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Sample records for electron transfer model

  1. A Simple Marcus-Theory Type Model for Hydrogen Atom Transfer/Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mayer, James M

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen atom transfer reactions are the simplest class of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes. These reactions involve transfer of one electron and one proton from one reagent to another, in the same kinetic step: XH + Y → X + HY. A predictive model for these reactions based on the Marcus cross relation is described. The model predicts rate constants within one or two orders of magnitude in most cases, over a very wide range of reactants and solvents. This remarkable result implies a surprising generality of the additivity postulate for the reaction intrinsic barriers, and a smaller role for the quantum mechanical details of the proton and electron transfers.

  2. A polaron model for electron transfer in globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D

    1993-07-07

    Polaron models have been considered for the electron states in protein globules existing in a solvent. These models account for two fundamental effects, viz, polarization interaction of an electron with the conformational vibrations and the heterogeneity of the medium. Equations have been derived to determine the electron state in a protein globule. The parameters of this state show that it is an extended state with an energy of 2 eV. The electron transfer rate for cyt C self-exchange reaction has been calculated in the polaron model. Reorganization energy, tunneling matrix element and the rate constant have also been estimated. The results are compared with experimental data. The influence of model parameters on the significance of the data obtained has been studied. The potentialities of the model are discussed.

  3. Long-range electron transfer in a model for DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, R. G.; Cox, D. L.

    2001-03-01

    Long-range electron transfer (ET) between well separated donor (D) and acceptor (A) sites through quantum mechanical tunneling is essential to many biological processes like respiration, photosynthesis and possibly DNA repair and damage. We are investigating the distance dependence of the electronic transition matrix element H_DA and hence of the electron transfer rate in a model for DNA. Fluorescence quenching in DNA at D-A distances of 40 Åand more suggests ET with an unusually high decay length β-1 of order 10 Å (S.O.Kelley and J.K.Barton, in:Metal Ions in Biological Systems), A.Sigel and H.Sigel, Eds., Marcel Dekker, New York, Vol.36, 1999. Assuming strong electron interactions on the D complex and suitable energetics, this could be explained by formation of a many electron Kondo boundstate. We obtain H_DA from the splitting between the two lowest adiabatic electronic eigenenergies, which constitute the potential energy surfaces (PES) of the nuclear motion in lowest order Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The PES are constructed by coupling D and A to local breathing modes and by making a semi-analytical variational ansatz for the adiabatic eigenstates. The results from the PES are compared with results from the Mulliken-Hush algorithm.

  4. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  5. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN BIOFILMS

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-12

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  6. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-11-28

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as their terminal electron acceptor for metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce components requisite for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates both diffusion- and conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found the literature. Our simulation results showed that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct measurements and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that cyclic and squarewave voltammetry are currently not good tools to determine the specific percentage of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms used by biofilms. The developed model will be a critical tool in designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  7. Molecular structures of porphyrin-quinone models for electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fajer, J.; Barkigia, K.M.; Melamed, D.; Sweet, R.M.; Kurreck, H.; Gersdorff, J. von; Plato, M.; Rohland, H.C.; Elger, G.; Moebius, K.

    1996-08-15

    Synthetic porphyrin-quinone complexes are commonly used to mimic electron transport in photosynthetic reaction centers and to probe the effects of energetics, distances, and relative orientations on rates of electron transfer between donor-acceptor couples. The structures of two such models have been determined by X-ray diffraction. The redox pairs consist of a zinc porphyrin covalently linked to benzoquinone in cis and trans configurations via a cyclohexanediyl bridge. The crystallographic studies were undertaken to provide a structural foundation for the extensive body of experimental and theoretical results that exists for these compounds in both the ground and photoinduced charge-separated states. The results validate conclusions reached from theoretical calculations, EPR and two-dimensional NMR results for these states. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. REFLECTIONS ON THE TWO-STATE ELECTRON TRANSFER MODEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Brunschwig, B.S.

    2000-01-12

    There is general agreement that the two most important factors determining electron transfer rates in solution are the degree of electronic interaction between the donor and acceptor sites, and the changes in the nuclear configurations of the donor, acceptor, and surrounding medium that occur upon the gain or loss of an electron Ll-51. The electronic interaction of the sites will be very weak, and the electron transfer slow, when the sites are far apart or their interaction is symmetry or spin forbidden. Since electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion, energy conservation requires that, prior to the actual electron transfer, the nuclear configurations of the reactants and the surrounding medium adjust from their equilibrium values to a configuration (generally) intermediate between that of the reactants and products. In the case of electron transfer between , two metal complexes in a polar solvent, the nuclear configuration changes involve adjustments in the metal-ligand and intraligand bond lengths and angles, and changes in the orientations of the surrounding solvent molecules. In common with ordinary chemical reactions, an electron transfer reaction can then be described in terms of the motion of the system on an energy surface from the reactant equilibrium configuration (initial state) to the product equilibrium configuration (final state) via the activated complex (transition state) configuration.

  9. Ions interacting with planar aromatic molecules: Modeling electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, B. O.; Alexander, J. D.; Chen, T.; Pettersson, A. T.; Gatchell, M.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2013-02-07

    We present theoretical absolute charge exchange cross sections for multiply charged cations interacting with the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules pyrene C{sub 14}H{sub 10}, coronene C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, or circumcoronene C{sub 54}H{sub 18}. These planar, nearly circular, PAHs are modelled as conducting, infinitely thin, and perfectly circular discs, which are randomly oriented with respect to straight line ion trajectories. We present the analytical solution for the potential energy surface experienced by an electron in the field of such a charged disc and a point-charge at an arbitrary position. The location and height of the corresponding potential energy barrier from this simple model are in close agreement with those from much more computationally demanding Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in a number of test cases. The model results compare favourably with available experimental data on single- and multiple electron transfer reactions and we demonstrate that it is important to include the orientation dependent polarizabilities of the molecules (model discs) in particular for the larger PAHs. PAH ionization energy sequences from DFT are tabulated and used as model inputs. Absolute cross sections for the ionization of PAH molecules, and PAH ionization energies such as the ones presented here may be useful when considering the roles of PAHs and their ions in, e.g., interstellar chemistry, stellar atmospheres, and in related photoabsorption and photoemission spectroscopies.

  10. A framework for modeling electroactive microbial biofilms performing direct electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Korth, Benjamin; Rosa, Luis F M; Harnisch, Falk; Picioreanu, Cristian

    2015-12-01

    A modeling platform for microbial electrodes based on electroactive microbial biofilms performing direct electron transfer (DET) is presented. Microbial catabolism and anabolism were coupled with intracellular and extracellular electron transfer, leading to biofilm growth and current generation. The model includes homogeneous electron transfer from cells to a conductive biofilm component, biofilm matrix conduction, and heterogeneous electron transfer to the electrode. Model results for Geobacter based anodes, both at constant electrode potential and in voltammetric (dynamic electrode potential) conditions, were compared to experimental data from different sources. The model can satisfactorily describe microscale (concentration, pH and redox gradients) and macroscale (electric currents, biofilm thickness) properties of Geobacter biofilms. The concentration of electrochemically accessible redox centers, here denominated as cytochromes, involved in the extracellular electron transfer, plays the key role and may differ between constant potential (300 mM) and dynamic potential (3mM) conditions. Model results also indicate that the homogeneous and heterogeneous electron transfer rates have to be within the same order of magnitude (1.2 s(-1)) for reversible extracellular electron transfer.

  11. Directionality of electron-transfer reactions in photosystem I of prokaryotes: universality of the bidirectional electron-transfer model.

    PubMed

    Santabarbara, Stefano; Kuprov, Ilya; Poluektov, Oleg; Casal, Antonio; Russell, Charlotte A; Purton, Saul; Evans, Michael C W

    2010-11-25

    The electron-transfer (ET) reactions in photosystem I (PS I) of prokaryotes have been investigated in wild-type cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and in two site-directed mutants in which the methionine residue of the reaction center subunits PsaA and PsaB, which acts as the axial ligand to the primary electron chlorophyll acceptor A(0), was substituted with histidine. Analysis by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy at 100 K indicates the presence of two forms of the secondary spin-correlated radical pairs, which are assigned to [P(700)(+)A(1A)(-)] and [P(700)(+)A(1B)(-)], where A(1A) and A(1B) are the phylloquinone molecules bound to the PsaA and the PsaB reaction center subunits, respectively. Each of the secondary radical pair forms is selectively observed in either the PsaA-M688H or the PsaB-M668H mutant, whereas both radical pairs are observed in the wild type following reduction of the iron-sulfur cluster F(X), the intermediate electron acceptor between A(1) and the terminal acceptors F(A) and F(B). Analysis of the time and spectral dependence of the light-induced electron spin echo allows the resolution of structural differences between the [P(700)(+)A(1A)(-)] and [P(700)(+)A(1B)(-)] radical pairs. The interspin distance is 25.43 ± 0.01 Å for [P(700)(+)A(1A)(-)] and 24.25 ± 0.01 Å for [P(700)(+)A(1B)(-)]. Moreover, the relative orientation of the interspin vector is rotated by ~60° with respect to the g-tensor of the P(700)(+) radical. These estimates are in agreement with the crystallographic structural model, indicating that the cofactors bound to both reaction center subunits of prokaryotic PS I are actively involved in electron transport. This work supports the model that bidirectionality is a general property of type I reaction centers from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and contrasts with the situation for photosystem II and other type II reaction centers, in which ET is strongly asymmetric. A revised model

  12. Model for primary electron transfer and coupling of electronic states at reaction centers of purple bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    A detailed derivation is presented for relations making it possible to describe the effect of temperature on the halfwidth of the P960 and P870 absorption bands and also on the electron transfer (ET) rate at reaction centers (RCs) of the purple bacteria Rps. viridis and Rb. sphaeroides. Primary electron transfer is considered as a resonant nonradiative transition between P* and P+B L - states (where P is a special pair, BL is an additional bacteriochlorophyll in the L branch of the reaction center). It has been shown that the vibrational hα mode with frequency 130 150 cm-1 controls primary electron transfer. It has been found that the matrix element of the electronic transition between the states P* and P+B L - is equal to 12.7 ± 0.9 and 12.0 ± 1.2 cm-1 for Rps. viridis and Rb. sphaeroides respectively. The mechanism is discussed for electron transport from P* and BL and then to bacteriopheophytin HL.

  13. Classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes resonance effects in electronic-vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, Ann E.; Ali, Dominic P.; Miller, William H.

    1981-02-01

    In this paper, a classical model for electronically non-adiabatic collision processes is applied to E → V energy transfer in a collinear system, A + BC (v = 1) → A* + BC (v = 0), resembling Br-H2. Finally, the model, which treats electronic as well as translational, rotational, and vibrational degrees of freedom by classical mechanics, describes the resonance features in this process reasonably well.

  14. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Biology: Results from Synergistic Studies in Natural and Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Steven Y.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) underpins energy conversion in biology. PCET may occur with the unidirectional or bidirectional transfer of a proton and electron and may proceed synchronously or asynchronously. To illustrate the role of PCET in biology, this review presents complementary biological and model systems that explore PCET in electron transfer (ET) through hydrogen bonds [azurin as compared to donor-acceptor (D–A) hydrogen-bonded networks], the activation of C–H bonds [alcohol dehydrogenase and soybean lipoxygenase (SLO) as compared to Fe(III) metal complexes], and the generation and transport of amino acid radicals [photosystem II (PSII) and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR)as compared to tyrosine-modified photoactive Re(I) and Ru(II) complexes]. In providing these comparisons, the fundamental principles of PCET in biology are illustrated in a tangible way. PMID:19344235

  15. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    SciTech Connect

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We

  16. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mourokh, Lev G.; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-01

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  17. Generalized Holstein model for spin-dependent electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Ai, Qing; Sun, C. P.

    2012-03-01

    Some chemical reactions are described by electron transfer (ET) processes. The underlying mechanism could be modeled as a polaron motion in the molecular crystal—the Holstein model. By taking spin degrees of freedom into consideration, we generalize the Holstein model (molecular crystal model) to microscopically describe an ET chemical reaction. In our model, the electron spins in the radical pair simultaneously interact with a magnetic field and their nuclear-spin environments. By virtue of the perturbation approach, we obtain the chemical reaction rates for different initial states. It is discovered that the chemical reaction rate of the triplet state demonstrates its dependence on the direction of the magnetic field while the counterpart of the singlet state does not. This difference is attributed to the explicit dependence of the triplet state on the direction when the axis is rotated. Our model may provide a possible candidate for the microscopic origin of the avian compass.

  18. A modeling approach to direct interspecies electron transfer process in anaerobic transformation of ethanol to methane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhou, Junliang; Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) plays an important part in contributing to methane production from anaerobic digestion. However, so far anaerobic digestion models that have been proposed only consider two pathways for methane production, namely, acetoclastic methanogenesis and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, via indirect interspecies hydrogen transfer, which lacks an effective way for incorporating DIET into this paradigm. In this work, a new mathematical model is specifically developed to describe DIET process in anaerobic digestion through introducing extracellular electron transfer as a new pathway for methane production, taking anaerobic transformation of ethanol to methane as an example. The developed model was able to successfully predict experimental data on methane dynamics under different experimental conditions, supporting the validity of the developed model. Modeling predictions clearly demonstrated that DIET plays an important role in contributing to overall methane production (up to 33 %) and conductive material (i.e., carbon cloth) addition would significantly promote DIET through increasing ethanol conversion rate and methane production rate. The model developed in this work will potentially enhance our current understanding on syntrophic metabolism via DIET.

  19. Control of interspecies electron transfer flow during anaerobic digestion: dynamic diffusion reaction models for hydrogen gas transfer in microbial flocs.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, S S; Palsson, B O; Thiele, J H

    1989-02-05

    Dynamic reaction diffusion models were used to analyze the consequences of aggregation for syntrophic reactions in methanogenic ecosystems. Flocs from a whey digestor were used to measure all model parameters under the in situ conditions of a particular defined biological system. Fermentation simulations without adjustable parameters could precisely predict the kinetics of H(2) gas production of digestor flocs during syntrophic methanogenesis from ethanol. The results demonstrated a kinetic compartmentalization of H(2) metabolism inside the flocs. The interspecies electron transfer reaction was mildly diffusion controlled. The H(2) gas profiles across the flocs showed high H (2) concentrations inside the flocs at any time. Simulations of the syntrophic metabolism at low substrate concentrations such as in digestors or sediments showed that it is impossible to achieve high H(2) gas turnovers at simultaneously low steady-state H(2) concentrations. This showed a mechanistic contradiction in the concept of postulated low H(2) microenvironments for the anaerobic digestion process. The results of the computer experiments support the conclusion that syntrophic H(2) production may only be a side reaction of H(2) independent interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic ecosystems.

  20. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  1. Doping Dependent Charge Transfer Gap and Realistic Electronic Model of n-type Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, T.

    2010-05-03

    Based on the analysis of the measurement data of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and optics, we show that the charge transfer gap is significantly smaller than the optical one and is reduced by doping in electron doped cuprate superconductors. This leads to a strong charge fluctuation between the Zhang-Rice singlet and the upper Hubbard bands. The basic model for describing this system is a hybridized two-band t-J model. In the symmetric limit where the corresponding intra- and inter-band hopping integrals are equal to each other, this two-band model is equivalent to the Hubbard model with an antiferromagnetic exchange interaction (i.e. the t-U-J model). The mean-field result of the t-U-J model gives a good account for the doping evolution of the Fermi surface and the staggered magnetization.

  2. Two-Electron Transfer Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiaxing; Balamurugan, D; Zhang, Peng; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2015-06-18

    The frontiers of electron-transfer chemistry demand that we develop theoretical frameworks to describe the delivery of multiple electrons, atoms, and ions in molecular systems. When electrons move over long distances through high barriers, where the probability for thermal population of oxidized or reduced bridge-localized states is very small, the electrons will tunnel from the donor (D) to acceptor (A), facilitated by bridge-mediated superexchange interactions. If the stable donor and acceptor redox states on D and A differ by two electrons, it is possible that the electrons will propagate coherently from D to A. While structure-function relations for single-electron superexchange in molecules are well established, strategies to manipulate the coherent flow of multiple electrons are largely unknown. In contrast to one-electron superexchange, two-electron superexchange involves both one- and two-electron virtual intermediate states, the number of virtual intermediates increases very rapidly with system size, and multiple classes of pathways interfere with one another. In the study described here, we developed simple superexchange models for two-electron transfer. We explored how the bridge structure and energetics influence multielectron superexchange, and we compared two-electron superexchange interactions to single-electron superexchange. Multielectron superexchange introduces interference between singly and doubly oxidized (or reduced) bridge virtual states, so that even simple linear donor-bridge-acceptor systems have pathway topologies that resemble those seen for one-electron superexchange through bridges with multiple parallel pathways. The simple model systems studied here exhibit a richness that is amenable to experimental exploration by manipulating the multiple pathways, pathway crosstalk, and changes in the number of donor and acceptor species. The features that emerge from these studies may assist in developing new strategies to deliver multiple

  3. Modeling the free energy surfaces of electron transfer in condensed phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2000-10-01

    We develop a three-parameter model of electron transfer (ET) in condensed phases based on the Hamiltonian of a two-state solute linearly coupled to a harmonic, classical solvent mode with different force constants in the initial and final states (a classical limit of the quantum Kubo-Toyozawa model). The exact analytical solution for the ET free energy surfaces demonstrates the following features: (i) the range of ET reaction coordinates is limited by a one-sided fluctuation band, (ii) the ET free energies are infinite outside the band, and (iii) the free energy surfaces are parabolic close to their minima and linear far from the minima positions. The model provides an analytical framework to map physical phenomena conflicting with the Marcus-Hush two-parameter model of ET. Nonlinear solvation, ET in polarizable charge-transfer complexes, and configurational flexibility of donor-acceptor complexes are successfully mapped onto the model. The present theory leads to a significant modification of the energy gap law for ET reactions.

  4. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/kBT where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 < 1 - 3) and for low (ξ0 ≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually

  5. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/k(B)T where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 < 1 - 3) and for low (ξ0 ≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually

  6. Molecular dynamics and charge transport in organic semiconductors: a classical approach to modeling electron transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Ratcliff, Laura E.; ...

    2017-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are a promising carbon-neutral energy conversion technology, with recent improvements pushing power conversion efficiencies over 10%. A major factor limiting OPV performance is inefficiency of charge transport in organic semiconducting materials (OSCs). Due to strong coupling with lattice degrees of freedom, the charges form polarons, localized quasi-particles comprised of charges dressed with phonons. These polarons can be conceptualized as pseudo-atoms with a greater effective mass than a bare charge. Here we propose that due to this increased mass, polarons can be modeled with Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD), a classical approach with a computational cost much lower thanmore » most quantum mechanical methods. Here we present LMD simulations of charge transfer between a pair of fullerene molecules, which commonly serve as electron acceptors in OSCs. We find transfer rates consistent with experimental measurements of charge mobility, suggesting that this method may provide quantitative predictions of efficiency when used to simulate materials on the device scale. Our approach also offers information that is not captured in the overall transfer rate or mobility: in the simulation data, we observe exactly when and why intermolecular transfer events occur. In addition, we demonstrate that these simulations can shed light on the properties of polarons in OSCs. In conclusion, much remains to be learned about these quasi-particles, and there are no widely accepted methods for calculating properties such as effective mass and friction. Lastly, our model offers a promising approach to exploring mass and friction as well as providing insight into the details of polaron transport in OSCs.« less

  7. Molecular dynamics and charge transport in organic semiconductors: a classical approach to modeling electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M.; Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Ratcliff, Laura E.; Tretiak, Sergei; Bair, Raymond A.; Gray, Stephen K.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Larsen, Ross E.; Darling, Seth B.

    2017-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are a promising carbon-neutral energy conversion technology, with recent improvements pushing power conversion efficiencies over 10%. A major factor limiting OPV performance is inefficiency of charge transport in organic semiconducting materials (OSCs). Due to strong coupling with lattice degrees of freedom, the charges form polarons, localized quasi-particles comprised of charges dressed with phonons. These polarons can be conceptualized as pseudo-atoms with a greater effective mass than a bare charge. Here we propose that due to this increased mass, polarons can be modeled with Langevin molecular dynamics (LMD), a classical approach with a computational cost much lower than most quantum mechanical methods. Here we present LMD simulations of charge transfer between a pair of fullerene molecules, which commonly serve as electron acceptors in OSCs. We find transfer rates consistent with experimental measurements of charge mobility, suggesting that this method may provide quantitative predictions of efficiency when used to simulate materials on the device scale. Our approach also offers information that is not captured in the overall transfer rate or mobility: in the simulation data, we observe exactly when and why intermolecular transfer events occur. In addition, we demonstrate that these simulations can shed light on the properties of polarons in OSCs. In conclusion, much remains to be learned about these quasi-particles, and there are no widely accepted methods for calculating properties such as effective mass and friction. Lastly, our model offers a promising approach to exploring mass and friction as well as providing insight into the details of polaron transport in OSCs.

  8. Model of convection mass transfer in titanium alloy at low energy high current electron beam action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The convection mixing model is proposed for low-energy high-current electron beam treatment of titanium alloys, pre-processed by heterogeneous plasma flows generated via explosion of carbon tape and powder TiB2. The model is based on the assumption vortices in the molten layer are formed due to the treatment by concentrated energy flows. These vortices evolve as the result of thermocapillary convection, arising because of the temperature gradient. The calculation of temperature gradient and penetration depth required solution of the heat problem with taking into account the surface evaporation. However, instead of the direct heat source the boundary conditions in phase transitions were changed in the thermal conductivity equation, assuming the evaporated material takes part in the heat exchange. The data on the penetration depth and temperature distribution are used for the thermocapillary model. The thermocapillary model embraces Navier-Stocks and convection heat transfer equations, as well as the boundary conditions with the outflow of evaporated material included. The solution of these equations by finite elements methods pointed at formation of a multi-vortices structure when electron-beam treatment and its expansion over new zones of material. As the result, strengthening particles are found at the depth exceeding manifold their penetration depth in terms of the diffusion mechanism.

  9. Model system-bath Hamiltonian and nonadiabatic rate constants for proton-coupled electron transfer at electrode-solution interfaces.

    PubMed

    Navrotskaya, Irina; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2008-06-28

    An extension of the Anderson-Newns-Schmickler model for electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is presented. This model describes reactions in which electron transfer between a solute complex in solution and an electrode is coupled to proton transfer within the solute complex. The model Hamiltonian is derived in a basis of electron-proton vibronic states defined within a double adiabatic approximation for the electrons, transferring proton, and bath modes. The interaction term responsible for electronic transitions between the solute complex and the electrode depends on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode within the solute complex. This model Hamiltonian is used to derive the anodic and cathodic rate constants for nonadiabatic electrochemical PCET. The derivation is based on the master equations for the reduced density matrix of the electron-proton subsystem, which includes the electrons of the solute complex and the electrode, as well as the transferring proton. The rate constant expressions differ from analogous expressions for electrochemical electron transfer because of the summation over electron-proton vibronic states and the dependence of the couplings on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. These differences lead to additional contributions to the total reorganization energy, an additional exponential temperature-dependent prefactor, and a temperature-dependent term in the effective activation energy that has different signs for the anodic and cathodic processes. This model can be generalized to describe both nonadiabatic and adiabatic electrochemical PCET reactions and provides the framework for the inclusion of additional effects, such as the breaking and forming of other chemical bonds.

  10. Electronic energy transfer in model photosynthetic systems: Markovian vs. non-Markovian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navinder; Brumer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    A simple numerical algorithm for solving the non-Markovian master equation in the second Born approximation is developed and used to propagate the traditional dimer system that models electronic energy transfer in photosynthetic systems. Specifically, the coupled integro-differential equations for the reduced density matrix are solved by an efficient auxiliary function method in both the energy and site representations. In addition to giving exact results to this order, the approach allows us to access the range of the reorganization energy and decay rates of the phonon auto-correlation function for which the Markovian Redfield theory and the second-order approximation is useful. For example, the use of Redfield theory for lambda > 10 cm(-1) in Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) type systems is shown to be fundamentally inaccurate.

  11. Tunneling Current of Electron in Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Bipolar Transistor Model Using Transfer Matrix Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, A. K.; Hasanah, L.; Rusdiana, D.; Aminudin, A.; Suhendi, E.

    2017-03-01

    The tunneling current of n-p-n bipolar junction transistor AGNR-based is modeled with semi-numerical method. The exponential solution from Schrödinger equation is used and solved analytically. The potential profile of n-p-n BJT divided into several segments in the numerical method. Then, the solved analytical result is used in the numerical method to compute the electron transmittance. Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) is the numerical method used to compute the electron transmittance. From the calculated transmittance the tunneling current can be computed by using Landauer formula with aid of Gauss-Legendre Quadrature (GLQ). Next, the tunneling current is computed with several change of variables which are base-emitter voltage (VBE), base-collector voltage (VBC), temperature and the AGNR’s width. The computed tunneling current shows that the larger value of applied voltage for both VBE and VBC results in larger value of tunneling current. At the lower temperature, the current is larger. The computed tunneling current shows that at wider width of AGNR, the current is also larger. This is due to the decreased band-gap energy (Eg) because of the wider width of AGNR.

  12. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    PubMed

    Feist, Adam M; Nagarajan, Harish; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  13. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Adam M.; Nagarajan, Harish; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. PMID:24762737

  14. The ‘porin–cytochrome’ model for microbe-to-mineral electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, David J.; Butt, Julea N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-05-30

    Many species of bacteria can couple anaerobic growth to the respiratory reduction of insoluble minerals containing Fe(III) or Mn(III/IV). It has been suggested that in Shewanella species electrons cross the outer membrane to extracellular substrates via 'porin-cytochrome' electron transport modules. The molecular structure of an outer-membrane extracellular-facing deca-haem terminus for such a module has recently been resolved. It is debated how, once outside the cells, electrons are transferred from outer-membrane cytochromes to insoluble electron sinks. This may occur directly or by assemblies of cytochromes, perhaps functioning as 'nanowires', or via electron shuttles. Here we review recent work in this field and explore whether it allows for unification of the electron transport mechanisms supporting extracellular mineral respiration in Shewanella that may extend into other genera of Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Comparing Fourier optics and contrast transfer function modeling of image formation in low energy electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, K M; Locatelli, A; Altman, M S

    2017-03-24

    A theoretical understanding of image formation in cathode lens microscopy can facilitate image interpretation. We compare Fourier Optics (FO) and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) approaches that were recently adapted from other realms of microscopy to model image formation in low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Although these two approaches incorporate imaging errors from several sources similarly, they differ in the way that the image intensity is calculated. The simplification that is used in the CTF calculation advantageously leads to its computational efficiency. However, we find that lens aberrations, and spatial and temporal coherence may affect the validity of the CTF approach to model LEEM image formation under certain conditions. In particular, these effects depend strongly on the nature of the object being imaged and also become more pronounced with increasing defocus. While the use of the CTF approach appears to be justified for objects that are routinely imaged with LEEM, comparison of theory to experimental observations of a focal image series for rippled, suspended graphene reveals one example where FO works, but CTF does not. This work alerts us to potential pitfalls and guides the effective use of FO and CTF approaches. It also lays the foundation for quantitative image evaluation using these methods.

  16. Photoinduced electron transfer across molecular bridges: electron- and hole-transfer superexchange pathways.

    PubMed

    Natali, Mirco; Campagna, Sebastiano; Scandola, Franco

    2014-06-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer plays key roles in many areas of chemistry. Superexchange is an effective model to rationalize photoinduced electron transfer, particularly when molecular bridges between donor and acceptor subunits are present. In this tutorial review we discuss, within a superexchange framework, the complex role played by the bridge, with an emphasis on differences between thermal and photoinduced electron transfer, oxidative and reductive photoinduced processes, charge separation and charge recombination. Modular bridges are also considered, with specific attention to the distance dependence of donor-acceptor electronic coupling and electron transfer rate constants. The possibility of transition, depending on the bridge energetics, from coherent donor-acceptor electron transfer to incoherent charge injection and hopping through the bridge is also discussed. Finally, conceptual analogies between bridge effects in photoinduced electron transfer and optical intervalence transfer are outlined. Selected experimental examples, instrumental to illustration of the principles, are discussed.

  17. Solvent free energy curves for electron transfer reactions: A nonlinear solvent response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko

    1996-05-01

    Marcus theory for electron transfer assumes a linear response of the solvent so that both the reactant and product free energy curves are parabolic functions of the solvent polarization, each with the same solvent force constant k characterizing the curvature. Simulation data by other workers indicate that the assumption of parabolic free energy curves is good for the Fe2+-Fe3+ self-exchange reaction but that the k of the reactant and product free energy curves are different for the reaction D0+A0→D1-+A1+. However, the fluctuations sampled in these simulations were not large enough to reach the activation barrier region, which was thus treated either by umbrella sampling or by parabolic extrapolation. Here, we present free energy curves calculated from a simple model of ionic solvation developed in an earlier paper by Hyun, Babu, and Ichiye, which we refer to here as the HBI model. The HBI model describes the nonlinearity of the solvent response due to the orientation of polar solvent molecules. Since it is a continuum model, it may be considered the first-order nonlinear correction to the linear response Born model. Moreover, in the limit of zero charge or infinite radius, the Born model and the Marcus relations are recovered. Here, the full free energy curves are calculated using analytic expressions from the HBI model. The HBI reactant and product curves have different k for D0+A0→D1-+A1+ as in the simulations, but examining the full curves shows they are nonparabolic due to the nonlinear response of the solvent. On the other hand, the HBI curves are close to parabolic for the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction, also in agreement with simulations, while those for another self-exchange reaction D0-A1+ show greater deviations from parabolic behavior than the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction. This indicates that transitions from neutral to charged species will have the largest deviations. Thus, the second moment of the polarization is shown to be a measure of the deviation from Marcus

  18. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  19. A stochastic study of electron transfer kinetics in nano-particulate photocatalysis: a comparison of the quasi-equilibrium approximation with a random walking model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoshun; Zhao, Xiujian; Yu, Jiaguo; Fujishima, Akira; Nakata, Kazuya

    2016-11-23

    In the photocatalysis of porous nano-crystalline materials, the transfer of electrons to O2 plays an important role, which includes the electron transport to photocatalytic active centers and successive interfacial transfer to O2. The slowest of them will determine the overall speed of electron transfer in the photocatalysis reaction. Considering the photocatalysis of porous nano-crystalline TiO2 as an example, although some experimental results have shown that the electron kinetics are limited by the interfacial transfer, we still lack the depth of understanding the microscopic mechanism from a theoretical viewpoint. In the present research, a stochastic quasi-equilibrium (QE) theoretical model and a stochastic random walking (RW) model were established to discuss the electron transport and electron interfacial transfer by taking the electron multi-trapping transport and electron interfacial transfer from the photocatalytic active centers to O2 into consideration. By carefully investigating the effect of the electron Fermi level (EF) and the photocatalytic center number on electron transport, we showed that the time taken for an electron to transport to a photocatalytic center predicated by the stochastic RW model was much lower than that predicted by the stochastic QE model, indicating that the electrons cannot reach a QE state during their transport to photocatalytic centers. The stochastic QE model predicted that the electron kinetics of a real photocatalysis for porous nano-crystalline TiO2 should be limited by electron transport, whereas the stochastic RW model showed that the electron kinetics of a real photocatalysis can be limited by the interfacial transfer. Our simulation results show that the stochastic RW model was more in line with the real electron kinetics that have been observed in experiments, therefore it is concluded that the photoinduced electrons cannot reach a QE state before transferring to O2.

  20. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2012-03-01

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  1. Diving into the redox properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens cytochromes: a model for extracellular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Telma C; Silva, Marta A; Morgado, Leonor; Dantas, Joana M; Salgueiro, Carlos A

    2015-05-28

    Geobacter bacteria have a remarkable respiratory versatility that includes the dissimilatory reduction of insoluble metal oxides in natural habitats and electron transfer to electrode surfaces from which electricity can be harvested. In both cases, electrons need to be exported from the cell interior to the exterior via a mechanism designated as extracellular electron transfer (EET). Several c-type cytochromes from G. sulfurreducens (Gs) were identified as key players in this process. Biochemical and biophysical data have been obtained for ten Gs cytochromes, including inner-membrane associated (MacA), periplasmic (PpcA, PpcB, PpcC, PpcD, PpcE and GSU1996) and outer membrane-associated (OmcF, OmcS and OmcZ). The redox properties of these cytochromes have been determined, except for PpcC and GSU1996. In this perspective, the reduction potentials of these two cytochromes were determined by potentiometric redox titrations followed by visible spectroscopy. The data obtained are taken together with those available for other key cytochromes to present a thorough overview of the current knowledge of Gs EET mechanisms and provide a possible rationalization for the existence of several multiheme cytochromes involved in the same respiratory pathways.

  2. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  3. Electron transfer in biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.B.

    1995-12-01

    Electron-transfer reactions are key stemps in photosynthesis, respiration, drug metabolism, and many other biochemical processes. These reactions commonly occur between protein-bound prosthetic groups that are separated by large molecular distances (often greater than 10 {Angstrom}). Although the electron donors and acceptors are expected to be weakly coupled, the reactions are remarkably fast and proceed with high specificity. Recent work on structurally engineered iron and cooper proteins has shown that the chemical bonds in the intervening medium potentially can control the rates of these electron-transfer reactions.

  4. Rate-promoting vibrations and coupled hydrogen-electron transfer reactions in the condensed phase: A model for enzymatic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincer, Joshua S.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2004-04-01

    A model is presented for coupled hydrogen-electron transfer reactions in condensed phase in the presence of a rate promoting vibration. Large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are found when the hydrogen is substituted with deuterium. While these KIEs are essentially temperature independent, reaction rates do exhibit temperature dependence. These findings agree with recent experimental data for various enzyme-catalyzed reactions, such as the amine dehydrogenases and soybean lipoxygenase. Consistent with earlier results, turning off the promoting vibration results in an increased KIE. Increasing the barrier height increases the KIE, while increasing the rate of electron transfer decreases it. These results are discussed in light of other views of vibrationally enhanced tunneling in enzymes.

  5. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, J.D. Jr.; Moore, T.A.

    1988-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. The knowledge gained from the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus can be used to design artificial photosynthetic systems which employ the basic physics and chemistry of photosynthesis to help meet mankind's energy needs. More specifically, the proposed models are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties.

  6. Energetic comparison between photoinduced electron-transfer reactions from NADH model compounds to organic and inorganic oxidants and hydride-transfer reactions from NADH model compounds to p-benzoquinone derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuzumi, S.; Koumitsu, S.; Hironaka, K.; Tanaka, T.

    1987-01-21

    Kinetic studies on photoinduced electron-transfer reactions from dihydropyridine compounds (PyH/sub 2/) as being NADH model compounds to organic and inorganic oxidants and hydride-transfer reactions from PyH/sub 2/ to p-benzoquinone derivatives (Q) in the absence and presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion are reported by determining over 150 rate constants. These results, combined with the values of Gibbs energy change of the photoinduced electron-transfer reactions as well as those of each step of the hydride-transfer reactions as being the e/sup -/-H/sup +/-e/sup -/ sequence, which are determined independently, revealed that the rate constants of the photoinduced electron-transfer reactions obey the Rehm-Weller-Gibbs energy relationship and that the activation barrier of the hydride-transfer reactions from PyH/sub 2/ to Q is dependent solely on the Gibbs energy changes of the initial electron transfer from PyH/sub 2/ to Q and the following proton transfer from PyH/sub 2//sup .+/ to Q/sup .-/ and thus independent of the Gibbs energy change of the final electron transfer from PyH/sup ./ to QH/sup ./. The retarding effect of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion observed on the photoinduced electron transfer and hydride-transfer reactions of PyH/sub 2/ is ascribed to the positive shifts of the redox potentials of the ground and excited states of PyH/sub 2/ due to the complex formation with Mg/sup 2 +/ ion.

  7. Hierarchical modeling of heat transfer in silicon-based electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicochea Pineda, Javier V.

    In this work a methodology for the hierarchical modeling of heat transfer in silicon-based electronic devices is presented. The methodology includes three steps to integrate the different scales involved in the thermal analysis of these devices. The steps correspond to: (i) the estimation of input parameters and thermal properties required to solve the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) for phonons by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, (ii) the quantum correction of some of the properties estimated with MD to make them suitable for BTE and (iii) the numerical solution of the BTE using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) under the single mode relaxation time approximation subject to different initial and boundary conditions, including non-linear dispersion relations and different polarizations in the [100] direction. Each step of the methodology is validated with numerical, analytical or experimental reported data. In the first step of the methodology, properties such as, phonon relaxation times, dispersion relations, group and phase velocities and specific heat are obtained with MD at of 300 and 1000 K (i.e. molecular temperatures). The estimation of the properties considers the anhamonic nature of the potential energy function, including the thermal expansion of the crystal. Both effects are found to modify the dispersion relations with temperature. The behavior of the phonon relaxation times for each mode (i.e. longitudinal and transverse, acoustic and optical phonons) is identified using power functions. The exponents of the acoustic modes are agree with those predicted theoretically perturbation theory at high temperatures, while those for the optical modes are higher. All properties estimated with MD are validated with values for the thermal conductivity obtained from the Green-Kubo method. It is found that the relative contribution of acoustic modes to the overall thermal conductivity is approximately 90% at both temperatures. In the second step

  8. Modeling electron transfer thermodynamics in protein complexes: interaction between two cytochromes c(3).

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Vitor H; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2004-05-01

    Redox protein complexes between type I and type II tetraheme cytochromes c(3) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough are here analyzed using theoretical methodologies. Various complexes were generated using rigid-body docking techniques, and the two lowest energy complexes (1 and 2) were relaxed using molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent and subjected to further characterization. Complex 1 corresponds to an interaction between hemes I from both cytochromes c(3). Complex 2 corresponds to an interaction between the heme IV from type I and the heme I from type II cytochrome c(3). Binding free energy calculations using molecular mechanics, Poisson-Boltzmann, and surface accessibility methods show that complex 2 is more stable than complex 1. Thermodynamic calculations on complex 2 show that complex formation induces changes in the reduction potential of both cytochromes c(3), but the changes are larger in the type I cytochrome c(3) (the largest one occurring on heme IV, of approximately 80 mV). These changes are sufficient to invert the global titration curves of both cytochromes, generating directionally in electron transfer from type I to type II cytochrome c(3), a phenomenon of obvious thermodynamic origin and consequences, but also with kinetic implications. The existence of processes like this occurring at complex formation may constitute a natural design of efficient redox chains.

  9. Extension of Hopfield's Electron Transfer Model To Accommodate Site-Site Correlation.

    PubMed

    Newton, Marshall D

    2015-11-19

    Extension of the Förster analogue for the ET rate constant (based on virtual intermediate electron detachment or attachment states) with inclusion of site-site correlation due to coulomb terms associated with solvent reorganization energy and the driving force, has been developed and illustrated for a simple three-state, two-mode model. The model is applicable to charge separation (CS), recombination (CR), and shift (CSh) ET processes, with or without an intervening bridge. The model provides a unified perspective on the role of virtual intermediate states in accounting for the thermal Franck-Condon weighted density of states (FCWD), the gaps controlling superexchange coupling, and mean absolute redox potentials, with full accommodation of site-site coulomb interactions. Two types of correlation have been analyzed: aside from the site-site correlation due to coulomb interactions, we have emphasized the intrinsic "nonorthogonality" which generally pertains to reaction coordinates (RCs) for different ET processes involving multiple electronic states, as may be expressed by suitably defined direction cosines (cos(θ)). A pair of RCs may be nonorthogonal even when the site-site coulomb correlations are absent. While different RCs are linearly independent in the mathematical sense for all θ ≠ 0°, they are independent in the sense of being "uncorrelated" only in the limit of orthogonality (θ = 90°). Application to more than two coordinates is straightforward and may include both discrete and continuum contributions.

  10. Extension of Hopfield’s Electron Transfer Model To Accommodate Site–Site Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Marshall D.

    2015-10-26

    Extension of the Förster analogue for the ET rate constant (based on virtual intermediate electron detachment or attachment states) with inclusion of site–site correlation due to coulomb terms associated with solvent reorganization energy and the driving force, has been developed and illustrated for a simple three-state, two-mode model. Furthermore, the model is applicable to charge separation (CS), recombination (CR), and shift (CSh) ET processes, with or without an intervening bridge. The model provides a unified perspective on the role of virtual intermediate states in accounting for the thermal Franck–Condon weighted density of states (FCWD), the gaps controlling superexchange coupling, and mean absolute redox potentials, with full accommodation of site–site coulomb interactions. We analyzed two types of correlation: aside from the site–site correlation due to coulomb interactions, we have emphasized the intrinsic “nonorthogonality” which generally pertains to reaction coordinates (RCs) for different ET processes involving multiple electronic states, as may be expressed by suitably defined direction cosines (cos(θ)). A pair of RCs may be nonorthogonal even when the site–site coulomb correlations are absent. While different RCs are linearly independent in the mathematical sense for all θ ≠ 0°, they are independent in the sense of being “uncorrelated” only in the limit of orthogonality (θ = 90°). There is application to more than two coordinates is straightforward and may include both discrete and continuum contributions.

  11. Extension of Hopfield’s Electron Transfer Model To Accommodate Site–Site Correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Newton, Marshall D.

    2015-10-26

    Extension of the Förster analogue for the ET rate constant (based on virtual intermediate electron detachment or attachment states) with inclusion of site–site correlation due to coulomb terms associated with solvent reorganization energy and the driving force, has been developed and illustrated for a simple three-state, two-mode model. Furthermore, the model is applicable to charge separation (CS), recombination (CR), and shift (CSh) ET processes, with or without an intervening bridge. The model provides a unified perspective on the role of virtual intermediate states in accounting for the thermal Franck–Condon weighted density of states (FCWD), the gaps controlling superexchange coupling, andmore » mean absolute redox potentials, with full accommodation of site–site coulomb interactions. We analyzed two types of correlation: aside from the site–site correlation due to coulomb interactions, we have emphasized the intrinsic “nonorthogonality” which generally pertains to reaction coordinates (RCs) for different ET processes involving multiple electronic states, as may be expressed by suitably defined direction cosines (cos(θ)). A pair of RCs may be nonorthogonal even when the site–site coulomb correlations are absent. While different RCs are linearly independent in the mathematical sense for all θ ≠ 0°, they are independent in the sense of being “uncorrelated” only in the limit of orthogonality (θ = 90°). There is application to more than two coordinates is straightforward and may include both discrete and continuum contributions.« less

  12. A phenomenological model of dynamical arrest of electron transfer in solvents in the glass-transition region

    SciTech Connect

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2005-02-22

    A phenomenological model of electron transfer reactions in solvents undergoing glass transition is discussed. The reaction constant cuts off slow polarization modes from the spectrum of nuclear thermal motions active on the observation time scale. The arrest of nuclear solvation in turn affects the reaction activation barrier making it dependent on the rate. The resultant rate constant is sought from a self-consistent equation. The model describes well the sharp change in the solvent Stokes shift of optical lines in the glass-transition region. It is also applied to describe the temperature dependence of primary charge separation and reduction of primary pair in photosynthetic reaction centers. The model shows that a weak dependence of the primary charge separation rate on temperature can be explained by dynamical arrest of nuclear solvation on the picosecond time scale of electron transfer. For reduction of primary pair by cytochrome, the model yields a sharp turnover of the reaction kinetics at the transition temperature when nuclear solvation freezes in.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II.

    1991-12-01

    Long range photoinduced electron transfer between electron donor and acceptor groups is of considerable current interest in terms of strategies for artificial photosynthesis and studies regarding the redox properties of proteins. As part of an extensive study of long range electron transfer involving biopolymers, we have carried out this year investigations of the assembly of electron transfer agents in a system of model short peptides. Also studied is a polyelectrolyte that can adopt a helical conformation when electrostatically complexed with organic dye counter-ions. The principal interest in these systems has to do with the well ordered secondary structures adopted by peptide polymers, and the capabilities for synthetic modification of peptide side chains and end groups with chromophores or electroactive substituents. The present report gives a brief account of the following elements of work related to photochemical electron transfer themes: (1) the synthesis and photochemical characterization of chromophore-bound peptides and amino acid model compounds based on the amino acids, tryptophan and the spacer residue, alanine (Ala); (2) the study of binding of the cationic organic dye to a peptide electrolyte, for which cooperative dye loading and helix formation is important; and (3) completion of the synthesis of a new series of acridinium chromophores that have rod-like'' arrangements of inked aryl rings for assembly of electron donor-acceptor systems that will exhibit especially long lived charge separation.

  14. 75 FR 31665 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... CFR Part 205 Electronic Fund Transfers AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System..., which implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, and the official staff commentary to the regulation... implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (EFTA), limiting a financial institution's ability to assess...

  15. Electron transfer and energy transfer through bridged systems. I. Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, J. R.; Hush, N. S.

    1989-07-01

    A time-dependent formalism is developed for reactions in which energy (vibrational or electronic excitation, electron or hole transfer, etc.) is transferred coherently between centres through a bridge. This approach is inspired by the Robinson and Frosch model of energy transfer within two-level systems. This formalism yields a completely general algorithm which, in particular limits, reduces to a generalised form of both Fermi's golden rule and Rabi's rate equation, and, in so doing, unifies many existing theories. It is shown that, only in the limit of the bridge states being non-resonant with the initial and final states, can the full problem be represented by an effective two-level model. Existing methods based upon Löwdin diagonalization are shown to be appropriate only when this limit applies, and ambiguities which arise from the ad hoc nature of these methods are resolved. Also, it is typically only in this limit that the transfer of energy proceeds exponentially in time and can be described by a simple single-parameter rate constant. Only problems which can be modelled using a single set of quantum numbers are treated in this paper. Applications and more general problems are treated in subsequent papers.

  16. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  17. Design and syntheses of electron-transfer photochromic metal-organic complexes using nonphotochromic ligands: a model compound and the roles of its ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Juan; Chen, Zi-Wei; Lin, Rong-Guang; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Li, Pei-Xin; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2014-01-21

    The model compound [Zn(HCOO)2(4,4'-bipy)] (1; 4,4'-bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine) is selected in this work to demonstrate the effectiveness of our previously proposed design strategy for electron-transfer photochromic metal-organic complexes. The electron-transfer photochromic behavior of 1 has been discovered for the first time. Experimental and theoretical data illustrate that the photochromism of 1 can be attributed to the electron transfer from formato to 4,4'-bipy and the formation of a radical photoproduct. The electron transfer prefers to occur between formato and 4,4'-bipy, which are combined directly by the Zn(II) atoms. A high-contrast (up to 8.3 times) photoluminescence switch occurs during the photochromic process. The similarity of photochromic behaviors among 1 and its analogues as well as viologen compounds has also been found. Photochromic studies of this model compound indicate that new electron-transfer photochromic metal-organic complexes can be largely designed and synthesized by the rational assembly of nonphotochromic electron-donating and electron-accepting ligands.

  18. Solvent gating of intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M. ); Spears, K.G.; Gong, J.H.; Wach, M. )

    1994-02-03

    The rates for ionic photodissociation of malachite green leucocyanide to form cyanide ion and a malachite green carbonium ion were measured as a function of solvent and temperature. The observed rates in mixtures of polar and nonpolar solvents all had an activation energy of about 1 kcal/mol for a wide range of dielectric constants. This dissociative intramolecular electron transfer (DIET) is unusual because it is the first example where solvent configurational entropy changes are required to enable a large amplitude molecular distortion leading to a nonadiabatic electron transfer and ionic dissociation. This solvent gated intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism is supported by analysis of the preexponential and activation energy trends in dipolar aprotic solven mixtures and alcohol solvents. The large amplitude motion is not separately measurable due to the slow gating rates, but viscosity effects on both the preexponential and the activation energy are analyzed to demonstrate consistency with a barrierless diffusion model having a structural dependence on electron-transfer rate. The rate has an inverse dependence on viscosity raised to the 0.53 power. 36 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Estimates of electronic coupling for excess electron transfer in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2005-07-01

    Electronic coupling Vda is one of the key parameters that determine the rate of charge transfer through DNA. While there have been several computational studies of Vda for hole transfer, estimates of electronic couplings for excess electron transfer (ET) in DNA remain unavailable. In the paper, an efficient strategy is established for calculating the ET matrix elements between base pairs in a π stack. Two approaches are considered. First, we employ the diabatic-state (DS) method in which donor and acceptor are represented with radical anions of the canonical base pairs adenine-thymine (AT) and guanine-cytosine (GC). In this approach, similar values of Vda are obtained with the standard 6-31G* and extended 6-31++G** basis sets. Second, the electronic couplings are derived from lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) of neutral systems by using the generalized Mulliken-Hush or fragment charge methods. Because the radical-anion states of AT and GC are well reproduced by LUMOs of the neutral base pairs calculated without diffuse functions, the estimated values of Vda are in good agreement with the couplings obtained for radical-anion states using the DS method. However, when the calculation of a neutral stack is carried out with diffuse functions, LUMOs of the system exhibit the dipole-bound character and cannot be used for estimating electronic couplings. Our calculations suggest that the ET matrix elements Vda for models containing intrastrand thymine and cytosine bases are essentially larger than the couplings in complexes with interstrand pyrimidine bases. The matrix elements for excess electron transfer are found to be considerably smaller than the corresponding values for hole transfer and to be very responsive to structural changes in a DNA stack.

  20. An analysis of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz A; Hanna, Gabriel

    2014-07-28

    The nonadiabatic dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions is investigated for the first time using a surface-hopping algorithm based on the solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE). This method provides a rigorous treatment of quantum coherence/decoherence effects in the dynamics of mixed quantum-classical systems, which is lacking in the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions surface-hopping approach commonly used for simulating PCET reactions. Within this approach, the protonic and electronic coordinates are treated quantum mechanically and the solvent coordinate evolves classically on both single adiabatic surfaces and on coherently coupled pairs of adiabatic surfaces. Both concerted and sequential PCET reactions are studied in detail under various subsystem-bath coupling conditions and insights into the dynamical principles underlying PCET reactions are gained. Notably, an examination of the trajectories reveals that the system spends the majority of its time on the average of two coherently coupled adiabatic surfaces, during which a phase enters into the calculation of an observable. In general, the results of this paper demonstrate the applicability of QCLE-based surface-hopping dynamics to the study of PCET and emphasize the importance of mean surface evolution and decoherence effects in the calculation of PCET rate constants.

  1. Analytical and computational studies of intramolecular electron transfer pertinent to electron transfer and electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Neff, Diane; Simons, Jack

    2010-01-28

    Earlier work from this group has suggested that, in electron capture and electron-transfer mass spectrometry experiments on positively charged gas-phase samples of polypeptides, the initial electron attachment event most likely occurs at one of the peptide's positively charged sites (e.g., protonated side chains), although electron attachment can occur at a disulfide or amide site ca. 1-10% of the time. Focusing on the 90-99% dominant channel in which initial electron attachment occurs at a positive site, this paper addresses to what extent and over what distances electron transfer can take place from a positively charged site to a disulfide sigma* or amide pi* orbital, because it is thought that it is through such orbitals that disulfide or N-C(alpha) backbone bond cleavage occurs. Ab initio electronic structure calculations show that, as long as an SS sigma* (or OCN pi*) orbital experiences sufficient Coulomb stabilization from proximal positively charged groups, there are a myriad of excited Rydberg states located on positive sites that are able to induce such intrapeptide electron transfer. Computational data show that the transfer rates decay exponentially with distance for a given Rydberg orbital. An analytical model is developed that allows us to estimate the rates of Rydberg-to-valence and Rydberg-to-Rydberg electron transfers as functions of the Rydberg orbitals' n quantum numbers. This model suggests that transfer can occur over very long distances at rates that are more than competitive with the rates of radiationless relaxation within the manifold of Rydberg states (the latter processes eventually terminate the electron-transfer process an thus the disulfide or N-C(alpha) bond cleavages), and it gives formulas for how these rates depend on n (and thus the radial span of the Rydberg orbitals).

  2. Short-term acclimation of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain to changing light: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Ebenhöh, Oliver; Fucile, Geoffrey; Finazzi, Giovanni; Rochaix, Jean-David; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic eukaryotes house two photosystems with distinct light absorption spectra. Natural fluctuations in light quality and quantity can lead to unbalanced or excess excitation, compromising photosynthetic efficiency and causing photodamage. Consequently, these organisms have acquired several distinct adaptive mechanisms, collectively referred to as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, which modulates the organization and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. The ability to monitor NPQ processes fluorometrically has led to substantial progress in elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. However, the relative contribution of distinct NPQ mechanisms to variable light conditions in different photosynthetic eukaryotes remains unclear. Here, we present a mathematical model of the dynamic regulation of eukaryotic photosynthesis using ordinary differential equations. We demonstrate that, for Chlamydomonas, our model recapitulates the basic fluorescence features of short-term light acclimation known as state transitions and discuss how the model can be iteratively refined by comparison with physiological experiments to further our understanding of light acclimation in different species. PMID:24591710

  3. Kinetic-dynamic model for conformational control of an electron transfer photocycle: mixed-metal hemoglobin hybrids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami D; Nocek, Judith M; Hoffman, Brian M

    2008-09-18

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the transfer of an electron across a protein-protein interface is coupled to the dynamics of conformational conversion between and within ensembles of interface conformations. Electron transfer (ET) reactions in conformationally mobile systems provide a "clock" against which the rapidity of a dynamic process may be measured, and we here report a simple kinetic (master equation) model that self-consistently incorporates conformational dynamics into an ET photocycle comprised of a photoinitiated "forward" step and thermal return to ground. This kinetic/dynamic (KD) model assumes an ET complex exists as multiple interconverting conformations which partition into an ET-optimized (reactive; R) population and a less-reactive population ( S). We take the members of each population to be equivalent by constraining them to have the same conformational energy, the same average rate constant for conversion to members of the other population, and the same rate constants for forward and back ET. The result is a mapping of a complicated energy surface onto the simple "gating", two-well surface, but with rate constants that are defined microscopically. This model successfully describes the changes in the ET photocycle within the "predocked" mixed-metal hemoglobin (Hb) hybrid, [alpha(Zn), beta(Fe3+N 3 (-))], as conformational kinetics are modulated by variations in viscosity (eta = 1-15 cP; 20 degrees C). The description reveals how the conformational "routes" by which a hybrid progresses through a photocycle differ in different dynamic regimes. Even at eta = 1 cP, the populations are not in fast exchange, and ET involves a complex interplay between conformational and ET processes; at intermediate viscosities the hybrid exhibits "differential dynamics" in which the forward and back ET processes involve different initial ensembles of configurational substates; by eta = 15 cP, the slow-exchange limit is approached. Even at low viscosity, the ET

  4. Modular electron transfer circuits for synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer is central to a wide range of essential metabolic pathways, from photosynthesis to fermentation. The evolutionary diversity and conservation of proteins that transfer electrons makes these pathways a valuable platform for engineered metabolic circuits in synthetic biology. Rational engineering of electron transfer pathways containing hydrogenases has the potential to lead to industrial scale production of hydrogen as an alternative source of clean fuel and experimental assays for understanding the complex interactions of multiple electron transfer proteins in vivo. We designed and implemented a synthetic hydrogen metabolism circuit in Escherichia coli that creates an electron transfer pathway both orthogonal to and integrated within existing metabolism. The design of such modular electron transfer circuits allows for facile characterization of in vivo system parameters with applications toward further engineering for alternative energy production. PMID:21468209

  5. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  6. 75 FR 33681 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 12 CFR Part 205 Electronic Fund Transfers June 4, 2010. AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve... following correction: PART 205--ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) 1. On page 31671, in the...

  7. Coupled electron transfers in artificial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Leif; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2007-01-01

    Light-induced charge separation in molecular assemblies has been widely investigated in the context of artificial photosynthesis. Important progress has been made in the fundamental understanding of electron and energy transfer and in stabilizing charge separation by multi-step electron transfer. In the Swedish Consortium for Artificial Photosynthesis, we build on principles from the natural enzyme photosystem II and Fe-hydrogenases. An important theme in this biomimetic effort is that of coupled electron-transfer reactions, which have so far received only little attention. (i) Each absorbed photon leads to charge separation on a single-electron level only, while catalytic water splitting and hydrogen production are multi-electron processes; thus there is the need for controlling accumulative electron transfer on molecular components. (ii) Water splitting and proton reduction at the potential catalysts necessarily require the management of proton release and/or uptake. Far from being just a stoichiometric requirement, this controls the electron transfer processes by proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). (iii) Redox-active links between the photosensitizers and the catalysts are required to rectify the accumulative electron-transfer reactions, and will often be the starting points of PCET. PMID:17954432

  8. Heme electron transfer in peroxidases: the propionate e-pathway.

    PubMed

    Guallar, Victor

    2008-10-23

    Computational modeling offers a new insight about the electron transfer pathway in heme peroxidases. Available crystal structures have revealed an intriguing arrangement of the heme propionate side chains in heme-heme and heme-substrate complexes. By means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics calculations, we study the involvement of these propionate groups into the substrate oxidation in ascorbate peroxidase and into the heme to heme electron transfer in bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. By selectively turning on/off different quantum regions, we obtain the electron transfer pathway which directly involves the porphyrin ring and the heme propionates. Furthermore, in ascorbate peroxidase the presence of the substrate appears to be crucial for the activation of the electron transfer channel. The results might represent a general motif for electron transfer from/to the heme group and change our view for the propionate side chains as simple electrostatic binding anchors. We name the new mechanism "the propionate e-pathway".

  9. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, R.; Calvin, M.

    1984-01-24

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospholipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transferring electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  10. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, Roland; Calvin, Melvin

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospho-lipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transfering electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II.

    1993-01-01

    The present report gives a brief account of the following elements of work related to photochemical electron transfer themes: (1) the synthesis and Photochemical characterization of chromophore-bound peptides and amino acid model compounds based on the amino acids, tryptophan and the spacer residue, alanine (Ala); (2) the study of binding of cationic organic dyes to a peptide electrolyte, for which cooperative dye loading and helix formation is important; (3) the completion of work on a new series of acridinium chromophores that have rod-like'' arrangements of linked aryl rings for assembly of electron donor-acceptor systems that exhibit long lived charge separation; and (4) use of the modified form of the peptide, poly-L-histidine, as a template for sulfide oxidation.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo Treatment of the Charge Transfer and Diradical Electronic Character in a Retinal Chromophore Minimal Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The penta-2,4-dieniminium cation (PSB3) displays similar ground state and first excited state potential energy features as those of the retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) chromophore in rhodopsin. Recently, PSB3 has been used to benchmark several electronic structure methods, including highly correlated multireference wave function approaches, highlighting the necessity to accurately describe the electronic correlation in order to obtain reliable properties even along the ground state (thermal) isomerization paths. In this work, we apply two quantum Monte Carlo approaches, the variational Monte Carlo and the lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo, to study the energetics and electronic properties of PSB3 along representative minimum energy paths and scans related to its thermal cis–trans isomerization. Quantum Monte Carlo is used in combination with the Jastrow antisymmetrized geminal power ansatz, which guarantees an accurate and balanced description of the static electronic correlation thanks to the multiconfigurational nature of the antisymmetrized geminal power term, and of the dynamical correlation, due to the presence of the Jastrow factor explicitly depending on electron–electron distances. Along the two ground state isomerization minimum energy paths of PSB3, CASSCF calculations yield wave functions having either charge transfer or diradical character in proximity of the two transition state configurations. Here, we observe that at the quantum Monte Carlo level of theory, only the transition state with charge transfer character can be located. The conical intersection, which becomes highly sloped, is observed only if the path connecting the two original CASSCF transition states is extended beyond the diradical one, namely by increasing the bond-length-alternation (BLA). These findings are in good agreement with the results obtained by MRCISD+Q calculations, and they demonstrate the importance of having an accurate description of the static and

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Treatment of the Charge Transfer and Diradical Electronic Character in a Retinal Chromophore Minimal Model.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Coccia, Emanuele; Gozem, Samer; Olivucci, Massimo; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-03-10

    The penta-2,4-dieniminium cation (PSB3) displays similar ground state and first excited state potential energy features as those of the retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) chromophore in rhodopsin. Recently, PSB3 has been used to benchmark several electronic structure methods, including highly correlated multireference wave function approaches, highlighting the necessity to accurately describe the electronic correlation in order to obtain reliable properties even along the ground state (thermal) isomerization paths. In this work, we apply two quantum Monte Carlo approaches, the variational Monte Carlo and the lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo, to study the energetics and electronic properties of PSB3 along representative minimum energy paths and scans related to its thermal cis–trans isomerization. Quantum Monte Carlo is used in combination with the Jastrow antisymmetrized geminal power ansatz, which guarantees an accurate and balanced description of the static electronic correlation thanks to the multiconfigurational nature of the antisymmetrized geminal power term, and of the dynamical correlation, due to the presence of the Jastrow factor explicitly depending on electron–electron distances. Along the two ground state isomerization minimum energy paths of PSB3, CASSCF calculations yield wave functions having either charge transfer or diradical character in proximity of the two transition state configurations. Here, we observe that at the quantum Monte Carlo level of theory, only the transition state with charge transfer character can be located. The conical intersection, which becomes highly sloped, is observed only if the path connecting the two original CASSCF transition states is extended beyond the diradical one, namely by increasing the bond-length-alternation (BLA). These findings are in good agreement with the results obtained by MRCISD+Q calculations, and they demonstrate the importance of having an accurate description of the static and

  14. Ab Initio Modeling of Fe(II) Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer at Goethite (α-FeOOH) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Vitali Y.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) surfaces represent one of the most ubiquitous redox-active interfaces in the environment, playing an important role in biogeochemical metal cycling and contaminant residence in the subsurface. Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite is a fundamental process in this context, but the proposed Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite electron and iron atom exchange mechanism of recrystallization remains poorly understood at the atomic level. We examine the adsorption of aqueous Fe(II) and subsequent interfacial electron transfer (ET) between adsorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) at the (110) and (021) goethite surfaces using density functional theory calculations including Hubbard U corrections (DFT+U) aided by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate various surface sites for the adsorption of Fe2+(H2O)6 in different coordination environments. Calculated energies for adsorbed complexes at both surfaces favor monodentate complexes with reduced 4- and 5-fold coordination over higher-dentate structures and 6- fold coordination. The hydrolysis of H2O ligands is observed for some pre-ET adsorbed Fe(II) configurations. ET from the adsorbed Fe(II) into the goethite lattice is calculated to be energetically uphill always, but simultaneous proton transfer from H2O ligands of the adsorbed complexes to the surface oxygen species stabilizes post-ET states. We find that surface defects such as oxygen vacancies near the adsorption site also can stabilize post-ET states, enabling the Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite interfacial electron transfer reaction implied from experiments to proceed.

  15. Local control approach to ultrafast electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindel-Zandbergen, Patricia; Meier, Christoph; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2016-10-01

    We study ultrafast electron transfer between separated nuclei using local control theory. By imposing electron ionization and electron transport through the continuum, different local control formulations are used to increase the yield of retrapping the electron at the desired nuclei. The control mechanism is based on impulsive de-excitation. Both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear arrangements are analyzed, as well as the role of the nuclear motion.

  16. Electron transfer mechanism and the locality of the system-bath interaction: a comparison of local, semilocal, and pure dephasing models.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Emily A; Katz, Gil; Goldsmith, Randall H; Wasielewski, Michael R; Ratner, Mark A; Kosloff, Ronnie; Nitzan, Abraham

    2006-02-21

    We simulate the effects of two types of dephasing processes, a nonlocal dephasing of system eigenstates and a dephasing of semilocal eigenstates, on the rate and mechanism of electron transfer (eT) through a series of donor-bridge-acceptor systems, D-B(N)-A, where N is the number of identical bridge units. Our analytical and numerical results show that pure dephasing, defined as the perturbation of system eigenstates through the system-bath interaction, does not disrupt coherent eT because it induces no localization; electron transfer may proceed through superexchange in a system undergoing only pure dephasing. A more physically reasonable description may be obtained via a system-bath interaction that reflects the perturbation of more local electronic structure by local nuclear distortions and dipole interactions. The degree of locality of this interaction is guided by the structure of the system Hamiltonian and by the nature of the measurement performed on the system (i.e., the nature of the environment). We compare our result from this "semilocal" model with an even more local phenomenological dephasing model. We calculate electron transfer rate by obtaining nonequilibrium steady-state solutions for the elements of a reduced density matrix; a semigroup formalism is used to write down the dissipative part of the equation of motion.

  17. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Progress was made on synthesis of new materials for directional electron transfer (block copolymers and helical oligopeptides), preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organics and inorganics, electrocatalysis (redox-activated catalysts), and surface modifications of metals and semiconductors.

  18. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II.

    1990-10-20

    Photochemical studies on organic polymers or biopolymers (particularly synthetic peptides) that have been modified by covalent attachment (or other means of binding) of organic chromophores and electron transfer agents are described. Specific projects involve are: peptide conjugates bearing electroactive residues such as tryptophan and specifically labeled at the N- or C-terminus of peptide chains; the electrostatic binding of organic dyes to poly-electrolytes (polyacrylates) for which the formation of dimeric aggregates of bound dye that display unusual photophysical and electron transfer properties is important; a study of the binding of dyes and electron transfer agents to the protein mimic,'' polyvinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (PVP), in hydrophobic domains that depend on specific H-bond interaction; and completion of an earlier study having to do with the triplet state properties of charge-transfer (CT) complexes of a high potential quinone and various electron donors (investigation of the properties of triplet (contact) radical-ion pairs). 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Impact of proton transfer phenomena on the electronic structure of model Schiff bases: An AIM/NBO/ELF study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, Jarosław J.; Filarowski, Aleksander; Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta

    2013-10-01

    Understanding of the electronic structure evolution due to a proton dynamics is a key issue in biochemistry and material science. This paper reports on density functional theory calculations of Schiff bases containing short, strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds where the bridged proton is located: (i) at the donor site, (ii) strongly delocalized, and (iii) at the acceptor site. The mobility of the bridged proton and its influence on the molecular structure and properties of the chosen Schiff base derivatives have been investigated on the basis of Atoms in Molecules, Natural Bond Orbitals, and Electron Localization Function theories. It has been observed that the extent of the bridged proton delocalization is strongly modified by the steric and inductive effects present in the studied compounds introduced by various substituents. It has been shown that: (i) potential energy profiles for the proton motion are extremely dependent on the substitution of the aromatic ring, (ii) the topology of the free electron pairs present at the donor/acceptor site, as well as their electron populations, are affected qualitatively by the bridged proton position, (iii) the distortion of the molecular structure due to the bridged proton dynamics includes the atomic charge fluctuations, which are in some cases non-monotonic, and (iv) topology of the ELF recognizes events of proton detachment from the donor and attachment to the acceptor. The quantitative and qualitative results shed light onto molecular consequences of the proton transfer phenomena.

  20. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  1. Flavin Charge Transfer Transitions Assist DNA Photolyase Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Prytkova, Tatiana; Beratan, David N.

    2007-12-01

    This contribution describes molecular dynamics, semi-empirical and ab-initio studies of the primary photo-induced electron transfer reaction in DNA photolyase. DNA photolyases are FADH--containing proteins that repair UV-damaged DNA by photo-induced electron transfer. A DNA photolyase recognizes and binds to cyclobutatne pyrimidine dimer lesions of DNA. The protein repairs a bound lesion by transferring an electron to the lesion from FADH-, upon photo-excitation of FADH- with 350-450 nm light. We compute the lowest singlet excited states of FADH- in DNA photolyase using INDO/S configuration interaction, time-dependent density-functional, and time-dependent Hartree-Fock methods. The calculations identify the lowest singlet excited state of FADH- that is populated after photo-excitation and that acts as the electron donor. For this donor state we compute conformationally-averaged tunneling matrix elements to empty electron-acceptor states of a thymine dimer bound to photolyase. The conformational averaging involves different FADH--thymine dimer confromations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of the solvated protein with a thymine dimer docked in its active site. The tunneling matrix element computations use INDO/S-level Green's function, energy splitting, and Generalized Mulliken-Hush methods. These calculations indicate that photo-excitation of FADH- causes a π→π* charge-transfer transition that shifts electron density to the side of the flavin isoalloxazine ring that is adjacent to the docked thymine dimer. This shift in electron density enhances the FADH--to-dimer electronic coupling, thus inducing rapid electron transfer.

  2. Breaking the barrier to fast electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Demin, Soren; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2009-09-01

    A study of the electron transfer for a non-glycosylated redox variant of GOx is reported, immobilised onto an electrode via a polyhistidine tag. The non-glycosylated variant allows the enzyme to be brought closer to the electrode, and within charge transfer distances predicted by Marcus' theory. The enzyme-electrode-hybrid shows direct very fast reversible electrochemical electron transfer, with a rate constant of approximately 350 s(-1) under anaerobic conditions. This is 2 orders of magnitude faster than the enzyme-free flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). These results are discussed in the context of the conformation of FAD in the active site of GOx. Further data, presented in the presence of oxygen, show a reduced electron transfer rate (approximately 160 s(-1)) that may be associated with the oxygen interaction with the histidines in the active site. These residues are implicated in the proton transfer mechanism and thus suggest that the presence of oxygen may have a profound effect in attenuating the direct electron transfer rate and thus moderating 'short-circuit' incidental electron transfer between proteins.

  3. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  4. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multi-chromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of the molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  5. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Dependence of the rate of transfer on distance].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N; Komarov, V M

    1998-01-01

    Based on the assumption that electron transfer between globular proteins occurs by a collective excitation of polaron type, the dependence of the rate of this process on the distance between the donor and acceptor centers with regard to their detailed electron structure was calculated. The electron structure of the heme was calculated by the quantum-chemical MNDO-PM3 method. The results were compared with experimental data on interprotein and intraglobular electron transfer. It is shown that, in the framework of this model, the electron transfer is not exponential and does not require a particular transfer pathway since the whole protein macromolecule is involved in the formation of the electron excited state.

  6. Molecular basis of intramolecular electron transfer in proteins during radical-mediated oxidations: Computer simulation studies in model tyrosine-cysteine peptides in solution

    PubMed Central

    Petruk, Ariel A.; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Trujillo, Madia; Estrin, Darío A.; Murgida, Daniel; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Marti, Marcelo A.; Radi, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies in hemeproteins and model Tyr/Cys-containing peptides exposed to oxidizing and nitrating species suggest that intramolecular electron transfer (IET) between tyrosyl radicals (Tyr-O●) and Cys residues controls oxidative modification yields. The molecular basis of this IET process is not sufficiently understood with structural atomic detail. Herein, we analyzed using molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics-based computational calculations, mechanistic possibilities for the radical transfer reaction in Tyr/Cys-containing peptides in solution and correlated them with existing experimental data. Our results support that Tyr-O● to Cys radical transfer is mediated by an acid/base equilibrium that involves deprotonation of Cys to form the thiolate, followed by a likely rate-limiting transfer process to yield cysteinyl radical and a Tyr phenolate; proton uptake by Tyr completes the reaction. Both, the pKa values of the Tyr phenol and Cys thiol groups and the energetic and kinetics of the reversible IET are revealed as key physico-chemical factors. The proposed mechanism constitutes a case of sequential, acid/base equilibrium-dependent and solvent-mediated, proton-coupled electron transfer and explains the dependency of oxidative yields in Tyr/Cys peptides as a function of the number of alanine spacers. These findings contribute to explain oxidative modifications in proteins that contain sequence and/or spatially close Tyr-Cys residues. PMID:22640642

  7. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Meneses, G.; Almeida, D.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present negative ion formation driven by electron transfer in atom (K) molecule (acetic acid) collisions. Acetic acid has been found in the interstellar medium, is also considered a biological related compound and as such studying low energy electron interactions will bring new insights as far as induced chemistry is concerned.

  8. New insights into the nonadiabatic state population dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shakib, Farnaz A.; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-01-14

    In a previous study [F. A. Shakib and G. Hanna, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044122 (2014)], we investigated a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville (MQCL) approach and found that the trajectories spend the majority of their time on the mean of two coherently coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces. This suggested a need for mean surface evolution to accurately simulate observables related to ultrafast PCET processes. In this study, we simulate the time-dependent populations of the three lowest adiabatic states in the ET-PT (i.e., electron transfer preceding proton transfer) version of the same PCET model via the MQCL approach and compare them to the exact quantum results and those obtained via the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) approach. We find that the MQCL population profiles are in good agreement with the exact quantum results and show a significant improvement over the FSSH results. All of the mean surfaces are shown to play a direct role in the dynamics of the state populations. Interestingly, our results indicate that the population transfer to the second-excited state can be mediated by dynamics on the mean of the ground and second-excited state surfaces, as part of a sequence of nonadiabatic transitions that bypasses the first-excited state surface altogether. This is made possible through nonadiabatic transitions between different mean surfaces, which is the manifestation of coherence transfer in MQCL dynamics. We also investigate the effect of the strength of the coupling between the proton/electron and the solvent coordinate on the state population dynamics. Drastic changes in the population dynamics are observed, which can be understood in terms of the changes in the potential energy surfaces and the nonadiabatic couplings. Finally, we investigate the state population dynamics in the PT-ET (i.e., proton transfer preceding electron transfer) and concerted versions of the model. The PT

  9. New insights into the nonadiabatic state population dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz A; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-01-14

    In a previous study [F. A. Shakib and G. Hanna, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044122 (2014)], we investigated a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville (MQCL) approach and found that the trajectories spend the majority of their time on the mean of two coherently coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces. This suggested a need for mean surface evolution to accurately simulate observables related to ultrafast PCET processes. In this study, we simulate the time-dependent populations of the three lowest adiabatic states in the ET-PT (i.e., electron transfer preceding proton transfer) version of the same PCET model via the MQCL approach and compare them to the exact quantum results and those obtained via the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) approach. We find that the MQCL population profiles are in good agreement with the exact quantum results and show a significant improvement over the FSSH results. All of the mean surfaces are shown to play a direct role in the dynamics of the state populations. Interestingly, our results indicate that the population transfer to the second-excited state can be mediated by dynamics on the mean of the ground and second-excited state surfaces, as part of a sequence of nonadiabatic transitions that bypasses the first-excited state surface altogether. This is made possible through nonadiabatic transitions between different mean surfaces, which is the manifestation of coherence transfer in MQCL dynamics. We also investigate the effect of the strength of the coupling between the proton/electron and the solvent coordinate on the state population dynamics. Drastic changes in the population dynamics are observed, which can be understood in terms of the changes in the potential energy surfaces and the nonadiabatic couplings. Finally, we investigate the state population dynamics in the PT-ET (i.e., proton transfer preceding electron transfer) and concerted versions of the model. The PT

  10. Electron transfer across a thermal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Galen T.

    2016-01-01

    Charge transfer is a fundamental process that underlies a multitude of phenomena in chemistry and biology. Recent advances in observing and manipulating charge and heat transport at the nanoscale, and recently developed techniques for monitoring temperature at high temporal and spatial resolution, imply the need for considering electron transfer across thermal gradients. Here, a theory is developed for the rate of electron transfer and the associated heat transport between donor–acceptor pairs located at sites of different temperatures. To this end, through application of a generalized multidimensional transition state theory, the traditional Arrhenius picture of activation energy as a single point on a free energy surface is replaced with a bithermal property that is derived from statistical weighting over all configurations where the reactant and product states are equienergetic. The flow of energy associated with the electron transfer process is also examined, leading to relations between the rate of heat exchange among the donor and acceptor sites as functions of the temperature difference and the electronic driving bias. In particular, we find that an open electron transfer channel contributes to enhanced heat transport between sites even when they are in electronic equilibrium. The presented results provide a unified theory for charge transport and the associated heat conduction between sites at different temperatures. PMID:27450086

  11. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer from Peroxide Dianion.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bryce L; Maher, Andrew G; Nava, Matthew; Lopez, Nazario; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-06-18

    The encapsulation of peroxide dianion by hexacarboxamide cryptand provides a platform for the study of electron transfer of isolated peroxide anion. Photoinitiated electron transfer (ET) between freely diffusing Ru(bpy)3(2+) and the peroxide dianion occurs with a rate constant of 2.0 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). A competing electron transfer quenching pathway is observed within an ion pair. Picosecond transient spectroscopy furnishes a rate constant of 1.1 × 10(10) s(-1) for this first-order process. A driving force dependence for the ET rate within the ion pair using a series of Ru(bpy)3(2+) derivatives allows for the electronic coupling and reorganization energies to be assessed. The ET reaction is nonadiabatic and dominated by a large inner-sphere reorganization energy, in accordance with that expected for the change in bond distance accompanying the conversion of peroxide dianion to superoxide anion.

  12. Transient kinetics of electron transfer reactions of flavodoxin: ionic strength dependence of semiquinone oxidation by cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and computer modeling of reaction complexes.

    PubMed

    Simondsen, R P; Weber, P C; Salemme, F R; Tollin, G

    1982-12-07

    Electron transfer reactions between Clostridum pasteurianum flavodoxin semiquinone and various oxidants [horse heart cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic [horse heart cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)] have been studied as a function of ionic strength by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The cytochrome c reaction is complicated by the existence of two cytochrome species which react at different rates and whose relative concentrations are ionic strength dependent. Only the faster of these two reactions is considered here. At low ionic strength, complex formation between cytochrome c and flavodoxin is indicated by a leveling off of the pseudo-first-order rate constant at high cytochrome c concentration. This is not observed for either ferricyanide or ferric EDTA. For cytochrome c, the rate and association constants for complex formation were found to increase with decreasing ionic strength, consistent with negative charges on flavodoxin interacting with the positively charged cytochrome electron transfer site. Both ferricyanide and ferric EDTA are negatively charged oxidants, and the rate data respond to ionic strength changes as would be predicted for reactants of the same charge sign. These results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions involving negatively charged groups are important in orienting flavodoxin with respect to oxidants during electron transfer. We have also carried out computer modeling studies of putative complexes of flavodoxin with cytochrome c and ferricyanide, which relate their structural properties to both the observed kinetic behavior and some more general features of physiological electron transfer processes. The results of this study are consistent with the ionic strength behavior described above.

  13. Theory of directed electronic energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Andrews, David L; Crisp, Richard G

    2006-03-01

    The migration of electronic energy between molecules or chromophores in molecular solids is a well-studied phenomenon. The ability to exert control over the directionality of this transfer, by a variety of methods involving applied electrical or optical fields, holds promise for advances in fields including nanoelectronics and energy harvesting materials. In this paper, we review in detail a number of methods for directing energy transfer, also identifying potential applications.

  14. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, J.D. Jr.; Moore, T.A.

    1988-04-12

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. The knowledge gained from the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus can be used to design artificial photosynthetic systems which employ the basic physics and chemistry of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. More specifically, the proposed models are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties.

  15. A benchmark test suite for proton transfer energies and its use to test electronic structure model chemistries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachimuthu, Santhanamoorthi; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2012-05-01

    We present benchmark calculations of nine selected points on potential energy surfaces describing proton transfer processes in three model systems, H5O2+, CH3OH…H+…OH2, and CH3COOH…OH2. The calculated relative energies of these geometries are compared to those calculated by various wave function and density functional methods, including the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) model recently developed in our research group and other semiempirical molecular orbital methods. We found that the SCC-DFTB and PMO methods (the latter available so far only for molecules consisting of only O and H and therefore only for the first of the three model systems) give results that are, on average, within 2 kcal/mol of the benchmark results. Other semiempirical molecular orbital methods have mean unsigned errors (MUEs) of 3-8 kcal/mol, local density functionals have MUEs in the range 0.7-3.7 kcal/mol, and hybrid density functionals have MUEs of only 0.3-1.0 kcal/mol, with the best density functional performance obtained by hybrid meta-GGAs, especially M06 and PW6B95.

  16. 75 FR 16579 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Part II Federal Reserve System 12 CFR Part 205 Electronic Fund Transfers; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 62... Consumers from Hidden Gift Card Fees Secretly Draining Shoppers' Pockets'', Press Release, Mar. 27,...

  17. Systems approach to excitation-energy and electron transfer reaction networks in photosystem II complex: model studies for chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2015-09-07

    Photosystem II (PS II) is a protein complex which evolves oxygen and drives charge separation for photosynthesis employing electron and excitation-energy transfer processes over a wide timescale range from picoseconds to milliseconds. While the fluorescence emitted by the antenna pigments of this complex is known as an important indicator of the activity of photosynthesis, its interpretation was difficult because of the complexity of PS II. In this study, an extensive kinetic model which describes the complex and multi-timescale characteristics of PS II is analyzed through the use of the hierarchical coarse-graining method proposed in the authors׳ earlier work. In this coarse-grained analysis, the reaction center (RC) is described by two states, open and closed RCs, both of which consist of oxidized and neutral special pairs being in quasi-equilibrium states. Besides, the PS II model at millisecond scale with three-state RC, which was studied previously, could be derived by suitably adjusting the kinetic parameters of electron transfer between tyrosine and RC. Our novel coarse-grained model of PS II can appropriately explain the light-intensity dependent change of the characteristic patterns of fluorescence induction kinetics from O-J-I-P, which shows two inflection points, J and I, between initial point O and peak point P, to O-J-D-I-P, which shows a dip D between J and I inflection points.

  18. Dynamics of electron transfer in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Burda, Kvetoslava

    2007-01-01

    Photosystem II, being a constituent of light driven photosynthetic apparatus, is a highly organized pigment-protein-lipid complex. The arrangement of PSII active redox cofactors insures efficiency of electron transfer within it. Donation of electrons extracted from water by the oxygen evolving complex to plastoquinones requires an additional activation energy. In this paper we present theoretical discussion of the anharmonic fluctuations of the protein-lipid matrix of PSII and an experimental evidence showing that the fluctuations are responsible for coupling of its donor and acceptor side. We argue that the fast collective motions liberated at temperatures higher that 200 K are crucial for the two final steps of the water splitting cycle and that one can distinguish three different dynamic regimes of PSII action which are controlled by the timescales of forward electron transfer, which vary with temperature. The three regimes of the dynamical behavior are related to different spatial domains of PSII.

  19. Mechanism of Intermolecular Electron Transfer in Bionanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruodis, A.; Galikova, N.; Šarka, K.; Saulė, R.; Batiuškaitė, D.; Saulis, G.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Most patients are inoperable and hepatoma cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. Thus, the development of novel therapies for HCC treatment is of paramount importance. Amongst different alimentary factors, vitamin C and vitamin K3 In the present work, it has been shown that the treatment of mouse hepatoma MH-22A cells by vitamin C and vitamin K3 at the ratio of 100:1 greatly enhanced their cytotoxicity. When cells were subjected to vitamin C at 200 μM or to vitamin K3 at 2 μM separately, their viability reduced by only about 10%. However, when vitamins C and K3 were combined at the same concentrations, they killed more than 90% of cells. To elucidate the mechanism of the synergistic cytotoxicity of the C&K3 mixture, theoretical quantum-chemical analysis of the dynamics of intermolecular electron transfer (IET) processes within the complexes containing C (five forms) and K3 (one form) has been carried out. Optimization of the ground state complex geometry has been provided by means of GAUSSIAN03 package. Simulation of the IET has been carried out using NUVOLA package, in the framework of molecular orbitals (MO). The rate of IET has been calculated using Fermi Golden rule. The results of simulations allow us to create the preliminary model of the reaction pathway.

  20. Flavin Electron Shuttles Dominate Extracellular Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Kotloski, Nicholas J.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is widely studied for its ability to respire a diverse array of soluble and insoluble electron acceptors. The ability to breathe insoluble substrates is defined as extracellular electron transfer and can occur via direct contact or by electron shuttling in S. oneidensis. To determine the contribution of flavin electron shuttles in extracellular electron transfer, a transposon mutagenesis screen was performed with S. oneidensis to identify mutants unable to secrete flavins. A multidrug and toxin efflux transporter encoded by SO_0702 was identified and renamed bfe (bacterial flavin adenine dinucleotide [FAD] exporter) based on phenotypic characterization. Deletion of bfe resulted in a severe decrease in extracellular flavins, while overexpression of bfe increased the concentration of extracellular flavins. Strains lacking bfe had no defect in reduction of soluble Fe(III), but these strains were deficient in the rate of insoluble Fe(III) oxide reduction, which was alleviated by the addition of exogenous flavins. To test a different insoluble electron acceptor, graphite electrode bioreactors were set up to measure current produced by wild-type S. oneidensis and the Δbfe mutant. With the same concentration of supplemented flavins, the two strains produced similar amounts of current. However, when exogenous flavins were not supplemented to bioreactors, bfe mutant strains produced significantly less current than the wild type. We have demonstrated that flavin electron shuttling accounts for ~75% of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble substrates by S. oneidensis and have identified the first FAD transporter in bacteria. PMID:23322638

  1. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  2. Bacterial Nanowires Facilitate Extracellular Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, including Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens, produce electrically conductive nanowires that facilitate electron transfer to solid phase iron oxides. Nanowires produced by S. oneidensis strain MR-1 are functionalized by decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA that are distributed along the length of the nanowires, as confirmed by immunolocalization experiments using peptide specific antibodies. Mutants lacking MtrC and OmcA produce nanowires that were poorly conductive, are unable to reduce solid phase iron oxides, and do not produce electric current in microbial fuel cells. Although less completely characterized, nanowires are also produced by organisms throughout a broad metabolic spectrum, from sulfate reducing bacteria to oxygenic, phototrophic cyanobacteria. Our research suggests that electrically conductive nanowires may be common throughout the microbial world and may serve as structures for efficient electron transfer and energy dissemination in complex communities such as microbial mats and biofilms.

  3. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-07

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO{sub 2} has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO{sub 2} systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO{sub 2}.

  4. Direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Liu, Fanghua; Markovaite, Beatrice; Chen, Shanshan; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-08-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) is potentially an effective form of syntrophy in methanogenic communities, but little is known about the diversity of methanogens capable of DIET. The ability of Methanosarcina barkeri to participate in DIET was evaluated in coculture with Geobacter metallireducens. Cocultures formed aggregates that shared electrons via DIET during the stoichiometric conversion of ethanol to methane. Cocultures could not be initiated with a pilin-deficient G. metallireducens strain, suggesting that long-range electron transfer along pili was important for DIET. Amendments of granular activated carbon permitted the pilin-deficient G. metallireducens isolates to share electrons with M. barkeri, demonstrating that this conductive material could substitute for pili in promoting DIET. When M. barkeri was grown in coculture with the H2-producing Pelobacter carbinolicus, incapable of DIET, M. barkeri utilized H2 as an electron donor but metabolized little of the acetate that P.carbinolicus produced. This suggested that H2, but not electrons derived from DIET, inhibited acetate metabolism. P. carbinolicus-M. barkeri cocultures did not aggregate, demonstrating that, unlike DIET, close physical contact was not necessary for interspecies H2 transfer. M. barkeri is the second methanogen found to accept electrons via DIET and the first methanogen known to be capable of using either H2 or electrons derived from DIET for CO2 reduction. Furthermore, M. barkeri is genetically tractable,making it a model organism for elucidating mechanisms by which methanogens make biological electrical connections with other cells.

  5. Theory of electron transfer and molecular state in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Robert Gunter

    2002-09-01

    In this thesis, a mechanism for long-range electron transfer in DNA and a systematic search for high conductance DNA are developed. DNA is well known for containing the genetic code of all living species. On the other hand, there are some experimental indications that DNA can mediate effectively long-range electron transfer leading to the concept of chemistry at a distance. This can be important for DNA damage and healing. In the first part of the thesis, a possible mechanism for long-range electron transfer is introduced. The weak distance dependent electron transfer was experimentally observed using transition metal intercalators for donor and acceptor. In our model calculations, the transfer is mediated by the molecular analogue of a Kondo bound state well known from solid state physics of mixed-valence rare-earth compounds. We believe this is quite realistic, since localized d orbitals of the transition metal ions could function as an Anderson impurity embedded in a reservoir of rather delocalized molecular orbitals of the intercalator ligands and DNA pi orbitals. The effective Anderson model is solved with a physically intuitive variational ansatz as well as with the essentially exact DMRG method. The electronic transition matrix element, which is important because it contains the donor-acceptor distance dependence, is obtained with the Mulliken-Hush algorithm as well as from Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces. Our possible explanation of long-range electron transfer is put in context to other more conventional mechanisms which also could lead to similar behavior. Another important issue of DNA is its possible use for nano-technology. Although DNA's mechanical properties are excellent, the question whether it can be conducting and be used for nano-wires is highly controversial. Experimentally, DNA shows conducting, semi-conducting and insulating properties. Motivated by these wide ranging experimental results on the conductivity of DNA, we have

  6. Electron Transfer and Reaction Mechanism of Laccases

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen M.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (TNC) where dioxygen reduction occurs. This review outlines the electron transfer (ET) process in laccases, and the mechanism of O2 reduction as elucidated through spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational data. Marcus theory is used to describe the relevant factors which impact ET rates including the driving force (ΔG°), reorganization energy (λ), and electronic coupling matrix element (HDA). Then the mechanism of O2 reaction is detailed with particular focus on the intermediates formed during the two 2e− reduction steps. The first 2e− step forms the peroxide intermediate (PI), followed by the second 2e− step to form the native intermediate (NI), which has been shown to be the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the enzyme. PMID:25572295

  7. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  8. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-28

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  9. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) and also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.

  10. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; ...

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  11. The Role of Resonant Vibrations in Electronic Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, Oscar J. G.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear vibrations play a prominent role in the spectroscopy and dynamics of electronic systems. As recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest, this may be even more so when vibrational frequencies are resonant with transitions between the electronic states. Herein, a vibronic multilevel Redfield model is reported for excitonically coupled electronic two‐level systems with a few explicitly included vibrational modes and interacting with a phonon bath. With numerical simulations the effects of the quantized vibrations on the dynamics of energy transfer and coherence in a model dimer are illustrated. The resonance between the vibrational frequency and energy gap between the sites leads to a large delocalization of vibronic states, which then results in faster energy transfer and longer‐lived mixed coherences. PMID:26910485

  12. A mixed quantum-classical Liouville study of the population dynamics in a model photo-induced condensed phase electron transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Najeh; Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Freedman, Holly; Hanna, Gabriel

    2013-04-14

    We apply two approximate solutions of the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) in the mapping representation to the simulation of the laser-induced response of a quantum subsystem coupled to a classical environment. These solutions, known as the Poisson Bracket Mapping Equation (PBME) and the Forward-Backward (FB) trajectory solutions, involve simple algorithms in which the dynamics of both the quantum and classical degrees of freedom are described in terms of continuous variables, as opposed to standard surface-hopping solutions in which the classical degrees of freedom hop between potential energy surfaces dictated by the discrete adiabatic state of the quantum subsystem. The validity of these QCLE-based solutions is tested on a non-trivial electron transfer model involving more than two quantum states, a time-dependent Hamiltonian, strong subsystem-bath coupling, and an initial energy shift between the donor and acceptor states that depends on the strength of the subsystem-bath coupling. In particular, we calculate the time-dependent population of the photoexcited donor state in response to an ultrafast, on-resonance pump pulse in a three-state model of an electron transfer complex that is coupled asymmetrically to a bath of harmonic oscillators through the optically dark acceptor state. Within this approach, the three-state electron transfer complex is treated quantum mechanically, while the bath oscillators are treated classically. When compared to the more accurate QCLE-based surface-hopping solution and to the numerically exact quantum results, we find that the PBME solution is not capable of qualitatively capturing the population dynamics, whereas the FB solution is. However, when the subsystem-bath coupling is decreased (which also decreases the initial energy shift between the donor and acceptor states) or the initial shift is removed altogether, both the PBME and FB results agree better with the QCLE-based surface-hopping results. These findings

  13. A mixed quantum-classical Liouville study of the population dynamics in a model photo-induced condensed phase electron transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rekik, Najeh; Freedman, Holly; Hanna, Gabriel; Hsieh, Chang-Yu

    2013-04-14

    We apply two approximate solutions of the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) in the mapping representation to the simulation of the laser-induced response of a quantum subsystem coupled to a classical environment. These solutions, known as the Poisson Bracket Mapping Equation (PBME) and the Forward-Backward (FB) trajectory solutions, involve simple algorithms in which the dynamics of both the quantum and classical degrees of freedom are described in terms of continuous variables, as opposed to standard surface-hopping solutions in which the classical degrees of freedom hop between potential energy surfaces dictated by the discrete adiabatic state of the quantum subsystem. The validity of these QCLE-based solutions is tested on a non-trivial electron transfer model involving more than two quantum states, a time-dependent Hamiltonian, strong subsystem-bath coupling, and an initial energy shift between the donor and acceptor states that depends on the strength of the subsystem-bath coupling. In particular, we calculate the time-dependent population of the photoexcited donor state in response to an ultrafast, on-resonance pump pulse in a three-state model of an electron transfer complex that is coupled asymmetrically to a bath of harmonic oscillators through the optically dark acceptor state. Within this approach, the three-state electron transfer complex is treated quantum mechanically, while the bath oscillators are treated classically. When compared to the more accurate QCLE-based surface-hopping solution and to the numerically exact quantum results, we find that the PBME solution is not capable of qualitatively capturing the population dynamics, whereas the FB solution is. However, when the subsystem-bath coupling is decreased (which also decreases the initial energy shift between the donor and acceptor states) or the initial shift is removed altogether, both the PBME and FB results agree better with the QCLE-based surface-hopping results. These findings

  14. 77 FR 40459 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... 1005 RIN 3170-AA15 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Correction AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer..., the Bureau published the Final Rule (77 FR 6194), which implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act... made to Sec. 1005.3(a) in the interim final rule, Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E),...

  15. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods July 2002 Payments under...

  16. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment methods. Electronic Funds Transfer Payment Methods October 2000 (a) Payments under this grant will be made by...

  17. 31 CFR 208.3 - Payment by electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Payment by electronic funds transfer... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.3 Payment by electronic funds transfer. Subject to § 208.4, and notwithstanding any other... electronic funds transfer....

  18. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline Payment System (FEDLINE) or the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment...

  19. Evidence for the purely electronic character of primary electron transfer in purple bacteria Rh. Sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, I. O.; Poddubnyy, V. V.; Eremin, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    A quantum-chemical calculation of the excited electronic states of a Rh. Sphaeroides reaction centre was performed. We discovered a new excited electronic state which can participate in electron transfer (ET). The energy gradient calculations showed that photoexcitation activates only high-frequency vibrational modes. This contradicts the widely accepted picture of ET resulting from vibrational wave packet motion. An alternative model is suggested where ET has a purely dissipative character and occurs only due to pigment--protein interaction. With this model, we demonstrate that oscillations in the femtosecond spectra can be caused by the new electronic state and non-Markovian character of dissipative dynamics.

  20. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  1. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-01

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements.

  2. Electronic structure and carrier transfer in B-DNA monomer polymers and dimer polymers: Stationary and time-dependent aspects of a wire model versus an extended ladder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambropoulos, K.; Chatzieleftheriou, M.; Morphis, A.; Kaklamanis, K.; Lopp, R.; Theodorakou, M.; Tassi, M.; Simserides, C.

    2016-12-01

    We employ two tight-binding (TB) approaches to systematically study the electronic structure and hole or electron transfer in B-DNA monomer polymers and dimer polymers made up of N monomers (base pairs): (I) at the base-pair level, using the onsite energies of base pairs and the hopping integrals between successive base pairs, i.e., a wire model and (II) at the single-base level, using the onsite energies of the bases and the hopping integrals between neighboring bases, i.e., an extended ladder model since we also include diagonal hoppings. We solve a system of M (matrix dimension) coupled equations [(I) M =N , (II) M =2 N ] for the time-independent problem, and a system of M coupled first order differential equations for the time-dependent problem. We perform a comparative study of stationary and time-dependent aspects of the two TB variants, using realistic sets of parameters. The studied properties include HOMO and LUMO eigenspectra, occupation probabilities, density of states and HOMO-LUMO gaps as well as mean over time probabilities to find the carrier at each site [(I) base pair or (II) base], Fourier spectra, which reflect the frequency content of charge transfer, and pure mean transfer rates from a certain site to another. The two TB approaches give coherent, complementary aspects of electronic properties and charge transfer in B-DNA monomer polymers and dimer polymers.

  3. Electronic structure and carrier transfer in B-DNA monomer polymers and dimer polymers: Stationary and time-dependent aspects of a wire model versus an extended ladder model.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, K; Chatzieleftheriou, M; Morphis, A; Kaklamanis, K; Lopp, R; Theodorakou, M; Tassi, M; Simserides, C

    2016-12-01

    We employ two tight-binding (TB) approaches to systematically study the electronic structure and hole or electron transfer in B-DNA monomer polymers and dimer polymers made up of N monomers (base pairs): (I) at the base-pair level, using the onsite energies of base pairs and the hopping integrals between successive base pairs, i.e., a wire model and (II) at the single-base level, using the onsite energies of the bases and the hopping integrals between neighboring bases, i.e., an extended ladder model since we also include diagonal hoppings. We solve a system of M (matrix dimension) coupled equations [(I) M=N, (II) M=2N] for the time-independent problem, and a system of M coupled first order differential equations for the time-dependent problem. We perform a comparative study of stationary and time-dependent aspects of the two TB variants, using realistic sets of parameters. The studied properties include HOMO and LUMO eigenspectra, occupation probabilities, density of states and HOMO-LUMO gaps as well as mean over time probabilities to find the carrier at each site [(I) base pair or (II) base], Fourier spectra, which reflect the frequency content of charge transfer, and pure mean transfer rates from a certain site to another. The two TB approaches give coherent, complementary aspects of electronic properties and charge transfer in B-DNA monomer polymers and dimer polymers.

  4. Mixed valent sites in biological electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Edward I; Xie, Xiangjin; Dey, Abhishek

    2008-04-01

    Many of the active sites involved in electron transfer (ET) in biology have more than one metal and are mixed valent in at least one redox state. These include Cu(A), and the polynuclear Fe-S clusters which vary in their extent of delocalization. In this tutorial review the relative contributions to delocalization are evaluated using S K-edge X-ray absorption, magnetic circular dichroism and other spectroscopic methods. The role of intra-site delocalization in ET is considered.

  5. Photochemical electron transfer reactions of tirapazamine.

    PubMed

    Poole, James S; Hadad, Christopher M; Platz, Matthew S; Fredin, Zachary P; Pickard, Laura; Guerrero, Elisa Levya; Kessler, Margarita; Chowdhury, Goutam; Kotandeniya, Delshanee; Gates, Kent S

    2002-04-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of 3-aminobenzo-1,2,4-triazine di-N-oxide (tirapazamine) have been recorded and exhibit a dependence on solvent that correlates with the Dimroth ET30 parameter. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations reveal that the transition of tirapazamine in the visible region is pi-->pi* in nature. The fluorescence lifetime is 98+/-2 ps in water. The fluorescence quantum yield is approximately 0.002 in water. The fluorescence of tirapazamine is efficiently quenched by electron donors via an electron-transfer process. Linear Stern-Volmer fluorescence quenching plots are observed with sodium azide, potassium thiocyanate, guanosine monophosphate and tryptophan (Trp) methyl ester hydrochloride. Guanosine monophosphate, tyrosine (Tyr) methyl ester hydrochloride and Trp methyl ester hydrochloride appear to quench the fluorescence at a rate greater than diffusion control implying that these substrates complex with tirapazamine in its ground state. This complexation was detected by absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multi-chromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads. Technical progress report, 1987--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This research project involves the design, synthesis and study of the molecules which mimic many of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. Specifically, the molecules are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic multistep electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited singlet state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they model carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  7. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  8. Synthesis and controlled self-assembly of covalently linked hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene/perylene diimide dyads as models to study fundamental energy and electron transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Dössel, Lukas F; Kamm, Valentin; Howard, Ian A; Laquai, Frédéric; Pisula, Wojciech; Feng, Xinliang; Li, Chen; Takase, Masayoshi; Kudernac, Tibor; De Feyter, Steven; Müllen, Klaus

    2012-04-04

    We report the synthesis and photophysical characterization of a series of hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC)/perylenetetracarboxy diimide (PDI) dyads that are covalently linked with a rigid bridge. Both the ratio of the two components and the conjugation of the bridging element are systematically modified to study the influence on self-assembly and energy and electron transfer between electron donor HBC and acceptor PDI. STM and 2D-WAXS experiments reveal that both in solution and in bulk solid state the dyads assemble into well-ordered two-dimensional supramolecular structures with controllable mutual orientations and distances between donor and acceptor at a nanoscopic scale. Depending on the symmetry of the dyads, either columns with nanosegregated stacks of HBC and PDI or interdigitating networks with alternating HBC and PDI moieties are observed. UV-vis, photoluminescence, transient photoluminescence, and transient absorption spectroscopy confirm that after photoexcitation of the donor HBC a photoinduced electron transfer between HBC and PDI can only compete with the dominant Förster resonance energy transfer, if facilitated by an intimate stacking of HBC and PDI with sufficient orbital overlap. However, while the alternating stacks allow efficient electron transfer, only the nanosegregated stacks provide charge transport channels in bulk state that are a prerequisite for application as active components in thin film electronic devices. These results have important implications for the further design of functional donor-acceptor dyads, being promising materials for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells and field-effect transistors.

  9. Rotational And Rovibrational Energy Transfer In Electron Collisions With Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Air flows around a hypervelocity reentry vehicle undergo dissociation, rovibrational excitation and ionization. More specifically the air, initially 80% N2 and 20% O2, in the shock layer consists of species such as N, O, N2, O2, NO, N+, O+, N+, O+, NO+ and 2 free electrons. It was pointed out in multi temperature models'' that the temperature of the rotational energy modes and the gas-kinetic translational temperature are quickly equilibrated by a few collisions and rise rapidly to high temperatures as 50000K before falling off to equilibrium value of 10000K. Contrary, the electronic and vibrational temperatures state energy distributions remain low (less than 15000K) because of the slow equilibration. Electron vibrational energy transfer is thought to play a crucial role in such a ionizing flow regime since chemical reaction rates and dissociation depend strongly on the vibrational temperatures. Modeling of these flowfields in principle require the rovibrational excitation and de-excitation cross section data for average electron energies from threshold up to several eV (leV=11605.4 K). In this lecture we focus on theoretical description of rotational effects i.e. energy transfer of electrons to molecules such that the molecular rotational (vojo goes to voj) or vibrational and rotational (v(sub 0)j(sub 0) goes to vj) states are changed. Excitation and de-excitation of electronic states was discussed in a previous talk at this conference.

  10. Water promoting electron hole transport between tyrosine and cysteine in proteins via a special mechanism: double proton coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Ma, Guangcai; Sun, Weichao; Dai, Hongjing; Xiao, Dong; Zhang, Yanfang; Qin, Xin; Liu, Yongjun; Bu, Yuxiang

    2014-03-26

    The proton/electron transfer reactions between cysteine residue (Cys) and tyrosinyl radical (Tyr(•)) are an important step for many enzyme-catalyzed processes. On the basis of the statistical analysis of protein data bank, we designed three representative models to explore the possible proton/electron transfer mechanisms from Cys to Tyr(•) in proteins. Our ab initio calculations on simplified models and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations on real protein environment reveal that the direct electron transfer between Cys and Tyr(•) is difficult to occur, but an inserted water molecule can greatly promote the proton/electron transfer reactions by a double-proton-coupled electron transfer (dPCET) mechanism. The inserted H2O plays two assistant roles in these reactions. The first one is to bridge the side chains of Tyr(•) and Cys via two hydrogen bonds, which act as the proton pathway, and the other one is to enhance the electron overlap between the lone-pair orbital of sulfur atom and the π-orbital of phenol moiety and to function as electron transfer pathway. This water-mediated dPCET mechanism may offer great help to understand the detailed electron transfer processes between Tyr and Cys residues in proteins, such as the electron transfer from Cys439 to Tyr730(•) in the class I ribonucleotide reductase.

  11. 78 FR 49365 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION 12 CFR Part 1005 RIN 3170-AA33 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Correction... rules \\1\\ implements the Electronic Fund Transfer Act's provisions regarding remittance transfers...

  12. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  13. Geometric Electron Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nika, G. Gerald; Parameswaran, R.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a visual approach for explaining the filling of electrons in the shells, subshells, and orbitals of the chemical elements. Enables students to apply the principles of atomic electron configuration while using manipulatives to model the building up of electron configurations as the atomic numbers of elements increase on the periodic…

  14. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1992-05-01

    We have studied electron transfer quenching of the excited state of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in aqueous suspensions of zeolites Y, L, and mordenite. The internal pore network of the zeolite is ion-exchanged with methylviologen cations, which quench the excited state of the surface-bound sensitizer. A detailed study of the quenching and charge recombination kinetics, using time-resolved luminescence quenching and transient diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, shows to remarkable effects: first, the excited state quenching is entirely dynamic is large-pore zeolites (L and Y), even when they are prepared as apparently dry'' powders (which still contain significant amounts of internally sited water). Second, a lower limit for the diffusion coefficient of the MV{sup 2+} ion in these zeolites, determined by this technique, is 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}sec, i.e., only about one order of magnitude slower than a typical ion in liquid water, and 2--3 orders of magnitude faster than charge transfer diffusion of cations in polyelectrolyte films or membranes such as Nafion. Surface sensitization of internally platinized layered oxide semiconductors such as K{sub 4-x}H{sub x}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 17}{center dot}nH{sub 2}O (x {approx} 2.5) yields photocatalysts for the production of H{sub 2} and I{sub 3{minus}} in aqueous iodide solutions. Layered alkali niobates and titanates form a class of zeolitic wide-bandap semiconductors, and are the first examples of photocatalysts that evolve hydrogen from an electrochemically reversible (i.e., non-sacrificial) electron donor with visible light excitation.

  15. Modeling the current-voltage characteristics of thin-film silicon solar cells based on photo-induced electron transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Satoru

    2013-12-01

    Power conversion efficiency of p-i-n type macrocrystalline silicon (µc-Si:H) solar cells has been analyzed in terms of sequential processes of photo-induced electron transfer. The effect of the excitonic state on the charged carrier generation has been studied compared to a conventional scheme in which only charged carriers are taken into account for the operation of the solar cells. A numerical model has been developed to calculate current-voltage characteristics of solar cells on the basis of two types of charged carrier generation processes (exciton process and charged carrier process). The light trapping effect due to a textured back surface reflector (BSR) was embedded in the numerical model by using the effective medium theory in combination with the matrix method in the field of the electromagnetic theory of light. As an application of this modeling, it was found that the reported data of the power conversion efficiency were not explained by the conventional charged carrier process model and that the combined model of the charged carrier process with the exciton process well explains the performance of the p-i-n type μc-Si:H solar cells. In this way, the typical power conversion efficiencies were estimated to be 10.5% for the device (i-layer thickness: 1.8 μm) with the BSR (period: 600 nm; height: 250 nm) and 8.6% for the device with the flat reflector under the condition that the fractions of the exciton process and charged carrier process were 60% and 40%, respectively.

  16. Soliton-like Solutions and Electron Transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D

    2000-06-01

    We consider various mechanisms of long-range electron transfer in DNAwhich enable us to explain recent controversial experiments. We show thatcontinuous super-exchange theory can explain the values of electron rateconstants in short fragments of DNA. The soliton-type electron transfer inlong segments of DNA is also dealt with.

  17. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Smell is a vital sense for animals. The mainstream explanation of smell is based on recognition of the odorant molecules through characteristics of their surface, e.g., shape, but certain experiments suggest that such recognition is complemented by recognition of vibrational modes. According to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain, thereby, recent experiments performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Our demonstration is based on known physical properties of biological electron transfer and on ab initio calculations on odorants carried out for the purpose of the present study. We identify a range of physical characteristics which olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through homology modeling. PMID:22899100

  18. Technology Transfer: A Policy Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    US foreign policy must support technology. A case in point: The Chinese are newly enlightened about some forms of economic develop- ment as the only...Directors of the National Technology Transfer Society. II TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: A Policy Model Text and display type in Trade Gothic ; Title and half-title

  19. Metal ion modulated electron transfer in photosynthetic proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacterial reaction center (RC) proteins are ideal native systems for addressing basic questions regarding the nature of biological electron transfer because both the protein structure and the electron-transfer reactions are well-characterized. Metal ion binding to the RC can affect primary photochemistry and provides a probe for understanding the involvement of local protein environments in electron transfer. The RC has two distinct transition metal ion binding sites, the well-known non-heme Fe{sup 2+} site buried in the protein interior and a recently discovered Zn{sup 2+} site located on the surface of the protein. Fe{sup 2+} removal and Zn{sup 2+} binding systematically affect different electron-transfer steps in the RC. Factors involved in the metal ion alteration of RC electron transfer may provide a paradigm for other biological systems involved in electron transfer.

  20. Solvent reorganizational red-edge effect in intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Demchenko, A P; Sytnik, A I

    1991-01-01

    Polar solvents are characterized by statistical distributions of solute-solvent interaction energies that result in inhomogeneous broadening of the solute electronic spectra. This allows photoselection of the high interaction energy part of the distribution by excitation at the red (long-wavelength) edge of the absorption bands. We observe that intramolecular electron transfer in the bianthryl molecule from the locally excited (LE) to the charge-transfer (CT) state, which requires solvent relaxation and does not occur in vitrified polar solutions, is dramatically facilitated in low-temperature propylene glycol glass by the red-edge excitation. This allows one to obtain spectroscopically the pure CT form and observe its dependence upon the relaxational properties of the solvent. A qualitative potential model of this effect is presented. PMID:11607224

  1. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  2. 76 FR 29901 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... delivery may be available for a higher fee. International Wire Transfers Consumers may also send... institutions by international wire transfer. Consumers may choose to send funds by wire transfer when..., particularly when sending larger amounts. A wire transfer is generally an account-to- account...

  3. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-10-02

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel-production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese-calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S(2) → S(3) transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (Y Z OX). The rate-determining elementary step (τ, approximately 30 µs at 20 °C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein-water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (E(a) = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S(0) → S(1) transition are similar (τ, approximately 100 µs; E(a) = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established.

  4. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Evaluation of a matrix element].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of the matrix element of the probability of interprotein electron transfer on the mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor centers and the distance between them was calculated. The calculations were made under the assumption that electron transfer proceeds mainly by a collective excitation of polaron nature, like a solvated electron state. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data and indicate the nonexponential behavior of this dependence in the case when the distance transfer is less than 20 A.

  5. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  6. Four-electron model for singlet and triplet excitation energy transfers with inclusion of coherence memory, inelastic tunneling and nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    A computational scheme to describe the coherent dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is proposed on the basis of generalized master equations with memory kernels. This formalism takes into account those physical effects in electron-bath coupling system such as the spin symmetry of excitons, the inelastic electron tunneling and the quantum features of nuclear motions, thus providing a theoretical framework to perform an ab initio description of EET through molecular simulations for evaluating the spectral density and the temporal correlation function of electronic coupling. Some test calculations have then been carried out to investigate the dependence of exciton population dynamics on coherence memory, inelastic tunneling correlation time, magnitude of electronic coupling, quantum correction to temporal correlation function, reorganization energy and energy gap.

  7. A mechano-chemiosmotic model for the coupling of electron and proton transfer to ATP synthesis in energy-transforming membranes: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Kasumov, Eldar A; Kasumov, Ruslan E; Kasumova, Irina V

    2015-01-01

    ATP is synthesized using ATP synthase by utilizing energy either from the oxidation of organic compounds, or from light, via redox reactions (oxidative- or photo phosphorylation), in energy-transforming membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts, and bacteria. ATP synthase undergoes several changes during its functioning. The generally accepted model for ATP synthesis is the well-known rotatory model (see e.g., Junge et al., Nature 459:364-370, 2009; Junge and Müller, Science 333:704-705, 2011). Here, we present an alternative modified model for the coupling of electron and proton transfer to ATP synthesis, which was initially developed by Albert Lester Lehninger (1917-1986). Details of the molecular mechanism of ATP synthesis are described here that involves cyclic low-amplitude shrinkage and swelling of mitochondria. A comparison of the well-known current model and the mechano-chemiosmotic model is also presented. Based on structural, and other data, we suggest that ATP synthase is a Ca(2+)/H(+)-K(+) Cl(-)-pump-pore-enzyme complex, in which γ-subunit rotates 360° in steps of 30°, and 90° due to the binding of phosphate ions to positively charged amino acid residues in the N-terminal γ-subunit, while in the electric field. The coiled coil b 2-subunits are suggested to act as ropes that are shortened by binding of phosphate ions to positively charged lysines or arginines; this process is suggested to pull the α 3 β 3-hexamer to the membrane during the energization process. ATP is then synthesized during the reverse rotation of the γ-subunit by destabilizing the phosphated N-terminal γ-subunit and b 2-subunits under the influence of Ca(2+) ions, which are pumped over from storage-intermembrane space into the matrix, during swelling of intermembrane space. In the process of ATP synthesis, energy is first, predominantly, used in the delivery of phosphate ions and protons to the α 3 β 3-hexamer against the energy barrier with the help of C-terminal alpha

  8. Ab initio quantum chemical study of electron transfer in carboranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Ranjit; Pineda, Andrew C.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2005-05-01

    The electron transfer (ET) properties of 10- and 12-vertex carboranes are investigated by the ab initio Hartree-Fock method within the Marcus-Hush (MH) two-state model and the Koopman theorem (KT) approach. The calculated value of the ET coupling matrix element, VAB, is consistently higher in the KT approach than in the MH two-state model. For the carborane molecules functionalized by -CH 2 groups at C-vertices, VAB strongly depends on the relative orientation of the planes containing the terminal -CH 2 groups. The predicted conformation dependence of VAB offers a molecular mechanism to control ET between two active centers in molecular systems.

  9. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher B; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K; Ringbauer, Joseph A; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D; Arkin, Adam P; Hazen, Terry C; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A

    2009-09-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic coupling between hydrogen producers and consumers is a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent on growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation were upregulated in D. vulgaris compared with their expression in sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn), and the well-characterized high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and upregulated genes. Additionally, a predicted operon containing genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited upregulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd, and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little effect on growth via sulfate respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that to understand microbial processes that sustain nutrient cycling, lifestyles not captured in pure culture must be considered.

  10. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  11. The electron transfer system of synthrophically grown desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Christopher; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin Koo; Ringbauer, Joseph; HE, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic coupling between hydrogen producers and consumers is a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent on growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation were upregulated in D. vulgaris compared with their expression in sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn), and the well-characterized high-molecular-weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and upregulated genes. Additionally, a predicted operon containing genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited upregulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd, and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little effect on growth via sulfate respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that to understand microbial processes that sustain nutrient cycling, lifestyles not captured in pure culture must be considered.

  12. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  13. First-Principles Calculations of Electron Transfer in Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Ranjit; Karna, Shashi P.

    2000-03-01

    Suitably tailored organic structures are considered potential candidates as components in molecular electronic devices. A common molecular architecture for electronics consists of an electron donor (D) and an electron acceptor (A) moiety bonded together by a chemically inert bridging moiety, called spacer (S). The D-S-A combination constitutes the basic component equivalent of a solid state capacitor. A useful physical property that determines the applicability of molecular structures in moletronics is the electron transfer (ET) rate, which is related, in a two-state approximation, to the coupling matrix between the two electronic states representing the localization of electrons. In an effort to model potential organic structures, we have calculated the ET coupling matrix elements in a number of D-, S-, and A-type organic molecules with the use of ab initio Hartree-Fock method and two different basis sets, namely an STO-3G and a double zeta plus polarization (DZP). A number of important findings have emerged from this study: (i) The ET coupling matrix strongly depends upon the geometrical arrangement of the molecular fragment(s) in the architecture. (ii) In an oligomeric chain, the ET matrix decreases exponentially with molecular length (number of monomer units). (iii) In cyclic alkanes, the magnitude of the ET coupling matrix decreases with increasing size of fused rings.

  14. Electronic energy transfer: Localized operator partitioning of electronic energy in composite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yaser; Brumer, Paul

    2012-11-01

    A Hamiltonian based approach using spatially localized projection operators is introduced to give precise meaning to the chemically intuitive idea of the electronic energy on a quantum subsystem. This definition facilitates the study of electronic energy transfer in arbitrarily coupled quantum systems. In particular, the decomposition scheme can be applied to molecular components that are strongly interacting (with significant orbital overlap) as well as to isolated fragments. The result defines a consistent electronic energy at all internuclear distances, including the case of separated fragments, and reduces to the well-known Förster and Dexter results in their respective limits. Numerical calculations of coherent energy and charge transfer dynamics in simple model systems are presented and the effect of collisionally induced decoherence is examined.

  15. Radiative transfer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, James L.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assist with the development of analytical techniques for the interpretation of infrared observations. We have done the following: (1) helped to develop models for continuum absorption calculations for water vapor in the far infrared spectral region; (2) worked on models for pressure-induced absorption for O2 and N2 and their comparison with available observations; and (3) developed preliminary studies of non-local thermal equilibrium effects in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere for infrared gases. These new techniques were employed for analysis of balloon-borne far infrared data by a group at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The empirical continuum absorption model for water vapor in the far infrared spectral region and the pressure-induced N2 absorption model were found to give satisfactory results in the retrieval of the mixing ratios of a number of stratospheric trace constituents from balloon-borne far infrared observations.

  16. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... cooperative agreement will be made by the Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931...

  17. Time-resolved EPR identifies unexpected electron transfer in cryptochrome**

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Till; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Krapf, Sebastian; Koslowski, Thorsten; Schleicher, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tuning photoinduced electron transfer: Subtle differences in local sequence and conformation can produce diversity and specificity in electron transfer (ET) in proteins, despite high structural conservation of redox partners. For individual ET steps, distance is not necessarily the decisive parameter; orientation and solvent accessibility of ET partners, and therefore, stabilization of charge-separated states contribute substantially. PMID:22086606

  18. PROTON-COUPLED ELECTRON TRANSFER: A Reaction Chemist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the concerted transfer of an electron and a proton. Such reactions play an important role in many areas of chemistry and biology. Concerted PCET is thermochemically more favorable than the first step in competing consecutive processes involving stepwise electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT), often by >=1 eV. PCET reactions of the form X-H + Y X + H-Y can be termed hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). Another PCET class involves outersphere electron transfer concerted with deprotonation by another reagent, Y+ + XH-B Y + X-HB+ . Many PCET/HAT rate constants are predicted well by the Marcus cross relation. The cross-relation calculation uses rate constants for self-exchange reactions to provide information on intrinsic barriers. Intrinsic barriers for PCET can be comparable to or larger than those for ET. These properties are discussed in light of recent theoretical treatments of PCET.

  19. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    PubMed

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    2000-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfersbetween globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions forits use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange couplingdue to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependenceof the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globularproteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling andsolvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis forunderstanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment.The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-rangeelectron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experimentsare made.

  20. Sodium heat transfer system modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. F.; Fewell, M. E.

    1983-11-01

    The sodium heat transfer system of the international energy agency (IEA) small solar power systems (SSPS) central receiver system (CRS), which includes the heliostat field, receiver, hot and cold storage vessels, and sodium/water steam generator was modeled. The computer code SOLTES (simulator of large thermal energy systems), was used to model this system. The results from SOLTES are compared to measured data.

  1. Molecular mimicry of photosynthetic energy and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Proper application of reaction design considerations can yield artificial photosynthetic devices which credibility mimic the three natural photochemical processes. One approach is to use pigments and electron donors and acceptors related to those found in natural photosynthesis (and thus presumably optimal for that system), but to replace the protein with covalent bonds as an organizing precept. Molecular pentads described herein exemplify the success of this approach. At the heart of these molecules, are two covalently linked synthetic porphyrin moieties (P-P). One of these models for chlorophyll is attached to a carotenoid polyene (C), whereas the other is linked to a rigid diquinone (Q-Q). As discussed later in this paper, excitation of such a pentad is followed by photoinitiated electron transfer steps which ultimately give a C[sup [center dot]+]-P-P-Q-Q[sup [center dot]-] charge-separated state. Depending upon the structure of the pentad and the conditions, these states are formed with quantum yields of up to 0.83, have lifetimes approaching 0.5 ms, and store about one-half of the energy of the exciting singlet state. Related photosynthesis mimics display singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to porphyrins and among porphyrin chromophores, and rapid quenching of porphyrin triplet states by attached carotenoids. How have the structures of these and other successful artificial reaction centers evolved, and what will be the next steps in their development The authors will address these questions from the point of view of photoinitiated electron transfer, and then singlet and triplet energy transfer will briefly be considered. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Electron transfer at thermally heterogeneous molecule-metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, Galen T.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    The rate of electron transfer between a molecular species and a metal, each at a different local temperature, is examined theoretically through the implementation of a bithermal (characterized by two temperatures) Marcus formalism. Expressions for the rate constant and the electronic contribution to a heat transfer mechanism which is induced by the temperature gradient between a molecule and metal are constructed. The system of coupled dynamical equations describing the electronic and thermal currents are derived and examined over diverse ranges of reaction geometries and temperature gradients. It is shown that electron transfer across the molecule-metal interface is associated with heat transfer and that the electron exchange between metal and molecule makes a distinct contribution to the interfacial heat conduction even when the net electronic current vanishes.

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer based ion sensing within an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Englich, Florian V; Foo, Tze Cheung; Richardson, Andrew C; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Sumby, Christopher J; Monro, Tanya M

    2011-01-01

    We combine suspended-core microstructured optical fibers with the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) effect to demonstrate a new type of fluorescent optical fiber-dip sensing platform for small volume ion detection. A sensor design based on a simple model PET-fluoroionophore system and small core microstructured optical fiber capable of detecting sodium ions is demonstrated. The performance of the dip sensor operating in a high sodium concentration regime (925 ppm Na(+)) and for lower sodium concentration environments (18.4 ppm Na(+)) is explored and future approaches to improving the sensor's signal stability, sensitivity and selectivity are discussed.

  4. Variable Electron Transfer Pathways in an Amphibian Cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Till; Paulus, Bernd; Okafuji, Asako; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions play vital roles in many biological processes. Very often the transfer of charge(s) proceeds stepwise over large distances involving several amino acid residues. By using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy, we have studied the mechanism of light-induced reduction of the FAD cofactor of cryptochrome/photolyase family proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that electron abstraction from a nearby amino acid by the excited FAD triggers further electron transfer steps even if the conserved chain of three tryptophans, known to be an effective electron transfer pathway in these proteins, is blocked. Furthermore, we were able to characterize this secondary electron transfer pathway and identify the amino acid partner of the resulting flavin-amino acid radical pair as a tyrosine located at the protein surface. This alternative electron transfer pathway could explain why interrupting the conserved tryptophan triad does not necessarily alter photoreactions of cryptochromes in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that light-induced electron transfer is a robust property of cryptochromes and more intricate than commonly anticipated. PMID:23430261

  5. Bridge-mediated hopping or superexchange electron-transfer processes in bis(triarylamine) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Christoph; Nöll, Gilbert; Schelter, Jürgen

    2002-09-01

    Hopping and superexchange are generally considered to be alternative electron-transfer mechanisms in molecular systems. In this work we used mixed-valence radical cations as model systems for the investigation of electron-transfer pathways. We show that substituents attached to a conjugated bridge connecting two triarylamine redox centres have a marked influence on the near-infrared absorption spectra of the corresponding cations. Spectral analysis, followed by evaluation of the electron-transfer parameters using the Generalized Mulliken-Hush theory and simulation of the potential energy surfaces, indicate that hopping and superexchange are not alternatives, but are both present in the radical cation with a dimethoxybenzene bridge. We found that the type of electron-transfer mechanism depends on the bridge-reorganization energy as well as on the bridge-state energy. Because superexchange and hopping follow different distance laws, our findings have implications for the design of new molecular and polymeric electron-transfer materials.

  6. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention.

  7. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the ks (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network. PMID:27148219

  8. Composition, size distribution, optical properties, and radiative effects of laboratory-resuspended PM10 from geological dust of the Rome area, by electron microscopy and radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrodangelo, A.; Salzano, R.; Bassani, C.; Pareti, S.; Perrino, C.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, new information has been gained on the laboratory-resuspended PM10 fraction from geological topsoil and outcropped rocks representative of the Rome area (Latium). Mineralogical composition, size distribution, optical properties and the surface radiative forcing efficiency (RFE) of dust types representing the compositional end members of this geological area have been addressed. A multi-disciplinary approach was used, based on chamber resuspension of raw materials and sampling of the PM10 fraction, to simulate field sampling at dust source, scanning electron microscopy/X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS) of individual mineral particles, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of bulk dust samples, building of number and volume size distribution (SD) from microanalysis data of mineral particles and fitting to a log-normal curve, and radiative transfer modelling (RTM) to retrieve optical properties and radiative effects of the compositional end-member dust samples. The mineralogical composition of Rome lithogenic PM10 varies between an end-member dominated by silicate minerals (from volcanics lithotypes), and one mostly composed of calcite (from travertine or limestones). Lithogenic PM10 with intermediate composition derives mainly from siliciclastic rocks or marlstones. Size and mineral species of PM10 particles of silicate-dominated dust types are tuned mainly by rock weathering and, to lesser extent, by debris formation or crystallization; chemical precipitation of CaCO3 plays a major role in calcite-dominated types. These differences are reflected in the diversity of volume distributions, either within dust types or mineral species. Differences are also observed between volume distributions of calcite from travertine (natural source; SD unimodal at 5 μm a.d.) and from road dust (anthropic source; SD bimodal at 3.8 and 1.8 μm a.d.). The volcanics and travertine dusts differently affect the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the asymmetry

  9. A molecular shift register based on electron transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Josenelson; Beratan, David N.

    1988-01-01

    An electronic shift-register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. This device integrates designed electronic molecules onto a very large scale integrated (silicon microelectronic) substrate, providing an example of a 'molecular electronic device' that could actually be made. The design requirements for such a device and possible synthetic strategies are discussed. Devices along these lines should have lower energy usage and enhanced storage density.

  10. A Comparison of Electron-Transfer Dynamics inIonic Liquids and Neutral Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Wishart J. F.; Lee, H.Y.; Issa, J.B.; Isied, S.S.; Castner, Jr., E.W.; Pan, Y.; Hussey, C.L.; Lee, K.S.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of ionic liquids on photoinduced electron-transfer reactions in a donor-bridge-acceptor system is examined for two ionic liquid solvents, 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and tributylmethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide. The results are compared with those for the same system in methanol and acetonitrile solution. Electron-transfer rates were measured using time-resolved fluorescence quenching for the donor-bridge-acceptor system comprising a 1-N,1-N-dimethylbenzene-1,4-diamine donor, a proline bridge, and a coumarin 343 acceptor. The photoinduced electron-transfer processes are in the inverted regime (-{Delta}G > {lambda}) in all four solvents, with driving forces of -1.6 to -1.9 eV and estimated reorganization energies of about 1.0 eV. The observed electron-transfer kinetics have broadly distributed rates that are generally slower in the ionic liquids compared to the neutral solvents, which also have narrower rate distributions. To describe the broad distributions of electron-transfer kinetics, we use two different models: a distribution of exponential lifetimes and a discrete sum of exponential lifetimes. Analysis of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling shows that for ionic liquids this intramolecular electron-transfer reaction should be treated using a solvent-controlled electron-transfer model.

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer between benzyloxy dendrimer phthalocyanine and benzoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Ma, Dongdong; Pan, Sujuan; Wu, Shijun; Jiang, Yufeng; Zeng, Di; Yang, Hongqin; Peng, Yiru

    2016-10-01

    Photo-induced electron transfer (PET) is an important and fundamental process in natural photosynthesis. To mimic such interesting PET process, a suitable donor and acceptor couple were properly chosen. Dendrimer phthalocyanines and their derivatives have emerged as promising materials for artificial photosynthesis systems. In this paper, the electron transfer between the light harvest dendrimer phthalocyanine (donor) and the 1,4-benzoquinone (acceptor) was studied by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. It was found that fluorescence of phthalocyanine was quenched by benzoquinone (BQ) via excited state electron transfer, from the phthalocyanine to the BQ upon excitation at 610 nm. The Stern-Volmer constant (KSV) of electron transfer was calculated. Our study suggests that this dendritic phthalocyanine is an effective new electron donor and transmission complex and could be used as a potential artificial photosynthesis system.

  12. Engineering of an alternative electron transfer path in photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Larom, Shirley; Salama, Faris; Schuster, Gadi; Adir, Noam

    2010-01-01

    The initial steps of oxygenic photosynthetic electron transfer occur within photosystem II, an intricate pigment/protein transmembrane complex. Light-driven electron transfer occurs within a multistep pathway that is efficiently insulated from competing electron transfer pathways. The heart of the electron transfer system, composed of six linearly coupled redox active cofactors that enable electron transfer from water to the secondary quinone acceptor QB, is mainly embedded within two proteins called D1 and D2. We have identified a site in silico, poised in the vicinity of the QA intermediate quinone acceptor, which could serve as a potential binding site for redox active proteins. Here we show that modification of Lysine 238 of the D1 protein to glutamic acid (Glu) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, results in a strain that grows photautotrophically. The Glu thylakoid membranes are able to perform light-dependent reduction of exogenous cytochrome c with water as the electron donor. Cytochrome c photoreduction by the Glu mutant was also shown to significantly protect the D1 protein from photodamage when isolated thylakoid membranes were illuminated. We have therefore engineered a novel electron transfer pathway from water to a soluble protein electron carrier without harming the normal function of photosystem II. PMID:20457933

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of Electron Transfer in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulys, J.

    1986-10-01

    The results of studies on the kinetics of the oxidation-reduction reactions of individual proteins (electron transfer agents and enzymes) are described. Attention has been concentrated on the effect of the nature of the active centres in the protein molecules and of the modification of individual aminoacid residues on the rate of electron transfer in a homogeneous medium. Questions associated with the electrochemical reactions of proteins and with the effect of the state of the interface on the rate of this process are considered in detail. Ideas concerning the theoretical calculation of the rate constants for electron transfer in proteins are described. The bibliography includes 154 references.

  14. Photosensitized electron transfer processes of nanocarbons applicable to solar cells.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Francis; Ito, Osamu

    2012-01-07

    Photosensitized electron-transfer processes of nanocarbon materials hybridized with electron donating or electron accepting molecules have been surveyed in this tutorial review on the basis of the recent results reported mainly from our laboratories. As nano-carbon materials, fullerenes and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been employed. Fullerenes act as photo-sensitizing electron acceptors with respect to a wide variety of electron donors; in addition, the fullerenes act as good ground state electron acceptors in the presence of light-absorbing electron donors such as porphyrins and phthalocyanines. In the case of SWCNTs, their ground states act as electron acceptor and electron donors, depending on the photosensitizers. For example, with respect to the photoexcited porphyrins and phthalocyanines, SWCNTs usually act as electron acceptors, whereas for the photoexcited fullerenes, SWCNTs act as electron donors. The diameter sorted semi-conductive SWCNTs have been used to verify the size-dependent electron transfer rates. For the confirmation of the electron transfer processes, the transient absorption methods have been widely used, in addition to the time-resolved fluorescence spectral measurements. The kinetic data thus obtained in solution are found to be quite useful to predict the efficiencies of photovoltaic cells constructed on semiconductor nanoparticle modified electrodes and their photocatalytic processes.

  15. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  16. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    PubMed

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    1999-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfers between globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions for its use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange coupling due to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependence of the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globular proteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling and solvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis for understanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment. The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-range electron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experiments are made.

  17. Promoting Knowledge Transfer with Electronic Note Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Andrew D.; Shambaugh, R. Neal; Doctor, Tasneem

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the differences between (a) copying and pasting text versus typed note-taking methods of constructing study notes simultaneously with (b) vertically scaffolded versus horizontally scaffold notes on knowledge transfer. Forty-seven undergraduate educational psychology students participated. Materials included 2 electronic…

  18. Supramolecular networks with electron transfer in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Shveyd, Alexander K.; Tayi, Alok S.; Sue, Chi-Hau; Narayanan, Ashwin

    2016-09-13

    Organic charge-transfer (CT) co-crystals in a crossed stack system are disclosed. The co-crystals exhibit bidirectional charge transfer interactions where one donor molecule shares electrons with two different acceptors, one acceptor face-to-face and the other edge-to-face. The assembly and charge transfer interaction results in a pleochroic material whereby the optical absorption continuously changes depending on the polarization angle of incident light.

  19. Improved heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics of fluorinated graphene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathi, Sidhureddy; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.; Senthil Kumar, Shanmugam

    2014-08-01

    Though graphitic carbons are commercially available for various electrochemical processes, their performance is limited in terms of various electrochemical activities. Recent experiments on layered carbon materials, such as graphene, demonstrated an augmented performance of these systems in all electrochemical activities due to their unique electronic properties, enhanced surface area, structure and chemical stabilities. Moreover, flexibility in controlling electronic, as well as electrochemical activities by heteroatom doping brings further leverage in their practical use. Here, we study the electron transfer kinetics of fluorinated graphene derivatives, known as fluorinated graphene oxide (FGO) and its reduced form, RFGO. Enhanced electron transfer kinetics (heterogeneous electron transfer (HET)) is observed from these fluorinated systems in comparison to their undoped systems such as graphene oxide (GO) and reduced GO. A detailed study has been conducted using standard redox probes and biomolecules revealing the enhanced electro-catalytic activities of FGO and RFGO, and electron transfer rates are simulated theoretically. This study reveals that fluorine not only induces defects in graphitic lattice leading to an enhanced HET process but also can modify the electronic structure of graphene surface.Though graphitic carbons are commercially available for various electrochemical processes, their performance is limited in terms of various electrochemical activities. Recent experiments on layered carbon materials, such as graphene, demonstrated an augmented performance of these systems in all electrochemical activities due to their unique electronic properties, enhanced surface area, structure and chemical stabilities. Moreover, flexibility in controlling electronic, as well as electrochemical activities by heteroatom doping brings further leverage in their practical use. Here, we study the electron transfer kinetics of fluorinated graphene derivatives, known as

  20. MANAGING ELECTRONIC DATA TRANSFER IN ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of computers and electronic information poses a complex problem for potential litigation in space law. The problem currently manifests itself in at least two ways. First, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) enforcement of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compen...

  1. Electron Donor-Acceptor Quenching and Photoinduced Electron Transfer for Coumarin Dyes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-31

    Mechanism of cousarin photodegradation . Ithe behavior of eoiuma dyes is water ad In aqueous detergent media,. and the effsects of medism aud, additives on...D-i36 345 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR UENCHING AND PHOTOINDUCED i/i Ai ELECTRON TRANSFER FOR COUMARIN DYES (U) BOSTON UNIY MR DEPT OF CHEMISTRY G JONES...TYPE OF REPORT & PEIOD COVERED Electron Donor-acceptor Quenching and Photo- Technical, 1/1/82-10/31/82 induced Electron Transfer for Coumarin Dyes S

  2. [Long-range electron transfer in globular proteins by polaron excitation].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V L; Chuev, G N

    1997-01-01

    Considering polaron model, we have calculated an electron state localized in the protein heme. Using these calculations: the electron density and electron energy, we estimated the self-exchange rate constant for cyt c (horse heart), its reorganization energy, matrix element, and dependence of this rate on the distance between hemes. The results are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical estimations. We discuss the role of polaron excitations in the long-range electron transfer in globular proteins.

  3. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H[sub 2] and I[sub 3][sup [minus

  4. Alternative ground states enable pathway switching in biological electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Abriata, Luciano A; Álvarez-Paggi, Damián; Ledesma, Gabriela N; Blackburn, Ninian J; Vila, Alejandro J; Murgida, Daniel H

    2012-10-23

    Electron transfer is the simplest chemical reaction and constitutes the basis of a large variety of biological processes, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Nature has evolved specific proteins and cofactors for these functions. The mechanisms optimizing biological electron transfer have been matter of intense debate, such as the role of the protein milieu between donor and acceptor sites. Here we propose a mechanism regulating long-range electron transfer in proteins. Specifically, we report a spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical study on WT and single-mutant Cu(A) redox centers from Thermus thermophilus, which shows that thermal fluctuations may populate two alternative ground-state electronic wave functions optimized for electron entry and exit, respectively, through two different and nearly perpendicular pathways. These findings suggest a unique role for alternative or "invisible" electronic ground states in directional electron transfer. Moreover, it is shown that this energy gap and, therefore, the equilibrium between ground states can be fine-tuned by minor perturbations, suggesting alternative ways through which protein-protein interactions and membrane potential may optimize and regulate electron-proton energy transduction.

  5. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... processed. (c) In the event the Recipient, during the performance of this cooperative agreement, elects to... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931 Electronic... cooperative agreement will be made by the Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury...

  6. Toddlers' word learning and transfer from electronic and print books.

    PubMed

    Strouse, Gabrielle A; Ganea, Patricia A

    2017-04-01

    Transfer from symbolic media to the real world can be difficult for young children. A sample of 73 toddlers aged 17 to 23months were read either an electronic book displayed on a touchscreen device or a traditional print book in which a novel object was paired with a novel label. Toddlers in both conditions learned the label within the context of the book. However, only those who read the traditional format book generalized and transferred the label to other contexts. An older group of 28 toddlers aged 24 to 30months did generalize and transfer from the electronic book. Across ages, those children who primarily used screens to watch prerecorded video at home transferred less from the electronic book than those with more diverse home media experiences.

  7. Electron transfer through rigid organic molecular wires enhanced by electronic and electron-vibration coupling.

    PubMed

    Sukegawa, Junpei; Schubert, Christina; Zhu, Xiaozhang; Tsuji, Hayato; Guldi, Dirk M; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    Electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental process in a wide range of biological systems, photovoltaics and molecular electronics. Therefore to understand the relationship between molecular structure and ET properties is of prime importance. For this purpose, photoinduced ET has been studied extensively using donor-bridge-acceptor molecules, in which π-conjugated molecular wires are employed as bridges. Here, we demonstrate that carbon-bridged oligo-p-phenylenevinylene (COPV), which is both rigid and flat, shows an 840-fold increase in the ET rate compared with the equivalent flexible molecular bridges. A 120-fold rate enhancement is explained in terms of enhanced electronic coupling between the electron donor and the electron acceptor because of effective conjugation through the COPVs. The remainder of the rate enhancement is explained by inelastic electron tunnelling through COPV caused by electron-vibration coupling, unprecedented for organic molecular wires in solution at room temperature. This type of nonlinear effect demonstrates the versatility and potential practical utility of COPVs in molecular device applications.

  8. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, V.; Pranculis, V.; Melianas, A.; Inganäs, O.; Gulbinas, V.; Abramavicius, D.

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  9. Photoinduced Bimolecular Electron Transfer from Cyano Anions in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Boning; Liang, Min; Maroncelli, Mark; Castner, Edward W

    2015-11-19

    Ionic liquids with electron-donating anions are used to investigate rates and mechanisms of photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer to the photoexcited acceptor 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (9,10-DCNA). The set of five cyano anion ILs studied comprises the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation paired with each of these five anions: selenocyanate, thiocyanate, dicyanamide, tricyanomethanide, and tetracyanoborate. Measurements with these anions dilute in acetonitrile and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide show that the selenocyanate and tricyanomethanide anions are strong quenchers of the 9,10-DCNA fluorescence, thiocyanate is a moderately strong quencher, dicyanamide is a weak quencher, and no quenching is observed for tetracyanoborate. Quenching rates are obtained from both time-resolved fluorescence transients and time-integrated spectra. Application of a Smoluchowski diffusion-and-reaction model showed that the complex kinetics observed can be fit using only two adjustable parameters, D and V0, where D is the relative diffusion coefficient between donor and acceptor and V0 is the value of the electronic coupling at donor-acceptor contact.

  10. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    PubMed

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-12-22

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  11. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  12. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    PubMed Central

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov’yov, Ilia A.

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome–a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor. PMID:26689792

  13. Alternative ground states enable pathway switching in biological electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Álvarez-Paggi, Damián; Ledesma, Gabriela N.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Vila, Alejandro J.; Murgida, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer is the simplest chemical reaction and constitutes the basis of a large variety of biological processes, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Nature has evolved specific proteins and cofactors for these functions. The mechanisms optimizing biological electron transfer have been matter of intense debate, such as the role of the protein milieu between donor and acceptor sites. Here we propose a mechanism regulating long-range electron transfer in proteins. Specifically, we report a spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical study on WT and single-mutant CuA redox centers from Thermus thermophilus, which shows that thermal fluctuations may populate two alternative ground-state electronic wave functions optimized for electron entry and exit, respectively, through two different and nearly perpendicular pathways. These findings suggest a unique role for alternative or “invisible” electronic ground states in directional electron transfer. Moreover, it is shown that this energy gap and, therefore, the equilibrium between ground states can be fine-tuned by minor perturbations, suggesting alternative ways through which protein–protein interactions and membrane potential may optimize and regulate electron–proton energy transduction. PMID:23054836

  14. Alternative ground states enable pathway switching in biological electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Alvarez-Paggi, Damian; Ledesma, Gabirela N.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Vila, Alejandro J.; Murgida, Daniel H.

    2012-10-10

    Electron transfer is the simplest chemical reaction and constitutes the basis of a large variety of biological processes, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Nature has evolved specific proteins and cofactors for these functions. The mechanisms optimizing biological electron transfer have been matter of intense debate, such as the role of the protein milieu between donor and acceptor sites. Here we propose a mechanism regulating long-range electron transfer in proteins. Specifically, we report a spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical study on WT and single-mutant CuA redox centers from Thermus thermophilus, which shows that thermal fluctuations may populate two alternative ground-state electronic wave functions optimized for electron entry and exit, respectively, through two different and nearly perpendicular pathways. In conclusion, these findings suggest a unique role for alternative or “invisible” electronic ground states in directional electron transfer. Moreover, it is shown that this energy gap and, therefore, the equilibrium between ground states can be fine-tuned by minor perturbations, suggesting alternative ways through which protein–protein interactions and membrane potential may optimize and regulate electron–proton energy transduction.

  15. Rates and Routes of Electron Transfer of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase in an Enzymatic Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander; Stein, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Hydrogenase enzymes are being used in enzymatic fuel cells immobilized on a graphite or carbon electrode surface, for example. The enzyme is used for the anodic oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2) to produce protons and electrons. The association and orientation of the enzyme at the anode electrode for a direct electron transfer is not completely resolved. The distal FeS-cluster in [NiFe]-hydrogenases contains a histidine residue which is known to play a critical role in the intermolecular electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase graphite electrode association was investigated using Brownian Dynamics simulations. Residues that were shown to be in proximity to the electrode surface were identified (His184, Ser196, Glu461, Glu464), and electron transfer routes connecting the distal FeS-cluster with the surface residues were investigated. Several possible pathways for electron transfer between the distal FeS-cluster and the terminal amino acid residues were probed in terms of their rates of electron transfer using DFT methods. The reorganization energies λ of the distal iron-sulfur cluster and coronene as a molecular model for graphite were calculated. The reorganization energy of the distal (His)(Cys)3 cluster was found to be not very different from that of a standard cubane clusters with a (Cys)4 coordination. Electronic coupling matrix elements and rates of electron transfer for the different pathways were calculated according to the Marcus equation. The rates for glutamate-mediated electrode binding were found to be incompatible with experimental data. A direct electron transfer from the histidine ligand of the distal FeS-cluster to the electrode yielded rates of electron transfer in excellent agreement with experiment. A second pathway, however, from the distal FeS-cluster to the Ser196 residue was found to be equally efficient and feasible.

  16. Effect of proton transfer on the electronic coupling in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Janusz; Makowska, Joanna; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-06-01

    The effects of single and double proton transfer within Watson-Crick base pairs on donor-acceptor electronic couplings, Vda, in DNA are studied on the bases of quantum chemical calculations. Four dimers [AT,AT], [GC,GC], [GC,AT] and [GC,TA)] are considered. Three techniques - the generalized Mulliken-Hush scheme, the fragment charge method and the diabatic states method - are employed to estimate Vda for hole transfer between base pairs. We show that both single- and double proton transfer (PT) reactions may substantially affect the electronic coupling in DNA. The electronic coupling in [AT,AT] is predicted to be most sensitive to PT. Single PT within the first base pair in the dimer leads to increase in the hole transfer efficiency by a factor of 4, while proton transfer within the second pair should substantially, by 2.7 times, decrease the rate of charge transfer. Thus, directional asymmetry of the PT effects on the electronic coupling is predicted. The changes in the Vda matrix elements correlate with the topological properties of orbitals of donor and acceptor and can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of resonance structures of donor and acceptor. Atomic pair contributions to the Vda matrix elements are also analyzed.

  17. Electrochemical Electron Transfer and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Effects of Double Layer and Ionic Environment on Solvent Reorganization Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Soumya; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-06-14

    Electron transfer and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions at electrochemical interfaces play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes. The reorganization energy, which is a measure of the free energy change associated with solute and solvent rearrangements, is a key quantity for calculating rate constants for these reactions. We present a computational method for including the effects of the double layer and ionic environment of the diffuse layer in calculations of electrochemical solvent reorganization energies. This approach incorporates an accurate electronic charge distribution of the solute within a molecular-shaped cavity in conjunction with a dielectric continuum treatment of the solvent, ions, and electrode using the integral equations formalism polarizable continuum model. The molecule-solvent boundary is treated explicitly, but the effects of the electrode-double layer and double layer-diffuse layer boundaries, as well as the effects of the ionic strength of the solvent, are included through an external Green’s function. The calculated total reorganization energies agree well with experimentally measured values for a series of electrochemical systems, and the effects of including both the double layer and ionic environment are found to be very small. This general approach was also extended to electrochemical PCET and produced total reorganization energies in close agreement with experimental values for two experimentally studied PCET systems. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  18. Effectiveness of perturbation theory approaches for computing non-condon electron transfer dynamics in condensed phases.

    PubMed

    Cook, William R; Coalson, Rob D; Evans, Deborah G

    2009-08-20

    A description of electron transfer in condensed-phase media requires models that adequately describe the coupling of the electronic degrees of freedom to the surrounding nuclear coordinates. The spin-boson model has been the canonical model used to understand quantum dynamic processes in condensed-phase media over the last 25 years. Inherent in the standard model of a two-state quantum system coupled to a bosonic bath is the assumption that the Condon approximation is valid. In this context, the Condon approximation assumes that the bath configurations (coordinates) have no effect on the nonadiabatic coupling matrix element. While this is a useful model for electron transfer in small molecular systems, the validity of this approximation is less likely when large-scale motions of solvent molecules are strongly coupled to the electron transfer event, e.g., in molecular clamps and long-range electron transfer in biopolymers. In the present paper a general model for two-state electron transfer which allows for system-bath coupling in both the diagonal and off-diagonal (nonadiabatic) terms is studied. Time-dependent perturbation theory for this Hamiltonian is developed using a small polaron transformation. As noted in several recent studies, in a certain regime of parameter space, the relevant Hamiltonian admits an exact solution, termed the exactly solvable non-Condon Hamiltonian (or NCE). This limit, for which exact solutions are available, is used to benchmark the short- and long-time accuracy of various perturbative approaches. The validated perturbation equations are subsequently used to explore the role of non-Condon effects on electron transfer by systematically increasing the strength of the non-Condon coupling term from zero (i.e., the canonical spin-boson model) to the value that pertains to the exactly solvable non-Condon model (where non-Condon effects are significant).

  19. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous and microheterogeneous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, D.G.

    1991-10-01

    The focus of the work described in this report is on single electron transfer reactions of excited states which culminate in the formation of stable or metastable even electron species. For the most part the studies have involved even electron organic substrates which are thus converted photochemically to odd electron species and then at some stage reconvert to even electron products. These reactions generally fall into two rather different categories. In one set of studies we have examined reactions in which the metastable reagents generated by single electron transfer quenching of an excited state undergo novel fragmentation reactions, chiefly involving C-C bond cleavage. These reactions often culminate in novel and potentially useful chemical reactions and frequently have the potential for leading to new chemical products otherwise unaffordable by conventional reaction paths. In a rather different investigation we have also studied reactions in which single electron transfer quenching of an excited state is followed by subsequent reactions which lead reversibly to metastable two electron products which, often stable in themselves, can nonetheless be reacted with each other or with other reagents to regenerate the starting materials with release of energy. 66 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Mapping protein electron transfer pathways with QM/MM methods

    PubMed Central

    Guallar, Victor; Wallrapp, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods offer a valuable computational tool for understanding the electron transfer pathway in protein–substrate interactions and protein–protein complexes. These hybrid methods are capable of solving the Schrödinger equation on a small subset of the protein, the quantum region, describing its electronic structure under the polarization effects of the remainder of the protein. By selectively turning on and off different residues in the quantum region, we are able to obtain the electron pathway for short- and large-range interactions. Here, we summarize recent studies involving the protein–substrate interaction in cytochrome P450 camphor, ascorbate peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase, and propose a novel approach for the long-range protein–protein electron transfer. The results on ascorbate peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase reveal the importance of the propionate groups in the electron transfer pathway. The long-range protein–protein electron transfer has been studied on the cytochrome c peroxidase–cytochrome c complex. The results indicate the importance of Phe82 and Cys81 on cytochrome c, and of Asn196, Ala194, Ala176 and His175 on cytochrome c peroxidase. PMID:18445553

  2. Alternative ground states enable pathway switching in biological electron transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Alvarez-Paggi, Damian; Ledesma, Gabirela N.; ...

    2012-10-10

    Electron transfer is the simplest chemical reaction and constitutes the basis of a large variety of biological processes, such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration. Nature has evolved specific proteins and cofactors for these functions. The mechanisms optimizing biological electron transfer have been matter of intense debate, such as the role of the protein milieu between donor and acceptor sites. Here we propose a mechanism regulating long-range electron transfer in proteins. Specifically, we report a spectroscopic, electrochemical, and theoretical study on WT and single-mutant CuA redox centers from Thermus thermophilus, which shows that thermal fluctuations may populate two alternative ground-state electronicmore » wave functions optimized for electron entry and exit, respectively, through two different and nearly perpendicular pathways. In conclusion, these findings suggest a unique role for alternative or “invisible” electronic ground states in directional electron transfer. Moreover, it is shown that this energy gap and, therefore, the equilibrium between ground states can be fine-tuned by minor perturbations, suggesting alternative ways through which protein–protein interactions and membrane potential may optimize and regulate electron–proton energy transduction.« less

  3. Electron transfer in systems of well-defined geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Overfield, R.E.; Kaufmann, K.J.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    Two mesopyropheophorbide macrocycles can be joined via two covalent linkages to produce a cyclophane. It is possible to insert one or two Mg atoms into the cyclophane. The Qy transitions of the macrocycles are nearly orthogonal. The visible absorption spectrum of the monometal cyclophane is nearly a superposition of the spectra of the monomers. Emission from the monometal cyclophane arises primarily from the red most absorbing chromophore. The excited state difference spectrum shows that both macrocycles are excited. Fluorescence lifetimes of the monometal cyclophane decrease with increasing dielectric strength. Changes in the fluorescence and the triplet yield parallel the shortening of the singlet lifetime. Thus the radiative rate is solvent independent. This is in contrast to what one would expect if the emitting state had charge transfer character. Since the fluorescence lifetime is dependent on dielectric, the nonradiative relaxation from the singlet state is due to formation of a radical pair. The decay rate of the postulated radical pair was monitored by observing the kinetics of ground state repopulation. For the geometry of this cyclophane, electron transfer proceeds relatively slowly (k = 3 x 10/sup 9/ sec/sup -1/) in the forward direction. Modeling calculations indicate that the rate of annihilation of the radical pair may decrease as the solvent dielectric decreases.

  4. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  5. Condensed phase electron transfer beyond the Condon approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavros, Michael G.; Hait, Diptarka; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-12-01

    Condensed phase electron transfer problems are often simplified by making the Condon approximation: the approximation that the coupling connecting two charge-transfer diabatic states is a constant. Unfortunately, the Condon approximation does not predict the existence of conical intersections, which are ubiquitous in both gas-phase and condensed-phase photochemical dynamics. In this paper, we develop a formalism to treat condensed-phase dynamics beyond the Condon approximation. We show that even for an extremely simple test system, hexaaquairon(ii)/hexaaquairon(iii) self-exchange in water, the electronic coupling is expected to fluctuate rapidly and non-Condon effects must be considered to obtain quantitatively accurate ultrafast nonequilibrium dynamics. As diabatic couplings are expected to fluctuate substantially in many condensed-phase electron transfer systems, non-Condon effects may be essential to quantitatively capture accurate short-time dynamics.

  6. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. M.

    1981-11-01

    The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy was pursued by two approaches. One is the photo-induced electron transfer reactions in heterogeneous media, and the other is the photo-decomposition of water with liquid-junction solar cells. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media with colloidal silica or poly-acrylate were studied by flash photolysis. In an effort to illustrate that small band-gap semiconductors can be protected from photo-corrosion through surface modification, the surface of polycrystalline ZnO was chemically coated with zinc phthalocyanine and the electron-transfer process across the coated ZnO-electrolyte interface was studied by photo-electrochemical techniques.

  7. Modulating the electronic structure of chromophores by chemical substituents for efficient energy transfer: application to fluorone.

    PubMed

    Sand, Andrew M; Liu, Claire; Valentine, Andrew J S; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-08-07

    Strong electron correlation within a quasi-spin model of chromophores was recently shown to enhance exciton energy transfer significantly. Here we investigate how the modulation of the electronic structure of the chromophores by chemical substitution can enhance energy-transfer efficiency. Unlike previous work that does not consider the direct effect of the electronic structure on exciton dynamics, we add chemical substituents to the fluorone dimer to study the effect of electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents on exciton energy transfer. The exciton dynamics are studied from the solution of a quantum Liouville equation for an open system whose model Hamiltonian is derived from excited-state electronic structure calculations. Both van der Waals energies and coupling energies, arising from the Hellmann-Feynman force generated upon transferring the dimers from infinity to a finite separation, are built into the model Hamiltonian. Though these two effects are implicitly treated in dipole-based models, their explicit and separate treatment as discussed here is critical to forging the correct connection with the electronic structure calculations. We find that the addition of electron-donating substituents to the fluorone system results in an increase in exciton-transfer rates by factors ranging from 1.3-1.9. The computed oscillator strength is consistent with the recent experimental results on a larger heterodimer system containing fluorone. The oscillator strength increases with the addition of electron-donating substituents. Our results indicate that the study of chromophore networks via electronic structure will help in the future design of efficient synthetic light-harvesting systems.

  8. (Validity of environmental transfer models)

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Gardner, R.H.

    1990-11-07

    BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) is an international cooperative study initiated in 1985 by the Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection to test models designed to calculate the environmental transfer and bioaccumulation of radionuclides and other trace substances. The objective of the symposium and workshop was to synthesize results obtained during Phase 1 of BIOMOVS (the first five years of the study) and to suggest new directions that might be pursued during Phase 2 of BIOMOVS. The travelers were an instrumental part of the development of BIOMOVS. This symposium allowed the travelers to present a review of past efforts at model validation and a synthesis of current activities and to refine ideas concerning future development of models and data for assessing the fate, effect, and human risks of environmental contaminants. R. H. Gardner also visited the Free University, Amsterdam, and the National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM) in Bilthoven to confer with scientists about current research in theoretical ecology and the use of models for estimating the transport and effect of environmental contaminants and to learn about the European efforts to map critical loads of acid deposition.

  9. Vibrational and Electronic Energy Transfer and Dissociation of Diatomic Molecules by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At high altitudes and velocities equal to or greater than the geosynchronous return velocity (10 kilometers per second), the shock layer of a hypersonic flight will be in thermochemical nonequilibrium and partially ionized. The amount of ionization is determined by the velocity. For a trans atmospheric flight of 10 kilometers per second and at an altitude of 80 kilometers, a maximum of 1% ionization is expected. At a velocity of 12 - 17 kilometer per second, such as a Mars return mission, up to 30% of the atoms and molecules in the flow field will be ionized. Under those circumstances, electrons play an important role in determining the internal states of atoms and molecules in the flow field and hence the amount of radiative heat load and the distance it takes for the flow field to re-establish equilibrium. Electron collisions provide an effective means of transferring energy even when the electron number density is as low as 1%. Because the mass of an electron is 12,760 times smaller than the reduced mass of N2, its average speed, and hence its average collision frequency, is more than 100 times larger. Even in the slightly ionized regime with only 1% electrons, the frequency of electron-molecule collisions is equal to or larger than that of molecule-molecule collisions, an important consideration in the low density part of the atmosphere. Three electron-molecule collision processes relevant to hypersonic flows will be considered: (1) vibrational excitation/de-excitation of a diatomic molecule by electron impact, (2) electronic excitation/de-excitation, and (3) dissociative recombination in electron-diatomic ion collisions. A review of available data, both theory and experiment, will be given. Particular attention will be paid to tailoring the molecular physics to the condition of hypersonic flows. For example, the high rotational temperatures in a hypersonic flow field means that most experimental data carried out under room temperatures are not applicable. Also

  10. Polaron assisted charge transfer in model biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangqi; Movaghar, Bijan

    2016-11-01

    We use a tight binding Hamiltonian to simulate the electron transfer from an initial charge-separating exciton to a final target state through a two-arm transfer model. The structure is copied from the model frequently used to describe electron harvesting in photosynthesis (photosystems I). We use this network to provide proof of principle for dynamics, in quantum system/bath networks, especially those involving interference pathways, and use these results to make predictions on artificially realizable systems. Each site is coupled to the phonon bath via several electron-phonon couplings. The assumed large energy gaps and weak tunneling integrals linking the last 3 sites give rise to"Stark Wannier like" quantum localization; electron transfer to the target cluster becomes impossible without bath coupling. As a result of the electron-phonon coupling, local electronic energies relax when the site is occupied, and transient polaronic states are formed as photo-generated electrons traverse the system. For a symmetric constructively interfering two pathway network, the population is shared equally between two sets of equivalent sites and therefore the polaron energy shift is smaller. The smaller energy shift however makes the tunnel transfer to the last site slower or blocks it altogether. Slight disorder (or thermal noise) can break the symmetry, permitting essentially a "one path", and correspondingly more efficient transfer.

  11. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction. The health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and...

  12. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction. The health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and...

  13. 45 CFR 162.1601 - Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and... Electronic Funds Transfers (EFT) and Remittance Advice § 162.1601 Health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction. The health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and...

  14. Evidence for concerted pathways in ion-pairing coupled electron transfers.

    PubMed

    Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2008-04-09

    Ion-pairing with electro-inactive metal ions may change drastically the thermodynamic and kinetic reactivity of electron transfer in chemical and biochemical processes. Besides the classical stepwise pathways (electron-transfer first, followed by ion-pairing or vice versa), ion-pairing may also occur concertedly with electron transfer. The latter pathway avoids high-energy intermediates but a key issue is that of the kinetic price to pay to benefit from this thermodynamic advantage. A model is proposed leading to activation/driving force relationships characterizing such concerted associative electron transfers for intermolecular and intramolecular homogeneous reactions and for electrochemical reactions. Contrary to previous assertions, the driving force of the reaction (defined as the opposite of the reaction standard free energy), as well as the intrinsic barrier, does not depend on the concentration of the ion-pairing agent, which simply plays the role of one of the reactants. Besides solvent and intramolecular reorganization, the energy of the bond being formed is the main component of the intrinsic barrier. Application of these considerations to reactions reported in recent literature illustrates how concerted ion-pairing electron-transfer reactions can be diagnosed and how competition between stepwise and concerted pathways can be analyzed. It provided the first experimental evidence of the viability of concerted ion-pairing electron-transfer reactions.

  15. Charge transfer to ground-state ions produces free electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, D.; Fukuzawa, H.; Sakakibara, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Maliyar, G. G.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Asa, K.; Sato, Y.; Saito, N.; Oura, M.; Schöffler, M.; Kastirke, G.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Ueda, K.

    2017-01-01

    Inner-shell ionization of an isolated atom typically leads to Auger decay. In an environment, for example, a liquid or a van der Waals bonded system, this process will be modified, and becomes part of a complex cascade of relaxation steps. Understanding these steps is important, as they determine the production of slow electrons and singly charged radicals, the most abundant products in radiation chemistry. In this communication, we present experimental evidence for a so-far unobserved, but potentially very important step in such relaxation cascades: Multiply charged ionic states after Auger decay may partially be neutralized by electron transfer, simultaneously evoking the creation of a low-energy free electron (electron transfer-mediated decay). This process is effective even after Auger decay into the dicationic ground state. In our experiment, we observe the decay of Ne2+ produced after Ne 1s photoionization in Ne-Kr mixed clusters.

  16. Charge transfer to ground-state ions produces free electrons

    PubMed Central

    You, D.; Fukuzawa, H.; Sakakibara, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Ito, Y.; Maliyar, G. G.; Motomura, K.; Nagaya, K.; Nishiyama, T.; Asa, K.; Sato, Y.; Saito, N.; Oura, M.; Schöffler, M.; Kastirke, G.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stumpf, V.; Gokhberg, K.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Ueda, K

    2017-01-01

    Inner-shell ionization of an isolated atom typically leads to Auger decay. In an environment, for example, a liquid or a van der Waals bonded system, this process will be modified, and becomes part of a complex cascade of relaxation steps. Understanding these steps is important, as they determine the production of slow electrons and singly charged radicals, the most abundant products in radiation chemistry. In this communication, we present experimental evidence for a so-far unobserved, but potentially very important step in such relaxation cascades: Multiply charged ionic states after Auger decay may partially be neutralized by electron transfer, simultaneously evoking the creation of a low-energy free electron (electron transfer-mediated decay). This process is effective even after Auger decay into the dicationic ground state. In our experiment, we observe the decay of Ne2+ produced after Ne 1s photoionization in Ne–Kr mixed clusters. PMID:28134238

  17. A new semiclassical decoupling scheme for electronic transitions in molecular collisions - Application to vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Lam, K. S.; Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    A new semiclassical decoupling scheme (the trajectory-based decoupling scheme) is introduced in a computational study of vibrational-to-electronic energy transfer for a simple model system that simulates collinear atom-diatom collisions. The probability of energy transfer (P) is calculated quasiclassically using the new scheme as well as quantum mechanically as a function of the atomic electronic-energy separation (lambda), with overall good agreement between the two sets of results. Classical mechanics with the new decoupling scheme is found to be capable of predicting resonance behavior whereas an earlier decoupling scheme (the coordinate-based decoupling scheme) failed. Interference effects are not exhibited in P vs lambda results.

  18. Accumulative electron transfer: multiple charge separation in artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Susanne; Boixel, Julien; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Becker, Hans-Christian; Odobel, Fabrice; Hammarström, Leif

    2012-01-01

    To achieve artificial photosynthesis it is necessary to couple the single-electron event of photoinduced charge separation with the multi-electron reactions of fuel formation and water splitting. Therefore, several rounds of light-induced charge separation are required to accumulate enough redox equivalents at the catalytic sites for the target chemistry to occur, without any sacrificial donors or acceptors other than the catalytic substrates. Herein, we discuss the challenges of such accumulative electron transfer in molecular systems. We present a series of closely related systems base on a Ru(II)-polypyridine photosensitizer with appended triaryl-amine or oligo-triaryl-amine donors, linked to nanoporous TiO2 as the acceptor. One of the systems, based on dye 4, shows efficient accumulative electron transfer in high overall yield resulting in the formation of a two-electron charge-separated state upon successive excitation by two photons. In contrast, the other systems do not show accumulative electron transfer because of different competing reactions. This illustrates the difficulties in designing successful systems for this still largely unexplored type of reaction scheme.

  19. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  20. Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Processes in Ultrafast Time Domain: Evidence for Effects of Hydrogen-Bond Stabilization on Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ananta; Dana, Jayanta; Aute, Sunil; Maity, Partha; Das, Amitava; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2017-03-08

    The proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reaction is investigated for a newly synthesized imidazole-anthraquinone biomimetic model with a photoactive Ru(II) -polypyridyl moiety that is covalently coupled to the imidazole fragment. Intramolecular H-bonding interactions between imidazole and anthraquinone moieties favor the PCET process; this can be correlated to an appreciable positive shift in the one-electron reduction potential of the coordinated anthraquinone moiety functionalized with the imidazole fragment. This can also be attributed to the low luminescence quantum yield of the Ru(II) -polypyridyl complex used. The dynamics of the intramolecular electron-transfer (ET) and PCET processes are studied by using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The steady-state spectroscopic studies and the results of the time-resolved absorption studies confirm that H-bonded water molecules play a major role in both ET and PCET dynamics as a proton relay in the excited state. The electron-transfer process is followed by a change in the H-bonding equilibrium between AQ and imidazole in acetonitrile solvent, and protonation of AQ(.-) by water leads to PCET in the presence of water. A slower forward and backward electron-transfer rate is observed in the presence of D2 O compared with that in H2 O. These results provide further experimental support for a detailed understanding of the PCET process.

  1. Experimental exploration of the Mulliken-Hush relationship for intramolecular electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Tamal; Ito, Naoki; Gould, Ian R

    2011-03-17

    The Mulliken-Hush (M-H) relationship provides the critical link between optical and thermal electron transfer processes, and yet very little direct experimental support for its applicability has been provided. Dicyanovinylazaadamantane (DCVA) represents a simple two-state (neutral/charge-transfer) intramolecular electron transfer system that exhibits charge-transfer absorption and emission spectra that are readily measurable in solvents with a wide range of polarities. In this regard it represents an ideal model system for studying the factors that control both optical charge separation (absorption) and recombination (emission) processes in solution. Here we explore the applicability of the M-H relation to quantitative descriptions of the optical charge-transfer processes in DCVA. For DCVA, the measured radiative rate constants exhibit a linear dependence on transition energy, and transition dipole moments exhibit an inverse dependence on transition energy, consistent with the M-H relationship.

  2. Tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in ferrous myoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Monni, Roberto; Al Haddad, André; van Mourik, Frank; Auböck, Gerald; Chergui, Majed

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that in ferric myoglobins (Mb) the fluorescence quenching of the photoexcited tryptophan 14 (*Trp14) residue is in part due to an electron transfer to the heme porphyrin (porph), turning it to the ferrous state. However, the invariance of *Trp decay times in ferric and ferrous Mbs raises the question as to whether electron transfer may also be operative in the latter. Using UV pump/visible probe transient absorption, we show that this is indeed the case for deoxy-Mb. We observe that the reduction generates (with a yield of about 30%) a low-valence Fe–porphyrin π [FeII(porph●−)] -anion radical, which we observe for the first time to our knowledge under physiological conditions. We suggest that the pathway for the electron transfer proceeds via the leucine 69 (Leu69) and valine 68 (Val68) residues. The results on ferric Mbs and the present ones highlight the generality of Trp–porphyrin electron transfer in heme proteins. PMID:25902517

  3. Quantum ergodicity breaking in semi-classical electron transfer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goychuk, Igor

    2017-01-25

    Can the statistical properties of single-electron transfer events be correctly predicted within a common equilibrium ensemble description? This fundamental in nanoworld question of ergodic behavior is scrutinized within a very basic semi-classical curve-crossing problem. It is shown that in the limit of non-adiabatic electron transfer (weak tunneling) well-described by the Marcus-Levich-Dogonadze (MLD) rate the answer is yes. However, in the limit of the so-called solvent-controlled adiabatic electron transfer, a profound breaking of ergodicity occurs. Namely, a common description based on the ensemble reduced density matrix with an initial equilibrium distribution of the reaction coordinate is not able to reproduce the statistics of single-trajectory events in this seemingly classical regime. For sufficiently large activation barriers, the ensemble survival probability in a state remains nearly exponential with the inverse rate given by the sum of the adiabatic curve crossing (Kramers) time and the inverse MLD rate. In contrast, near to the adiabatic regime, the single-electron survival probability is clearly non-exponential, even though it possesses an exponential tail which agrees well with the ensemble description. Initially, it is well described by a Mittag-Leffler distribution with a fractional rate. Paradoxically, the mean transfer time in this classical on the ensemble level regime is well described by the inverse of the nonadiabatic quantum tunneling rate on a single particle level. An analytical theory is developed which perfectly agrees with stochastic simulations and explains our findings.

  4. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities...

  5. 48 CFR 18.123 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.123 Section 18.123 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities...

  6. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities...

  7. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities...

  8. 48 CFR 18.124 - Electronic funds transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.124 Section 18.124 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities...

  9. Tryptophan-to-heme electron transfer in ferrous myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Monni, Roberto; Al Haddad, André; van Mourik, Frank; Auböck, Gerald; Chergui, Majed

    2015-05-05

    It was recently demonstrated that in ferric myoglobins (Mb) the fluorescence quenching of the photoexcited tryptophan 14 (*Trp(14)) residue is in part due to an electron transfer to the heme porphyrin (porph), turning it to the ferrous state. However, the invariance of *Trp decay times in ferric and ferrous Mbs raises the question as to whether electron transfer may also be operative in the latter. Using UV pump/visible probe transient absorption, we show that this is indeed the case for deoxy-Mb. We observe that the reduction generates (with a yield of about 30%) a low-valence Fe-porphyrin π [Fe(II)(porph(●-))] -anion radical, which we observe for the first time to our knowledge under physiological conditions. We suggest that the pathway for the electron transfer proceeds via the leucine 69 (Leu(69)) and valine 68 (Val(68)) residues. The results on ferric Mbs and the present ones highlight the generality of Trp-porphyrin electron transfer in heme proteins.

  10. 75 FR 51707 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ..., 40, and 301 [REG-153340-09] RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes AGENCY... hearing. SUMMARY: This document contains proposed regulations relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background This document contains proposed amendments to the Income Tax...

  11. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule's permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  12. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  13. 77 FR 30923 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Part 1005 [Docket No. CFPB-2012-0019] RIN 3170-AA22 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) AGENCY... interested in learning more about this product, including its costs, benefits, and risks to consumers. The Bureau intends to issue a proposal to extend the Regulation E protections to GPR cards. Your comments,...

  14. Correlating electronic and vibrational motions in charge transfer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Munira

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this research program was to measure coupled electronic and nuclear motions during photoinduced charge transfer processes in transition metal complexes by developing and using novel femtosecond spectroscopies. The scientific highlights and the resulting scientific publications from the DOE supported work are outlined in the technical report.

  15. 77 FR 77187 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Vol. 77 Monday, No. 250 December 31, 2012 Part II Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection 12 CFR Part 1005 Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E); Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 250 / Monday, December...

  16. Shewanella secretes flavins that mediate extracellular electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Marsili, Enrico; Baron, Daniel B.; Shikhare, Indraneel D.; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria able to transfer electrons to metals are key agents in biogeochemical metal cycling, subsurface bioremediation, and corrosion processes. More recently, these bacteria have gained attention as the transfer of electrons from the cell surface to conductive materials can be used in multiple applications. In this work, we adapted electrochemical techniques to probe intact biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Shewanella sp. MR-4 grown by using a poised electrode as an electron acceptor. This approach detected redox-active molecules within biofilms, which were involved in electron transfer to the electrode. A combination of methods identified a mixture of riboflavin and riboflavin-5′-phosphate in supernatants from biofilm reactors, with riboflavin representing the dominant component during sustained incubations (>72 h). Removal of riboflavin from biofilms reduced the rate of electron transfer to electrodes by >70%, consistent with a role as a soluble redox shuttle carrying electrons from the cell surface to external acceptors. Differential pulse voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry revealed a layer of flavins adsorbed to electrodes, even after soluble components were removed, especially in older biofilms. Riboflavin adsorbed quickly to other surfaces of geochemical interest, such as Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy(hydr)oxides. This in situ demonstration of flavin production, and sequestration at surfaces, requires the paradigm of soluble redox shuttles in geochemistry to be adjusted to include binding and modification of surfaces. Moreover, the known ability of isoalloxazine rings to act as metal chelators, along with their electron shuttling capacity, suggests that extracellular respiration of minerals by Shewanella is more complex than originally conceived. PMID:18316736

  17. Electron Transfer Dissociation: Effects of Cation Charge State on Product Partitioning in Ion/Ion Electron Transfer to Multiply Protonated Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of cation charge state on product partitioning in the gas-phase ion/ion electron transfer reactions of multiply protonated tryptic peptides, model peptides, and relatively large peptides with singly charged radical anions has been examined. In particular, partitioning into various competing channels, such as proton transfer (PT) versus electron transfer (ET), electron transfer with subsequent dissociation (ETD) versus electron transfer with no dissociation (ET,noD), and fragmentation of backbone bonds versus fragmentation of side chains, was measured quantitatively as a function of peptide charge state to allow insights to be drawn about the fundamental aspects of ion/ion reactions that lead to ETD. The ET channel increases relative to the PT channel, ETD increases relative to ET,noD, and fragmentation at backbone bonds increases relative to side-chain cleavages as cation charge state increases. The increase in ET versus PT with charge state is consistent with a Landau-Zener based curve-crossing model. An optimum charge state for ET is predicted by the model for the ground state-to-ground state reaction. However, when the population of excited product ion states is considered, it is possible that a decrease in ET efficiency as charge state increases will not be observed due to the possibility of the population of excited electronic states of the products. Several factors can contribute to the increase in ETD versus ET,noD and backbone cleavage versus side-chain losses. These factors include an increase in reaction exothermicity and charge state dependent differences in precursor and product ion structures, stabilities, and sites of protonation. PMID:23264749

  18. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  19. The impact of symmetric modes on intramolecular electron transfer: A semi-classical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Boldyrev, Sergei I.; Risko, Chad; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2006-07-01

    We have generalized the Hush equations developed for the analysis of intervalence charge-transfer bands by including into the model the interaction with symmetric vibrations. Our results indicate that in symmetric class-II systems the maximum of the intervalence charge-transfer band is equal to the reorganization energy λ related to the antisymmetric vibrations as is the case in the conventional Hush model. In contrast, the corresponding transition dipole moment and the activation barrier for thermal electron transfer, in addition to their dependence on λ, also depend on the reorganization energy L related to symmetric vibrational modes. We show that the interaction with symmetric vibrational modes reduces the activation barrier and that the thermal electron-transfer rates derived on the basis of a Hush-type analysis of the optical data are generally underestimated.

  20. Syntrophic growth via quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica A.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET) is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS). A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Co-cultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require further investigation. PMID

  1. Molecular view of an electron transfer process essential for iron–sulfur protein biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Calderone, Vito; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Giachetti, Andrea; Jaiswal, Deepa; Mikolajczyk, Maciej; Piccioli, Mario; Winkelmann, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Biogenesis of iron–sulfur cluster proteins is a highly regulated process that requires complex protein machineries. In the cytosolic iron–sulfur protein assembly machinery, two human key proteins—NADPH-dependent diflavin oxidoreductase 1 (Ndor1) and anamorsin—form a stable complex in vivo that was proposed to provide electrons for assembling cytosolic iron–sulfur cluster proteins. The Ndor1–anamorsin interaction was also suggested to be implicated in the regulation of cell survival/death mechanisms. In the present work we unravel the molecular basis of recognition between Ndor1 and anamorsin and of the electron transfer process. This is based on the structural characterization of the two partner proteins, the investigation of the electron transfer process, and the identification of those protein regions involved in complex formation and those involved in electron transfer. We found that an unstructured region of anamorsin is essential for the formation of a specific and stable protein complex with Ndor1, whereas the C-terminal region of anamorsin, containing the [2Fe-2S] redox center, transiently interacts through complementary charged residues with the FMN-binding site region of Ndor1 to perform electron transfer. Our results propose a molecular model of the electron transfer process that is crucial for understanding the functional role of this interaction in human cells. PMID:23596212

  2. Subpicosecond time-resolved intramolecular electronic energy transfer in flexible bichromophoric Coumarin molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kaschke, M.; Ernsting, N.P. ); Valeur, B.; Bourson, J. )

    1990-07-26

    By excite-and-probe spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution, the authors have measured the intramolecular electronic energy transfer in bichromophoric coumarins linked by a flexible polymethylene chain. The transfer proceeds on a time scale between 1 and 20 ps depending on the polymethylene chain length. The results can be well described by a dipole-dipole interaction model that takes into account the statistical distribution of intramolecular distances between the two chromophores.

  3. Fundamental research on convective heat transfer in electronic cooling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. F.; Gan, Y. P.; Tian, Y. Q.; Lei, D. H.

    1992-03-01

    During the past six years comprehensive research programs have been conducted at the Beijing Polytechnic University to provide a better understanding of heat transfer characteristics of existing and condidate cooling techniques for electronic and microelectronic devices. This paper provides a review and summary of the programs with emphasis on direct liquid cooling. Included in this review are the heat transfer investigations related to the following cooling modes: liquid free, mixed and forced convection, liquid jet impingement, flowing liquid film cooling, pool boiling, spray cooling, foreign gas jet impingement in liquid pool, and forced convection air-cooling.

  4. Electron Transfer Mechanisms of DNA Repair by Photolyase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2015-04-01

    Photolyase is a flavin photoenzyme that repairs two DNA base damage products induced by ultraviolet (UV) light: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts. With femtosecond spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, investigators have recently made significant advances in our understanding of UV-damaged DNA repair, and the entire enzymatic dynamics can now be mapped out in real time. For dimer repair, six elementary steps have been characterized, including three electron transfer reactions and two bond-breaking processes, and their reaction times have been determined. A unique electron-tunneling pathway was identified, and the critical residues in modulating the repair function at the active site were determined. The dynamic synergy between the elementary reactions for maintaining high repair efficiency was elucidated, and the biological nature of the flavin active state was uncovered. For 6-4 photoproduct repair, a proton-coupled electron transfer repair mechanism has been revealed. The elucidation of electron transfer mechanisms and two repair photocycles is significant and provides a molecular basis for future practical applications, such as in rational drug design for curing skin cancer.

  5. The dipole moment of the electron carrier adrenodoxin is not critical for redox partner interaction and electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Hannemann, Frank; Guyot, Arnaud; Zöllner, Andy; Müller, Jürgen J; Heinemann, Udo; Bernhardt, Rita

    2009-07-01

    Dipole moments of proteins arise from helical dipoles, hydrogen bond networks and charged groups at the protein surface. High protein dipole moments were suggested to contribute to the electrostatic steering between redox partners in electron transport chains of respiration, photosynthesis and steroid biosynthesis, although so far experimental evidence for this hypothesis was missing. In order to probe this assumption, we changed the dipole moment of the electron transfer protein adrenodoxin and investigated the influence of this on protein-protein interactions and electron transfer. In bovine adrenodoxin, the [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin of the adrenal glands, a dipole moment of 803 Debye was calculated for a full-length adrenodoxin model based on the Adx(4-108) and the wild type adrenodoxin crystal structures. Large distances and asymmetric distribution of the charged residues in the molecule mainly determine the observed high value. In order to analyse the influence of the resulting inhomogeneous electric field on the biological function of this electron carrier the molecular dipole moment was systematically changed. Five recombinant adrenodoxin mutants with successively reduced dipole moment (from 600 to 200 Debye) were analysed for their redox properties, their binding affinities to the redox partner proteins and for their function during electron transfer-dependent steroid hydroxylation. None of the mutants, not even the quadruple mutant K6E/K22Q/K24Q/K98E with a dipole moment reduced by about 70% showed significant changes in the protein function as compared with the unmodified adrenodoxin demonstrating that neither the formation of the transient complex nor the biological activity of the electron transfer chain of the endocrine glands was affected. This is the first experimental evidence that the high dipole moment observed in electron transfer proteins is not involved in electrostatic steering among the proteins in the redox chain.

  6. Diameter dependent electron transfer kinetics in semiconductor-enzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine A; Song, Qing; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-28

    Excited state electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental step for the catalytic conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. To understand the properties controlling ET between photoexcited nanoparticles and catalysts, the ET kinetics were measured for solution-phase complexes of CdTe quantum dots and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (CaI) using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Over a 2.0-3.5 nm diameter range of CdTe nanoparticles, the observed ET rate (kET) was sensitive to CaI concentration. To account for diameter effects on CaI binding, a Langmuir isotherm and two geometric binding models were created to estimate maximal CaI affinities and coverages at saturating concentrations. Normalizing the ET kinetics to CaI surface coverage for each CdTe diameter led to k(ET) values that were insensitive to diameter, despite a decrease in the free energy for photoexcited ET (ΔGET) with increasing diameter. The turnover frequency (TOF) of CaI in CdTe-CaI complexes was measured at several molar ratios. Normalization for diameter-dependent changes in CaI coverage showed an increase in TOF with diameter. These results suggest that k(ET) and H2 production for CdTe-CaI complexes are not strictly controlled by ΔG(ET) and that other factors must be considered.

  7. Electron-Nuclear Spin Transfer in Triple Quantum Dot Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, Marta; Toonen, Ryan; Harrison, Paul

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the conductance spectra of coupled quantum dots to study systematically the nuclear spin relaxation of delta- and y-junction networks and observe spin blockade dependence on the electronic configurations. We derive the conductance using the Beenakker approach generalised to an array of quantum dots where we consider the nuclear spin transfer to electrons by hyperfine coupling. This allows us to predict the relevant memory effects on the different electronic states by studying the evolution of the single electron resonances in presence of nuclear spin relaxation. We find that the gradual depolarisation of the nuclear system is imprinted in the conductance spectra of the multidot system. Our calculations of the temporal evolution of the conductance resonance reveal that spin blockade can be lifted by hyperfine coupling.

  8. Electron nuclear spin transfer in quantum-dot networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, M.; Toonen, R. C.; Blick, R. H.; Harrison, P.

    2005-05-01

    We investigate the conductance spectra of coupled quantum dots to study systematically the nuclear spin relaxation of different geometries of a two-dimensional network of quantum dots and observe spin blockade dependence on the electronic configurations. We derive the conductance using the Beenakker approach generalized to an array of quantum dots where we consider the nuclear spin transfer to electrons by hyperfine coupling. This allows us to predict the relevant memory effects on the different electronic states by studying the evolution of the single electron resonances in the presence of nuclear spin relaxation. We find that the gradual depolarization of the nuclear system is imprinted in the conductance spectra of the multidot system. Our calculations of the temporal evolution of the conductance resonance reveal that spin blockade can be lifted by hyperfine coupling.

  9. Effects of G-Quadruplex Topology on Electronic Transfer Integrals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenming; Varsano, Daniele; Di Felice, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex is a quadruple helical form of nucleic acids that can appear in guanine-rich parts of the genome. The basic unit is the G-tetrad, a planar assembly of four guanines connected by eight hydrogen bonds. Its rich topology and its possible relevance as a drug target for a number of diseases have stimulated several structural studies. The superior stiffness and electronic π-π overlap between consecutive G-tetrads suggest exploitation for nanotechnologies. Here we inspect the intimate link between the structure and the electronic properties, with focus on charge transfer parameters. We show that the electronic couplings between stacked G-tetrads strongly depend on the three-dimensional atomic structure. Furthermore, we reveal a remarkable correlation with the topology: a topology characterized by the absence of syn-anti G-G sequences can better support electronic charge transfer. On the other hand, there is no obvious correlation of the electronic coupling with usual descriptors of the helix shape. We establish a procedure to maximize the correlation with a global helix shape descriptor. PMID:28335314

  10. Distance dependence in photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven; Volosov, Andrey

    1986-09-01

    The distance dependence of the rate of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is studied. A quantum mechanical method CNDO/S is applied to a series of molecules recently investigated by Hush et al. experimentally. The calculations show a large interaction through the saturated bridge which connects the two chromophores. The electronic matrix element HAB decreases a factor 10 in about 4 Å. There is also a decrease of the rate due to less exothermicity for the longer molecule. The results are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  11. A redox beginning: Which came first phosphoryl, acyl, or electron transfer ?. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic information available on the synthesis of prebiotic monomers and polymers will be examined in order to illuminate the prebiotic plausibility of polymer syntheses based on (a) phosphoryl transfer that yields phosphodiester polymers, (b) acyl transfer that gives polyamides, and (c) electron transfer that produces polydisulfide or poly(thio)ester polymers. New experimental results on the oxidative polymerization of 2,3-dimercaptopropanol by ferric ions on the surface of ferric hydroxide oxide will be discussed as a chemical model of polymerization by electron transfer. This redox polymerization that yields polymers with a polydisulfide backbone was found to give oligomers up to the 15-mer from 1 mM of 2,3-dimercaptopropanol after one day at 25 C. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the oligomers was carried out on an Alltech OH-100 column eluted with acetonitrile-water.

  12. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D M Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T; Srikanta, S S; Krishnaswamy, P R; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-02-07

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute.

  13. DNA Intercalated Psoralen Undergoes Efficient Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fröbel, Sascha; Reiffers, Anna; Torres Ziegenbein, Christian; Gilch, Peter

    2015-04-02

    The interaction of psoralens with DNA has been used for therapeutic and research purposes for decades. Still the photoinduced behavior of psoralens in DNA has never been observed directly. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used here to gain direct insight into the photophysics of a DNA-intercalated psoralen (4'-aminomethyl-4,5',8-trimethyl-psoralen (AMT)). Intercalation reduces the excited singlet lifetime of AMT to 4 ps compared with 1400 ps for AMT in water. This singlet quenching prohibits the population of the triplet state that is accessed in free AMT. Instead, a DNA to AMT electron transfer takes place. The resulting radical pair decays primarily via charge recombination with a time constant of 30 ps. The efficient electron transfer observed here reveals a completely new aspect of the psoralen-DNA interaction.

  14. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups. PMID:26439818

  15. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-02-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute.

  16. Aza-heterocyclic Receptors for Direct Electron Transfer Hemoglobin Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinay; Kashyap, D. M. Nikhila; Hebbar, Suraj; Swetha, R.; Prasad, Sujay; Kamala, T.; Srikanta, S. S.; Krishnaswamy, P. R.; Bhat, Navakanta

    2017-01-01

    Direct Electron Transfer biosensors, facilitating direct communication between the biomolecule of interest and electrode surface, are preferable compared to enzymatic and mediator based sensors. Although hemoglobin (Hb) contains four redox active iron centres, direct detection is not possible due to inaccessibility of iron centres and formation of dimers, blocking electron transfer. Through the coordination of iron with aza-heterocyclic receptors - pyridine and imidazole - we report a cost effective, highly sensitive and simple electrochemical Hb sensor using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The receptor can be either in the form of liquid micro-droplet mixed with blood or dry chemistry embedded in paper membrane on top of screen printed carbon electrodes. We demonstrate excellent linearity and robustness against interference using clinical samples. A truly point of care technology is demonstrated by integrating disposable test strips with handheld reader, enabling finger prick to result in less than a minute. PMID:28169325

  17. Poisson-distributed electron-transfer dynamics from single quantum dots to C60 molecules.

    PubMed

    Song, Nianhui; Zhu, Haiming; Jin, Shengye; Zhan, Wei; Lian, Tianquan

    2011-01-25

    Functional quantum dot (QD)-based nanostructures are often constructed through the self-assembly of QDs with binding partners (molecules or other nanoparticles), a process that leads to a statistical distribution of the number of binding partners. Using single QD fluorescence spectroscopy, we probe this distribution and its effect on the function (electron-transfer dynamics) in QD-C60 complexes. Ensemble-averaged transient absorption and fluorescence decay as well as single QD fluorescence decay measurements show that the QD exciton emission was quenched by electron transfer from the QD to C60 molecules and the electron-transfer rate increases with the C60-to-QD ratio. The electron-transfer rate of single QD-C60 complexes fluctuates with time and varies among different QDs. The standard deviation increases linearly with the average of electron-transfer rates of single QD-C60 complexes, and the distributions of both quantities obey Poisson statistics. The observed distributions of single QD-C60 complexes and ensemble-averaged fluorescence decay kinetics can be described by a model that assumes a Poisson distribution of the number of adsorbed C60 molecules per QD. Our findings suggest that, in self-assembled QD nanostructures, the statistical distribution of the number of adsorbed partners can dominate the distributions of the averages and standard deviation of their interfacial dynamical properties.

  18. Exploring Autoionization and Photoinduced Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Pathways of Phenol in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Thomas A A; Zhang, Yuyuan; Roy, Anirban; Ashfold, Michael N R; Bradforth, Stephen E

    2015-10-15

    The excited state dynamics of phenol in water have been investigated using transient absorption spectroscopy. Solvated electrons and vibrationally cold phenoxyl radicals are observed upon 200 and 267 nm excitation, but with formation time scales that differ by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The impact of these findings is assessed in terms of the relative importance of autoionization versus proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in this computationally tractable model system.

  19. Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Biju, Vasudevan P.; Micic, Miodrag; Hu, Dehong; Lu, H. Peter

    2004-08-04

    We report on single molecule studies of photosensitized interfacial electron transfer (ET) processes in Coumarin 343 (C343)-TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) and Cresyl Violet (CV+)-TiO2 NP systems, using time-correlated single photon counting coupled with scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence intensity trajectories of individual dye molecules adsorbed on a semiconductor NP surface showed fluorescence fluctuations and blinking, with time constrants distributed from sub-milliseconds to several seconds.

  20. Electron-transfer and acid-base properties of a two-electron oxidized form of quaterpyrrole that acts as both an electron donor and an acceptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; E, Wenbo; Ohkubo, Kei; Sanchez-Garcia, David; Yoon, Dae-Wi; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kadish, Karl M

    2008-02-21

    Electron-transfer interconversion between the four-electron oxidized form of a quaterpyrrole (abbreviated as P4 for four pyrroles) and the two-electron oxidized form (P4H2) as well as between P4H2 and its fully reduced form (P4H4) bearing analogous substituents in the alpha- and beta-pyrrolic positions was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible spectroelectrochemistry combined with ESR and laser flash photolysis measurements. The two-electron oxidized form, P4H2, acts as both an electron donor and an electron acceptor. The radical cation (P4H2*+) and radical anion (P4H2*-) are both produced by photoinduced electron transfer from dimeric 1-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide to P4H2, whereas the cation radical form of the compound is also produced by electron-transfer oxidation of P4H2 with [Ru(bpy)3]3+. The ESR spectra of P4H2*+ and P4H2*- were recorded at low temperature and exhibit spin delocalization over all four pyrrole units. Thus, the two-electron oxidized form of the quaterpyrrole (P4H2) displays redox and electronic features analogous to those seen in the case of porphyrins and may be considered as a simple, open-chain model of this well-studied tetrapyrrolic macrocycle. The dynamics of deprotonation from P4H2*+ and disproportionation of P4H2 were examined by laser flash photolysis measurements of photoinduced electron-transfer oxidation and reduction of P4H2, respectively.

  1. Electron Spectroscopy In Heavy-Ion Storage Rings: Resonant and Non-Resonant Electron Transfer Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, S.; Stoehlker, Th.; Trotsenko, S.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Spillmann, U.; Bosch, F.; Liesen, D.; Winters, D.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Shabaev, V.; Tupitsyn, I.; Kozhedub, Y.; Rothard, H.; Reuschl, R.; Ullrich, J.; Moshammer, R.; Voitkiv, A.; Surzhykov, A.; Fischer, D.; Doerner, R.

    2011-06-01

    Whereas our understanding of total cross sections for ionization and capture processes in ion-atom collisions is widely viewed as having arrived at a state of adequate maturity, the same cannot be said at all about the dynamics of collisions, multi-electron processes or the electron continua (in target and projectile) which are at the origin of total cross sections. We depict how these processes can be studied favourably in storage ring environments. We present examples of resonant and non-resonant electron transfer processes, radiative and non-radiative. This is elucidated via the relation of the electron nucleus bremsstrahlung at the high energy tip of the bremsstrahlung spectrum to the radiative electron capture cusp (RECC) and a new approach to determining molecular orbital binding energies in superheavy quasi-molecules in resonant KK charge transfer.

  2. Theory and experiment on the cuprous-cupric electron transfer rate at a copper electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halley, J. W.; Smith, B. B.; Walbran, S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Rigney, R. O.; Sutjianto, A.; Hung, N. C.; Yonco, R. M.; Nagy, Z.

    1999-04-01

    We describe results of experiment and theory of the cuprous-cupric electron transfer rate in an aqueous solution at a copper electrode. The methods are similar to those we reported earlier for the ferrous-ferric rate. The comparison strongly suggests that, in marked distinction to the ferrous-ferric case, the electron transfer reaction is adiabatic. The model shows that the activation barrier is dominated by the energy required for the ion to approach the electrode, rather than by the energy required for rearrangement of the solvation shell, also in sharp distinction to the case of the ferric-ferrous electron transfer at a gold electrode. Calculated activation barriers based on this image agree with the experimental results reported here.

  3. Studies of Photosynthetic Energy and Charge Transfer by Two-dimensional Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer

    2010-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform electronic spectroscopy has recently emerged as a powerful tool for the study of energy transfer in complex condensed-phase systems. Its experimental implementation is challenging but can be greatly simplified by implementing a pump-probe geometry, where the two phase-stable collinear pump pulses are created with an acousto-optic pulse-shaper. This approach also allows the use of a continuum probe pulse, expanding the available frequency range of the detection axis and allowing studies of energy transfer and electronic coupling over a broad range of frequencies. We discuss several benefits of 2D electronic spectroscopy and present 2D data on the D1-D2 reaction center complex of Photosystem II from spinach. We discuss the ability of 2D spectroscopy to distinguish between current models of energy and charge transfer in this system.

  4. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Riedel, Dietmar; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje

    2015-10-22

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia.

  5. Charge-Transfer Emitting Triarylborane π-Electron Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Yong; Sun, Zuo-Bang; Zhao, Cui-Hua

    2017-02-06

    Triarylboranes have attracted significantly increasing research interest as a remarkable class of photoelectronic π-electron materials. Because of the presence of vacant p orbital on the B center, the boryl group is a very unique electron acceptor that exhibits not only electron-accepting ability through p-π* conjugation but also high Lewis acidity to coordinate with Lewis bases and steric bulk arising from the aryl substituent on the B center to get enough kinetic stability. Thus, the incorporation of a trivalent B element into π-conjugated systems is an efficient strategy to tune the electronic and stereo structures and thus the photoelectronic properties of π-electron systems. When an electron-donating group, such as amino, is present, triarylboranes would likely display intramolecular charge-transfer transitions. These kinds of molecules are often highly emissive. In addition, the geometry of the molecules has a great impact on the emission properties. In this Forum Article, we herein describe our recent progress on the charge-transfer emitting triarylborane π-electron systems with novel geometries, which include the lateral boryl-substituted π-system with amino groups at the terminal positions, the o,o'-substituted biaryl π-system with boryl and amino groups at the o,o'-positions, a triarylborane-based BODIPY system, and a B,N/S-bridged ladder-type π-system. We mainly put the emphasis on the molecular design concept, structure-property relationships, intriguing emission properties and great applications of the corresponding triarylborane π-systems.

  6. Guanine oxidation by electron transfer: one- versus two-electron oxidation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kupan, Adam; Saulière, Aude; Broussy, Sylvain; Seguy, Christel; Pratviel, Geneviève; Meunier, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    The degeneracy of the guanine radical cation, which is formed in DNA by oxidation of guanine by electron transfer, was studied by a detailed analysis of the oxidation products of guanine on oligonucleotide duplexes and by labeling experiments. It was shown that imidazolone, the major product of guanine oxidation, is formed through a one-electron oxidation process and incorporates one oxygen atom from O2. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine by a two-electron oxidation process was a minor pathway. The two-electron oxidation mechanism was also evidenced by the formation of a tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane adduct.

  7. Syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis via direct interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Shi, Liang; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Fredrickson, James K.; Madigan, Michael T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2017-01-01

    Microbial phototrophs, key primary producers on Earth, use H2O, H2, H2S and other reduced inorganic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe a form of metabolism linking anoxygenic photosynthesis to anaerobic respiration that we call ‘syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis'. We show that photoautotrophy in the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestaurii can be driven by either electrons from a solid electrode or acetate oxidation via direct interspecies electron transfer from a heterotrophic partner bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens. Photosynthetic growth of P. aestuarii using reductant provided by either an electrode or syntrophy is robust and light-dependent. In contrast, P. aestuarii does not grow in co-culture with a G. sulfurreducens mutant lacking a trans-outer membrane porin-cytochrome protein complex required for direct intercellular electron transfer. Syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis is therefore a carbon cycling process that could take place in anoxic environments. This process could be exploited for biotechnological applications, such as waste treatment and bioenergy production, using engineered phototrophic microbial communities. PMID:28067226

  8. Electronic coupling between Watson-Crick pairs for hole transfer and transport in desoxyribonucleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.; Jortner, Joshua; Bixon, M.; Rösch, Notker

    2001-04-01

    Electronic matrix elements for hole transfer between Watson-Crick pairs in desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of regular structure, calculated at the Hartree-Fock level, are compared with the corresponding intrastrand and interstrand matrix elements estimated for models comprised of just two nucleobases. The hole transfer matrix element of the GAG trimer duplex is calculated to be larger than that of the GTG duplex. "Through-space" interaction between two guanines in the trimer duplexes is comparable with the coupling through an intervening Watson-Crick pair. The gross features of bridge specificity and directional asymmetry of the electronic matrix elements for hole transfer between purine nucleobases in superstructures of dimer and trimer duplexes have been discussed on the basis of the quantum chemical calculations. These results have also been analyzed with a semiempirical superexchange model for the electronic coupling in DNA duplexes of donor (nuclobases)-acceptor, which incorporates adjacent base-base electronic couplings and empirical energy gaps corrected for solvation effects; this perturbation-theory-based model interpretation allows a theoretical evaluation of experimental observables, i.e., the absolute values of donor-acceptor electronic couplings, their distance dependence, and the reduction factors for the intrastrand hole hopping or trapping rates upon increasing the size of the nucleobases bridge. The quantum chemical results point towards some limitations of the perturbation-theory-based modeling.

  9. Electronic Couplings for Resonance Energy Transfer from CCSD Calculations: From Isolated to Solvated Systems.

    PubMed

    Caricato, Marco; Curutchet, Carles; Mennucci, Benedetta; Scalmani, Giovanni

    2015-11-10

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of electronic couplings provide great insights for the study of resonance energy transfer (RET). However, most of these calculations rely on approximate QM methods due to the computational limitations imposed by the size of typical donor-acceptor systems. In this work, we present a novel implementation that allows computing electronic couplings at the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level of theory. Solvent effects are also taken into account through the polarizable continuum model (PCM). As a test case, we use a dimer of indole, a common model system for tryptophan, which is routinely used as an intrinsic fluorophore in Förster resonance energy transfer studies. We consider two bright π → π* states, one of which has charge transfer character. Lastly, the results are compared with those obtained by applying TD-DFT in combination with one of the most popular density functionals, B3LYP.

  10. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron-Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of timescales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron-proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  11. Current Theoretical Challenges in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Electron Proton Nonadiabaticity, Proton Relays, and Ultrafast Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological and chemical processes. The motions of the electrons, transferring protons, solute nuclei, and solvent nuclei occur on a wide range of time scales and are often strongly coupled. As a result, the theoretical description of these processes requires a combination of quantum and classical methods. This Perspective discusses three of the current theoretical challenges in the field of PCET. The first challenge is the calculation of electron proton nonadiabatic effects, which are significant for these reactions because the hydrogen tunneling is often faster than the electronic transition. The second challenge is the modeling of electron transfer coupled to proton transport along hydrogen-bonded networks. The third challenge is the simulation of the ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium photoinduced PCET reactions in solution. Insights provided by theoretical studies may assist in the design of more effective catalysts for energy conversion processes. The proton relay portion of this review is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather R.; Dow, Brian A.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. PMID:25085775

  13. Photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer kinetics in small unilamellar vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Pal, Haridas

    2007-11-21

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from N,N-dimethylaniline to some coumarin derivatives has been studied in small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of the phospholipid, DL-{alpha}-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, both below and above the phase transition temperature of the vesicles. The primary interest was to examine whether Marcus inversion [H. Sumi and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] could be observed for the present ET systems in these organized assemblies. The influence of the topology of SUVs on the photophysical properties of the reactants and consequently on their ET kinetics has also been investigated. Absorption and fluorescence spectral data of the coumarins in SUVs and the variation of their fluorescence decays with temperature indicate that the dyes are localized in the bilayer of the SUVs. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra analysis, however, reveals that the dyes are distributed in two different microenvironments in the SUVs, which we attribute to the two leaflets of the bilayer, one toward bulk water and the other toward the inner water pool. The microenvironments in the two leaflets are, however, not indicated to be that significantly different. Time-resolved anisotropy decays were biexponential for all the dyes in SUVs, and this has been interpreted in terms of the compound motion model according to which the dye molecules can experience a fast wobbling-in-cone type of motion as well as a slow overall rotating motion of the cone containing the molecule. The expected bimolecular diffusion-controlled rates in SUVs, as estimated by comparing the microviscosities in SUVs (determined from rotational correlation times) and that in acetonitrile solution, are much slower than the observed fluorescence quenching rates, suggesting that reactant diffusion (translational) does not play any role in the quenching kinetics in the present systems. Accordingly, clear inversions are

  14. Improving data transfer for model coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Liu, L.; Yang, G.; Li, R.; Wang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Data transfer, which means transferring data fields between two component models or rearranging data fields among processes of the same component model, is a fundamental operation of a coupler. Most of state-of-the-art coupler versions currently use an implementation based on the point-to-point (P2P) communication of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) (call such an implementation "P2P implementation" for short). In this paper, we reveal the drawbacks of the P2P implementation, including low communication bandwidth due to small message size, variable and big number of MPI messages, and jams during communication. To overcome these drawbacks, we propose a butterfly implementation for data transfer. Although the butterfly implementation can outperform the P2P implementation in many cases, it degrades the performance in some cases because the total message size transferred by the butterfly implementation is larger than that by the P2P implementation. To make the data transfer completely improved, we design and implement an adaptive data transfer library that combines the advantages of both butterfly implementation and P2P implementation. Performance evaluation shows that the adaptive data transfer library significantly improves the performance of data transfer in most cases and does not decrease the performance in any cases. Now the adaptive data transfer library is open to the public and has been imported into a coupler version C-Coupler1 for performance improvement of data transfer. We believe that it can also improve other coupler versions.

  15. Application of Electron-Transfer Theory to Several Systems of Biological Interest

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Marcus, R. A.; Sutin, N.

    1985-03-23

    Electron-transfer reaction rates are compared with theoretically calculated values for several reactions in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. A second aspect of the theory, the cross-relation, is illustrated using protein-protein electron transfers.

  16. ELECTRON TRANSFER MECHANISM AT THE SOLID-LIQUID INTERFACE OF PHYLLOSILICATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interfacial electron transfer processes on clay minerals have significant impact in natural environments and geochemical systems. Nitrobenzene was used as molecular probes to study the electron transfer mechanism at the solid-water interfaces of Fe-containing phyllosicates. For...

  17. Characterisation of the signal and noise transfer of CCD cameras for electron detection.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R R; Kirkland, A I

    2000-05-01

    Methods to characterise the performance of CCD cameras for electron detection are investigated with particular emphasis on the difference between the transfer of signal and noise. Similar to the Modulation Transfer Function MTF, which describes the spatial frequency dependent attenuation of contrast in the image, we introduce a Noise Transfer Function NTF that describes the transfer of the Poisson noise that is inevitably present in any electron image. A general model for signal and noise transfer by an image converter is provided. This allows the calculation of MTF and NTF from Monte-Carlo simulations of the trajectories of electrons and photons in the scintillator and the optical coupling of the camera. Furthermore, accurate methods to measure the modulation and noise transfer functions experimentally are presented. The spatial-frequency dependent Detection Quantum Efficiency DQE, an important figure of merit of the camera which has so far not been measured experimentally, can be obtained from the measured MTF and NTF. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulations and show that the NTF at high spatial frequencies is in some cases by a factor of four higher than the MTF. This implies that the noise method, which is frequently used to measure the MTF, but in fact measures the NTF, gives over-optimistic results. Furthermore, the spatial frequency dependent DQE is lower than previously assumed.

  18. Photosensitization of thymine nucleobase by benzophenone derivatives as models for photoinduced DNA damage: Paterno-Büchi vs energy and electron transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Encinas, Susana; Belmadoui, Noureddine; Climent, Maria J; Gil, Salvador; Miranda, Miguel A

    2004-07-01

    Time-resolved and product studies have shown that there is a strong interaction between drugs containing the benzophenone chromophore and the free thymidine nucleoside. In quantitative terms, such an interaction is stronger for the lowest lying npi* triplet states (S-ketoprofen) than for mixed npi*-pipi* triplets (fenofibrate and fenofibric acid), as indicated by the quenching rate constants. This is consistent with a Paterno-Büchi photoreaction, where the initial step is the formation of a new bond between the excited carbonyl oxygen and one of the thymine olefinic carbons. Actually, oxetanes are obtained as photoproducts when benzophenone is irradiated in the presence of thymidine. Hence, triplet-triplet energy transfer resulting in formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, which would be thermodynamically disfavored, does not seem to play a major role. However, in DNA, the contribution of energy transfer could be higher, due to the lower energy of the thymine triplet in the biomacromolecule. These results are discussed in connection with the observed DNA damage upon photosensitization with ketoprofen, fenofibrate, and fenofibric acid.

  19. Imaging charge and energy transfer in molecules using free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Artem

    2014-05-01

    Charge and energy transfer reactions drive numerous important processes in physics, chemistry and biology, with applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to artificial photosynthesis and molecular electronics. Experimentally, the central goal in studies of transfer phenomena is to trace the spatial localization of charge at a given time. Because of their element and site sensitivity, ultrafast X-rays provide a promising tool to address this goal. In this talk I will discuss several experiments where free-electron lasers were employed to study charge and energy transfer dynamics in fragmenting molecules. In a first example, we used intense, 70 femtosecond 1.5 keV pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study distance dependence of electron transfer in laser-dissociated methyl iodide molecules. Inducing well-localized positive charge on the heavy iodine atom, we observe signature of electron transition from the separated methyl group up to the distances of 35 atomic units. In a complementary experiment, we studied charge exchange between two partners in a dissociating molecular iodine employing a pump-probe arrangement with two identical 90 eV pulses from the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH). In both cases, the effective spatial range of the electron transfer can be reasonably described by a classical over-the-barrier model developed for ion-atom collisions. Finally, I will discuss a time-resolved measurement on non-local relaxation mechanism based on a long-range energy transfer, the so-called interatomic Coulombic decay. This work was supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Department of Energy and by the Kansas NSF ``First Award'' program.

  20. Hetero-cycloreversions mediated by photoinduced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Jiménez, M Consuelo; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-04-15

    Discovered more than eight decades ago, the Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition (CA) remains one of the most versatile tools in synthetic organic chemistry. Hetero-DA processes are powerful methods for the synthesis of densely functionalized six-membered heterocycles, ubiquitous substructures found in natural products and bioactive compounds. These reactions frequently employ azadienes and oxadienes, but only a few groups have reported DA processes with thiadienes. The electron transfer (ET) version of the DA reaction, though less investigated, has emerged as a subject of increasing interest. In the last two decades, researchers have paid closer attention to radical ionic hetero-cycloreversions, mainly in connection with their possible involvement in the repair of pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photolesions in DNA by photolyases. In biological systems, these reactions likely occur through a reductive photosensitization mechanism. In addition, photooxidation can lead to cycloreversion (CR) reactions, and researchers can exploit this strategy for DNA repair therapies. In this Account, we discuss electron-transfer (ET) mediated hetero-CR reactions. We focus on the oxidative and reductive ET splitting of oxetanes, azetidines, and thietanes. Photoinduced electron transfer facilitates the splitting of a variety of four-membered heterocycles. In this context, researchers have commonly examined oxetanes, both experimentally and theoretically. Although a few studies have reported the cycloreversion of azetidines and thietanes carried out under electron transfer conditions, the number of examples remains limited. In general, the cleavage of the ionized four-membered rings appears to occur via a nonconcerted two-step mechanism. The trapping of the intermediate 1,4-radical ions and transient absorption spectroscopy data support this hypothesis, and it explains the observed loss of stereochemistry in the products. In the initial step, either C-C or C-X bond breaking may occur, and the

  1. Molecular control of electron and hole transfer processes: Theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.D.; Cave, R.J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent decades have seen remarkable advances in microscopic understanding of electron transfer (ET) processes in widely ranging contexts, including solid-state, liquid solution, and complex biological assemblies. The primary goal of this chapter is to report recent advances in the modeling, calculation, and analysis of electronic coupling in complex molecular aggregates, thereby allowing an assessment of current progress toward the goal of molecular-level control and design. The control of electron transfer kinetics (i.e., enhancing desired processes, while inhibiting others) involves, of course, system energetics (especially activation and reorganization energies) as well as electronic coupling, which is most directly relevant only after the system has reached the appropriate point (or region) along the reaction coordinate. Nevertheless, to focus the discussion in this chapter, the authors will consider such energetics, and the associated molecular and solvent coordinates which control then, only to the extent that they bear on the analysis of the electronic coupling. In the following sections they first discuss the formulation of basic ET models, including the definition of initial and final states, the role of orbitals and 1-particle models in a many-electron context, the utility of various effective Hamiltonians, and the role of vibronic as well as purely electronic effects. With these theoretical tools in hand, they then examine very recent applications to complex molecular systems using the techniques of computational quantum chemistry, followed by detailed analysis of the numerical results. They then conclude with some comments regarding the current ``state of the art`` and remaining challenges.

  2. Inner reorganization limiting electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding: intra- vs. intermolecular effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, Eduardo; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-05-07

    In this work, experimental evidence of the influence of the electron transfer kinetics during electron transfer controlled hydrogen bonding between anion radicals of metronidazole and ornidazole, derivatives of 5-nitro-imidazole, and 1,3-diethylurea as the hydrogen bond donor, is presented. Analysis of the variations of voltammetric EpIcvs. log KB[DH], where KB is the binding constant, allowed us to determine the values of the binding constant and also the electron transfer rate k, confirmed by experiments obtained at different scan rates. Electronic structure calculations at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level for metronidazole, including the solvent effect by the Cramer/Truhlar model, suggested that the minimum energy conformer is stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In this structure, the inner reorganization energy, λi,j, contributes significantly (0.5 eV) to the total reorganization energy of electron transfer, thus leading to a diminishment of the experimental k.

  3. A dynamical approach to non-adiabatic electron transfers at the bio-inorganic interface.

    PubMed

    Zanetti-Polzi, Laura; Corni, Stefano

    2016-04-21

    A methodology is proposed to investigate electron transfer reactions between redox-active biomolecular systems (e.g. a protein) and inorganic surfaces. The whole system is modelled at the atomistic level using classical molecular dynamics - making an extensive sampling of the system's configurations possible - and the energies associated with the redox-active complex reduction are calculated using a hybrid quantum/classical approach along the molecular dynamics trajectory. The non-adiabaticity is introduced a posteriori using a Monte Carlo approach based on the Landau-Zener theory extended to treat a metal surface. This approach thus allows us to investigate the role of the energy fluctuations, determined by the dynamical evolution of the system, as well as the role of non-adiabaticity in affecting the kinetic rate of the electron transfer reaction. Most notably, it allows us to investigate the two contributions separately, hence achieving a detailed picture of the mechanisms that determine the rate. The analysis of the system configurations also allows us to relate the estimated electronic coupling to the structural and dynamic properties of the system. As a test case, the methodology is here applied to study the electron transfer reaction between cytochrome c and a gold surface. The results obtained explain the different electron transfer rates experimentally measured for two different concentrations of proteins on the electrode surface.

  4. Extracting electron transfer coupling elements from constrained density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2006-10-01

    Constrained density functional theory (DFT) is a useful tool for studying electron transfer (ET) reactions. It can straightforwardly construct the charge-localized diabatic states and give a direct measure of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. In this work, a method is presented for calculating the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) based on constrained DFT. This method completely avoids the use of ground-state DFT energies because they are known to irrationally predict fractional electron transfer in many cases. Instead it makes use of the constrained DFT energies and the Kohn-Sham wave functions for the diabatic states in a careful way. Test calculations on the Zn2+ and the benzene-Cl atom systems show that the new prescription yields reasonable agreement with the standard generalized Mulliken-Hush method. We then proceed to produce the diabatic and adiabatic potential energy curves along the reaction pathway for intervalence ET in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q) anion. While the unconstrained DFT curve has no reaction barrier and gives Hab≈17kcal /mol, which qualitatively disagrees with experimental results, the Hab calculated from constrained DFT is about 3kcal /mol and the generated ground state has a barrier height of 1.70kcal/mol, successfully predicting (Q-TTF-Q)- to be a class II mixed-valence compound.

  5. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Process Visualized on Single Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lei, Gang; Gao, Peng Fei; Yang, Tong; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Hong Zhi; Sun, Shan Shan; Gao, Ming Xuan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2017-02-28

    Understanding the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism is vital to improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency for solar energy materials and photosensitization systems. Herein, we visually demonstrate the PET process by real-time monitoring the photoinduced chemical transformation of p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP), an important SERS signal molecule, to 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene on single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy coupled dark-field microscopy. The bidirectional LSPR scattering spectral shifts bathochromically at first and hypsochromically then, which are caused by the electron transfer delay of p-ATP, disclose the PET path from p-ATP to O2 through AgNPs during the reaction, and enable us to digitalize the corresponding electron loss and gain on the surface of AgNP at different time periods. This visualized PET process could provide a simple and efficient approach to explore the nature of PET and help to interpret the SERS mechanism in terms of p-ATP.

  6. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions is mostly caused by microbial activities, which is termed as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Among diverse MIC mechanisms, microbial EET activity that enhances corrosion via direct uptake of electrons from metallic iron, specifically termed as electrical MIC (EMIC), has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. The EMIC-inducing microorganisms initially identified were certain sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea isolated from marine environments. Subsequently, abilities to induce EMIC were also demonstrated in diverse anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater environments and oil fields, including acetogenic bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria. Abilities of EET and EMIC are now regarded as microbial traits more widespread among diverse microbial clades than was thought previously. In this review, basic understandings of microbial EET and recent progresses in the EMIC research are introduced.

  7. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer of government benefits. 205.15 Section 205.15 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.15 Electronic fund transfer of...

  8. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer of government benefits. 205.15 Section 205.15 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.15 Electronic fund transfer of...

  9. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer of government benefits. 205.15 Section 205.15 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.15 Electronic fund transfer of...

  10. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer of government benefits. 205.15 Section 205.15 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.15 Electronic fund transfer of...

  11. 12 CFR 205.15 - Electronic fund transfer of government benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer of government benefits. 205.15 Section 205.15 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 205.15 Electronic fund transfer of...

  12. Gunn effect and transferred electron devices. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-06-01

    A bibliography containing 99 abstracts addressing the Gunn effect and transferred electron devices is presented. The application of Gunn effect and transferred electron devices to microwave generation, amplification, and control is included. The Gunn effect in semiconductors is dicussed along with the design, fabrication, and properties of Gunn diodes and transferred electron devices.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer from dialkyl nitroxides to halogenated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Chateauneuf, J. ); Lusztyk, J.; Ingold, K.U. )

    1990-02-02

    Laser flash photolysis (LFP) at wavelengths within the charge-transfer absorption present in CCl{sub 4} solutions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) yields the oxoammonium chloride of TEMPO, 1 ({lambda}{sub max} = 460 nm), and the trichloromethyl radical in an essentially instantaneous ({le}18 ps) process. The primary photochemical event is an electron transfer from TEMPO to CCl{sub 4}, and this is followed by immediate decomposition of the CCl{sub 4}{sup {sm bullet}{minus}} radical anion to Cl{sup {minus}} and Cl{sub 3}C{sup {sm bullet}}. An independent synthesis of 1 confirmed that the absorption attributed to this species has been correctly assigned. The formation of Cl{sub 3}C{sup {sm bullet}} was inferred by its trapping by molecular oxygen. LFP of TEMPO in other halogenated solvents and of other nitroxides in halogenated solvents has confirmed the generality of these photoreactions.

  14. Theoretical studies of electron transfer and optical spectroscopy. Progress report, September 25, 1990--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Friesner, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    Progress has been made in three areas. First, we have made major strides in developing our PSGVB electronic structure code, including high level electron correlation methods needed to treat complex structures like semiconductor clusters. Secondly, we have developed a one-electron pseudopotential model for semiconductor clusters which reproduces the experimental bandgap as a function of cluster size without adjustable parameters. We are currently using the model to calculate absorption spectra as opposed to just the bandgap via a dispersed polaron formalism. Finally, we have developed two novel quantum dynamical methods, one involving surface hopping and the second utilizing Redfield theory. These methods will be applied to calculation of the relaxation of an excited electron is a semiconductor cluster and also to electron transfer through DNA.

  15. A study of electron transfer using a three-level system coupled to an ohmic bath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takasu, Masako; Chandler, David

    1993-01-01

    Electron transfer is studied using a multi-level system coupled to a bosonic bath. Two body correlation functions are obtained using both exact enumeration of spin paths and Monte Carlo simulation. It was found that the phase boundary for the coherent-incoherent transition lies at a smaller friction in the asymmetric two-level model than in the symmetric two-level model. A similar coherent-incoherent transition is observed for three-level system.

  16. Transcriptomic and Genetic Analysis of Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M.; Shrestha, Minita; Liu, Fanghua; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the electron-accepting partner for either Geobacter metallireducens, which performs DIET, or Pelobacter carbinolicus, which relies on HIT. Transcript abundance for G. sulfurreducens uptake hydrogenase genes was 7-fold lower in cocultures with G. metallireducens than in cocultures with P. carbinolicus, consistent with DIET and HIT, respectively, in the two cocultures. Transcript abundance for the pilus-associated cytochrome OmcS, which is essential for DIET but not for HIT, was 240-fold higher in the cocultures with G. metallireducens than in cocultures with P. carbinolicus. The pilin gene pilA was moderately expressed despite a mutation that might be expected to repress pilA expression. Lower transcript abundance for G. sulfurreducens genes associated with acetate metabolism in the cocultures with P. carbinolicus was consistent with the repression of these genes by H2 during HIT. Genes for the biogenesis of pili and flagella and several c-type cytochrome genes were among the most highly expressed in G. metallireducens. Mutant strains that lacked the ability to produce pili, flagella, or the outer surface c-type cytochrome encoded by Gmet_2896 were not able to form cocultures with G. sulfurreducens. These results demonstrate that there are unique gene expression patterns that distinguish DIET from HIT and suggest that metatranscriptomics may be a promising route to investigate interspecies electron transfer pathways in more-complex environments. PMID:23377933

  17. A molecular Debye-Hückel approach to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Tiejun; Song, Xueyu

    2014-10-07

    Electron transfer near an electrode immersed in ionic fluids is studied using the linear response approximation, namely, mean value of the vertical energy gap can be used to evaluate the reorganization energy, and hence any linear response model that can treat Coulomb interactions successfully can be used for the reorganization energy calculation. Specifically, a molecular Debye-Hückel theory is used to calculate the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell. Applications to electron transfer near an electrode in molten salts show that the reorganization energies from our molecular Debye-Hückel theory agree well with the results from MD simulations.

  18. Artificial photosynthesis: from nanosecond electron transfer to catalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kärkäs, Markus D; Johnston, Eric V; Verho, Oscar; Akermark, Björn

    2014-01-21

    Human society faces a fundamental challenge as energy consumption is projected to increase due to population and economic growth as fossil fuel resources decrease. Therefore the transition to alternative and sustainable energy sources is of the utmost importance. The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy, by splitting H2O to generate molecular O2 and H2, could contribute to solving the global energy problem. Developing such a system will require the combination of several complicated processes, such as light-harvesting, charge separation, electron transfer, H2O oxidation, and reduction of the generated protons. The primary processes of charge separation and catalysis, which occur in the natural photosynthetic machinery, provide us with an excellent blueprint for the design of such systems. This Account describes our efforts to construct supramolecular assemblies capable of carrying out photoinduced electron transfer and to develop artificial water oxidation catalysts (WOCs). Early work in our group focused on linking a ruthenium chromophore to a manganese-based oxidation catalyst. When we incorporated a tyrosine unit into these supramolecular assemblies, we could observe fast intramolecular electron transfer from the manganese centers, via the tyrosine moiety, to the photooxidized ruthenium center, which clearly resembles the processes occurring in the natural system. Although we demonstrated multi-electron transfer in our artificial systems, the bottleneck proved to be the stability of the WOCs. Researchers have developed a number of WOCs, but the majority can only catalyze H2O oxidation in the presence of strong oxidants such as Ce(IV), which is difficult to generate photochemically. By contrast, illumination of ruthenium(II) photosensitizers in the presence of a sacrificial acceptor generates [Ru(bpy)3](3+)-type oxidants. Their oxidation potentials are significantly lower than that of Ce(IV), but our group recently showed that incorporating negatively

  19. Geometric phase and quantum interference in photosynthetic reaction center: Regulation of electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuming; Su, Yuehua; Dai, Zhenhong; Wang, WeiTian

    2016-10-01

    Photosynthesis is driven by electron transfer in reaction centers in which the functional unit is composed of several simple molecules C2-symmetrically arranged into two branches. In view of quantum mechanism, both branches are possible pathways traversed by the transferred electron. Due to different evolution of spin state along two pathways in transmembrane electric potential (TEP), quantum state of the transferred electron at the bridged site acquires a geometric phase difference dependent on TEP, the most efficient electron transport takes place in a specific range of TEP beyond which electron transfer is dramatically suppressed. What's more, reaction center acts like elaborately designed quantum device preparing polarized spin dependent on TEP for the transferred electron to regulate the reduction potential at bridged site. In brief, electron transfer generates the TEP, reversely, TEP modulates the efficiency of electron transfer. This may be an important approach to maintaining an appreciable pH environment in photosynthesis.

  20. The Relationship between Organizational Factors and the Transfer of Training in the Electronics Industry in Shenzhen, China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Jin

    1996-01-01

    A transfer model was applied to data from a survey of workers in four Chinese electronics firms. Results showed that transfer of training depends on organizational factors that facilitate use of knowledge, skills, and attitudes acquired. Supervision and other human factors were most influential. (SK)

  1. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  2. Biochemical Mechanisms Controlling Terminal Electron Transfer in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, R.; Liermann, L. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Tien, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ability of Geobacter sulfurreducens to use a variety of metals as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for cellular respiration makes it attractive for use in bioremediation and implies its importance to mineral cycling in the environment. This study is aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanisms that allow Geobacter sulfurreducens to use soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms as TEAs for cellular respiration and is the first of its kind to address the kinetics of manganese use as a TEA by G. sulfurreducens. First, G. sulfurreducens was conditioned to grow on various soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms. G. sulfurreducens demonstrated enhanced growth rates when cultured using soluble TEAs compared with insoluble TEAs. However, the lower growth rate on insoluble iron compared with soluble iron was observed concomitantly with a 1-2 log lower cell density in stationary phase in insoluble iron cultures and a lower growth yield per electron donor used in log growth phase. Furthermore, the growth yield per electron was similar with both soluble and insoluble iron. These results suggest that the net amount of energy available for biomass production achieved from reducing insoluble iron is lower than with soluble iron, which may be due to a different biochemical mechanism catalyzing the electron transfer to TEA dependent upon the solubility of the TEA. One scenario consistent with this notion is that protein(s) in the outer membrane of G. sulfurreducens that transfers electrons to insoluble TEAs does so in a manner that uncouples electron flow from the proton pump in the cellular membrane, similar to what we have observed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Both the growth rate and growth yield of G. sulfurreducens on insoluble manganese were higher than on insoluble iron, indicating that there is a difference in the flow of electrons to the TEA in these two situations. While the different redox potentials of these elements may affect these values

  3. Exciton Relaxation and Electron Transfer Dynamics of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cunming

    Quantum dots (QDs), also referred to as colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, exhibit unique electronic and optical properties arising from their three-dimensional confinement and strongly enhanced coulomb interactions. Developing a detailed understanding of the exciton relaxation dynamics within QDs is important not only for sake of exploring the fundamental physics of quantum confinement processes, but also for their applications. Ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy, as a powerful tool to explore the relaxation dynamics of excitons, was employed to characterize the hot single/multiexciton relaxation dynamics at the first four exciton states of CdSe/CdZnS QDs. We observed for the first time that the hot hole can relax through two possible pathways: Intraband multiple phonon coupling and intrinsic defect trapping, with a lifetime of ˜7 ps. Additionally, an ultra-short component of ˜ 8 ps, directly associated with the Auger recombination of highly energetic exciton states, was discovered. After exploring the exciton relaxation inside QDs, ultrafast TA spectroscopy was further applied to study the electron transferring outside from QDs. By using a brand-new photocatalytic system consisting of CdSe QDs and Ni-dihydrolipoic acid (Ni-DHLA) catalyst, which has represented a robust photocatalysis of H2 from water, the photoinduced electron transfer (ET) dynamics between QD and the catalyst, one of most important steps during H2 generation, was studied. We found smaller bare CdSe QDs exhibit a better ET performance and CdS shelling on the bare QDs leads to worsen the ET. The calculations of effective mass approximation (EMA) and Marcus theory show the ET process is mainly dominated by driving force, electronic coupling strength and reorganization energy between QD and the catalyst.

  4. Electron transfer kinetics in water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swierk, John R.

    steps of injection, recombination, and hole transfer among others. Finally, in Chapter 6 a model system that describes electron transfer between an oxidized sensitizer and water oxidation catalyst is demonstrated and provides insight into sensitizer regeneration in WS-DSPECs. Together the results in these chapters present a detailed picture of how electron scavenging, recombination, and transport combine to generate photocurrent in a fully characterized WS-DSPEC and serve as starting point for the further development of WS-DSPECs.

  5. Universality of energy and electron transfer processes in photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Hastings, G; Hoshina, S; Webber, A N; Blankenship, R E

    1995-11-28

    Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy has been used to investigate the photoinduced energy and electron transfer processes in photosystem I (PS I) particles from cyanobacteria, green algae, and higher plants. At room temperature, the kinetics observed in all three species are very similar: Following 590 nm excitation, an equilibration process(es) with a 3.7-7.5 ps lifetime was observed, followed by a 19-24 ps process that is associated with trapping. In all three species long-wavelength pigments (pigments that absorb at longer wavelengths than the primary electron donor) were observed. The difference spectrum associated with reduction of the primary electron acceptor [Ao(-)-Ao) difference spectrum] was obtained for all three species. The (Ao(-)-Ao) difference spectra obtained from measurements using detergent-isolated PS I particles from spinach and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are similar but clearly membrane fragments. In all three species the reduced primary electron acceptor (Ao(-)) is reoxidized extremely rapidly, in about 20 ps. The difference spectrum associated with Ao reduction appears to contain contributions from more than a single chlorophyll pigment.

  6. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by Dexter mechanism in the quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samosvat, D. M.; Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work the energy transfer between quantum dots by the exchange (Dexter) mechanism is analysed. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same compound A3B5 and embedded in the matrix of other material creating potential barriers for electron and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found using the Kane model that provides the most adequate description spectra of semiconductors A3B5. Numerical calculations show that the rate of the energy transfer by Dexter mechanism is comparable to the rate of the energy transfer by electrostatic mechanism at the distances approaching to the contact ones.

  7. Supporting Students' Knowledge Transfer in Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piksööt, Jaanika; Sarapuu, Tago

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates ways to enhance secondary school students' knowledge transfer in complex science domains by implementing question prompts. Two samples of students applied two web-based models to study molecular genetics--the model of genetic code (n = 258) and translation (n = 245). For each model, the samples were randomly divided into…

  8. Spatial resolution and information transfer in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiping; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Chisholm, Matthew F; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The relation between image resolution and information transfer is explored. It is shown that the existence of higher frequency transfer in the image is just a necessary but not sufficient condition for the achievement of higher resolution. Adopting a two-point resolution criterion, we suggest that a 10% contrast level between two features in an image should be used as a practical definition of resolution. In the context of scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is shown that the channeling effect does not have a direct connection with image resolution because sharp channeling peaks do not move with the scanning probe. Through a quantitative comparison between experimental image and simulation, a Fourier-space approach is proposed to estimate defocus and sample thickness. The effective atom size in Z-contrast imaging depends on the annular detector's inner angle. Therefore, an optimum angle exists for the highest resolution as a trade-off between reduced atom size and reduced signal with limited information transfer due to noise.

  9. Electron transfer in native and mutated photosystem I reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Xu, Wu; Chitnis, Parag; Struve, Walter

    2002-03-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved absorption difference studies were performed on photosystem I complexes from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The overal electron transfer from the special pair P700 to the secondary acceptor A1 has been shown to be 10 ps, twice shorter than the previously estimated value. Similar studies were performed on more than 10 genetically engineered species, where protein structure was altered in the visinity of the reaction center (RC). The functioning of the PS I complex was found to be extremelly sensitive to the protein sequence in the immediate proximity of the RC: less than half of the studied mutations resulted in photosynthetically active complexes, and all of the latter had electron transfer dynamics indistinguishable from that of the wild type. Most of the mutations in the other areas of the PS I, including antenna, did not affect the photosynthetic function of this complex radically. These results confirm the extreme importance of the precise RC structure and demonstrate why millions of years of evolution resulted in only two types of topologically similar RC's shared by all photosynthetic organisms.

  10. MD studies of electron transfer at ambient and elevated pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Alex; Spooner, Jacob; Weinberg, Noham

    2013-06-01

    The effect of pressure on the rate constants of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions has often been described using the Marcus-Hush theory. This theory agrees well with experiment when internal reorganization of the ionic system is negligible, however it does not offer a recipe for calculation of the effects that result from significant solute restructuring. We have recently developed a molecular dynamics technique that accurately describes structural dependence of molecular volumes in non-polar and weakly polar systems. We are now extending this approach to the case of highly polar ionic systems where both solvent and solute restructuring components are important. For this purpose we construct pressure-dependent two-dimensional surfaces for electron transfer reactions in coordinate system composed of interionic distance and Marcus-type solvent polarization coordinate, and use these surfaces to describe pressure effects on reaction kinetics. R.A. Marcus. J. Chem. Phys. 24, 966 (1956); 24, 979 (1956); 26, 867 (1957). Discuss. Faraday Soc. 29, 21 (1960). Faraday Discuss. Chem. Soc. 74, 7 (1982); N.S. Hush. Trans. Faraday Soc. 57, 557 (1961).

  11. Proton transfer in phenol-amine complexes: phenol electronic effects on free energy profile in solution.

    PubMed

    Aono, Shinji; Kato, Shigeki

    2010-12-01

    Free energy profiles for the proton transfer reactions in hydrogen-bonded complex of phenol with trimethylamine in methyl chloride solvent are studied with the reference interaction site model self-consistent field method. The reactions in both the electronic ground and excited states are considered. The second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP) theory or the second-order multireference MP theory is used to evaluate the effect of the dynamical electron correlation on the free energy profiles. The free energy surface in the ground state shows a discrepancy with the experimental results for the related hydrogen-bonded complexes. To resolve this discrepancy, the effects of chloro-substitutions in phenol are examined, and its importance in stabilizing the ionic form is discussed. The temperature effect is also studied. In contrast to the ground state, the ππ* excited state of phenol-trimethylamine complex exhibits the proton transfer reaction with a low barrier. The reaction is almost thermoneutral. This is attributed to the reduction of proton affinity of phenol by the ππ* electronic excitation. We further examine the possibility of the electron-proton-coupled transfer in the ππ* state through the surface crossing with the charge transfer type πσ* state.

  12. Vibrational dynamics in photoinduced electron transfer. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, K.G.

    1993-09-08

    Objective is to perform a new type of measurement for optically excited electron transfer processes that can provide unique experimental insight into the molecular mechanism of electron transfer. Measurements of optically excited electron transfer are done with picosecond infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy to monitor the vibrational motions of the molecules immediately after electron transfer. Theory and experiment suggest that molecular vibrations and distortions are important controlling elements for electron transfer, and direct information has yet to be obtained on these elements of electron transfer mechanisms. The second period of funding has been dedicated to finishing technique development and performing studies of electron transfer in ion pair systems to identify if vibrational dependent electron transfer rates are present in this system. We have succeeded in measuring, for the first time, electron transfer rates as a function of vibrational state in an ion pair complex in solution. In a different area of electron transfer research we have proposed a new mechanism of solvent gated electron transfer.

  13. Electron transfer of Pseudomonas aeruginosa CP1 in electrochemical reduction of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; He, Jiaxin; Li, Han; Zhang, Yongqing

    2016-10-01

    This study reports catalytic electro-chemical reduction of nitric oxide (NO) enhanced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain CP1. The current generated in the presence of bacteria was 4.36times that in the absence of the bacteria. The strain was able to catalyze electro-chemical reduction of NO via indirect electron transfer with an electrode, revealed by a series of cyclic voltammetry experiments. Soluble electron shuttles secreted into solution by live bacteria were responsible for the catalytic effects. The enhancement of NO reduction was also confirmed by detection of nitrous oxide; the level of this intermediate was 46.4% higher in the presence of bacteria than in controls, illustrated that the electron transfer pathway did not directly reduce nitric oxide to N2. The findings of this study may offer a new model for bioelectrochemical research in the field of NO removal by biocatalysts.

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Parametrization of Transfer Matrix: for One-Dimensional Anderson Model with Diagonal Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kai; Qin, Shao-Jing; Wang, Chui-Lin

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we developed a new parametrization method to calculate the localization length in one-dimensional Anderson model with diagonal disorder. This method can avoid the divergence difficulty encountered in the conventional methods, and significantly save computing time as well.

  15. CAN A MODEL TRANSFERABILITY FRAMEWORK IMPROVE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Budget constraints and policies that limit primary data collection have fueled a practice of transferring estimates (or models to generate estimates) of ecological endpoints from sites where primary data exists to sites where little to no primary data were collected. Whereas benefit transfer has been well studied; there is no comparable framework for evaluating whether model transfer between sites is justifiable. We developed and applied a transferability assessment framework to a case study involving forest carbon sequestration for soils in Tillamook Bay, Oregon. The carbon sequestration capacity of forested watersheds is an important ecosystem service in the effort to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions. We used our framework, incorporating three basic steps (model selection, defining context variables, assessing logistical constraints) for evaluating model transferability, to compare estimates of carbon storage capacity derived from two models, COMET-Farm and Yasso. We applied each model to Tillamook Bay and compared results to data extracted from the Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) using ArcGIS. Context variables considered were: geographic proximity to Tillamook, dominant tree species, climate and soil type. Preliminary analyses showed that estimates from COMET-Farm were more similar to SSURGO data, likely because model context variables (e.g. proximity to Tillamook and dominant tree species) were identical to those in Tillamook. In contras

  16. Effects of alkoxy groups on arene rings of lignin β-O-4 model compounds on the efficiencies of single electron transfer-promoted photochemical and enzymatic C-C Bond Cleavage Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lim, Suk Hyun; Nahm, Keepyung; Ra, Choon Sup; Cho, Dae Won; Yoon, Ung Chan; Latham, John A; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Mariano, Patrick S

    2013-09-20

    To gain information about how alkoxy substitution in arene rings of β-O-4 structural units within lignin governs the efficiencies/rates of radical cation C1-C2 bond cleavage reactions, single electron transfer (SET) photochemical and lignin peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation reactions of dimeric/tetrameric model compounds have been explored. The results show that the radical cations derived from less alkoxy-substituted dimeric β-O-4 models undergo more rapid C1-C2 bond cleavage than those of more alkoxy-substituted analogues. These findings gained support from the results of DFT calculations, which demonstrate that C1-C2 bond dissociation energies of β-O-4 radical cations decrease as the degree of alkoxy substitution decreases. In SET reactions of tetrameric compounds consisting of two β-O-4 units, containing different degrees of alkoxy substitution, regioselective radical cation C-C bond cleavage was observed to occur in one case at the C1-C2 bond in the less alkoxy-substituted β-O-4 moiety. However, regioselective C1-C2 cleavage in the more alkoxy-substituted β-O-4 moiety was observed in another case, suggesting that other factors might participate in controlling this process. These observations show that lignins containing greater proportions of less rather than more alkoxylated rings as part of β-O-4 units would be more efficiently cleaved by SET mechanisms.

  17. ATP-induced electron transfer by redox-selective partner recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Sandra E.; Goetzl, Sebastian; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Bommer, Martin; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2014-08-01

    Thermodynamically unfavourable electron transfers are enabled by coupling to an energy-supplying reaction. How the energy is transduced from the exergonic to the endergonic process is largely unknown. Here we provide the structural basis for an energy transduction process in the reductive activation of B12-dependent methyltransferases. The transfer of one electron from an activating enzyme to the cobalamin cofactor is energetically uphill and relies on coupling to an ATPase reaction. Our results demonstrate that the key to coupling is, besides the oxidation state-dependent complex formation, the conformational gating of the electron transfer. Complex formation induces a substitution of the ligand at the electron-accepting Co ion. Addition of ATP initiates electron transfer by provoking conformational changes that destabilize the complex. We show how remodelling of the electron-accepting Co2+ promotes ATP-dependent electron transfer; an efficient strategy not seen in other electron-transferring ATPases.

  18. Simplified models for heat transfer in rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graca, Guilherme C. C. Carrilho Da

    Buildings protect their occupants from the outside environment. As a semi-enclosed environment, buildings tend to contain the internally generated heat and air pollutants, as well as the solar and conductive heat gains that can occur in the facade. In the warmer months of the year this generally leads to overheating, creating a need for a cooling system. Ventilation air replaces contaminated air in the building and is often used as the dominant medium for heat transfer between indoor and outdoor environments. The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to develop a better understanding of the important parameters in the performance of ventilation systems and to develop simplified convective heat transfer models. The general approach used in this study seeks to capture the dominant physical processes for these problems with first order accuracy, and develop simple models that show the correct system behavior trends. Dimensional analysis, in conjunction with simple momentum and energy conservation, scaled model experiments and numerical simulations, is used to improve airflow and heat transfer rate predictions in both single and multi room ventilation systems. This study includes the three commonly used room ventilation modes: mixing, displacement and cross-ventilation. A new modeling approach to convective heat transfer between the building and the outside is presented: the concept of equivalent room heat transfer coefficient. The new model quantifies the reduction in heat transfer between ventilation air and internal room surfaces caused by limited thermal capacity and temperature variation of the air for the three modes studied. Particular emphasis is placed on cross-ventilation, and on the development of a simple model to characterize the airflow patterns that occur in this case. The implementation of the models in a building thermal simulation software tool is presented as well as comparisons between model predictions, experimental results and complex

  19. High-Valent Oxo, Methoxorhenium Complexes: Models for Intermediates and Transition States in Proton-Coupled Multi-Electron Transfer Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-30

    useful as redox catalysts .ŗ On the other hand, we have found them to be remarkably versatile model reactants for systematic Atudies of interfacial (i.e...context of possible mechanisms for trans-dioxorhenium-based oxidativeŗ and reductive" electrocatalytic reactions, respectively. Experimental Section...3.26; N, 5.64. Caled: C, 33.52; H, 3.49; N, 6.26. ’H-NMR (acetone-d,)(ppm): 8.52(d,8H), 7.77(d,8H), 4.27(s,3H), 2.79(s, 12H). Metathesis of selected

  20. Electronic structure contributions to electron-transfer reactivity in iron-sulfur active sites: 1. Photoelectron spectroscopic determination of electronic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kennepohl, Pierre; Solomon, Edward I

    2003-02-10

    Electronic relaxation, the change in molecular electronic structure as a response to oxidation, is investigated in [FeX(4)](2)(-)(,1)(-) (X = Cl, SR) model complexes. Photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with density functional methods, is used to define and evaluate the core and valence electronic relaxation upon ionization of [FeX(4)](2)(-). The presence of intense yet formally forbidden charge-transfer satellite peaks in the PES data is a direct reflection of electronic relaxation. The phenomenon is evaluated as a function of charge redistribution at the metal center (Deltaq(rlx)) resulting from changes in the electronic structure. This charge redistribution is calculated from experimental core and valence PES data using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) model. It is found that electronic relaxation is very large for both core (Fe 2p) and valence (Fe 3d) ionization processes and that it is greater in [Fe(SR)(4)](2)(-) than in [FeCl(4)](2)(-). Similar results are obtained from DFT calculations. The results suggest that, although the lowest-energy valence ionization (from the redox-active molecular orbital) is metal-based, electronic relaxation causes a dramatic redistribution of electron density ( approximately 0.7ē) from the ligands to the metal center corresponding to a generalized increase in covalency over all M-L bonds. The more covalent tetrathiolate achieves a larger Deltaq(rlx) because the LMCT states responsible for relaxation are significantly lower in energy than those in the tetrachloride. The large observed electronic relaxation can make significant contributions to the thermodynamics and kinetics of electron transfer in inorganic systems.

  1. Characterizing the Locality of Diabatic States for Electronic Excitation Transfer by Decomposing the Diabatic Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Vura-Weis, Josh; Newton, M. D.; Wasielewski, Michael R; Subotnik, J.E.

    2010-12-09

    A common strategy to calculate electronic coupling matrix elements for charge or energy transfer is to take the adiabatic states generated by electronic structure computations and rotate them to form localized diabatic states. In this paper, we show that, for intermolecular transfer of singlet electronic excitation, usually we cannot fully localize the electronic excitations in this way. Instead, we calculate putative initial and final states with small excitation tails caused by weak interactions with high energy excited states in the electronic manifold. These tails do not lead to substantial changes in the total diabatic coupling between states, but they do lead to a different partitioning of the total coupling between Coulomb (Förster), exchange (Dexter), and one-electron components. The tails may be reduced by using a multistate diabatic model or eliminated entirely by truncation (denoted as “chopping”). Without more information, we are unable to conclude with certainty whether the observed diabatic tails are a physical reality or a computational artifact. This research suggests that decomposition of the diabatic coupling between chromophores into Coulomb, exchange, and one-electron components may depend strongly on the number of states considered, and such results should be treated with caution.

  2. Experimental insights on the electron transfer and energy transfer processes between Ce{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 3+}-Tb{sup 3+} in borate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sontakke, Atul D. Katayama, Yumiko; Tanabe, Setsuhisa; Ueda, Jumpei; Dorenbos, Pieter

    2015-03-30

    A facile method to describe the electron transfer and energy transfer processes among lanthanide ions is presented based on the temperature dependent donor luminescence decay kinetics. The electron transfer process in Ce{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} exhibits a steady rise with temperature, whereas the Ce{sup 3+}-Tb{sup 3+} energy transfer remains nearly unaffected. This feature has been investigated using the rate equation modeling and a methodology for the quantitative estimation of interaction parameters is presented. Moreover, the overall consequences of electron transfer and energy transfer process on donor-acceptor luminescence behavior, quantum efficiency, and donor luminescence decay kinetics are discussed in borate glass host. The results in this study propose a straight forward approach to distinguish the electron transfer and energy transfer processes between lanthanide ions in dielectric hosts, which is highly advantageous in view of the recent developments on lanthanide doped materials for spectral conversion, persistent luminescence, and related applications.

  3. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  4. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two π-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5'-GG-3' and 5'-GT-3'. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  5. A semiclassical extended electron model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Valdes, J. F.; Bruce, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    The self-energy of a given charge distribution is the energy required to assemble the distribution by bringing in the constituent charges from infinity. Particularly, for a pointlike distribution ( e.g., a classical electron) the self-energy is infinity. Thus a modification of the Coulomb potential is required in order to have a finite value for this energy. Here we present a model for a charged particle consisting of a potential well together with a combination of Coulomb and Yukawa-like potentials. This leads us to finding an approximate value attributed to its self-energy. We subsequently discuss the non-relativistic electron-electron scattering problem.

  6. Fabrication and single-electron-transfer operation of a triple-dot single-electron transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Mingyu Uchida, Takafumi; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Akira; Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori; Inokawa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-07

    A triple-dot single-electron transistor was fabricated on silicon-on-insulator wafer using pattern-dependent oxidation. A specially designed one-dimensional silicon wire having small constrictions at both ends was converted to a triple-dot single-electron transistor by means of pattern-dependent oxidation. The fabrication of the center dot involved quantum size effects and stress-induced band gap reduction, whereas that of the two side dots involved thickness modulation because of the complex edge structure of two-dimensional silicon. Single-electron turnstile operation was confirmed at 8 K when a 100-mV, 1-MHz square wave was applied. Monte Carlo simulations indicated that such a device with inhomogeneous tunnel and gate capacitances can exhibit single-electron transfer.

  7. Mechanically Controlled Electron Transfer in a Single-Polypeptide Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Proteins are of interest in nano-bio electronic devices due to their versatile structures, exquisite functionality and specificity. However, quantum transport measurements produce conflicting results due to technical limitations whereby it is difficult to precisely determine molecular orientation, the nature of the moieties, the presence of the surroundings and the temperature; in such circumstances a better understanding of the protein electron transfer (ET) pathway and the mechanism remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report an approach to mechanically drive polypeptide flip-flop motion to achieve a logic gate with ON and OFF states during protein ET. We have calculated the transmission spectra of the peptide-based molecular junctions and observed the hallmarks of electrical current and conductance. The results indicate that peptide ET follows an NC asymmetric process and depends on the amino acid chirality and α-helical handedness. Electron transmission decreases as the number of water molecules increases, and the ET efficiency and its pathway depend on the type of water-bridged H-bonds. Our results provide a rational mechanism for peptide ET and new perspectives on polypeptides as potential candidates in logic nano devices.

  8. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09066.001 PMID:26687009

  9. Mechanically Controlled Electron Transfer in a Single-Polypeptide Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Proteins are of interest in nano-bio electronic devices due to their versatile structures, exquisite functionality and specificity. However, quantum transport measurements produce conflicting results due to technical limitations whereby it is difficult to precisely determine molecular orientation, the nature of the moieties, the presence of the surroundings and the temperature; in such circumstances a better understanding of the protein electron transfer (ET) pathway and the mechanism remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report an approach to mechanically drive polypeptide flip-flop motion to achieve a logic gate with ON and OFF states during protein ET. We have calculated the transmission spectra of the peptide-based molecular junctions and observed the hallmarks of electrical current and conductance. The results indicate that peptide ET follows an NC asymmetric process and depends on the amino acid chirality and α-helical handedness. Electron transmission decreases as the number of water molecules increases, and the ET efficiency and its pathway depend on the type of water-bridged H-bonds. Our results provide a rational mechanism for peptide ET and new perspectives on polypeptides as potential candidates in logic nano devices. PMID:28051140

  10. Exogenous electron shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens 200: electrochemical parameters and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yundang; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai

    2014-08-19

    Despite the importance of exogenous electron shuttles (ESs) in extracellular electron transfer (EET), a lack of understanding of the key properties of ESs is a concern given their different influences on EET processes. Here, the ES-mediated EET capacity of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was evaluated by examining the electricity generated in a microbial fuel cell. The results indicated that all the ESs substantially accelerated the current generation compared to only SP200. The current and polarization parameters were linearly correlated with both the standard redox potential (E(ES)(0)) and the electron accepting capacity (EAC) of the ESs. A thermodynamic analysis of the electron transfer from the electron donor to the electrode suggested that the EET from c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) to ESs is a crucial step causing the differences in EET capacities among various ESs. Based on the derived equations, both E(ES)(0) and EAC can quantitatively determine potential losses (ΔE) that reflect the potential loss of the ES-mediated EET. In situ spectral kinetic analysis of ES reduction by c-Cyts in a living SP200 suspension was first investigated with the E(ES), E(c-Cyt), and ΔE values being calculated. This study can provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ESs in EET.

  11. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  12. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field.

  13. Quantum mechanical methods for calculating proton tunneling splittings and proton-coupled electron transfer vibronic couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skone, Jonathan H.

    Development of quantum mechanical methods for the calculation of proton tunneling splittings and proton-coupled electron transfer vibronic couplings is presented in this thesis. The fundamental physical principles underlying proton transfer in the electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic limits are illustrated by applying the quantum mechanical methods we developed to chemical systems exemplary of the electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic proton-tunneling regimes. Overall, this thesis emphasizes the need for quantum chemical methods that avoid the adiabatic separation of the quantum proton and electron, are computationally tractable, and treat all quantum particles three-dimensionally. The nuclear-electronic orbital nonorthogonal configuration interaction (NEO-NOCI) approach is presented for calculating proton tunneling splittings and vibronic couplings. The NEO approach is a molecular orbital based method that avoids the Born-Oppenheimer separation of the select protons and electrons, thereby making methods developed within this scheme, such as NEO-NOCI, applicable to electronically nonadiabatic proton transfer. In the two-state NEO-NOCI approach, the ground and excited state delocalized nuclear-electronic wavefunctions are expressed as linear combinations of two nonorthogonal localized nuclear-electronic wavefunctions obtained at the NEO-Hartree-Fock level. The advantages of the NEO-NOCI approach are the removal of the adiabatic separation between the electrons and the quantum nuclei, the computational efficiency, the potential for systematic improvement by enhancing the basis sets and number of configurations, and the applicability to a broad range of chemical systems. The tunneling splitting is determined by the energy difference between these two delocalized vibronic states. The proton tunneling splittings calculated with the NEO-NOCI approach for the [He-H-He]+ model system with a range of fixed He-He distances are shown to be in excellent agreement with

  14. Variation among Desulfovibrio species in electron transfer systems used for syntrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers linked by interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate-reducing species (e.g., Desulfovibrio). Physiological differences and various gene repertoires implicated in syntrophic metabolism among Desulfovibrio species suggest considerable variation in the biochemical basis of syntrophy. In this study, comparative transcriptional and mutant analyses of Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough growing syntrophically with Methanococcus maripaludis on lactate were used to develop new and revised models for their alternative electron transfer and energy conservation systems. Lactate oxidation by strain G20 generates a reduced thiol-disulfide redox pair(s) and ferredoxin that are energetically coupled to H(+)/CO(2) reduction by periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase via a flavin-based reverse electron bifurcation process (electron confurcation) and a menaquinone (MQ) redox loop-mediated reverse electron flow involving the membrane-bound Qmo and Qrc complexes. In contrast, strain Hildenborough uses a larger number of cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins linked in three intertwining pathways to couple H(+) reduction to lactate oxidation. The faster growth of strain G20 in coculture is associated with a kinetic advantage conferred by the Qmo-MQ-Qrc loop as an electron transfer system that permits higher lactate oxidation rates under elevated hydrogen levels (thereby enhancing methanogenic growth) and use of formate as the main electron-exchange mediator (>70% electron flux), as opposed to the primarily hydrogen-based exchange by strain Hildenborough. This study further demonstrates the absence of a conserved gene core in Desulfovibrio that would determine the ability for a syntrophic lifestyle.

  15. Variation among Desulfovibrio Species in Electron Transfer Systems Used for Syntrophic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers linked by interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate-reducing species (e.g., Desulfovibrio). Physiological differences and various gene repertoires implicated in syntrophic metabolism among Desulfovibrio species suggest considerable variation in the biochemical basis of syntrophy. In this study, comparative transcriptional and mutant analyses of Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough growing syntrophically with Methanococcus maripaludis on lactate were used to develop new and revised models for their alternative electron transfer and energy conservation systems. Lactate oxidation by strain G20 generates a reduced thiol-disulfide redox pair(s) and ferredoxin that are energetically coupled to H+/CO2 reduction by periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase via a flavin-based reverse electron bifurcation process (electron confurcation) and a menaquinone (MQ) redox loop-mediated reverse electron flow involving the membrane-bound Qmo and Qrc complexes. In contrast, strain Hildenborough uses a larger number of cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins linked in three intertwining pathways to couple H+ reduction to lactate oxidation. The faster growth of strain G20 in coculture is associated with a kinetic advantage conferred by the Qmo-MQ-Qrc loop as an electron transfer system that permits higher lactate oxidation rates under elevated hydrogen levels (thereby enhancing methanogenic growth) and use of formate as the main electron-exchange mediator (>70% electron flux), as opposed to the primarily hydrogen-based exchange by strain Hildenborough. This study further demonstrates the absence of a conserved gene core in Desulfovibrio that would determine the ability for a syntrophic lifestyle. PMID:23264581

  16. Charge transfer emission in coumarin 343 sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle: A direct measurement of back electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, H.N.

    1999-11-25

    Electron injection and back electron transfer dynamics in coumarin 343 (C-343) adsorbed on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are studied by picosecond transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The direct detection of electrons in the nanoparticles and the parent cation are monitored using picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, and the corresponding dynamics of the adsorbate are monitored by time-resolved absorption spectra of the cation radical of C-343 in the visible region. When the electron returns from the nanoparticles to the present cation, a low quantum yield red-shifted charge transfer emission is observed. Measuring the charge transfer emission lifetimes by a picosecond time-resolved fluorimeter, the author gets an exact rate of back electron transfer reaction from the nanoparticle to the parent cation.

  17. Quantum Ising model coupled with conducting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasufumi; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    The effect of photo-doping on the quantum paraelectric SrTiO3 is studied by using the one-dimensional quantum Ising model, where the Ising spin describes the effective lattice polarization of an optical phonon. Two types of electron-phonon couplings are introduced through the modulation of transfer integral via lattice deformations. After the exact diagonalization and the perturbation studies, we find that photo-induced low-density carriers can drastically alter quantum fluctuations when the system locates near the quantum critical point between the quantum para- and ferro-electric phases.

  18. Modeling microscale heat transfer using Calore.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Rader, Daniel John; Wong, Chung-Nin Channy; Bainbridge, Bruce L.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2005-09-01

    Modeling microscale heat transfer with the computational-heat-transfer code Calore is discussed. Microscale heat transfer problems differ from their macroscopic counterparts in that conductive heat transfer in both solid and gaseous materials may have important noncontinuum effects. In a solid material, three noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of phonons across a thin film, scattering of phonons from surface roughness at a gas-solid interface, and scattering of phonons from grain boundaries within the solid material. These processes are modeled for polycrystalline silicon, and the thermal-conductivity values predicted by these models are compared to experimental data. In a gaseous material, two noncontinuum effects are considered: ballistic transport of gas molecules across a thin gap and accommodation of gas molecules to solid conditions when reflecting from a solid surface. These processes are modeled for arbitrary gases by allowing the gas and solid temperatures across a gas-solid interface to differ: a finite heat transfer coefficient (contact conductance) is imposed at the gas-solid interface so that the temperature difference is proportional to the normal heat flux. In this approach, the behavior of gas in the bulk is not changed from behavior observed under macroscopic conditions. These models are implemented in Calore as user subroutines. The user subroutines reside within Sandia's Source Forge server, where they undergo version control and regression testing and are available to analysts needing these capabilities. A Calore simulation is presented that exercises these models for a heated microbeam separated from an ambient-temperature substrate by a thin gas-filled gap. Failure to use the noncontinuum heat transfer models for the solid and the gas causes the maximum temperature of the microbeam to be significantly underpredicted.

  19. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    PubMed Central

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light–matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems. PMID:27694805

  20. Electron transfer dissociation of modified peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuping; Dong, Jia; Vachet, Richard W

    2011-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is the method of choice for sequencing peptides and proteins and is the preferred choice for characterizing post-translational modifications (PTMs). The most commonly used dissociation method to characterize peptides (i.e. collision-induced dissociation (CID)), however, has some limitations when it comes to analyzing many PTMs. Because CID chemistry is influenced by amino acid side-chains, some modifications can alter or inhibit dissociation along the peptide backbone, thereby limiting sequence information and hindering identification of the modification site. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has emerged as an alternate dissociation technique that, in most cases, overcomes these limitations of CID because it is less affected by side chain chemistry. Here, we review recent applications of ETD for characterizing peptide and protein PTMs with a particular emphasis on the advantages of ETD over CID, the ways in which ETD and CID have been used in a complementary manner, and how peptide modifications can still influence ETD dissociation pathways.

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  2. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light-matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems.

  3. Mimicking the electron transfer chain in photosystem II with a molecular triad thermodynamically capable of water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Megiatto, Jackson D.; Antoniuk-Pablant, Antaeres; Sherman, Benjamin D.; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gervaldo, Miguel; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Gust, Devens

    2012-01-01

    In the photosynthetic photosystem II, electrons are transferred from the manganese-containing oxygen evolving complex (OEC) to the oxidized primary electron-donor chlorophyll P680•+ by a proton-coupled electron transfer process involving a tyrosine-histidine pair. Proton transfer from the tyrosine phenolic group to a histidine nitrogen positions the redox potential of the tyrosine between those of P680•+ and the OEC. We report the synthesis and time-resolved spectroscopic study of a molecular triad that models this electron transfer. The triad consists of a high-potential porphyrin bearing two pentafluorophenyl groups (PF10), a tetracyanoporphyrin electron acceptor (TCNP), and a benzimidazole-phenol secondary electron-donor (Bi-PhOH). Excitation of PF10 in benzonitrile is followed by singlet energy transfer to TCNP (τ = 41 ps), whose excited state decays by photoinduced electron transfer (τ = 830 ps) to yield . A second electron transfer reaction follows (τ < 12 ps), giving a final state postulated as BiH+-PhO•-PF10-TCNP•-, in which the phenolic proton now resides on benzimidazole. This final state decays with a time constant of 3.8 μs. The triad thus functionally mimics the electron transfers involving the tyrosine-histidine pair in PSII. The final charge-separated state is thermodynamically capable of water oxidation, and its long lifetime suggests the possibility of coupling systems such as this system to water oxidation catalysts for use in artificial photosynthetic fuel production. PMID:22566659

  4. Mimicking the electron transfer chain in photosystem II with a molecular triad thermodynamically capable of water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Megiatto, Jackson D; Antoniuk-Pablant, Antaeres; Sherman, Benjamin D; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gervaldo, Miguel; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2012-09-25

    In the photosynthetic photosystem II, electrons are transferred from the manganese-containing oxygen evolving complex (OEC) to the oxidized primary electron-donor chlorophyll P680(•+) by a proton-coupled electron transfer process involving a tyrosine-histidine pair. Proton transfer from the tyrosine phenolic group to a histidine nitrogen positions the redox potential of the tyrosine between those of P680(•+) and the OEC. We report the synthesis and time-resolved spectroscopic study of a molecular triad that models this electron transfer. The triad consists of a high-potential porphyrin bearing two pentafluorophenyl groups (PF(10)), a tetracyanoporphyrin electron acceptor (TCNP), and a benzimidazole-phenol secondary electron-donor (Bi-PhOH). Excitation of PF(10) in benzonitrile is followed by singlet energy transfer to TCNP (τ = 41 ps), whose excited state decays by photoinduced electron transfer (τ = 830 ps) to yield Bi-PhOH-PF(10)(•+)-TCNP(•-). A second electron transfer reaction follows (τ < 12 ps), giving a final state postulated as BiH(+)-PhO(•)-PF(10)-TCNP(•-), in which the phenolic proton now resides on benzimidazole. This final state decays with a time constant of 3.8 μs. The triad thus functionally mimics the electron transfers involving the tyrosine-histidine pair in PSII. The final charge-separated state is thermodynamically capable of water oxidation, and its long lifetime suggests the possibility of coupling systems such as this system to water oxidation catalysts for use in artificial photosynthetic fuel production.

  5. Redox induced electron transfer in doublet azo-anion diradical rhenium(II) complexes. Characterization of complete electron transfer series.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nandadulal; Samanta, Subhas; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2010-03-15

    Reactions of dirhenium decacarbonyl with the two azoaromatic ligands, L(a) = (2-phenylazo)pyridine and L(b) = (4-chloro-2-phenylazo)pyridine (general abbreviation of the ligands is L) afford paramagnetic rhenium(II) complexes, [Re(II)(L(*-))(2)(CO)(2)] (1) (S = 1/2 ground state) with two one-electron reduced azo-anion radical ligands in an octahedral geometrical arrangement. At room temperature (300 K) the complexes 1a-b, showed magnetic moments (mu(eff)) close to 1.94 mu(B), which is suggestive of the existence of strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the complexes. The results of magnetic measurements on one of the complexes, 1b, in the temperature range 2-300 K are reported. The above complexes showed two cathodic and two anodic responses in cyclic voltammetry where one-electron oxidation leads to an unusual redox event involving simultaneous reduction of the rhenium(II) and oxidation of the second ligand via intramolecular electron transfer. The oxidized complexes 1a(+) and 1b(+) are air stable and were isolated as crystalline solids as their tri-iodide (I(3)(-)) salts. The structures of the two representative complexes, 1b and [1b]I(3), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are compared. The anionic complexes, [1](-) and [1](2-) were characterized in solution by their spectral properties.

  6. Numerical modeling of electron-beam welding of dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krektuleva, R. A.; Cherepanov, O. I.; Cherepanov, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to numerical modeling of heat transfer processes and estimation of thermal stresses in weld seams created by electron beam welding of heterogeneous metals. The mathematical model is based on a system of equations that includes the Lagrange's variational equation of theory of plasticity and variational equation of M. Biot's principle to simulate the heat transfer processes. The two-dimensional problems (plane strain and plane stress) are considered for estimation of thermal stresses in welds considering differences of mechanical properties of welded materials. The model is developed for simulation of temperature fields and stresses during electron beam welding.

  7. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Benedetto, E.; Fischer, W.; Franchetti, G.; Ohmi, K.; Schulte, D.; Sonnad, K.; Tomas, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; Rumolo, G.; Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.

    2007-06-18

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e+e- scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed.

  8. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Benedetto, E.; Rumolo, G.; Schulte, D.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, Frank; Franchetti, G.; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Sonnad, K.G.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Pivi, M.T.F.; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; /SLAC

    2008-01-24

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e{sup +}e{sup -} scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed.

  9. Substrate entasis and electronic coupling elements in electron transfer from FeII in a multicopper ferroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Kosman, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Outersphere electron transfer in multicopper oxidases occurs at the type 1, blue CuII. One class of MCO proteins exhibits a specificity in this reaction towards FeII. In work carried out in collaboration with the Solomon lab over the past 7 years, we have delineated the structural motifs that support this ferroxidase specificity and have quantified the contributions that each makes to this outersphere electron transfer reaction from FeII to the type 1 CuII. Two features of this electron transfer catalysis stand out. First, the protein provides a binding site for FeII that actually favors FeIII; this coordination sphere places the bound FeII in a state of “entasis” that can be relieved by loss of an electron. In short, the EO of the bound FeII is lowered relative to that of aqueous ferrous iron making electron transfer thermodynamically favorable. Second, carboxylates within this coordination sphere provide an electronic coupling pathway for the electron transfer via their H-bond network with type 1 Cu histidine ligands thus making electron transfer kinetically efficient. This brief report breaks down these contributions to ferroxidase specificity in terms of the semi-classical Marcus equation describing outersphere electron transfer. PMID:18443651

  10. Proton-coupled electron transfer: the mechanistic underpinning for radical transport and catalysis in biology.

    PubMed

    Reece, Steven Y; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G

    2006-08-29

    Charge transport and catalysis in enzymes often rely on amino acid radicals as intermediates. The generation and transport of these radicals are synonymous with proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which intrinsically is a quantum mechanical effect as both the electron and proton tunnel. The caveat to PCET is that proton transfer (PT) is fundamentally limited to short distances relative to electron transfer (ET). This predicament is resolved in biology by the evolution of enzymes to control PT and ET coordinates on highly different length scales. In doing so, the enzyme imparts exquisite thermodynamic and kinetic controls over radical transport and radical-based catalysis at cofactor active sites. This discussion will present model systems containing orthogonal ET and PT pathways, thereby allowing the proton and electron tunnelling events to be disentangled. Against this mechanistic backdrop, PCET catalysis of oxygen-oxygen bond activation by mono-oxygenases is captured at biomimetic porphyrin redox platforms. The discussion concludes with the case study of radical-based quantum catalysis in a natural biological enzyme, class I Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase. Studies are presented that show the enzyme utilizes both collinear and orthogonal PCET to transport charge from an assembled diiron-tyrosyl radical cofactor to the active site over 35A away via an amino acid radical-hopping pathway spanning two protein subunits.

  11. Chlorophyll-quinone photochemical electron transfer in liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.K.; Castelli, F.; Tollin, G.

    1981-09-01

    The study described involves the reduction of electron acceptors (quinones) by photoexcited Chloroplasts (Chl). Chl a (from spinach) is incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (either synthetic or from hen egg yolks) liposomes suspended in 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). The quinones are either present during liposome formation or added later, depending upon their water solubility. The measurement technique employed is laser flash photolysis. A pulsed nitrogen laser pumps a dye laser, which delivers a short light flash (10 ns) to the sample at a wavelength (655-660 nm) within an absorption band of Chl. This raises Chl to an excited singlet level, which can rapidly cross to the lowest excited triple level (/sup 3/Chl). From this state Chl can transfer an electron to acceptors such as quinones, resulting in the formation of the Chl cation radical (Chl./sup +/) and the semiquinone anion radical (Q./sup +/). Transient absorbance changes ocurring within the sample cell are monitored and can be attributed to processes such as excited state quenching (of /sup 3/Chl by Q) and radical product formation and decay. (JMT)

  12. Long-range electron transfer in biomolecules. Tunneling or hopping?

    PubMed

    Voityuk, Alexander A

    2011-10-27

    Two competing mechanisms are relevant for long-range electron transfer (ET) in biomolecules: direct electron tunneling between donor (D) and acceptor (A), D → A, and multistep hopping D → X → A, where an electron or an electron hole is transiently localized on intermediate sites X. Which of these mechanisms dominates the ET reaction is determined by the arrangement and electronic properties of the redox centers. For thermal ET, it is shown that single-step tunneling is overcome by hopping when the energy gap E between D and X is smaller than the crossover barrier E(C), E(C) = (ΔG/2) + (3/4)k(B)TβR(DA), where ΔG is the driving force, β the decay parameter, and R(DA) the donor-acceptor distance. In proteins at T = 300 K, hopping will dominate when E < E(C) = (ΔG/2) + (R(DA)/50) (E and ΔG are in eV, R(DA) in Å); single-step tunneling will be operative when E > E(C). Thus, one can explore the ET mechanism using three quantities E, ΔG, and R(DA). When ΔG = 0 and E = 0.5 eV (the difference in redox potentials of D and X is 0.5 V), two-step hopping D → X → A will be favored at R(DA) >25 Å. In protein ET chains, the distance between redox cofactors is often smaller than 20 Å, but the gap E between the cofactors and surrounding amino acid residues is larger than 0.5 eV. Therefore, ET in the systems should occur by single-step tunneling D → A. In the activationless regime (ΔG ≈ -λ, λ is the reorganization energy) often observed for photoinduced ET, the crossing point energy is determined by E(C) = (2λkTβR(DA))(1/2) - λ. The suggested expressions for the threshold barrier may be useful to predict the ET mechanism in natural and artificial redox systems.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer reaction in polymer-surfactant aggregates: Photoinduced electron transfer between N,N-dimethylaniline and 7-amino coumarin dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Anjan; Seth, Debabrata; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2008-05-28

    Photoinduced electron transfer between coumarin dyes and N,N-dimethylaniline has been investigated by using steady state and picosecond time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micelles and PVP-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (SDS) polymer-surfactant aggregates. A slower rate of electron transfer is observed in PVP-SDS aggregates than in polymer-free SDS micelles. A Marcus type inversion is observed in the correlation of free energy change in comparison with the electron transfer rate. The careful investigation reveals that C-151 deviates from the normal Marcus inverted region compared to its analogs C-152 and C-481 due to slower rotational relaxation and smaller translational diffusion coefficient.

  14. Modular electron transfer circuits for synthetic biology: insulation of an engineered biohydrogen pathway.

    PubMed

    Agapakis, Christina M; Silver, Pamela A

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer is central to a wide range of essential metabolic pathways, from photosynthesis to fermentation. The evolutionary diversity and conservation of proteins that transfer electrons makes these pathways a valuable platform for engineered metabolic circuits in synthetic biology. Rational engineering of electron transfer pathways containing hydrogenases has the potential to lead to industrial scale production of hydrogen as an alternative source of clean fuel and experimental assays for understanding the complex interactions of multiple electron transfer proteins in vivo. We designed and implemented a synthetic hydrogen metabolism circuit in Escherichia coli that creates an electron transfer pathway both orthogonal to and integrated within existing metabolism. The design of such modular electron transfer circuits allows for facile characterization of in vivo system parameters with applications toward further engineering for alternative energy production.

  15. Calibration transfer between electronic nose systems for rapid in situ measurement of pulp and paper industry emissions.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sharvari; Kamde, Kalyani; Jana, Arun; Korde, Sanjivani; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Sankar, Ravi; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Pandey, R A

    2014-09-02

    Electronic nose systems when deployed in network mesh can effectively provide a low budget and onsite solution for the industrial obnoxious gaseous measurement. For accurate and identical prediction capability by all the electronic nose systems, a reliable calibration transfer model needs to be implemented in order to overcome the inherent sensor array variability. In this work, robust regression (RR) is used for calibration transfer between two electronic nose systems using a Box-Behnken (BB) design. Out of the two electronic nose systems, one was trained using industrial gas samples by four artificial neural network models, for the measurement of obnoxious odours emitted from pulp and paper industries. The emissions constitute mainly of hydrogen sulphide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulphide (DMS) and dimethyl disulphide (DMDS) in different proportions. A Box-Behnken design consisting of 27 experiment sets based on synthetic gas combinations of H2S, MM, DMS and DMDS, were conducted for calibration transfer between two identical electronic nose systems. Identical sensors on both the systems were mapped and the prediction models developed using ANN were then transferred to the second system using BB-RR methodology. The results showed successful transmission of prediction models developed for one system to other system, with the mean absolute error between the actual and predicted concentration of analytes in mg L(-1) after calibration transfer (on second system) being 0.076, 0.1801, 0.0329, 0.427 for DMS, DMDS, MM, H2S respectively.

  16. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  17. The first picoseconds in bacterial photosynthesis--ultrafast electron transfer for the efficient conversion of light energy.

    PubMed

    Zinth, Wolfgang; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2005-05-01

    In this Minireview, we describe the function of the bacterial reaction centre (RC) as the central photosynthetic energy-conversion unit by ultrafast spectroscopy combined with structural analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, pigment exchange and theoretical modelling. We show that primary energy conversion is a stepwise process in which an electron is transferred via neighbouring chromophores of the RC. A well-defined chromophore arrangement in a rigid protein matrix, combined with optimised energetics of the different electron carriers, allows a highly efficient charge-separation process. The individual molecular reactions at room temperature are well described by conventional electron-transfer theory.

  18. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  19. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution.

  20. Ultrafast Intramolecular Electron and Proton Transfer in Bis(imino)isoindole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Eric; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2015-06-04

    Concerted motion of electrons and protons in the excited state is pertinent to a wide range of chemical phenomena, including those relevant for solar-to-fuel light harvesting. The excited state dynamics of small proton-bearing molecules are expected to serve as models for better understanding such phenomena. In particular, for designing the next generation of multielectron and multiproton redox catalysts, understanding the dynamics of more than one proton in the excited state is important. Toward this goal, we have measured the ultrafast dynamics of intramolecular excited state proton transfer in a recently synthesized dye with two equivalent transferable protons. We have used a visible ultrafast pump to initiate the proton transfer in the excited state, and have probed the transient absorption of the molecule over a wide bandwidth in the visible range. The measurement shows that the signal which is characteristic of proton transfer emerges within ∼710 fs. To identify whether both protons were transferred in the excited state, we have measured the ultrafast dynamics of a related derivative, where only a single proton was available for transfer. The measured proton transfer time in that molecule was ∼427 fs. The observed dynamics in both cases were reasonably fit with single exponentials. Supported by the ultrafast observations, steady-state fluorescence, and preliminary computations of the relaxed excited states, we argue that the doubly protonated derivative most likely transfers only one of its two protons in the excited state. We have performed calculations of the frontier molecular orbitals in the Franck-Condon region. The calculations show that in both derivatives, the excitation is primarily from the HOMO to LUMO causing a large rearrangement of the electronic charge density immediately after photoexcitation. In particular, charge density is shifted away from the phenolic protons and toward the proton acceptor nitrogens. The proton transfer is

  1. 75 FR 59172 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Hearing Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Depository Taxes; Hearing Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Cancellation... on proposed regulation relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by Electronic Funds Transfer...

  2. Type IV pili of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can transfer electrons from extracellular electron donors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongquan; Li, Hongyu

    2014-03-01

    Studies on Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans accepting electrons from Fe(II) have previously focused on cytochrome c. However, we have discovered that, besides cytochrome c, type IV pili (Tfp) can transfer electrons. Here, we report conduction by Tfp of A. ferrooxidans analyzed with a conducting-probe atomic force microscope (AFM). The results indicate that the Tfp of A. ferrooxidans are highly conductive. The genome sequence of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 contains two genes, pilV and pilW, which code for pilin domain proteins with the conserved amino acids characteristic of Tfp. Multiple alignment analysis of the PilV and PilW (pilin) proteins indicated that pilV is the adhesin gene while pilW codes for the major protein element of Tfp. The likely function of Tfp is to complete the circuit between the cell surface and Fe(II) oxides. These results indicate that Tfp of A. ferrooxidans might serve as biological nanowires transferring electrons from the surface of Fe(II) oxides to the cell surface.

  3. When electron transfer meets electron transport in redox-active molecular nanojunctions.

    PubMed

    Janin, Marion; Ghilane, Jalal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe

    2013-02-13

    A scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) was used to arrange two microelectrodes face-to-face separated by a micrometric gap. Polyaniline (PANI) was deposited electrochemically from the SECM tip side until it bridged the two electrodes. The junctions obtained were characterized by following the current through the PANI as a function of its electrochemical potential measured versus a reference electrode acting as a gate electrode in a solid-state transistor. PANI nanojunctions showed conductances below 100 nS in the oxidized state, indicating control of the charge transport within the whole micrometric gap by a limited number of PANI wires. The SECM configuration makes it possible to observe in the same experiment and in the same current range the electron-transfer and electron-transport processes. These two phenomena are distinguished here and characterized by following the variation of the current with the bias voltage and the scan rate. The electron-transfer current changes with the scan rate, while the charge-transport current varies with the bias voltage. Finally, despite the initially micrometric gap, a junction where the conductance is controlled by a single oligoaniline strand is achieved.

  4. Kinetics of electron transfer through the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2002-01-01

    We show that the rate at which electrons pass through the respiratory chain in mitochondria and respiring prokaryotic cells is described by the product of three terms, one describing electron donation, one acceptance, and a third, the thermodynamic drive. We apply the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of the chemiosmotic model of proton translocation and energy conservation. This approach leads to a closed-form expression that predicts steady-state electron flux as a function of chemical conditions and the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane or prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane. The rate expression, derived considering reverse and forward electron flow, is the first to account for both thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the respiration rate. The expression can be simplified under specific conditions to give rate laws of various forms familiar in cellular physiology and microbial ecology. The expression explains the nonlinear dependence of flux on electrical potential gradient, its hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, and the inhibiting effects of reaction products. It provides a theoretical basis for investigating life under unusual conditions, such as microbial respiration in alkaline waters. PMID:12324402

  5. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  6. Transfer equations for modeling interrill erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bako Amina, Nouhou; Frédéric, Darboux; François, James; Carine, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Numerous models are available for matter transfer along an hillslope. They are usually process-specific, requiring to use several models to simulate transfers along an hillslope. To overcome this issue, we develop a new model valid for chemical (nutrients, pollutants, dissolved carbon) and particle transfers by water. It is able to simulate both interrill and rill erosion. This new equation encompasses the previous models of Gao et al. (2004), Hairsine and Rose (1992, 1991) and Lajeunesse et al. (2013) in a single and unified form. We show that it can account for multi-class particle transport able to simulate both linear and non-linear behaviors. Surface conditions (crusts) is accounted for, making possible for space and time changes of soil properties. For the calibration of the model, specific laboratory experiments have been carried out to validate the effect of rainfall on travel distance of particles. These experiments allow to separate detachment by raindrops from the agitation of the flow by the drops. Different particle sizes and rainfall kinetic energies are investigated. The results assess the exact role of rainfall on sediment transport. Our new model is able to represent adequately these experimental results.

  7. A hybrid approach to simulation of electron transfer in complex molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Kubař, Tomáš; Elstner, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in biomolecular systems represent an important class of processes at the interface of physics, chemistry and biology. The theoretical description of these reactions constitutes a huge challenge because extensive systems require a quantum-mechanical treatment and a broad range of time scales are involved. Thus, only small model systems may be investigated with the modern density functional theory techniques combined with non-adiabatic dynamics algorithms. On the other hand, model calculations based on Marcus's seminal theory describe the ET involving several assumptions that may not always be met. We review a multi-scale method that combines a non-adiabatic propagation scheme and a linear scaling quantum-chemical method with a molecular mechanics force field in such a way that an unbiased description of the dynamics of excess electron is achieved and the number of degrees of freedom is reduced effectively at the same time. ET reactions taking nanoseconds in systems with hundreds of quantum atoms can be simulated, bridging the gap between non-adiabatic ab initio simulations and model approaches such as the Marcus theory. A major recent application is hole transfer in DNA, which represents an archetypal ET reaction in a polarizable medium. Ongoing work focuses on hole transfer in proteins, peptides and organic semi-conductors. PMID:23883952

  8. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  9. 77 FR 1555 - Administrative Simplification: Adoption of Standards for Health Care Electronic Funds Transfers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... and 162 Administrative Simplification: Adoption of Standards for Health Care Electronic Funds... Health Care Electronic Funds Transfers (EFTs) and Remittance Advice AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS... facilitate health care EFT transmissions. DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective on...

  10. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  11. Coherent electronic energy transfer and nonlinear polariton effects in anthracene-doped naphthalene crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The nature of electronic energy transfer in strain-free mounted anthracene-doped naphthalene single crystals at frequencies near that of the (0.0) a-exciton in naphthalene was probed using sensitized resonant two-photon fluorescence excitation (TPE) and second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopies. The naphthalene-to-anthracene TPE intensity ratios were found to be 1.2 and 1.6, for excitation of the zero-phonon transition at 1.6 K and 20 K, respectively. This result is consistent with coherent exciton-polariton electronic energy transfer at liquid helium temperatures, and incoherent transfer at high temperatures. Energy transfer for the pure and the anthracene-doped naphthalene systems under investigation was determined to be in the capture limited regime. The polariton trapping event is discussed in terms of scattering off a trap with subsequent trapping (i.e., capture) and scattering off a trap without subsequent trapping (i.e., trap scattering). Thermal broadening and temperature dependences of the TPE and SHG signal intensities for both naphthalene and anthracene are presented and are discussed in terms of the polariton fusion model. The experimental data do not agree with the theoretical predictions; this discrepancy is discussed in terms of the anomalous crystal habit (diamond plates) observed in the present investigation. The first report of a longitudinal exciton in a doped organic molecular system also is reported.

  12. Ultrafast energy and electron transfers in structurally well addressable BODIPY-porphyrin-fullerene polyads.

    PubMed

    Gao, Di; Aly, Shawkat M; Karsenti, Paul-Ludovic; Brisard, Gessie; Harvey, Pierre D

    2017-01-25

    Two electron transfer polyads built upon [C60]-[ZnP]-[BODIPY] (1) and [ZnP]-[ZnP](-[BODIPY])(-[C60]) (2), where [C60] = N-methyl-2-phenyl-3,4-fulleropyrrolidine, [BODIPY] = boron dipyrromethane, and [ZnP] = zinc(ii) porphyrin, were synthesized along with their corresponding energy transfer polyads [ZnP]-[BODIPY] (1a) and [ZnP]-[ZnP]-[BODIPY] (2a) as well as relevant models. These polyads were studied using cyclic voltammetry, DFT computations, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, and fs transient absorption spectroscopy. The rates for energy transfer, kET, [BODIPY]* → [ZnP] are ∼2.8 × 10(10) s(-1) for both 1a and 2a, with an efficiency of 99%. Concurrently, the fast appearance of the [C60](-)˙ anion for 1 and 2 indicates that the charge separation occurs on the 20-30 ps timescale with the rates of electron transfer, ket, [ZnP]*/[C60] → [ZnP](+)˙/[C60](-)˙ of ∼0.9 × 10(10) to ∼3.8 × 10(10) s(-1). The latter value is among the fastest for these types of polyads. Conversely, the charge recombination operates on the ns timescale. These rates are comparable to or faster than those reported for other more flexible [C60]-[ZnP]-[BODIPY] polyads, which can be rationalized by the donor-acceptor separations.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer from triplet fullerene, [sup 3]C[sub 60], to tetracyanoethylene. Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Michaeli, S.; Meiklyar, V.; Levanon, H. ); Schulz, M.; Moebius, K. )

    1994-08-04

    Fourier transform EPR spectroscopy was employed in studying the electron transfer (ET) and the quenching mechanisms of the photoexcited triplet state of C[sub 60] (electron donor) in the presence of the electron acceptor tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) in a benzonitrile solution. The ET reaction product, which is the stable anion radical TCNE[sup [minus

  14. Ultrafast Electron Microscopes: Design Criteria, Electron Sources, and Column Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Joel A.

    Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy, and its picosecond/femtosecond subclass Ultrafast Electron Microscopy, is an emerging field in instrumentation science. It attempts to combine the nanoscale spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopes with the temporal resolution of modern ultrafast lasers. In this thesis, I present my contributions to this young field. These include a novel model for simulating the dynamics of ultrafast electron pulses in electron microscope systems, design criteria for constructing such a system, and theoretical and experimental groundwork geared towards selecting a useful photocathode for electron pulse generation. I also present the prototype ultrafast electron microscope system being built at UIC.

  15. Kinetic coupling between electron and proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase: simultaneous measurements of conductance and absorbance changes.

    PubMed Central

    Adelroth, P; Sigurdson, H; Hallén, S; Brzezinski, P

    1996-01-01

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase is an electron-current driven proton pump. To investigate the mechanism by which this pump operates it is important to study individual electron- and proton-transfer reactions in the enzyme, and key reactions in which they are kinetically and thermodynamically coupled. In this work, we have simultaneously measured absorbance changes associated with electron-transfer reactions and conductance changes associated with protonation reactions following pulsed illumination of the photolabile complex of partly reduced bovine cytochrome c oxidase and carbon monoxide. Following CO dissociation, several kinetic phases in the absorbance changes were observed with time constants ranging from approximately 3 microseconds to several milliseconds, reflecting internal electron-transfer reactions within the enzyme. The data show that the rate of one of these electron-transfer reactions, from cytochrome a3 to a on a millisecond time scale, is controlled by a proton-transfer reaction. These results are discussed in terms of a model in which cytochrome a3 interacts electrostatically with a protonatable group, L, in the vicinity of the binuclear center, in equilibrium with the bulk through a proton-conducting pathway, which determines the rate of proton transfer (and indirectly also of electron transfer). The interaction energy of cytochrome a3 with L was determined independently from the pH dependence of the extent of the millisecond-electron transfer and the number of protons released, as determined from the conductance measurements. The magnitude of the interaction energy, 70 meV (1 eV = 1.602 x 10(-19) J), is consistent with a distance of 5-10 A between cytochrome a3 and L. Based on the recently determined high-resolution x-ray structures of bovine and a bacterial cytochrome c oxidase, possible candidates for L and a physiological role for L are discussed. PMID:8901574

  16. Identifying electron transfer coordinates in donor-bridge-acceptor systems using mode projection analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xunmo; Keane, Theo; Delor, Milan; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Weinstein, Julia; Bittner, Eric R.

    2017-01-01

    We report upon an analysis of the vibrational modes that couple and drive the state-to-state electronic transfer branching ratios in a model donor-bridge-acceptor system consisting of a phenothiazine-based donor linked to a naphthalene-monoimide acceptor via a platinum-acetylide bridging unit. Our analysis is based upon an iterative Lanczos search algorithm that finds superpositions of vibronic modes that optimize the electron/nuclear coupling using input from excited-state quantum chemical methods. Our results indicate that the electron transfer reaction coordinates between a triplet charge-transfer state and lower lying charge-separated and localized excitonic states are dominated by asymmetric and symmetric modes of the acetylene groups on either side of the central atom in this system. In particular, we find that while a nearly symmetric mode couples both the charge-separation and charge-recombination transitions more or less equally, the coupling along an asymmetric mode is far greater suggesting that IR excitation of the acetylene modes preferentially enhances charge-recombination transition relative to charge-separation. PMID:28233775

  17. The electron-transfer reaction between azurin and the cytochrome c oxidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Parr, S R; Barber, D; Greenwood, C; Brunori, M

    1977-11-01

    A stopped-flow investigation of the electron-transfer reaction between oxidized azurin and reduced Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase and between reduced azurin and oxidized Ps. aeruginosa cytochrome c-551 oxidase was performed. Electrons leave and enter the oxidase molecule via its haem c component, with the oxidation and reduction of the haem d1 occurring by internal electron transfer. The reaction mechanism in both directions is complex. In the direction of oxidase oxidation, two phases assigned on the basis of difference spectra to haem c proceed with rate constants of 3.2 X 10(5)M-1-S-1 and 2.0 X 10(4)M-1-S-1, whereas the haem d1 oxidation occurs at 0.35 +/- 0.1S-1. Addition of CO to the reduced enzyme profoundly modifies the rate of haem c oxidation, with the faster process tending towards a rate limit of 200S-1. Reduction of the oxidase was similarly complex, with a fast haem c phase tending to a rate limit of 120S-1, and a slower phase with a second-order rate of 1.5 X 10(4)M-1-S-1; the internal transfer rate in this direction was o.25 +/- 0.1S-1. These results have been applied to a kinetic model originally developed from temperature-jump studies.

  18. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of the photoinduced electron transfer dynamics of plastocyanin.

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, L W; Scherer, N F; Voth, G A

    1997-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the nuclear motions associated with photoinduced electron transfer in plastocyanin. The blue copper protein is modeled using a molecular mechanics potential; potential parameters for the copper-protein interactions are determined using an x-ray crystallographic structure and absorption and resonance Raman spectra. Molecular dynamics simulations yield a variety of information about the ground (oxidized) and optically excited (charge-transfer) states: 1) The probability distribution of the potential difference between the states, which is used to determine the coordinate and energy displacements, places the states well within the Marcus inverted region. 2) The two-time autocorrelation function of the difference potential in the ground state and the average of the difference potential after instantaneous excitation to the excited state are very similar (confirming linear response in this system); their decay indicates that vibrational relaxation occurs in about 1 ps in both states. 3) The spectral densities of various internal coordinates begin to identify the vibrations that affect the optical transition; the spectral density of the difference potential correlation function should also prove useful in quantum simulations of the back electron transfer. 4) Correlation functions of the protein atomic motions with the difference potential show that the nuclear motions are correlated over a distance of more than 20 A, especially along proposed electron transport paths. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 7 PMID:8994588

  19. Intermolecular electron transfer from naphthalene derivatives in the higher triplet excited states.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masanori; Cai, Xichen; Hara, Michihiro; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2004-08-11

    Intermolecular electron transfer (ELT) from a series of naphthalene derivatives (NpD) in the higher triplet excited states (T(n)) to carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) in Ar-saturated acetonitrile was observed using the two-color two-laser flash photolysis method. The ELT efficiency depended on the driving force of ELT. Since the ELT from the T(n) state occurred competitively with the internal conversion (IC, T(n) --> T(1)) and the triplet energy transfer (ENT), the ELT became apparent only when sufficient free energy change of ELT was attained. On the other hand, ELT from the T(1) state was not observed, although ELT from the T(1) state with sufficiently long lifetime has a slightly exothermic driving force. The fast ELT from the T(n) state and lack of the reactivity of the T(1) state were explained well by the "sticky" dissociative electron-transfer model based on one-electron reductive attachment to CCl(4) leading to the C-Cl bond cleavage.

  20. Thermodynamic Model of Noise Information Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejna, Bohdan

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we apply a certain unifying physical description of the results of Information Theory. Assuming that heat entropy is a thermodynamic realization of information entropy [2], we construct a cyclical, thermodynamic, average-value model of an information transfer chain [3] as a general heat engine, in particular a Carnot engine, reversible or irreversible. A working medium of the cycle (a thermodynamic system transforming input heat energy) can be considered as a thermodynamic, average-value model or, as such, as a realization of an information transfer channel. We show that in a model realized in this way the extended II. Principle of Thermodynamics is valid [2] and we formulate its information form.

  1. Comprehensive comparison of collision induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Molina, Henrik; Matthiesen, Rune; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-07-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a recently introduced mass spectrometric technique which has proven to be an excellent tool for the elucidation of labile post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation of serine and threonine residues. However, unlike collision induced dissociation (CID), which has been studied for decades, the intricacies of ETD-based fragmentation have not yet been firmly established or systematically addressed. In this analysis, we have systematically compared the CID and ETD fragmentation patterns for the large majority of the peptides that do not contain such labile modifications. Using a standard 48 protein mix, we were able to measure false-positive rates for the experiments and also assess a large number of peptides for a detailed comparison of CID and ETD fragmentation pattern. Analysis of approximately 19,000 peptides derived from both standard proteins and complex protein samples revealed that (i) CID identified 50% more peptides than ETD; (ii) ETD resulted in approximately 20% increase in amino acid sequence coverage over CID; and (iii) combining CID and ETD fragmentation increased the sequence coverage for an average tryptic peptide to 92%. Interestingly, our analysis revealed that nearly 60% of all ETD-identified peptides carried two positive charges, which is in sharp contrast to what has been generally accepted. We also present a novel strategy for automatic validation of peptide assignments based on identification of a peptide by consecutive CID and ETD fragmentation in an alternating mode.

  2. Mechanism of teratogenesis: electron transfer, reactive oxygen species, and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2006-12-01

    Teratogenesis has been a topic of increasing interest and concern in recent years, generating controversy in association with danger to humans and other living things. A veritable host of chemicals is known to be involved, encompassing a wide variety of classes, both organic and inorganic. Contact with these chemicals is virtually unavoidable due to contamination of air, water, ground, food, beverages, and household items, as well as exposure to medicinals. The resulting adverse effects on reproduction are numerous. There is uncertainty regarding the mode of action of these chemicals, although various theories have been advanced, e.g., disruption of the central nervous system (CNS), DNA attack, enzyme inhibition, interference with hormonal action, and insult to membranes, proteins, and mitochondria. This review provides extensive evidence for involvement of oxidative stress (OS) and electron transfer (ET) as a unifying theme. Successful application of the mechanistic approach is made to all of the main classes of toxins, in addition to large numbers of miscellaneous types. We believe it is not coincidental that the vast majority of these substances incorporate ET functionalities (quinone, metal complex, ArNO2, or conjugated iminium) either per se or in metabolites, potentially giving rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS) by redox cycling. Some categories, e.g., peroxides and radiation, appear to generate ROS by non-ET routes. Other mechanisms are briefly addressed; a multifaceted approach to mode of action appears to be the most logical. Our framework should increase understanding and contribute to preventative measures, such as use of antioxidants.

  3. Synthesis, Characterization, Photophysics and Photochemistry of Pyrylogen Electron Transfer Sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Clennan, Edward L.; Liao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    A series of new dicationic sensitizers that are hybrids of pyrylium salts and viologens has been synthesized. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of these "pyrylogen" sensitizers are reported in sufficient detail to allow rationale design of new photoinduced electron transfer reactions. The range of their reduction potentials (+0.37-+0.05V vs SCE) coupled with their range of singlet (48-63 kcal mol(-1)) and triplet (48-57kcalmol(-1)) energies demonstrate that they are potent oxidizing agents in both their singlet and triplet excited states, thermodynamically capable of oxidizing substrates with oxidation potentials as high as 3.1eV. The pyrylogens are synthesized in three steps from readily available starting materials in modest overall 11.4-22.3% yields. These sensitizers have the added advantages that: (1) their radical cations do not react on the CV timescale with oxygen bypassing the need to run reactions under nitrogen or argon and (2) have long wavelength absorptions between 413 and 523nm well out of the range where competitive absorbance by most substrates would cause a problem. These new sensitizers do react with water requiring special precautions to operate in a dry reaction environment.

  4. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-07-22

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced processes, are also described. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. The work described herein was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CHE-13-61293 (theory development), National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (soybean lipoxygenase), Center for Chemical Innovation of the National Science Foundation Solar Fuels Grant CHE-1305124 (cobalt catalysts), Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (nickel catalysts), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0295 (photoinduced PCET).

  5. Cooperative electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation with electron-proton-transfer mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2016-07-01

    electron-proton-transfer mediators, such as TEMPO, may be used in combination with first-row transition metals, such as copper, to achieve efficient two-electron electrochemical processes, thereby introducing a new concept for the development of non-precious-metal electrocatalysts.

  6. Cooperative electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation with electron-proton-transfer mediators.

    PubMed

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Stahl, Shannon S

    2016-07-21

    electron-proton-transfer mediators, such as TEMPO, may be used in combination with first-row transition metals, such as copper, to achieve efficient two-electron electrochemical processes, thereby introducing a new concept for the development of non-precious-metal electrocatalysts.

  7. 77 FR 6193 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... instance through wire transfers or automated clearing house (ACH) transactions. Furthermore, consumers in... Dodd-Frank Amendments, Congress had specifically structured the EFTA to exclude wire transfers,\\13\\ and... of certain methods, particularly consumer wire transfers, is very limited, but the Bureau...

  8. Electric-field-driven electron-transfer in mixed-valence molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Enrique P.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Lent, Craig S.

    2016-07-01

    Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata is a computing paradigm in which digital information is encoded by the charge configuration of a mixed-valence molecule. General-purpose computing can be achieved by arranging these compounds on a substrate and exploiting intermolecular Coulombic coupling. The operation of such a device relies on nonequilibrium electron transfer (ET), whereby the time-varying electric field of one molecule induces an ET event in a neighboring molecule. The magnitude of the electric fields can be quite large because of close spatial proximity, and the induced ET rate is a measure of the nonequilibrium response of the molecule. We calculate the electric-field-driven ET rate for a model mixed-valence compound. The mixed-valence molecule is regarded as a two-state electronic system coupled to a molecular vibrational mode, which is, in turn, coupled to a thermal environment. Both the electronic and vibrational degrees-of-freedom are treated quantum mechanically, and the dissipative vibrational-bath interaction is modeled with the Lindblad equation. This approach captures both tunneling and nonadiabatic dynamics. Relationships between microscopic molecular properties and the driven ET rate are explored for two time-dependent applied fields: an abruptly switched field and a linearly ramped field. In both cases, the driven ET rate is only weakly temperature dependent. When the model is applied using parameters appropriate to a specific mixed-valence molecule, diferrocenylacetylene, terahertz-range ET transfer rates are predicted.

  9. Chemical reactivity imprint lithography on graphene: Controlling the substrate influence on electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing Hua; Jin, Zhong; Kim, Ki Kang; Hilmer, Andrew; Paulus, Geraldine; Shih, Chih-Jen; Ham, Moon-Ho; Sanchez-Yamagishi, Javier; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kong, Jing; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Strano, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The chemical functionalization of graphene enables control over electronic properties and interactions with other materials. Graphene's chemical reactivity is strongly influenced by the underlying substrate. In this paper, we show a stark difference in the rate of electron transfer chemistry with aryl diazonium salts on monolayer graphene supported on a broad range of substrates. Reactions proceed rapidly when graphene is on SiO2 and Al2O3 (sapphire), but negligibly on alkyl-terminated and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) surfaces. The effect cannot be explained by the overall graphene doping levels alone, and can instead be described using a reactivity model accounting for substrate-induced electron-hole puddles in graphene. Raman spectroscopic mapping is used to characterize the effect of the substrates on graphene. Reactivity imprint lithography (RIL) is demonstrated as a technique for spatially patterning chemical groups on graphene by patterning the underlying substrate, and is applied to the covalent tethering of proteins on graphene.

  10. Spin Entangling Effects of Electron and Nucleus on Hopping Transfer in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Qing; Sun, Ling-Ling; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    To study the spin entangling effects on organic magneto-resistance in organic semiconductors, we focused on the entanglement-related hopping transfer of electrons on the basis of the Miller-Abrahams hopping rate. Considering spin entanglement of localized electron with the nucleus in the hopping process, we deduced an attempt hopping rate of electrons as a function of the applied magnetic field and the localized hyperfine interaction, and thus established a model to calculate the organic magneto-resistance. The calculated results show that the magneto-resistance has a maximum in the lower magnetic field, and the corresponding magnetic field Bmax increases with the hyperfine interaction. In the higher magnetic field, the magneto-resistance tends to a negative saturation value. This analysis will be an valuable reference for deep understanding of the organic magneto-resistance.

  11. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  12. A Transfer Learning Approach for Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuai; Li, Jing; Chen, Kewei; Wu, Teresa; Ye, Jieping; Wu, Xia; Yao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Networks models have been widely used in many domains to characterize the interacting relationship between physical entities. A typical problem faced is to identify the networks of multiple related tasks that share some similarities. In this case, a transfer learning approach that can leverage the knowledge gained during the modeling of one task to help better model another task is highly desirable. In this paper, we propose a transfer learning approach, which adopts a Bayesian hierarchical model framework to characterize task relatedness and additionally uses the L1-regularization to ensure robust learning of the networks with limited sample sizes. A method based on the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is further developed to learn the networks from data. Simulation studies are performed, which demonstrate the superiority of the proposed transfer learning approach over single task learning that learns the network of each task in isolation. The proposed approach is also applied to identification of brain connectivity networks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) from functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data. The findings are consistent with the AD literature. PMID:24526804

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A.; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO2, TiO2, and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO2) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO2). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency. PMID:21149685

  14. Electron, proton and hydrogen-atom transfers in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Tommos, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    When photosynthetic organisms developed so that they could use water as an electron source to reduce carbon dioxide, the stage was set for efficient proliferation. Algae and plants spread globally and provided the foundation for our atmosphere and for O(2)-based chemistry in biological systems. Light-driven water oxidation is catalysed by photosystem II, the active site of which contains a redox-active tyrosine denoted Y(Z), a tetramanganese cluster, calcium and chloride. In 1995, Gerald Babcock and co-workers presented the hypothesis that photosynthetic water oxidation occurs as a metallo-radical catalysed process. In this model, the oxidized tyrosine radical is generated by coupled proton/electron transfer and re-reduced by abstracting hydrogen atoms from substrate water or hydroxide-ligated to the manganese cluster. The proposed function of Y(Z) requires proton transfer from the tyrosine site upon oxidation. The oxidation mechanism of Y(Z) in an inhibited and O(2)-evolving photosystem II is discussed. Domino-deprotonation from Y(Z) to the bulk solution is shown to be consistent with a variety of data obtained on metal-depleted samples. Experimental data that suggest that the oxidation of Y(Z) in O(2)-evolving samples is coupled to proton transfer in a hydrogen-bonding network are described. Finally, a dielectric-dependent model for the proton release that is associated with the catalytic cycle of photosystem II is discussed. PMID:12437877

  15. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G.H.; Felby, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert. PMID:26686263

  16. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Westereng, Bjørge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Jørgensen, Henning; Larsen Andersen, Mogens; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Felby, Claus

    2015-12-21

    Enzymatic oxidation of cell wall polysaccharides by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) plays a pivotal role in the degradation of plant biomass. While experiments have shown that LPMOs are copper dependent enzymes requiring an electron donor, the mechanism and origin of the electron supply in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds new light on how oxidative enzymes present in plant degraders may act in concert.

  17. Revising Intramolecular Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) from First-Principles.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Daniel

    2016-09-20

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) plays relevant roles in many areas of chemistry, including charge separation processes in photovoltaics, natural and artificial photosynthesis, and photoluminescence sensors and switches. As in many other photochemical scenarios, the structural and energetic factors play relevant roles in determining the rates and efficiencies of PET and its competitive photodeactivation processes. Particularly, in the field of fluorescent sensors and switches, intramolecular PET is believed (in many cases without compelling experimental proof) to be responsible of the quench of fluorescence. There is an increasing experimental interest in fluorophore's molecular design and on achieving optimal excitation/emission spectra, excitation coefficients, and fluorescence quantum yields (importantly for bioimaging purposes), but less efforts are devoted to fundamental mechanistic studies. In this Account, I revise the origins of the fluorescence quenching in some of these systems with state-of-the-art quantum chemical tools. These studies go beyond the common strategy of analyzing frontier orbital energy diagrams and performing PET thermodynamics calculations. Instead, the potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the lowest-lying excited states are explored with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations and the radiative and nonradiative decay rates from the involved excited states are computed from first-principles using a thermal vibration correlation function formalism. With such a strategy, this work reveals the real origins of the fluorescence quenching, herein entitled as dark-state quenching. Dark states (those that do not absorb or emit light) are often elusive to experiments and thus, computational investigations can provide novel insights into the actual photodeactivation mechanisms. The success of the dark-state quenching mechanism is demonstrated for a wide variety of

  18. 27 CFR 26.267 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... transfer (EFT), as defined in paragraph (c) of this section, of such taxes during the succeeding calendar... make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar amount of tax liability is to be... to make remittances by EFT. (c) Electronic fund transfer or EFT means any transfer of funds,...

  19. 27 CFR 26.267 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... transfer (EFT), as defined in paragraph (c) of this section, of such taxes during the succeeding calendar... make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar amount of tax liability is to be... to make remittances by EFT. (c) Electronic fund transfer or EFT means any transfer of funds,...

  20. 27 CFR 26.267 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... transfer (EFT), as defined in paragraph (c) of this section, of such taxes during the succeeding calendar... make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar amount of tax liability is to be... to make remittances by EFT. (c) Electronic fund transfer or EFT means any transfer of funds,...

  1. 27 CFR 26.267 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... transfer (EFT), as defined in paragraph (c) of this section, of such taxes during the succeeding calendar... make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar amount of tax liability is to be... to make remittances by EFT. (c) Electronic fund transfer or EFT means any transfer of funds,...

  2. 27 CFR 26.267 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... transfer (EFT), as defined in paragraph (c) of this section, of such taxes during the succeeding calendar... make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar amount of tax liability is to be... to make remittances by EFT. (c) Electronic fund transfer or EFT means any transfer of funds,...

  3. 49 CFR 225.37 - Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission..., AND INVESTIGATIONS § 225.37 Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission. (a) A railroad has the option of submitting the following reports, updates, and amendments by way of magnetic media...

  4. 49 CFR 225.37 - Optical media transfer and electronic submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Optical media transfer and electronic submission..., AND INVESTIGATIONS § 225.37 Optical media transfer and electronic submission. (a) A railroad has the option of submitting the following reports, updates, and amendments by way of optical media (CD-ROM),...

  5. 27 CFR 40.165a - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... making payment by electronic fund transfer (EFT) of taxes on tobacco products, cigarette papers, and... electronic fund transfer. 40.165a Section 40.165a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO..., CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Operations by Manufacturers of Tobacco...

  6. 27 CFR 41.115a - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electronic fund transfer. 41.115a Section 41.115a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO..., CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Puerto Rican Tobacco Products and Cigarette Papers and....115a Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer. (a) General. (1) Each taxpayer who was liable,...

  7. 27 CFR 41.63 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electronic fund transfer. 41.63 Section 41.63 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX..., CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Taxes Customs' Collection of Taxes § 41.63 Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer. (a) Each importer who was liable, during a calendar year, for a...

  8. 27 CFR 40.357 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electronic fund transfer. 40.357 Section 40.357 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO..., CIGARETTE PAPERS AND TUBES, AND PROCESSED TOBACCO Manufacture of Cigarette Papers and Tubes Taxes § 40.357 Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer. (a) General. (1) Each taxpayer who was liable, during...

  9. Distance dependence of electron transfer from liposome-embedded (alkanephosphocholine-porphinato) zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, E.; Kaneko, M.; Nishide, H.; Hoshino, M.

    1986-05-22

    (Alkanephosphocholine-porphinato)zinc forms a geometrically well-defined bilayer liposome with phospholipid. Electron transfer from the liposome-embedded (porphinato)zincs with different alkyl chain lengths to methylviologen present in the outer bulk solution is measured by laser flash photolysis: the intermolecular electron transfer was observed only when the porphyrin plane is located within 12 A from the surface.

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31 U.S.C. 3332, et seq., your agency must make all payments for goods and services via EFT (this includes...

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.70 - Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... payments via electronic funds transfer? 102-118.70 Section 102-118.70 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.70 Must my agency make all payments via electronic funds transfer? Yes, under 31 U.S.C. 3332, et seq., your agency must make all payments for goods and services via EFT (this includes...

  12. 27 CFR 41.63 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... commercial bank in making payment by electronic fund transfer (EFT) of such taxes during the succeeding... is required, by this section, to make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar... required to make remittances by EFT. (c) For the purposes of this section, (1) electronic fund transfer...

  13. 27 CFR 41.63 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... commercial bank in making payment by electronic fund transfer (EFT) of such taxes during the succeeding... is required, by this section, to make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar... required to make remittances by EFT. (c) For the purposes of this section, (1) electronic fund transfer...

  14. 27 CFR 41.63 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... commercial bank in making payment by electronic fund transfer (EFT) of such taxes during the succeeding... is required, by this section, to make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar... required to make remittances by EFT. (c) For the purposes of this section, (1) electronic fund transfer...

  15. 27 CFR 41.63 - Payment of tax by electronic fund transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... commercial bank in making payment by electronic fund transfer (EFT) of such taxes during the succeeding... is required, by this section, to make remittances by EFT. For purposes of this section, the dollar... required to make remittances by EFT. (c) For the purposes of this section, (1) electronic fund transfer...

  16. Structural and orientation effects on electronic energy transfer between silicon quantum dots with dopants and with silver adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Vinson, N; Freitag, H; Micha, D A

    2014-06-28

    Starting from the atomic structure of silicon quantum dots (QDs), and utilizing ab initio electronic structure calculations within the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) treatment, a model has been developed to characterize electronic excitation energy transfer between QDs. Electronic energy transfer rates, KEET, between selected identical pairs of crystalline silicon quantum dots systems, either bare, doped with Al or P, or adsorbed with Ag and Ag3, have been calculated and analyzed to extend previous work on light absorption by QDs. The effects of their size and relative orientation on energy transfer rates for each system have also been considered. Using time-dependent density functional theory and the hybrid functional HSE06, the FRET treatment was employed to model electronic energy transfer rates within the dipole-dipole interaction approximation. Calculations with adsorbed Ag show that: (a) addition of Ag increases rates up to 100 times, (b) addition of Ag3 increases rates up to 1000 times, (c) collinear alignment of permanent dipoles increases transfer rates by an order of magnitude compared to parallel orientation, and (d) smaller QD-size increases transfer due to greater electronic orbitals overlap. Calculations with dopants show that: (a) p-type and n-type dopants enhance energy transfer up to two orders of magnitude, (b) surface-doping with P and center-doping with Al show the greatest rates, and (c) KEET is largest for collinear permanent dipoles when the dopant is on the outer surface and for parallel permanent dipoles when the dopant is inside the QD.

  17. Activated-ion electron transfer dissociation improves the ability of electron transfer dissociation to identify peptides in a complex mixture.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Beauchene, Nicole A; McAlister, Graeme C; Syka, John E P; Schwartz, Jae C; Griep-Raming, Jens; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-12-15

    Using a modified electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-enabled quadrupole linear ion trap (QLT) mass spectrometer, we demonstrate the utility of IR activation concomitant with ETD ion-ion reactions (activated-ion ETD, AI-ETD). Analyzing 12 strong cation exchanged (SCX) fractions of a LysC digest of human cell protein extract using ETD, collision-activated dissociation (CAD), and AI-ETD, we find that AI-ETD generates 13 405 peptide spectral matches (PSMs) at a 1% false-discovery rate (1% FDR), surpassing both ETD (7 968) and CAD (10 904). We also analyze 12 SCX fractions of a tryptic digest of human cell protein extract and find that ETD produces 6 234 PSMs, AI-ETD 9 130 PSMs, and CAD 15 209 PSMs. Compared to ETD with supplemental collisional activation (ETcaD), AI-ETD generates ∼80% more PSMs for the whole cell lysate digested with trypsin and ∼50% more PSMs for the whole cell lysate digested with LysC.

  18. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic

  19. Electron transfer catalysis with monolayer protected Au25 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, Sabrina; Hesari, Mahdi; Polo, Federico; Maran, Flavio

    2012-08-01

    Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and the Au25L18+/Au25L18 redox couples as redox mediators. Simulation of the CV curves led to determination of the ET rate constant (kET) values for concerted dissociative ET to the peroxides. The ET free energy ΔG° could be estimated for all donor-acceptor combinations, leading to observation of a nice activation-driving force (log kETvs. ΔG°) relationship. Comparison with the kET obtained using a ferrocene-type donor with a formal potential similar to that of Au25L18/Au25L18- showed that the presence of the capping monolayer affects the ET rate rather significantly, which is attributed to the intrinsic nonadiabaticity of peroxide acceptors.Au25L18 (L = S(CH2)2Ph) clusters were prepared and characterized. The resulting monodisperse clusters were reacted with bis(pentafluorobenzoyl) peroxide in dichloromethane to form Au25L18+ quantitatively. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the corresponding electron transfer (ET) reactions were characterized via electrochemistry and thermochemical calculations. Au25L18+ was used in homogeneous redox catalysis experiments with a series of sym-substituted benzoyl peroxides, including the above peroxide, bis(para-cyanobenzoyl) peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide, and bis(para-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide. Peroxide dissociative ET was catalyzed using both the Au25L18/Au25L18- and

  20. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  1. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  2. A computational comparison of electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to flavin adenine dinucleotide and a gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Walch, Stephen P; Komadina, Jason D; Prinz, Fritz B

    2009-05-21

    We have carried out calculations of the electronic structure of ferredoxin and of the electronic coupling matrix element Hif for electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and to cluster models of the Au111 surface and a Au111 surface with a mercaptopyridene self-assembled monolayer (SAM). We conclude, based on Hif2, that a gold electrode is approximately 14 times less efficient as an electron acceptor than FAD and that the mercaptopyridine SAM enhances electron transfer. The magnitude of Hif is large enough for these systems that the weak coupling limit approximations may no longer be valid. However, the barrier to electron transfer in the strong coupling limit is computed to be small due to minimal geometry change between oxidized and reduced ferredoxin. MD simulations of the interaction of ferredoxin and protonated pyridine within a water solvation box indicate that the protonated pyridine does strongly orient the ferredoxin, favoring electron transfer as compared to a bare gold surface, where we speculate the orientation of the ferredoxin may be more random.

  3. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method for teaching electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena that relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions. Discusses the quantum mechanical background needed and presents ways of using models of electronic ground states to teach electronic structure, bonding concepts,…

  4. Reorganization of intramolecular high frequency vibrational modes and dynamic solvent effect in electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Yudanov, Vladislav V; Mikhailova, Valentina A; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2012-04-26

    The possibility of the multichannel stochastic model to adequately describe all principal regularities observed in thermal electron transfer kinetics has been demonstrated. The most important are as follows: (i) the model predicts the solvent controlled regime in the Marcus normal region and its almost full suppression in the Marcus inverted region as well as a continuous transition between them in the vicinity of the activationless region; (ii) the suppression of dynamic solvent effect (DSE) is principally caused by the reorganization of high frequency vibrational modes; (iii) an additional factor of the DSE suppression stems from fast solvent relaxation component; (iv) in the inverted region, the multichannel stochastic model predicts the apparent activation energy to be much less than that calculated with Marcus equation. The exploration of the multichannel stochastic model has allowed one to conclude that the reorganization of high frequency vibrational modes can (i) raise the maximum rate constant above the solvent controlled limit by 2 and more orders of magnitude, (ii) shift the rate constant maximum to larger values of the free energy gap, and (iii) approach the electron transfer kinetics to the nonadiabatic regime.

  5. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F{sub 4}TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  6. Experimental and database-transferred electron-density analysis and evaluation of electrostatic forces in coumarin-102 dye.

    PubMed

    Bibila Mayaya Bisseyou, Yvon; Bouhmaida, Nouhza; Guillot, Benoit; Lecomte, Claude; Lugan, Noel; Ghermani, Noureddine; Jelsch, Christian

    2012-12-01

    The electron-density distribution of a new crystal form of coumarin-102, a laser dye, has been investigated using the Hansen-Coppens multipolar atom model. The charge density was refined versus high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collected at 100 K and was also constructed by transferring the charge density from the Experimental Library of Multipolar Atom Model (ELMAM2). The topology of the refined charge density has been analysed within the Bader `Atoms In Molecules' theory framework. Deformation electron-density peak heights and topological features indicate that the chromen-2-one ring system has a delocalized π-electron cloud in resonance with the N (amino) atom. The molecular electrostatic potential was estimated from both experimental and transferred multipolar models; it reveals an asymmetric character of the charge distribution across the molecule. This polarization effect is due to a substantial charge delocalization within the molecule. The molecular dipole moments derived from the experimental and transferred multipolar models are also compared with the liquid and gas-phase dipole moments. The substantial molecular dipole moment enhancements observed in the crystal environment originate from the crystal field and from intermolecular charge transfer induced and controlled by C-H···O and C-H···N intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The atomic forces were integrated over the atomic basins and compared for the two electron-density models.

  7. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  8. SO2−· Electron Transfer Ion/Ion Reactions with Disulfide Linked Polypeptide Ions

    PubMed Central

    Chrisman, Paul A.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Hogan, Jason M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    Multiply-charged peptide cations comprised of two polypeptide chains (designated A and B) bound via a disulfide linkage have been reacted with SO2−· in an electrodynamic ion trap mass spectrometer. These reactions proceed through both proton transfer (without dissociation) and electron transfer (with and without dissociation). Electron transfer reactions are shown to give rise to cleavage along the peptide backbone, loss of neutral molecules, and cleavage of the cystine bond. Disulfide bond cleavage is the preferred dissociation channel and both Chain A (or B)—S· and Chain A (or B)—SH fragment ions are observed, similar to those observed with electron capture dissociation (ECD) of disulfide-bound peptides. Electron transfer without dissociation produces [M + 2H]+· ions, which appear to be less kinetically stable than the proton transfer [M + H]+ product. When subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID), the [M + 2H]+· ions fragment to give products that were also observed as dissociation products during the electron transfer reaction. However, not all dissociation channels noted in the electron transfer reaction were observed in the CID of the [M + 2H]+· ions. The charge state of the peptide has a significant effect on both the extent of electron transfer dissociation observed and the variety of dissociation products, with higher charge states giving more of each. PMID:15914021

  9. Coherent control of long-range photoinduced electron transfer by stimulated X-ray Raman processes

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    We show that X-ray pulses resonant with selected core transitions can manipulate electron transfer (ET) in molecules with ultrafast and atomic selectivity. We present possible protocols for coherently controlling ET dynamics in donor–bridge–acceptor (DBA) systems by stimulated X-ray resonant Raman processes involving various transitions between the D, B, and A sites. Simulations presented for a Ru(II)–Co(III) model complex demonstrate how the shapes, phases and amplitudes of the X-ray pulses can be optimized to create charge on demand at selected atoms, by opening up otherwise blocked ET pathways. PMID:27559082

  10. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer interaction of anthraquinones with aniline quenchers: Influence of methyl substitution in aniline donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, V.; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Hussein, Yasser H. A.

    2017-02-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer between triplet state of 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) and its two derivatives: 2-chloro-9,10-anthraquinone (CAQ) and sodium anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and ground state aniline (AN) and its dimethyl substitutions: 2,3-dimethylaniline (2,3-DMA), 2,6-dimethylaniline (2,6-DMA), 3,5-dimethylaniline (3,5-DMA) and N,N-dimethylaniline (N,N-DMA) is studied using nanosecond laser flash photolysis at room temperature. Detection of radical bands of quinone anions and aniline cations along with their formation and/or decay kinetics are used to confirm the electron transfer (ET) process. In MeCN medium, AN quenches the triplet state of CAQ (CAQT) but not the triplets AQT or AQST. However in aqueous medium, AN quenches AQST and forms radical ion pair. All the DMAs can react through ET with all the triplet quinones at different degrees of efficiency in MeCN medium. Noticeably, the ring substituted DMAs are less efficient in electron donation to AQT or AQST while the N,N-DMA shows high efficiency in donating electron to all triplet quinones in MeCN medium. Charge distribution of donor molecules, in MeCN medium is calculated using density functional theory (DFT), and shows an enhancement of electron density of the ring of N,N-DMA, making it an ideal electron donor for ET studies compared to other DMAs. This systematic selection and usage of anilines with electrochemically tunable quinones can be viewed as a working model of donor-acceptor system that can be utilized in photoinduced ET applications.

  12. Charge transfer and electronic doping in nitrogen-doped graphene

    PubMed Central

    Joucken, Frédéric; Tison, Yann; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Tejeda, Antonio; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Conrad, Edward; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Ghijsen, Jacques; Sporken, Robert; Amara, Hakim; Ducastelle, François; Lagoute, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the modification of the graphene’s electronic structure upon doping is crucial for enlarging its potential applications. We present a study of nitrogen-doped graphene samples on SiC(000) combining angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The comparison between tunneling and angle-resolved photoelectron spectra reveals the spatial inhomogeneity of the Dirac energy shift and that a phonon correction has to be applied to the tunneling measurements. XPS data demonstrate the dependence of the N 1s binding energy of graphitic nitrogen on the nitrogen concentration. The measure of the Dirac energy for different nitrogen concentrations reveals that the ratio usually computed between the excess charge brought by the dopants and the dopants’ concentration depends on the latter. This is supported by a tight-binding model considering different values for the potentials on the nitrogen site and on its first neighbors. PMID:26411651

  13. Redox potential of the terminal quinone electron acceptor QB in photosystem II reveals the mechanism of electron transfer regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yuki; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) extracts electrons from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster using light energy and then transfers them to two plastoquinones, the primary quinone electron acceptor QA and the secondary quinone electron acceptor QB. This forward electron transfer is an essential process in light energy conversion. Meanwhile, backward electron transfer is also significant in photoprotection of PSII proteins. Modulation of the redox potential (Em) gap of QA and QB mainly regulates the forward and backward electron transfers in PSII. However, the full scheme of electron transfer regulation remains unresolved due to the unknown Em value of QB. Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), the Em value of QB reduction was measured directly using spectroelectrochemistry in combination with light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The Em(QB−/QB) was determined to be approximately +90 mV and was virtually unaffected by depletion of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This insensitivity of Em(QB−/QB), in combination with the known large upshift of Em(QA−/QA), explains the mechanism of PSII photoprotection with an impaired Mn4CaO5 cluster, in which a large decrease in the Em gap between QA and QB promotes rapid charge recombination via QA−. PMID:26715751

  14. 77 FR 50243 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... course of business'' in the definition of ``remittance transfer provider,'' which determines whether a... in the United States to individuals and businesses in foreign countries. For covered transactions... providing remittance transfers in the ``normal course of business,'' and thus is a ``remittance...

  15. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... discontinue providing a small number of transfers per year to accommodate customers of its regular business... phrase ``normal course of business'' in the definition of ``remittance transfer provider.'' This... 1700 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20006, on official business days between the hours of 10 a.m. and...

  16. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-07

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopy of energy and electron transfer processes in the photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacillus mobilis.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Chiou, H C; Kleinherenbrink, F A; Blankenship, R E

    1994-02-01

    The kinetics of excitation energy transfer and electron transfer processes within the membrane of Heliobacillus mobilis were investigated using femtosecond transient absorption difference spectroscopy at room temperature. The kinetics in the 725- to 865-nm region, upon excitation at 590 and 670 nm, were fit using global analysis. The fits returned three kinetic components with lifetimes of 1-2 ps and 27-30 ps, and a component that does not decay within several nanoseconds. The 1- to 2-ps component is attributed to excitation equilibration to form a thermally relaxed excited state. The 27- to 30-ps phase corresponds to the decay of the relaxed excited state to form a charge-separated state. The intrinsic energy and electron transfer rates were estimated using the experimental results and theoretical models for excitation migration and trapping dynamics. Taking into account the number of antenna pigments and their spectral distribution, an upper limit of 1.2 ps for the intrinsic time constant for charge separation in the reaction center is calculated. This upper limit corresponds with the trapping-limited case for excitation migration and trapping. Reduction of the primary electron acceptor A0 was observed in the 640 to 700 nm region using excitation at 780 nm. An instantaneous absorbance increase followed by a decay of about 30 ps was observed over a broad wavelength region due to the excited state absorption and decay of BChl g molecules in the antenna. In addition, a narrow bleaching band centered at 670 nm grows in with an apparent time constant of about 1.0 ps, superimposed on the 30-ps absorbance increase due to excited state absorption. Measurements on a longer time scale showed that besides the 670 nm pigment a BChl g molecule absorbing near 785 nm may be involved in the primary charge separation, and that this pigment may be in equilibrium with the 670 nm pigment. The bleaching bands at 670 nm and 785nm recovered with a time constant of about 600 ps, due to

  18. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer across multiple regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F. III

    2013-04-07

    The coupled transfer of electrons and protons is a central feature of biological and molecular catalysis, yet fundamental aspects of these reactions remain poorly understood. In this study, we extend the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method to enable direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions across a wide range of physically relevant regimes. In a system-bath model for symmetric, co-linear PCET in the condensed phase, RPMD trajectories reveal distinct kinetic pathways associated with sequential and concerted PCET reaction mechanisms, and it is demonstrated that concerted PCET proceeds by a solvent-gating mechanism in which the reorganization energy is mitigated by charge cancellation among the transferring particles. We further employ RPMD to study the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across multiple coupling regimes, including the fully non-adiabatic (both electronically and vibrationally non-adiabatic), partially adiabatic (electronically adiabatic, but vibrationally non-adiabatic), and fully adiabatic (both electronically and vibrationally adiabatic) limits. Comparison of RPMD with the results of PCET rate theories demonstrates the applicability of the direct simulation method over a broad range of conditions; it is particularly notable that RPMD accurately predicts the crossover in the thermal reaction rates between different coupling regimes while avoiding a priori assumptions about the PCET reaction mechanism. Finally, by utilizing the connections between RPMD rate theory and semiclassical instanton theory, we show that analysis of ring-polymer configurations in the RPMD transition path ensemble enables the a posteriori determination of the coupling regime for the PCET reaction. This analysis reveals an intriguing and distinct 'transient-proton-bridge' mechanism for concerted PCET that emerges in the transition between the proton-mediated electron superexchange mechanism for fully non

  19. Where Does the Electron Go? Stable and Metastable Peptide Cation Radicals Formed by Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Layton, Erik D.; Liu, Yang; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2017-01-01

    Electron transfer to doubly and triply charged heptapeptide ions containing polar residues Arg, Lys, and Asp in combination with nonpolar Gly, Ala, and Pro or Leu generates stable and metastable charge-reduced ions, (M + 2H)+●, in addition to standard electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) fragment ions. The metastable (M + 2H)+● ions spontaneously dissociate upon resonant ejection from the linear ion trap, giving irregularly shaped peaks with offset m/ z values. The fractions of stable and metastable (M + 2H)+● ions and their mass shifts depend on the presence of Pro-4 and Leu-4 residues in the peptides, with the Pro-4 sequences giving larger fractions of the stable ions while showing smaller mass shifts for the metastables. Conversion of the Asp and C-terminal carboxyl groups to methyl esters further lowers the charge-reduced ion stability. Collisional activation and photodissociation at 355 nm of mass-selected (M + 2H)+● results in different dissociations that give sequence specific MS3 spectra. With a single exception of charge-reduced (LKGLADR + 2H)+●, the MS3 spectra do not produce ETD sequence fragments of the c and z type. Hence, these (M + 2H)+● ions are covalent radicals, not ion-molecule complexes, undergoing dramatically different dissociations in the ground and excited electronic states. The increased stability of the Pro-4 containing (M + 2H)+● ions is attributed to radicals formed by opening of the Pro ring and undergoing further stabilization by hydrogen atom migrations. UV-VIS photodissociation action spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used in a case in point study of the stable (LKGPADR + 2H)+● ion produced by ETD. In contrast to singly-reduced peptide ions, doubly reduced (M + 3H)+ ions are stable only when formed from the Pro-4 precursors and show all characteristics of even electron ions regarding no photon absorption at 355 nm or ion-molecule reactions, and exhibiting proton driven

  20. Electron transfer and catalysis with high-valent metal-oxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    High-valent metal-oxo complexes are produced by reductive activation of dioxygen via reduction of metal complexes with reductants and dioxygen. Photoinduced electron transfer from substrates to metal complexes with dioxygen also leads to the generation of high-valent metal-oxo complexes that can oxygenate substrates. In such a case metal complexes act as a photocatalyst to oxygenate substrates with dioxygen. High-valent metal-oxo complexes are also produced by proton-coupled electron-transfer oxidation of metal complexes by one-electron oxidants with water, oxygenating substrates to regenerate metal complexes. In such a case metal complexes act as a catalyst for electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates by one-electron oxidants with water that acts as an oxygen source. The one-electron oxidants which can oxidize metal complexes can be replaced by much weaker oxidants by a combination of redox photocatalysts and metal complexes. Thus, photocatalytic oxygenation of substrates proceeds via photoinduced electron transfer from a photocatalyst to reductants followed by proton-coupled electron transfer oxidation of metal complexes with the oxidized photocatalyst to produce high-valent metal-oxo complexes that oxygenate substrates. Thermal and photoinduced electron-transfer catalytic reactions of high-valent metal-oxo complexes for oxygenation of substrates using water or dioxygen as an oxygen source are summarized in this perspective.

  1. Symmetrical windowing for quantum states in quasi-classical trajectory simulations: Application to electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, Stephen J.; Igumenshchev, Kirill; Miller, William H.

    2014-08-28

    It has recently been shown [S. J. Cotton and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234112 (2013)] that a symmetrical windowing quasi-classical (SQC) approach [S. J. Cotton and W. H. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 7190 (2013)] applied to the Meyer-Miller model [H.-D. Meyer and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 70, 3214 (1979)] for the electronic degrees of freedom in electronically non-adiabatic dynamics is capable of quantitatively reproducing quantum mechanical results for a variety of test applications, including cases where “quantum” coherence effects are significant. Here we apply this same SQC methodology, within a flux-side correlation function framework, to calculate thermal rate constants corresponding to several proposed models of electron transfer processes [P. Huo, T. F. Miller III, and D. F. Coker, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 151103 (2013); A. R. Menzeleev, N. Ananth, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 074106 (2011)]. Good quantitative agreement with Marcus Theory is obtained over several orders of magnitude variation in non-adiabatic coupling. Moreover, the “inverted regime” in thermal rate constants (with increasing bias) known from Marcus Theory is also reproduced with good accuracy by this very simple classical approach. The SQC treatment is also applied to a recent model of photoinduced proton coupled electron transfer [C. Venkataraman, A. V. Soudackov, and S. Hammes-Schiffer, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 154502 (2009)] and population decay of the photoexcited donor state is found to be in reasonable agreement with results calculated via reduced density matrix theory.

  2. Symmetrical windowing for quantum states in quasi-classical trajectory simulations: application to electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Stephen J; Igumenshchev, Kirill; Miller, William H

    2014-08-28

    It has recently been shown [S. J. Cotton and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234112 (2013)] that a symmetrical windowing quasi-classical (SQC) approach [S. J. Cotton and W. H. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 7190 (2013)] applied to the Meyer-Miller model [H.-D. Meyer and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 70, 3214 (1979)] for the electronic degrees of freedom in electronically non-adiabatic dynamics is capable of quantitatively reproducing quantum mechanical results for a variety of test applications, including cases where "quantum" coherence effects are significant. Here we apply this same SQC methodology, within a flux-side correlation function framework, to calculate thermal rate constants corresponding to several proposed models of electron transfer processes [P. Huo, T. F. Miller III, and D. F. Coker, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 151103 (2013); A. R. Menzeleev, N. Ananth, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 074106 (2011)]. Good quantitative agreement with Marcus Theory is obtained over several orders of magnitude variation in non-adiabatic coupling. Moreover, the "inverted regime" in thermal rate constants (with increasing bias) known from Marcus Theory is also reproduced with good accuracy by this very simple classical approach. The SQC treatment is also applied to a recent model of photoinduced proton coupled electron transfer [C. Venkataraman, A. V. Soudackov, and S. Hammes-Schiffer, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 154502 (2009)] and population decay of the photoexcited donor state is found to be in reasonable agreement with results calculated via reduced density matrix theory.

  3. Transferable pseudoclassical electrons for aufbau of atomic ions.

    PubMed

    Ekesan, Solen; Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith

    2014-06-05

    Generalizing the LEWIS reactive force field from electron pairs to single electrons, we present LEWIS• in which explicit valence electrons interact with each other and with nuclear cores via pairwise interactions. The valence electrons are independently mobile particles, following classical equations of motion according to potentials modified from Coulombic as required to capture quantum characteristics. As proof of principle, the aufbau of atomic ions is described for diverse main group elements from the first three rows of the periodic table, using a single potential for interactions between electrons of like spin and another for electrons of unlike spin. The electrons of each spin are found to distribute themselves in a fashion akin to the major lobes of the hybrid atomic orbitals, suggesting a pointillist description of the electron density. The broader validity of the LEWIS• force field is illustrated by predicting the vibrational frequencies of diatomic and triatomic hydrogen species.

  4. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    PubMed

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  5. Observation of orientation-dependent electron transfer in molecule–surface collisions

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Nils; Golibrzuch, Kai; Bartels, Christof; Chen, Li; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Molecules typically must point in specific relative directions to participate efficiently in energy transfer and reactions. For example, Förster energy transfer favors specific relative directions of each molecule’s transition dipole [Förster T (1948) Ann Phys 2(1-2):55–75] and electron transfer between gas-phase molecules often depends on the relative orientation of orbitals [Brooks PR, et al. (2007) J Am Chem Soc 129(50):15572–15580]. Surface chemical reactions can be many orders of magnitude faster than their gas-phase analogs, a fact that underscores the importance of surfaces for catalysis. One reason surface reactions can be so fast is the labile change of oxidation state that commonly takes place upon adsorption, a process involving electron transfer between a solid metal and an approaching molecule. By transferring electrons to or from the adsorbate, the process of bond weakening and/or cleavage is initiated, chemically activating the reactant [Yoon B, et al. (2005) Science 307(5708):403–407]. Here, we show that the vibrational relaxation of NO—an example of electronically nonadiabatic energy transfer that is driven by an electron transfer event [Gadzuk JW (1983) J Chem Phys 79(12):6341–6348]—is dramatically enhanced when the molecule approaches an Au(111) surface with the N atom oriented toward the surface. This represents a rare opportunity to investigate the steric influences on an electron transfer reaction happening at a surface. PMID:24127598

  6. High throughput electron transfer from carbon dots to chloroplast: a rationale of enhanced photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sourov; Pradhan, Saheli; Mitra, Shouvik; Patra, Prasun; Bhattacharya, Ankita; Pramanik, Panchanan; Goswami, Arunava

    2014-03-01

    A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH).A biocompatible amine functionalized fluorescent carbon dots were developed and isolated for gram scale applications. Such carbogenic quantum dots can strongly conjugate over the surface of the chloroplast and due to that strong interaction the former can easily transfer electrons towards the latter by assistance of absorbed light or photons. An exceptionally high electron transfer from carbon dots to the chloroplast can directly effect the whole chain electron transfer pathway in a light reaction of photosynthesis, where electron carriers play an important role in modulating the system. As a result, carbon dots can promote photosynthesis by modulating the electron transfer process as they are capable of fastening the conversion of light energy to the electrical energy and finally to the chemical energy as assimilatory power (ATP and NADPH). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06079a

  7. Relative antioxidant efficiency of a large series of carotenoids in terms of one electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia

    2007-11-08

    The relative antioxidant efficiency, expressed as electron donating capability, of a large series of carotenoids has been studied using density functional theory. Their reactivity toward nine different radicals has been modeled as well as the electron transfer between pairs of carotenoids, one of which is present as a radical cation. The influence of the solvent polarity has also been studied. Torulene was found to be the most easily oxidized carotenoid, followed by lycopene. This higher reactivity is proposed in the present work for the first time, and the potential implications of such a finding are discussed. Since torulene has not been previously studied, compared to other carotenoids in terms of oxidation potentials, further experimental studies are suggested in order to confirm or reject this prediction. Ionization potential seems to be a magnitude calculable at low computational cost that correctly predicts the relative ease of oxidation in a series of carotenoids. The nuclear reorganization energy associated with electron-transfer reactions has been calculated in a very simple but apparently efficient way that allows computation of free energy barriers and relative rate constants in good agreement with the experimental values. In addition, an additive correction is proposed to include the effect of increasing the size of basis sets on the energies of Car(n) --> Car(n-1)(*+) processes. The general agreement between different calculated magnitudes and the corresponding available experimental data supports the predictions from this work.

  8. The electron and energy transfer between oligothiophenes and thieno[3,4-b]thiophene units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szarko, Jodi; Guo, Jianchang; Liang, Yongye; Rolczynski, Brian; Yu, Luping; Chen, Lin X.

    2008-08-01

    In a recent study, it has been shown that organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells consisting of polymers with certain stoichiometric ratios of alkyl thiophene:thieno[3,4-b]thiophene monomeric units in random sequences, when combined with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), may have potentials for creating more efficient devices. Such a potential enhancement is mainly due to the light harvesting in most of the visible and near infrared region by these low band-gap polymers. However, very little is known about the photoinduced energy/electron transfer and transport within these copolymers. It is important to understand both the ultrafast interactions between these two monomeric units when they are linked in the copolymers and their interactions with the electron acceptor PCBM in order to determine the transport mechanisms in these systems, and then to create the architectures that optimize electronic transport properties. Therefore, three oligomer molecules have been synthesized to model the local interactions in the copolymers, each of which consists of a thieno[3,4-b] thiophene derivative at its center linked with two alkyl oligothiophene side units. The alkyl oligothiophene units for the three molecules are 2, 4, or 8 units in length. By performing transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion measurements, the nature of the early exciton diffusion and energy transfer between these different units is elucidated.

  9. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions.

  10. 48 CFR 52.232-33 - Payment by Electronic Funds Transfer-Central Contractor Registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Government under this contract shall be made by electronic funds transfer (EFT), except as provided in... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment by Electronic... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.232-33 Payment by Electronic Funds...

  11. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of energy transfer in light-harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David; Miller, Thomas

    Recent 2D-spectroscopy experiments have observed transient electronic coherence in natural and artificial light harvesting systems, which raises questions about the role of electronic coherence in facilitating excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. In this talk, we introduce the recently developed partial linearized path-integral (PLPI) method, which can accurately simulate exciton transfer dynamics across multiple reaction regimes, as well as reliably describe the electronic coherence among excitonic states. Further, we develop a strategy that enables the analysis of the relative impact of static and dynamic electronic coherence. With PLPI simulations, we find that energy transfer dynamics are almost entirely dominated by static coherence effects; dynamic coherence is found to cause only minor effects. These conclusions are consistent with the historical view that emphasizes the importance of energy-level alignment for efficient incoherent energy transfer,while suggesting a less important role for more exotic electronic coherence effects that have been recently emphasized.

  12. Intercalation of trioxatriangulenium ion in DNA: binding, electron transfer, x-ray crystallography, and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Reynisson, Jóhannes; Schuster, Gary B; Howerton, Sheldon B; Williams, Loren Dean; Barnett, Robert N; Cleveland, Charles L; Landman, Uzi; Harrit, Niels; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2003-02-26

    Trioxatriangulenium ion (TOTA(+)) is a flat, somewhat hydrophobic compound that has a low-energy unoccupied molecular orbital. It binds to duplex DNA by intercalation with a preference for G-C base pairs. Irradiation of intercalated TOTA(+) causes charge (radical cation) injection that results in strand cleavage (after piperidine treatment) primarily at GG steps. The X-ray crystal structure of TOTA(+) intercalated in the hexameric duplex d[CGATCG](2) described here reveals that intercalation of TOTA(+) results in an unusually large extension of the helical rise of the DNA and that the orientation of TOTA(+) is sensitive to hydrogen-bonding interactions with backbone atoms of the DNA. Electronic structure calculations reveal no meaningful charge transfer from DNA to TOTA(+) because the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of TOTA(+), (LUMO)(T), falls in the gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital, (HOMO)(D), and the (LUMO)(D) of the DNA bases. These calculations reveal the importance of backbone, water, and counterion interactions, which shift the energy levels of the bases and the intercalated TOTA(+) orbitals significantly. The calculations also show that the inserted TOTA(+) strongly polarizes the intercalation cavity where a sheet of excess electron density surrounds the TOTA(+).

  13. Session on modeling of radiative transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatau, Piotr

    1993-01-01

    The session on modeling of radiative transfer processes is reviewed. Six critical issues surfaced in the discussion concerning scale-interactive radiative processes relevent to the mesoscale convective systems (MCS's). These issues are the need to expand basic knowledge of how MCS's influence climate through extensive cloud shields and increased humidity in the upper troposphere; to improve radiation parameterizations used in mesoscale and General Circulation Model (GCM) models; to improve our basic understanding of the influence of radiation on MCS dynamics due to diabatic heating, production of condensate, and vertical and horizontal heat fluxes; to quantify our understanding of radiative impacts of MCS's on the surface and free atmosphere energy budgets; to quantify and identify radiative and microphysical processes important in the evolution of MCS's; and to improve the capability to remotely sense MCS radiative properties from space and ground-based systems.

  14. Electron donor-acceptor quenching and photoinduced electron transfer for coumarin dyes. Technical report, 1 January-31 October 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II; Griffin, S.F.; Choi, C.; Bergmark, W.R.

    1983-10-31

    The fluorescence of 7-aminocoumarins is quenched by a variety of organic electron donors or acceptors in acetonitrile. In general, donors with half-wave oxidation potentials less positive than 1.0 V vs SCE and acceptors with reduction potentials less negative than -1.5 V vs SCE are candidates for diffusion limited quenching of coumarin singlet states. Profiles of quenching rates are consistent with calculated free energies for electron transfer between excited coumarins and donors or acceptors. In flash photolysis experiments electron transfer for several dyes and quenchers (e.g., methyl viologen) is demonstrated. Relatively low yields of net electron transfer are consistently obtained due to inefficient ionic photodissociation via singlet quenching or a low yield of more photoactive coumarin triplets. Electrochemical properties of the coumarins have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry with the indications of reversible oxidation and irreversible reduction as important processes.

  15. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopies for Probing Electronic Structure and Charge Transfer: Applications to Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Ogilvie, Jennifer P.

    2016-11-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water, making the elucidation of its design principles critical for our fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and for our ability to mimic PSII’s remarkable properties. This report discusses progress towards addressing key open questions about the PSII RC. It describes new spectroscopic methods that were developed to answer these questions, and summarizes the outcomes of applying these methods to study the PSII RC. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D electronic Stark spectroscopy, models for the PSII RC were tested and refined. Work is ongoing to use the collected data to elucidate the charge separation mechanism in the PSII RC. Coherent dynamics were also observed in the PSII RC for the first time. Through extensive characterization and modeling we have assigned these coherences as vibronic in nature, and believe that they reflect resonances between key vibrational pigment modes and electronic energy gaps that may facilitate charge separation. Work is ongoing to definitively test the functional relevance of electronic-vibrational resonances.

  16. Charge transfer and electronic transitions in polycrystalline BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, B.; Dixit, A.; Naik, R.; Lawes, G.; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra

    2010-07-01

    We report on the electronic energy-level diagram of polycrystalline BiFeO3 using the elemental, optical, and current-density-electric field (J-E) characteristics. The elemental, electronic composition, and valence-band structure of BiFeO3 ceramics were studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The diffuse reflectance spectrum of a mixture of BiFeO3 and BaSO4 , used as a standard, was recorded to test the Kubelka-Munk model. From the graph of the Kubelka-Munk function versus wavelength, two charge-transfer bands and two doubly degenerated d-d transitions ( A61g→T42g and A61g→T41g ) were observed in polycrystalline BiFeO3 . The J-E curves measured on the BiFeO3 ceramics showed space-charge-limited conduction mechanism.

  17. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    DOE PAGES

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; ...

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximatelymore » 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.« less

  18. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces: Importance of molecular orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do -Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2014-12-04

    Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  19. Mixed Quantum-Classical Liouville Approach for Calculating Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-07-12

    In this work, we derive a general mixed quantum-classical formula for calculating thermal proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) rate constants, starting from the time integral of the quantum flux-flux correlation function. This formula allows for the direct simulation of PCET reaction dynamics via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach. Owing to the general nature of the derivation, this formula does not rely on any prior mechanistic assumptions and can be applied across a wide range of electronic and protonic coupling regimes. To test the validity of this formula, we applied it to a reduced model of a condensed-phase PCET reaction. Good agreement with the numerically exact rate constant is obtained, demonstrating the accuracy of our formalism. We believe that this approach constitutes a solid foundation for future investigations of the rates and mechanisms of a wide range of PCET reactions.

  20. Effect of temperature, energy gap, and distortion of potential surfaces on photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Islampour, R.; Alden, R.G.; Wu, G.Y.C.; Lin, S.H. )

    1993-07-01

    We report the quantitative examination of the effect of distortion of potential energy surfaces and the temperature effect on photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer (PIET) as a function of electronic energy gap. The results demonstrate the importance of distorted oscillators in determining the dependence of the rate of PIET on the energy gap. This phenomenon may in some cases lead to misinterpretations of experimental data, when undistorted oscillators are assumed to be involved in the PIET process. The condition for observing the linear (rather than parabolic) dependence of the ET rate will be determined using the multimode model. The inclusion of multivibrational modes in the nuclear factors results in energy gap behavior, which is markedly different from the single mode case. Finally, a comparison between PIET and internal conversion is discussed. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer dynamics manipulated by an external electric current.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guofeng; Xiao, Liantuan; Chen, Ruiyun; Gao, Yan; Wang, Xiaobo; Jia, Suotang

    2011-08-14

    Interfacial electron transfer (IET) dynamics in a 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine (DiD) dye molecule/indium tin oxide (ITO) film system have been probed at the ensemble and single-molecule levels. By comparing the difference in the external electric current (EEC) dependence of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of the ensembles and single molecules, it is shown that the single-molecule probe can effectively demonstrate IET dynamics. The backward electron transfer and electron transfer from the ground state induce single-molecule fluorescence quenching when an EEC is applied to the DiD/ITO film system.

  2. Energetics and Dynamics of Electron Transfer and Proton Transfer in Dissociation of Metal III (salen)-Peptide Complexes in the Gas Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Chu, Ivan K.

    2008-03-12

    Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of ternary complexes of CoIII(salen)+, FeIII(salen)+, and MnIII(salen)+ with several angiotensin peptide analogs was studied using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially equipped to perform SID experiments. Time-resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) were modeled using an RRKM-based approach developed in our laboratory. The approach utilizes a very flexible analytical expression for the internal energy deposition function that is capable of reproducing both single-collision and multiple-collision activation in the gas phase and excitation by collisions with a surface. The energetics and dynamics of competing dissociation pathways obtained from the modeling provides important insight on the competition between proton transfer, electron transfer, loss of neutral peptide ligand, and other processes that determine gas-phase fragmentation of these model systems. Similar fragmentation behavior was obtained for various CoIII(salen)-peptide systems of different angiotensin analogs. In contrast, dissociation pathways and relative stabilities of the complexes changed dramatically when cobalt was replaced with trivalent iron or manganese. We demonstrate that the electron transfer efficiency is correlated with redox properties of the metalIII(salen) complexes (Co > Fe > Mn), while differences in the types of fragments formed from the complexes reflect differences in the modes of binding between the metal-salen complex and the peptide ligand. RRKM modeling of time- and collision energy-resolved SID data suggests that the competition between proton transfer and electron transfer during dissociation of CoIII(salen)-peptide complexes is mainly determined by differences in entropy effects while the energetics of these two pathways are very similar.

  3. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron S.; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M.

    2016-03-01

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm-1 oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology.

  4. Structural and dynamical control of the reaction rate in protein electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabin, Ilya A.

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in proteins are key steps in many vital bioenergetic processes, and the reaction rate is known to be highly sensitive to the protein structure in some cases. For most bioenergetic reactions, as described by the Fermi Golden rule, the rate is proportional to a product of the average square of the effective electronic donor to acceptor coupling and a Franck-Condon factor, which accounts for the nuclear control of the energy gap. The nuclear factor is reasonably well described in Marcus theory and its modifications, and this work is focused on the mechanisms that control the effective coupling. About ten years ago, the Pathways model described for the first time how protein environment may control the effective coupling. In this work, a novel theoretical approach is developed to explore the mechanisms of structural and dynamical control beyond the qualitative level of the Pathways model. In Chapter 1, the assumptions of the Pathways model, its limitations and effects of the structure and the electronic Hamiltonian are investigated for model chain-like bridges using the Dyson's equations. In Chapter II, the framework to explore the sensitivity of the effective coupling to quality of the electronic Hamiltonian, the interference among the dominant pathways and the bridge dynamics is presented. This analysis employs the Green's function technique and includes combined molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Finally, in Chapter III, this framework is tested on the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, and the mechanisms of the structural and dynamical control for different ET steps are discussed.

  5. Relationship between conformational dynamics and electron transfer in a desolvated peptide. Part I. Structures.

    PubMed

    Semrouni, David; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Parks, Joel H

    2013-02-14

    The structures, dynamics and energetics of the protonated, derivatized peptide DyeX-(Pro)(4)-Arg(+)-Trp, where "Dye" stands for the BODIPY analogue of tetramethylrhodamine and X is a (CH(2))(5) linker, have been investigated using a combination of modeling approaches in order to provide a numerical framework to the interpretation of fluorescence quenching data in the gas phase. Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations using the new generation AMOEBA force field were carried out using a representative set of conformations, at eight temperatures ranging from 150 to 500 K. Force field parameters were derived from ab initio calculations for the Dye. Strong electrostatic, polarization and dispersion interactions combine to shape this charged peptide. These effects arise in particular from the electric field generated by the charge of the protonated arginine and from several hydrogen bonds that can be established between the Dye linker and the terminal Trp. This conclusion is based on both the analysis of all structures generated in the MD simulations and on an energy decomposition analysis at classical and quantum mechanical levels. Structural analysis of the simulations at the different temperatures reveals that the relatively rigid polyproline segment allows for the Dye and Trp indole side chain to adopt stacking conformations favorable to electron transfer, yielding support to a model in which it is electron transfer from tryptophan to the dye that drives fluorescence quenching.

  6. Ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer in pi-conjugated electron systems: Effects of structure, delocalization, and energetics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanze, Kirk S.; Jones, Austin; Gish, Melissa; Zeman, Charles J.; Alsam, Amani A.; Aly, Shawkat M.; Papanikolas, John M.; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-09-01

    Photoinduced charge transfer is a key step in the mechanism of charge generation in organic solar cells. Charge transfer typically occurs from a photoexcited conjugated polymer donor to an electron acceptor. In an effort to better understand the primary events in solar cells, we have investigated photoinduced charge transfer in model donor-acceptor systems consisting of pi-conjugated oligomer donors that are covalently linked to diimide electron acceptors. These studies utilized oligo(thiophene), oligo(phenylene ethynylene) and oligo(fluorene) pi-conjugated systems with lengths varying from 4 to 12 repeat units linked to naphthalene diimide electron acceptors. Excitation with 100 femtosecond pulses at wavelengths correspoinding to the conjugated oligomer absorption band(s) leads to rapid photoinduced charge transfer to produce a charge separated state, (oligomer+)-(NDI-), which subsequently decays on timescales ranging from 100 ps to 5 ns. The dynamics of the forward and reverse electron transfer reactions depend strongly on the structure and length of the pi-conjugated oligomers, with the fastest rates occurring for oligo(thiophene)s, and considerably slower rates for oligo(phenylene ethynylene)s. The talk will discuss the structure-property relationships and energetic correlations that control the dynamics of charge separation and recombination.

  7. Polarizable solute in polarizable and flexible solvents: simulation study of electron transfer reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tateki

    2005-10-06

    A polarizable solute model, based on the empirical valence bond approach, is developed and applied to electron transfer (ET) reactions in polarizable and flexible water solvents. The polarization effect is investigated in comparison with a nonpolarizable solute and solvent model. With free energy curves constructed by a molecular dynamics simulation, the activation energy barrier and the reorganization energy related to ET processes are investigated. The present simulation results show that the activation energy barrier becomes larger in the polarizable model than in the nonpolarizable model and that this makes the ET rate slower than that with the nonpolarizable model. It is shown that the effect of the electronic energy difference of solute molecule on free energy profiles is remarkable and that, corresponding to this effect, the reorganization energy is significantly modified. These results indicate that the process of solvent polarization by the polarized solute to enhance the solute-solvent interaction is a key factor and that treating the polarization of both solute and solvent at the same time is essential. Also, the polarization effect on the diffusive motion of the solute molecule in the polarization solvent is studied. The polarized solute molecule shows slower diffusive motion compared with that in the nonpolarizable model.

  8. 75 FR 52485 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Depository Taxes; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Correction to notice... Federal Register on Monday, August 23, 2010, relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by Electronic...

  9. Role for bound water and CH-pi aromatic interactions in photosynthetic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Bender, Shana L; Barry, Bridgette A

    2005-06-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) is one of two photosynthetic reaction centers present in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria and catalyzes the reduction of ferredoxin and the oxidation of cytochrome c or plastocyanin. The PSI primary chlorophyll donor, which is oxidized in the primary electron-transfer events, is a heterodimer of chl a and a' called P700. It has been suggested that protein relaxation accompanies light-induced electron transfer in this reaction center (Dashdorj, N.; Xu, W.; Martinsson, P.; Chitnis, P. R.; Savikhin, S. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 3121. Kim, S.; Sacksteder, C. A.; Bixby, K. A.; Barry, B. A. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 15384). To investigate the details of electron transfer and relaxation events in PSI, we have employed several experimental approaches. First, we report a pH-dependent viscosity effect on P700+ reduction; this result suggests a role for proton transfer in the PSI electron-transfer reactions. Second, we find that changes in hydration alter the rate of P700+ reduction and the interactions of P700 with the protein environment. This result suggests a role for bound water in electron transfer to P700+. Third, we present evidence that deuteration of the tyrosine aromatic side chain perturbs the vibrational spectrum, associated with P700+ reduction. We attribute this result to a linkage between CH-pi interactions and electron transfer to P700+.

  10. Probing Nonadiabaticity in the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Catalyzed by Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. PCET rate constant expressions are available for various well-defined regimes, and determining which expression is appropriate for a given system is essential for reliable modeling. Quantitative diagnostics have been devised to characterize the vibronic nonadiabaticity between the electron–proton quantum subsystem and the classical nuclei, as well as the electron–proton nonadiabaticity between the electrons and proton(s) within the quantum subsystem. Herein these diagnostics are applied to a model of the active site of the enzyme soybean lipoxygenase, which catalyzes a PCET reaction that exhibits unusually high deuterium kinetic isotope effects at room temperature. Both semiclassical and electronic charge density diagnostics illustrate vibronic and electron–proton nonadiabaticity for this PCET reaction, supporting the use of the Golden rule nonadiabatic rate constant expression with a specific form of the vibronic coupling. This type of characterization will be useful for theoretical modeling of a broad range of PCET processes. PMID:25258676

  11. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, P.

    1995-02-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is applied to the study of electron transfer processes in a variety of chemical systems. Reactive intermediates are produced in solution by electron pulse irradiation and the kinetics of their reactions are followed by time resolved absorption spectrophotometry. Complementary experiments are carried out with excimer laser flash photolysis. These studies are concerned with mechanisms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of reactions of organic and inorganic radicals and unstable oxidation states of metal ions. Reactions are studied in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The studies focus on the unique ability of pulse radiolysis to provide absolute rate constants for reactions of many inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals, species that are key intermediates in many chemical processes. A special concern of this work is the study of electron transfer reactions of metalloporphyrins, which permits evaluation of these molecules as intermediates in solar energy conversion. Metalloporphyrins react with free radicals via electron transfer, involving the ligand or the metal center, or via bonding to the metal, leading to a variety of chemical species whose behavior is also investigated. The highlights of the results during the past three years are summarized below under the following sections: (a) electron transfer reactions of peroxyl radicals, concentrating on the characterization of new peroxyl radicals derived from vinyl, phenyl, other aryl, and pyridyl; (b) solvent effects on electron transfer reactions of inorganic and organic peroxyl radicals, including reactions with porphyrins, and (c) electron transfer and alkylation reactions of metalloporphyrins and other complexes.

  12. The Mechanism and Properties of Electron Transfer in the Biological Organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng

    2013-08-01

    The mechanism and properties of electron transfer along protein molecules at finite temperature T ≠ 0 in the life systems are studied using nonlinear theory of bio-energy transport and Green function method, in which the electrons are transferred from donors to acceptors in virtue of the supersound soliton excited by the energy released in ATP hydrolysis. The electron transfer is, in essence, a process of oxidation-reduction reaction. In this study we first give the Hamiltonian and wavefunction of the system and find out the soliton solution of the dynamical equation in the protein molecules with finite temperature, and obtain the dynamical coefficient of the electron transfer. The results show that the speed of the electron transfer is related to the velocity of motion of the soliton, distribution of electrons in the donor and acceptor as well as the interaction strength among them. We finally concluded the changed rule of electric current, arising from the electron transfer, with increasing time. These results are useful in molecular and chemical biology.

  13. Non-equilibrium modelling of transferred arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, J.

    1999-02-01

    A two-temperature, variable-density, arc model has been developed for description of high-current free-burning arcs, including departures from thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium in the plasma. The treatment includes the arc, the anode and the cathode and considers the separate energy balance of the electrons and the heavy particles, together with the continuity equations for these species throughout the plasma. The output includes a two-dimensional distribution for the temperatures and densities both of the electrons and of the heavy particles, plasma velocity, current density and electrical potential throughout the arc. For a 200 A arc in pure argon at 1 atm, we calculate large differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles in the plasma region near the cathode tip, together with large departures from local chemical plasma equilibrium. In the main body of the arc at high plasma temperatures, we predict minor differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles, which are inconsistent with recent measurements using laser-scattering techniques showing differences of up to several thousand degrees. However, we find that, for the region in front of the cathode tip, the ground-state level of the neutral atoms is overpopulated relative to the corresponding populations under conditions of LTE, in agreement with experimental observations. These departures from LTE are caused by the injection of a large mass flow of cold gas into the arc core due to arc constriction at the tip of the cathode.

  14. Nanoparticle Facilitated Extracellular Electron Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-13

    KEYWORDS: Bacteria, facilitated electron transport, electrochemically active, iron sulfide, Shewanella Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are capable of...to MFC technology is the unique capability of electrochemically active bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter, to divert electrons from the... electrochemical studies also demonstra- ted that the current contribution from remote bacterial cells was significantly diminished at longer cell−electrode dis

  15. Theoretical study on the antioxidant properties of 2'-hydroxychalcones: H-atom vs. electron transfer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yunsheng; Zheng, Youguang; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Wenya; Yu, Ding; Liu, Yi

    2013-09-01

    The free radical scavenging activity of six 2'-hydroxychalcones has been studied in gas phase and solvents using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The three main working mechanisms, hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), stepwise electron-transfer-proton-transfer (ET-PT) and sequential-proton-loss-electron-transfer (SPLET) have been considered. The O-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE), ionization potential (IP), proton affinity (PA) and electron transfer energy (ETE) parameters have been computed in gas phase and solvents. The theoretical results confirmed the important role of the B ring in the antioxidant properties of hydroxychalcones. In addition, the calculated results matched well with experimental values. The results suggested that HAT would be the most favorable mechanism for explaining the radical-scavenging activity of hydroxychalcone in gas phase, whereas SPLET mechanism is thermodynamically preferred pathway in aqueous solution.

  16. The initial and final states of electron and energy transfer processes: Diabatization as motivated by system-solvent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Cave, Robert J.; Steele, Ryan P.; Shenvi, Neil

    2009-06-21

    For a system which undergoes electron or energy transfer in a polar solvent, we define the diabatic states to be the initial and final states of the system, before and after the nonequilibrium transfer process. We consider two models for the system-solvent interactions: A solvent which is linearly polarized in space and a solvent which responds linearly to the system. From these models, we derive two new schemes for obtaining diabatic states from ab initio calculations of the isolated system in the absence of solvent. These algorithms resemble standard approaches for orbital localization, namely, the Boys and Edmiston-Ruedenberg (ER) formalisms. We show that Boys localization is appropriate for describing electron transfer [Subotnik et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 244101 (2008)] while ER describes both electron and energy transfer. Neither the Boys nor the ER methods require definitions of donor or acceptor fragments and both are computationally inexpensive. We investigate one chemical example, the case of oligomethylphenyl-3, and we provide attachment/detachment plots whereby the ER diabatic states are seen to have localized electron-hole pairs.

  17. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-28

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  18. An electron-transfer photochromic crystalline MOF accompanying photoswitchable luminescence in a host-guest system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Shuang; Luo, Yu-Hui; Li, Li; Zhang, Hong

    2017-03-23

    A new electron transfer type photoactive host-guest supramolecule was constructed by introducing (CH3)2NH2(+) cations to the MOF framework. The resulting compound 1 exhibits reversible photochromic property without using photochromic components, resulting from photoinduced electron-transfer between the electron-rich anionic framework and the electron-deficient guest ions. In addition, a photoluminescence "on/off switch" occurs during the coloration-decoloration process. The raw materials are non-poisonous and harmless, hence compound 1 may be more cost-effective, clean, and harmless to the heath than existing photochromic materials.

  19. Design of a Molecular Memory Device: The Electron Transfer Shift Register Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, D.

    1993-01-01

    A molecular shift register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements consist of molecules can exit in either an oxidized or reduced state and the bits are shifted between the cells with photoinduced electron transfer reactions.

  20. Density Functional Reactivity Theory Characterizes Charge Separation Propensity in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shubin; Ess, Daniel H.; Schauer, Cynthia

    2011-04-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions occur in many biological and artificial solar energy conversion processes. In these reactions the electron is often transferred to a site distant to the proton acceptor site. In this work, we employ the dual descriptor and the electrophilic Fukui function from density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) to characterize the propensity for an electron to be transferred to a site other than the proton acceptor site. The electrophilic regions of hydrogen bond or van der Waal reactant complexes were examined using these DFRT descriptors to determine the region of space to which the electron is most likely to be transferred. This analysis shows that in PCET reactions the electrophilic region of the reactant complex does not include the proton acceptor site.

  1. Determination of electron transfer kinetic parameters by fourier transform electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Byoung-Yong; Hong, Sung-Young; Yoo, Jung-Suk; Park, Su-Moon

    2006-10-05

    A new attempt to obtain electron transfer kinetic parameters at an electrified electrode/electrolyte interface using Fourier transform electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (FTEIS) analyses of small potential step chronoamperometric currents is presented. The kinetic parameters thus obtained allowed mass transport free voltammograms to be constructed in an overpotential region, where the diffusion limits the electron transfer reaction, using the Butler-Volmer (B-V) relation. The B-V voltammograms clearly distinguish electrode reactions that are not much different in their electron transfer kinetic parameters, thus showing very similar normal linear sweep voltammetric (SCV) behaviors. Electrochemical reduction of p-benzoquinone, which displays nearly the same SCV responses at a gold electrode regardless whether the electrode is covered by a thiolated beta-cyclodextrin self-assembled monolayer, was taken as an example for the demonstration. The results show that the two voltametrically similar systems display very different electron transfer characteristics.

  2. Rhodamine-6G can photosensitize folic acid decomposition through electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Ito, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Rhodamine-6G photosensitized folic acid decomposition in aqueous solution, and its quantum yield in the presence of 10 μM folic acid was 9.9 × 10-6. A possible mechanism of this photodecomposition is direct oxidation through an electron transfer from folic acid to rhodamine-6G. The fluorescence lifetime of rhodamine-6G was slightly decreased by folic acid, suggesting electron transfer in the excited singlet state of rhodamine-6G. The quenching rate coefficient estimated from the Stern-Volmer plot of the fluorescence quenching supported that this electron transfer proceeds as a diffusion-controlled reaction. The quantum yields of the electron transfer and the following reaction could be determined.

  3. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... information that is required to make payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT) under any contract that results from this solicitation. This submission satisfies the requirement to provide EFT information...

  4. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... information that is required to make payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT) under any contract that results from this solicitation. This submission satisfies the requirement to provide EFT information...

  5. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... information that is required to make payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT) under any contract that results from this solicitation. This submission satisfies the requirement to provide EFT information...

  6. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... information that is required to make payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT) under any contract that results from this solicitation. This submission satisfies the requirement to provide EFT information...

  7. 48 CFR 52.232-38 - Submission of Electronic Funds Transfer Information with Offer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... information that is required to make payment by electronic funds transfer (EFT) under any contract that results from this solicitation. This submission satisfies the requirement to provide EFT information...

  8. 77 FR 71035 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Market Research Study AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of its...

  9. Electrode assemblies composed of redox cascades from microbial respiratory electron transfer chains

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Bradley, Justin; Shi, Liang; McMillan, Duncan G.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Richardson, David; Butt, Julea N.

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains are dependent on vectorial electron transfer through a series of redox proteins. Examples include electron transfer from NapC to NapAB nitrate reductase in Paracoccus denitrificans and from CymA to Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3) fumarate reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the present article, we demonstrate that graphite electrodes can serve as surfaces for the stepwise adsorption of NapC and NapAB, and the stepwise adsorption of CymA and Fcc3. Aspects of the catalytic properties of these assemblies are different from those of NapAB and Fcc3 adsorbed in isolation. We propose that this is due to the formation of NapC-NapAB and of CymA-Fcc3 complexes that are capable of supporting vectorial electron transfer.

  10. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays. Progress report, January 1992--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Progress was made on synthesis of new materials for directional electron transfer (block copolymers and helical oligopeptides), preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organics and inorganics, electrocatalysis (redox-activated catalysts), and surface modifications of metals and semiconductors.

  11. 77 FR 34127 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of...

  12. Electron transfer from humic substances to biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) oxyhydroxide minerals.

    PubMed

    Piepenbrock, Annette; Schröder, Christian; Kappler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Microbial humic substance (HS) reduction and subsequent abiotic electron transfer from reduced HS to poorly soluble Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides, a process named electron shuttling, significantly increases microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction rates. However, the importance of electron shuttling in nature and notably the electron transfer from HS to biogenic Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides have thus far not been determined. In this study, we have quantified the rate and extent of electron transfer from reduced and nonreduced Pahokee Peat humic acids (PPHA) and fresh soil organic matter (SOM) extracts to both synthetic and environmentally relevant biogenic Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. We found that biogenic Fe(III) minerals were reduced faster and to an equal or higher degree than their abiogenic counterparts. Differences were attributed to differences in crystallinity and the association of bacterial biomass with biogenic minerals. Compared to purified PPHA, SOM extract transferred fewer electrons per milligram of carbon and electron transfer was observed only to poorly crystalline ferrihydrite but not to more crystalline goethite. This indicates a difference in redox potential distribution of the redox-active functional groups in extracted SOM relative to the purified PPHA. Our results suggest that HS electron shuttling can also contribute to iron redox processes in environments where biogenic Fe(III) minerals are present.

  13. 76 FR 81019 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...Title X of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) transferred rulemaking authority for a number of consumer financial protection laws from seven Federal agencies to the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) as of July 21, 2011. The Bureau is in the process of republishing the regulations implementing those laws with technical and conforming......

  14. 78 FR 30661 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... involved in open network transfers may learn about each other's practices regarding fees or other matters..., even a large correspondent bank, attempting to learn and accurately disclose these fees. Relatedly... introductory language in Sec. 1005.30 states that ``for purposes of this subpart, the following...

  15. Transferred metal electrode films for large-area electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jin-Guo; Kam, Fong-Yu; Chua, Lay-Lay

    2014-11-10

    The evaporation of metal-film gate electrodes for top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) limits the minimum thickness of the polymer gate dielectric to typically more than 300 nm due to deep hot metal atom penetration and damage of the dielectric. We show here that the self-release layer transfer method recently developed for high-quality graphene transfer is also capable of giving high-quality metal thin-film transfers to produce high-performance capacitors and OFETs with superior dielectric breakdown strength even for ultrathin polymer dielectric films. Dielectric breakdown strengths up to 5–6 MV cm{sup −1} have been obtained for 50-nm thin films of polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer TOPAS{sup ®} (Zeon). High-quality OFETs with sub-10 V operational voltages have been obtained this way using conventional polymer dielectrics and a high-mobility polymer semiconductor poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]. The transferred metal films can make reliable contacts without damaging ultrathin polymer films, self-assembled monolayers and graphene, which is not otherwise possible from evaporated or sputtered metal films.

  16. The Historian and Electronic Research: File Transfer Protocol (FTP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that the Internet will become the academic communication medium for historians in the 1990s. Describes the "file transfer protocol" (FTP) access approach to the Internet and discusses its significant for historical research. Includes instructions for using FTP and a list of history-related FTP sites. (CFR)

  17. An in situ transmission electron microscope deformation study of the slip transfer mechanisms in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.C.; Robertson, I.M.; Birnbaum, H.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-09-01

    The slip transfer mechanisms across grain boundaries in 310 stainless steel, high-purity aluminum, and a Ni-S alloy have been studied by using the in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) deformation technique. Several interactions between mobile lattice dislocations and grain boundaries have been observed, including the transfer and generation of dislocations at grain boundaries and the nucleation and propagation of a grain boundary crack. Quantitative condition have been established to correctly predict the slip transfer mechanism.

  18. Electron Transfer Studies of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Biologically Important Phenolic Acids and Tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-03-01

    The ruthenium(II) complexes having 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline derivatives are synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes at pH 12.5 are studied. The electron transfer reaction of biologically important phenolic acids and tyrosine are studied using absorption, emission and transient absorption spectral techniques. Semiclassical theory is applied to calculate the rate of electron transfer between ruthenium(II) complexes and biologically important phenolic acids.

  19. 36 CFR 1235.48 - What documentation must agencies transfer with electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NARA Form 14097, Technical Description for Transfer of Electronic Records, for magnetic tape media, and... format and codes as transferred. (c) Digital geospatial data files. Digital geospatial data files must... digital geospatial data files can include metadata that conforms to the Federal Geographic Data...

  20. 12 CFR 205.14 - Electronic fund transfer service provider not holding consumer's account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... initiates a transfer to effect a provisional credit in accordance with § 205.11(c)(2)(ii). (iii) If the..., in the appropriate amount and within the applicable time period, in accordance with § 205.11(c)(2)(i... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic fund transfer service provider...