare tissues for immunofluorescence array tomography.

  7. Waste inspection tomography (WIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, R.T.; Han, K.S.

    1994-12-31

    The WIT program will provide an inspection system that offers the nuclear waste evaluator a unique combination of tools for regulatory-driven characterization of low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRU), and mixed waste drums. WIT provides nondestructive, noninvasive, and environmentally safe inspections using X-ray and gamma ray technologies, with reasonable cost and throughput. Two emission imaging techniques will be employed for characterizing materials in waste containers. The first of these is gamma emission tomography, commonly called single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Rather than using an external radiation source, SPECT uses the emission of radioactive materials within the object of interest for imaging. In this case, emission from actual nuclear waste within a container will provide a three-dimensional image of the radioactive substances in the container. The second emission technique will use high-purity germanium detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy. This technique, called nondestructive assay (NDA), can identify the emitting isotopic species and strength. Work in emission tomography and assay of nuclear waste has been undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a technique called Passive Tomography. Results from a process development unit are presented.

  8. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  9. Neural networks for calibration tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are suitable for performing pattern-to-pattern calibrations. These calibrations are potentially useful for facilities operations in aeronautics, the control of optical alignment, and the like. Computed tomography is compared with neural net calibration tomography for estimating density from its x-ray transform. X-ray transforms are measured, for example, in diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry of fluids. Computed tomography and neural net calibration tomography are shown to have comparable performance for a 10 degree viewing cone and 29 interferograms within that cone. The system of tomography discussed is proposed as a relevant test of neural networks and other parallel processors intended for using flow visualization data.

  10. Ultrafast limited-angle-type x-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bieberle, M.; Fischer, F.; Schleicher, E.; Hampel, U.; Koch, D.; Aktay, K. S. d. C.; Menz, H.-J.; Mayer, H.-G.

    2007-09-17

    The authors present an ultrafast electron beam x-ray computed tomography technique usable for imaging of fast processes, such as multiphase flows or moving parts in technical or biological objects. The setup consists of an electron beam unit with fast deflection capability and an ultrafast multielement x-ray detector and achieves 10 000 frames/s image rate. Since full sampling of the Radon space requires an angular overlap of source path and detector which strongly decreases axial resolution, the authors devised a limited-angle-type tomography. As a demonstration they visualized the movement of particles and gas bubbles rising in a stagnant liquid.

  11. Atom probe tomography of lithium-doped network glasses.

    PubMed

    Greiwe, Gerd-Hendrik; Balogh, Zoltan; Schmitz, Guido

    2014-06-01

    Li-doped silicate and borate glasses are electronically insulating, but provide considerable ionic conductivity. Under measurement conditions of laser-assisted atom probe tomography, mobile Li ions are redistributed in response to high electric fields. In consequence, the direct interpretation of measured composition profiles is prevented. It is demonstrated that composition profiles are nevertheless well understood by a complex model taking into account the electronic structure of dielectric materials, ionic mobility and field screening. Quantitative data on band bending and field penetration during measurement are derived which are important in understanding laser-assisted atom probe tomography of dielectric materials.

  12. Development of a proton Computed Tomography detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimuddin, Md.; Coutrakon, G.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Erdelyi, B.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Krider, J.; Rukalin, V.; Uzunyan, S. A.; Zutshi, V.; Fordt, R.; Sellberg, G.; Rauch, J. E.; Roman, M.; Rubinov, P.; Wilson, P.

    2016-02-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  13. Atomic-scale tomography: a 2020 vision.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Thomas F; Miller, Michael K; Rajan, Krishna; Ringer, Simon P

    2013-06-01

    Atomic-scale tomography (AST) is defined and its place in microscopy is considered. Arguments are made that AST, as defined, would be the ultimate microscopy. The available pathways for achieving AST are examined and we conclude that atom probe tomography (APT) may be a viable basis for AST on its own and that APT in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy is a likely path as well. Some possible configurations of instrumentation for achieving AST are described. The concept of metaimages is introduced where data from multiple techniques are melded to create synergies in a multidimensional data structure. When coupled with integrated computational materials engineering, structure-properties microscopy is envisioned. The implications of AST for science and technology are explored.

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    Seventy percent of our body is made up of water. For that reason, radiation based medical imaging techniques operate in spectral regions where water absorption is low (Fig. 18.1, panel). Well known modalities are MRI that operates at radio frequencies, and PET/SPECT which work in the high frequency range. Water absorption is also low around the part of the spectrum that is visible to the human eye. In this spectral region, scattering of the light by tissue structures roughly decreases with wavelength. Therefore, most optical imaging techniques such as (confocal) microscopy, optical tomography and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) use wavelengths between 650 and 1300 nm to allow reasonable imaging depths.

  15. Computed tomography status

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  16. Computed Tomography Status

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  17. Tutorial on photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has become one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical optics. Unlike pure optical imaging, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, PAT employs acoustic detection to image optical absorption contrast with high-resolution deep into scattering tissue. So far, PAT has been widely used for multiscale anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging of biological tissues. We focus on PAT's basic principles, major implementations, imaging contrasts, and recent applications.

  18. Proton computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantonio, Martina; Sauli, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a diagnostic method capable of in situ imaging the three-dimensional density distribution in a patient before irradiation with charged particle beams. Proposed long time ago, this technology has been developed by several groups, and may become an essential tool for advanced quality assessment in hadrontherapy. We describe the basic principles of the method, its performance and limitations as well as provide a summary of experimental systems and of results achieved.

  19. High Resolution Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-31

    samples. 14. SUBJECTTERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 38 High Resolution, Microfocus , Characterization, X - Ray , Micrography, Computed Tomography (CT), Failure...high resolutions (50 g.tm feature sensitivity) when a small field of view (50 mm) is used [11]. Specially designed detectors and a microfocus X - ray ...Wright Laboratories. Feldkamp [14] at Ford used a microfocus X - ray source and an X - ray image intensifier to develop a system capable of 20 g.m

  20. Compton tomography system

    DOEpatents

    Grubsky, Victor; Romanoov, Volodymyr; Shoemaker, Keith; Patton, Edward Matthew; Jannson, Tomasz

    2016-02-02

    A Compton tomography system comprises an x-ray source configured to produce a planar x-ray beam. The beam irradiates a slice of an object to be imaged, producing Compton-scattered x-rays. The Compton-scattered x-rays are imaged by an x-ray camera. Translation of the object with respect to the source and camera or vice versa allows three-dimensional object imaging.

  1. Ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Malyarenko, Eugene V.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2002-12-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace structures using traditional methods is a complex, time-consuming process critical to maintaining mission readiness and flight safety. Limited access to corrosion-prone structure and the restricted applicability of available NDE techniques for the detection of hidden corrosion or other damage often compound the challenge. In this paper we discuss our recent work using ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography to address this pressing NDE technology need. Lamb waves are ultrasonic guided waves, which allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected for structural flaws such as disbonds, corrosion and delaminations. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the travel times of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. Our work focuses on tomographic reconstruction to produce quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians or fed directly into structural integrity and lifetime prediction codes. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using a square perimeter array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography is appropriate for detecting flaws in aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this paper.

  2. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., <10 km), the acoustic wave field densely samples properties of the water column over the width of the receiver array. A method, referred to as ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  3. Enhanced local tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomography is enhanced to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. In a first method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, the relative attenuation data is inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA. to define the location S of the density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA. is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA.. In a second method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, a gradient value for a mollified local tomography function .gradient..function..sub..LAMBDA..epsilon. (x.sub.ij) is determined along the discontinuity; and the value of the jump of the density across the discontinuity curve (or surface) S is estimated from the gradient values.

  4. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  5. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  6. Using computerized tomography to determine ionospheric structures. Part 1, Notivation and basic approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1993-08-01

    Properties of the ionosphere are reviewed along with its correlations with other geophysical phenomena and with applications of ionospheric studies to communication, navigation, and surveillance systems. Computer tomography is identified as a method to determine the detailed, three-dimensional distribution of electron density within the ionosphere. Several tomography methods are described, with a basic approach illustrated by an example. Limitations are identified.

  7. Research on ionospheric tomography based on variable pixel height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dunyong; Li, Peiqing; He, Jie; Hu, Wusheng; Li, Chaokui

    2016-05-01

    A novel ionospheric tomography technique based on variable pixel height was developed for the tomographic reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The method considers the height of each pixel as an unknown variable, which is retrieved during the inversion process together with the electron density values. In contrast to conventional computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT), which parameterizes the model with a fixed pixel height, the variable-pixel-height computerized ionospheric tomography (VHCIT) model applies a disturbance to the height of each pixel. In comparison with conventional CIT models, the VHCIT technique achieved superior results in a numerical simulation. A careful validation of the reliability and superiority of VHCIT was performed. According to the results of the statistical analysis of the average root mean square errors, the proposed model offers an improvement by 15% compared with conventional CIT models.

  8. Super-sensing through industrial process tomography.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2016-06-28

    In this introduction article, we present a brief overview of industrial process tomography. This will start by linking between the concept of industrial process tomography and super-sensing. This will follow with a brief introduction to various process tomography systems and in particular electrical tomography methods. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  9. Application of Fast Optical Tomography to Flow Tubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    electro-optics, quantum electronics, solid-state lasers , optical propagation and communications; microwave semiconductor devices, microwave /millimeter...34Application of Tomography in 3-D Transonic Flows, AIAA-87-1374, AIAA 19th Fluid Dynamics, Plasma Dynamics and Laser Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii...thermomechanics, gas kinetics and radiation; cw and pulsed chemical and excimer laser development including chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, optical

  10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  11. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Simon S.; Jia, Yali; Zhang, Miao; Su, Johnny P.; Liu, Gangjun; Hwang, Thomas S.; Bailey, Steven T.; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a noninvasive approach that can visualize blood vessels down to the capillary level. With the advent of high-speed OCT and efficient algorithms, practical OCTA of ocular circulation is now available to ophthalmologists. Clinical investigations that used OCTA have increased exponentially in the past few years. This review will cover the history of OCTA and survey its most important clinical applications. The salient problems in the interpretation and analysis of OCTA are described, and recent advances are highlighted. PMID:27409483

  13. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  14. Transurethral Ultrasound Diffraction Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    transmitter. These are then 7 Fourier transformed into the frequency domain data. The clock rate is 33 MHz, and the FFT is performed after 1536 time...B. Yazgan and O.K. Ersoy, Multistage parallel algorithm for diffraction tomography, Applied Optica , vol. 34, pp, 1426-1431, 1995. [9] J. Wiskin, D.T...J1k0a2. Note that Eq. 34 reflects the well-known fact that in the Born approxi- mation the Fourier frequencies of the object are confined within a

  15. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  16. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  17. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  18. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale – the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone.

  19. Atomic scale chemical tomography of human bone

    PubMed Central

    Langelier, Brian; Wang, Xiaoyue; Grandfield, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Human bone is a complex hierarchical material. Understanding bone structure and its corresponding composition at the nanometer scale is critical for elucidating mechanisms of biomineralization under healthy and pathological states. However, the three-dimensional structure and chemical nature of bone remains largely unexplored at the nanometer scale due to the challenges associated with characterizing both the structural and chemical integrity of bone simultaneously. Here, we use correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography for the first time, to our knowledge, to reveal structures in human bone at the atomic level. This approach provides an overlaying chemical map of the organic and inorganic constituents of bone on its structure. This first use of atom probe tomography on human bone reveals local gradients, trace element detection of Mg, and the co-localization of Na with the inorganic-organic interface of bone mineral and collagen fibrils, suggesting the important role of Na-rich organics in the structural connection between mineral and collagen. Our findings provide the first insights into the hierarchical organization and chemical heterogeneity in human bone in three-dimensions at its smallest length scale – the atomic level. We demonstrate that atom probe tomography shows potential for new insights in biomineralization research on bone. PMID:28054636

  20. Array tomography: immunostaining and antibody elution.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are prepared for imaging by tagging with primary antibodies against specific cellular targets, followed by labeling with fluorescent secondary antibodies. Alternatively, fluorescent proteins that have been introduced into the tissue before dissection can be used.

  1. Ionospheric tomography using the FORTE satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.C.

    1993-08-01

    The possibility of obtaining ionospheric profile data via tomographic techniques has elicited considerable interest in recent years. The input data for the method is a set of total electron content measurements along intersecting lines of sight which form a grid. This can conveniently be provided by a fast-moving satellite with a VHF beacon which will generate the multiple paths needed for effective tomography. Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories will launch and operate the FORTE satellite for the US Department of Energy, with launch scheduled in 1995. FORTE will provide such a beacon. Additionally, wideband VHF receivers aboard the satellite will allow corraborative measurements of ionospheric profile parameters in some cases.

  2. Tomography and optical properties of silver nano-inukshuk

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tanmay; Das, Pabitra; Ghosh, Tapas; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-06-24

    Following a simple dip-and-rinse galvanic displacement reaction silver nano-inukshuks were prepared directly on germanium surfaces. Morphology, 3-dimensional (3D) structure, chemical composition and optical properties of the silver nanostructurs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. Exact 3D morphology was reconstructed in the by tomography mode of TEM.

  3. Internal tide oceanic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2016-09-01

    A concept of internal tide oceanic tomography (ITOT) is proposed to monitor ocean warming on a global scale. ITOT is similar to acoustic tomography, but that work waves are internal tides. ITOT detects ocean temperature changes by precisely measuring travel time changes of long-range propagating internal tides. The underlying principle is that upper ocean warming strengthens ocean stratification and thus increases the propagation speed of internal tides. This concept is inspired by recent advances in observing internal tides by satellite altimetry. In particular, a plane wave fit method can separately resolve multiple internal tidal waves and thus accurately determines the phase of each wave. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of ITOT. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the yearly time series of travel time changes of the M2 internal tide is closely correlated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation index. In the North Atlantic, significant interannual variations and bidecadal trends are observed and consistent with the changes in ocean heat content measured by Argo floats. ITOT offers a long-term, cost-effective, environmentally friendly technique for monitoring global ocean warming. Future work is needed to quantify the accuracy of this technique.

  4. Waste inspection tomography (WIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, R.T.

    1995-10-01

    Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting, isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU.

  5. Stripe sensor tomography.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Mladen; Vltava, Lvcian; Barrett, Christopher P; Emery, Teresa H; Scherer, Axel

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a general concept of tomographic imaging for the case of an imaging sensor that has a stripelike shape. We first show that there is no difference, in principle, between two-dimensional tomography using conventional electromagnetic or particle radiation and tomography where a stripe sensor is mechanically scanned over a sample at a sequence of different angles. For a single stripe detector imaging, linear motion and angular rotation are required. We experimentally demonstrate single stripe sensor imaging principle using an elongated inductive coil detector. By utilizing an array of parallel stripe sensors that can be individually addressed, two-dimensional imaging can be performed with rotation only, eliminating the requirement for linear motion, as we also experimentally demonstrate with parallel coil array. We conclude that imaging with a stripe-type sensor of particular width and thickness (where the width is much larger than the thickness) is resolution limited only by the thickness (smaller parameter) of the sensor. We give examples of multiple sensor families where this imaging technique may be beneficial such as magnetoresistive, inductive, superconducting quantum interference device, and Hall effect sensors, and, in particular, discuss the possibilities of the technique in the field of magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Optical tomography of plastic deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Puro, A.E.

    1994-12-01

    In the framework of linear dependence of the dielectric constant tensor on the strain tensor (birefringence described by the Neumann law), weak optical anisotropy, and incompressibility of a material, we consider the application of optical tomography to the problem of photoplasticity. As starting information, the path difference and the isocline parameter measured by tomography are used. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Surface area and volume measurements of volcanic ash particles using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT): A comparison with scanning electron microscope (SEM) stereoscopic imaging and geometric considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Orkun; Şen, Erdal; Aydar, Erkan; Tatar, İlkan; Çelik, H. Hamdi

    2010-10-01

    Volcanic ash particles are important components of explosive eruptions, and their surface textures are the subject of intense research. Characterization of ash surfaces is crucial for understanding the physics of volcanic plumes, remote sensing measurements of ash and aerosols, interfacial processes, modelling transportation and deposition of tephra and characterizing eruptive styles. A number of different methods have been used over the years to arrive at surface area estimates. The more common methods include estimates based on geometric considerations (geometric surface area) and physisorption of gas molecules on the surface of interest (physical surface area). In this study, micro computed tomography (micro-CT), which is a non-destructive method providing three-dimensional data, enabled the measurement of surface area and volume of individual ash particles. Results were compared with the values obtained from SEM stereoscopic imaging and geometric considerations. Surface area estimates of micro-CT and SEM stereoscopic imaging are similar, with surface area/volume ratios (SA/V) of 0.0368 and 0.0467, respectively. Ash particle surface textures show a large deviation from that of simple geometric forms, and an approximation both to spheres and ellipsoids do not seem adequate for the representation of ash surface. SEM stereoscopic and/or micro-CT imaging are here suggested as good candidate techniques for the characterization of textures on macro-pore regions of ash particles.

  8. Simplified quantum process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branderhorst, M. P. A.; Nunn, J.; Walmsley, I. A.; Kosut, R. L.

    2009-11-01

    We propose and evaluate experimentally an approach to quantum process tomography that completely removes the scaling problem plaguing the standard approach. The key to this simplification is the incorporation of prior knowledge of the class of physical interactions involved in generating the dynamics, which reduces the problem to one of parameter estimation. This allows part of the problem to be tackled using efficient convex methods, which, when coupled with a constraint on some parameters, allows globally optimal estimates for the Krauss operators to be determined from experimental data. Parameterizing the maps provides further advantages: it allows the incorporation of mixed states of the environment as well as some initial correlation between the system and environment, both of which are common physical situations following excitation of the system away from thermal equilibrium. Although the approach is not universal, in cases where it is valid it returns a complete set of positive maps for the dynamical evolution of a quantum system at all times.

  9. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  10. 4-D photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  11. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  12. Evolution prediction from tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Shabani, Alireza; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum process tomography provides a means of measuring the evolution operator for a system at a fixed measurement time t. The problem of using that tomographic snapshot to predict the evolution operator at other times is generally ill-posed since there are, in general, infinitely many distinct and compatible solutions. We describe the prediction, in some "maximal ignorance" sense, of the evolution of a quantum system based on knowledge only of the evolution operator for finitely many times 0<τ 1

  13. Ocean acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Worcester, Peter F.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2008-10-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was proposed in 1979 by Walter Munk and Carl Wunsch as an analogue to x-ray computed axial tomography for the oceans. The oceans are opaque to most electromagnetic radiation, but there is a strong acoustic waveguide, and sound can propagate for 10 Mm and more with distinct multiply-refracted ray paths. Transmitting broadband pulses in the ocean leads to a set of impulsive arrivals at the receiver which characterize the impulse response of the sound channel. The peaks observed at the receiver are assumed to represent the arrival of energy traveling along geometric ray paths. These paths can be distinguished by arrival time, and by arrival angle when a vertical array of receivers is available. Changes in ray arrival time can be used to infer changes in ocean structure. Ray travel time measurements have been a mainstay of long-range acoustic measurements, but the strong sensitivity of ray paths to range-dependent sound speed perturbations makes the ray sampling functions uncertain in real cases. In the ray approximation travel times are sensitive to medium changes only along the corresponding eigenrays. Ray theory is an infinite-frequency approximation, and its eikonal equation has nonlinearities not found in the acoustic wave equation. We build on recent seismology results (kernels for body wave arrivals in the earth) to characterize the kernel for converting sound speed change in the ocean to travel time changes using more complete propagation physics. Wave-theoretic finite frequency kernels may show less sensitivity to small-scale sound speed structure.

  14. Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, R.T.

    1995-12-01

    Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

  15. Global Adjoint Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Peter, Daniel; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    We will present our initial results of global adjoint tomography based on 3D seismic wave simulations which is one of the most challenging examples in seismology in terms of intense computational requirements and vast amount of high-quality seismic data that can potentially be assimilated in inversions. Using a spectral-element method, we incorporate full 3D wave propagation in seismic tomography by running synthetic seismograms and adjoint simulations to compute exact sensitivity kernels in realistic 3D background models. We run our global simulations on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system taking advantage of the GPU version of the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package. We have started iterations with initially selected 253 earthquakes within the magnitude range of 5.5 < Mw < 7.0 and numerical simulations having resolution down to ~27 s to invert for a transversely isotropic crust and mantle model using a non-linear conjugate gradient algorithm. The measurements are currently based on frequency-dependent traveltime misfits. We use both minor- and major-arc body and surface waves by running 200 min simulations where inversions are performed with more than 2.6 million measurements. Our initial results after 12 iterations already indicate several prominent features such as enhanced slab (e.g., Hellenic, Japan, Bismarck, Sandwich), plume/hotspot (e.g., the Pacific superplume, Caroline, Yellowstone, Hawaii) images, etc. To improve the resolution and ray coverage, particularly in the lower mantle, our aim is to increase the resolution of numerical simulations first going down to ~17 s and then to ~9 s to incorporate high-frequency body waves in inversions. While keeping track of the progress and illumination of features in our models with a limited data set, we work towards to assimilate all available data in inversions from all seismic networks and earthquakes in the global CMT catalogue.

  16. Surface area and volume measurements of volcanic ash particles using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT): A comparison with scanning electron microscope (SEM) stereoscopic imaging and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Orkun; Şen, Erdal; Aydar, Erkan; Tatar, Ä.°Lkan; Ćelik, H. Hamdi

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic ash particles are important components of explosive eruptions and their surface texture is the subject of intense research. Characterization of ash surfaces is crucial for understanding the physics of the volcanic plumes, remote sensing measurements of ash and aerosols, interfacial processes, modelling transportation and deposition of tephra and characterizing eruptive styles. A number of different methods have been used over the years to arrive at surface area estimates. The more common methods include estimates based on the geometric considerations (geometric surface area) and the physisorption of gas molecules on the surface of interest (physical surface area). In this study, micro computed tomography (micro-CT), a non-destructive method providing three-dimensional data enabled the measurement of surface areas and volumes of individual ash particles. Specific surface area estimates for ash particles were also obtained using nitrogen as gas adsorbent and the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) model. Results were compared with the values obtained from SEM stereoscopic imaging and geometric considerations. Surface area estimates of micro-CT and SEM stereoscopic imaging overlaps with mean specific surface area results of 0.0167 and 0.0214 m2/g, respectively. However, ash particle surface textures present quite a deviation from that of their geometric forms and approximation to sphere and ellipsoid both seemed to be inadequate for representation of real ash surfaces. The higher surface area estimate (> 0.4 m2/g) obtained from the technique based on physical sorption of gases (BET model here) was attributed to its capability for surface areas associated even with angstrom-sized pores. SEM stereoscopic and/or micro-CT imaging were suggested for characterization of textures on macro-pore regions of ash particles.

  17. Muon tomography: Plans for observations in the Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, D.; Beauducel, F.; Déclais, Y.; Lesparre, N.; Marteau, J.; Nicollin, F.; Tarantola, A.

    2010-02-01

    The application of muon tomography to monitor and image the internal structure of volcanoes in the Lesser Antilles is discussed. Particular focus is directed towards the three volcanoes that fall under the responsibility of the Institut de Physique du Globe of Paris, namely La Montagne Pelée in Martinique, La Soufriére in Guadeloupe, and the Soufriére Hills in Montserrat. The technological criteria for the design of portable muon telescopes are presented in detail for both their mechanical and electronic aspects. The detector matrices are constructed with scintillator strips, and their detection characteristics are discussed. The tomography inversion is presented, and its distinctive characteristics are briefly discussed. Details are given on the implementation of muon tomography experiments on La Soufriére in Guadeloupe.

  18. Mapping distributed brain function and networks with diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Robichaux-Viehoever, Amy; Hassanpour, Mahlega S.; Dehghani, Hamid; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Hershey, Tamara; Culver, Joseph P.

    2014-06-01

    Mapping of human brain function has revolutionized systems neuroscience. However, traditional functional neuroimaging by positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used when applications require portability, or are contraindicated because of ionizing radiation (positron emission tomography) or implanted metal (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Optical neuroimaging offers a non-invasive alternative that is radiation free and compatible with implanted metal and electronic devices (for example, pacemakers). However, optical imaging technology has heretofore lacked the combination of spatial resolution and wide field of view sufficient to map distributed brain functions. Here, we present a high-density diffuse optical tomography imaging array that can map higher-order, distributed brain function. The system was tested by imaging four hierarchical language tasks and multiple resting-state networks including the dorsal attention and default mode networks. Finally, we imaged brain function in patients with Parkinson's disease and implanted deep brain stimulators that preclude functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. What is Computed Tomography?

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Imaging System back to top Advances in Technology and Clinical Practice Today most CT systems are ... in relatively less time. Another advancement in the technology is electron beam CT, also known as EBCT. ...

  20. Super-sensing through industrial process tomography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this introduction article, we present a brief overview of industrial process tomography. This will start by linking between the concept of industrial process tomography and super-sensing. This will follow with a brief introduction to various process tomography systems and in particular electrical tomography methods. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Supersensing through industrial process tomography’. PMID:27185965

  1. Feasible Dose Reduction in Routine Chest Computed Tomography Maintaining Constant Image Quality Using the Last Three Scanner Generations: From Filtered Back Projection to Sinogram-affirmed Iterative Reconstruction and Impact of the Novel Fully Integrated Detector Design Minimizing Electronic Noise

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Lukas; Knobloch, Felix; Huber, Adrian; Landau, Julia; Ott, Daniel; Heverhagen, Johannes T; Christe, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate a dose reduction in contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) by comparing the three latest generations of Siemens CT scanners used in clinical practice. We analyzed the amount of radiation used with filtered back projection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm to yield the same image quality. Furthermore, the influence on the radiation dose of the most recent integrated circuit detector (ICD; Stellar detector, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) was investigated. Materials and Methods: 136 Patients were included. Scan parameters were set to a thorax routine: SOMATOM Sensation 64 (FBP), SOMATOM Definition Flash (IR), and SOMATOM Definition Edge (ICD and IR). Tube current was set constantly to the reference level of 100 mA automated tube current modulation using reference milliamperes. Care kV was used on the Flash and Edge scanner, while tube potential was individually selected between 100 and 140 kVp by the medical technologists at the SOMATOM Sensation. Quality assessment was performed on soft-tissue kernel reconstruction. Dose was represented by the dose length product. Results: Dose-length product (DLP) with FBP for the average chest CT was 308 mGy*cm ± 99.6. In contrast, the DLP for the chest CT with IR algorithm was 196.8 mGy*cm ± 68.8 (P = 0.0001). Further decline in dose can be noted with IR and the ICD: DLP: 166.4 mGy*cm ± 54.5 (P = 0.033). The dose reduction compared to FBP was 36.1% with IR and 45.6% with IR/ICD. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was favorable in the aorta, bone, and soft tissue for IR/ICD in combination compared to FBP (the P values ranged from 0.003 to 0.048). Overall contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) improved with declining DLP. Conclusion: The most recent technical developments, namely IR in combination with integrated circuit detectors, can significantly lower radiation dose in chest CT examinations. PMID:25161807

  2. Quantum field tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, A.; Riofrío, C. A.; Hübener, R.; Eisert, J.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce the concept of quantum field tomography, the efficient and reliable reconstruction of unknown quantum fields based on data of correlation functions. At the basis of the analysis is the concept of continuous matrix product states (cMPS), a complete set of variational states grasping states in one-dimensional quantum field theory. We innovate a practical method, making use of and developing tools in estimation theory used in the context of compressed sensing such as Prony methods and matrix pencils, allowing us to faithfully reconstruct quantum field states based on low-order correlation functions. In the absence of a phase reference, we highlight how specific higher order correlation functions can still be predicted. We exemplify the functioning of the approach by reconstructing randomized cMPS from their correlation data and study the robustness of the reconstruction for different noise models. Furthermore, we apply the method to data generated by simulations based on cMPS and using the time-dependent variational principle. The presented approach is expected to open up a new window into experimentally studying continuous quantum systems, such as those encountered in experiments with ultra-cold atoms on top of atom chips. By virtue of the analogy with the input-output formalism in quantum optics, it also allows for studying open quantum systems.

  3. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  4. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  5. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  6. Fast dual tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrion, Philip M.

    1990-09-01

    This paper can be considered as a continuation of the work by Carrion and Carneiro (1989), where a generalized approach to linearized inversion of geophysical data was developed. Their method allows one to incorporate virtually any constraints in the inversion and reformulate the problem in the dual space of Langrangian multipliers (see also Carrion, 1989a). The constrained tomography makes traveltime inversion robust: it automatically rejects “bad data” which correspond to solutions beyond the chosen constraints and allows one to start inversion with an arbitrary chosen initial model.In this paper, I will derive basic formulas for constrained tomographic imaging that can be used in such areas of geophysics as global mapping of the earth interior, exploration geophysics, etc. The method is fast: an example that will be shown in the paper took only 6 min. of VAX CPU time. Had the conventional least-squares matrix inversion been used it would have taken more than 10 hours of the CPU time to solve the same problem.

  7. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  8. Cardiovascular Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Taishi; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    The potential of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for intravascular imaging and assessing the microstructure of atherosclerosis was suggested already by Huang et al. at the very beginning of OCT [1]. For ophthalmology, the eye provides a natural window for OCT to image the retinal microstructure, and OCT has rapidly become the standard imaging modality to diagnose retinal disease and assess disease progression and response to therapy [1, 2]. Intravascular imaging is more invasive by nature and requires imaging through a catheter probe. This has triggered the development of advanced fiber-optic OCT systems with compact, rotating fiber probes, to image the vessel by circumferentially scanning the luminal wall [3, 4]. In 1998, we established the first cardiac OCT research group at the Massachusetts General Hospital to explore the clinical applications of OCT. The first imaging of rabbit aorta was reported by Fujimoto et al. [5], followed by the first swine measurements in vivo by Tearney et al. [6], and finally the first assessment of coronary arteries in patients by Jang et al. [7]. The scope of this chapter is to highlight the steps taken to bring intravascular OCT from bench to bedside over the last 15 years. We will give a general description of atherosclerosis and its pathophysiology and the specific technical implementation of OCT for intravascular imaging through a fiber-optic probe. The motivation is to provide sufficient medical details to provide a basic introduction to the terminology, principles, and challenges of intracoronary imaging.

  9. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  10. Development of novel emission tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Geng

    In recent years, small animals, such as mice and rats, have been widely used as subjects of study in biomedical research while molecular biology and imaging techniques open new opportunities to investigate disease model. With the help of medical imaging techniques, researchers can investigate underlying mechanisms inside the small animal, which are useful for both early diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Based on tracer principle single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has increased popularity in small animal imaging due to its higher spatial resolution and variety of single-photon emitting radionuclides. Since the image quality strongly depends on the detector properties, both scintillation and semiconductor detectors are under active investigation for high resolution X-ray and gamma ray photon detection. The desired detector properties include high intrinsic spatial resolution, high energy resolution, and high detection efficiency. In this thesis study, we have made extensive efforts to develop novel emission tomography system, and evaluate the use of both semiconductor and ultra-high resolution scintillation detectors for small animal imaging. This thesis work includes the following three areas. Firstly, we have developed a novel energy-resolved photon counting (ERPC) detector. With the benefits of high energy resolution, high spatial resolution, flexible detection area, and a wide dynamic range of 27--200keV, ERPC detector is well-suited for small animal SPECT applications. For prototype ERPC detector excellent imaging (˜350microm) and spectroscopic performance (4keV Co-57 122keV) has been demonstrated in preliminary study. Secondly, to further improve spatial resolution to hundred-micron level, an ultra-high resolution Intensified EMCCD (I-EMCCD) detector has been designed and evaluated. This detector consists of the newly developed electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) sensor, columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, and an electrostatic de-magnifier (DM) tube

  11. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (<20 nm), tips display a curved surface and a significantly larger thickness. As far as a correlative approach aims at analysing the same specimen by both techniques, it is mandatory to explore the limits and advantages imposed by the particular geometry of atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography.

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, David

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new method for noninvasive cross-sectional imaging in biological systems. In OCT, the longitudinal locations of tissue structures are determined by measuring the time-of-flight delays of light backscattered from these structures. The optical delays are measured by low coherence interferometry. Information on lateral position is provided by transverse scanning of the probe beam. The two dimensional map of optical scattering from internal tissue microstructures is then represented in a false-color or grayscale image. OCT is the optical analog of ultrasonic pulse-echo imaging, but with greatly improved spatial resolutions (a few microns). This thesis describes the development of this new high resolution tomographic imaging technology and the demonstration of its use in a variety of tissues under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro OCT ranging and imaging studies were performed using human ocular and arterial tissues, two clinically relevant examples of transparent and turbid media, respectively. In the anterior eye, precise measurements of cornea and anterior chamber dimensions were made. In the arterial specimens, the differentiation between fatty -calcified and fibromuscular tissues was demonstrated. In vivo OCT imaging in the retina and optic nerve head in human subjects was also performed. The delineation of retinal layers, which has not been possible with other noninvasive imaging techniques, is demonstrated in these OCT images. OCT has high spatial resolution but limited penetration into turbid tissue. It has potential for diagnostic applications where high resolution is needed and optical access is available, such as in the eye, skin, surgically exposed tissues, and surfaces that can be reached by various catheters and endoscopic probes. In particular, the measurement of fine retinal structures promises improvements in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma, macular edema and other vitreo-retinal diseases

  13. Database tomography for commercial application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostoff, Ronald N.; Eberhart, Henry J.

    1994-01-01

    Database tomography is a method for extracting themes and their relationships from text. The algorithms, employed begin with word frequency and word proximity analysis and build upon these results. When the word 'database' is used, think of medical or police records, patents, journals, or papers, etc. (any text information that can be computer stored). Database tomography features a full text, user interactive technique enabling the user to identify areas of interest, establish relationships, and map trends for a deeper understanding of an area of interest. Database tomography concepts and applications have been reported in journals and presented at conferences. One important feature of the database tomography algorithm is that it can be used on a database of any size, and will facilitate the users ability to understand the volume of content therein. While employing the process to identify research opportunities it became obvious that this promising technology has potential applications for business, science, engineering, law, and academe. Examples include evaluating marketing trends, strategies, relationships and associations. Also, the database tomography process would be a powerful component in the area of competitive intelligence, national security intelligence and patent analysis. User interests and involvement cannot be overemphasized.

  14. Medical Electronics and Physiological Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, T.

    1989-01-01

    Described are developments in medical electronics and physiological measurement. Discussed are electrocardiology, audiology, and urology as mature applications; applied potential tomography, magnetic stimulation of nerves, and laser Doppler flowmetry as new techniques; and optical sensors, ambulatory monitoring, and biosensors as future…

  15. EEL spectroscopic tomography: towards a new dimension in nanomaterials analysis.

    PubMed

    Yedra, Lluís; Eljarrat, Alberto; Arenal, Raúl; Pellicer, Eva; Cabo, Moisés; López-Ortega, Alberto; Estrader, Marta; Sort, Jordi; Baró, Maria Dolors; Estradé, Sònia; Peiró, Francesca

    2012-11-01

    Electron tomography is a widely spread technique for recovering the three dimensional (3D) shape of nanostructured materials. Using a spectroscopic signal to achieve a reconstruction adds a fourth chemical dimension to the 3D structure. Up to date, energy filtering of the images in the transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) is the usual spectroscopic method even if most of the information in the spectrum is lost. Unlike EFTEM tomography, the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectrum images (SI) for tomographic reconstruction retains all chemical information, and the possibilities of this new approach still remain to be fully exploited. In this article we prove the feasibility of EEL spectroscopic tomography at low voltages (80 kV) and short acquisition times from data acquired using an aberration corrected instrument and data treatment by Multivariate Analysis (MVA), applied to Fe(x)Co((3-x))O(4)@Co(3)O(4) mesoporous materials. This approach provides a new scope into materials; the recovery of full EELS signal in 3D.

  16. Quantum gate-set tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2014-03-01

    Quantum information technology is built on (1) physical qubits and (2) precise, accurate quantum logic gates that transform their states. Developing quantum logic gates requires good characterization - both in the development phase, where we need to identify a device's flaws so as to fix them, and in the production phase, where we need to make sure that the device works within specs and predict residual error rates and types. This task falls to quantum state and process tomography. But until recently, protocols for tomography relied on a pre-existing and perfectly calibrated reference frame comprising the measurements (and, for process tomography, input states) used to characterize the device. In practice, these measurements are neither independent nor perfectly known - they are usually implemented via exactly the same gates that we are trying to characterize! In the past year, several partial solutions to this self-consistency problem have been proposed. I will present a framework (gate set tomography, or GST) that addresses and resolves this problem, by self-consistently characterizing an entire set of quantum logic gates on a black-box quantum device. In particular, it contains an explicit closed-form protocol for linear-inversion gate set tomography (LGST), which is immune to both calibration error and technical pathologies like local maxima of the likelihood (which plagued earlier methods). GST also demonstrates significant (multiple orders of magnitude) improvements in efficiency over standard tomography by using data derived from long sequences of gates (much like randomized benchmarking). GST has now been applied to qubit devices in multiple technologies. I will present and discuss results of GST experiments in technologies including a single trapped-ion qubit and a silicon quantum dot qubit. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U

  17. Structured interference optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ji; Wei, Qing; Zhang, Hao F; Backman, Vadim

    2012-08-01

    We developed a structured interference optical coherence tomography (SIOCT) to enhance the lateral resolution beyond the diffraction limit. A sinusoidal pattern is created on the interferometric beam with the reference intensity temporally modulated. In the Fourier domain, the high spatial frequencies are shifted into the detectable range, which enhances the lateral resolution beyond the diffraction limit by a factor of 2. The lateral resolution of SIOCT was characterized in our study as ~5.5 μm, surpassing the diffraction limit ~9.6 μm as in conventional Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. SIOCT was demonstrated on phantoms and ex vivo adipose tissues.

  18. Self-Guided Quantum Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a self-learning tomographic technique in which the experiment guides itself to an estimate of its own state. Self-guided quantum tomography uses measurements to directly test hypotheses in an iterative algorithm which converges to the true state. We demonstrate through simulation on many qubits that Self-guided quantum tomography is a more efficient and robust alternative to the usual paradigm of taking a large amount of informationally complete data and solving the inverse problem of postprocessed state estimation.

  19. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents computed tomography of the major disease states involving the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery, and peritoneal cavity. Computed Tomography of the Gastrointestinal Tract combined experience of l5 authorities includes illustrations (most of these radiographs).

  20. Anisotropic resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwanger, J. V.; Pain, C. C.; Binley, A.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.; Worthington, M. H.

    2004-08-01

    , the inversion model is smoother than the true model and the difference in absolute value of anisotropy and conductivity between features is slightly underestimated. Using an anisotropic conductivity distribution aggravates the problem of non-uniqueness of the solution of the inverse electrical problem. This problem can be overcome by applying appropriate structural and anisotropy constraints. We find that running a suite of inversions with varying constraint levels and subsequent examination of the results (including the inspection of residual maps) offers a viable method for choosing appropriate numerical values for the imposed constraints. Inversion of field data reveals a strongly anisotropic subsurface with marked spatial variations of both magnitude of anisotropy and conductivity. Average conductivities range from 0.001 S m-1 (= 1000 Ω m) to 0.003 S m-1 (= 333 Ω m) and anisotropy values range from 0 per cent to more than 300 per cent. As an independent test of the reliability of the structures revealed by anisotropic electric tomography, anisotropic seismic traveltime tomograms were calculated. We find a convincing structural agreement between the two independently derived images. Areas of high electric anisotropy coincide with seismically anisotropic areas and we observe an anticorrelation between electric conductivity and seismic velocity. Both observations are consistent with anisotropy anomalies caused by fracturing or layering.

  1. Model-assisted ionospheric tomography: A new algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Raymund, T.D.; Bresler, Y.; Anderson, D.N.; Daniell, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    Ionospheric tomography uses total electron content (TEC) records collected by longitudinally aligned stations, which receive a beacon satellite orbiting overhead. The electron density distribution is reconstructed for the region bounded by the satellite orbit and the line of ground receivers. A new reconstruction algorithm is describes which satisfies the TEC records, makes use of an ionospheric model, and allows the incorporation of complementary measurements. The new algorithm also accepts relative (rather than absolute) TEC as input data. A comparison of the new algorithm and one used recently shows significant improvement over early techniques, particularly when a scaled ionogram is included in the data.

  2. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  3. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  4. Computed tomography of intracranial ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, J.D.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-04-01

    Twenty-six patients with ependymoma were evaluated by computed tomography (CT) over a period of 5 1/2 years. The usual CT appearance was an isodense, partially calcified mass, capable of contrast enhancement, occurring in the posterior fossa (73%) in an infant or child (77%). Outcome remains poor despite modern diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  5. Computed tomography:the details.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  6. Computed tomography of the thorax

    SciTech Connect

    Naidich, D.P.; Zerhouni, E.A.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains chapters on: Principles and Techniques of Chest Computed Tomography; Aortic Arch and Great Vessels; Normal Anatomy and Variants; Mediastinum/Airways/Lobar Collapse/Pulmonary Hila/Pulmonary Nodule/Pulmonary Parenchyma/Pleura and Chest Wall/Pericardium/Diaphragm.

  7. Computed tomography in hepatic echinococcosis

    SciTech Connect

    Choliz, J.D.; Olaverri, F.J.L.; Casas, T.F.; Zubieta, S.O.

    1982-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 50 cases of hydatid disease of the liver. It was definite in 49 cases and negative in one case. Pre- and postcontrast scans were performed. CT may reveal the exact location and extension of cysts and possible complications. However, a false-negative case was found in a hydatid cyst located in a fatty liver.

  8. Optical tomography with structured illumination.

    PubMed

    Lukic, Vladimir; Markel, Vadim A; Schotland, John C

    2009-04-01

    We consider the image reconstruction problem for optical tomography with structured illumination. A fast image reconstruction algorithm is proposed that reduces the required number of measurements of the optical field compared to methods that utilize point-source illumination. The results are illustrated with numerical simulations.

  9. Image reconstruction in optical tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Arridge, S R; Schweiger, M

    1997-01-01

    Optical tomography is a new medical imaging modality that is at the threshold of realization. A large amount of clinical work has shown the very real benefits that such a method could provide. At the same time a considerable effort has been put into theoretical studies of its probable success. At present there exist gaps between these two realms. In this paper we review some general approaches to inverse problems to set the context for optical tomography, defining both the terms forward problem and inverse problem. An essential requirement is to treat the problem in a nonlinear fashion, by using an iterative method. This in turn requires a convenient method of evaluating the forward problem, and its derivatives and variance. Photon transport models are described for obtaining analytical and numerical solutions for the most commonly used ones are reviewed. The inverse problem is approached by classical gradient-based solution methods. In order to develop practical implementations of these methods, we discuss the important topic of photon measurement density functions, which represent the derivative of the forward problem. We show some results that represent the most complex and realistic simulations of optical tomography yet developed. We suggest, in particular, that both time-resolved, and intensity-modulated systems can reconstruct variations in both optical absorption and scattering, but that unmodulated, non-time-resolved systems are prone to severe artefact. We believe that optical tomography reconstruction methods can now be reliably applied to a wide variety of real clinical data. The expected resolution of the method is poor, meaning that it is unlikely that the type of high-resolution images seen in computed tomography or medical resonance imaging can ever be obtained. Nevertheless we strongly expect the functional nature of these images to have a high degree of clinical significance. PMID:9232860

  10. Ptychographic X-ray computed tomography at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Dierolf, Martin; Menzel, Andreas; Thibault, Pierre; Schneider, Philipp; Kewish, Cameron M; Wepf, Roger; Bunk, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2010-09-23

    X-ray tomography is an invaluable tool in biomedical imaging. It can deliver the three-dimensional internal structure of entire organisms as well as that of single cells, and even gives access to quantitative information, crucially important both for medical applications and for basic research. Most frequently such information is based on X-ray attenuation. Phase contrast is sometimes used for improved visibility but remains significantly harder to quantify. Here we describe an X-ray computed tomography technique that generates quantitative high-contrast three-dimensional electron density maps from phase contrast information without reverting to assumptions of a weak phase object or negligible absorption. This method uses a ptychographic coherent imaging approach to record tomographic data sets, exploiting both the high penetration power of hard X-rays and the high sensitivity of lensless imaging. As an example, we present images of a bone sample in which structures on the 100 nm length scale such as the osteocyte lacunae and the interconnective canalicular network are clearly resolved. The recovered electron density map provides a contrast high enough to estimate nanoscale bone density variations of less than one per cent. We expect this high-resolution tomography technique to provide invaluable information for both the life and materials sciences.

  11. Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an advanced method of noninvasive infrared imaging of tissues in depth. Heretofore, commercial OCT systems for 3D imaging have been designed principally for external ophthalmological examination. As explained below, such systems have been based on a one-dimensional OCT principle, and in the operation of such a system, 3D imaging is accomplished partly by means of a combination of electronic scanning along the optical (Z) axis and mechanical scanning along the two axes (X and Y) orthogonal to the optical axis. In 3D OCT, 3D imaging involves a form of electronic scanning (without mechanical scanning) along all three axes. Consequently, the need for mechanical adjustment is minimal and the mechanism used to position the OCT probe can be correspondingly more compact. A 3D OCT system also includes a probe of improved design and utilizes advanced signal- processing techniques. Improvements in performance over prior OCT systems include finer resolution, greater speed, and greater depth of field.

  12. STEM-EDX tomography of bimetallic nanoparticles: A methodological investigation.

    PubMed

    Slater, Thomas J A; Janssen, Arne; Camargo, Pedro H C; Burke, M Grace; Zaluzec, Nestor J; Haigh, Sarah J

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the limitations and optimisation of energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) tomography within the scanning transmission electron microscope, focussing on application of the technique to characterising the 3D elemental distribution of bimetallic AgAu nanoparticles. The detector collection efficiency when using a standard tomography holder is characterised using a tomographic data set from a single nanoparticle and compared to a standard low background double tilt holder. Optical depth profiling is used to investigate the angles and origin of detector shadowing as a function of specimen field of view. A novel time-varied acquisition scheme is described to compensate for variations in the intensity of spectrum images at each sample tilt. Finally, the ability of EDX spectrum images to satisfy the projection requirement for nanoparticle samples is discussed, with consideration of the effect of absorption and shadowing variations.

  13. White-light diffraction tomography of unlabelled live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Zhou, Renjie; Mir, Mustafa; Babacan, S. Derin; Carney, P. Scott; Goddard, Lynford L.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    We present a technique called white-light diffraction tomography (WDT) for imaging microscopic transparent objects such as live unlabelled cells. The approach extends diffraction tomography to white-light illumination and imaging rather than scattering plane measurements. Our experiments were performed using a conventional phase contrast microscope upgraded with a module to measure quantitative phase images. The axial dimension of the object was reconstructed by scanning the focus through the object and acquiring a stack of phase-resolved images. We reconstructed the three-dimensional structures of live, unlabelled, red blood cells and compared the results with confocal and scanning electron microscopy images. The 350 nm transverse and 900 nm axial resolution achieved reveals subcellular structures at high resolution in Escherichia coli cells. The results establish WDT as a means for measuring three-dimensional subcellular structures in a non-invasive and label-free manner.

  14. Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances by three-dimensional ionospheric GPS tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Saito, A.; Lin, C. H.; Yamamoto, M.; Suzuki, S.; Seemala, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we develop a three-dimensional ionospheric tomography with the ground-based global position system (GPS) total electron content observations. Because of the geometric limitation of GPS observation path, it is difficult to solve the ill-posed inverse problem for the ionospheric electron density. Different from methods given by pervious studies, we consider an algorithm combining the least-square method with a constraint condition, in which the gradient of electron density tends to be smooth in the horizontal direction and steep in the vicinity of the ionospheric F2 peak. This algorithm is designed to be independent of any ionospheric or plasmaspheric electron density models as the initial condition. An observation system simulation experiment method is applied to evaluate the performance of the GPS ionospheric tomography in detecting ionospheric electron density perturbation at the scale size of around 200 km in wavelength, such as the medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances.

  15. Vibration-based photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Rajian, Justin R.; Wang, Pu; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging employing molecular overtone vibration as contrast mechanism opens a new avenue for deep tissue imaging with chemical bond selectivity. Here, we demonstrate vibration-based photoacoustic tomography with an imaging depth on the centimeter scale. To provide sufficient pulse energy at the overtone transition wavelengths, we constructed a compact, barium nitrite crystal-based Raman laser for excitation of 2nd overtone of C-H bond. Using a 5-ns Nd:YAG laser as pumping source, up to 105 mJ pulse energy at 1197 nm was generated. Vibrational photoacoutic spectroscopy and tomography of phantom (polyethylene tube) immersed in whole milk was performed. With a pulse energy of 47 mJ on the milk surface, up to 2.5 cm penetration depth was reached with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12.

  16. Seismic Tomography in Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Song, W.; Lees, J. M.; Xing, G.

    2012-12-01

    Tomography imaging, applied to seismology, requires a new, decentralized approach if high resolution calculations are to be performed in a sensor network configuration. The real-time data retrieval from a network of large-amount wireless seismic stations to a central server is virtually impossible due to the sheer data amount and resource limitations. In this paper, we propose and design a distributed algorithm for processing data and inverting tomography in the network, while avoiding costly data collections and centralized computations. Based on a partition of the tomographic inversion problem, the new algorithms distribute the computational burden to sensor nodes and perform real-time tomographic inversion in the network, so that we can recover a high resolution tomographic model in real-time under the constraints of network resources. Our emulation results indicate that the distributed algorithms successfully reconstruct the synthetic models, while reducing and balancing the communication and computation cost to a large extent.

  17. X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The primary advantage of the X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) NDE method is that features are not superposed in the image, thereby rendering them easier to interpret than radiographic projection images. Industrial XRCT systems, unlike medical diagnostic systems, have no size and dosage constraints; they are accordingly used for systems from the scale of gas turbine blades, with hundreds-of-kV energies, to those of the scale of ICBMs, requiring MV-level X-ray energies.

  18. Computed tomography of neutropenic colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; Maile, C.W.; Crass, J.R.; Goldberg, M.E.; Delaney, J.P.

    1984-10-01

    Four patients developed neutropenic colitis as a complication of acute leukemia (three) or aplastic anemia (one). On computed tomography (CT), neutropenic colitis was characterized by cecal wall thickening (four) and pneumatosis (one). Intramural areas of lower density presumably reflected edema or hemorrhage. Clinical improvement and return of adequate numbers of functioning neutrophils coincided with decrease in cecal wall thickening on CT. Prompt radiologic recognition of this serious condition is crucial, since surgical intervention is probably best avoided.

  19. Acoustic tomography. Laboratory technique Implementation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvis, Jorge; Carvajal, Jenny

    2010-05-01

    From geomechanical tests carried out on rocks it is possible to determine its physico-mechanical properties, which relate the strain and applied stress; even so, conventional tests do not allow to identify how stress is distributed and how it has affected porous media. Today, techniques like acoustic tomography widely used in medicine, geophysics and others sciences, generates images by sections of the interior of a body. Acoustic tomography allows inferring the stress state within porous media; since wave velocities are closely related to media density, if a stress is applied to a rock, it will generate grains compaction and this will be showed by an increase of wave velocity. Implementation was conducted on rock plugs under diverse stress fields, simultaneously recording P-wave velocities (Compressional) on perpendicular planes to sample vertical axis. Transmission and reception of acoustic waves through porous media were done by piezoelectric crystals (PZT) used as sensors. A transmitting crystal excited by a voltage pulse causes a mechanical vibration, which travels across media; this is known as inverse piezoelectric effect. This vibration is recorded by a receiving crystal in which the direct piezoelectric effect appears; which dictates that if a piezoelectric is disturbed mechanically, an electrical signal between its terminals will appear. This electrical signal is used to obtain the wave velocity. Nevertheless, acoustic tomography corresponds to one of those called inverse Problems that arise when from observed data the model parameters must be obtained; in this way, tomography involves iterative reconstruction techniques (ART or SIRT) which are projections of observed data and its later inversion. Obtained results are cross-sectional images of velocity within the rock. In these images it is possible to identify where stress has a greater concentration observing the color map generated; thus, a greater velocity density area corresponding to a greater

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Pulsed terahertz tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Zhang, X.-C.

    2004-02-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is a coherent measurement technology. Using THz-TDS, the phase and amplitude of the THz pulse at each frequency can be determined. Like radar, THz-TDS also provides time information that allows us to develop various three-dimensional THz tomographic imaging modalities. The three-dimensional THz tomographic imagings we investigated are: terahertz diffraction tomography (THz DT), terahertz computed tomography (THz CT), THz binary lens tomography and THz digital holography. THz DT uses the THz wave as a probe beam to interact with a target, and then reconstructs the three-dimensional image of the target using the THz waves scattered by the target. THz CT is based on geometrical optics and inspired by x-ray CT. THz binary lens tomography uses the frequency dependent focal length property of binary lenses to obtain tomographic images of an object. THz three-dimensional holography combines radar and conventional holography technology. By separating the multiple scattered THz waves of different scattering orders, we used a digital holography method to reconstruct the sparsely distributed scattering centres. Three-dimensional THz imaging has potential in such applications as non-destructive inspection. The interaction between a coherent THz pulse and an object provides rich information about the object under study; therefore, three-dimensional THz imaging is a very useful tool to inspect or characterize dielectric and semiconductor objects. For example, three-dimensional THz imaging can be used to detect and identify the defects inside a space shuttle insulation tile.

  1. Computed tomography of gynecologic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Moss, A.A.; Mihara, K.; Goldberg, H.I.; Glazer, G.M.

    1983-10-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) provides superb images of all areas of the body, sonography, because of its lack of ionizing radiation and its real-time and multiplanar capacities, has become the preferred initial method of evaluating the female pelvis. This has resulted in a relative paucity of information in the literature concerning CT features of benign pelvic disorders in particular and prompted the authors to review our experience with third-generation CT scanning of the uterus and ovaries.

  2. Computed tomography in supratentorial hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Rovira, M; Ortega, A; Ibarra, B

    1984-01-01

    Supratentorial hemangioblastomas are rare. A 28-yr-old man with a solid tumor in the left temporal region is described. There was neither meningeal connection nor associated polycythemia or Von Hippel-Lindau disease. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography showed a hyperdense, homogeneous lesion and cerebral angiography demonstrated a nodular tumor blush. The microscopic appearance of the lesion is described with a review of previously reported cases.

  3. Measuring Lattice Strain in Three Dimensions through Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) atomic structure of nanomaterials, including strain, is crucial to understand their properties. Here, we investigate lattice strain in Au nanodecahedra using electron tomography. Although different electron tomography techniques enabled 3D characterizations of nanostructures at the atomic level, a reliable determination of lattice strain is not straightforward. We therefore propose a novel model-based approach from which atomic coordinates are measured. Our findings demonstrate the importance of investigating lattice strain in 3D. PMID:26340328

  4. Model Based Iterative Reconstruction for Bright Field Electron Tomography (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Reconstruction Technique ( SIRT ) are applied to the data. Model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) provides a powerful framework for tomographic...the reconstruction when the typical algorithms such as Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique ( SIRT ) are

  5. Multiple-illumination photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Quinn M.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    Previously we described the potential for multiple illumination photoacoustic tomography to provide quantitative reconstructions, however this work used only simulated data. We have developed a custom photoacoustic-ultrasound tomography system capable of multiple illuminations and parallel acquisition from a 256 element 5 MHz transducer ring array with 8-cm diameter. The multiple illumination scheme uses a free-space light delivery geometry where a rotational stage scans a pulsed laser beam onto different incident locations around the sample. For each illumination location a photoacoustic image is reconstructed using a modified backprojection algorithm. Images from different source locations have the potential to be combined to form an improved deep-tissue image using our previously developed iterative algorithms. We complement the photoacoustic imaging data with unique ultrasound imaging data. Most previous ultrasound tomography methods have used migration algorithms, iterative ray-based analysis, wave-equation modeling, or frequency-based algorithms that all demand large amounts of data and computational power. We propose a new UST method that offers isotropic resolution, provides scattering contrast, as well as the potential for measuring ultrasound scattering anisotropy and decoupling density and compressibility contributions. The imaging system is driven by a Verasonics scan engine and programmed for both ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging modes. Resolution has been measured to be 150 μm for ultrasound and 200 μm for photoacoustic images. Imaging capabilities are demonstrated on phantoms with custom-tailored ultrasound scattering and optical properties, as well as in murine models.

  6. Inherent Limitations of Hydraulic Tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    We offer a cautionary note in response to an increasing level of enthusiasm regarding high-resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. We use synthetic examples based on two recent field experiments to demonstrate that a high degree of nonuniqueness remains in estimates of hydraulic parameter fields even when those estimates are based on simultaneous analysis of a number of carefully controlled hydraulic tests. We must, therefore, be careful not to oversell the technique to the community of practicing hydrogeologists, promising a degree of accuracy and resolution that, in many settings, will remain unattainable, regardless of the amount of effort invested in the field investigation. No practically feasible amount of hydraulic tomography data will ever remove the need to regularize or bias the inverse problem in some fashion in order to obtain a unique solution. Thus, along with improving the resolution of hydraulic tomography techniques, we must also strive to couple those techniques with procedures for experimental design and uncertainty assessment and with other more cost-effective field methods, such as geophysical surveying and, in unconsolidated formations, direct-push profiling, in order to develop methods for subsurface characterization with the resolution and accuracy needed for practical field applications. Copyright ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  7. Review of Terahertz Tomography Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, J. P.; Recur, B.; Frederique, L.; Bousquet, B.; Canioni, L.; Manek-Hönninger, I.; Desbarats, P.; Mounaix, P.

    2014-04-01

    Terahertz and millimeter waves penetrate various dielectric materials, including plastics, ceramics, crystals, and concrete, allowing terahertz transmission and reflection images to be considered as a new imaging tool complementary to X-Ray or Infrared. Terahertz imaging is a well-established technique in various laboratory and industrial applications. However, these images are often two-dimensional. Three-dimensional, transmission-mode imaging is limited to thin samples, due to the absorption of the sample accumulated in the propagation direction. A tomographic imaging procedure can be used to acquire and to render three-dimensional images in the terahertz frequency range, as in the optical, infrared or X-ray regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, after a brief introduction to two dimensional millimeter waves and terahertz imaging we establish the principles of tomography for Terahertz Computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis (TS), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) terahertz tomography. For each technique, we present advantages, drawbacks and limitations for imaging the internal structure of an object.

  8. Inherent limitations of hydraulic tomography.

    PubMed

    Bohling, Geoffrey C; Butler, James J

    2010-01-01

    We offer a cautionary note in response to an increasing level of enthusiasm regarding high-resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. We use synthetic examples based on two recent field experiments to demonstrate that a high degree of nonuniqueness remains in estimates of hydraulic parameter fields even when those estimates are based on simultaneous analysis of a number of carefully controlled hydraulic tests. We must, therefore, be careful not to oversell the technique to the community of practicing hydrogeologists, promising a degree of accuracy and resolution that, in many settings, will remain unattainable, regardless of the amount of effort invested in the field investigation. No practically feasible amount of hydraulic tomography data will ever remove the need to regularize or bias the inverse problem in some fashion in order to obtain a unique solution. Thus, along with improving the resolution of hydraulic tomography techniques, we must also strive to couple those techniques with procedures for experimental design and uncertainty assessment and with other more cost-effective field methods, such as geophysical surveying and, in unconsolidated formations, direct-push profiling, in order to develop methods for subsurface characterization with the resolution and accuracy needed for practical field applications.

  9. IONOTOMO: A new approach for ionospheric tomography using OTH radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Corinna; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Boschi, Lapo; Moliné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Most of the recent methods in ionospheric tomography are based on the inversion of the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured by ground-based GPS receivers [e.g., Garcia et al. 2008]. As a consequence of the high frequency of the GPS, the electron density structure is principally well reconstructed at the F2 region, where the ionosphere reaches the maximum of ionization, neglecting the lower ionosphere. Here, we develop a new 3D ionospheric tomography method based on the full analysis of over-the-horizon (OTH) radar data. Previous studies in ionospheric tomography by OTH radar (Fridman and Fridman, 1994; Ruelle and Landeau, 1994; Landeau et al., 1997; Fridman, 1998) are all based on the inversion of the leading edge echo curve, consequently an important amount of valuable information present in the data is necessarily neglected. To overcome this limit, we set up a new method, based on the ray-tracing tool TDR [Occhipinti, 2006], to invert the propagation time of electromagnetic waves emitted by monostatic OTH radars. The major advance of our methodology is taking into account, numerically and jointly, not only the speed variation of EM wave induced by the electron density variation (solved analytically with a linear inversion) but also the perturbation in the raypath (nonlinear numerical method). As the present problem is an ill posed problem we calculate the matrix inversion numerically, using a regularisation method (Tikhonov, 1963). We determine the best regularisation parameter using the Lcurve method (Hansen, 2000). We present here the originality and the advantage of our method with a full set of synthetic benchmark highlighting the sensitivity of our tomography to the plasma heterogeneities. Some preliminary test on real data will be presented with a full coverage over Europe. Indeed, the ionospheric tomography by OTH radar, jointly with GPS, could open new exciting perspective in the plasma density estimation with a good resolution to the entire ionosphere

  10. FIB–SEM tomography of 4th generation PWA 1497 superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ziętara, Maciej Kruk, Adam Gruszczyński, Adam Czyrska-Filemonowicz, Aleksandra

    2014-01-15

    The effect of creep deformation on the microstructure of the PWA 1497 single crystal Ni-base superalloy developed for turbine blade applications was investigated. The aim of the present study was to characterize quantitatively a superalloy microstructure and subsequent development of rafted γ′ precipitates in the PWA 1497 during creep deformation at 982 °C and 248 MPa up to rupture. The PWA1497 microstructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FIB–SEM electron tomography. The 3D reconstruction of the PWA1497 microstructure is presented and discussed. - Highlights: • The microstructure of PWA1497 superalloy was examined using FIB–SEM tomography. • In case of modern single crystal superalloys, measurements of A{sub A} are adequate for V{sub V}. • During creep the γ channel width increases from 65 to 193 nm for ruptured specimen. • Tomography is a useful technique for quantitative studies of material microstructure.

  11. Finite Quantum Tomography and Semidefinite Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, M.; Rezaee, M.; Jafarizadeh, M. A.

    2007-06-01

    Using the convex semidefinite programming method and superoperator formalism we obtain the finite quantum tomography of some mixed quantum states such as: truncated coherent states tomography, phase tomography and coherent spin state tomography, qudit tomography, N-qubit tomography, where that obtained results are in agreement with those of References (Buzek et al., Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 10 (1999) 981; Schack and Caves, Separable states of N quantum bits. In: Proceedings of the X. International Symposium on Theoretical Electrical Engineering, 73. W. Mathis and T. Schindler, eds. Otto-von-Guericke University of Magdeburg, Germany (1999); Pegg and Barnett Physical Review A 39 (1989) 1665; Barnett and Pegg Journal of Modern Optics 36 (1989) 7; St. Weigert Acta Physica Slov. 4 (1999) 613).

  12. Role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in dementia.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Sidney R; Stocker, Derek J; Bradley, Yong C

    2013-09-01

    This article provides a clinically based review of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for dementia. Significant advances in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques have improved the understanding of the genetic and molecular processes that define neurodegenerative dementia diseases. Metabolic imaging remains constant in its ability to document neuronal loss and lost function. Amyloid-β radiotracers are useful in documenting amyloid deposition, differentiating origins of dementia and possibly predicting disease progression. These radiotracers may be useful in diagnosis-specific treatment. PET radiotracers have increased sensitivity and specificity to complement clinical presentation and other adjunct testing in the evaluation of dementia.

  13. Acoustic Tomography of the Atmospheric Surface Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-28

    resolution of an ultrasonic anemometer , it was suggested that one consider it is as a small acoustic tomography array and apply appropriate inverse...Fairall, D. Keith Wilson, Ludovic Bariteau. Sonic Anemometer as a Small Acoustic Tomography Array, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, (08 2013): 0. doi...Received Paper 3.00 S. N. Vecherin, V. E. Ostashev, D. K. Wilson, A. Grached. Utilization of an acoustic tomography array as a large sonic anemometer

  14. Hybrid diffraction tomography without phase information.

    PubMed

    Gbur, Greg; Wolf, Emil

    2002-11-01

    We introduce a hybrid tomographic method, based on recent investigations concerning the connection between computed tomography and diffraction tomography, that allows direct reconstruction of scattering objects from intensity measurements. This technique is noniterative and is intuitively easier to understand and easier to implement than some other methods described in the literature. The manner in which the new method reduces to computed tomography at short wavelengths is discussed. Numerical examples of reconstructions are presented.

  15. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Optical Techniques for Actuation, Sensing , and Imaging of Biological Systems Multi-functional tumor...Time Reversal Optical Tomography Non-negative Matrix Factorization- based Optical Tomography Optical Tomography based on Principal Component...of the two targets 3.9. Estimated size and absorption coefficient of the targets 4.1. Positions and optical strengths retrieved using ICA, PCA and

  16. Complete Tem-Tomography: 3D Structure of Gems Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, J.; Miyake, A.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are considered to be one of the ubiquitous and fundamental building blocks of solids in the Solar System. They have been considered to be interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk but the elemental and isotopic composition measurements suggest that most of them have been formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas. This formation model is also supported by the formation of GEMS-like grains with respect to the size, mineral assemblage, texture and infrared spectrum by condensation experiments from mean GEMS composition materials. Previous GEMS studies were performed only with 2D observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). However, the 3D shape and structure of GEMS grains and the spatial distribution of Fe/FeS's has critical information about their formation and origin. Recently, the 3D structure of GEMS grains in ultrathin sections of cluster IDPs was revealed by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL). However, CT images of thin sections mounted on Cu grids acquired by conventional TEM-tomography are limited to low tilt angles (e. g., less than absolute value of 75 deg. In fact, previous 3D TEM observations of GEMS were affected by some artifacts related to the limited tilt range in the TEM used. Complete tomographic images should be acquired by rotating the sample tilt angle over a range of more than absolute value of 80 deg otherwise the CT images lose their correct structures. In order to constrain the origin and formation process of GEMS grains more clearly, we performed complete electron tomography for GEMS grains. Here we report the sample preparation method we have developed for this study, and the preliminary results.

  17. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice.

  18. Computed tomography and thin-section tomography in facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, D L; Moss, J J; Franco, J M; Maves, M D; Smith, D J

    1984-05-01

    The efficacy of radiographic methods in detecting and classifying facial fractures was assessed. Thirty-one patients with maxillofacial trauma were studied with plain radiography, coronal and lateral pluridirectional tomography (PT), and axial and direct coronal computed tomography (CT). PT and CT were compared to assess how many fractures each method could demonstrate. In addition, plain films were used in combination with each special study to see how efficacious each combination was at classifying fractures into types, such as blow-out, tripod, etc. To reflect the fact that it is sometimes impossible to obtain lateral PT or direct coronal CT scans at this institution, the same analysis was done using just coronal PT and axial CT. With two projections, CT was better than PT at demonstrating fractured surfaces (168 vs. 156) and in classifying fractures in combination with plain films (48 vs. 43). However, when only one projection from each special study was used, PT surpassed CT in showing fractures (137 vs. 124) and in classifying fractures (42 vs. 40). Failures with each method occurred when the plane of section was parallel or oblique to the plane of the structure being examined, that is, axial CT failed to show the floor of the orbit well and coronal PT failed to show the anterior maxillary sinus wall well. Imaging in two planes, including the coronal plane, is desirable for greatest accuracy in fracture detection, whether by CT, PT, or both. CT is generally better for the display of soft-tissue abnormalities.

  19. Computed tomography and thin-section tomography in facial trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kreipke, D.L.; Moss, J.J.; Franco, J.M.; Maves, M.D.; Smith, D.J.

    1984-05-01

    The efficacy of radiographic methods in detecting and classifying facial fractures was assessed. Thirty-one patients with maxillofacial trauma were studied with plain radiography, coronal and lateral pluridirectional tomography (PT), and axial and direct coronal computed tomography (CT). PT and CT were compared to assess how many fractures each method could demonstrate. In addition, plain films were used in combination with each special study to see how efficacious each combination was at classifying fractures into types. With two projection, CT was better than PT at demonstrating fracture surfaces (168 vs. 156) and in classifying fractures in combination with plain films (48 vs. 43). However, when only one projection from each special study was used, PT surpassed CT in showing fractures (137 vs. 124) and in classifying fractures (42 vs. 40). Failures with each method occurred when the plane of section was parallel or oblique to the plane of the structure being examined. Imaging in two planes, including the coronal plane, is desirable for greatest accuracy in fracture detection, whether by CT, PT, or both. CT is generally better for the display of soft-tissue abnormalities.

  20. Interferometer for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Christoph; Wörz, Marco; Hellmuth, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    We describe a new interferometer setup for optical coherence tomography (OCT). The interferometer is based on a fiber arrangement similar to Young's two-pinhole interference experiment with spatial coherent and temporal incoherent light. Depth gating is achieved detection of the interference signal on a linear CCD array. Therefore no reference optical delay scanning is needed. The interference signal, the modulation of the signal, the axial resolution, and the depth range are derived theoretically and compared with experiments. The dynamic range of the setup is compared with OCT sensors in the time domain. To our knowledge, the first images of porcine brain and heart tissue and human skin are presented.

  1. Atom probe tomography in nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blavette, Didier; Duguay, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    The role of laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) in microelectronics is discussed on the basis of various illustrations related to SiGe epitaxial layers, bipolar transistors or MOS nano-devices including gate all around (GAA) devices that were carried out at the Groupe de Physique des Matériaux of Rouen (France). 3D maps as provided by APT reveal the atomic-scale distribution of dopants and nanostructural features that are vital for nanoelectronics. Because of trajectory aberrations, APT images are subjected to distortions and local composition at the nm scale may either be biased. Procedures accounting for these effects were applied so that to correct images.

  2. Scanning color optical tomography (SCOT)

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Poorya; Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Youngwoon; Lue, Niyom; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an interferometric optical microscope that provides three-dimensional refractive index map of a specimen by scanning the color of three illumination beams. Our design of the interferometer allows for simultaneous measurement of the scattered fields (both amplitude and phase) of such a complex input beam. By obviating the need for mechanical scanning of the illumination beam or detection objective lens; the proposed method can increase the speed of the optical tomography by orders of magnitude. We demonstrate our method using polystyrene beads of known refractive index value and live cells. PMID:26367632

  3. Computed Tomography software and standards

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; Martz, H.E.; Skeate, M.F.; Schneberk, D.J.; Roberson, G.P.

    1990-02-20

    This document establishes the software design, nomenclature, and conventions for industrial Computed Tomography (CT) used in the Nondestructive Evaluation Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is mainly a users guide to the technical use of the CT computer codes, but also presents a proposed standard for describing CT experiments and reconstructions. Each part of this document specifies different aspects of the CT software organization. A set of tables at the end describes the CT parameters of interest in our project. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Computed Tomography Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lisa J

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging has become the mainstay of oncology, providing accurate tumor staging and follow-up imaging to monitor treatment response. Presurgical evaluation of tumors is becoming commonplace and guides surgeons as to the extent and whether complete tumor resection is possible. CT imaging plays a crucial role in radiotherapy treatment planning. CT imaging in oncology has become ubiquitous in veterinary medicine because of increased availability of this imaging modality. This article focuses on CT cancer staging in veterinary oncology, CT imaging for surgical planning, and advances in CT simulation for radiation therapy planning.

  5. Molecularly sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S; Vinegoni, Claudio; Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2005-03-01

    Molecular contrast in optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated by use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for molecular sensitivity. Femtosecond laser pulses are focused into a sample by use of a low-numerical-aperture lens to generate CARS photons, and the backreflected CARS signal is interferometrically measured. With the chemical selectivity provided by CARS and the advanced imaging capabilities of OCT, this technique may be useful for molecular contrast imaging in biological tissues. CARS can be generated and interferometrically measured over at least 600 microm of the depth of field of a low-numerical-aperture objective.

  6. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-06-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic.

  7. NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,G.C.

    2002-03-01

    Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

  8. Computed tomography of intrathoracic goiters

    SciTech Connect

    Bashist, B.; Ellis, K.; Gold, R.P.

    1983-03-01

    Ten patients with intrathoracic goiters were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). In comparison with chest radiographs, CT showed additional features helpful in suggesting the correct diagnosis. These observations included: (1) clear continuity with the cervical thyroid gland (8/10 cases); (2) well defined borders (9/10); (3) punctate, coarse, or ringlike calcifications (8/10); (4) nonhomogeneity (9/10) often with discrete, nonenhancing, low-density areas (6/10); (5) precontrast attenuation values at least 15 H greater than adjacent muscles (4/10) with more than 25 H after contrast enhancement (8/8); and (6) characteristic patterns of goiter extension into mediastinum.

  9. X-ray computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wellington, S.L.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1987-08-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is a new radiological imaging technique that measures density and atomic composition inside opaque objects. A revolutionary advance in medical radiology since 1972, CT has only recently been applied in petrophysics and reservoir engineering. This paper discusses several petrophysical applications, including three-dimensional (3D) measurement of density and porosity; rock mechanics studies; correlation of core logs with well logs; characterization of mud invasion, fractures, and disturbed core; and quantification of complex mineralogies and sand/shale ratios. Reservoir engineering applications presented include fundamental studies of CO/sub 2/ displacement in cores, focussing on viscous fingering, gravity segregation, miscibility, and mobility control.

  10. Quantum control and quantum tomography on neutral atom qudits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa Martinez, Hector

    Neutral atom systems are an appealing platform for the development and testing of quantum control and measurement techniques. This dissertation presents experimental investigations of control and measurement tools using as a testbed the 16-dimensional hyperfine manifold associated with the electronic ground state of cesium atoms. On the control side, we present an experimental realization of a protocol to implement robust unitary transformations in the presence of static and dynamic perturbations. We also present an experimental realization of inhomogeneous quantum control. Specifically, we demonstrate our ability to perform two different unitary transformations on atoms that see different light shifts from an optical addressing field. On the measurement side, we present experimental realizations of quantum state and process tomography. The state tomography project encompasses a comprehensive evaluation of several measurement strategies and state estimation algorithms. Our experimental results show that in the presence of experimental imperfections, there is a clear tradeoff between accuracy, efficiency and robustness in the reconstruction. The process tomography project involves an experimental demonstration of efficient reconstruction by using a set of intelligent probe states. Experimental results show that we are able to reconstruct unitary maps in Hilbert spaces with dimension ranging from d=4 to d=16. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a unitary process in d=16 is successfully reconstructed in the laboratory.

  11. Noninvasive Scanning Raman Spectroscopy and Tomography for Graphene Membrane Characterization.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Dieing, Thomas; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Smith, Anderson D; Östling, Mikael; Kataria, Satender; Lemme, Max C

    2017-03-08

    Graphene has extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties, making it a promising material for membrane-based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene is transferred onto target substrates to suspend it over cavities and trenches for pressure-sensor applications. The development of such devices requires suitable metrology methods, i.e., large-scale characterization techniques, to confirm and analyze successful graphene transfer with intact suspended graphene membranes. We propose fast and noninvasive Raman spectroscopy mapping to distinguish between free-standing and substrate-supported graphene, utilizing the different strain and doping levels. The technique is expanded to combine two-dimensional area scans with cross-sectional Raman spectroscopy, resulting in three-dimensional Raman tomography of membrane-based graphene NEMS. The potential of Raman tomography for in-line monitoring is further demonstrated with a methodology for automated data analysis to spatially resolve the material composition in micrometer-scale integrated devices, including free-standing and substrate-supported graphene. Raman tomography may be applied to devices composed of other two-dimensional materials as well as silicon micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems.

  12. Bayesian statistical ionospheric tomography improved by incorporating ionosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Johannes; Virtanen, Ilkka I.; Roininen, Lassi; Vierinen, Juha; Orispää, Mikko; Kauristie, Kirsti; Lehtinen, Markku S.

    2016-04-01

    We validate two-dimensional ionospheric tomography reconstructions against EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements. Our tomography method is based on Bayesian statistical inversion with prior distribution given by its mean and covariance. We employ ionosonde measurements for the choice of the prior mean and covariance parameters and use the Gaussian Markov random fields as a sparse matrix approximation for the numerical computations. This results in a computationally efficient tomographic inversion algorithm with clear probabilistic interpretation. We demonstrate how this method works with simultaneous beacon satellite and ionosonde measurements obtained in northern Scandinavia. The performance is compared with results obtained with a zero-mean prior and with the prior mean taken from the International Reference Ionosphere 2007 model. In validating the results, we use EISCAT ultra-high-frequency incoherent scatter radar measurements as the ground truth for the ionization profile shape. We find that in comparison to the alternative prior information sources, ionosonde measurements improve the reconstruction by adding accurate information about the absolute value and the altitude distribution of electron density. With an ionosonde at continuous disposal, the presented method enhances stand-alone near-real-time ionospheric tomography for the given conditions significantly.

  13. Noninvasive Scanning Raman Spectroscopy and Tomography for Graphene Membrane Characterization

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Graphene has extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties, making it a promising material for membrane-based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene is transferred onto target substrates to suspend it over cavities and trenches for pressure-sensor applications. The development of such devices requires suitable metrology methods, i.e., large-scale characterization techniques, to confirm and analyze successful graphene transfer with intact suspended graphene membranes. We propose fast and noninvasive Raman spectroscopy mapping to distinguish between free-standing and substrate-supported graphene, utilizing the different strain and doping levels. The technique is expanded to combine two-dimensional area scans with cross-sectional Raman spectroscopy, resulting in three-dimensional Raman tomography of membrane-based graphene NEMS. The potential of Raman tomography for in-line monitoring is further demonstrated with a methodology for automated data analysis to spatially resolve the material composition in micrometer-scale integrated devices, including free-standing and substrate-supported graphene. Raman tomography may be applied to devices composed of other two-dimensional materials as well as silicon micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. PMID:28140595

  14. Array tomography: high-resolution three-dimensional immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography, which is described in this article, is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Although the fabrication procedures can be relatively difficult, the high resolution, depth invariance, and molecular discrimination offered by array tomography justify the effort involved. Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture.

  15. Noninvasive Scanning Raman Spectroscopy and Tomography for Graphene Membrane Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Stefan; Dieing, Thomas; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia; Smith, Anderson D.; Östling, Mikael; Kataria, Satender; Lemme, Max C.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has extraordinary mechanical and electronic properties, making it a promising material for membrane based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Here, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene is transferred onto target substrates to suspend it over cavities and trenches for pressure-sensor applications. The development of such devices requires suitable metrology methods, i.e., large-scale characterization techniques, to confirm and analyze successful graphene transfer with intact suspended graphene membranes. We propose fast and noninvasive Raman spectroscopy mapping to distinguish between freestanding and substrate-supported graphene, utilizing the different strain and doping levels. The technique is expanded to combine two-dimensional area scans with cross-sectional Raman spectroscopy, resulting in three-dimensional Raman tomography of membrane-based graphene NEMS. The potential of Raman tomography for in-line monitoring is further demonstrated with a methodology for automated data analysis to spatially resolve the material composition in micrometer-scale integrated devices, including free-standing and substrate-supported graphene. Raman tomography may be applied to devices composed of other two-dimensional materials as well as silicon micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems.

  16. Tropospheric wet refractivity tomography using multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoying, Wang; Ziqiang, Dai; Enhong, Zhang; Fuyang, K. E.; Yunchang, Cao; Lianchun, Song

    2014-01-01

    Algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) have been successfully used to reconstruct the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere and in recent years be tentatively used in tropospheric wet refractivity and water vapor tomography in the ground-based GNSS technology. The previous research on ART used in tropospheric water vapor tomography focused on the convergence and relaxation parameters for various algebraic reconstruction techniques and rarely discussed the impact of Gaussian constraints and initial field on the iteration results. The existing accuracy evaluation parameters calculated from slant wet delay can only evaluate the resultant precision of the voxels penetrated by slant paths and cannot evaluate that of the voxels not penetrated by any slant path. The paper proposes two new statistical parameters Bias and RMS, calculated from wet refractivity of the total voxels, to improve the deficiencies of existing evaluation parameters and then discusses the effect of the Gaussian constraints and initial field on the convergence and tomography results in multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) to reconstruct the 4D tropospheric wet refractivity field using simulation method.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography: A Basic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbacher, M. E.; Deaton, J. W.; Phinney, L. C.; Mitchell, L. J.; Duggan, J. L.

    2007-10-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is useful in detecting biological abnormalities. The technique involves attaching radiotracers to a material used inside the body, in many cases glucose. Glucose is absorbed most readily in areas of unusual cell growth or uptake of nutrients so through natural processes the treated glucose highlights regions of tumors and other degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The higher the concentration of isotopes, the more dynamic the area. Isotopes commonly used as tracers are 11C, 18F, 13N, and 15O due to their easy production and short half-lives. Once the tracers have saturated an area of tissue they are detected using coincidence detectors collinear with individual isotopes. As the isotope decays it emits a positron which, upon annihilating an electron, produces two oppositely directioned gamma rays. The PET machine consists of several pairs of detectors, each 180 degrees from their partner detector. When the oppositely positioned detectors are collinear with the area of the isotope, a computer registers the location of the isotope and can compile an image of the activity of the highlighted area based on the position and strength of the isotopes.

  18. Computerized ionospheric tomography based on geosynchronous SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng; Tian, Ye; Dong, Xichao; Wang, Rui; Long, Teng

    2017-02-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an emerging technique to construct the three-dimensional (3-D) image of ionosphere. The current studies are all based on the Low Earth Orbit synthetic aperture radar (LEO SAR) which is limited by long repeat period and small coverage. In this paper, a novel ionospheric 3-D CIT technique based on geosynchronous SAR (GEO SAR) is put forward. First, several influences of complex atmospheric environment on GEO SAR focusing are detailedly analyzed, including background ionosphere and multiple scattering effects (induced by turbulent ionosphere), tropospheric effects, and random noises. Then the corresponding GEO SAR signal model is constructed with consideration of the temporal-variant background ionosphere within the GEO SAR long integration time (typically 100 s to 1000 s level). Concurrently, an accurate total electron content (TEC) retrieval method based on GEO SAR data is put forward through subband division in range and subaperture division in azimuth, obtaining variant TEC value with respect to the azimuth time. The processing steps of GEO SAR CIT are given and discussed. Owing to the short repeat period and large coverage area, GEO SAR CIT has potentials of covering the specific space continuously and completely and resultantly has excellent real-time performance. Finally, the TEC retrieval and GEO SAR CIT construction are performed by employing a numerical study based on the meteorological data. The feasibility and correctness of the proposed methods are verified.

  19. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  20. Laser-Assisted Atom Probe Tomography of Deformed Minerals: A Zircon Case Study.

    PubMed

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Piazolo, Sandra; Trimby, Patrick; Yang, Limei; Cairney, Julie M

    2017-01-30

    The application of atom probe tomography to the study of minerals is a rapidly growing area. Picosecond-pulsed, ultraviolet laser (UV-355 nm) assisted atom probe tomography has been used to analyze trace element mobility within dislocations and low-angle boundaries in plastically deformed specimens of the nonconductive mineral zircon (ZrSiO4), a key material to date the earth's geological events. Here we discuss important experimental aspects inherent in the atom probe tomography investigation of this important mineral, providing insights into the challenges in atom probe tomography characterization of minerals as a whole. We studied the influence of atom probe tomography analysis parameters on features of the mass spectra, such as the thermal tail, as well as the overall data quality. Three zircon samples with different uranium and lead content were analyzed, and particular attention was paid to ion identification in the mass spectra and detection limits of the key trace elements, lead and uranium. We also discuss the correlative use of electron backscattered diffraction in a scanning electron microscope to map the deformation in the zircon grains, and the combined use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and focused ion beam sample preparation to assist preparation of the final atom probe tip.

  1. IDA3D: An Ionospheric Data Assimilative Three Dimensional Tomography Processor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    region electron densities, it can contribute important spatial and temporal information to the Joule heating at high latitudes. Figure 2: 2D...using the Greenland tomography data with IDA3D to investigate E-region electron densities and the related Joule heating effects. • Alaska...for long term monitoring of the Alaska ionosphere in support of HAARP activities and to do scientific studies of neutral wind coupling to the

  2. Electronic Cigarettes

    MedlinePlus

    ... New FDA Regulations Text Size: A A A Electronic Cigarettes Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are battery operated products designed ... more about: The latest news and events about electronic cigarettes on this FDA page Electronic cigarette basics ...

  3. Temperature-modulated bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge; Shen, Haiou; Cong, Wenxiang; Zhao, Shan; Wei, Guo Wei

    2006-08-01

    It was recently reported that bioluminescent spectra can be significantly affected by temperature, which we recognize as a major opportunity to overcome the inherent illposedness of bioluminescence tomography (BLT). In this paper, we propose temperature-modulated bioluminescence tomography (TBT) to utilize the temperature dependence of bioluminescence for superior BLT performance. Specifically, we employ a focused ultrasound array to heat small volumes of interest (VOI) one at a time, and induce a detectable change in the optical signal on the body surface of a mouse. Based on this type of information, the BLT reconstruction can be stabilized and improved. Our numerical experiments clearly demonstrate the merits of our TBT with either noise-free or noisy datasets. Also, this idea is applicable in 2D bioluminescence imaging and computational optical biopsy (COB). We believe that our approach and technology represents a major step forward in the field of BLT, and has an important and immediate applicability in bioluminescence imaging of small animals in general.

  4. Unpowered wireless ultrasound tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Farshad; Huang, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an unpowered wireless ultrasound tomography system is presented. The system consists of two subsystems; the wireless interrogation unit (WIU) and three wireless nodes installed on the structure. Each node is designed to work in generation and sensing modes, but operates at a specific microwave frequency. Wireless transmission of the ultrasound signals between the WIU and the wireless nodes is achieved by converting ultrasound signals to microwave signals and vice versa, using a microwave carrier signal. In the generation mode, both a carrier signal and an ultrasound modulated microwave signal are transmitted to the sensor nodes. Only the node whose operating frequency matches the carrier signal will receive these signals and demodulate them to recover the original ultrasound signal. In the sensing mode, a microwave carrier signal with two different frequency components matching the operating frequencies of the sensor nodes is broadcasted by the WIU. The sensor nodes, in turn, receive the corresponding carrier signals, modulate it with the ultrasound sensing signal, and wirelessly transmit the modulated signal back to the WIU. The demodulation of the sensing signals is performed in the WIU using a digital signal processing. Implementing a software receiver significantly reduces the complexity and the cost of the WIU. A wireless ultrasound tomography system is realized by interchanging the carrier frequencies so that the wireless transducers can take turn to serve as the actuator and sensors.

  5. Spectral partitioning in diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    1999-06-14

    The scattering mechanism of diffraction tomography is described by the integral form of the Helmholtz equation. The goal of diffraction tomography is to invert this equation in order to reconstruct the object function from the measured scattered fields. During the forward propagation process, the spatial spectrum of the object under investigation is ''smeared,'' by a convolution in the spectral domain, across the propagating and evanescent regions of the received field. Hence, care must be taken in performing the reconstruction, as the object's spectral information has been moved into regions where it may be considered to be noise rather than useful information. This will reduce the quality and resolution of the reconstruction. We show haw the object's spectrum can be partitioned into resolvable and non-resolvable parts based upon the cutoff between the propagating and evanescent fields. Operating under the Born approximation, we develop a beam-forming on transmit approach to direct the energy into either the propagating or evanescent parts of the spectrum. In this manner, we may individually interrogate the propagating and evanescent regions of the object spectrum.

  6. Elastic wavefield migration and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yuting

    Wavefield migration and tomography are well-developed under the acoustic assumption; however, multicomponent recorded seismic data include shear waves (S-modes) in addition to the compressional waves (P-modes). Constructing multicomponent wavefields and considering multiparameter model properties make it possible to utilize information provided by various wave modes, and this information allows for better characterization of the subsurface. In my thesis, I apply popular wavefield imaging and tomography to elastic media, and propose methods to address challenges posed by elastic multicomponent wavefields and multiparameter models. The key novelty of my research consists of new elastic imaging conditions, which generate elastic images with improved qualities and clear physical meaning. Moreover, I demonstrate an elastic wavefield tomography method to obtain realistic elastic models which benefits elastic migration. Migration techniques, including conventional RTM, extended RTM, and least-squares RTM (LSRTM), provide images of subsurface structures. I propose one imaging condition that computes potential images (PP, PS, SP, and SS). This imaging condition exploits pure P- and S-modes obtained by Helmholtz decomposition and corrects for the polarity reversal in PS and SP images. Using this imaging condition, I propose methods for conventional RTM and extended RTM. The extended imaging condition makes it possible to compute angle gathers for converted waves. The amplitudes of the scalar images indicate reflectivities, which can be used for amplitude verse offset (AVO) analysis; however, this imaging condition requires knowledge of the geologic dip. I propose a second imaging condition that computes perturbation images, i.e., P and S velocity perturbations. Because these images correspond to perturbations to material properties that are angle-independent, they do not have polarity reversals; therefore, they do not need dip information for polarity correction. I use this

  7. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  8. Optical coherence tomography in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Elke; Kästle, Raphaela; Welzel, Julia

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive diagnostic method that offers a view into the superficial layers of the skin in vivo in real-time. An infrared broadband light source allows the investigation of skin architecture and changes up to a depth of 1 to 2 mm with a resolution between 15 and 3 μm, depending on the system used. Thus OCT enables evaluation of skin lesions, especially nonmelanoma skin cancers and inflammatory diseases, quantification of skin changes, visualization of parasitic infestations, and examination of other indications such as the investigation of nails. OCT provides a quick and useful diagnostic imaging technique for a number of clinical questions and is a valuable addition or complement to other noninvasive imaging tools such as dermoscopy, high-frequency ultrasound, and confocal laser scan microscopy.

  9. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Barbour, Randall L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image.

  10. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Barbour, R.L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image. 6 figs.

  11. X-ray tensor tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malecki, A.; Potdevin, G.; Biernath, T.; Eggl, E.; Willer, K.; Lasser, T.; Maisenbacher, J.; Gibmeier, J.; Wanner, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for x-ray computed tomography that yields information about the local micro-morphology and its orientation in each voxel of the reconstructed 3D tomogram. Contrary to conventional x-ray CT, which only reconstructs a single scalar value for each point in the 3D image, our approach provides a full scattering tensor with multiple independent structural parameters in each volume element. In the application example shown in this study, we highlight that our method can visualize sub-pixel fiber orientations in a carbon composite sample, hence demonstrating its value for non-destructive testing applications. Moreover, as the method is based on the use of a conventional x-ray tube, we believe that it will also have a great impact in the wider range of material science investigations and in future medical diagnostics. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

  12. Computed tomography of Krukenberg tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.C.; Gold, B.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of three patients with Kurkenberg tumor was reviewed retrospectively. CT showed large, lobulated, multicystic masses with soft-tissue components, indistinguishable from primary ovarian carcinoma. Much has been written about metastatic ovarian tumor, but this is the first report in the radiologic literature about their CT features. The authors emphasize the importance of recognizing the ovary as a frequent site of metastases and the proper approach to this problem. In patients with a history of colon or gastric carcinoma, the mixed cystic and solid ovarian mass on CT should be regarded as metastatic tumor until proven otherwise. A careful search for gastrointestinal tract signs or symptoms should be done in any patient with a pelvic tumor. When CT is done for evaluation of ovarian tumor, the stomach and colon should be carefully evaluated, and the ovaries routinely examined in the preoperative CT staging of gastric or colon carcinoma.

  13. Experimental compressive phase space tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lei; Lee, Justin; Oh, Se Baek; Barbastathis, George

    2012-01-01

    Phase space tomography estimates correlation functions entirely from snapshots in the evolution of the wave function along a time or space variable. In contrast, traditional interferometric methods require measurement of multiple two–point correlations. However, as in every tomographic formulation, undersampling poses a severe limitation. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, experimental demonstration of compressive reconstruction of the classical optical correlation function, i.e. the mutual intensity function. Our compressive algorithm makes explicit use of the physically justifiable assumption of a low–entropy source (or state.) Since the source was directly accessible in our classical experiment, we were able to compare the compressive estimate of the mutual intensity to an independent ground–truth estimate from the van Cittert–Zernike theorem and verify substantial quantitative improvements in the reconstruction. PMID:22513541

  14. Photoacoustic tomography: principles and advances

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that shows great potential for preclinical research and clinical practice. As a hybrid technique, PAT is based on the acoustic detection of optical absorption from either endogenous chromophores, such as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin, or exogenous contrast agents, such as organic dyes and nanoparticles. Because ultrasound scatters much less than light in tissue, PAT generates high-resolution images in both the optical ballistic and diffusive regimes. Over the past decade, the photoacoustic technique has been evolving rapidly, leading to a variety of exciting discoveries and applications. This review covers the basic principles of PAT and its different implementations. Strengths of PAT are highlighted, along with the most recent imaging results. PMID:25642127

  15. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  16. Catheters for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Ullah, H.; Hamza, M. Y.; Ikram, M.

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review article is to overview technology, clinical evidence, and future applications to date optical coherence tomography (OCT) probes to yield the diagnostic purpose. We have reviewed the designing, construction and working of different categories of OCT probes developed for optical diagnostics having a potential for non invasive and improved detection of different types of cancer as well as other neoplasm. Rotational and balloon catheters, imaging needles and hand-held, linear scanning, multichannel, micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology based, dynamic focusing, forward view imaging, and common path interferometer based probes have been discussed in details. The fiber probes have shown excellent performance for two dimensional and three dimensional higher resolution, cross-sectional imaging of interior and exterior body tissues that can be compared with histopathology to provide the information about the angiogenesis and other lesions in the tissue. The MEMS-technology based probes are found to be more suitable for three dimensional morphological imaging.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography: Technical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution, noninvasive, 3D imaging technique with great potential in both clinical and fundamental research applications in many areas. Owing to its exceptionally high spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity, the functional extension of OCT techniques can simultaneously provide tissue structure, blood perfusion, birefringence, and other physiological information and it has great potential for basic biomedical research and clinical medicine. OCT has the far-reaching potential to be a quantitative imaging technique that could impact many, as yet unexplored, areas and should therefore be considered a vital measurement tool. In this chapter, we will first discuss the principle of operation and then the practical aspects of the OCT system; we will also provide detailed discussion on different OCT schemes and its functional extensions.

  18. Single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piez, C.W. Jr.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming an increasingly important part of routine clinical nuclear medicine. By providing tomographic reconstructions in multiple planes through the patient, SPECT expands the clinical applications in nuclear medicine as well as providing better contrast, edge definition and separation of target from background activities. Imaging techniques have been developed for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using radiolabeled amines. Thus, cerebral functional imaging can be used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction, cerebral vascular disease, dementia and epilepsy. SPECT plays a complementary role in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, particularly when it is coupled with thallium-201 and exercise testing. SPECT extends our diagnostic capabilities in additional areas, such as liver and bone scintigraphy as well as tumor imaging with gallium-67.

  19. Electrical impedance tomography of electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations.

  20. Spatial light interference tomography (SLIT)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, Paul Scott; Millet, Larry J.; Gillette, Martha U.; Mihi, Agustin; Braun, Paul V.; Shen, Zhen; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We present spatial light interference tomography (SLIT), a label-free method for 3D imaging of transparent structures such as live cells. SLIT uses the principle of interferometric imaging with broadband fields and combines the optical gating due to the micron-scale coherence length with that of the high numerical aperture objective lens. Measuring the phase shift map associated with the object as it is translated through focus provides full information about the 3D distribution associated with the refractive index. Using a reconstruction algorithm based on the Born approximation, we show that the sample structure may be recovered via a 3D, complex field deconvolution. We illustrate the method with reconstructed tomographic refractive index distributions of microspheres, photonic crystals, and unstained living cells. PMID:21996999

  1. Muon Tomography for Geological Repositories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, D.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Gluyas, J.; Clark, S. J.; Thompson, L. F.; Klinger, J.; Spooner, N. J.; Blackwell, T. B.; Pal, S.; Lincoln, D. L.; Paling, S. M.; Mitchell, C. N.; Benton, C.; Coleman, M. L.; Telfer, S.; Cole, A.; Nolan, S.; Chadwick, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic-ray muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere in collisions of primary cosmic rays with atoms in air. Due to their high penetrating power these muons can be used to image the content (primarily density) of matter they pass through. They have already been used to image the structure of pyramids, volcanoes and other objects. Their applications can be extended to investigating the structure of, and monitoring changes in geological formations and repositories, in particular deep subsurface sites with stored CO2. Current methods of monitoring subsurface CO2, such as repeat seismic surveys, are episodic and require highly skilled personnel to operate. Our simulations based on simplified models have previously shown that muon tomography could be used to continuously monitor CO2 injection and migration and complement existing technologies. Here we present a simulation of the monitoring of CO2 plume evolution in a geological reservoir using muon tomography. The stratigraphy in the vicinity of the reservoir is modelled using geological data, and a numerical fluid flow model is used to describe the time evolution of the CO2 plume. A planar detection region with a surface area of 1000 m2 is considered, at a vertical depth of 776 m below the seabed. We find that one year of constant CO2 injection leads to changes in the column density of about 1%, and that the CO2 plume is already resolvable with an exposure time of less than 50 days. The attached figure show a map of CO2 plume in angular coordinates as reconstructed from observed muons. In parallel with simulation efforts, a small prototype muon detector has been designed, built and tested in a deep subsurface laboratory. Initial calibrations of the detector have shown that it can reach the required angular resolution for muon detection. Stable operation in a small borehole within a few months has been demonstrated.

  2. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometric technique capable of noninvasive high-resolution cross-sectional imaging by measuring the intensity of light reflected from within tissue [1]. This results in a noncontact imaging modality that provides images similar in scale and geometry to histology. Just as different stains can be used to enhance the contrast in histology, various extensions of OCT allow for visualization of features not readily apparent in traditional OCT. For example, optical Doppler tomography [2] can enable depth-resolved imaging of flow by observing differences in phase between successive depth scans [3-5]. This chapter will focus on polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT), which utilizes depth-dependent changes in the polarization state of detected light to determine the light-polarization changing properties of a sample [6-11]. These properties, including birefringence, dichroism, and optic axis orientation, can be determined directly by studying the depth evolution of Stokes parameters [7-10, 12-16] or indirectly by using the changing reflected polarization states to first determine Jones or Mueller matrices [11, 17-21]. PS-OCT has been used in a wide variety of applications, including correlating burn depth with a decrease in birefringence [14], measuring the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer [22, 23], and monitoring the onset and progression of caries lesions [24]. In this chapter, a discussion of polarization theory and its application to PS-OCTwill be followed by clinical uses of the technology and will conclude with mentionof more recent work and future directions of PS-OCT.

  3. EDITORIAL: Optical tomography and digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Jeremy; Lobera, Julia

    2008-07-01

    The articles in this special feature in Measurement Science and Technology concern exciting new developments in the field of digital holography—the process of electronically recording and numerically reconstructing an optical field [1]. Making use of the enormous advances in digital imaging and computer technology, digital holography is presented in a range of applications from fluid flow measurement and structural analysis to medical imaging. The science of digital holography rests on the foundations of optical holography, on the work of Gabor in the late 1940s, and on the development of laser sources in the 1960s, which made his vision a practical reality [2]. Optical holography, however, uses a photosensitive material, both to record a latent image and subsequently to behave as a diffractive optical element with which to reconstruct the incident field. In this way display holograms, using silver halide materials for example, can produce life-size images that are virtually indistinguishable from the object itself [3]. Digital holography, in contrast, separates the steps of recording and reconstruction, and the final image is most often in the form of a 3D computer model. Of course, television cameras have been used from the beginnings of holography to record interferometric images. However, the huge disparity between the resolution of holographic recording materials (more than 3000 cycles/mm) and television cameras (around 50 cycles/mm) was raised as a major concern by early researchers. TV holography, as it was sometimes called, generally recorded low numerical aperture (NA) holograms producing images with characteristically large speckle and was therefore more often referred to as electronic speckle pattern interferomery (ESPI) [4]. It is possible, however, to record large NA holograms on a sensor with restricted resolution by using an objective lens or a diverging reference wave [5]. This is generally referred to as digital holographic microscopy (DHM) since

  4. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  5. Axial tomography from digitized real time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnay, A.S.; McDonald, W.M.; Doupont, P.A.; McKinney, R.L.; Lee, M.M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  6. Efficient State Tomography for Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Jiang, Luyao; Krastanov, Stefan; Albert, Victor V.; Heeres, Reinier; Vlastakis, Brian; Schoelkopf, Rob; Jiang, Liang

    2015-03-01

    We propose an efficient and error robust scheme for state tomography of a continuous variable system, which is dispersively coupled to a two-level system. Our adaptive tomography protocol offers a significant speed up compared to the conventional Wigner tomography for a practically interesting class of states, such as Schrodinger cat states. In the presence of typical experimental errors, the number of measurements required is still close to the information theoretic limit. Our proposals can be readily implemented in platforms such as superconducting transmon qubit inside a microwave cavity.

  7. Phase Space Tomography: A Simple, Portable and Accurate Technique to Map Phase Spaces of Beams with Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Kishek, R. A.; Bernal, S.; Walter, M.; Haber, I.; Fiorito, R.; Thangaraj, J. C. T.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; O'Shea, P. G.; Li, H.

    2006-11-27

    In order to understand the charged particle dynamics, e.g. the halo formation, emittance growth, x-y energy transfer and coupling, knowledge of the actual phase space is needed. Other the past decade there is an increasing number of articles who use tomography to map the beam phase space and measure the beam emittance. These studies where performed at high energy facilities where the effect of space charge was neglible and therefore not considered in the analysis. This work extends the tomography technique to beams with space charge. In order to simplify the analysis linear forces where assumed. By carefully modeling the tomography process using the particle-in-cell code WARP we test the validity of our assumptions and the accuracy of the reconstructed phase space. Finally, we report experimental results of phase space mapping at the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) using tomography.

  8. Electrons, Electronic Publishing, and Electronic Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownrigg, Edwin B.; Lynch, Clifford A.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a perspective on electronic publishing by distinguishing between "Newtonian" publishing and "quantum-mechanical" publishing. Highlights include media and publishing, works delivered through electronic media, electronic publishing and the printed word, management of intellectual property, and recent copyright-law issues…

  9. Calibration of electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    2000-05-01

    Over the past 10 years we have developed methods for imaging the electrical resistivity of soil and rock formations. These technologies have been called electrical resistance tomography of ERT (e.g. Daily and Owen, 1991). Recently we have been striving to extend this capability to include images of electric impedance--with a new nomenclature of electrical impedance tomography or EIT (Ramirez et al., 1999). Electrical impedance is simply a generalization of resistance. Whereas resistance is the zero frequency ratio of voltage and current, impedance includes both the magnitude and phase relationship between voltage and current at frequency. This phase and its frequency behavior is closely related to what in geophysics is called induced polarization or (Sumner, 1976). Why is this phase or IP important? IP is known to be related to many physical phenomena of importance so that image of IP will be maps of such things as mineralization and cation exchange IP (Marshall and Madden, 1959). Also, it is likely that IP, used in conjunction with resistivity, will yield information about the subsurface that can not be obtained by either piece of information separately. In order to define the accuracy of our technologies to image impedance we have constructed a physical model of known impedance that can be used as a calibration standard. It consists of 616 resistors, along with some capacitors to provide the reactive response, arranged in a three dimensional structure as in figure 1. Figure 2 shows the construction of the network and defines the coordinate system used to describe it. This network of components is a bounded and discrete version of the unbounded and continuous medium with which we normally work (the subsurface). The network has several desirable qualities: (1) The impedance values are known (to the accuracy of the component values). (2) The component values and their 3D distribution is easily controlled. (3) Error associated with electrode noise is eliminated. (4

  10. [Clinical application of computed tomography in cattle].

    PubMed

    Nuss, K; Schnetzler, C; Hagen, R; Schwarz, A; Kircher, P

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography involves the use of x-rays to produce cross-sectional images of body regions. It provides non-overlapping, two-dimensional images of all desired planes as well as three-dimensional reconstruction of regions of interest. There are few reports on the clinical use of computed tomography in farm animals. Its use in cattle is limited by high cost, the application of off-label drugs and the need for general anaesthesia. In cattle computed tomography is indicated primarily for diseases of the head, e.g. dental diseases and otitis media, and neurological disorders. Less often it is used for diseases of the vertebrae and limbs. In valuable cattle, the results of computed tomography can be an important part of preoperative planning or be used to avoid unnecessary surgery when the prognosis is poor.

  11. Improved precision-guaranteed quantum tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Takanori

    Quantum tomography is one of the standard tool in current quantum information experiments for verifying that a state/process/measurement prepared in the lab is close to an ideal target. Precision-guaranteed quantum tomography (Sugiyama, Turner, Murao, PRL 111, 160406 2013) gives rigorous error bars on a result estimated from arbitrary finite data sets from any given informationally complete tomography experiments. The rigorous error bars were derived with a real-valued concentration inequality called Hoeffding's inequality. In this talk, with a vector-valued concentration inequality, we provide an improved version of the error bars of precision-guaranteed quantum tomography. We examine the new error bars for specific cases of multi-qubit systems and numerically show that the degree of improvement becomes large as the dimension of the system increases. Supported by JSPS Research Fellowships for Young Scientists H27-276 and JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad H25-32.

  12. Computed tomography of orbital-facial neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Metzger, R.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Schut, L.; Bruce, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with orbital-facial manifestations of neurofibromations were examined by computed tomography. Delineation of the extent of the disease, and differentiation of the disease processes (orbital tumor, osseous orbital dysplasia, plexiform neurofibromatosis, and buphthalmos) was possible.

  13. Intraperitoneal contrast agents for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, J.

    1985-08-01

    Intraperitoneal contrast agents have been used to diagnose mass lesions, adhesions, and hernias using conventional radiographic techniques. The use of intraperitoneal contrast agents in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) has been limited and is the subject of this report.

  14. Soft Route to 4D Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillandier-Thomas, Thibault; Roux, Stéphane; Hild, François

    2016-07-01

    Based on the assumption that the time evolution of a sample observed by computed tomography requires many less parameters than the definition of the microstructure itself, it is proposed to reconstruct these changes based on the initial state (using computed tomography) and very few radiographs acquired at fixed intervals of time. This Letter presents a proof of concept that for a fatigue cracked sample its kinematics can be tracked from no more than two radiographs in situations where a complete 3D view would require several hundreds of radiographs. This 2 order of magnitude gain opens the way to a "computed" 4D tomography, which complements the recent progress achieved in fast or ultrafast computed tomography, which is based on beam brightness, detector sensitivity, and signal acquisition technologies.

  15. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  16. Quantum State Tomography via Reduced Density Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Tao; Lu, Dawei; Klassen, Joel; Yu, Nengkun; Ji, Zhengfeng; Chen, Jianxin; Ma, Xian; Long, Guilu; Zeng, Bei; Laflamme, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Quantum state tomography via local measurements is an efficient tool for characterizing quantum states. However, it requires that the original global state be uniquely determined (UD) by its local reduced density matrices (RDMs). In this work, we demonstrate for the first time a class of states that are UD by their RDMs under the assumption that the global state is pure, but fail to be UD in the absence of that assumption. This discovery allows us to classify quantum states according to their UD properties, with the requirement that each class be treated distinctly in the practice of simplifying quantum state tomography. Additionally, we experimentally test the feasibility and stability of performing quantum state tomography via the measurement of local RDMs for each class. These theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the advantages and possible pitfalls of quantum state tomography with local measurements.

  17. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D M; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J; Beale, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn-Na-W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

  18. Computed Tomography of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Ballegeer, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has specific uses in veterinary species' appendicular musculoskeletal system. Parameters for acquisition of images, interpretation limitations, as well as published information regarding its use in small animals is reviewed.

  19. [Computer tomography of the brain in neurology].

    PubMed

    Shmidt, E V; Vereshchagin, N V; Bragina, L K; Vavilov, S B

    1978-01-01

    The results of the studies, obtained in a computer head tomography confirms its effectiveness in the diagnosis of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, tumor and degenerative brain diseases, as well as in investigations of the brain ventricular systems and subarachnoidal spaces. A computer head tomography--is a perspective method in the study of brain lesions with the aid of X-ray equipment and computers.

  20. 3D Imaging with Holographic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Kou, Shan Shan

    2010-04-01

    There are two main types of tomography that enable the 3D internal structures of objects to be reconstructed from scattered data. The commonly known computerized tomography (CT) give good results in the x-ray wavelength range where the filtered back-projection theorem and Radon transform can be used. These techniques rely on the Fourier projection-slice theorem where rays are considered to propagate straight through the object. Another type of tomography called `diffraction tomography' applies in applications in optics and acoustics where diffraction and scattering effects must be taken into account. The latter proves to be a more difficult problem, as light no longer travels straight through the sample. Holographic tomography is a popular way of performing diffraction tomography and there has been active experimental research on reconstructing complex refractive index data using this approach recently. However, there are two distinct ways of doing tomography: either by rotation of the object or by rotation of the illumination while fixing the detector. The difference between these two setups is intuitive but needs to be quantified. From Fourier optics and information transformation point of view, we use 3D transfer function analysis to quantitatively describe how spatial frequencies of the object are mapped to the Fourier domain. We first employ a paraxial treatment by calculating the Fourier transform of the defocused OTF. The shape of the calculated 3D CTF for tomography, by scanning the illumination in one direction only, takes on a form that we might call a 'peanut,' compared to the case of object rotation, where a diablo is formed, the peanut exhibiting significant differences and non-isotropy. In particular, there is a line singularity along one transverse direction. Under high numerical aperture conditions, the paraxial treatment is not accurate, and so we make use of 3D analytical geometry to calculate the behaviour in the non-paraxial case. This time, we

  1. Uniqueness theorems in bioluminescence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Li, Yi; Jiang, Ming

    2004-08-01

    Motivated by bioluminescent imaging needs for studies on gene therapy and other applications in the mouse models, a bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system is being developed in the University of Iowa. While the forward imaging model is described by the well-known diffusion equation, the inverse problem is to recover an internal bioluminescent source distribution subject to Cauchy data. Our primary goal in this paper is to establish the solution uniqueness for BLT under practical constraints despite the ill-posedness of the inverse problem in the general case. After a review on the inverse source literature, we demonstrate that in the general case the BLT solution is not unique by constructing the set of all the solutions to this inverse problem. Then, we show the uniqueness of the solution in the case of impulse sources. Finally, we present our main theorem that solid/hollow ball sources can be uniquely determined up to nonradiating sources. For better readability, the exact conditions for and rigorous proofs of the theorems are given in the Appendices. Further research directions are also discussed.

  2. Prospectively gated cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Moore, S C; Judy, P F; Garnic, J D; Kambic, G X; Bonk, F; Cochran, G; Margosian, P; McCroskey, W; Foote, F

    1983-01-01

    A fourth-generation scanner has been modified to perform prospectively gated cardiac computed tomography (CT). A computer program monitors the electrocardiogram (ECG) and predicts when to initiate the next scan in a gated series in order to acquire all projection data for a desired phase of the heart cycle. The system has been tested with dogs and has produced cross-sectional images of all phases of the cardiac cycle. Eight to ten scans per series were sufficient to obtain reproducible images of each transverse section in the end-diastolic and end-systolic phases. The radiation dose to the skin was approximately 1.4 cGy per scan. The prospectively gated system is more than twice as efficient as a retrospectively gated system in obtaining complete angular projection data for a 10% heart cycle window. A temporal smoothing technique to suppress reconstruction artifacts due to sorting inconsistent projection data was developed and evaluated. Image noise was reduced by averaging together any overlapping projection data. Prospectively gated cardiac CT has also been used to demonstrate that the error in attenuation measured with a single nongated CT scan through the heart can be as large as 50-60 CT numbers outside the heart in the lung field.

  3. [Computerized tomography and craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Richter, H P; Braun, V

    1993-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is now the standard neuroradiological examination for patients with major head injuries, although conventional X-ray of the skull should not be neglected. Whereas the latter only shows such skull pathology as fractures or intracranial air following a basal fracture, CT clearly visualizes intracranial pathology. It allows differentiation between haematoma and contusion, between localized oedema and generalized brain swelling; CT is therefore indicated in every patient with disturbed consciousness, focal neurological signs, and/or secondary clinical impairment, and also in all drunken patients with head injury. In a patient with impaired consciousness and focal neurological deficit the probability of a pathologic CT is 85%. An extracerebral haematoma is often present, which needs urgent evacuation. A modern, non-expensive communications system using a standard telephone line enables hospitals without a neurosurgical unit to send CT pictures that are difficult to interpret to a neurosurgeon and to discuss them on-line by telephone. This system has now been in operation for over 2 years and has improved the care of patients with head injury in our region. It is highly efficient and reliable and improves cooperation between distant hospitals. It also helps to avoid unnecessary transfers, which are not only expensive but may even harm a critically ill patient.

  4. Radar tomography of bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Nigel C.; Chase, Steven B.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents the development of ground-penetrating radar bridge deck inspection systems sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration. Two radar systems have been designed and built by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The HERMES bridge inspector (High-speed Electromagnetic Roadway Mapping and Evaluation System) is designed to survey the deck condition during normal traffic flow. Thus the need for traffic control during inspection is eliminated. This system employs a 64 channel antenna array covering 1.9 m in width with a sampling density of 3 cm. To investigate areas of a bridge deck that are of particular interest and require detailed inspection a slower, cart mounted radar has been produced. This system is named PERES (Precision Electromagnetic Roadway Evaluation System). The density of data coverage with PERES is 1 cm and an average or 100 samples is taken at each location to improve the signal to noise ratio. Images of the deck interior are reconstructed from the original data using synthetic aperture tomography. The target of these systems is the location of steel reinforcement, corrosion related delaminations, voids and disbonds. The final objective is for these, and other non-destructive technologies, to provide information on the condition of the nation's bridges so that funds will be spent on the structures in most need of repair.

  5. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils.

  6. Discrete tomography in neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuba, Attila; Rodek, Lajos; Kiss, Zoltán; Ruskó, László; Nagy, Antal; Balaskó, Márton

    2005-04-01

    Discrete tomography (DT) is an imaging technique for reconstructing discrete images from their projections using the knowledge that the object to be reconstructed contains only a few homogeneous materials characterized by known discrete absorption values. One of the main reasons for applying DT is that we will hopefully require relatively few projections. Using discreteness and some a priori information (such as an approximate shape of the object) we can apply two DT methods in neutron imaging by reducing the problem to an optimization task. The first method is a special one because it is only suitable if the object is composed of cylinders and sphere shapes. The second method is a general one in the sense that it can be used for reconstructing objects of any shape. Software was developed and physical experiments performed in order to investigate the effects of several reconstruction parameters: the number of projections, noise levels, and complexity of the object to be reconstructed. We give a summary of the experimental results and make a comparison of the results obtained using a classical reconstruction technique (FBP). The programs we developed are available in our DT reconstruction program package DIRECT.

  7. Development of Proton Computed Tomography for Applications in Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirov, Vladimir; Schulte, Reinhard; Coutrakon, George; Erdelyi, Bela; Wong, Kent; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Penfold, Scott; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; McAllister, Scott; Schubert, Keith

    2009-03-01

    Determination of the Bragg peak position in proton therapy requires accurate knowledge of the electron density and ratio of effective atomic number and mass (Z/A) of the body tissues traversed. While the Z/A ratio is fairly constant for human tissues, the density of tissues varies significantly. One possibility to obtain accurate electron density information of tissues is to use protons of sufficient energy to penetrate the patient and measure their energy loss. From these transmission measurements, it is possible to reconstruct a three-dimensional map of electron densities using algebraic techniques. The interest in proton computed tomography (pCT) has considerably increased in recent years due to the more common use of proton accelerators for cancer treatment world-wide and a modern design concept based on current high-energy physics technology has been suggested. This contribution gives a status update on the pCT project carried out by the pCT Collaboration, a group of institutions sharing interest and expertise in the development of pCT. We will present updated imaging data obtained with a small pCT prototype developed in collaboration with the Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and installed on the proton research beam line at Loma Linda University Medical Center. We will discuss hardware decisions regarding the next-generation pCT scanner, which will permit scanning of head-sized objects. Progress has also been made in the formulation of the most likely path of protons through an object and parallelizable iterative reconstruction algorithms that can be implemented on general-purpose commodity graphics processing units. Finally, we will present simulation studies for utilizing pCT technology for on-line proton dose verification and tumor imaging with positron emission tomography (PET).

  8. Quantitative Tomography of Organic Photovoltaic Blends at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Pfannmöller, M; Heidari, H; Nanson, L; Lozman, O R; Chrapa, M; Offermans, T; Nisato, G; Bals, S

    2015-10-14

    The success of semiconducting organic materials has enabled green technologies for electronics, lighting, and photovoltaics. However, when blended together, these materials have also raised novel fundamental questions with respect to electronic, optical, and thermodynamic properties. This is particularly important for organic photovoltaic cells based on the bulk heterojunction. Here, the distribution of nanoscale domains plays a crucial role depending on the specific device structure. Hence, correlation of the aforementioned properties requires 3D nanoscale imaging of materials domains, which are embedded in a multilayer device. Such visualization has so far been elusive due to lack of contrast, insufficient signal, or resolution limits. In this Letter, we introduce spectral scanning transmission electron tomography for reconstruction of entire volume plasmon spectra from rod-shaped specimens. We provide 3D structural correlations and compositional mapping at a resolution of approximately 7 nm within advanced organic photovoltaic tandem cells. Novel insights that are obtained from quantitative 3D analyses reveal that efficiency loss upon thermal annealing can be attributed to subtle, fundamental blend properties. These results are invaluable in guiding the design and optimization of future devices in plastic electronics applications and provide an empirical basis for modeling and simulation of organic solar cells.

  9. Multiscale microstructural characterization of Sn-rich alloys by three dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yazzie, K.E.; Williams, J.J.; Phillips, N.C.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2012-08-15

    Sn-rich (Pb-free) alloys serve as electrical and mechanical interconnects in electronic packaging. It is critical to quantify the microstructures of Sn-rich alloys to obtain a fundamental understanding of their properties. In this work, the intermetallic precipitates in Sn-3.5Ag and Sn-0.7Cu, and globular lamellae in Sn-37Pb solder joints were visualized and quantified using 3D X-ray synchrotron tomography and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography. 3D reconstructions were analyzed to extract statistics on particle size and spatial distribution. In the Sn-Pb alloy the interconnectivity of Sn-rich and Pb-rich constituents was quantified. It will be shown that multiscale characterization using 3D X-ray and FIB tomography enabled the characterization of the complex morphology, distribution, and statistics of precipitates and contiguous phases over a range of length scales. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiscale characterization by X-ray synchrotron and focused ion beam tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterized microstructural features in several Sn-based alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantified size, fraction, and clustering of microstructural features.

  10. Correlative Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopic Tomography and Atom Probe Tomography of the Phase Separation in an Alnico 8 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Sneed, Brian T.; Zhou, Lin; Tang, Wei; Kramer, Matthew J.; Cullen, David A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-12-21

    Alnico alloys have long been used as strong permanent magnets because of their ferromagnetism and high coercivity. Understanding their structural details allows for better prediction of the resulting magnetic properties. However, quantitative three-dimensional characterization of the phase separation in these alloys is still challenged by the spatial quantification of nanoscale phases. Herein, we apply a dual tomography approach, where correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) tomography and atom probe tomography (APT) are used to investigate the initial phase separation process of an alnico 8 alloy upon non-magnetic annealing. STEM-EDS tomography provides information on the morphology and volume fractions of Fe–Co-rich and Νi–Al-rich phases after spinodal decomposition in addition to quantitative information of the composition of a nanoscale volume. Subsequent analysis of a portion of the same specimen by APT offers quantitative chemical information of each phase at the sub-nanometer scale. Furthermore, APT reveals small, 2–4 nm Fe-rich α1 phases that are nucleated in the Ni-rich α2 matrix. From this information, we show that phase separation of the alnico 8 alloy consists of both spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth processes. Lastly, we discuss the complementary benefits and challenges associated with correlative STEM-EDS and APT.

  11. Correlative Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopic Tomography and Atom Probe Tomography of the Phase Separation in an Alnico 8 Alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Sneed, Brian T.; Zhou, Lin; ...

    2016-12-21

    Alnico alloys have long been used as strong permanent magnets because of their ferromagnetism and high coercivity. Understanding their structural details allows for better prediction of the resulting magnetic properties. However, quantitative three-dimensional characterization of the phase separation in these alloys is still challenged by the spatial quantification of nanoscale phases. Herein, we apply a dual tomography approach, where correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) tomography and atom probe tomography (APT) are used to investigate the initial phase separation process of an alnico 8 alloy upon non-magnetic annealing. STEM-EDS tomography provides information on the morphology andmore » volume fractions of Fe–Co-rich and Νi–Al-rich phases after spinodal decomposition in addition to quantitative information of the composition of a nanoscale volume. Subsequent analysis of a portion of the same specimen by APT offers quantitative chemical information of each phase at the sub-nanometer scale. Furthermore, APT reveals small, 2–4 nm Fe-rich α1 phases that are nucleated in the Ni-rich α2 matrix. From this information, we show that phase separation of the alnico 8 alloy consists of both spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth processes. Lastly, we discuss the complementary benefits and challenges associated with correlative STEM-EDS and APT.« less

  12. Nano-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergey A.; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Zam, Azhar; Leahy, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Depth resolved label-free detection of structural changes with nanoscale sensitivity is an outstanding problem in the biological and physical sciences and has significant applications in both the fundamental research and healthcare diagnostics arenas. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel label-free depth resolved sensing technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect structural changes at the nanoscale. Structural components of the 3D object, spectrally encoded in the remitted light, are transformed from the Fourier domain into each voxel of the 3D OCT image without compromising sensitivity. Spatial distribution of the nanoscale structural changes in the depth direction is visualized in just a single OCT scan. This label free approach provides new possibilities for depth resolved study of pathogenic and physiologically relevant molecules in the body with high sensitivity and specificity. It offers a powerful opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Experimental results show the ability of the approach to differentiate structural changes of 30 nm in nanosphere aggregates, located at different depths, from a single OCT scan, and structural changes less than 30 nm in time from two OCT scans. Application for visualization of the structure of human skin in vivo is also demonstrated.Depth resolved label-free detection of structural changes with nanoscale sensitivity is an outstanding problem in the biological and physical sciences and has significant applications in both the fundamental research and healthcare diagnostics arenas. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel label-free depth resolved sensing technique based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect structural changes at the nanoscale. Structural components of the 3D object, spectrally encoded in the remitted light, are transformed from the Fourier domain into each voxel of the 3D OCT image without compromising sensitivity. Spatial distribution of the nanoscale

  13. Asymptomatic Emphysematous Pyelonephritis - Positron Emission Tomography Computerized Tomography Aided Diagnostic and Therapeutic Elucidation

    PubMed Central

    Pathapati, Deepti; Shinkar, Pawan Gulabrao; kumar, Satya Awadhesh; Jha; Dattatreya, Palanki Satya; Chigurupati, Namrata; Chigurupati, Mohana Vamsy; Rao, Vatturi Venkata Satya Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    The authors report an interesting coincidental unearthing by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) of a potentially serious medical condition of emphysematous pyelonephritis in a case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The management by conservative ureteric stenting and antibiotics was done with gratifying clinical outcome. PMID:28242985

  14. Time-dependent seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Of methods for measuring temporal changes in seismic-wave speeds in the Earth, seismic tomography is among those that offer the highest spatial resolution. 3-D tomographic methods are commonly applied in this context by inverting seismic wave arrival time data sets from different epochs independently and assuming that differences in the derived structures represent real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of independent inversions would differ even if the structure in the Earth did not change, due to observational errors and differences in the seismic ray distributions. The latter effect may be especially severe when data sets include earthquake swarms or aftershock sequences, and may produce the appearance of correlation between structural changes and seismicity when the wave speeds are actually temporally invariant. A better approach, which makes it possible to assess what changes are truly required by the data, is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, minimizing the difference between models for different epochs as well as the rms arrival-time residuals. This problem leads, in the case of two epochs, to a system of normal equations whose order is twice as great as for a single epoch. The direct solution of this system would require twice as much memory and four times as much computational effort as would independent inversions. We present an algorithm, tomo4d, that takes advantage of the structure and sparseness of the system to obtain the solution with essentially no more effort than independent inversions require. No claim to original US government works Journal compilation ?? 2010 RAS.

  15. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  16. Advantages of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P. K.; Bakhos, T.; Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing the subsurface is significant for most hydrogeologic studies, such as those involving site remediation and groundwater resource explo¬ration. A variety of hydraulic and geophysical methods have been developed to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Hydraulic methods based on the analysis of conventional pumping tests allow the estimation of conductivity and storage without need for approximate petrophysical relations, which is an advantage over most geophysical methods that first estimate other properties and then infer values of hydraulic parameters. However, hydraulic methods have the disadvantage that the head-change signal decays with distance from the pumping well and thus becomes difficult to separate from noise except in close proximity to the source. Oscillatory hydraulic tomography (OHT) is an emerging technology to im¬age the subsurface. This method utilizes the idea of imposing sinusoidally varying pressure or discharge signals at several points, collecting head observations at several other points, and then processing these data in a tomographic fashion to estimate conductivity and storage coefficients. After an overview of the methodology, including a description of the most important potential advantages and challenges associated with this approach, two key promising features of the approach will be discussed. First, the signal at an observation point is orthogonal to and thus can be separated from nuisance inputs like head fluctuation from production wells, evapotranspiration, irrigation, and changes in the level of adjacent streams. Second, although the signal amplitude may be weak, one can extract the phase and amplitude of the os¬cillatory signal by collecting measurements over a longer time, thus compensating for the effect of large distance through longer sampling period.

  17. Ultrasound process tomography system for hydrocyclones

    PubMed

    Schlaberg; Podd; Hoyle

    2000-03-01

    The implementation of a laboratory-based ultrasound tomography system to an industrial process application is not straightforward. In the present work, a tomography system with 16 transducers has been applied to an industrial 50 mm hydrocyclone to visualize its air-core size and position. Hydrocyclones are used to separate fine particles from a slurry. The efficiency of the separation process depends on the size of the air core within the cyclone. If the core is too large due to spigot wear, there will be a detrimental effect on the slurry throughput. Conversely, if the throughput is increased to an extent where the air core becomes unstable or disappears, the particle separation will no longer take place, and the processed batches may become contaminated. Ultrasound tomography presents a very good tool with which to visualize the size, position and movement of the air core and monitor its behaviour under varying input parameters. Ultimately, it could be used within this application both to control the input flow rate depending on the air core size and to detect spigot wear. This paper describes the development of an ultrasonic tomography system applied to an instrumented hydrocyclone. Time-of-flight data are captured by a dedicated acquisition system that pre-processes the information using a DSP and transfers the results to a PC via a fast serial link. The hardware of the tomography system is described, and cursory results are presented in the form of reconstructed images of the air core within the hydrocyclone.

  18. Double-difference adjoint seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yanhua O.; Simons, Frederik J.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a `double-difference' method for the inversion for seismic wave speed structure based on adjoint tomography. Differences between seismic observations and model predictions at individual stations may arise from factors other than structural heterogeneity, such as errors in the assumed source-time function, inaccurate timings and systematic uncertainties. To alleviate the corresponding non-uniqueness in the inverse problem, we construct differential measurements between stations, thereby reducing the influence of the source signature and systematic errors. We minimize the discrepancy between observations and simulations in terms of the differential measurements made on station pairs. We show how to implement the double-difference concept in adjoint tomography, both theoretically and practically. We compare the sensitivities of absolute and differential measurements. The former provide absolute information on structure along the ray paths between stations and sources, whereas the latter explain relative (and thus higher resolution) structural variations in areas close to the stations. Whereas in conventional tomography a measurement made on a single earthquake-station pair provides very limited structural information, in double-difference tomography one earthquake can actually resolve significant details of the structure. The double-difference methodology can be incorporated into the usual adjoint tomography workflow by simply pairing up all conventional measurements; the computational cost of the necessary adjoint simulations is largely unaffected. Rather than adding to the computational burden, the inversion of double-difference measurements merely modifies the construction of the adjoint sources for data assimilation.

  19. Capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids for downstream cryo-electron microscopy applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron microscopy cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography are essential techniques used for characterizing basic virus morphology and determining the three-dimensional structure of viruses. Enveloped viruses, which contain an outer lipoprotein coat, constitute the largest group of pa...

  20. The Dark Side of EDX Tomography: Modeling Detector Shadowing to Aid 3D Elemental Signal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Catriona S M; Rossouw, David; Saghi, Zineb; Burdet, Pierre; Leary, Rowan K; Midgley, Paul A

    2015-06-01

    A simple model is proposed to account for the loss of collected X-ray signal by the shadowing of X-ray detectors in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The model is intended to aid the analysis of three-dimensional elemental data sets acquired using energy-dispersive X-ray tomography methods where shadow-free specimen holders are unsuitable or unavailable. The model also provides a useful measure of the detection system geometry.