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Sample records for electron transmission spectroscopy

  1. Valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Erni, Rolf; Browning, Nigel D

    2005-10-01

    With the development of monochromators for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes, valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) is developing into a unique technique to study the band structure and optical properties of nanoscale materials. This article discusses practical aspects of spatially resolved VEELS performed in scanning transmission mode and the alignments necessary to achieve the current optimum performance of approximately 0.15 eV energy resolution with an electron probe size of approximately 1 nm. In particular, a collection of basic concepts concerning the acquisition process, the optimization of the energy resolution, the spatial resolution and the data processing are provided. A brief study of planar defects in a Y(1)Ba(2)Cu(3)O(7-)(delta) high-temperature superconductor illustrates these concepts and shows what kind of information can be accessed by VEELS.

  2. Unveiling nanometric plasmons optical properties with advanced electron spectroscopy in the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kociak, Mathieu

    Since the pioneering work of Yamamoto, the use of electron spectroscopy such as Cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) in a Scanning (Transmission) Electron Microscope (STEM) has considerably helped improving our understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanoparticles. The resemblance of spectroscopic signals from electron and pure optical techniques leads to the intuition that both types of techniques are very close, an idea theoretically discussed by F.J. Garcia de Abajo and coworkers. However, it is also quite intuitive that CL and EELS should be different. For example, EELS helps detecting any sort of modes while CL can only detect radiative ones. On the other hand, even between optical spectroscopy techniques, clear differences such as energy shifts or spectral shapes changes are expected in the case of plasmons. The lack of adapted instrumentation capable of performing combined EELS and CL, as well as theoretical developments allowing to account for the generic difference between EELS and CL and their optical counterparts impeached a comprehensive understanding of plasmons physics with the otherwise amazing electron spectroscopies. In this talk, I will present recent experimental results showing combined EELS and CL spectral mapping of plasmonic properties for nanoparticles with several shapes (triangles, cubes, stars...) and composition (gold, silver, aluminum...). Helped with different theoretical tools, I will try to show how these results can be related to their optical counterparts (extinction, scattering), and what type of physical insights can be gained from these combined measurements. Finally, if time allows, pointing the weaknesses of state-of-the-art CL and EELS (in terms of spectral range and/or spectral resolution), I will present EELS results obtained on highly monochromated electron beams that could cope with these limitations

  3. Reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy and imaging for surface studies in transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z L; Bentley, J

    1992-02-15

    A review is given on the techniques and applications of high-energy reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) and reflection electron microscopy (REM) for surface studies in scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) and conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM). A diffraction method is introduced to identify a surface orientation in the geometry of REM. The surface dielectric response theory is presented and applied for studying alpha-alumina surfaces. Domains of the alpha-alumina (012) surface initially terminated with oxygen can be reduced by an intense electron beam to produce Al metal; the resistance to beam damage of surface domains initially terminated with Al+3 ions is attributed to the screening effect of adsorbed oxygen. Surface energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS), and microanalysis using REELS are illustrated based on the studies of TiO2 and MgO. Effects of surface resonances (or channeling) on the REELS signal-to-background ratio are described. The REELS detection of a monolayer of oxygen adsorption on diamond (111) surfaces is reported. It is shown that phase contrast REM image content can be significantly increased with the use of a field emission gun (FEG). Phase contrast effects close to the core of a screw dislocation are discussed and the associated Fresnel fringes around a surface step are observed. Finally, an in situ REM experiment is described for studying atomic desorption and diffusion processes on alpha-alumina surfaces at temperatures of 1,300-1,400 degrees C.

  4. Practical spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shah, A B; Ramasse, Q M; Wen, J G; Bhattacharya, A; Zuo, J M

    2011-08-01

    The resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited by delocalization of inelastic electron scattering rather than probe size in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). In this study, we present an experimental quantification of EELS spatial resolution using chemically modulated 2×(LaMnO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) and 2×(SrVO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) superlattices by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of integrated Ti M(2,3), Ti L(2,3), V L(2,3), Mn L(2,3), La N(4,5), La N(2,3) La M(4,5) and Sr L(3) edges over the superlattices. The EELS signals recorded using large collection angles are peaked at atomic columns. The FWHM of the EELS profile, obtained by curve-fitting, reveals a systematic trend with the energy loss for the Ti, V, and Mn edges. However, the experimental FWHM of the Sr and La edges deviates significantly from the observed experimental tendency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Interpreting electron transmission spectroscopy and negative ion mass spectrometry data using a spherical potential well model

    SciTech Connect

    Asfandiarov, N. L. Nafikova, E. P.; Pshenichnyuk, S. A.

    2007-03-15

    Experimental data obtained using electron transmission spectroscopy and negative ion mass spectrometry based on resonance electron capture are interpreted within the framework of a spherical potential well model in application to a series of chloro-and bromoalkane molecules. Allowance for the scattering of a single partial p-wave of the incoming electron makes possible (i) reproduction of the ratio of a resonance peak width to the electron energy observed in the electron transmission spectra and (ii) establishment of a relation between the total cross section of electron scattering on a molecule and the dissociative electron attachment cross section. The proposed model offers a radical simplification of the approach developed previously based on the Fashbach-Fano resonance theory.

  6. The spatial coherence function in scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; Findlay, S D; Etheridge, J

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the implications of the form of the spatial coherence function, also referred to as the effective source distribution, for quantitative analysis in scanning transmission electron microscopy, and in particular for interpreting the spatial origin of imaging and spectroscopy signals. These questions are explored using three different source distribution models applied to a GaAs crystal case study. The shape of the effective source distribution was found to have a strong influence not only on the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) image contrast, but also on the distribution of the scattered electron wavefield and hence on the spatial origin of the detected electron intensities. The implications this has for measuring structure, composition and bonding at atomic resolution via annular dark field, X-ray and electron energy loss STEM imaging are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM.

  8. Dehydriding process of α-AlH3 observed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, S.; Tatsumi, K.; Ikeda, K.; Orimo, S.

    2009-06-01

    The dehydriding reaction of α-AlH3 induced by high-energy electron irradiation was observed in situ by transmission electron microscopy and associated electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). An α-AlH3 crystal decomposed into fine aluminum particles while retaining its initial external shape because of a thin rigid surface layer that covered the entire particle. EELS revealed that the thin surface layer was amorphous aluminum oxide, which stabilizes α-AlH3 particles at ambient temperature.

  9. High-Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy at High Pressure: A Novel Liquid Cell for the Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Mihaela; Winterstein, Jonathan; Sharma, Renu; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Holland, Glenn; Liddle, James A

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate quantitative core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and imaging resolution of Ag nanoparticles in liquid down to 0.24 nm, in both transmission and scanning transmission modes, in a novel, monolithic liquid cell developed for the transmission electron microscope (TEM). At typical SiN membrane thicknesses of 50 nm the liquid-layer thickness has a maximum change of only 30 nm for the entire TEM viewing area of 200×200 µm.

  10. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-06-04

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

  11. Atomic-scale imaging and spectroscopy for in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jungjohann, Katherine L; Evans, James E; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2012-06-01

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics, and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope. In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle and demonstrate that characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration-corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution-based catalysis.

  12. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hachtel, Jordan A.; Marvinney, Claire; Mouti, Anas; ...

    2016-03-02

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows usmore » to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. Furthermore, the approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications.« less

  13. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hachtel, Jordan A.; Marvinney, Claire; Mouti, Anas; Mayo, Daniel; Mu, Richard R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Haglund, R. F.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2016-03-02

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. Furthermore, the approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications.

  14. Characterization of polysilicon films by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Medernach, J.W.; Geyling, F.

    1993-11-12

    Samples of chemically-vapor-deposited micrometer and sub-micrometer-thick films of polysilicon were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in cross-section and by Raman spectroscopy with illumination at their surface. TEM and Raman spectroscopy both find varying amounts of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon in the wafers. Raman spectra obtained using blue, green and red excitation wavelengths to vary the Raman sampling depth are compared with TEM cross-sections of these films. Films showing crystalline columnar structures in their TEM micrographs have Raman spectra with a band near 497 cm{sup {minus}1} in addition to the dominant polycrystalline silicon band (521 cm{sup {minus}1}). The TEM micrographs of these films have numerous faulted regions and fringes indicative of nanometer-scale silicon structures, which are believed to correspond to the 497cm{sup {minus}1} Raman band.

  15. Analysis of Multilayer Devices for Superconducting Electronics by High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Missert, Nancy; Kotula, Paul G.; Rye, Michael; ...

    2017-02-15

    We used a focused ion beam to obtain cross-sectional specimens from both magnetic multilayer and Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junction devices for characterization by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). An automated multivariate statistical analysis of the EDX spectral images produced chemically unique component images of individual layers within the multilayer structures. STEM imaging elucidated distinct variations in film morphology, interface quality, and/or etch artifacts that could be correlated to magnetic and/or electrical properties measured on the same devices.

  16. Implementation of subcellular water mapping by electron energy loss spectroscopy in a medium-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Terryn, C; Michel, J; Thomas, X; Laurent-Maquin, D; Balossier, G

    2004-07-01

    The water concentration in biological cells plays a predominant role in cellular life. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy, the feasibility to measure the water content in cells has already been demonstrated. In this paper, we present an upgrade of water measurement in hydrated cryosections by spectrum imaging mode in a medium-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope. The electron energy loss spectra are recorded in spectrum imaging mode in a 2(n)x2(n) pixels array. Each spectrum is processed in order to determine the water mass content in the corresponding pixel. Then a parametric image is obtained in which grey levels are related to water concentration. In this image, it is possible to recognize the different subcellular compartments. By averaging the water concentration over the relevant pixels, we can determine the water mass content in the concerned subcellular compartment. As an example, we present water mass content measurement at subcellular level in rat hepatocytes.

  17. High-energy-resolution monochromator for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy/electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Ursin, Jonathan P; Bacon, Neil J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Hrncirik, Petr; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S

    2009-09-28

    An all-magnetic monochromator/spectrometer system for sub-30 meV energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope is described. It will link the energy being selected by the monochromator to the energy being analysed by the spectrometer, without resorting to decelerating the electron beam. This will allow it to attain spectral energy stability comparable to systems using monochromators and spectrometers that are raised to near the high voltage of the instrument. It will also be able to correct the chromatic aberration of the probe-forming column. It should be able to provide variable energy resolution down to approximately 10 meV and spatial resolution less than 1 A.

  18. Analysis of virus infected cell by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, Kamila; Ohtani, Kiyoshi; Myrzakozha, Diyas; Zhanserkenova, Orik; Andriana, Bibin B.; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for detection of virus infection in live cells. In the present study, we demonstrate its feasibility to observe dynamic reaction of the live cell infected by virus. The Raman spectra of the adenovirus infected live cell (293 HEK) are analyzed by comparing with those of control cells. Principal component analysis (PCA) is employed also to analyze the spectra in detail. A band at 1650 cm-1 increases its intensity in the spectra measured at 24 hours after the virus infection. The infection of the virus is also examined by immune-staining and transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the virus infection is confirmed with these method also. It should be noted that the present technique does not require specifying the type of virus in advance.

  19. Broadband transmission EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Wilfred R

    2013-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy employs a resonator operating at a single microwave frequency and phase-sensitive detection using modulation of the magnetic field. The X-band spectrometer is the general standard with a frequency in the 9-10 GHz range. Most (bio)molecular EPR spectra are determined by a combination of the frequency-dependent electronic Zeeman interaction and a number of frequency-independent interactions, notably, electron spin - nuclear spin interactions and electron spin - electron spin interactions, and unambiguous analysis requires data collection at different frequencies. Extant and long-standing practice is to use a different spectrometer for each frequency. We explore the alternative of replacing the narrow-band source plus single-mode resonator with a continuously tunable microwave source plus a non-resonant coaxial transmission cell in an unmodulated external field. Our source is an arbitrary wave digital signal generator producing an amplitude-modulated sinusoidal microwave in combination with a broadband amplifier for 0.8-2.7 GHz. Theory is developed for coaxial transmission with EPR detection as a function of cell dimensions and materials. We explore examples of a doublet system, a high-spin system, and an integer-spin system. Long, straigth, helical, and helico-toroidal cells are developed and tested with dilute aqueous solutions of spin label hydroxy-tempo. A detection limit of circa 5 µM HO-tempo in water at 800 MHz is obtained for the present setup, and possibilities for future improvement are discussed.

  20. Broadband Transmission EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2013-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy employs a resonator operating at a single microwave frequency and phase-sensitive detection using modulation of the magnetic field. The X-band spectrometer is the general standard with a frequency in the 9–10 GHz range. Most (bio)molecular EPR spectra are determined by a combination of the frequency-dependent electronic Zeeman interaction and a number of frequency-independent interactions, notably, electron spin – nuclear spin interactions and electron spin – electron spin interactions, and unambiguous analysis requires data collection at different frequencies. Extant and long-standing practice is to use a different spectrometer for each frequency. We explore the alternative of replacing the narrow-band source plus single-mode resonator with a continuously tunable microwave source plus a non-resonant coaxial transmission cell in an unmodulated external field. Our source is an arbitrary wave digital signal generator producing an amplitude-modulated sinusoidal microwave in combination with a broadband amplifier for 0.8–2.7 GHz. Theory is developed for coaxial transmission with EPR detection as a function of cell dimensions and materials. We explore examples of a doublet system, a high-spin system, and an integer-spin system. Long, straigth, helical, and helico-toroidal cells are developed and tested with dilute aqueous solutions of spin label hydroxy-tempo. A detection limit of circa 5 µM HO-tempo in water at 800 MHz is obtained for the present setup, and possibilities for future improvement are discussed. PMID:23555819

  1. Measurement of vibrational spectrum of liquid using monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Tomohiro; Fukuyama, Mao; Hibara, Akihide; Okunishi, Eiji; Mukai, Masaki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2014-10-01

    Investigations on the dynamic behavior of molecules in liquids at high spatial resolution are greatly desired because localized regions, such as solid-liquid interfaces or sites of reacting molecules, have assumed increasing importance with respect to improving material performance. In application to liquids, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a promising analytical technique with the appropriate resolutions. In this study, we obtained EELS spectra from an ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl) imide (C2mim-TFSI), chosen as the sampled liquid, using monochromated scanning TEM (STEM). The molecular vibrational spectrum and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap of the liquid were investigated. The HOMO-LUMO gap measurement coincided with that obtained from the ultraviolet-visible spectrum. A shoulder in the spectrum observed ∼0.4 eV is believed to originate from the molecular vibration. From a separately performed infrared observation and first-principles calculations, we found that this shoulder coincided with the vibrational peak attributed to the C-H stretching vibration of the [C2mim(+)] cation. This study demonstrates that a vibrational peak for a liquid can be observed using monochromated STEM-EELS, and leads one to expect observations of chemical reactions or aids in the analysis of the dynamic behavior of molecules in liquid.

  2. Investigation of nanoparticulate silicon as printed layers using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unuigbe, David M.; Harting, Margit; Jonah, Emmanuel O.; ...

    2017-08-21

    The presence of native oxide on the surface of silicon nanoparticles is known to inhibit charge transport on the surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal that the particles in the printed silicon network have a wide range of sizes and shapes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the particle surfaces have mainly the (111)- and (100)-oriented planes which stabilizes against further oxidation of the particles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements at the O 1s-edge have been utilized to study the oxidation and local atomic structure of printed layers of silicon nanoparticles which were milledmore » for different times. XANES results reveal the presence of the +4 (SiO2) oxidation state which tends towards the +2 (SiO) state for higher milling times. Si 2pXPS results indicate that the surfaces of the silicon nanoparticles in the printed layers are only partially oxidized and that all three sub-oxide, +1 (Si2O), +2 (SiO) and +3 (Si2O3), states are present. The analysis of the change in the sub-oxide peaks of the silicon nanoparticles shows the dominance of the +4 state only for lower milling times.« less

  3. Transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence, and capacitance spectroscopy on GaAs/Si grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremond, Georges E.; Said, Hicham; Guillot, Gerard; Meddeb, Jaafar; Pitaval, M.; Draidia, Nasser; Azoulay, Rozette

    1991-03-01

    We present a complete characterization study of GaAs/Si heteroepitaxial layers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) at 750C using the two-step method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy secondary ion mass spectroscopy deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy have been performed to study the initial stage of growth misfit and threading dislocations Si diffusion and the deep levels in the GaAs layer. We describe the influence of GaAs/AlAs superlattices in the buffer layer on the decrease of dislocation density and on Si diffusion from the substrate and the existence of deep electron traps induced by the heteroepitaxy. DLTS reveals hole traps attributed to Si incorporation on the basis of PL measurements which could contribute to the reduction of the minority carrier lifetime. We also show an improvement of the layer quality by the use of selective epitaxy.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy and time resolved optical spectroscopy study of the electronic and structural interactions of ZnO nanorods with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Klaumünzer, M; Weichsel, U; Mačković, M; Spiecker, E; Peukert, W; Kryschi, C

    2013-08-22

    The adsorption behavior and electronic interactions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with ZnO nanorod surfaces were investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy as well as stationary and time-resolved optical spectroscopy techniques. Transmission electron microscopy shows that ZnO nanorod surfaces are surrounded by a homogeneous amorphous BSA film with thicknesses between ~2.5 and 5.0 nm. The electronic structure and adsorption geometry of BSA were examined using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The adsorption process was observed to result into an unfolded conformation of BSA becoming predominantly bound in the side-on orientation at the ZnO surface. This adsorption mode of the BSA molecules allows for a strong interaction with surface states of the ZnO nanorods. This is obvious from its efficient quenching of the defect-center photoluminescence of ZnO. Complementary information of electronic interactions across the ZnO nanorod interface was obtained from femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy experiments. The rise dynamics of the measured transients revealed altered hole trapping dynamics and, thus, indicated to heterogeneous charge transfer as emerging from adsorbed BSA molecules to defect centers of the ZnO interface.

  5. Correlated Optical Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy of Individual Hollow Nanoparticles and their Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linglu; Yan, Bo; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2009-01-01

    The optical spectra of individual Ag-Au alloy hollow particles were correlated with the particles’ structures obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM provided direct experimental access to the dimension of the cavity, thickness of the metal shell, and the interparticle distance of hollow particle dimers with high spatial resolution. The analysis of correlated spectral and structural information enabled the quantification of the influence of the core-shell structure on the resonance energy, plasmon lifetime, and plasmon coupling efficiency. Electron beam exposure during TEM inspection was observed to affect plasmon wavelength and lifetime, making optical inspection prior to structural characterization mandatory. PMID:19768108

  6. In Situ Environmental Cell-Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Microbial Reduction of Chromium(VI) Using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2001-11-01

    Reduction of Cr(VI) by the bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis (previously classified Shewanella putrefaciens strain MR-1), was studied by absorption spectrophotometry and in situ, environmental cell-transmission electron microscopy (EC-TEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Bacteria from rinsed cultures were placed directly in the environmental cell of the transmission electron microscope and examined under 100 Torr pressure. Bright field EC-TEM images show two distinct populations of S. oneidensis in incubated cultures containing Cr(VI)O2- 4: those that exhibit low image contrast and heavily precipitate-encrusted cells exhibiting high image contrast. Several EELS techniques were applied to determine the oxidation state of Cr associated with encrusted cells. The encrusted cells are shown to contain a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state +3 or lower. These results demonstrate the capability to determine the chemistry and valence state of reduction products associated with unfixed, hydrated bacteria in an environmental cell transmission electron microscope.

  7. Optical spectroscopy and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy of surface plasmons in core-shell nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Eggeman, A. S.; Dobson, P. J.; Petford-Long, A. K.; Materials Science Division; Oxford Univ.

    2007-01-01

    Silica-silver core-shell nanoparticles were produced using colloidal chemistry methods. Surface plasmon resonances in the silver shells were investigated using optical absorption measurements in ultraviolet-to-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and the effect of shell thickness on the wavelength of the resonance was noted. Further studies of the resonances were performed using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) imaging. The plasmon resonance was seen in an EELS spectrum at an energy corresponding to the wavelengths measured in an UV-vis spectrophotometer, and EFTEM images confirmed that the resonance was indeed localized at the surface of the silver shell. Further features were seen in the EELS spectrum and confirmed as bulk-plasmon features of silica and the carbon support film in the TEM specimen.

  8. 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy: Single-particle imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ortalan, Volkan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-07-20

    We report the development of 4D scanning transmission ultrafast electron microscopy (ST-UEM). The method was demonstrated in the imaging of silver nanowires and gold nanoparticles. For the wire, the mechanical motion and shape morphological dynamics were imaged, and from the images we obtained the resonance frequency and the dephasing time of the motion. Moreover, we demonstrate here the simultaneous acquisition of dark-field images and electron energy loss spectra from a single gold nanoparticle, which is not possible with conventional methods. The local probing capabilities of ST-UEM open new avenues for probing dynamic processes, from single isolated to embedded nanostructures, without being affected by the heterogeneous processes of ensemble-averaged dynamics. Such methodology promises to have wide-ranging applications in materials science and in single-particle biological imaging.

  9. Strain analysis of plasma CVD graphene for roll-to-roll production by scanning transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ryuichi; Koga, Yoshinori; Matsuishi, Kiyoto; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2017-03-01

    The establishment of the roll-to-roll CVD is one of the key factors for realizing the commercial application of graphene. The strain in graphene synthesized by high-throughput plasma CVD using two different conditions related to growth rate and tension to the substrate is analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The compressive strain generated during the growth by the tension to the substrate and the difference in thermal expansion coefficient between the graphene and the copper substrate is observed, which affects electrical conductivity. It was confirmed by STEM observation that no particularly large strain was accumulated at grain boundaries and their surroundings.

  10. A short story of imaging and spectroscopy of two-dimensional materials by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Zhou, Wu

    2017-03-01

    Here we present a short historical account of when single adatom impurities where first identified in two-dimensional materials by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We also present a study of the graphene low-loss (below 50 eV) response as a function of number of layers using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The study shows that as few as three layers of graphene behave as bulk graphite for losses above 10 eV We also show examples of how point and extended defects can easily be resolved and structural dynamics can be readily capture by using aberration-corrected STEM imaging. Lastly, we show that themore » new generation of monochromators has opened up possibilities to explore new physics with an electron microscope. All these capabilities were enabled by the development of spherical aberration correctors and monochromators, where Ondrej Krivanek has played a key role.« less

  11. A short story of imaging and spectroscopy of two-dimensional materials by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Idrobo, Juan C; Zhou, Wu

    2017-09-01

    Here we present a short historical account of when single adatom impurities where first identified in two-dimensional materials by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We also present a study of the graphene low-loss (below 50eV) response as a function of number of layers using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The study shows that as few as three layers of graphene behave as bulk graphite for losses above 10eV We also show examples of how point and extended defects can easily be resolved and structural dynamics can be readily capture by using aberration-corrected STEM imaging. Finally, we show that the new generation of monochromators has opened up possibilities to explore new physics with an electron microscope. All these capabilities were enabled by the development of spherical aberration correctors and monochromators, where Ondrej Krivanek has played a key role. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Microstructure of highly strained BiFeO3 thin films: Transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy loss spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heon Kim, Young; Bhatnagar, Akash; Pippel, Eckhard; Alexe, Marin; Hesse, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Microstructure and electronic structure of highly strained bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) thin films grown on lanthanum aluminate substrates are studied using high-resolution transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopies and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Monoclinic and tetragonal phases were observed in films grown at different temperatures, and a mix of both phases was detected in a film grown at intermediate temperature. In this film, a smooth transition of the microstructure was found between the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. A considerable increase in the c-axis parameters was observed in both phases compared with the rhombohedral bulk phase. The off-center displacement of iron (Fe) ions was increased in the monoclinic phase as compared with the tetragonal phase. EEL spectra show different electronic structures in the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. These experimental observations are well consistent with the results of theoretical first-principle calculations performed.

  13. Microstructure of highly strained BiFeO{sub 3} thin films: Transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy loss spectroscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Heon Kim, Young; Bhatnagar, Akash; Pippel, Eckhard; Hesse, Dietrich; Alexe, Marin

    2014-01-28

    Microstructure and electronic structure of highly strained bismuth ferrite (BiFeO{sub 3}) thin films grown on lanthanum aluminate substrates are studied using high-resolution transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopies and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Monoclinic and tetragonal phases were observed in films grown at different temperatures, and a mix of both phases was detected in a film grown at intermediate temperature. In this film, a smooth transition of the microstructure was found between the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. A considerable increase in the c-axis parameters was observed in both phases compared with the rhombohedral bulk phase. The off-center displacement of iron (Fe) ions was increased in the monoclinic phase as compared with the tetragonal phase. EEL spectra show different electronic structures in the monoclinic and the tetragonal phases. These experimental observations are well consistent with the results of theoretical first-principle calculations performed.

  14. 2D atomic mapping of oxidation states in transition metal oxides by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haiyan; Turner, Stuart; Yücelen, Emrah; Verbeeck, Jo; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2011-09-02

    Using a combination of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomically resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope we demonstrate the possibility of 2D atom by atom valence mapping in the mixed valence compound Mn3O4. The Mn L(2,3) energy-loss near-edge structures from Mn2+ and Mn3+ cation sites are similar to those of MnO and Mn2O3 references. Comparison with simulations shows that even though a local interpretation is valid here, intermixing of the inelastic signal plays a significant role. This type of experiment should be applicable to challenging topics in materials science, such as the investigation of charge ordering or single atom column oxidation states in, e.g., dislocations.

  15. Analytical electron microscope based on scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, Masanari; Tsuneta, Ruriko; Anan, Yoshihiro; Nakamae, Koji

    2017-01-01

    An analytical electron microscope based on the scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (STEM-WDX) to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements has been developed. In this study, a large-solid-angle multi-capillary x-rays lens with a focal length of 5 mm, long-time data acquisition (e.g. longer than 26 h), and a drift-free system made it possible to visualize boron-dopant images in a Si substrate at a detection limit of 0.2 atomic percent.

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis of silver-coated gold nanorods designed for bionanotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Honda, Takumi; Mitsuhara, Masatoshi; Nishida, Minoru; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2017-01-01

    Multicomponent nano-agents were designed and built via a core-shell approach to enhance their surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. These nano-agents had 36 nm × 12 nm gold nanorod cores coated by 4 nm thick silver shell films and a subsequent thin bifunctional thiolated polyethylene glycol (HS-PEG-COOH) layer. Ambient time-lapsed SERS signal measurements of these functionalized nanorods taken over a two-week period indicated no signal degradation, suggesting that large portions of the silver shells remained in pure metallic form. The morphology of the nanorods was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultra-high resolution scanning TEM. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were utilized to assess the oxidation states of the silver shells covered by HS-PEG-COOH. The binding energies of Ag 3d XPS spectra yielded very small chemical shifts with oxidation; however, the AES peak shapes gave meaningful information about the extent of oxidation undergone by the nano-agent. While the silver shells without HS-PEG-COOH coatings oxidized significantly, the silver shells with HS-PEG-COOH remained predominantly metallic. In fact, six month-old samples still retained mostly metallic silver shells. These findings further demonstrate the stability and longevity of the nanostructures, indicating their significant potential as plasmonically active agents for highly sensitive detection in various biological systems, including cancer cells, tissues, or even organisms.

  17. Protein-nanoparticle interaction in bioconjugated silver nanoparticles: A transmission electron microscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond-Laruinaz, Sébastien; Saviot, Lucien; Potin, Valérie; Marco de Lucas, María del Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of interaction between proteins and noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is crucial to extend the use of NPs in biological applications and nanomedicine. We report the synthesis of Ag-NPs:protein bioconjugates synthesized in total absence of citrates or other stabilizing agents in order to study the NP-protein interaction. Four common proteins (lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome-C and hemoglobin) were used in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were mainly used to study these bioconjugated NPs. TEM images showed Ag NPs with sizes in the 5-40 nm range. The presence of a protein layer surrounding the Ag NPs was also observed by TEM. Moreover, the composition at different points of single bioconjugated NPs was probed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The thickness of the protein layer varies in the 3-15 nm range and the Ag NPs are a few nanometers away. This allowed to obtain an enhancement of the Raman signal of the proteins in the analysis of water suspensions of bioconjugates. SERS results showed a broadening of the Raman bands of the proteins which we attribute to the contribution of different configurations of the proteins adsorbed on the Ag NPs surface. Moreover, the assignment of an intense and sharp peak in the low-frequency range to Ag-N vibrations points to the chemisorption of the proteins on the Ag-NPs surface.

  18. The influence of Cs/Cc correction in analytical imaging and spectroscopy in scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2014-11-11

    Aberration correction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) owes much to the efforts of a small dedicated group of innovators. Leading that frontier has been Prof. Harald Rose. To date his leadership and dynamic personality has spearheaded our ability to leave behind many of the limitations imposed by spherical aberration (Cs) in high resolution phase contrast imaging. Following shortly behind, has been the development of chromatic aberration correction (Cc) which augments those accomplishments. In this study we will review and summarize how the combination of Cs/Cc technology enhances our ability to conduct hyperspectral imaging and spectroscopy in today's and future computationallymore » mediated experiments in both thin as well as realistic specimens in vacuo and during in-situ/environmental experiments.« less

  19. Composition measurement in substitutionally disordered materials by atomic resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Taplin, D J; Weyland, M; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy invites the question of whether its success in precision composition determination at lower magnifications can be replicated in the atomic resolution regime. In this paper, we explore, through simulation, the prospects for composition measurement via the model system of AlxGa1-xAs, discussing the approximations used in the modelling, the variability in the signal due to changes in configuration at constant composition, and the ability to distinguish between different compositions. Results are presented in such a way that the number of X-ray counts, and thus the expected variation due to counting statistics, can be gauged for a range of operating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Elemental analysis of sunflower cataract in Wilson's disease: a study using scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyo Ju; Kim, Joon Mo; Choi, Chul Young

    2014-04-01

    Signature ophthalmic characteristics of Wilson's disease (WD) are regarded as diagnostically important manifestations of the disease. Previous studies have proved the common occurrence of copper accumulation in the liver of patients with WD. However, in the case of sunflower cataracts, one of the rare diagnostic signs of WD, no study has demonstrated copper accumulation in the lens capsules of sunflower cataracts in WD patients. To investigate the nanostructure and elemental composition of sunflower cataracts in WD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was done on the capsulorhexised anterior lens capsule of sunflower cataracts in WD in order to evaluate anatomical variation and elemental changes. We utilized energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to investigate the elemental composition of the lens capsule using both point and mapping spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis was performed for relative comparison of the elements. TEM showed the presence of granular deposits of varying size (20-350 nm), appearing mainly in the posterior one third of the anterior capsule. The deposits appeared in linear patterns with scattered dots. There were no electron-dense particles in the epithelial cell layer of the lens. Copper and sulfur peaks were consistently revealed in electron-dense granular deposits. In contrast, copper and sulfur peaks were absent in other tissues, including granule-free lens capsules and epithelial tissue. Most copper was exclusively located in clusters of electron-dense particles, and the copper distribution overlapped with sulfur on mapping spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis presented inconsistent ratios of copper to sulfur in each electron-dense granule. The mean ratio of copper to sulfur was about 3.25 (with a range of 2.39-3.78). This is the first elemental analysis of single electron particles in sunflower cataracts using EDS in the ophthalmic area. Sunflower cataracts with WD are assumed to be the result of accumulation of heterogeneous

  1. Quantitative characterization of the mesothelioma-inducing erionite series minerals by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Meral

    2012-01-01

    Air-collected erionite series minerals from Cappadocia region of Turkey were characterized quantitatively by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Field emission scanning electron microscopy aided identification of fibrous minerals. Quantitative characterization guidelines for positive identification of erionites proposed by Dogan and Dogan (2008) was applied and the modified balance error formula (E%<10) and Mg-content test <0.80 were performed for each analysis. Erionite species computation showed that the mineral is erionite-K and a mean chemical formula is proposed based upon the TEM-EDS results. Among the 60 analyses, 11 passed E% test (18.3%), 33 passed Mg-content test (55.0%), and only 3 passed both E% and Mg-content tests (5.0%). This shows difficulty of quantitative characterization of the erionite series minerals. However, as erionite is the most carcinogenic mineral known and is classified by IARC as a Group-I (human) carcinogen, it requires special attention from the mineralogical community to help establish its true mineralogical properties. Quantitatively characterized erionite data are very scarce in literature. Correctly identified erionite mineral types will be useful to medical researchers in their search to find a possible cure for the deadly disease of mesothelioma. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Distributions of hafnia and titania cores in EUV metal resists evaluated by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Sato, Yuta; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-11-01

    The morphologies of hafnia (HfO x ) and titania (TiO x ) cores and their distributions in metal resists for EUV lithography were characterized at the atomic level by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The HfO x cores show a higher affinity to organic components, such as methacrylic acid and benzoic acid, than the TiO x cores, and the same core-shell state as in a solution is almost completely maintained in the HfO x resist film. Furthermore, it was found that the surface modification of the TiO x cores by silylation is effective for preventing their aggregation and improves the postcoating delay (PCD) of the resist.

  3. Measurement of the dielectric function of α-Al2O3 by transmission electron microscopy - Electron energy-loss spectroscopy without Cerenkov radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Norihito; Tanda, Luka; Kunisada, Yuji

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric function of α-Al2O3 was measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) coupled with the difference method. The influence of Cerenkov radiation was significant in measurements using a 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the correct dielectric function could not be obtained using the conventional EELS procedure. However, a good agreement between the optical data and EELS for the dielectric functions was obtained via a 60kV TEM. Combining EELS and the difference method, however, provided an accurate measurement of the dielectric function for α-Al2O3 even at an accelerating voltage of 200kV. The combination of EELS and the difference method in the nano-beam diffraction mode could derive an accurate dielectric function with superior spatial resolution regardless of the occurrence of Cerenkov radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Silver Colloids in Bacteria: A Study by Transmission Electron Microscopy, Absorption Spectroscopy and Elemental Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    Coupled Plasma system. Results and Analysis Electron Microscopy Internal Colloid Figure 1 shows the main features we observe for E . coli bacteria treated...when prepared in E . coli bacteria using our procedure, and also 4-10 nm silver particle aggregates are often observed in our TEM micrographs. Thus...suspension of E . coli bacteria with an internal colloid, and the insert to that Figure shows the spectrum of the filtrate obtained after filtering the

  5. Shocked chromites in fossil L chondrites: A Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Surya S.; Heck, Philipp R.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Ishii, Takayuki; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean J.; Schmitz, Birger

    2017-09-01

    Chromites from Middle Ordovician fossil L chondrites and from matrix and shock-melt veins in Catherwood, Tenham, and Coorara L chondrites were studied using Raman spectroscopy and TEM. Raman spectra of chromites from fossil L chondrites showed similarities with chromites from matrix and shock-melt veins in the studied L chondrite falls and finds. Chromites from shock-melt veins of L chondrites show polycrystallinity, while the chromite grains in fossil L chondrites are single crystals. In addition, chromites from shock-melt veins in the studied L chondrites have high densities of planar fractures within the subgrains and many subgrains show intergrowths of chromite and xieite. Matrix chromite of Tenham has similar dislocation densities and planar fractures as a chromite from the fossil meteorite Golvsten 001 and higher dislocation densities than in chromite from the fossil meteorite Sextummen 003. Using this observation and knowing that the matrix of Tenham experienced 20-22 GPa and <1000° C, an upper limit for the P,T conditions of chromite from Golvsten 001 and Sextummen 003 can be estimated to be 20-22 GPa and 1000° C (shock stage S3-S6) and 20 GPa and 1000° C (S3-S5), respectively, and we conclude that the studied fossil meteorite chromites are from matrix.

  6. Detection of local chemical states of lithium and their spatial mapping by scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy and hyperspectral image analysis.

    PubMed

    Muto, Shunsuke; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi

    2017-02-08

    Advancements in the field of renewable energy resources have led to a growing demand for the analysis of light elements at the nanometer scale. Detection of lithium is one of the key issues to be resolved for providing guiding principles for the synthesis of cathode active materials, and degradation analysis after repeated use of those materials. We have reviewed the different techniques currently used for the characterization of light elements such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). In the present study, we have introduced a methodology to detect lithium in solid materials, particularly for cathode active materials used in lithium-ion battery. The chemical states of lithium were isolated and analyzed from the overlapping multiple spectral profiles, using a suite of STEM, EELS and hyperspectral image analysis. The method was successfully applied in the chemical state analyses of hetero-phases near the surface and grain boundary regions of the active material particles formed by chemical reactions between the electrolyte and the active materials. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  8. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (>20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (<10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 \\upmu s which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  9. Martensitic transformation of Ni2FeGa ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy studied via transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. R.; Ma, C.; Tian, H. F.; Wu, G. H.; Li, J. Q.

    2008-06-01

    The structural properties of Ni2FeGa Heusler alloy synthesized by melt-spinning technique have been systematically studied by means of in situ heating and cooling transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the Ni2FeGa alloy was annealed into a well-defined L21 structure at around 980 K, and complex microstructural domains appeared along with lowering temperature. At room temperature (293 K), a rich variety of micromodulated domains were observed. The domain structures were aligned along the ⟨110⟩ or ⟨100⟩ directions resulting to complex tweed structures. Below martensitic transformation (MT) temperature (Ms,˜142K) , the cubic parent phase transformed into unmodulated martensitic variants and modulated martensitic variants. The variants were alternated along the ⟨100⟩ direction with various arrangements and steplike incommensurate boundaries. The modulated martensitic variants were composed of lamellar structures that have predominately a 5M modulation structure along the ⟨110⟩ directions. The electron energy-loss spectroscopy analysis of the low-loss region and the electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure revealed a visible change of the electronic structure along with MT, which can be well interpreted by means of intra-atomic or intraband charge redistribution due to spd orbital hybridization among the Ni-Fe-Ga atoms.

  10. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Microcharacterization of materials on a scale of less than 10 nm has been afforded by recent advances in analytical transmission electron microscopy. The factors limiting accurate analysis at the limit of spatial resolution for the case of a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are examined in this paper.

  11. Study of semiconductor valence plasmon line shapes via electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Kundmann, M.K.

    1988-11-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the semiconductors Si, AlAs, GaAs, InAs, InP, and Ge are examined in detail in the regime of outer-shell and plasmon energy losses (0--100eV). Particular emphasis is placed on modeling and analyzing the shapes of the bulk valence plasmon lines. A line shape model based on early work by Froehlich is derived and compared to single-scattering probability distributions extracted from the measured spectra. Model and data are found to be in excellent agreement, thus pointing the way to systematic characterization of the plasmon component of EELS spectra. The model is applied to three separate investigations. 82 refs.

  12. Phase evolution in {sup 57}Fe/Al multilayers studied through dc magnetization, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, Snehal; Lakshmi, N.; Venugopalan, K.; Sebastian, Varkey; Reddy, V. R.; Gupta, Ajay; Lalla, N. P.

    2008-12-15

    Fe/Al multilayer thin films with an overall atomic concentration ratio of Fe:Al=1:2 have been prepared by ion-beam sputtering. Phase formation and microstructural evolution with thermal annealing have been studied by x-ray reflectivity, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, dc magnetization, and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy. These studies show that although the starting composition is Al rich, the intermixing of Fe and Al at the interfaces leads to the formation of a magnetic Fe{sub 3}Al-like region at the interface. Thus, the magnetic contribution in the as-deposited multilayer structure (MLS) is not only from pure Fe but also from an Fe{sub 3}Al-like region formed at the interface. On annealing the MLS, a stable nonmagnetic MLS consisting of intermetallic B2Fe{sub 50}Al{sub 50} separated by thin Al layers is formed. Further annealing only induces better ordering of Fe{sub 50}Al{sub 50} and does not destroy the MLS.

  13. Conventional transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winey, Mark; Meehl, Janet B.; O'Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to make contributions to cell biology for well over 50 years, and TEM continues to be an important technology in our field. We briefly present for the neophyte the components of a TEM-based study, beginning with sample preparation through imaging of the samples. We point out the limitations of TEM and issues to be considered during experimental design. Advanced electron microscopy techniques are listed as well. Finally, we point potential new users of TEM to resources to help launch their project. PMID:24482357

  14. Exoplanet transmission spectroscopy using KMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Hannu; Aigrain, Suzanne; Thatte, Niranjan; Barstow, Joanna K.; Evans, Thomas M.; Gibson, Neale

    2015-11-01

    KMOS (K-Band Multi Object Spectrograph) is a novel integral field spectrograph installed in the Very Large Telescope's (VLT's) ANTU unit. The instrument offers an ability to observe 24 2.8 arcsec × 2.8 arcsec subfields positionable within a 7.2 arcmin patrol field, each subfield producing a spectrum with a 14 × 14-pixel spatial resolution. The main science drivers for KMOS are the study of galaxies, star formation, and molecular clouds, but its ability to simultaneously measure spectra of multiple stars makes KMOS an interesting instrument for exoplanet atmosphere characterization via transmission spectroscopy. We set to test whether transmission spectroscopy is practical with KMOS, and what are the conditions required to achieve the photometric precision needed, based on observations of a partial transit of WASP-19b, and full transits of GJ 1214b and HD 209458b. Our analysis uses the simultaneously observed comparison stars to reduce the effects from instrumental and atmospheric sources, and Gaussian processes to model the residual systematics. We show that KMOS can, in theory, deliver the photometric precision required for transmission spectroscopy. However, this is shown to require (a) pre-imaging to ensure accurate centring and (b) a very stable night with optimal observing conditions (seeing ˜0.8 arcsec). Combining these two factors with the need to observe several transits, each with a sufficient out-of-transit baseline (and with the fact that similar or better precision can be reached with telescopes and instruments with smaller pressure), we conclude that transmission spectroscopy is not the optimal science case to take advantage of the abilities offered by KMOS and VLT.

  15. An in ovo investigation into the hepatotoxicity of cadmium and chromium evaluated with light- and transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venter, Chantelle; Oberholzer, Hester M; Taute, Helena; Cummings, Franscious R; Bester, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive agriculture, transport and mining often lead to the contamination of valuable water resources. Communities using this water for drinking, washing, bathing and the irrigation of crops are continuously being exposed to these heavy metals. The most vulnerable is the developing fetus. Cadmium (Cd) and chrome (Cr) were identified as two of the most prevalent heavy metal water contaminants in South Africa. In this study, chicken embryos at the stage of early organogenesis were exposed to a single dosage of 0.430 μM physiological dosage (PD) and 430 μM (×1000 PD) CdCl2, as well as 0.476 μM (PD) and 746 μM (×1000 PD) K2Cr2O7. At day 14, when all organ systems were completely developed, the embryos were terminated and the effect of these metals on liver tissue and cellular morphology was determined with light- and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The intracellular localization of these metals was determined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). With light microscopy, the PD of both Cd and Cr had no effect on liver tissue or cellular morphology. At ×1000 PD both Cd and Cr caused sinusoid dilation and tissue necrosis. With TEM analysis, Cd exposed hepatocytes presented with irregular chromatin condensation, ruptured cellular membranes and damaged or absent organelles. In contrast Cr caused only slight mitochondrial damage. EELS revealed the bio-accumulation of Cd and Cr along the cristae of the mitochondria and chromatin of the nuclei.

  16. Low voltage transmission electron microscopy of graphene.

    PubMed

    Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Zhao, Jiong; Gorantla, Sandeep Madhukar; Martinez, Ignacio Guillermo Gonzalez; Wiedermann, Jerzy; Lee, Changgu; Eckert, Juergen; Rummeli, Mark Hermann

    2015-02-04

    The initial isolation of graphene in 2004 spawned massive interest in this two-dimensional pure sp(2) carbon structure due to its incredible electrical, optical, mechanical, and thermal effects. This in turn led to the rapid development of various characterization tools for graphene. Examples include Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. However, the one tool with the greatest prowess for characterizing and studying graphene is the transmission electron microscope. State-of-the-art (scanning) transmission electron microscopes enable one to image graphene with atomic resolution, and also to conduct various other characterizations simultaneously. The advent of aberration correctors was timely in that it allowed transmission electron microscopes to operate with reduced acceleration voltages, so that damage to graphene is avoided while still providing atomic resolution. In this comprehensive review, a brief introduction is provided to the technical aspects of transmission electron microscopes relevant to graphene. The reader is then introduced to different specimen preparation techniques for graphene. The different characterization approaches in both transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are then discussed, along with the different aspects of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The use of graphene for other electron microscopy approaches such as in-situ investigations is also presented.

  17. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  18. Electronically controlled automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.; Shiba, H.; Nakamura, K.

    1989-03-28

    This patent describes an electronically controlled automatic transmission having a manual valve working in connection with a manual shift lever, shift valves operated by solenoid valves which are driven by an electronic control circuit previously memorizing shift patterns, and a hydraulic circuit controlled by these manual valve and shift valves for driving brakes and a clutch in order to change speed. Shift patterns of 2-range and L-range, in addition to a shift pattern of D-range, are memorized previously in the electronic control circuit, an operation switch is provided which changes the shift pattern of the electronic control circuit to any shift pattern among those of D-range, 2-range and L-range at time of the manual shift lever being in a D-range position, a releasable lock mechanism is provided which prevents the manual shift lever from entering 2-range and L-range positions, and the hydraulic circuit is set to a third speed mode when the manual shift lever is in the D-range position. The circuit is set to a second speed mode when it is in the 2-range position, and the circuit is set to a first speed mode when it is in the L-range position, respectively, in case where the shift valves are not working.

  19. Spatially resolved chemical mapping of dry and hydrated polymer morphology by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Alioscka A. C. A.

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is a technique that allows compositional analysis to be performed at high spatial resolution in thin TEM specimens, and here we implement and apply this technique to quantitatively study the morphology of unstained dry and frozen-hydrated polymer films. While water can play a controlling role that determines many of the important properties of polymers, there has not yet been much experimental work performed to correlate water spatial distribution with variations in underlying polymer morphology. We show how a quantitative map of the nanoscale spatial distribution of water can be generated from frozen-hydrated polymer thin films using EELS in the STEM. We find that hydrated polymers are very sensitive to the incident electron irradiation, and there is a trade off between the spatial resolution that a compositional map can display and its signal-to-noise ratio. The identification of minor fluctuations in composition within small regions across a given water map is therefore challenging because one must distinguish the fluctuations that are significant from those within noise. We implement a methodology using scatter diagrams in combination with noise simulations to threshold water maps and separate real pixel-by-pixel compositional fluctuations from noise. We study a model system comprised of hydrophilic poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and hydrophobic poly(styrene), and we show that the thresholding approach enables us to quantitatively identify statistically significant single-pixel fluctuations in water content. We also apply EELS in the STEM to characterize the morphology of a dry, solvent-cast thin-film biopolymer blend comprised of poly(caprolactone) and poly(DTE carbonate). We quantitatively show the effect that solvent evaporation rate has on the morphology development of this blend and how the underlying morphology can dramatically influence the spatial distribution of

  20. Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Maroncelli, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-06-08

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electronic Spectroscopy and Dynamics was held at Colby College, Waterville, NH from 07/19/2009 thru 07/24/2009. The Conference was well-attended with participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. The GRC on Electronic Spectroscopy & Dynamics showcases some of the most recent experimental and theoretical developments in electronic spectroscopy that probes the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules, molecules embedded in clusters and condensed phases, and bulk materials. Electronic spectroscopy is an important tool in many fields of research, and this GRC brings together experts having diverse backgrounds in physics, chemistry, biophysics, and materials science, making the meeting an excellent opportunity for the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and techniques. Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, biological molecules in the gas phase, electronic structure theory for excited states, multi-chromophore and single-molecule spectroscopies, and excited state dynamics in chemical and biological systems.

  1. The extraction of gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using sodium citrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Veronica; Parsons, Jason G; Lopez, Martha L; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-03-11

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles can be produced through the interaction of Au(III) ions with oat and wheat biomasses. This paper describes a procedure to recover gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium citrate. Extracts were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The HRTEM data demonstrated that smaller nanoparticles are extracted first, followed by larger nanoparticles. In the fourth extraction, coating of chelating agents is visible on the extracted nanoparticles.

  2. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy And Spectroscopy Studies Of Rechargeable Batteries Under Dynamic Operating Conditions: A Retrospective And Perspective View

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chong M.

    2015-02-14

    Since the advent of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), continuing efforts have been made to image material under native and reaction environments that typically involve liquids, gases, and external stimuli. With the advances of aberration-corrected TEM for improving the imaging resolution, steady progress has been made on developing methodologies that allow imaging under dynamic operating conditions, or in situ TEM imaging. The success of in situ TEM imaging is closely associated with advances in microfabrication techniques that enable manipulation of nanoscale objects around the objective lens of the TEM. This paper summarizes and highlights recent progress involving in situ TEM studies of energy storage materials, especially rechargeable batteries. The paper is organized to cover both the in situ TEM techniques and the scientific discoveries made possible by in situ TEM imaging.

  3. In Situ Industrial Bimetallic Catalyst Characterization using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and X‐ray Absorption Spectroscopy at One Atmosphere and Elevated Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Prestat, Eric; Kulzick, Matthew A.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Smith, Mr. Matthew; Tien, Mr. Eu‐Pin; Burke, M. Grace

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a new experimental platform for in situ scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) energy dispersive X‐ray spectroscopy (EDS) which allows real time, nanoscale, elemental and structural changes to be studied at elevated temperature (up to 1000 °C) and pressure (up to 1 atm). Here we demonstrate the first application of this approach to understand complex structural changes occurring during reduction of a bimetallic catalyst, PdCu supported on TiO2, synthesized by wet impregnation. We reveal a heterogeneous evolution of nanoparticle size, distribution, and composition with large differences in reduction behavior for the two metals. We show that the data obtained is complementary to in situ STEM electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and when combined with in situ X‐ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows correlation of bulk chemical state with nanoscale changes in elemental distribution during reduction, facilitating new understanding of the catalytic behavior for this important class of materials. PMID:28605152

  4. In Situ Industrial Bimetallic Catalyst Characterization using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at One Atmosphere and Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Prestat, Eric; Kulzick, Matthew A; Dietrich, Paul J; Smith, Mr Matthew; Tien, Mr Eu-Pin; Burke, M Grace; Haigh, Sarah J; Zaluzec, Nestor J

    2017-08-18

    We have developed a new experimental platform for in situ scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) which allows real time, nanoscale, elemental and structural changes to be studied at elevated temperature (up to 1000 °C) and pressure (up to 1 atm). Here we demonstrate the first application of this approach to understand complex structural changes occurring during reduction of a bimetallic catalyst, PdCu supported on TiO2 , synthesized by wet impregnation. We reveal a heterogeneous evolution of nanoparticle size, distribution, and composition with large differences in reduction behavior for the two metals. We show that the data obtained is complementary to in situ STEM electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and when combined with in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows correlation of bulk chemical state with nanoscale changes in elemental distribution during reduction, facilitating new understanding of the catalytic behavior for this important class of materials. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  6. A transmission electron microscopy study of CoFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles in silica aerogel matrix using HREM and STEM imaging and EDX spectroscopy and EELS.

    PubMed

    Falqui, Andrea; Corrias, Anna; Wang, Peng; Snoeck, Etienne; Mountjoy, Gavin

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite materials consisting of 5 and 10 wt% CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in a silica aerogel matrix have been synthesized by the sol-gel method. For the CoFe2O4-10wt% sample, bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF STEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) images showed distinct, rounded CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, with typical diameters of roughly 8 nm. For the CoFe2O4-5wt% sample, BF STEM images and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) measurements showed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with diameters of roughly 3 +/- 1 nm. EDX measurements indicate that all nanoparticles consist of stoichiometric CoFe2O4, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements from lines crossing nanoparticles in the CoFe2O4-10wt% sample show a uniform composition within nanoparticles, with a precision of at best than +/-0.5 nm in analysis position. BF STEM images obtained for the CoFe2O4-10wt% sample showed many "needle-like" nanostructures that typically have a length of 10 nm and a width of 1 nm, and frequently appear to be attached to nanoparticles. These needle-like nanostructures are observed to contain layers with interlayer spacing 0.33 +/- 0.1 nm, which could be consistent with Co silicate hydroxide, a known precursor phase in these nanocomposite materials.

  7. A view of the implanted SiC damage by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Battistig, G.; Khanh, N. Q.; Petrik, P.; Lohner, T.; Dobos, L.; Pecz, B.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Morilla, Y.

    2006-11-01

    4H-SiC single crystalline substrates were implanted at room temperature with 150 keV Al{sup +} ions using fluences of 4x10{sup 14}, 1x10{sup 15}, and 2x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} with current density of 2.5 {mu}A cm{sup -2}. The samples were subsequently annealed at 1100 deg. C in N{sub 2} for 1 h in order to analyze their structural recovery. The disorder induced in both sublattices by the Al{sup +} ions was studied by backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry with a 3.5 MeV He{sup 2+} beam. The results were compared with the optical properties of the samples measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. In a previous work, we concluded that during the postimplantation annealing of a highly damaged SiC crystalline material the short distance order can be recovered, while the long distance disorder remains. We also presented the possibility to have grains of different polytypes oriented faraway from the original direction. Now, this alternative is confirmed by the cross-sectional transmission and high resolution electron microscopy studies, carried out to obtain information about the crystal structure.

  8. Inexpensive read-out for coincident electron spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope at nanometer scale using micro channel plates and multistrip anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollander, R. W.; Bom, V. R.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Faber, J. S.; Hoevers, H.; Kruit, P.

    1994-09-01

    The elemental composition of a sample at nanometer scale is determined by measurement of the characteristic energy of Auger electrons, emitted in coincidence with incoming primary electrons from a microbeam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Single electrons are detected with position sensitive detectors, consisting of MicroChannel Plates (MCP) and MultiStrip Anodes (MSA), one for the energy of the Auger electrons (Auger-detector) and one for the energy loss of primary electrons (EELS-detector). The MSAs are sensed with LeCroy 2735DC preamplifiers. The fast readout is based on LeCroy's PCOS III system. On the detection of a coincidence (Event) energy data of Auger and EELS are combined with timing data to an Event word. Event words are stored in list mode in a VME memory module. Blocks of Event words are scanned by transputers in VME and two-dimensional energy histograms are filled using the timing information to obtain a maximal true/accidental ratio. The resulting histograms are stored on disk of a PC-386, which also controls data taking. The system is designed to handle 10 5 Events per second, 90% of which are accidental. In the histograms the "true" to "accidental" ratio will be 5. The dead time is 15%.

  9. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Golberg, D. E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp; Xu, Z. E-mail: golberg.dmitri@nims.go.jp; Kvashnin, D. G.; Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y.; Sorokin, P. B.

    2015-08-31

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  10. The influence of Cs/Cc correction in analytical imaging and spectroscopy in scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2014-11-11

    Aberration correction in scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) owes much to the efforts of a small dedicated group of innovators. Leading that frontier has been Prof. Harald Rose. To date his leadership and dynamic personality has spearheaded our ability to leave behind many of the limitations imposed by spherical aberration (Cs) in high resolution phase contrast imaging. Following shortly behind, has been the development of chromatic aberration correction (Cc) which augments those accomplishments. In this study we will review and summarize how the combination of Cs/Cc technology enhances our ability to conduct hyperspectral imaging and spectroscopy in today's and future computationally mediated experiments in both thin as well as realistic specimens in vacuo and during in-situ/environmental experiments.

  11. Nanometer-scale, quantitative composition mappings of InGaN layers from a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pantzas, K; Patriarche, G; Troadec, D; Gautier, S; Moudakir, T; Suresh, S; Largeau, L; Mauguin, O; Voss, P L; Ougazzaden, A

    2012-11-16

    Using elastic scattering theory we show that a small set of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements is sufficient to experimentally evaluate the scattering function of electrons in high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission microscopy (HAADF-STEM). We then demonstrate how to use this function to transform qualitative HAADF-STEM images of InGaN layers into precise, quantitative chemical maps of the indium composition. The maps obtained in this way combine the resolution of HAADF-STEM and the chemical precision of EDX. We illustrate the potential of such chemical maps by using them to investigate nanometer-scale fluctuations in the indium composition and their impact on the growth of epitaxial InGaN layers.

  12. Opto-mechano-electrical tripling in ZnO nanowires probed by photocurrent spectroscopy in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Xu, Z.; Kvashnin, D. G.; Tang, D.-M.; Xue, Y. M.; Bando, Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Golberg, D.

    2015-08-01

    Photocurrent spectroscopy of individual free-standing ZnO nanowires inside a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) is reported. By using specially designed optical in situ TEM system capable of scanning tunneling microscopy probing paired with light illumination, opto-mechano-electrical tripling phenomenon in ZnO nanowires is demonstrated. Splitting of photocurrent spectra at around 3.3 eV under in situ TEM bending of ZnO nanowires directly corresponds to nanowire deformation and appearance of expanded and compressed nanowire sides. Theoretical simulation of a bent ZnO nanowire has an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The splitting effect could be explained by a change in the valence band structure of ZnO nanowires due to a lattice strain. The strain-induced splitting provides important clues for future flexible piezo-phototronics.

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R W; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E; Lagos, Maureen J; Egerton, Ray F; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-10-09

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for 'aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Lovejoy, Tracy C.; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R. W.; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E.; Lagos, Maureen J.; Egerton, Ray F.; Crozier, Peter A.

    2014-10-01

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for `aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  15. Electron spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    The Surface Science Laboratories at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are equipped with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) facilities. These techniques provide information from the uppermost atomic layers of a sample, and are thus truly surface sensitive. XPS provides both elemental and chemical state information without restriction on the type of material that can be analyzed. The sample is placed into an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber and irradiated with x-rays which cause the ejection of photoelectrons from the sample surface. Since x-rays do not normally cause charging problems or beam damage, XPS is applicable to a wide range of samples including metals, polymers, catalysts, and fibers. AES uses a beam of high energy electrons as a surface probe. Following electronic rearrangements within excited atoms by this probe, Auger electrons characteristic of each element present are emitted from the sample. The main advantage of electron induced AES is that the electron beam can be focused down to a small diameter and localized analysis can be carried out. On the rastering of this beam synchronously with a video display using established scanning electron microscopy techniques, physical images and chemical distribution maps of the surface can be produced. Thus very small features, such as electronic circuit elements or corrosion pits in metals, can be investigated. Facilities are available on both XPS and AES instruments for depth-profiling of materials, using a beam of argon ions to sputter away consecutive layers of material to reveal sub-surface (and even semi-bulk) analyses.

  16. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  17. Energy dispersive spectroscopy-scanning transmission electron microscope observations of free radical production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes phagocytosing non-opsonized Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Keiichi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Higuchi, Naoya; Murakami, Yukitaka; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Honda, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the association between human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and non-opsonized Tannerella forsythia ATCC 43037 displaying a serum-resistant surface layer (S-layer). When PMNs were mixed with T. forsythia in suspension, the cells phagocytosed T. forsythia cells. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction, indicative of O2- production, was observed by light microscopy; cerium (Ce) perhydroxide deposition, indicative of H2 O2 production, was observed by electron microscopy. We examined the relationship between high-molecular-weight proteins of the S-layer and Ce reaction (for T. forsythia phagocytosis) using electron microscopic immunolabeling. Immunogold particles were localized within the PMNs and on cell surfaces, labelling at the same Ce-reacted sites where the S-layer was present. We then used energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)-scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to perform Ce and nitrogen (N) (for S-layer immunocytochemistry) elemental analysis on the phagocytosed cells. That is, the elemental mapping and analysis of N by EDS appeared to reflect the presence of the same moieties detected by the 3,3'-diaminobenzidine-tetrahydrochloride (DAB) reaction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated secondary antibodies, instead of immunogold labeling. We focused on the use of EDS-STEM to visualize the presence of N resulting from the DAB reaction. In a parallel set of experiments, we used EDS-STEM to perform Ce and gold (Au; from immunogold labeling of the S-layer) elemental analysis on the same phagocytosing cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nanowire Electron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian; Bronikowsky, Michael; Wong, Eric; VonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fablano

    2009-01-01

    Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy (NESS) has been proposed as the basis of a class of ultra-small, ultralow-power sensors that could be used to detect and identify chemical compounds present in extremely small quantities. State-of-the-art nanowire chemical sensors have already been demonstrated to be capable of detecting a variety of compounds in femtomolar quantities. However, to date, chemically specific sensing of molecules using these sensors has required the use of chemically functionalized nanowires with receptors tailored to individual molecules of interest. While potentially effective, this functionalization requires labor-intensive treatment of many nanowires to sense a broad spectrum of molecules. In contrast, NESS would eliminate the need for chemical functionalization of nanowires and would enable the use of the same sensor to detect and identify multiple compounds. NESS is analogous to Raman spectroscopy, the main difference being that in NESS, one would utilize inelastic scattering of electrons instead of photons to determine molecular vibrational energy levels. More specifically, in NESS, one would exploit inelastic scattering of electrons by low-lying vibrational quantum states of molecules attached to a nanowire or nanotube.

  19. Measurement Error in Atomic-Scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy-Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) Mapping of a Model Oxide Interface.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Steven R; Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A

    2017-06-01

    With the development of affordable aberration correctors, analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) studies of complex interfaces can now be conducted at high spatial resolution at laboratories worldwide. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in particular has grown in popularity, as it enables elemental mapping over a wide range of ionization energies. However, the interpretation of atomically resolved data is greatly complicated by beam-sample interactions that are often overlooked by novice users. Here we describe the practical factors-namely, sample thickness and the choice of ionization edge-that affect the quantification of a model perovskite oxide interface. Our measurements of the same sample, in regions of different thickness, indicate that interface profiles can vary by as much as 2-5 unit cells, depending on the spectral feature. This finding is supported by multislice simulations, which reveal that on-axis maps of even perfectly abrupt interfaces exhibit significant delocalization. Quantification of thicker samples is further complicated by channeling to heavier sites across the interface, as well as an increased signal background. We show that extreme care must be taken to prepare samples to minimize channeling effects and argue that it may not be possible to extract atomically resolved information from many chemical maps.

  20. Investigations on the structure of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and oil-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles by photon correlation spectroscopy, field-flow fractionation and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jores, Katja; Mehnert, Wolfgang; Drechsler, Markus; Bunjes, Heike; Johann, Christoph; Mäder, Karsten

    2004-03-05

    Recently, colloidal dispersions made from mixtures of solid and liquid lipids were described to combine controlled release characteristics with higher drug loading capacities than solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). It has been proposed that these nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) are composed of oily droplets which solubilize the drug and which are embedded in a solid lipid matrix. The structures of SLN and NLC based on glyceryl behenate and medium chain triglycerides were characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and laser diffraction (LD), field-flow fractionation (FFF) with multi-angle light scattering detection (MALS), and cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo TEM). PCS indicates that SLN and NLC differ from a nanoemulsion with respect to Brownian motion due to asymmetric particle shapes. Non-spherical particles, in case of SLN and NLC, lead to higher polydispersity indices compared to the nanoemulsion. In FFF, the nanodroplets elute much earlier than SLN- and NLC-platelets although their PCS and LD data show similar particle sizes. In TEM platelet (for SLN), oil loaded platelet ("nanospoons"; for NLC) and droplet (for nanoemulsion) structures were observed. In contrast to literature reports, the investigated SLN appear as thin platelets. NLC are found to be lipid platelets with oil spots sticking on the surface. Very short diffusion pathways in platelets, increased water-lipid interfaces and low drug incorporation in crystalline lipids are the drawback of SLN and NLC compared to conventional nanoemulsions.

  1. Structural studies on Si:H network before and after solid phase crystallization using spectroscopic ellipsometry: Correlation with Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Romyani; Ray, Swati

    2013-10-01

    The structure of hydrogenated silicon films (Si:H) before and after solid phase crystallization (SPC) has been investigated by detailed study of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). The Si:H films have been deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) system varying deposition power density from 0.03 W/cm2 to 0.46 W/cm2, just below the onset of amorphous to nano-crystalline transition region. Solid phase crystallization of the Si:H network has been done by thermal annealing of the films in a vacuum furnace. Different bulk compositions of the as deposited Si:H network and annealed (polycrystalline) films have been calculated from the fitted parameters obtained from the simulation of the ellipsometry data by Bruggeman effective medium approximation (BEMA) method. More compact and void free structure in the bulk layer of the as deposited films has been observed at low power deposition region. Whereas void fraction in the bulk and surface roughness layer has increased with increase of deposition power density. For the annealed films higher crystallinity at the bulk layer with fewer voids has been observed at the low power region but in the surface roughness layer void fraction dominates in all the low and high power deposited films. The results obtained from the spectroscopic ellipsometry study have been correlated with Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy for both the as deposited and annealed films.

  2. Measurement Error in Atomic-Scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy—Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) Mapping of a Model Oxide Interface

    DOE PAGES

    Spurgeon, Steven R.; Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2017-04-05

    With the development of affordable aberration correctors, analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) studies of complex interfaces can now be conducted at high spatial resolution at laboratories worldwide. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in particular has grown in popularity, as it enables elemental mapping over a wide range of ionization energies. However, the interpretation of atomically resolved data is greatly complicated by beam–sample interactions that are often overlooked by novice users. Here we describe the practical factors—namely, sample thickness and the choice of ionization edge—that affect the quantification of a model perovskite oxide interface. Our measurements of the same sample,more » in regions of different thickness, indicate that interface profiles can vary by as much as 2–5 unit cells, depending on the spectral feature. This finding is supported by multislice simulations, which reveal that on-axis maps of even perfectly abrupt interfaces exhibit significant delocalization. Quantification of thicker samples is further complicated by channeling to heavier sites across the interface, as well as an increased signal background. We show that extreme care must be taken to prepare samples to minimize channeling effects and argue that it may not be possible to extract atomically resolved information from many chemical maps.« less

  3. Abnormal cubic-tetragonal phase transition of barium strontium titanate nanoparticles studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Chen, Chen; Gao, Ran; Xia, Feng; Li, YueSheng; Che, Renchao

    2015-11-02

    Phase stability of the ferroelectric materials at high temperature is extremely important to their device performance. Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3} (BST) nanoparticles with different Sr contents (x = 1, 0.91, 0.65, 0.4, and 0) are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. Using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses under in situ heating conditions (up to 300 °C), the phase transitions of BST nanoparticles between 25 °C and 280 °C are comprehensively investigated. The original Curie temperature of BST nanoparticles decreases abruptly with the increase in Sr content, which is more obvious than in the bulk or film material. Besides, an abnormal phase transition from cubic to tetragonal structure is observed from BST nanoparticles and the transition temperature rises along with the increase in Sr content. Direct TEM evidences including a slight lattice distortion have been provided. Differently, BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles remained in the tetragonal phase during the above temperature ranges.

  4. INTRACELLULAR METAL COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN THE GREEN ALGAL MODEL SYSTEM MICRASTERIAS DENTICULATA (STREPTOPHYTA) MEASURED BY TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY-COUPLED ELECTRON ENERGY LOSS SPECTROSCOPY(1).

    PubMed

    Volland, Stefanie; Andosch, Ancuela; Milla, Manuela; Stöger, Barbara; Lütz, Cornelius; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2011-06-01

    Entry of metals in form of aerosols into areas of high air humidity such as peat bogs represents a serious danger for inhabiting organisms such as the unicellular desmid Micrasterias denticulata Bréb. ex Ralfs (Desmidiaceae, Zynematophyceae, Streptophyta). To understand cellular detoxification and tolerance mechanisms, detailed intracellular localization of metal pollutants is required. This study localizes the metals aluminum (Al), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and cadmium (Cd) in the green algal model system Micrasterias after experimental exposure to sulfate solutions by highly sensitive TEM-coupled electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Concentrations of the metals shown to induce inhibiting effects on cell development and cytomorphogenesis were chosen for these experiments. Long-term exposure to these metal concentrations led to a pronounced impact on cell physiology expressed by a general decrease in apparent photosynthesis. After long-term treatment, Zn, Al, and Cu were detected in the cell walls by EELS. Zn was additionally found in vacuoles and mucilage vesicles, and Cu in starch grains and also in mucilage vesicles. Elevated amounts of oxygen in areas where Zn, Al, and Cu were localized suggest sequestration of these metals as oxides. The study demonstrated that Micrasterias can cope differently with metal pollutants. In low doses and during a limited time period, the cells were able to compartmentalize Cu the best, followed by Zn and Al. Cu and Zn were taken up into intracellular compartments, whereas Al was only bound to the cell wall. Cd was not compartmentalized at all, which explains its strongest impact on growth, cell division rate, and photosynthesis in Micrasterias. © 2011 Phycological Society of America.

  5. A Site-isolated Mononuclear Iridium Complex Catalyst Supported on MgO: Characterization by Spectroscopy and Aberration-corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, A.; Ortalan, V; Browning, N; Gates , B

    2010-01-01

    Supported mononuclear iridium complexes with ethene ligands were prepared by the reaction of Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(acac) (acac is CH{sub 3}COCHCOCH{sub 3}) with highly dehydroxylated MgO. Characterization of the supported species by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopies showed that the resultant supported organometallic species were Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, formed by the dissociation of the acac ligand from Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(acac) and bonding of the Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} species to the MgO surface. Direct evidence of the site-isolation of these mononuclear complexes was obtained by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); the images demonstrate the presence of the iridium complexes in the absence of any clusters. When the iridium complexes were probed with CO, the resulting IR spectra demonstrated the formation of Ir(CO){sub 2} complexes on the MgO surface. The breadth of the {nu}{sub CO} bands demonstrates a substantial variation in the metal-support bonding, consistent with the heterogeneity of the MgO surface; the STEM images are not sufficient to characterize this heterogeneity. The supported iridium complexes catalyzed ethene hydrogenation at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a flow reactor, and EXAFS spectra indicated that the mononuclear iridium species remained intact. STEM images of the used catalyst confirmed that almost all of the iridium complexes remained intact, but this method was sensitive enough to detect a small degree of aggregation of the iridium on the support.

  6. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  7. Terahertz homodyne self-mixing transmission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Till Breuer, Stefan; Blömer, Dominik; Patel, Sanketkumar; Schlosser, Malte; Birkl, Gerhard; Elsäßer, Wolfgang; Simonetta, Marcello; Deninger, Anselm; Giuliani, Guido

    2015-02-09

    A compact homodyne self-mixing terahertz spectroscopy concept is experimentally investigated and confirmed by calculations. This method provides amplitude and phase information of the terahertz radiation emitted by a photoconductive antenna in a transmission experiment where a rotating chopper wheel serves as a feedback mirror. As a proof-of-principle experiment the frequency-dependent refractive index of Teflon is measured.

  8. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Sottile, F.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO2) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO2, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO2 may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  9. Evidence for anisotropic dielectric properties of monoclinic hafnia using valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guedj, C.; Hung, L.; Sottile, F.; Zobelli, A.; Blaise, P.; Olevano, V.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanocrystal orientation on the energy loss spectra of monoclinic hafnia (m-HfO{sub 2}) is measured by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and valence energy loss spectroscopy (VEELS) on high quality samples. For the same momentum-transfer directions, the dielectric properties are also calculated ab initio by time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Experiments and simulations evidence anisotropy in the dielectric properties of m-HfO{sub 2}, most notably with the direction-dependent oscillator strength of the main bulk plasmon. The anisotropic nature of m-HfO{sub 2} may contribute to the differences among VEELS spectra reported in literature. The good agreement between the complex dielectric permittivity extracted from VEELS with nanometer spatial resolution, TDDFT modeling, and past literature demonstrates that the present HRTEM-VEELS device-oriented methodology is a possible solution to the difficult nanocharacterization challenges given in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

  10. Temporary anion states of. pi. -ligand transition-metal carbonyls studied by means of electron transmission spectroscopy and x. cap alpha. calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Modelli, A.; Distefano, G.; Guerra, M.; Jones, D.

    1987-07-22

    The resonances observed in the electron transmission spectra of (benzene)chromium tricarbonyl, (cyclopentadienyl)manganese tricarbonyl, (1,3-butadiene)iron tricarbonyl, and (cyclopentadienyl)cobalt dicarbonyl have been assigned with the aid of MS X..cap alpha.. calculations. In contrast with previous theoretical results, the present calculations on the neutral states show a large net electronic charge transfer from the ..pi.. ligand to the metal.

  11. Picosecond Fresnel transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliep, Karl B.; Quarterman, P.; Wang, Jian-Ping; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-05-01

    We report the demonstration of picosecond Fresnel imaging with an ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UEM). By operating with a low instrument repetition rate (5 kHz) and without objective-lens excitation, the picosecond demagnetization of an FePt film, via in situ, femtosecond laser excitation, is directly imaged. The dynamics are quantified and monitored as a time-dependent change in the degree of electron coherence within the magnetic domain walls. The relative coherence of conventional (thermionic) Fresnel transmission electron microscopy is also directly compared to that of Fresnel UEM through the domain-wall size. Further, the robustness and reversibility of the domain-wall dynamics are illustrated by repeating the picosecond image scans at defocus values having the same magnitude but different signs (e.g., +25 mm vs. -25 mm). Control experiments and approaches to identifying and isolating systematic errors and sources of artifacts are also described. This work, and continued future developments also described here, opens the way to direct correlation of transient structure, morphology, and magnetic dynamics in magnetic thin films and spintronic devices.

  12. Measurement of electron-spin transports in GaAs quantum wells using a transmission-grating-sampled circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hua-Liang; Fang, Shaoyin; Wen, Jinhui; Lai, Tianshu

    2014-11-07

    A transmission-grating-sampled circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy (TGS-CDAS) and its theoretical model are developed sensitively to measure decay dynamics of a transient spin grating (TSG). A binary transmission grating with the same period as TSG is set behind TSG. It allows only a same small part of each period in TSG measured by circular dichroism absorption effect of a probe. In this way, the zero average of spin-dependent effects measured over a whole period in TSG is avoided so that TGS-CDAS has a high sensitivity to spin evolution in TSG. Spin transport experiments are performed on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. Experimental results prove the feasibility and reliability of TGS-CDAS.

  13. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-27

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  14. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  15. Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Wong, Eric W. (Inventor); von Allmen, Paul (Inventor); Oyafuso, Fabiano A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and devices for spectroscopic identification of molecules using nanoscale wires are disclosed. According to one of the methods, nanoscale wires are provided, electrons are injected into the nanoscale wire; and inelastic electron scattering is measured via excitation of low-lying vibrational energy levels of molecules bound to the nanoscale wire.

  16. Microscopic mechanism of path-dependence on charge-discharge history in lithium iron phosphate cathode analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Yoshitake; Muto, Shunsuke; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Kondo, Hiroki; Horibuchi, Kayo; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2015-09-01

    We revisited the "path-dependence" problem, i.e., the differing polarization observed in LiFePO4 cathode charge/discharge curves depending on the electrochemical treatment history of the material. The phase distributions of the active material particles with different charge/discharge histories in the LiFePO4 cathode were investigated through spectral imaging (SI) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The STEM-EELS-SI experiments revealed that LiFePO4 (LFP) and FePO4 (FP) almost always coexist in the individual primary particles of Li0.5FePO4 (50% state of charge (SOC)) electrodes, forming core/shell structures. This is unlike the conventional domino-cascade model, in that LFP-inside/FP-outside is observed in the lithium-extracted Li0.5FePO4 particles, whereas FP-inside/LFP-outside is seen in the lithium-inserted Li0.5FePO4 particles. We examined the particle-size dependence of the core/total volume ratio of each Li0.5FePO4 particle, and the essential features of the path-dependent charge/discharge curves were semi-quantitatively reproduced by a simple static model that considered the ionic conductivity of the shell phase.

  17. Fabrication of large area plasmonic nanoparticle grating structure on silver halide based transmission electron microscope film and its application as a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sudheer, Tiwari, P.; Singh, M. N.; Sinha, A. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Bhartiya, S.; Mukherjee, C.

    2015-08-14

    The plasmonic responses of silver nanoparticle grating structures of different periods made on silver halide based electron microscope film are investigated. Raster scan of the conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to carry out electron beam lithography for fabricating the plasmonic nanoparticle grating (PNG) structures. Morphological characterization of the PNG structures, carried out by the SEM and the atomic force microscope, indicates that the depth of the groove decreases with a decrease in the grating period. Elemental characterization performed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy and the x-ray diffraction shows the presence of nanoparticles of silver in the PNG grating. The optical characterization of the gratings shows that the localized surface plasmon resonance peak shifts from 366 to 378 nm and broadens with a decrease in grating period from 10 to 2.5 μm. The surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the Rhodamine-6G dye coated PNG structure shows the maximum enhancement by two orders of magnitude in comparison to the randomly distributed silver nanoparticles having similar size and shape as the PNG structure.

  18. Narrow electron injector for ballistic electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kast, M.; Pacher, C.; Strasser, G.; Gornik, E.

    2001-06-04

    A three-terminal hot electron transistor is used to measure the normal energy distribution of ballistic electrons generated by an electron injector utilizing an improved injector design. A triple barrier resonant tunneling diode with a rectangular transmission function acts as a narrow (1 meV) energy filter. An asymmetric energy distribution with its maximum on the high-energy side with a full width at half maximum of {Delta}E{sub inj}=10 meV is derived. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. In-Plane Anisotropy in Mono- and Few-Layer ReS2 Probed by Raman Spectroscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chenet, Daniel A; Aslan, O Burak; Huang, Pinshane Y; Fan, Chris; van der Zande, Arend M; Heinz, Tony F; Hone, James C

    2015-09-09

    Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) is a semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide that exhibits a stable distorted 1T phase. The reduced symmetry of this system leads to in-plane anisotropy in various material properties. Here, we demonstrate the strong anisotropy in the Raman scattering response for linearly polarized excitation. Polarized Raman scattering is shown to permit a determination of the crystallographic orientation of ReS2 through comparison with direct structural analysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Analysis of the frequency difference of appropriate Raman modes is also shown to provide a means of precisely determining layer thickness up to four layers.

  20. Constraining exoplanet mass from transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Julien; Seager, Sara

    2013-12-20

    Determination of an exoplanet's mass is a key to understanding its basic properties, including its potential for supporting life. To date, mass constraints for exoplanets are predominantly based on radial velocity (RV) measurements, which are not suited for planets with low masses, large semimajor axes, or those orbiting faint or active stars. Here, we present a method to extract an exoplanet's mass solely from its transmission spectrum. We find good agreement between the mass retrieved for the hot Jupiter HD 189733b from transmission spectroscopy with that from RV measurements. Our method will be able to retrieve the masses of Earth-sized and super-Earth planets using data from future space telescopes that were initially designed for atmospheric characterization.

  1. Nonlinear transmission spectroscopy with dual frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Rachel; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-08-01

    We show how two frequency combs E1, E2 can be used to measure single-photon, two-photon absorption (TPA), and Raman resonances in a molecule with three electronic bands, by detecting the radio frequency modulation of the nonlinear transmission signal. Some peaks are independent of the carrier frequency of the comb and others shift with that frequency and have a width close to the comb width. TPA and Raman resonances independent of the carrier frequency are selected by measuring the transmission signal ˜E12E22 and the single-photon resonances are selected by measuring the transmission signal ˜E13E2. Sinusoidal spectral phase shaping strongly affects the TPA, but not the Raman resonances.

  2. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kociak, M; Zagonel, L F

    2016-12-19

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kociak, M; Zagonel, L F

    2017-05-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations. Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.

  5. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations.more » Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.« less

  6. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, D. H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  7. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the principal computational approaches and their accuracy for the study of electronic spectroscopy of diatomic molecules. We include a number of examples from our work that illustrate the range of application. We show how full configuration interaction benchmark calculations were instrumental in improving the understanding of the computational requirements for obtaining accurate results for diatomic spectroscopy. With this understanding it is now possible to compute radiative lifetimes accurate to within 10% for systems involving first- and second-row atoms. We consider the determination of the infrared vibrational transition probabilities for the ground states of SiO and NO, based on a globally accurate dipole moment function. We show how we were able to assign the a(sup "5)II state of CO as the upper state in the recently observed emission bands of CO in an Ar matrix. We next discuss the assignment of the photoelectron detachment spectra of NO and the alkali oxide negative ions. We then present several examples illustrating the state-of-the-art in determining radiative lifetimes for valence-valence and valence-Rydberg transitions. We next compare the molecular spectroscopy of the valence isoelectronic B2, Al2, and AlB molecules. The final examples consider systems involving transition metal atoms, which illustrate the difficulty in describing states with different numbers of d electrons.

  8. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  9. Electron transmission through a macroscopic platinum capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka, D.; Borka Jovanović, V.; Lemell, C.; Tőkési, K.

    2017-09-01

    We present simulations for electron transmission through a platinum macrocapillary (diameter d = 3.3 mm, length l = 48 mm) using classical transport theory. Both elastic and inelastic scattering events of primary electrons colliding with the inner wall of the capillary are taken into account. We also model the generation and transport of secondary electrons inside the material. We find excellent agreement of our simulated electron-energy spectra with recent experimental data for 200 eV primary electrons.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy: Imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.

    1988-10-01

    This report was an invited paper for a symposium and only covers general aspects of transmission electron microscopy. A history, and examples of work done on ceramics and alloys are covered. 6 refs., 44 figs. (JL)

  11. Soft x-ray reflectometry, hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy investigations of the internal structure of TiO2(Ti)/SiO2/Si stacks

    PubMed Central

    Filatova, Elena O; Kozhevnikov, Igor V; Sokolov, Andrey A; Ubyivovk, Evgeniy V; Yulin, Sergey; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Schäfers, Franz

    2012-01-01

    We developed a mathematical analysis method of reflectometry data and used it to characterize the internal structure of TiO2/SiO2/Si and Ti/SiO2/Si stacks. Atomic concentration profiles of all the chemical elements composing the samples were reconstructed from the analysis of the reflectivity curves measured versus the incidence angle at different soft x-ray reflection (SXR) photon energies. The results were confirmed by the conventional techniques of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HXPES) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The depth variation of the chemical composition, thicknesses and densities of individual layers extracted from SXR and HXPES measurements are in close agreement and correlate well with the HRTEM images. PMID:27877468

  12. Correlation of microphotoluminescence spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography on a single nano-object containing an InGaN/GaN multiquantum well system.

    PubMed

    Rigutti, Lorenzo; Blum, Ivan; Shinde, Deodatta; Hernández-Maldonado, David; Lefebvre, Williams; Houard, Jonathan; Vurpillot, François; Vella, Angela; Tchernycheva, Maria; Durand, Christophe; Eymery, Joël; Deconihout, Bernard

    2014-01-08

    A single nanoscale object containing a set of InGaN/GaN nonpolar multiple-quantum wells has been analyzed by microphotoluminescence spectroscopy (μPL), high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR-STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). The correlated measurements constitute a rich and coherent set of data supporting the interpretation that the observed μPL narrow emission lines, polarized perpendicularly to the crystal c-axis and with energies in the interval 2.9-3.3 eV, are related to exciton states localized in potential minima induced by the irregular 3D In distribution within the quantum well (QW) planes. This novel method opens up interesting perspectives, as it will be possible to apply it on a wide class of quantum confining emitters and nano-objects.

  13. Image resolution and sensitivity in an environmental transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Jinschek, J R; Helveg, S

    2012-11-01

    An environmental transmission electron microscope provides unique means for the atomic-scale exploration of nanomaterials during the exposure to a reactive gas environment. Here we examine conditions to obtain such in situ observations in the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) mode with an image resolution of 0.10nm. This HRTEM image resolution threshold is mapped out under different gas conditions, including gas types and pressures, and under different electron optical settings, including electron beam energies, doses and dose-rates. The 0.10nm resolution is retainable for H(2) at 1-10mbar. Even for N(2), the 0.10nm resolution threshold is reached up to at least 10mbar. The optimal imaging conditions are determined by the electron beam energy and the dose-rate as well as an image signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio that is consistent with Rose's criterion of S/N≥5. A discussion on the electron-gas interactions responsible for gas-induced resolution deterioration is given based on interplay with complementary electron diffraction (ED), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) as well as electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) data.

  14. Practical aspects of monochromators developed for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A few practical aspects of monochromators recently developed for transmission electron microscopy are briefly reviewed. The basic structures and properties of four monochromators, a single Wien filter monochromator, a double Wien filter monochromator, an omega-shaped electrostatic monochromator and an alpha-shaped magnetic monochromator, are outlined. The advantages and side effects of these monochromators in spectroscopy and imaging are pointed out. A few properties of the monochromators in imaging, such as spatial or angular chromaticity, are also discussed. PMID:25125333

  15. Transmission electron microscopy of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirouz, P.; Farmer, S. C.; Ernst, F.; Chung, J.

    1988-01-01

    Since interphase-interfaces are often both the structurally weakest and chemically least stable regions of a composite material, they are critical determinants of such macrostructural characteristics as tensile strength and fracture toughness. Attention is presently given to the use of TEM for the study of interfaces between dissimilar materials; electron-diffraction, analytical, and high-resolution forms of TEM are employed, for the cases of both structural and semiconductor composites. The materials studied are SiC/Si, GaP/Si, and SiC fiber- and whisker-reinforced Si3N4.

  16. In situ formation of bismuth nanoparticles through electron-beam irradiation in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda-Guzman, S.; Elizondo-Villarreal, N.; Ferrer, D.; Torres-Castro, A.; Gao, X.; Zhou, J. P.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, bismuth nanoparticles were synthesized when a precursor, sodium bismuthate, was exposed to an electron beam at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The irradiation effects were investigated in situ using selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After the electron irradiation, bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 6 nm were observed. The average particle size increased with the irradiation time. The electron-induced reduction is attributed to the desorption of oxygen ions. This method offers a one-step route to synthesize bismuth nanoparticles using electron irradiation, and the particle size can be controlled by the irradiation time.

  17. Sunrise over Mars - electronic transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Caption: 'Taken during the Viking Orbiter 1's 40th revolution of Mars, this electronically transmitted image shows sunrise over the tributary canyons of a high plateau region. The white areas are bright clouds of water ice.' As the sun rises over Noctis Labryinthus (the labyrinth of the night), bright clouds of water ice can be observed in and around the tributary canyons of this high plateau region of Mars. This color composite image, reconstructed from three individual black and white frames taken through violet, green, and orange filters, vividly shows the distribution of the clouds against the rust colored background of this Martian desert. The picture was reconstructed by JPL's Image Processing Laboratory using in-flight calibration data to correct the color balance. Scientists have puzzled why the clouds cling to the canyon areas and, only in certain areas, spill over onto the plateau surface. One possibility is that water which condensed during the previous afternoon in shaded eastern-facing slopes of the canyon floor is vaporized as the early morning sun falls on those same slopes. The area covered is about 10,000 square kilometers (4000 square miles), centered at 9 degrees South, 95 degrees West, and the large partial crater at lower right is Oudemans. The picture was taken on Viking Orbiter 1's 40th revolution of the planet. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (pages 108-109), by James Schultz.

  18. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  19. Electronic spectroscopy of diatomic VC.

    PubMed

    Krechkivska, Olha; Morse, Michael D

    2013-12-19

    Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy has been applied to diatomic VC, providing the first optical spectrum of this molecule. The ground state is determined to be a (2)Δ3/2 state that arises from the 1σ(2)1π(4)2σ(2)1δ(1) configuration. The r0" ground-state bond length is 1.6167(3) Å. The manifold of excited vibronic states in the visible portion of the spectrum is quite dense, but two possible vibrational progressions have been identified. It is noted that VC joins CrC, NbC, and MoC as species in which the metal ns-based 3σ orbital is unoccupied, resulting in large dipole moments in the ground states of these molecules. In the corresponding 5d metal carbides, however, the 3σ orbital is occupied, leading to different ground electronic states of the 5d congeners, TaC and WC.

  20. Communication: Investigation of the electron momentum density distribution of nanodiamonds by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Yang, Bing; Lin, Yangming; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-12-07

    The electron momentum distribution of detonation nanodiamonds (DND) was investigated by recording electron energy-loss spectra at large momentum transfer in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), which is known as electron Compton scattering from solid (ECOSS). Compton profile of diamond film obtained by ECOSS was found in good agreement with prior photon experimental measurement and theoretical calculation that for bulk diamond. Compared to the diamond film, the valence Compton profile of DND was found to be narrower, which indicates a more delocalization of the ground-state charge density for the latter. Combining with other TEM characterizations such as high-resolution transmission electron spectroscopy, diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements, ECOSS was shown to be a great potential technique to study ground-state electronic properties of nanomaterials.

  1. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  2. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W [Livermore, CA

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  3. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  4. Isotope analysis in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Hofer, Christoph; Argentero, Giacomo; Leuthner, Gregor T; Pennycook, Timothy J; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C; Kotakoski, Jani

    2016-10-10

    The Ångström-sized probe of the scanning transmission electron microscope can visualize and collect spectra from single atoms. This can unambiguously resolve the chemical structure of materials, but not their isotopic composition. Here we differentiate between two isotopes of the same element by quantifying how likely the energetic imaging electrons are to eject atoms. First, we measure the displacement probability in graphene grown from either (12)C or (13)C and describe the process using a quantum mechanical model of lattice vibrations coupled with density functional theory simulations. We then test our spatial resolution in a mixed sample by ejecting individual atoms from nanoscale areas spanning an interface region that is far from atomically sharp, mapping the isotope concentration with a precision better than 20%. Although we use a scanning instrument, our method may be applicable to any atomic resolution transmission electron microscope and to other low-dimensional materials.

  5. Isotope analysis in the transmission electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Susi, Toma; Hofer, Christoph; Argentero, Giacomo; Leuthner, Gregor T.; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C.; Kotakoski, Jani

    2016-01-01

    The Ångström-sized probe of the scanning transmission electron microscope can visualize and collect spectra from single atoms. This can unambiguously resolve the chemical structure of materials, but not their isotopic composition. Here we differentiate between two isotopes of the same element by quantifying how likely the energetic imaging electrons are to eject atoms. First, we measure the displacement probability in graphene grown from either 12C or 13C and describe the process using a quantum mechanical model of lattice vibrations coupled with density functional theory simulations. We then test our spatial resolution in a mixed sample by ejecting individual atoms from nanoscale areas spanning an interface region that is far from atomically sharp, mapping the isotope concentration with a precision better than 20%. Although we use a scanning instrument, our method may be applicable to any atomic resolution transmission electron microscope and to other low-dimensional materials. PMID:27721420

  6. Electron and hole transmission through superconductor — Normal metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloos, Kurt; Tuuli, Elina

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated the transmission of electrons and holes through interfaces between superconducting aluminum ( T c = 1.2K) and various normal non-magnetic metals (copper, gold, palladium, platinum, and silver) using Andreev-reflection spectroscopy at T = 0.1K. We analysed the point contacts with the modified BTK theory that includes Dynes' lifetime as a fitting parameter Γ in addition to superconducting energy gap 2Δ and normal reflection described by Z. For contact areas from 1 nm2 to 10000nm2 the BTK Z parameter was 0.5, corresponding to transmission coefficients of about 80%, independent of the normal metal. The very small variation of Z indicates that the interfaces have a negligible dielectric tunneling barrier. Fermi surface mismatch does not account for the observed transmission coefficient.

  7. Spectroscopy of Sound Transmission in Solid Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Peterson, Joshua P.; Fitzjarrald, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to familiarize students with concepts of spectroscopy by using sound waves. Topics covered in these experiments include the structure of nitinol alloys and polymer chain stiffness as a function of structure and temperature. Generally, substances that are stiffer or have higher symmetry at the molecular…

  8. Spectroscopy of Sound Transmission in Solid Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Peterson, Joshua P.; Fitzjarrald, Tamara J.

    2013-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to familiarize students with concepts of spectroscopy by using sound waves. Topics covered in these experiments include the structure of nitinol alloys and polymer chain stiffness as a function of structure and temperature. Generally, substances that are stiffer or have higher symmetry at the molecular…

  9. Insights into complexation of dissolved organic matter and Al(III) and nanominerals formation in soils under contrasting fertilizations using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yongli; Li, Huan; Xiao, Jian; Wang, Chang; Shen, Qirong; Ran, Wei; He, Xinhua; Zhou, Quansuo; Yu, Guanghui

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the organomineral associations in soils is of great importance. Using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques, this study compared the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in dissolved organic matter (DOM) from soils under short-term (3-years) and long-term (22-years) fertilizations. Three fertilization treatments were examined: (i) no fertilization (Control), (ii) chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK), and (iii) NPK plus swine manure (NPKM). Soil spectra detected by the 2DCOS Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that fertilization modified the binding characteristics of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM at both short- and long- term location sites. The CH deformations in aliphatic groups played an important role in binding to Al(III) but with minor differences among the Control, NPK and NPKM at the short-term site. While at the long-term site both C-O stretching of polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances and aliphatic O-H were bound to Al(III) under the Control, whereas only aliphatic O-H, and only polysaccharides and silicates, were bound to Al(III) under NPK and NPKM, respectively. Images from HRTEM demonstrated that crystalline nanominerals, composed of Fe and O, were predominant in soil DOM under NPK, while amorphous nanominerals, predominant in Al, Si, and O, were dominant in soil DOM under Control and NPKM. In conclusion, fertilization strategies, especially under long-term, could affect the binding of organic ligands to Al(III) in soil DOM, which resulted in alterations in the turnover, reactivity, and bioavailability of soil organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the FTIR-2DCOS combined with HRTEM techniques could enhance our understanding in the binding characteristics of DOM to Al(III) and the resulted nanominerals in soils.

  10. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  11. Size dependent behavior of Fe3O4 crystals during electrochemical (de)lithiation: an in situ X-ray diffraction, ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Bock, David C; Pelliccione, Christopher J; Zhang, Wei; Timoshenko, Janis; Knehr, K W; West, Alan C; Wang, Feng; Li, Yan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Takeuchi, Esther S; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C

    2017-08-09

    The iron oxide magnetite, Fe3O4, is a promising conversion type lithium ion battery anode material due to its high natural abundance, low cost and high theoretical capacity. While the close packing of ions in the inverse spinel structure of Fe3O4 enables high energy density, it also limits the kinetics of lithium ion diffusion in the material. Nanosizing of Fe3O4 to reduce the diffusion path length is an effective strategy for overcoming this issue and results in improved rate capability. However, the impact of nanosizing on the multiple structural transformations that occur during the electrochemical (de)lithiation reaction in Fe3O4 is poorly understood. In this study, the influence of crystallite size on the lithiation-conversion mechanisms in Fe3O4 is investigated using complementary X-ray techniques along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and continuum level simulations on electrodes of two different Fe3O4 crystallite sizes. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were utilized to track the changes to the crystalline phases during (de)lithiation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements at multiple points during the (de)lithiation processes provided local electronic and atomic structural information. Tracking the crystalline and nanocrystalline phases during the first (de)lithiation provides experimental evidence that (1) the lithiation mechanism is non-uniform and dependent on crystallite size, where increased Li(+) diffusion length in larger crystals results in conversion to Fe(0) metal while insertion of Li(+) into spinel-Fe3O4 is still occurring, and (2) the disorder and size of the Fe metal domains formed when either material is fully lithiated impacts the homogeneity of the FeO phase formed during the subsequent delithiation.

  12. Study of lignification by noninvasive techniques in growing maize internodes. An investigation by Fourier transform infrared cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and immunocytochemical transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Joseleau, J P; Ruel, K

    1997-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques were used for the study in situ of lignification in the maturing cell walls of the maize (Zea mays L.) stem. Within the longitudinal axis of a developing internode all of the stages of lignification can be found. The synthesis of the three types of lignins, p-hydroxyphenylpropane (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S), was investigated in situ by cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and immunocytochemical electron microscopy. The first lignin appearing in the parenchyma is of the G-type preceeding the incorporation of S nuclei in the later stages. However, in vascular bundles, typical absorption bands of S nuclei are visible in the Fourier transform infrared spectra at the earliest stage of lignification. Immunocytochemical determination of the three types of lignin in transmission electron microscopy was possible thanks to the use of antisera prepared against synthetic H, G, and the mixed GS dehydrogenative polymers (K. Ruel, O. Faix, J.P. Joseleau [1994] J Trace Microprobe Tech 12: 247-265). The specificity of the immunological probes demonstrated that there are differences in the relative temporal synthesis of the H, G, and GS lignins in the different tissues undergoing lignification. Considering the intermonomeric linkages predominating in the antigens used for the preparation of the immunological probes, the relative intensities of the labeling obtained provided, for the first time to our knowledge, information about the macromolecular nature of lignins (condensed versus noncondensed) in relation to their ultrastructural localization and development stage. PMID:9232887

  13. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy at High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wall, J.; Langmore, J.; Isaacson, M.; Crewe, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    We have shown that a scanning transmission electron microscope with a high brightness field emission source is capable of obtaining better than 3 Å resolution using 30 to 40 keV electrons. Elastic dark field images of single atoms of uranium and mercury are shown which demonstrate this fact as determined by a modified Rayleigh criterion. Point-to-point micrograph resolution between 2.5 and 3.0 Å is found in dark field images of micro-crystallites of uranium and thorium compounds. Furthermore, adequate contrast is available to observe single atoms as light as silver. Images PMID:4521050

  14. Atmospheric pressure scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels; Bigelow, Wilbur C; Veith, Gabriel M

    2010-03-10

    Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of gold nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure have been recorded through a 0.36 mm thick mixture of CO, O2, and He. This was accomplished using a reaction cell consisting of two electron-transparent silicon nitride membranes. Gold nanoparticles of a full width at half-maximum diameter of 1.0 nm were visible above the background noise, and the achieved edge resolution was 0.4 nm in accordance with calculations of the beam broadening.

  15. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  16. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  17. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  18. Extreme ultraviolet spectrometer based on a transmission electron microscopy grid

    SciTech Connect

    Sistrunk, Emily; Gühr, Markus

    2014-12-12

    Here, we performed extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy using an 80 lines/mm transmission electron microscope mesh as the dispersive element. We also present the usefulness of this instrument for dispersing a high harmonic spectrum from the 13th to the 29th harmonic of a Ti:sapph laser, corresponding to a wavelength range from 60 to 27 nm. The resolution of the instrument is limited by the image size of the high harmonic generation region on the detector. Finally, the resolution in first order diffraction is under 2 nm over the entire spectral range with a resolving power around 30.

  19. Transmission electron microscopic examination of phosphoric acid fuel cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pebler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to physically characterize tested and untested phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) components. Those examined included carbon-supported platinum catalysts, carbon backing paper, and Teflon-bonded catalyst layers at various stages of fabrication and after testing in pressurized PAFC's. Applicability of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy for identifying the various phases was explored. The discussion focuses on the morphology and size distribution of platinum, the morphology and structural aspects of Teflon in catalyst layers, and the structural evidence of carbon corrosion. Reference is made to other physical characterization techniques where appropriate. A qualitative model of the catalyst layer that emerged from the TEM studies is presented.

  20. A transmission electron microscope for lecture demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, J. A.; Rempfer, Gertrude

    2006-11-01

    A simple transmission electron microscope (TEM) suitable for lecture demonstrations is described. In this TEM electrons are created in a glow discharge between two parallel electrodes in air at a reduced pressure. The electrons are collimated by a small hole in the anode, focused by a solenoid that acts as an electromagnetic lens, and imaged on a thin layer of phosphor deposited inside an Erlenmeyer flask. An image of a biological sample placed between the source and the lens can be magnified about 20 times. The microscope uses inexpensive components that can be quickly assembled during a demonstration. The TEM provides a visual and memorable display that highlights phenomena such as mean-free-path, charged particle optics, electrical discharges, and cathodoluminescence.

  1. Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Strum, G.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M.

    2012-08-01

    A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

  2. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ruskin, Rachel S.; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope’s built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. PMID:24189638

  3. TEBAL: Nanosculpting devices with electrons in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drndic, Marija

    2008-03-01

    Manipulation of matter on the scale of atoms and molecules is an essential part of realizing the potential that nanotechnology has to offer. In this talk I will describe transmission electron beam ablation lithography (TEBAL), a method for fabricating nanostructures and fully integrated devices on silicon nitride membranes by nanosculpting evaporated metal films with electron beams. TEBAL works by controllably exposing materials to an intense and highly focused beam of 200 keV electrons inside the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The effect of electron irradiation can be used to controllably displace or ablate regions of the metal with resolution on the scale of tens of atoms per exposure. In situ TEM imaging of the ablation action with atomic resolution allows for real-time feedback control during fabrication. Specific examples presented here include the fabrication and characterization of nanogaps, nanorings, nanowires with tailored shapes and curvatures, and multi-terminal devices with nanoislands or nanopores between the terminals. These nanostructures are fabricated at precise locations on a chip and seamlessly integrated into large-scale circuitry. I will discuss how the combination of high resolution, geometrical control and yield make TEBAL attractive for many applications including nanoelectronics, superconductivity, nanofluidics and molecular (DNA) translocation studies through nanopore-based transistors. References: 1) M.D. Fischbein and M. Drndic, ``Sub-10 nm Device Fabrication in a Transmission Electron Microscope'', Nano Letters, 7 (5), 1329, 2007. 2) M. D. Fischbein and M. Drndic, ``Nanogaps by direct lithography for high-resolution imaging and electronic characterization of nanostructures'', Applied Physics Letters, 88 (6), 063116, 2006.

  4. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging. PMID:27149617

  6. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mankos, Marian; Persson, Henrik H J; N'Diaye, Alpha T; Shadman, Khashayar; Schmid, Andreas K; Davis, Ronald W

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. Both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging.

  7. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    McVitie, S; McGrouther, D; McFadzean, S; MacLaren, D A; O'Shea, K J; Benitez, M J

    2015-05-01

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale.

  8. Nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Hoff, Brad W.; Tang Wilkin; Heidger, Susan; Shiffler, Don; Allen-Flowers, Jordan

    2012-12-15

    Gated field emission cathodes can provide short electron pulses without the requirement of laser systems or cathode heating required by photoemission or thermionic cathodes. The large electric field requirement for field emission to take place can be achieved by using a high aspect ratio cathode with a large field enhancement factor which reduces the voltage requirement for emission. In this paper, a cathode gate driver based on the output pulse train from a nonlinear transmission line is experimentally demonstrated. The application of the pulse train to a tufted carbon fiber field emission cathode generates short electron pulses. The pulses are approximately 2 ns in duration with emission currents of several mA, and the train contains up to 6 pulses at a frequency of 100 MHz. Particle-in-cell simulation is used to predict the characteristic of the current pulse train generated from a single carbon fiber field emission cathode using the same technique.

  9. Development of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in the Biological Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Aronova, M.A.; Leapman, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The high sensitivity of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for detecting light elements at the nanoscale makes it a valuable technique for application to biological systems. In particular, EELS provides quantitative information about elemental distributions within subcellular compartments, specific atoms bound to individual macromolecular assemblies, and the composition of bionanoparticles. The EELS data can be acquired either in the fixed beam energy-filtered transmission electron microscope (EFTEM) or in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), and recent progress in the development of both approaches has greatly expanded the range of applications for EELS analysis. Near single atom sensitivity is now achievable for certain elements bound to isolated macromolecules, and it becomes possible to obtain three-dimensional compositional distributions from sectioned cells through EFTEM tomography. PMID:23049161

  10. Electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Koshizawa, T.

    1989-04-25

    This patent describes an electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus having a shift schedule map for commanding an optimum gear position based on a vehicle speed signal and an accelerator opening signal, the electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus comprising: first means for comparing a gear position commanded by the shift schedule map with a present gear position; second means for effecting a gear shift to a gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position and for restraining a gear shift to the commanded gear position for a prescribed period of time, if the commanded gear position requires an upshift to a gear position which is two or more gear positions higher than the present gear position as a result of the comparison performed by the first means; and third means for holding the gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position until an accelerator pedal is depressed again, when the accelerator opening signal indicates an idling position while the gear shift up to the gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position, is being effected by the second means.

  11. Probing battery chemistry with liquid cell electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Aguiar, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to determine the chemistry and oxidation state of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 thin film battery electrodes in liquid cells for in situ scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM). Using the L2,3 white line intensity ratio method we determine the oxidation state of Mn and Ti in a liquid electrolyte solvent and discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity.

  12. Probing Battery Chemistry with Liquid Cell Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Baggetto, Loic; Veith, Gabriel M.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.

    2015-11-25

    We demonstrate the ability to apply electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to follow the chemistry and oxidation states of LiMn2O4 and Li4Ti5O12 battery electrodes within a battery solvent. The use and importance of in situ electrochemical cells coupled with a scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) has expanded and been applied to follow changes in battery chemistry during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, we discuss experimental parameters that influence measurement sensitivity and provide a framework to apply this important analytical method to future in situ electrochemical studies.

  13. Terahertz wave reference-free transmission spectroscopy of aminophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chao; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Liangliang; Zhang, Cunlin

    2008-12-01

    We present a reference-free transmission spectroscopy of two kinds of aminophenol (Tyrosine and Phenylalanine) using terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The THz band, which refers to the spectral region between 0.1 to 10 THz, offers a plethora of fingerprints of many chemical and biological materials. Within the past few years, efforts have been focused on exploiting the broadband nature of the THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system for material identification and characterization. The conventional spectroscopic sensing method involves measuring both the terahertz signal carrying the sample information and a reference terahertz signal. In transmission geometry measurement, the absorption peaks of the sample material are found by taking the logarithm of the power spectrum of the transmitted signal beam divided by a reference power spectrum. In this work, we propose a reference-free approach to extract the absorption feature in THz transmission spectroscopy. The samples are identified by their absorption peaks extracted from the negative first-order derivative of the sample signal phase divided by the frequency. Unlike in conventional transmission spectroscopy measurement, in this method, the amplitude spectrum of the terahertz signal is not considered at all. Instead, the absorption features are extracted exclusively from the phase information by taking advantage of the almost-linear phase spectrum of terahertz pulses and the correlation between dispersion and absorption. It is also noted that the spectral phase of the terahertz pulse can be determined with far greater accuracy than the amplitude, which makes this method even more favorable. We measured two kinds of aminophenol (Tyrosine and Phenylalanine), and calculated the absorbance spectrum of each by both methods: taking the ratio between the power spectra of the sample signal and the reference signal and the reference-free phase spectrum of each material. The agreement between the positions

  14. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky Reshetnyak, Igor; Giorgetti, Christine; Sottile, Francesco; Reining, Lucia; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Guzzo, Matteo; Gatti, Matteo

    2015-11-14

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green’s function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green’s function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  15. Dynamical effects in electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianqiang Sky; Kas, J. J.; Sponza, Lorenzo; Reshetnyak, Igor; Guzzo, Matteo; Giorgetti, Christine; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Rehr, J. J.; Reining, Lucia

    2015-11-01

    One of the big challenges of theoretical condensed-matter physics is the description, understanding, and prediction of the effects of the Coulomb interaction on materials properties. In electronic spectra, the Coulomb interaction causes a renormalization of energies and change of spectral weight. Most importantly, it can lead to new structures, often called satellites. These can be linked to the coupling of excitations, also termed dynamical effects. State-of-the-art methods in the framework of many-body perturbation theory, in particular, the widely used GW approximation, often fail to describe satellite spectra. Instead, approaches based on a picture of electron-boson coupling such as the cumulant expansion are promising for the description of plasmon satellites. In this work, we give a unified derivation of the GW approximation and the cumulant expansion for the one-body Green's function. Using the example of bulk sodium, we compare the resulting spectral functions both in the valence and in the core region, and we discuss the dispersion of quasi-particles and satellites. We show that self-consistency is crucial to obtain meaningful results, in particular, at large binding energies. Very good agreement with experiment is obtained when the intrinsic spectral function is corrected for extrinsic and interference effects. Finally, we sketch how one can approach the problem in the case of the two-body Green's function, and we discuss the cancellation of various dynamical effects that occur in that case.

  16. Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Alex; Koymen, A. R.; Mehl, David; Jensen, K. O.; Lei, Chun; Lee, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, Weiss et al. have demonstrated that it is possible to excite Auger transitions by annihilating core electrons using a low energy (less than 30eV) beam of positrons. This mechanism makes possible a new electron spectroscopy, Positron annihilation induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES). The probability of exciting an Auger transition is proportional to the overlap of the positron wavefunction with atomic core levels. Since the Auger electron energy provides a signature of the atomic species making the transition, PAES makes it possible to determine the overlap of the positron wavefunction with a particular element. PAES may therefore provide a means of detecting positron-atom complexes. Measurements of PAES intensities from clean and adsorbate covered Cu surfaces are presented which indicate that approx. 5 percent of positrons injected into CU at 25eV produce core annihilations that result in Auger transitions.

  17. Broadband transmission spectroscopy in tissue: application to radiofrequency tissue fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy; Syms, Richard R. A.; Darzi, Ara W.; Hanna, George B.

    2009-05-01

    Radiofrequency tissue fusion consists in heating apposed tissue faces, which results in their sealing. Tissue transformations must be controlled to obtain reliable reproducible seal. In this paper we demonstrate how to extract information on the two main tissue transformations, thermal damage and dehydration, from continuous wave transmission spectra. A fibre based near infrared transmission spectroscopy system is presented and described theoretically. Show demonstrate that such system can be fully modeled using ray optics considerations for the coupling of the light into optical fibers, and MC simulations of light propagation in tissue. We then develop an algorithm based on the absolute measurement of attenuation and the modified Beer Lambert Law that enables the extraction of absolute tissue hydration and information on the degree of thermal damage, via scattering losses. We also discuss the basis and limit of absolute measurement during broadband submicronic tissue transmittance spectroscopy.

  18. Deciphering the physics and chemistry of perovskites with transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polking, Mark J.

    2016-03-01

    Perovskite oxides exhibit rich structural complexity and a broad range of functional properties, including ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, and superconductivity. The development of aberration correction for the transmission electron microscope and concurrent progress in electron spectroscopy, electron holography, and other techniques has fueled rapid progress in the understanding of the physics and chemistry of these materials. New techniques based on the transmission electron microscope are first surveyed, and the applications of these techniques for the study of the structure, chemistry, electrostatics, and dynamics of perovskite oxides are then explored in detail, with a particular focus on ferroelectric materials.

  19. Deciphering the physics and chemistry of perovskites with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Polking, Mark J

    2016-03-28

    Perovskite oxides exhibit rich structural complexity and a broad range of functional properties, including ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, and superconductivity. The development of aberration correction for the transmission electron microscope and concurrent progress in electron spectroscopy, electron holography, and other techniques has fueled rapid progress in the understanding of the physics and chemistry of these materials. New techniques based on the transmission electron microscope are first surveyed, and the applications of these techniques for the study of the structure, chemistry, electrostatics, and dynamics of perovskite oxides are then explored in detail, with a particular focus on ferroelectric materials.

  20. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruskin, Rachel S; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope's built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS TemCam-F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Simplifying Electron Beam Channeling in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ryan J; Mittal, Anudha; Odlyzko, Michael L; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2017-08-01

    Sub-angstrom scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows quantitative column-by-column analysis of crystalline specimens via annular dark-field images. The intensity of electrons scattered from a particular location in an atomic column depends on the intensity of the electron probe at that location. Electron beam channeling causes oscillations in the STEM probe intensity during specimen propagation, which leads to differences in the beam intensity incident at different depths. Understanding the parameters that control this complex behavior is critical for interpreting experimental STEM results. In this work, theoretical analysis of the STEM probe intensity reveals that intensity oscillations during specimen propagation are regulated by changes in the beam's angular distribution. Three distinct regimes of channeling behavior are observed: the high-atomic-number (Z) regime, in which atomic scattering leads to significant angular redistribution of the beam; the low-Z regime, in which the probe's initial angular distribution controls intensity oscillations; and the intermediate-Z regime, in which the behavior is mixed. These contrasting regimes are shown to exist for a wide range of probe parameters. These results provide a new understanding of the occurrence and consequences of channeling phenomena and conditions under which their influence is strengthened or weakened by characteristics of the electron probe and sample.

  2. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnette, Drew; Roper, D. Keith

    2014-08-07

    Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

  3. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor...; (b) Maintain an electronic system which must be tested and approved by the Corporation; (c) Maintain...

  4. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor...; (b) Maintain an electronic system which must be tested and approved by the Corporation; (c) Maintain...

  5. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement... VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies for... to submit the required electronic arrival or departure manifests specified in paragraph (a) of this...

  6. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  7. Transmission spectroscopy of dengue viral infection Transmission spectroscopy of dengue viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdous, S.; Ahmed, M.; Rehman, A.; Nawaz, M.; Anwar, S.; Murtaza, S.

    2012-04-01

    We presented the rapid diagnostic test for dengue infection based on light spectrum of human blood. The transmission spectra of dengue infected whole blood samples have been recorded in ultra violet to near infrared range (400 - 800 nm) of about 30 conformed infected patients and compared to normal blood samples. Transmission spectra of dengue infected blood illustrate a strong band from 400 - 600 nm with prominant peaks at 540 and 580 nm, where is in case of normal blood below 600 nm, total absorption has been observed. These prominent peaks from 400 - 600 nm are characteristics of cells damage and dangue virus antibodies immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) produced against dengue antigen. The presented diagnostic method is non invasive, cost effective, easy and fast screening technique for dengue infected patients.

  8. Ballistic electron emission spectroscopy of magnetic multilayers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, P. N.; Bonetti, J. A.; Guthrie, D. K.; Harrell, L. E.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    1997-04-01

    The giant magnetoresistance observed in magnetic multilayers arises from spin-dependent scattering and transmission of electrons at the Fermi energy. We will describe a method for the measurement of these quantities in a "CPP" geometry at electron energies both above and below the Fermi energy. Initial results will also be presented. The measurements employ ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) to detect the ballistic electron current transmitted through a multilayer as a function of magnetic field and electron energy. The experiments are similar in concept to the "spin-valve transistor,"1 except that the injector is the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. This allows the injection energy to be varied over a wide range, and spectra can be correlated with the local surface morphology on a nanometer scale. Spectral broadening due to sample inhomogeneities is also eliminated. We anticipate that BEES measurements and complementary scanning tunneling spectroscopy will provide information that is easily compared with calculations of the multilayer band structure and the electron transmittance versus energy.

  9. Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Trevor L.; Fox, Zachary W.; Slenkamp, Karla M.; Khalil, Munira

    2015-10-21

    Two-dimensional vibrational-electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy is a femtosecond Fourier transform (FT) third-order nonlinear technique that creates a link between existing 2D FT spectroscopies in the vibrational and electronic regions of the spectrum. 2D VE spectroscopy enables a direct measurement of infrared (IR) and electronic dipole moment cross terms by utilizing mid-IR pump and optical probe fields that are resonant with vibrational and electronic transitions, respectively, in a sample of interest. We detail this newly developed 2D VE spectroscopy experiment and outline the information contained in a 2D VE spectrum. We then use this technique and its single-pump counterpart (1D VE) to probe the vibrational-electronic couplings between high frequency cyanide stretching vibrations (ν{sub CN}) and either a ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition ([Fe{sup III}(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−} dissolved in formamide) or a metal-to-metal charge transfer (MMCT) transition ([(CN){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNRu{sup III}(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup −} dissolved in formamide). The 2D VE spectra of both molecules reveal peaks resulting from coupled high- and low-frequency vibrational modes to the charge transfer transition. The time-evolving amplitudes and positions of the peaks in the 2D VE spectra report on coherent and incoherent vibrational energy transfer dynamics among the coupled vibrational modes and the charge transfer transition. The selectivity of 2D VE spectroscopy to vibronic processes is evidenced from the selective coupling of specific ν{sub CN} modes to the MMCT transition in the mixed valence complex. The lineshapes in 2D VE spectra report on the correlation of the frequency fluctuations between the coupled vibrational and electronic frequencies in the mixed valence complex which has a time scale of 1 ps. The details and results of this study confirm the versatility of 2D VE spectroscopy and its applicability to probe how vibrations modulate charge and energy transfer in a

  10. Pulsed electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, Hans; Bernardo, Marcelino

    1990-05-01

    A new experimental technique, pulsed electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance spectroscopy, is demonstrated. It is based on a modification of the pulse sequence for electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) in which two EPR and one NMR transition are irradiated. The irradiation of one EPR transition is detected via a second EPR transition. The nuclear hyperfine coupling, which separates these EPR transition frequencies, is the irradiated NMR transition. The major advantages of triple resonance spectroscopy include the ability to resolve overlapping nuclear resonances in the ENDOR spectrum and a more direct quantitative assignment of nuclear hyperfine and quadrupole couplings. The triple resonance experiment is an alternative to the recently proposed method of employing rapid magnetic field jumps between microwave pulses for generating hyperfine selective ENDOR spectra.

  11. Data Treatment in Electron and Ion Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    IA) Sprinter. It. W. and Pocker. D. J., Rcriew of Scientific Instruments, % ol. 48, 1977, p. 74. 171 Smith, 1). P., Journal of Applied Phyisics , Vol...Bonding" monitored by T. W. Haas. This report covers work conducted inhouse during the period July 1977 through July 1979. It was published in Applied ...Baun, W. L., "Data Treatment in Electron and Ion Spectroscopy," Applied SurjaceAnalysis. ASTMSTP699. T. L. Bart ,nd L. . Davis. Ids., American

  12. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    PubMed Central

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons. In this method, we demonstrate the single-atom detection of lithium, fluorine, sodium and chlorine with near-atomic precision, which is limited by the incident probe size, signal delocalization and atomic movement in nanospace. Moreover, chemical shifts of lithium K-edge have been successfully identified with various atomic configurations in one-dimensional lithium compounds. PMID:26228378

  13. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons. PMID:27982030

  14. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-12-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons.

  15. Electronic and optical spectroscopy of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiner, Michael J.

    Electronic transport through molecules has been intensively studied in recent years, due to scientific interest in fundamental questions about charge transport and the technological promise of nanoscale circuitry. A wide range of range of experimental platforms have been developed to electronically probe both single molecules and molecular monolayers. However, it remains challenging to fabricate reliable electronic contacts to molecules, and the vast majority of molecular electronic architectures are not amenable to standard characterization techniques, such as optical spectroscopy. Thus the field of molecular electronics has been hampered with problems of reproducibility, and many fundamental questions about electronic transport remain unanswered. This thesis describes four significant contributions towards the fabrication and characterization of molecular electronic devices: (1) The development of a new method for creating robust, large area junctions where the electronic transport is through a single monolayer of molecules. This method utilizes atomic layer deposition (ALD) to grow an ultrathin oxide layer on top of a molecular monolayer, which protects the molecules against subsequent processing. (2) A new method for rapid imaging and analysis of single defects in molecular monolayers. This method also electrically passivates defects as it labels them. (3) Hot carrier spectroscopy of molecular junctions. Using optically excited hot carriers, we demonstrate the ability to probe the energy level lineup inside buried molecular junctions. (4) Efficient coupling of optical fields to metal-insulator-metal (MIM) surface plasmon modes. We show both theoretical and experimental work illustrating the ability to create very intense optical fields inside MIM systems. The intense fields generated in this manner have natural extensions to a variety of applications, such as photon assisted tunneling in molecular junctions, optical modulators, and ultrafast optoelectronic

  16. Nanoscale mapping of optical band gaps using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, W; Granerød, C S; Venkatachalapathy, V; Johansen, K M H; Jensen, I J T; Kuznetsov, A Yu; Prytz, Ø

    2017-03-10

    Using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy in a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope we demonstrate band gap mapping in ZnO/ZnCdO thin films with a spatial resolution below 10 nm and spectral precision of 20 meV.

  17. Nanoscale mapping of optical band gaps using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, W.; Granerød, C. S.; Venkatachalapathy, V.; Johansen, K. M. H.; Jensen, I. J. T.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu; Prytz, Ø.

    2017-03-01

    Using monochromated electron energy loss spectroscopy in a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope we demonstrate band gap mapping in ZnO/ZnCdO thin films with a spatial resolution below 10 nm and spectral precision of 20 meV.

  18. Surface studies of praseodymium by electron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Mirosław; Pisarek, Marcin; Lisowski, Wojciech; Jablonski, Aleksander

    2016-12-01

    Electron transport properties in praseodymium (Pr) foil samples were studied by elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES). Prior to EPES measurements, the Pr sample surface was pre-sputtered by Ar ions with ion energy of 2-3 keV. After such treatment, the Pr sample still contained about 10 at.% of residual oxygen in the surface region, as detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analyses. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP), characterizing electron transport within this region (4 nm-thick), was evaluated from EPES using both Ni and Au standards as a function of energy in the range of 0.5-2 keV. Experimental IMFPs, λ, were approximated by the simple function λ = kEp, where E is energy (in eV), and k = 0.1549 and p = 0.7047 were the fitted parameters. These values were compared with IMFPs for the praseodymium surface in which the presence of oxygen was tentatively neglected, and also with IMFPs resulting from the TPP-2M predictive equation for bulk praseodymium. We found that the measured IMFP values to be only slightly affected by neglect of oxygen in calculations. The fitted function applied here was consistent with the energy dependence of the EPES-measured IMFPs. Additionally, the measured IMFPs were found to be from 2% to 4.2% larger than the predicted IMFPs for praseodymium in the energy range of 500-1000 eV. For electron energies of 1500 eV and 2000 eV, there was an inverse correlation between these values, and then the resulting deviations of -0.4% and -2.7%, respectively, were calculated.

  19. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    PubMed

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement. 217.7 Section 217.7 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies...

  1. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement. 217.7 Section 217.7 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies...

  2. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement. 217.7 Section 217.7 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies...

  3. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement. 217.7 Section 217.7 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies...

  4. Probing the bonding and electronic structure of single atom dopants in graphene with electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramasse, Quentin M; Seabourne, Che R; Kepaptsoglou, Despoina-Maria; Zan, Recep; Bangert, Ursel; Scott, Andrew J

    2013-10-09

    A combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations reveal striking electronic structure differences between two distinct single substitutional Si defect geometries in graphene. Optimised acquisition conditions allow for exceptional signal-to-noise levels in the spectroscopic data. The near-edge fine structure can be compared with great accuracy to simulations and reveal either an sp(3)-like configuration for a trivalent Si or a more complicated hybridized structure for a tetravalent Si impurity.

  5. Explosives detection studies using Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detection of explosives in luggage or air cargo. We present here the principle results of a two-year study of a few-view tomographic FNTS system using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP to simulate neutron transmission through simple luggage phantoms and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves to determine system performance. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing MCNP generated neutron transmission data. Transmission data for few (3-5) angles and relatively coarse resolution ({approximately}2 cm) are used to create a tomographic reconstruction of elemental distributions within the object. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms and the concept of transmission-derived cross sections for use in elemental analysis have been validated by application to experimental data. Elemental distributions are combined in an explosives detection algorithm to provide an indication of the presence or absence of explosives. The algorithm in current use, termed the ``equivalent explosive`` algorithm, determines the quantity of explosive that can be formed using the measured amount of the constituent elements in each pixel. Reconstruction and explosives detection algorithms have been applied to a series of randomly packed suitcases to generated ROC that describe system performance in terms of the probability of detection and of false alarms. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as neutron source reaction and incident particle energy, flight path length, and the position of the interrogated object.

  6. Uranium trioxide behavior during electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2015-03-01

    A sample of uranium trioxide (UO3) was produced by focused ion beam (~10 μm×~10 μm×<0.5 μm) for transmission electron and electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy examinations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The EEL spectra were recorded as a function of the thickness for the P and O edges in the low energy range 0-350 eV and were compared to spectra of UO3 small grains attached to a TEM grid. The EEL spectrum was studied through a range of thicknesses going from ~60 to ~260 nm. The EEL spectra recorded for UO3 are compared with those recorded for UO2. The reduction of UO3 into U4O9 and/or UO2 is readily observed apparently during the TEM investigations and as confirmed by electron diffraction (eD). This redox effect is similar to that known for other redox sensitive oxides. Recommendations are suggested to avoid sample decomposition.

  7. Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy of Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.; Asnin, Vladimir M.; Petukhov, Andre G.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the secondary electron emission spectroscopy study of hydrogenated diamond surfaces for single crystals and chemical vapor-deposited polycrystalline films. One-electron calculations of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces having various hydrogen coverages are presented, the major features of the experimental spectra are explained, and a theoretical model for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces is proposed. An energy shift and a change in the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence (KVV) Auger spectra were observed for diamond surfaces after exposure to an electron beam or by annealing at temperatures higher than 950 C. This change is related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by hydrogen desorption from the surface. A strong negative electron affinity (NEA) effect, which appeared as a large, narrow peak in the low-energy portion of the spectrum of the secondary electron energy distribution, was also observed on the diamond surfaces. A fine structure in this peak, which was found for the first time, reflected the energy structure of the bottom of the conduction band. Further, the breakup of the bulk excitons at the surface during secondary electron emission was attributed to one of the features of this structure. The study demonstrated that the NEA type depends on the extent of hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface, changing from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surface.

  8. Amino acid quantification in bulk soybeans by transmission Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schulmerich, Matthew V; Gelber, Matthew K; Azam, Hossain M; Harrison, Sandra K; McKinney, John; Thompson, Dennis; Owen, Bridget; Kull, Linda S; Bhargava, Rohit

    2013-12-03

    Soybeans are a commodity crop of significant economic and nutritional interest. As an important source of protein, buyers of soybeans are interested in not only the total protein content but also in the specific amino acids that comprise the total protein content. Raman spectroscopy has the chemical specificity to measure the twenty common amino acids as pure substances. An unsolved challenge, however, is to quantify varying levels of amino acids mixed together and bound in soybeans at relatively low concentrations. Here we report the use of transmission Raman spectroscopy as a secondary analytical approach to nondestructively measure specific amino acids in intact soybeans. With the employment of a transmission-based Raman instrument, built specifically for nondestructive measurements from bulk soybeans, spectra were collected from twenty-four samples to develop a calibration model using a partial least-squares approach with a random-subset cross validation. The calibration model was validated on an independent set of twenty-five samples for oil, protein, and amino acid predictions. After Raman measurements, the samples were reduced to a fine powder and conventional wet chemistry methods were used for quantifying reference values of protein, oil, and 18 amino acids. We found that the greater the concentrations (% by weight component of interest), the better the calibration model and prediction capabilities. Of the 18 amino acids analyzed, 13 had R(2) values greater than 0.75 with a standard error of prediction c.a. 3-4% by weight. Serine, histidine, cystine, tryptophan, and methionine showed poor predictions (R(2) < 0.75), which were likely a result of the small sampling range and the low concentration of these components. It is clear from the correlation plots and root-mean-square error of prediction that Raman spectroscopy has sufficient chemical contrast to nondestructively quantify protein, oil, and specific amino acids in intact soybeans.

  9. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W. Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens prepared by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.

  10. Data processing for atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Paul; Hovden, Robert; Mundy, Julia A; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A

    2012-08-01

    The high beam current and subangstrom resolution of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes has enabled electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping with atomic resolution. These spectral maps are often dose limited and spatially oversampled, leading to low counts/channel and are thus highly sensitive to errors in background estimation. However, by taking advantage of redundancy in the dataset map, one can improve background estimation and increase chemical sensitivity. We consider two such approaches--linear combination of power laws and local background averaging--that reduce background error and improve signal extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) can also be used to analyze spectrum images, but the poor peak-to-background ratio in EELS can lead to serious artifacts if raw EELS data are PCA filtered. We identify common artifacts and discuss alternative approaches. These algorithms are implemented within the Cornell Spectrum Imager, an open source software package for spectroscopic analysis.

  11. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  12. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  13. Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy growth, transmission electron microscopy, and magneto-optical spectroscopy of individual InAsxP1 -x/Ga0.5In0.5P quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pozo-Zamudio, O.; Puebla, J.; Krysa, A.; Toro, R.; Sanchez, A. M.; Beanland, R.; Tartakovskii, A. I.; Skolnick, M. S.; Chekhovich, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    We report on growth and characterization of individual InAsxP1 -x /GaInP quantum dots with variable nominal As molar fraction. Magnetophotoluminescence experiments reveal quantum dot emission in a wide range from 1.3 to 1.8 eV, confirming successful incorporation of As into the quantum dots. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a core-cap structure of InAsP quantum dots with an InAs-rich core capped by an InP-rich layer. Inside the core, an average As molar fraction up to x ≈0.15 is observed. The heavy-hole g factors are found to be strongly dependent on As molar fraction, while the electron g factors are close to the InP values. This suggests type-II carrier confinement in the studied InAsP dots with holes (electrons) localized in the core (cap) region. Finally, dynamic nuclear polarization is observed, which allows for further insight into structural properties using nuclear magnetic resonance.

  14. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-22

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  15. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-01-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future. PMID:28004794

  16. Imaging molecular geometry with electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enliang; Shan, Xu; Tian, Qiguo; Yang, Jing; Gong, Maomao; Tang, Yaguo; Niu, Shanshan; Chen, Xiangjun

    2016-12-01

    Electron momentum spectroscopy is a unique tool for imaging orbital-specific electron density of molecule in momentum space. However, the molecular geometry information is usually veiled due to the single-centered character of momentum space wavefunction of molecular orbital (MO). Here we demonstrate the retrieval of interatomic distances from the multicenter interference effect revealed in the ratios of electron momentum profiles between two MOs with symmetric and anti-symmetric characters. A very sensitive dependence of the oscillation period on interatomic distance is observed, which is used to determine F-F distance in CF4 and O-O distance in CO2 with sub-Ångström precision. Thus, using one spectrometer, and in one measurement, the electron density distributions of MOs and the molecular geometry information can be obtained simultaneously. Our approach provides a new robust tool for imaging molecules with high precision and has potential to apply to ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics if combined with ultrashort electron pulses in the future.

  17. Nucleotide-Specific Contrast for DNA Sequencing by Electron Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Mankos, Marian; Persson, Henrik H. J.; N’Diaye, Alpha T.; ...

    2016-05-05

    DNA sequencing by imaging in an electron microscope is an approach that holds promise to deliver long reads with low error rates and without the need for amplification. Earlier work using transmission electron microscopes, which use high electron energies on the order of 100 keV, has shown that low contrast and radiation damage necessitates the use of heavy atom labeling of individual nucleotides, which increases the read error rates. Other prior work using scattering electrons with much lower energy has shown to suppress beam damage on DNA. Here we explore possibilities to increase contrast by employing two methods, X-ray photoelectronmore » and Auger electron spectroscopy. Using bulk DNA samples with monomers of each base, both methods are shown to provide contrast mechanisms that can distinguish individual nucleotides without labels. In conclusion, both spectroscopic techniques can be readily implemented in a low energy electron microscope, which may enable label-free DNA sequencing by direct imaging.« less

  18. Electronic Spectroscopy of Cobalt-Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T. C.; Hasbrouck, S.; Duncan, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    Co^+Ne was generated via laser vaporization in a pulsed supersonic expansion source, mass selected, and analyzed by visible photodissociation spectroscopy. An electronic band system was observed with an origin beginning at 13503 cm-1. A progression of peaks beginning from the origin until the convergence limit can be seen, corresponding to the vibrational bands in the excited state of Co^+Ne. The excited state constants (we = 124 cm-1) were determined and the electronic cycle leads to a ground state binding energy (D_0 = 948 cm-1). The ground state binding energy can be compared to other rare gas binding energies, which is correlated to the polarizability of the rare gas.

  19. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  20. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  1. Ballistic electron spectroscopy of individual buried molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirczenow, George

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the ballistic electron emission spectra (BEES) of individual insulating and conducting organic molecules chemisorbed on a silicon substrate and buried under a thin gold film. It is predicted that ballistic electrons injected into the gold film from a scanning tunneling microscope tip should be transmitted so weakly to the silicon substrate by alkane molecules of moderate length (decane, hexane) and their thiolates that individual buried molecules of this type will be difficult to detect in BEES experiments. However, resonant transmission by molecules containing unsaturated C-C bonds or aromatic rings is predicted to be strong enough for BEES spectra of individual buried molecules of these types to be measured. Calculated BEES spectra of molecules of both types are presented and the effects of some simple interstitial and substitutional gold defects that may occur in molecular films are also briefly discussed.

  2. Venus transit 2004: Illustrating the capability of exoplanet transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedelt, P.; Alonso, R.; Brown, T.; Collados Vera, M.; Rauer, H.; Schleicher, H.; Schmidt, W.; Schreier, F.; Titz, R.

    2011-09-01

    The transit of Venus in 2004 offered the rare possibility to remotely sense a well-known planetary atmosphere using ground-based absorption spectroscopy. Transmission spectra of Venus' atmosphere were obtained in the near infrared using the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) in Tenerife. Since the instrument was designed to measure the very bright photosphere of the Sun, extracting Venus' atmosphere was challenging. We were able to identify CO2 absorption lines in the upper Venus atmosphere. Moreover, the relative abundance of the three most abundant CO2 isotopologues could be determined. The observations resolved Venus' limb, showing Doppler-shifted absorption lines that are probably caused by high-altitude winds. We demonstrate the utility of ground-based measurements in analyzing the atmospheric constituents of a terrestrial planet atmosphere using methods that might be applied in future to terrestrial extrasolar planets.

  3. Four-dimensional coherent electronic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, Elad

    2017-04-01

    The correlations between different quantum-mechanical degrees of freedom of molecular species dictate their chemical and physical properties. Generally, these correlations are reflected in the optical response of the system but in low-order or low-dimensionality measurement the signals are highly averaged. Here, we describe a novel four-dimensional coherent spectroscopic method that directly correlates within and between the manifold of electronic and vibrational states. The optical response theory is developed in terms of both resonant and non-resonant field-matter interactions. Using resonance to select coherences on specific electronic states creates opportunities to directly distinguish coherent dynamics on the ground and electronically excited potentials. Critically, this method is free from lower-order signals that have plagued other electronically non-resonant vibrational spectroscopies. The theory presented here compliments recent work on the experimental demonstration of the 4D spectroscopic method described. We highlight specific means by which non-trivial effects such as anharmonicity (diagonal and off-diagonal), mode-specific vibronic coupling, and curvature of the excited states manifest in different projections of the 4D spectrum.

  4. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Precision Laser Transmission Spectroscopy: Applications to Nanoparticle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Carol; Li, Frank; Hwang, Ching-Ting; Schafer, Robert; Ruggiero, Steven

    2011-05-01

    We describe the implementation of precision laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) for determining the size, shape, and number of nanoparticles in suspension. Our apparatus incorporates a tunable laser and balanced optical system, which measures light transmission over a wide wavelength range (210-2300 nm) with high precision and sensitivity. Spectral inversion is employed to determine both the particle size distribution and the absolute number density of particles ranging in diameter from 5 to 3000 nm with ~3 nm resolution. With respect to density, the sensitivity or our measurement system ranges from ~1000 particles/mL up to 1010 particles/mL (5×10-8 vol.% to 0.5 vol. %). The size range of applicability is comparable to that of dynamic light scattering (DLS) but with approximately six orders of magnitude higher sensitivity and five times the resolution. The technique also allows us to determine the length and width of rod shaped particles including biological objects. Currently, LTS is being applied as a tool to investigate various biological and non-biological nanoparticle systems including: metals, oxides, carbon, organic materials, proteins, viruses, bacteria, liposomes, DNA, etc. We acknowledge the support of the University of Notre Dame Office of the Vice President for Research and NDnano/MIND.

  6. Probing core-electron orbitals by scanning transmission electron microscopy and measuring the delocalization of core-level excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Odlyzko, Michael L.; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    2016-04-01

    By recording low-noise energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps from crystalline specimens using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to probe core-level electron orbitals in real space. Both the 1 s and 2 p orbitals of Sr and Ti atoms in SrTi O3 are probed, and their projected excitation potentials are determined. This paper also demonstrates experimental measurement of the electronic excitation impact parameter and the delocalization of an excitation due to Coulombic beam-orbital interaction.

  7. Ultrafast spectroscopy of correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Benjamin Andrew

    This dissertation attempts to illuminate and expand our understanding of charge dynamics in a number of different semiconductor materials, in particular the behavior of electron-hole pairs which are correlated via the long-range Coulomb interaction. Terahertz spectroscopy gives us direct access to probe the fundamental excitations of quasiparticles in a wide range of materials systems. By probing the low-energy excitations of materials on short time scales, one can learn a great deal about their quasiparticles and dynamics as well as explore new tools for their manipulation. Carriers in semiconductors, existing either as bound electron-hole pairs or "free" carriers (or both), are particularly amenable to this avenue of study. The internal structure of excitons in semiconductors lies energetically in the far- to mid-infrared. Free carriers moving under the influence of a free-space electric field reveal much about themselves. By exploiting this unique window, one can both characterize and manipulate these systems in novel ways, as well as seek to understand the physics of new materials. I study the ferromagnetic semiconductor gallium manganese phosphide (GaMnP) to better understand the role of charge carriers in the origins of ferromagnetism. By applying the tools of terahertz spectroscopy, I am able to make contact free measurements of hole populations in a novel GaMnP film. I exploit THz spectroscopy to provide a direct gauge of bound and unbound pair densities in gallium arsenide quantum wells, enabling the observation of the excitonic fine structure as it evolves under high-density conditions. And finally I have observed for the first time stimulated emission of far-infrared radiation from internal transitions in excitons in the semiconductor Cu 2O. Broadband THz spectroscopy is employed to directly map out the ultrafast dynamics, spectral positions, and line broadenings of intra-excitonic transitions. This work has opened up new possibilities for the quantum

  8. Multi-pass transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Juffmann, Thomas; Koppell, Stewart A.; Klopfer, Brannon B.; ...

    2017-05-10

    Feynman once asked physicists to build better electron microscopes to be able to watch biology at work. While electron microscopes can now provide atomic resolution, electron beam induced specimen damage precludes high resolution imaging of sensitive materials, such as single proteins or polymers. Here, we use simulations to show that an electron microscope based on a multi-pass measurement protocol enables imaging of single proteins, without averaging structures over multiple images. While we demonstrate the method for particular imaging targets, the approach is broadly applicable and is expected to improve resolution and sensitivity for a range of electron microscopy imaging modalities,more » including, for example, scanning and spectroscopic techniques. The approach implements a quantum mechanically optimal strategy which under idealized conditions can be considered interaction-free.« less

  9. Standardless atom counting in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, James M; Findlay, Scott D; Allen, Leslie J; Stemmer, Susanne

    2010-11-10

    We demonstrate that high-angle annular dark-field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows for quantification of the number and location of all atoms in a three-dimensional, crystalline, arbitrarily shaped specimen without the need for a calibration standard. We show that the method also provides for an approach to directly measure the finite effective source size of a scanning transmission electron microscope.

  10. Transfer calibration of the transmission of electron-energy spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. L.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Relative intensities of strong peaks in the Hel photoelectron spectra of N2, CO2, CO, and O2 are tabulated. These data were measured with an electron energy analyzer whose relative transmission was calibrated to an accuracy of + or - 5%. The tables are useful for calibrating the transmission of other analyzers for electron energies below 9 eV. Correction for angular distribution effects is discussed.

  11. Imaging and microanalysis of thin ionomer layers by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, David A; Koestner, Roland; Kukreja, Ratan; Minko, Sergiy; Trotsenko, Oleksandr; Tokarev, Alexander V; Guetaz, Laure; Meyer III, Harry M; Parish, Chad M; More, Karren Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Improved conditions for imaging and spectroscopic mapping of thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layers in fuel cell electrodes by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) have been investigated. These conditions are first identified on model systems of Nafion ionomer-coated nanostructured thin films and nanoporous Si. The optimized conditions are then applied in a quantitative study of the ionomer through-layer loading for two typical electrode catalyst coatings using electron energy loss and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope. The e-beam induced damage to the perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer is quantified by following the fluorine mass loss with electron exposure and is then mitigated by a few orders of magnitude using cryogenic specimen cooling and a higher incident electron voltage. Multivariate statistical analysis is also applied to the analysis of spectrum images for data denoising and unbiased separation of independent components related to the catalyst, ionomer, and support.

  12. Fluorescence-integrated transmission electron microscopy images: integrating fluorescence microscopy with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sims, Paul A; Hardin, Jeff D

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes high-pressure freezing (HPF) techniques for correlative light and electron microscopy on the same sample. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) is exploited for its ability to collect fluorescent, as well as transmitted and back scattered light (BSL) images at the same time. Fluorescent information from a whole mount (preembedding) or from thin sections (post-embedding) can be displayed as a color overlay on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Fluorescence-integrated TEM (F-TEM) images provide a fluorescent perspective to TEM images. The pre-embedding method uses a thin two-part agarose pad to immobilize live Caenorhabditis elegans embryos for LSCM, HPF, and TEM. Pre-embedding F-TEM images display fluorescent information collected from a whole mount of live embryos onto all thin sections collected from that sample. In contrast, the postembedding method uses HPF and freeze substitution with 1% paraformaldehyde in 95% ethanol followed by low-temperature embedding in methacrylate resin. This procedure preserves the structure and function of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as determined by immunogold labeling of GFP, when compared with GFP expression, both demonstrated in the same thin section.

  13. Electron transmission through a class of anthracene aldehyde molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Petreska, Irina Ohanesjan, Vladimir; Pejov, Ljupco; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2016-03-25

    Transmission of electrons via metal-molecule-metal junctions, involving rotor-stator anthracene aldehyde molecules is investigated. Two model barriers having input parameters evaluated from accurate ab initio calculations are proposed and the transmission coefficients are obtained by using the quasiclassical approximation. Transmission coefficients further enter in the integral for the net current, utilizing Simmons’ method. Conformational dependence of the tunneling processes is evident and the presence of the side groups enhances the functionality of the future single-molecule based electronic devices.

  14. Electron transmission through a class of anthracene aldehyde molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petreska, Irina; Ohanesjan, Vladimir; Pejov, Ljupco; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2016-03-01

    Transmission of electrons via metal-molecule-metal junctions, involving rotor-stator anthracene aldehyde molecules is investigated. Two model barriers having input parameters evaluated from accurate ab initio calculations are proposed and the transmission coefficients are obtained by using the quasiclassical approximation. Transmission coefficients further enter in the integral for the net current, utilizing Simmons' method. Conformational dependence of the tunneling processes is evident and the presence of the side groups enhances the functionality of the future single-molecule based electronic devices.

  15. Transmission and Reflection Terahertz Spectroscopy of Insensitive Melt-Cast High-Explosive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Norbert; Szala, Mateusz

    2016-10-01

    Currently, artillery shells and grenades that are introduced into the market are based on melt-castable insensitive high explosives (IHEs), which do not explode while they run a risk of impact, heat or shrapnel. Particles of explosives (such as hexogen, nitroguanidine and nitrotriazolone) are suspended in different proportions in a matrix of 2.4-dinitroanisole. In this paper, we investigated samples of commonly used IHEs: PAX-41, IMX-104 and IMX-101, whose internal structures were determined by a scanning electron microscope. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy was applied in both transmission and reflection configurations. At first, the complex refraction indices of four pure constituents creating IHEs were determined and became the basis of further calculations. Next, the experimentally determined transmission and reflection spectra of IHEs and pure constituents were compared with theoretical considerations. The influence of the grain size of constituent material and scattering on the reflection spectra was analysed, and good agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was achieved.

  16. Electronic Spectroscopy of Trapped PAH Photofragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joblin, Christine; Bonnamy, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    The PIRENEA set-up combines an ion cyclotron resonance cell mass spectrometer with cryogenic cooling in order to study the physical and chemical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of astrophysical interest. In space, PAHs are submitted to UV photons that lead to their dissociation. It is therefore of interest to study fragmentation pathways and search for species that might be good interstellar candidates because of their stability. Electronic spectroscopy can bring major insights into the structure of species formed by photofragmentation. This is also a way to identify new species in space as recently illustrated in the case of C60^+. In PIRENEA, the trapped ions are not cold enough, and thus we cannot use complexation with rare gas in order to record spectroscopy, as was nicely performed in the work by Campbell et al. on C60^+. We are therefore using the dissociation of the trapped ions themselves instead, which requires in general a multiple photon scheme. This leads to non-linear effects that affect the measured spectrum. We are working on improving this scheme in the specific case of the photofragment obtained by H-loss from 1-methylpyrene cation (CH_3-C16H9^+). A recent theoretical study has shown that a rearrangement can occur from 1-pyrenemethylium cation (CH_2-C16H9^+) to a system containing a seven membered ring (tropylium like pyrene system). This study also reports the calculated electronic spectra of both isomers, which are specific enough to distinguish them, and as a function of temperature. We will present experiments that have been performed to study the photophysics of these ions using the PIRENEA set-up and a two-laser scheme for the action spectroscopy. J. Montillaud, C. Joblin, D. Toublanc, Astron. & Astrophys. 552 (2013), id.A15 E.K. Campbell, M. Holz, D. Gerlich, and J.P. Maier, Nature 523 (2015), 322-323 F. Useli-Bacchitta, A. Bonnamy, G. Malloci, et al., Chem. Phys. 371 (2010), 16-23; J. Zhen, A. Bonnamy, G. Mulas, C

  17. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine-C60 bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Herzig, Melanie; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Knupfer, Martin; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C60 (MnPc:C60) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C60. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C60 bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C60 to MnPc thin films.

  18. Electronic properties of Mn-phthalocyanine–C{sub 60} bulk heterojunctions: Combining photoemission and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Friedrich; Lupulescu, Cosmin; Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-11-14

    The electronic properties of co-evaporated mixtures (blends) of manganese phthalocyanine and the fullerene C{sub 60} (MnPc:C{sub 60}) have been studied as a function of the concentration of the two constituents using two supplementary electron spectroscopic methods, photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in transmission. Our PES measurements provide a detailed picture of the electronic structure measured with different excitation energies as well as different mixing ratios between MnPc and C{sub 60}. Besides a relative energy shift, the occupied electronic states of the two materials remain essentially unchanged. The observed energy level alignment is different compared to that of the related CuPc:C{sub 60} bulk heterojunction. Moreover, the results from our EELS investigations show that, despite the rather small interface interaction, the MnPc related electronic excitation spectrum changes significantly by admixing C{sub 60} to MnPc thin films.

  19. Electron energy-loss and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of electronic structure of MgB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yohei; Saito, Taiki; Tsuchiya, Kohei; Terauchi, Masami; Saito, Hiroki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structure of MgB4, with the characteristic crystal structure comprising one-dimensional pentagonal B6 cluster chain, was investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy. The dielectric function and density of state of unoccupied and occupied states were clarified experimentally for the first time. Although theoretical calculations has predicted MgB4 to be a semiconductor, the electron energy-loss spectrum in this study show a plasmon peak at 0.4 eV, which might be due to carrier electrons. Theoretical calculations suggested that the electronic states near the Fermi energy are localized along the one dimensional B6 cluster chain. Therefore, one-dimensional electric conductivity is expected.

  20. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy: a preliminary study of the distribution of Cu2+ and Cu2+/Pb2+ on a Bt horizon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, B; Vega, F A; Serra, C; Silva, L F O; Andrade, M L

    2011-11-15

    Relatively new techniques can help in determining the occurrence of mineral species and the distribution of contaminants on soil surfaces such as natural minerals and organic matter. The Bt horizon from an Endoleptic Luvisol was chosen because of its well-known sorption capability. The samples were contaminated with Cu(2+) and/or Pb(2+) and both sorption and desorption experiments were performed. The preferential distribution of the contaminant species ((63)Cu and (208)Pb) to the main soil components and their associations were studied together with the effectiveness of the surface sorption and desorption processes. The results obtained were compared with non-contaminated samples as well as with previous results obtained by different analytical techniques and advanced statistical analysis. Pb(2+) competes favorably for the sorption sites in this soil, mainly in oxides and the clay fraction. Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) were mainly associated with hematite, gibbsite, vermiculite and chlorite. This study will serve as a basis for further scientific research on the soil retention of heavy metals. New techniques such as spectroscopic imaging and transmission electron microscopy make it possible to check which soil components retain heavy metals, thereby contributing to propose effective measures for the remediation of contaminated soil.

  1. Investigation of Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Atmospheric Transmission Using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    101 325 Pa = 760 Torr † NIST 2006 CODATA recommended values 98 Appendix B. Alkali Data Potassium Properties Table 3. Potassium (K) physical...INVESTIGATION OF DIODE PUMPED ALKALI LASER ATMOSPHERIC TRANSMISSION USING TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY DISSERTATION Christopher A... ALKALI LASER ATMOSPHERIC TRANSMISSION USING TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy methods for the analysis of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Arturo; Mejía-Rosales, Sergio; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Here we review the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) characterization technique and STEM imaging methods. We describe applications of STEM for studying inorganic nanoparticles, and other uses of STEM in biological and health sciences and discuss how to interpret STEM results. The STEM imaging mode has certain benefits compared with the broad-beam illumination mode; the main advantage is the collection of the information about the specimen using a high angular annular dark field (HAADF) detector, in which the images registered have different levels of contrast related to the chemical composition of the sample. Another advantage of its use in the analysis of biological samples is its contrast for thick stained sections, since HAADF images of samples with thickness of 100-120 nm have notoriously better contrast than those obtained by other techniques. Combining the HAADF-STEM imaging with the new aberration correction era, the STEM technique reaches a direct way to imaging the atomistic structure and composition of nanostructures at a sub-angstrom resolution. Thus, alloying in metallic nanoparticles is directly resolved at atomic scale by the HAADF-STEM imaging, and the comparison of the STEM images with results from simulations gives a very powerful way of analysis of structure and composition. The use of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy attached to the electron microscope for STEM mode is also described. In issues where characterization at the atomic scale of the interaction between metallic nanoparticles and biological systems is needed, all the associated techniques to STEM become powerful tools for the best understanding on how to use these particles in biomedical applications.

  3. Power electronics in electric utilities: HVDC power transmission systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, F.; Patel, H.S.

    1988-04-01

    High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) power transmission systems constitute an important application of power electronics technology. This paper reviews salient aspects of this growing industry. The paper summarizes the history of HVDC transmission and discusses the economic and technical reasons responsible for development of HVDC systems. The paper also describes terminal design and basic configurations of HVDC systems, as well as major equipments of HVDC transmission system. In this regard, the state-of-the-art technology in the equipments constructions are discussed. Finally, the paper reviews future developments in the HVDC transmission systems, including promising technologies, such as multiterminal configurations, Gate Turn-Off (GTO) devices, forced commutation converters, and new advances in control electronics.

  4. Coherent pump pulses in Double Electron Electron Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Claudia E.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The recent introduction of shaped pulses to Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy has led to significant enhancements in sensitivity through increased excitation bandwidths and improved control over spin dynamics. The application of DEER has so far relied on the presence of an incoherent pump channel to average out most undesired coherent effects of the pump pulse(s) on the observer spins. However, in fully coherent EPR spectrometers that are increasingly used to generate shaped pulses, the presence of coherent pump pulses means that these effects need to be explicitly considered. In this paper, we examine the effects of coherent rectangular and sech/tanh pump pulses in DEER experiments with up to three pump pulses. We show that, even in the absence of significant overlap of the observer and pump pulse excitation bandwidths, coherence transfer pathways involving both types of pulses generate spin echoes of considerable intensity. These echoes introduce artefacts, which, if not identified and removed, can easily lead to misinterpretation. We demonstrate that the observed echoes can be quantitatively modelled using a simple spin quantum dynamics approach that includes instrumental transfer functions. Based on an analysis of the echo crossing artefacts, we propose efficient phase cycling schemes for their suppression. This enables the use of advanced DEER experiments, characterized by high sensitivity and increased accuracy for long-distance measurements, on novel fully coherent EPR spectrometers. PMID:27339858

  5. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  6. Analysis on electronic control unit of continuously variable transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuanggui

    Continuously variable transmission system can ensure that the engine work along the line of best fuel economy, improve fuel economy, save fuel and reduce harmful gas emissions. At the same time, continuously variable transmission allows the vehicle speed is more smooth and improves the ride comfort. Although the CVT technology has made great development, but there are many shortcomings in the CVT. The CVT system of ordinary vehicles now is still low efficiency, poor starting performance, low transmission power, and is not ideal controlling, high cost and other issues. Therefore, many scholars began to study some new type of continuously variable transmission. The transmission system with electronic systems control can achieve automatic control of power transmission, give full play to the characteristics of the engine to achieve optimal control of powertrain, so the vehicle is always traveling around the best condition. Electronic control unit is composed of the core processor, input and output circuit module and other auxiliary circuit module. Input module collects and process many signals sent by sensor and , such as throttle angle, brake signals, engine speed signal, speed signal of input and output shaft of transmission, manual shift signals, mode selection signals, gear position signal and the speed ratio signal, so as to provide its corresponding processing for the controller core.

  7. Nanoparticle–Film Plasmon Ruler Interrogated with Transmission Visible Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of plasmonic nanorulers (PNRs) in sensing platforms has been plagued by technical challenges associated with the development of methods to fabricate precisely controlled nanostructures with high yield and characterize them with high throughput. We have previously shown that creating PNRs in a nanoparticle–film (NP–film) format enables the fabrication of an extremely large population of uniform PNRs with 100% yield using a self-assembly approach, which facilitates high-throughput PNR characterization using ensemble spectroscopic measurements and eliminates the need for expensive microscopy systems required by many other PNR platforms. We expand upon this prior work herein, showing that the NP–film PNR can be made compatible with aqueous sensing studies by adapting it for use in a transmission localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy format, where the coupled NP–film resonance responsible for the PNR signal is directly probed using an extinction measurement from a standard spectrophotometer. We designed slide holders that fit inside standard spectrophotometer cuvettes and position NP–film samples so that the coupled NP–film resonance can be detected in a collinear optical configuration. Once the NP–film PNR samples are cuvette-compatible, it is straightforward to calibrate the PNR in aqueous solution and use it to characterize dynamic, angstrom-scale distance changes resulting from pH-induced swelling of polyelectrolyte (PE) spacer layers as thin as 1 PE layer and also of a self-assembled monolayer of an amine-terminated alkanethiol. This development is an important step toward making PNR sensors more user-friendly and encouraging their widespread use in various sensing schemes. PMID:25541618

  8. DNA-based species detection capabilities using laser transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, A R; Barnes, M A; Li, F; Egan, S P; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T; Feder, J L; Lodge, D M

    2013-01-06

    Early detection of invasive species is critical for effective biocontrol to mitigate potential ecological and economic damage. Laser transmission spectroscopy (LTS) is a powerful solution offering real-time, DNA-based species detection in the field. LTS can measure the size, shape and number of nanoparticles in a solution and was used here to detect size shifts resulting from hybridization of the polymerase chain reaction product to nanoparticles functionalized with species-specific oligonucleotide probes or with the species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone. We carried out a series of DNA detection experiments using the invasive freshwater quagga mussel (Dreissena bugensis) to evaluate the capability of the LTS platform for invasive species detection. Specifically, we tested LTS sensitivity to (i) DNA concentrations of a single target species, (ii) the presence of a target species within a mixed sample of other closely related species, (iii) species-specific functionalized nanoparticles versus species-specific oligonucleotide probes alone, and (iv) amplified DNA fragments versus unamplified genomic DNA. We demonstrate that LTS is a highly sensitive technique for rapid target species detection, with detection limits in the picomolar range, capable of successful identification in multispecies samples containing target and non-target species DNA. These results indicate that the LTS DNA detection platform will be useful for field application of target species. Additionally, we find that LTS detection is effective with species-specific oligonucleotide tags alone or when they are attached to polystyrene nanobeads and with both amplified and unamplified DNA, indicating that the technique may also have versatility for broader applications.

  9. Angular-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy on a split-ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Cube, F.; Niegemann, J.; Irsen, S.; Bell, D. C.; Linden, S.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the plasmonic near field of a lithographically defined split-ring resonator with angular-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. By tilting the sample, different electric field components of the plasmonic modes can be probed with the electron beam. The electron energy loss spectra recorded under oblique incidence can feature plasmonic resonances that are not observable under normal incidence. Our experimental findings are supported by full numerical calculations based on the discontinuous Galerkin time-domain method.

  10. Cryo-scanning transmission electron tomography of vitrified cells.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sharon Grayer; Houben, Lothar; Elbaum, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) of fully hydrated, vitrified biological specimens has emerged as a vital tool for biological research. For cellular studies, the conventional imaging modality of transmission electron microscopy places stringent constraints on sample thickness because of its dependence on phase coherence for contrast generation. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using scanning transmission electron microscopy for cryo-tomography of unstained vitrified specimens (CSTET). We compare CSTET and CET for the imaging of whole bacteria and human tissue culture cells, finding favorable contrast and detail in the CSTET reconstructions. Particularly at high sample tilts, the CSTET signals contain more informative data than energy-filtered CET phase contrast images, resulting in improved depth resolution. Careful control over dose delivery permits relatively high cumulative exposures before the onset of observable beam damage. The increase in acceptable specimen thickness broadens the applicability of electron cryo-tomography.

  11. New views of materials through aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pennycook, S J; Varela, M

    2011-01-01

    The successful correction of third-order and, more recently, fifth-order aberrations has enormously enhanced the capabilities of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), by not only achieving record resolution, but also allowing near 100% efficiency for electron energy loss spectroscopy, and higher currents for two-dimensional spectrum imaging. These advances have meant that the intrinsic advantages of the STEM, incoherent imaging and simultaneous collection of multiple complementary images can now give new insights into many areas of materials physics. Here, we review a number of examples, mostly from the field of complex oxides, and look towards new directions for the future.

  12. Defects in paramagnetic Co-doped ZnO films studied by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, Andras; Ney, A.; Duchamp, Martial; Ney, V.; Boothroyd, Chris; Galindo, Pedro L.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal

    2013-12-23

    We have studied planar defects in epitaxial Co:ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al2O3) and the Co:ZnO/Al2O3 interface structure at atomic resolution using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Comparing Co:ZnO samples deposited by pulsed laser deposition and reactive magnetron sputtering, both exhibit extrinsic stacking faults, incoherent interface structures, and compositional variations within the first 3-4 Co:ZnO layers at the interface.. In addition, we have measured the local strain which reveals the lattice distortion around the stacking faults.

  13. Electron impact spectroscopy. [for atom and molecule quantum state investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of electron impact spectroscopy are discussed, comparing the electron spectroscopy techniques with those of the optical spectroscopy. The main advantage of the electron spectroscopy is to be found in the elimination of optical selection rules in excitation processes and the ability to scan the spectrum from the infrared to the X-ray region. The range of the method is indicated through a review of several examples, including electron impact excitation of Ba and rotational excitation of H2. The sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by vibrational excitation spectrum of N2. It is shown that the application of the method to the inner-shell excitation allows to obtain information about molecular species which are not commonly available, while spectroscopy of negative ions yields information about their energy and symmetry properties. However, the techniques are still under development and more data are expected to become available in the coming years.

  14. Quantification of the Information Limit of Transmission Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2008-11-14

    The resolving power of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes is characterized by the information limit, which reflects the size of the smallest object detail observable with a particular instrument. We introduce a highly accurate measurement method for the information limit, which is suitable for modern aberration-corrected electron microscopes. An experimental comparison with the traditionally applied Young's fringe method yields severe discrepancies and confirms theoretical considerations according to which the Young's fringe method does not reveal the information limit.

  15. Direct observations of atomic diffusion by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, M.; Kopf, D.; Utlaut, M.; Parker, N. W.; Crewe, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope to study the diffusion of heavy atoms on thin film substrates of low atomic number has been investigated. We have shown that it is possible to visualize the diffusion of individual uranium atoms adsorbed to thin carbon film substrates and that the observed motion of the atoms does not appear to be induced by the incident electron beam. Images PMID:16592396

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia Diaz; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Kristiansen, Per Magnus; Olsson, Eva

    2017-05-01

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000kGy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia Diaz; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Kristiansen, Per Magnus; Olsson, Eva

    2017-02-01

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000kGy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Electronic spectroscopy and electronic structure of diatomic CrC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugh, Dale J.; Morse, Michael D.; Kalemos, Apostolos; Mavridis, Aristides

    2010-07-01

    Optical spectra of jet-cooled diatomic CrC have been recorded in the near infrared region using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy combined with mass-selective detection of the resulting ions. Several weak transitions have been observed, along with one relatively strong band near 842 nm. Rotational resolution and analysis of this band confirms that the ground state is of Σ3- symmetry. Ab initio calculations have been performed that demonstrate that the ground state is highly multiconfigurational in nature, with a leading configuration of 1σ22σ21π41δ2 for the ten valence electrons. From the rotational analysis of the 842 nm Σ3-←X Σ3- band, the derived spectroscopic constants of the ground and excited states for C52rC12 are B0″=0.659 97(49), λ0″=6.74(24), γ0″=-0.066(20), T0=11 870.7660(65), B'=0.608 29(39), λ'=7.11(24), and γ'=0.144(17) cm-1. Here and throughout this article, 1σ error limits are reported in parentheses. These rotational constants may be inverted to provide the bond lengths in the ground and excited states, r0″=1.6188(6) Å and r'=1.6861(5) Å, respectively. Ab initio calculations show that the upper state is the third state of Σ3- symmetry.

  19. Electronic signal regulator for constant resolution inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seman, T. R.; Mallik, R. R.

    1999-06-01

    A relatively simple and inexpensive ac signal regulator is described which facilitates constant resolution inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Constant resolution is achieved by maintaining an approximately constant ac modulation voltage across IET junctions during spectral scans. The regulator circuit is based upon a field-effect transistor optoisolator with appropriate feedback control acting as a voltage comparator. It is modular in design and can easily be added in the signal path of existing IET spectrometers. A complete schematic diagram of the circuit is provided as well as a discussion on the theory of operation. IET spectra obtained from tunnel junctions with various degrees of nonlinear conductance-voltage behavior are presented with, and without, the circuit. Analysis of these spectra shows that the regulator increases the spectrometer's signal-to-noise ratio, produces no distortion and, in the case of severely nonlinear junctions, reveals spectral features at mid to high bias, which are otherwise difficult or impossible to detect. Additionally, the regulator offers approximately an order of magnitude increase in data acquisition rate over software algorithms for maintaining constant resolution via IEEE-488 control of spectrometer instrumentation. Our results suggest that such a modular analog regulator would be a valuable addition to IET spectrometers, especially for workers wishing to investigate severely nonlinear IET junctions.

  20. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M; Hull, Robert

    2015-01-04

    Localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films exposed to aqueous NaCl solutions was studied using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM). We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au(+) ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films.

  1. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Andrew M.

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  2. Nanowire growth kinetics in aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Yi -Chia; Panciera, Federico; Reuter, Mark C.; Stach, Eric A.; Ross, Frances M.

    2016-03-15

    Here, we visualize atomic level dynamics during Si nanowire growth using aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, and compare with lower pressure results from ultra-high vacuum microscopy. We discuss the importance of higher pressure observations for understanding growth mechanisms and describe protocols to minimize effects of the higher pressure background gas.

  3. Metals on BN Studied by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Zan, R.; Ramasse, Q.; Jalil, Rashid; Riaz, Ibstam; Novoselov, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    Metal impurities, gold and nickel, have been deliberately introduced into boron-nitride (BN) sheets. The structural and topographic properties of doped BN have been studied by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Analysis revealed that metal atoms cluster preferentially in/on contaminated areas. The metal coverage on BN is almost the same for the same evaporated amount of 1 Å.

  4. Nanowire growth kinetics in aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Yi -Chia; Panciera, Federico; Reuter, Mark C.; ...

    2016-03-15

    Here, we visualize atomic level dynamics during Si nanowire growth using aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, and compare with lower pressure results from ultra-high vacuum microscopy. We discuss the importance of higher pressure observations for understanding growth mechanisms and describe protocols to minimize effects of the higher pressure background gas.

  5. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy using incoherent light: theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Daniel B; Howey, Dylan J; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2013-07-25

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I((4)) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and new opportunities.

  7. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Bradley, R. F.; de Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Fernandes, J. L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, E. C.; Formaggio, J. A.; Furse, D.; Jones, A. M.; Kofron, J. N.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leber, M.; McBride, E. L.; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, P.; Monreal, B.; Oblath, N. S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rybka, G.; Rysewyk, D.; Sternberg, M. G.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Thummler, T.; VanDevender, B. A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-20

    Since 1897, we've understood that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. Here, we observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

  8. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Asner, D. M.; Bradley, R. F.; de Viveiros, L.; ...

    2015-04-20

    Since 1897, we've understood that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spec- trometer. Here, we observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual magnetically-trapped electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precisemore » electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.« less

  9. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; ...

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with amore » theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.« less

  10. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with a theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.

  11. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-04

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Chemical mapping and quantification at the atomic scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng Hsuan

    2013-06-25

    With innovative modern material-growth methods, a broad spectrum of fascinating materials with reduced dimensions-ranging from single-atom catalysts, nanoplasmonic and nanophotonic materials to two-dimensional heterostructural interfaces-is continually emerging and extending the new frontiers of materials research. A persistent central challenge in this grand scientific context has been the detailed characterization of the individual objects in these materials with the highest spatial resolution, a problem prompting the need for experimental techniques that integrate both microscopic and spectroscopic capabilities. To date, several representative microscopy-spectroscopy combinations have become available, such as scanning tunneling microscopy, tip-enhanced scanning optical microscopy, atom probe tomography, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Among these tools, STEM boasts unique chemical and electronic sensitivity at unparalleled resolution. In this Perspective, we elucidate the advances in STEM and chemical mapping applications at the atomic scale by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with a focus on the ultimate challenge of chemical quantification with atomic accuracy.

  13. Two dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy for molecular fingerprinting, DNA sequencing, and cancerous DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Arunkumar Chitteth; Rezapour, Mohammad Reza; Yun, Jeonghun; Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Min, Seung Kyu; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-02-25

    Laser-driven molecular spectroscopy of low spatial resolution is widely used, while electronic current-driven molecular spectroscopy of atomic scale resolution has been limited because currents provide only minimal information. However, electron transmission of a graphene nanoribbon on which a molecule is adsorbed shows molecular fingerprints of Fano resonances, i.e., characteristic features of frontier orbitals and conformations of physisorbed molecules. Utilizing these resonance profiles, here we demonstrate two-dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy (2D MES). The differential conductance with respect to bias and gate voltages not only distinguishes different types of nucleobases for DNA sequencing but also recognizes methylated nucleobases which could be related to cancerous cell growth. This 2D MES could open an exciting field to recognize single molecule signatures at atomic resolution. The advantages of the 2D MES over the one-dimensional (1D) current analysis can be comparable to those of 2D NMR over 1D NMR analysis.

  14. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  15. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  16. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  17. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P. Sartori, E.

    2016-02-15

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed.

  18. Atomic resolution imaging of graphene by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alex W.; Warner, Jamie H.

    2013-05-01

    The atomic structure of a material influences its electronic, chemical, magnetic and mechanical properties. Characterising carbon nanomaterials, such as fullerenes, nanotubes and graphene, at the atomic level is challenging due to their chemical reactivity and low atomic mass. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy are two of the leading methods for imaging graphene at the atomic level. Here, we report on recent advances in atomic resolution imaging of graphene using aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy and how it has revealed many of the structural deviations from the pristine monolayer form. Structures in graphene such as vacancy defects, edges, grain boundaries, linear chains, impurity dopants, layer number, layer stacking and bond rotations are explored.

  19. Quantitative high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of single atoms.

    PubMed

    Gamm, Björn; Blank, Holger; Popescu, Radian; Schneider, Reinhard; Beyer, André; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    Single atoms can be considered as the most basic objects for electron microscopy to test the microscope performance and basic concepts for modeling image contrast. In this work high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied to image single platinum, molybdenum, and titanium atoms in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The atoms are deposited on a self-assembled monolayer substrate that induces only negligible contrast. Single-atom contrast simulations were performed on the basis of Weickenmeier-Kohl and Doyle-Turner form factors. Experimental and simulated image intensities are in quantitative agreement on an absolute intensity scale, which is provided by the vacuum image intensity. This demonstrates that direct testing of basic properties such as form factors becomes feasible.

  20. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  1. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage.

  2. Secondary electron imaging of monolayer materials inside a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cretu, Ovidiu Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2015-08-10

    A scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a backscattered and secondary electron detector is shown capable to image graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Secondary electron contrasts of the two lightest monolayer materials are clearly distinguished from the vacuum level. A signal difference between these two materials is attributed to electronic structure differences, which will influence the escape probabilities of the secondary electrons. Our results show that the secondary electron signal can be used to distinguish between the electronic structures of materials with atomic layer sensitivity, enhancing its applicability as a complementary signal in the analytical microscope.

  3. Bone calcium, phosphorus detection by Auger electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tzaphlidou, Margaret; Berillis, Panagiotis; Matthopoulos, Demetrios

    2005-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy was used to detect calcium and phosphorus of cortical bone from rat femoral neck and rear tibia. Spectra were taken from bone pieces as well as from disks prepared from grinded bone material. Experimental conditions were found whereby the samples could be analyzed without conductive coatings. The results of this preliminary investigation demonstrate that Auger electron spectroscopy can be used to study bone mineral elements.

  4. Dose-rate-dependent damage of cerium dioxide in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; DuChene, Joseph S; Roberts, Alan D; Wei, Wei David; Herzing, Andrew A

    2016-11-01

    Beam damage caused by energetic electrons in the transmission electron microscope is a fundamental constraint limiting the collection of artifact-free information. Through understanding the influence of the electron beam, experimental routines may be adjusted to improve the data collection process. Investigations of CeO2 indicate that there is not a critical dose required for the accumulation of electron beam damage. Instead, measurements using annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrate that the onset of measurable damage occurs when a critical dose rate is exceeded. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is that oxygen vacancies created by exposure to a 300keV electron beam are actively annihilated as the sample re-oxidizes in the microscope environment. As a result, only when the rate of vacancy creation exceeds the recovery rate will beam damage begin to accumulate. This observation suggests that dose-intensive experiments can be accomplished without disrupting the native structure of the sample when executed using dose rates below the appropriate threshold. Furthermore, the presence of an encapsulating carbonaceous layer inhibits processes that cause beam damage, markedly increasing the dose rate threshold for the accumulation of damage. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Single-Electron Detection and Spectroscopy via Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation.

    PubMed

    Asner, D M; Bradley, R F; de Viveiros, L; Doe, P J; Fernandes, J L; Fertl, M; Finn, E C; Formaggio, J A; Furse, D; Jones, A M; Kofron, J N; LaRoque, B H; Leber, M; McBride, E L; Miller, M L; Mohanmurthy, P; Monreal, B; Oblath, N S; Robertson, R G H; Rosenberg, L J; Rybka, G; Rysewyk, D; Sternberg, M G; Tedeschi, J R; Thümmler, T; VanDevender, B A; Woods, N L

    2015-04-24

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges must emit electromagnetic radiation. Although first derived in 1904, cyclotron radiation from a single electron orbiting in a magnetic field has never been observed directly. We demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radio-frequency spectrometer. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay end point, and this work demonstrates a fundamentally new approach to precision beta spectroscopy for future neutrino mass experiments.

  6. Synthesis and Cs-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Multimetallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Subarna; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Velázquez-Salazar, Jesus; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Subarna Khanal Team

    2014-03-01

    Multimetallic nanoparticles have been attracted greater attention both in materials science and nanotechnology due to its unique electronic, optical, biological, and catalytic properties lead by physiochemical interactions among different atoms and phases. The distinct features of multimetallic nanoparticles enhanced synergetic properties, large surface to volume ratio and quantum size effects ultimately lead to novel and wide range of possibilities for different applications than monometallic counterparts. For instance, PtPd, Pt/Cu, Au-Au3Cu, AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt and many other multimetallic nanoparticles have raised interest for their various applications in fuel cells, ethanol and methanol oxidation reactions, hydrogen storage, and so on. The nanostructures were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM), in combination with high angle annular dark field (HAADF), bright field (BF), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) detectors. These techniques allowed us to probe the structure at the atomic level of the nanoparticles revealing new structural information and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. The authors would like to acknowledge NSF grants DMR-1103730, ``Alloys at the Nanoscale: The Case of Nanoparticles Second Phase'' and NSF PREM Grant # DMR 0934218.

  7. Optimization of monochromated TEM for ultimate resolution imaging and ultrahigh resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, Sergei; Cheng, Bin; Liu, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Meng-Lin; He, Jr-Hau; Chuvilin, Andrey

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In situ observation on electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition by Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, S.; Mori, K.

    1987-08-31

    W deposition, using WF/sub 6/ gas source by electron beam induced surface reaction, has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. W Auger electron signals have been observed for WF/sub 6/ adlayer by Auger electron spectroscopy. Moreover, initial growth for W deposition has been observed in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy. As a result, it became clear that a growth rate for W deposition is proportional to WF/sub 6/ gas pressure and can be --1 A/min at 2 x 10/sup -7/ Torr.

  9. A fast image simulation algorithm for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Image simulation for scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution for samples with realistic dimensions can require very large computation times using existing simulation algorithms. We present a new algorithm named PRISM that combines features of the two most commonly used algorithms, namely the Bloch wave and multislice methods. PRISM uses a Fourier interpolation factor f that has typical values of 4-20 for atomic resolution simulations. We show that in many cases PRISM can provide a speedup that scales with f(4) compared to multislice simulations, with a negligible loss of accuracy. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method with large-scale scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of a crystalline nanoparticle on an amorphous carbon substrate.

  10. Electron-beam-induced ferroelectric domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope: Toward deterministic domain patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, James L.; Liu, Shi; Lang, Andrew C.; Hubert, Alexander; Zukauskas, Andrius; Canalias, Carlota; Beanland, Richard; Rappe, Andrew M.; Arredondo, Miryam; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on transmission electron microscope beam-induced ferroelectric domain nucleation and motion. While previous observations of this phenomenon have been reported, a consistent theory explaining induced domain response is lacking, and little control over domain behavior has been demonstrated. We identify positive sample charging, a result of Auger and secondary electron emission, as the underlying mechanism driving domain behavior. By converging the electron beam to a focused probe, we demonstrate controlled nucleation of nanoscale domains. Molecular dynamics simulations performed are consistent with experimental results, confirming positive sample charging and reproducing the result of controlled domain nucleation. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of sample geometry and electron irradiation conditions on induced domain response. These findings elucidate past reports of electron beam-induced domain behavior in the transmission electron microscope and provide a path towards more predictive, deterministic domain patterning through electron irradiation.

  11. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; ...

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  12. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  13. Transmission of High-Power Electron Beams Through Small Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Tschalaer, Christoph; Alarcon, Ricardo O.; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V.; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R.; Cowan, Ray Franklin; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisher, Peter H.; Ihloff, Ernest E.; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kelleher, Aidan Michael; Legg, Robert A.; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R.; Ou, Longwu; Schmookler, Barak Abraham; Tennant, Christopher D.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Zhang, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Beam transmission losses of 3 p.p.m. through a 2 mm diameter aperture were maintained during a 7 hour continuous run.

  14. High Brightness and high polarization electron source using transmission photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Jin Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Mano, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Yasuhide; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Okumi, Shoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Konomi, Taro; Ohshima, Takashi; Saka, Takashi; Kato, Toshihiro; Horinaka, Hiromichi; Yasue, Tsuneo; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2009-08-04

    A transmission photocathode was fabricated based on GaAs-GaAsP strained superlattice layers on a GaP substrate and a 20 kV-gun was built to generate the polarized electron beams with the diameter of a few micro-meter. As the results, the reduced brightness of 1.3x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}/sr and the polarization of 90% were achieved.

  15. ENHANCEMENT OF CELL BOUNDARIES IN TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Tasdizen, Tolga; Whitaker, Ross; Marc, Robert; Jones, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an important modality for the analysis of cellular structures in neurobiology. The computational analysis of neurons entail their segmentation and reconstruction from TEM images. This problem is complicated by the heavily textured nature of cellular TEM images and typically low signal-to-noise ratios. In this paper, we propose a new partial differential equation for enhancing the contrast and continuity of cell membranes in TEM images. PMID:19169423

  16. Sub-10 nm device fabrication in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Fischbein, Michael D; Drndić, Marija

    2007-05-01

    We show that a high-resolution transmission electron microscope can be used to fabricate metal nanostructures and devices on insulating membranes by nanosculpting metal films. Fabricated devices include nanogaps, nanodiscs, nanorings, nanochannels, and nanowires with tailored curvatures and multi-terminal nanogap devices with nanoislands or nanoholes between the terminals. The high resolution, geometrical flexibility, and yield make this fabrication method attractive for many applications including nanoelectronics and nanofluidics.

  17. Reciprocity relations in transmission electron microscopy: A rigorous derivation.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A concise derivation of the principle of reciprocity applied to realistic transmission electron microscopy setups is presented making use of the multislice formalism. The equivalence of images acquired in conventional and scanning mode is thereby rigorously shown. The conditions for the applicability of the found reciprocity relations is discussed. Furthermore the positions of apertures in relation to the corresponding lenses are considered, a subject which scarcely has been addressed in previous publications.

  18. Analysis of Electron Beam Damage of Crystalline Pharmaceutical Materials by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S'ari, M.; Cattle, J.; Hondow, N.; Blade, H.; Cosgrove, S.; Brydson, R. M.; Brown, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the impact of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and low dose electron diffraction on ten different crystalline pharmaceutical compounds, covering a diverse chemical space and with differing physical properties. The aim was to establish if particular chemical moieties were more susceptible to damage within the electron beam. We have measured crystalline diffraction patterns for each and indexed nine out of ten of them. Characteristic electron dosages are reported for each material, with no apparent correlation between chemical structure and stability within the electron beam. Such low dose electron diffraction protocols are suitable for the study of pharmaceutical compounds.

  19. Free-standing graphene by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, F Q; Li, Z Y; Wang, Z W; He, L; Han, M; Wang, G H

    2010-11-01

    Free-standing graphene sheets have been imaged by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We show that the discrete numbers of graphene layers enable an accurate calibration of STEM intensity to be performed over an extended thickness and with single atomic layer sensitivity. We have applied this calibration to carbon nanoparticles with complex structures. This leads to the direct and accurate measurement of the electron mean free path. Here, we demonstrate potentials using graphene sheets as a novel mass standard in STEM-based mass spectrometry.

  20. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum,J.; Anderson, T.

    2006-07-13

    InN nanorods were grown on a, c-, and r-plane of sapphire and also on Si (111) and GaN (0001) by non-catalytic, template-free hydride metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and studied by transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss (EELS) and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. These nanocrystals have different shapes and different faceting depending on the substrate used and their crystallographic orientation. EELS measurements have confirmed the high purity of these crystals. The observed PL peak was in the range of 0.9-0.95 eV. The strongest PL intensity was observed for the nanocrystals with the larger diameters.

  1. Applications of 1 MV field-emission transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Akira

    2003-01-01

    A newly developed 1 MV field-emission transmission electron microscope has recently been applied to the field of superconductivity by utilizing its bright and monochromatic field-emission electron beam. This microscope allows individual magnetic vortices inside high-Tc superconductors to be observed, thus, opening the way to investigate the unusual behaviour of vortices, which reflects the anisotropic layered structure of these superconducting materials. One example is the observation of the arrangements of chain vortex lines that are formed when a magnetic field is applied obliquely to the layer plane of the materials.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of a model crystalline organic, theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattle, J.; S'ari, M.; Hondow, N.; Abellán, P.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyse the diffraction patterns of the model crystalline organic theophylline to investigate beam damage in relation to changing accelerating voltage, sample temperature and TEM grid support films. We find that samples deposited on graphene film grids have the longest lifetimes when also held at -190 °C and imaged at 200 kV accelerating voltage. Finally, atomic lattice images are obtained in bright field STEM by working close to the estimated critical electron dose for theophylline.

  3. Transmission electron microscopic characterization of hypersensitive human radicular dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiyama, M.; Noiri, Y.; Ozaki, K.; Uchida, A.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ishida, H. )

    1990-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray microanalysis (XMA) were used for the study of the ultrastructure of the lumens of dentinal tubules in superficial layers of dentin specimens obtained by use of a new biopsy technique from both hypersensitive and naturally desensitized areas of exposed root surfaces, in vivo. The TEM images showed clearly that the lumens of most of the tubules were occluded with mineral crystals in naturally desensitized areas, but such lumens were empty and surrounded with peritubular and intertubular dentin in hypersensitive areas. Moreover, electron-dense structures that lined peritubular dentin were observed in the empty lumens of dentinal tubules.

  4. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  5. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Studying Arabidopsis chloroplast structural organisation using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Stefan; Jarvis, R Paul

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts, as well as other, non-photosynthetic types of plastid, are characteristic structures within plant cells. They are relatively large organelles (typically 1-5 μm in diameter), and so can readily be analysed by electron microscopy. Chloroplast structure is remarkably complex, comprising at least six distinct sub-organellar compartments, and is sensitive to developmental changes, environmental effects, and genetic lesions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), therefore, represents a powerful technique for monitoring the effects of various changing parameters or treatments on the development and differentiation of these important organelles. We describe a method for the analysis of Arabidopsis plant material by TEM, primarily for the assessment of plastid ultrastructure.

  7. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  8. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  9. Challenges to Constraining Exoplanet Masses via Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natasha E.; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2017-02-01

    MassSpec, a method for determining the mass of a transiting exoplanet from its transmission spectrum alone, was proposed by de Wit & Seager. The premise of this method relies on the planet’s surface gravity being extracted from the transmission spectrum via its effect on the atmospheric scale height, which in turn determines the strength of absorption features. Here, we further explore the applicability of MassSpec to low-mass exoplanets—specifically those in the super-Earth size range for which radial velocity determinations of the planetary mass can be extremely challenging and resource intensive. Determining the masses of these planets is of the utmost importance because their nature is otherwise highly unconstrained. Without knowledge of the mass, these planets could be rocky, icy, or gas-dominated. To investigate the effects of planetary mass on transmission spectra, we present simulated observations of super-Earths with atmospheres made up of mixtures of H2O and H2, both with and without clouds. We model their transmission spectra and run simulations of each planet as it would be observed with James Webb Space Telescope using the NIRISS, NIRSpec, and MIRI instruments. We find that significant degeneracies exist between transmission spectra of planets with different masses and compositions, making it impossible to unambiguously determine the planet’s mass in many cases.

  10. Challenges to Constraining Exoplanet Masses via Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Eliza; Batalha, Natasha; Mbarek, Rostom

    2017-01-01

    MassSpec, a method for determining the mass of a transiting exoplanet from its transmission spectrum alone, was proposed by deWit and Seager (2013). The premise of this method relies on the planet's surface gravity being extracted from the transmission spectrum via its affect on the atmospheric scale height, which in turn determines the depth of absorption features. Here, we further explore the applicability of MassSpec to low-mass exoplanets - specifically those in the super-Earth size range for which radial velocity determinations of the planetary mass can be extremely challenging and resource intensive. Determining the masses of these planets is of the utmost importance because the nature of these planets is otherwise highly unconstrained. Without knowledge of the mass, these planets could be rocky, icy, or gas-dominated. To investigate the effects of planetary mass on transmission spectra, we present simulated observations of super-Earths with atmospheres made up of mixtures of water and H2 both with and without clouds. We model their transmission spectra and run simulations of each planet as it would be observed via JWST with the NIRISS, NIRSpec, and MIRI instruments. We find that significant degeneracies exist between transmission spectra of planets with different masses and compositions, making it impossible to unambiguously determine the planet's mass in many cases.

  11. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  12. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy in molecular junctions showing quantum interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhani, C.; Della Rocca, M. L.; Bessis, C.; Bonnet, R.; Barraud, C.; Lafarge, P.; Chevillot, A.; Martin, P.; Lacroix, J.-C.

    2017-04-01

    Destructive quantum interference effect is implemented in large area molecular junctions to improve signatures of electron-phonon interaction. Vertical molecular junctions based on a cross-conjugated anthraquinone layer were fabricated and low-noise transport measurements were performed by acquiring simultaneously the current-voltage characteristics, its second derivative, and the differential conductance. Signatures of vibrational modes excited by inelastic events are present in the whole measured voltage range and superpose to the conductance suppression induced by destructive quantum interference. As a consequence vibrational modes have improved visibility in the low energy window (<80 meV ). Inelastic electron transport spectroscopy data are compared to infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy on Au/anthraquinone thin films. Common vibrational modes can be clearly identified, but inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy reveals the existence of vibrational modes in a wider energy range (0 -400 meV ) where infrared spectroscopy is lacking.

  13. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  14. Precision electron flow measurements in a disk transmission line.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Waylon T.; Pelock, Michael D.; Martin, Jeremy Paul; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David

    2008-01-01

    An analytic model for electron flow in a system driving a fixed inductive load is described and evaluated with particle in cell simulations. The simple model allows determining the impedance profile for a magnetically insulated transmission line given the minimum gap desired, and the lumped inductance inside the transition to the minimum gap. The model allows specifying the relative electron flow along the power flow direction, including cases where the fractional electron flow decreases in the power flow direction. The electrons are able to return to the cathode because they gain energy from the temporally rising magnetic field. The simulations were done with small cell size to reduce numerical heating. An experiment to compare electron flow to the simulations was done. The measured electron flow is {approx}33% of the value from the simulations. The discrepancy is assumed to be due to a reversed electric field at the cathode because of the inductive load and falling electron drift velocity in the power flow direction. The simulations constrain the cathode electric field to zero, which gives the highest possible electron flow.

  15. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy: the ultimate nanoanalytical technique.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John Meurig; Midgley, Paul A

    2004-06-07

    To be able to determine the elemental composition and morphology of individual nanoparticles consisting of no more than a dozen or so atoms that weigh a few zeptograms (10(-21) g) is but one of the attainments of modern electron microscopy. With slightly larger specimens (embracing a few unit cells of the structure) their symmetry, crystallographic phase, unit-cell dimension, chemical composition and often the valence state (from parallel electron spectroscopic measurements) of the constituent atoms may also be determined using a scanning beam of electrons of ca. 0.5 nm diameter. Nowadays electron crystallography, which treats the digital data of electron diffraction (ED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) images of minute (ca. 10(-18)g) specimens in a quantitatively rigorous manner, solves hitherto unknown structures just as X-ray diffraction does with bulk single crystals. In addition, electron tomography (see cover photograph and its animation) enables a three-dimensional picture of the internal structure of minute objects, such as nanocatalysts in a single pore, as well as structural faults such as micro-fissures, to be constructed with a resolution of 1 nm from an angular series of two-dimensional (projected) images. Very recently (since this article was first written) a new meaning has been given to electron crystallography as a result of the spatio-temporal resolution of surface phenomena achieved on a femtosecond timescale.

  16. Transmission And Emission Spectroscopy Of Exoplanetary Atmospheres From The Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I like to present some preliminary results on a new attempt of the ground based efforts and discuss the feasibility of ground-based spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres. This project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  17. Synergy between transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction: application to modulated structures.

    PubMed

    Batuk, Dmitry; Batuk, Maria; Abakumov, Artem M; Hadermann, Joke

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structure solution of modulated compounds is often very challenging, even using the well established methodology of single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This task becomes even more difficult for materials that cannot be prepared in a single-crystal form, so that only polycrystalline powders are available. This paper illustrates that the combined application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder diffraction is a possible solution to the problem. Using examples of anion-deficient perovskites modulated by periodic crystallographic shear planes, it is demonstrated what kind of local structural information can be obtained using various TEM techniques and how this information can be implemented in the crystal structure refinement against the powder diffraction data. The following TEM methods are discussed: electron diffraction (selected area electron diffraction, precession electron diffraction), imaging (conventional high-resolution TEM imaging, high-angle annular dark-field and annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy) and state-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques (atomic resolution mapping using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy).

  18. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  19. Auger electron spectroscopy of contrast-forming layers on metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Siegfried; Exner, Hans Eckart

    1988-01-01

    As shown by Auger electron spectroscopy, the layers formed during contrasting metallographic polished Cu and Ni with an apparatus using intense electron bombardment consist of metal sputtered from the Au, Fe, or Pb cathode. This layer takes up oxygen from the residual atmosphere. The mechanism of contrast enhancement is the same as that of vapor-deposited interference layers.

  20. In situ transmission electron microscopy analysis of conductive filament during solid electrolyte resistance switching

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Takashi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Ichiro

    2011-05-23

    An in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of a solid electrolyte, Cu-GeS, during resistance switching is reported. Real-time observations of the filament formation and disappearance process were performed in the TEM instrument and the conductive-filament-formation model was confirmed experimentally. Narrow conductive filaments were formed corresponding to resistance switching from high- to low-resistance states. When the resistance changed to high-resistance state, the filament disappeared. It was also confirmed by use of selected area diffractometry and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy that the conductive filament was made of nanocrystals composed mainly of Cu.

  1. Mapping unoccupied electronic states of freestanding graphene by angle-resolved low-energy electron transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicki, Flavio; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-08-01

    We report angle-resolved electron transmission measurements through freestanding graphene sheets in the energy range of 18 to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The measurements are carried out in a low-energy electron point source microscope, which allows simultaneously probing the transmission for a large angular range. The characteristics of low-energy electron transmission through graphene depend on its electronic structure above the vacuum level. The experimental technique described here allows mapping of the unoccupied band structure of freestanding two-dimensional materials as a function of the energy and probing angle, respectively, in-plane momentum. Our experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of a resonance in the band structure of graphene above the vacuum level [V. U. Nazarov, E. E. Krasovskii, and V. M. Silkin, Phys. Rev. B 87, 041405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.041405].

  2. Imaging domains in transmission electron microscopy (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. K.

    1987-04-01

    Magnetic domain walls and domains inside thin electron transparent specimens of ferromagnetic materials can be imaged using the Fresnel and Focault techniques in a transmission electron microscope. Combined with the diffraction, microstructural and microchemical capabilities of modern microscopes, Lorentz microscopy offers one of the most powerful tools to study structure-property relationships in magnetic materials. In addition, using this technique, it is possible to deduce the local magnetization distribution around inhomogeneities and complex Bloch and Néel walls. Lorentz images can be used to quantitatively measure domain wall thickness and estimate domain wall energy. With modified sample holders and pole pieces, one can study in situ domain wall motion and the interaction of domains with microstructural features such as second phases, grain boundaries, structural defects, etc. All these will be illustrated with examples of Lorentz images from soft and hard magnets with special emphasis on the Nd-Fe-B hard magnets. Finally, the limitations of the Lorentz imaging technique utilizing the deflected electron intensities will be outlined and a new technique which utilizes the phase changes in the electron beam as it passes through the material in a scanning transmission microscope will be reviewed.

  3. MgH2 → Mg phase transformation driven by a high-energy electron beam: An in situ transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, B.; Jones, I. P.; Walton, A.; Mann, V.; Book, D.; Harris, I. R.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a phase change have been studied using the electron beam in a transmission electron microscope to transform MgH2 into Mg. The study involved selected-area diffraction and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The orientation relation ( ? and ? ), obtained from the electron diffraction study, has been used to propose a model for the movements of magnesium atoms during the phase change. The in situ EELS results have been compared with the existing H-desorption model. The study aims to describe the sorption dynamics of hydrogen in MgH2, which is a base material for a number of promising hydrogen storage systems.

  4. High-resolution characterization of multiferroic heterojunction using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhoushen; Ruan, Jieji; Xie, Lin; Pan, Xiaoqing; Wu, Di; Wang, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Multiferroic tunnel junctions have been considered as potential candidates for nonvolatile memory devices. Understanding the atomic structure at the interface is crucial for optimizing the performances in such oxide electronics. Spatially resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy is employed to measure the compositional profiles across the interfaces of different layers with atomic resolution. Two-dimensional elemental imaging with atomic resolution is demonstrated, and the influences of the interface sharpness, the terminal layer, and cation intermixing are investigated. An asymmetric sublattice intermixing at the Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 interface is observed, which can affect the local Mn valence and coupling. The reduction in the Mn valence at the interface is further studied using EELS near-edge fine structures.

  5. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment--a transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M.Y.; Wang, Z.G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S.

    2005-08-08

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 deg. C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model.

  6. Below band-gap laser ablation of diamond for transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Foote, M. C.; Vasquez, R. P.; Fortier, E. P.; Posthill, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    A 248 nm excimer laser was used to thin naturally occurring type 1a diamond substrates at normal and glancing (22 deg) incidence. Perforation of a 250-micron-thick substrate was achieved in about 15 min at normal incidence. While the substrate thinned at glancing incidence was found to have large electron-transparent areas, that thinned at normal incidence required additional argon-ion milling to achieve electron transparency. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the back surface of the diamond failed to detect any graphite or glassy carbon, confirming that damage due to laser ablation occurs only at the incident surface. Samples prepared using this technique imaged in the transmission electron microscope were observed to have retained the nitrogen platelets characteristic of such type 1a diamonds.

  7. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment—a transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M. Y.; Wang, Z. G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S. T.

    2005-08-01

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 °C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy of bulk specimens over 10µm in thickness.

    PubMed

    Sadamatsu, Sunao; Tanaka, Masaki; Higashida, Kenji; Matsumura, Syo

    2016-03-01

    We succeeded the observation of microstructures in bulk-sized specimens of over 10µm in thickness by employing a technique that combines transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy-filtered imaging based on electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This method is unique in that it incorporates the inelastically scattered electrons into the imaging process. Using this technique, bright and sharp images of dislocations in crystalline silicon specimens as thick as 10µm were obtained. A calibration curve to determine foil thickness of such a thick specimen was also derived. This method simply extends the observable thickness range in TEM. If combined with tilt series of observation over a significant range of angle, it will disclose three dimensional nanostructures in a µm-order block of a specimen, promoting our understanding of the controlling mechanisms behind various bulky material properties. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Some performance tests of a microarea AES. [Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, G.; Poppa, H.

    1978-01-01

    An Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) system which has a submicron analysis capability is described. The system provides secondary electron imaging, as well as micro- and macro-area AES. The resolution of the secondary electron image of an oxidized Al contact pad on a charge-coupled device chip indicates a primary beam size of about 1000 A. For Auger mapping, a useful resolution of about 4000 A is reported

  10. Transmission electron microscope characterisation of molar-incisor-hypomineralisation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zonghan; Kilpatrick, Nicky M; Swain, Michael V; Munroe, Paul R; Hoffman, Mark

    2008-10-01

    Molar-incisor-hypomineralisation (MIH), one of the major developmental defects in dental enamel, is presenting challenge to clinicians due, in part, to the limited understanding of microstructural changes in affected teeth. Difficulties in the preparation of site-specific transmission electron microscope (TEM) specimens are partly responsible for this deficit. In this study, a dual-beam field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM)/focused ion beam (FIB) milling instrument was used to prepare electron transparent specimens of sound and hypomineralised enamel. Microstructural analysis revealed that the hypomineralised areas in enamel were associated with marked changes in microstructure; loosely packed apatite crystals within prisms and wider sheath regions were identified. Microstructural changes appear to occur during enamel maturation and may be responsible for the dramatic reduction in mechanical properties of the affected regions. An enhanced knowledge of the degradation of structural integrity in hypomineralised enamel could shed light on more appropriate management strategies for these developmental defects.

  11. In-situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy for battery research.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, B Layla; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong-Min; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  12. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L.; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A.; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  13. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  14. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and optical characterization of a-C-H and BN films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Warner, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The amorphous dielectrics a-C:H and BN were deposited on III-V semiconductors. Optical band gaps as high as 3 eV were measured for a-C:H generated by C4H10 plasmas; a comparison was made with bad gaps obtained from films prepared by CH4 glow discharges. The ion beam deposited BN films exhibited amorphous behavior with band gaps on the order of 5 eV. Film compositions were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The optical properties were characterized by ellipsometry, UV/VIS absorption, and IR reflection and transmission. Etching rates of a-C:H subjected to O2 dicharges were determined.

  16. Electronic spectroscopy of the Al +-Ar complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jie; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    1999-05-01

    The laser fluorescence excitation spectrum of the Al +-Ar complex near the Al + ion 3s3p 1P ← 3s 2 1S resonance transition is reported. An excited-state ( v', 0) progression and the (0, 1) hot band were observed. Rotational analysis revealed that these bands involve an electronic transition from the Al +-Ar X 1Σ+ ground state to the 1Σ+ state correlating with the Al +( 1P)+Ar asymptote. Rotational constants and upper-state vibrational constants and the dissociation energy were determined. The spectroscopic constants of the two observed Al +-Ar electronic states are compared with those for neutral AlAr states.

  17. Electron flow stability in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Stygar, W. A.

    2011-03-01

    We evaluate the stability of electron current flow in high-power magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). A detailed model of electron flow in cross-field gaps yields a dispersion relation for electromagnetic (EM) transverse magnetic waves [R. C. Davidson et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 2332 (1984)] which is solved numerically to obtain growth rates for unstable modes in various sheath profiles. These results are compared with two-dimensional (2D) EM particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of electron flow in high-power MITLs. We find that the macroscopic properties (charge and current densities and self-fields) of the equilibrium profiles observed in the simulations are well represented by the laminar-flow model of Davidson et al. Idealized simulations of sheared flow in electron sheaths yield growth rates for both long (diocotron) and short (magnetron) wavelength instabilities that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis. We conclude that electron sheaths that evolve self-consistently from space-charged-limited emission of electrons from the cathode in well-resolved 2D EM PIC simulations form stable profiles.

  18. Electron flow stability in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Stygar, W. A.

    2011-03-15

    We evaluate the stability of electron current flow in high-power magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). A detailed model of electron flow in cross-field gaps yields a dispersion relation for electromagnetic (EM) transverse magnetic waves [R. C. Davidson et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 2332 (1984)] which is solved numerically to obtain growth rates for unstable modes in various sheath profiles. These results are compared with two-dimensional (2D) EM particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of electron flow in high-power MITLs. We find that the macroscopic properties (charge and current densities and self-fields) of the equilibrium profiles observed in the simulations are well represented by the laminar-flow model of Davidson et al. Idealized simulations of sheared flow in electron sheaths yield growth rates for both long (diocotron) and short (magnetron) wavelength instabilities that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis. We conclude that electron sheaths that evolve self-consistently from space-charged-limited emission of electrons from the cathode in well-resolved 2D EM PIC simulations form stable profiles.

  19. Electron flow stability in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines.

    SciTech Connect

    Genoni, Thomas C.; Stygar, William A.; Welch, Dale Robert; Clark, R. E.; Rose, David V.

    2010-11-01

    We evaluate the stability of electron current flow in high-power magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). A detailed model of electron flow in cross-field gaps yields a dispersion relation for electromagnetic (EM) transverse magnetic waves [R. C. Davidson et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 2332 (1984)] which is solved numerically to obtain growth rates for unstable modes in various sheath profiles. These results are compared with two-dimensional (2D) EM particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of electron flow in high-power MITLs. We find that the macroscopic properties (charge and current densities and self-fields) of the equilibrium profiles observed in the simulations are well represented by the laminar-flow model of Davidson et al. Idealized simulations of sheared flow in electron sheaths yield growth rates for both long (diocotron) and short (magnetron) wavelength instabilities that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis. We conclude that electron sheaths that evolve self-consistently from space-charged-limited emission of electrons from the cathode in well-resolved 2D EM PIC simulations form stable profiles.

  20. Detection of nitric oxide by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-07-15

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges of detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different from those of transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems.

  1. Regaining the FORS: optical ground-based transmission spectroscopy of the exoplanet WASP-19b with VLT+FORS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghati, E.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Gibson, N.; Kabath, P.; Mallonn, M.; Van den Ancker, M. E.

    2015-04-01

    In the past few years, the study of exoplanets has evolved from being pure discovery, then being more exploratory in nature and finally becoming very quantitative. In particular, transmission spectroscopy now allows the study of exoplanetary atmospheres. Such studies rely heavily on space-based or large ground-based facilities, because one needs to perform time-resolved, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy. The very recent exchange of the prisms of the FORS2 atmospheric diffraction corrector on ESO's Very Large Telescope should allow us to reach higher data quality than was ever possible before. With FORS2, we have obtained the first optical ground-based transmission spectrum of WASP-19b, with 20 nm resolution in the 550-830 nm range. For this planet, the data set represents the highest resolution transmission spectrum obtained to date. We detect large deviations from planetary atmospheric models in the transmission spectrum redwards of 790 nm, indicating either additional sources of opacity not included in the current atmospheric models for WASP-19b or additional, unexplored sources of systematics. Nonetheless, this work shows the new potential of FORS2 for studying the atmospheres of exoplanets in greater detail than has been possible so far. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Three-Dimensional Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2–3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. PMID:20082729

  3. Three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2 - 3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original data set. The precision of the height determination was 0.2 nm. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved data set.

  4. Three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset.

  5. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvimov, Sergei; Plachinda, Pavel; Moeck, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Three novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals in a transmission electron microscope are presented. Either a single high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image [1] or a single precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] may be employed. PEDs from fine-grained crystal powders may also be utilized. Automation of the former two strategies is in progress and shall lead to statistically significant results on ensembles of nanocrystals. Open-access databases such as the Crystallography Open Database which provides more than 81,500 crystal structure data sets [3] or its mainly inorganic and educational subsets [4] may be utilized. [1] http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals 2007/j/of/dissertation.htm [2] P. Moeck and S. Rouvimov, in: {Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences}, Vol. 191, 2009, 270-313 [3] http://cod.ibt.lt, http://www.crystallography.net, http://cod.ensicaen.fr, http://nanocrystallography.org, http://nanocrystallography.net, http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2009/04/00/kk5039/kk5039.pdf [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  6. Auger electron spectroscopy of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, R. W.; Housley, R. M.; Szalkowski, F. J.; Marcus, H. L.

    1974-01-01

    Auger spectroscopy has been employed to study the surface composition of a number of grains from the submillimeter lunar fines. Some of the problems associated with using this technique for lunar sample analyses are discussed in terms of relevant physical principles. The use of inert gas sputtering to obtain thickness profiles of surface films is shown to be important in this type of investigation. Four anorthite grains from the Apollo 17 fines have been examined for evidence of vapor-deposited surface coatings of micrometeorite impact origin. The results indicate that the thickness of surface deposits, if they exist at all, are orders of magnitude less than expected. Auger analysis of orange glass balls form the 74220,107 fines have established sulfur-rich surface coatings on the order of 30 A in thickness.

  7. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1355 - Electronic Data Transmission Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic Data Transmission Format C Appendix C.... 1355, App. C Appendix C to Part 1355—Electronic Data Transmission Format All AFCARS data to be sent... be four semi-annual electronic data transmissions from the title IV-E agency to the...

  8. Improving transmission rates of electronic discharge summaries to GPs.

    PubMed

    Barr, Rory; Chin, Kuen Yeow; Yeong, Keefai

    2013-01-01

    Discharge summaries are a vital tool to communicate information from Hospital to Primary Care teams; updating GPs about what happened during an admission, and handing over care detailing any follow up care required. Historically, Discharge Summaries have been posted to hospitals, increasing costs for hospitals, creating administrative work for GP practices receiving the letters, and resulting in some letters being lost or delayed in reaching the GP, with implications for patient safety if follow up requests are not received and acted upon. In an effort to improve patient care, the Clinical Commissioning Group in Surrey drew up a contract with Ashford and St Peter's Foundation Trust, aiming to increase the percentage of discharge summaries sent electronically from the rate of 9% sent within 24 hours, to over 75%. This contract set targets of 50% in May, 65% in June, and 80% in July. Financial penalties would be imposed if targets were not achieved, starting in June 2013. The Trust set up a working group comprising of doctors, IT personnel and ward PAs to devise a multi-pronged solution to achieve this target. The electronic discharge summary system was reviewed and improvements were designed and developed to make the process of signing off letters easier, and transmission of signed off letters became automated rather than requiring manual transmission by ward PAs. Presentations and leaflets to explain the importance of prompt completion and transmission of discharge summaries were given to Doctors to improve compliance using the revised IT system. Figures on transmission rates were automatically emailed to key stakeholders every day (Ward PAs, Divisional Leads) showing performance on each ward. This helped identify areas requiring more intervention. Areas (e.g. Day Surgery) that had not used electronic discharge summaries were engaged with, and persuaded to take part. As a result, transmission rates of Discharge Summaries within 24 hours of patient discharge

  9. Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Semiconductor Interfacial Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Michael Dennis

    The epitaxial structure and characterization of semiconductor/semiconductor interfacial systems have been studied using transmission electron microscopy as the primary investigative technique. Geometrical and elastic energy theories of epitaxy, as they relate to interfacial structure, have been reviewed to establish the framework necessary for analyzing experimental semiconductor heterostructures. The diffracted electron intensities for cross-sectional semiconductor single layer and superlattice structures have been derived based on the kinematical theory. The expression for the kinematical intensity for electron diffraction from a superlattice was observed to be analogous to the diffraction of light by a diffraction grating. The effects of surface relaxation, present in all strained-layer specimens prepared for the transmission electron microscope, have been investigated using elasticity theory. Conditions where surface relaxation effects can be ignored have also been presented. In order to quantify elastic strains at the nanometer level using high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) images, a new strain analysis technique, based on the cumulative sum of deviations (CUSUM) in lattice-fringe spacings from a target value, has been developed. This technique accurately reproduced the strain profiles in simulated and experimental HREM images and proved to be robust even in the presence of high levels of experimental noise. The above theory and techniques have been applied to three experimental systems, covering three distinct regimes of lattice mismatch (lattice mismatch ranged from -3.4% to +14.6%). These three systems were In_{1-x}Ga_ {x}Sb (0 <=q x <=q 1) single layers on (001) GaAs, rm In_{1-x}Al_{x}Sb/InSb single layers and superlattices on (001) InSb, and a 20 period AlAs/GaAs superlattice on (001) GaAs.

  10. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis: Sample analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure conditions in atomic oxygen (ESCA) was performed on an SSL-100/206 Small Spot Spectrometer. All data were taken with the use of a low voltage electron flood gun and a charge neutralization screen to minimize charging effects on the data. The X-ray spot size and electron flood gun voltage used are recorded on the individual spectra as are the instrumental resolutions. Two types of spectra were obtained for each specimen: (1) general surveys, and (2) high resolution spectra. The two types of data reduction performed are: (1) semiquantitative compositional analysis, and (2) peak fitting. The materials analyzed are: (1) kapton 4, 5, and 6, (2) HDPE 19, 20, and 21, and (3) PVDF 4, 5, and 6.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  12. Segmentation of virus particle candidates in transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kylberg, G; Uppström, M; Hedlund, K-O; Borgefors, G; Sintorn, I-M

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation method that detects virus particles of various shapes in transmission electron microscopy images. The method is based on a statistical analysis of local neighbourhoods of all the pixels in the image followed by an object width discrimination and finally, for elongated objects, a border refinement step. It requires only one input parameter, the approximate width of the virus particles searched for. The proposed method is evaluated on a large number of viruses. It successfully segments viruses regardless of shape, from polyhedral to highly pleomorphic.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy of electrospun GaN nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-García, Joshua L.; Meléndez, Anamaris; Yates, Douglas; Santiago-Avilés, Jorge J.; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva M.

    2011-06-01

    We have reported earlier progress in producing polycrystalline wurtzite-polymorph and photo-conductive GaN nanofibers by electrospinning. This paper shows grain stacking during heat treatment and suggests the need to understand nucleation and grain growth following electrospinning. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis of GaN shows brittle fibers, grain stacking, and unfinished grain nucleation. X-Ray Diffraction analysis confirmed dominant hexagonal 101-wurtzite preferential overall orientation and the incipient grains are of high crystalline quality as seen by high resolution TEM.

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy Of Lipid Vesicles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Valentina; Mattei, Giovanni; Mazzoldi, Paolo; Vivenza, Nicoletta; Gasco, Paolo; Idee, Jean Marc; Robic, Caroline; Borsella, Elisabetta

    2010-10-01

    Iron oxides nanocrystals are largely used for biomedical applications due to their high magnetization. Furthermore for in vivo applications these nanoparticles must be covered with a non-toxic material. Inside the numerous nano-systems for drug delivery, lipid structures, such as Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs), have been largely developed for various administration routes. In this work SLNs and iron-oxide nanocrystals covered with a lipid shell are characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy. This technique has revealed to be essential to investigate the ultrafine compositional and morphological properties of these systems.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy study of flea lymph cell thin sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Uryi P.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Novikova, Olga V.

    2002-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy investigation of thin sections remains the major method of cells inner structure study with high resolution. However, the present-day technique of cells preparation make it impossible to study a number of biological samples, such as very small quantity of lymph cells of little insects. A new technique of cells preparation has been developed in our lab, which allows to obtain a thin sections of ultra small quantity of cells. Structure of lymph cells of flea was investigated by the technique.

  16. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  17. Simulation of transmission electron microscope images of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Rullgård, H; Ofverstedt, L-G; Masich, S; Daneholt, B; Oktem, O

    2011-09-01

    We present a new approach to simulate electron cryo-microscope images of biological specimens. The framework for simulation consists of two parts; the first is a phantom generator that generates a model of a specimen suitable for simulation, the second is a transmission electron microscope simulator. The phantom generator calculates the scattering potential of an atomic structure in aqueous buffer and allows the user to define the distribution of molecules in the simulated image. The simulator includes a well defined electron-specimen interaction model based on the scalar Schrödinger equation, the contrast transfer function for optics, and a noise model that includes shot noise as well as detector noise including detector blurring. To enable optimal performance, the simulation framework also includes a calibration protocol for setting simulation parameters. To test the accuracy of the new framework for simulation, we compare simulated images to experimental images recorded of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in vitreous ice. The simulated and experimental images show good agreement with respect to contrast variations depending on dose and defocus. Furthermore, random fluctuations present in experimental and simulated images exhibit similar statistical properties. The simulator has been designed to provide a platform for development of new instrumentation and image processing procedures in single particle electron microscopy, two-dimensional crystallography and electron tomography with well documented protocols and an open source code into which new improvements and extensions are easily incorporated. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Electron Flow Stability in Magnetically Insulated Vacuum Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Stygar, W. A.

    2010-11-01

    We evaluate the stability of electron current flow in high power magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). A detailed model of electron flow in cross-field gaps yields a dispersion relation for electromagnetic TM waves [1] which is solved numerically to obtain growth rates for unstable modes in various density profiles. These results are compared with 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of electron flow in high power MITLs. We find that the macroscopic properties (charge and current density, self-fields) of the equilibrium profiles observed in the simulations are well represented by the laminar flow model of [1]. Idealized simulations of sheared flow in electron sheaths show that unstable, sharp-cutoff radial density profiles rapidly evolve into stable flows with a more gradual density gradient. Growth rates for both long (diocotron) and short (magnetron) wavelength instabilities observed in the simulations agree well with the dispersion analysis. We conclude that electron sheaths in high power 2D MITL flows form stable profiles and that sheath expansion is not caused by flow instability. Subsequently, we investigate the impact of electrode plasma formation and evolution on sheath stability and gap closure using PIC simulations. We compare MITL simulations with experimental measurements. [1] R. C. Davidson, et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 2332 (1984).

  19. Signatures of vibronic coupling in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational and vibrational-electronic spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, James D; Khalil, Munira

    2017-09-07

    Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational (2D EV) spectroscopy and Two-Dimensional Vibrational-Electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy are new coherent four-wave mixing spectroscopies that utilize both electronically resonant and vibrationally resonant field-matter interactions to elucidate couplings between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. A system Hamiltonian is developed here to lay a foundation for interpreting the 2D EV and 2D VE signals that arise from a vibronically coupled molecular system in the condensed phase. A molecular system consisting of one anharmonic vibration and two electronic states is modeled. Equilibrium displacement of the vibrational coordinate and vibrational frequency shifts upon excitation to the first electronic excited state are included in our Hamiltonian through linear and quadratic vibronic coupling terms. We explicitly consider the nuclear dependence of the electronic transition dipole moment and demonstrate that these spectroscopies are sensitive to non-Condon effects. A series of simulations of 2D EV and 2D VE spectra obtained by varying parameters of the system, system-bath, and interaction Hamiltonians demonstrate that one of the following conditions must be met to observe signals: (1) non-zero linear and/or quadratic vibronic coupling in the electronic excited state, (2) vibrational-coordinate dependence of the electronic transition dipole moment, or (3) electronic-state-dependent vibrational dephasing dynamics. We explore how these vibronic interactions are manifested in the positions, amplitudes, and line shapes of the peaks in 2D EV and 2D VE spectroscopies.

  20. Signatures of vibronic coupling in two-dimensional electronic-vibrational and vibrational-electronic spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynor, James D.; Khalil, Munira

    2017-09-01

    Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational (2D EV) spectroscopy and Two-Dimensional Vibrational-Electronic (2D VE) spectroscopy are new coherent four-wave mixing spectroscopies that utilize both electronically resonant and vibrationally resonant field-matter interactions to elucidate couplings between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. A system Hamiltonian is developed here to lay a foundation for interpreting the 2D EV and 2D VE signals that arise from a vibronically coupled molecular system in the condensed phase. A molecular system consisting of one anharmonic vibration and two electronic states is modeled. Equilibrium displacement of the vibrational coordinate and vibrational frequency shifts upon excitation to the first electronic excited state are included in our Hamiltonian through linear and quadratic vibronic coupling terms. We explicitly consider the nuclear dependence of the electronic transition dipole moment and demonstrate that these spectroscopies are sensitive to non-Condon effects. A series of simulations of 2D EV and 2D VE spectra obtained by varying parameters of the system, system-bath, and interaction Hamiltonians demonstrate that one of the following conditions must be met to observe signals: (1) non-zero linear and/or quadratic vibronic coupling in the electronic excited state, (2) vibrational-coordinate dependence of the electronic transition dipole moment, or (3) electronic-state-dependent vibrational dephasing dynamics. We explore how these vibronic interactions are manifested in the positions, amplitudes, and line shapes of the peaks in 2D EV and 2D VE spectroscopies.

  1. Electron Spectroscopy: Applications for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercules, David M.

    2004-12-01

    The development of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA, XPS) is reviewed from an historical perspective that is relevant to its use for analytical chemistry. The emphasis is on early development of the technique, primarily during the period, 1964 1977. During these years there were significant developments in instrumentation, accompanied by significant advances in understanding the fundamentals of the technique. First, a historical perspective is presented to establish the backdrop against which XPS was developed. The early work in the field dealt mainly with measuring and understanding chemical shifts for elements and particularly for organic compounds. This was an exciting time because XPS appeared to provide chemical information unavailable otherwise. A detailed summary of some of the early work on chemical shifts is presented. It was also established that XPS could be used for quantitative analysis of elements, compounds, and different oxidation states of the same element. As the development of XPS occurred, emphasis changed from measuring chemical shifts to developing XPS as a surface analytical tool, a role that it fills today. Early applications to the analysis of catalysts and polymers, use to study adsorption and surface reactions, application of XPS to electrochemistry and corrosion, and studies of atmospheric particulates are all reviewed.

  2. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  3. Iterative reconstruction of magnetic induction using Lorentz transmission electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Phatak, C.; Gürsoy, D.

    2015-03-01

    Intense ongoing research on complex nanomagnetic structures requires a fundamental understanding of the 3D magnetization and the stray fields around the nano-objects. 3D visualization of such fields offers the best way to achieve this. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy provides a suitable combination of high resolution and ability to quantitatively visualize the magnetization vectors using phase retrieval methods. In this paper, we present a formalism to represent the magnetic phase shift of electrons as a Radon transform of the magnetic induction of the sample. Using this formalism, we then present the application of common tomographic methods particularly the iterative methods, to reconstruct the 3D components of the vector held. We present an analysis of the effect of missing wedge and the limited angular sampling as well as reconstruction of complex 3D magnetization in a nanowire using simulations.

  4. Modeling atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Scott D; Oxley, Mark P; Allen, Leslie J

    2008-02-01

    A real-space description of inelastic scattering in scanning transmission electron microscopy is derived with particular attention given to the implementation of the projected potential approximation. A hierarchy of approximations to expressions for inelastic images is presented. Emphasis is placed on the conditions that must hold in each case. The expressions that justify the most direct, visual interpretation of experimental data are also the most approximate. Therefore, caution must be exercised in selecting experimental parameters that validate the approximations needed for the analysis technique used. To make the most direct, visual interpretation of electron-energy-loss spectroscopic images from core-shell excitations requires detector improvements commensurate with those that aberration correction provides for the probe-forming lens. Such conditions can be relaxed when detailed simulations are performed as part of the analysis of experimental data.

  5. Development of a Nanoindenter for In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stach, Eric A.; Freeman, Tony; Minor, Andrew M.; Owen, Doug K.; Cumings, John; Wall, Mark A.; Chraska, Tomas; Hull, Robert; Morris, J.W.; Jr, A.; Zettl, Ulrich

    2001-11-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy is an established experimental technique that permits direct observation of the dynamics and mechanisms of dislocation motion and deformation behavior. In this article, we detail the development of a novel specimen goniometer that allows real-time observations of the mechanical response of materials to indentation loads. The technology of the scanning tunneling microscope is adopted to allow nanometer-scale positioning of a sharp, conductive diamond tip onto the edge of an electron-transparent sample. This allows application of loads to nanometer-scale material volumes coupled with simultaneous imaging of the material's response. The emphasis in this report is qualitative and technique oriented, with particular attention given to sample geometry and other technical requirements. Examples of the deformation of aluminum and titanium carbide as well as the fracture of silicon will be presented.

  6. Coherent Chromatic Effect in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erni, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    Under the assumption of local atomic scattering, elastic electron scattering at finite scattering angles implies a small but finite energy loss. This energy loss, which under conventional imaging conditions in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is of the order of 0.1 meV and thus negligible, increases by more than 2 orders of magnitude if light elements are investigated at sub-Ångström resolution. For a microscope of finite chromatic aberration, the energy loss leads to an element-specific chromatic effect which increases with the instrument resolution and with decreasing mass of the scattering atom. Despite that this effect is small, it can degrade the achievable image contrast. However, the effect can be considered in the optimization of the phase-contrast imaging conditions and even be beneficial to enhance the relative image contrast of light atoms in the presence of heavy atoms.

  7. Coherent Chromatic Effect in the Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Erni, Rolf

    2016-03-18

    Under the assumption of local atomic scattering, elastic electron scattering at finite scattering angles implies a small but finite energy loss. This energy loss, which under conventional imaging conditions in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is of the order of 0.1 meV and thus negligible, increases by more than 2 orders of magnitude if light elements are investigated at sub-Ångström resolution. For a microscope of finite chromatic aberration, the energy loss leads to an element-specific chromatic effect which increases with the instrument resolution and with decreasing mass of the scattering atom. Despite that this effect is small, it can degrade the achievable image contrast. However, the effect can be considered in the optimization of the phase-contrast imaging conditions and even be beneficial to enhance the relative image contrast of light atoms in the presence of heavy atoms.

  8. In situ transmission electron microscopy for magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Duc-The; Theil Kuhn, Luise

    2016-12-01

    Nanomagnetism is a subject of great interest because of both application and fundamental aspects in which understanding of the physical and electromagnetic structure of magnetic nanostructures is essential to explore the magnetic properties. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool that allows understanding of both physical structure and micromagnetic structure of the thin samples at nanoscale. Among TEM techniques, in situ TEM is the state-of-the-art approach for imaging such structures in dynamic experiments, reconstructing a real-time nanoscale picture of the properties-structure correlation. This paper aims at reviewing and discussing in situ TEM magnetic imaging studies, including Lorentz microscopy and electron holography in TEM, applied to the research of magnetic nanostructures.

  9. A transmission electron microscopic study of the Bethany iron meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, F.; Axon, H. J.

    1985-02-01

    The Bethany iron meteorite, which is a part of the Gibeon shower, is a fine octahedrite with zoned plessite fields of various sizes. The optically irresolvable microstructural details inside the plessitic fields have been studied by transmission electron microscopy, and the crystallographic relationships between the primary kamacite (alpha) and the parent taenite (gamma), and between the alpha and gamma particles in the coarse plessite, have been examined using electron diffraction. In the case of primary kamacite, the orientation-relationship with gamma was close to the Nishiyama-Wasserman relationship, whereas, for the plessitic alpha, the orientation-relationship with gamma was close to Kurdjumov-Sachs. It was also found that the (111)-gamma and (110)-alpha planes were not strictly parallel. Additionally, measurements of the composition profile through the zoned plessite have been made using STEM microanalysis technique, and related to microstructure.

  10. Electronic and Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Green, Alistair M.; Tame-Reyes, Victor; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-06-01

    Electronic and photoelectron spectra of toluene are presented and discussed. The utilization of a recently reported scheme for assigning the normal vibrations of substituted benzenes allows these spectra to be compared to those of other molecules with unprecedented clarity. Changes in vibrational activity within a series of substituted benzene molecules will be discussed, specifically the increased rate of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution observed in molecules where the substituent is a methyl group. A. M. Gardner and T. G. Wright, J. Chem. Phys., 135, 114305 (2011)

  11. Hot electron inelastic scattering and transmission across graphene surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Byoung Don; Champlain, James G.; Boos, J. Brad

    2017-06-01

    Inelastic scattering and transmission of externally injected hot carriers across graphene layers are considered as a function of graphene carrier density, temperature, and surrounding dielectric media. A finite temperature dynamic dielectric function for graphene for an arbitrary momentum q and frequency ω is found under the random phase approximation and a generalized scattering lifetime formalism is used to calculate the scattering and transmission rates. Unusual trends in scattering are found, including declining rates as graphene carrier density increases and interband transition excitations, which highlights the difference with out-of-plane as compared to in-plane transport. The results also show strong temperature dependence with a drastic increase in scattering at room temperature. The calculated scattering rate at T = 300 K shows a wide variation from 0.2 to 10 fs-1 depending on graphene carrier density, incident carrier momentum, and surrounding dielectrics. The analysis suggests that a transmission rate greater than 0.9 for a carrier with kinetic energy over 1 eV is achievable by carefully controlling the graphene carrier density in conjunction with the use of high-κ dielectric materials. Potential applications to electronic and electro-optical devices are also discussed.

  12. Modulation scheme for electron-electron double resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlkopf, A. F.; Kuiper, F. G.; Smidt, J.; Tiggelman, T. A.

    1983-06-01

    A modulation scheme for electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) spectrometers is presented. With this scheme an optimum stabilization signal for locking the pump microwave generator to the pumped electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) line is generated. A separate pump power level and a separate magnetic field modulation amplitude are used for the purpose of locking. In general, such a modulation scheme introduces false ELDOR lines. These false lines disturb the real ELDOR signals, or introduce an ELDOR signal in the absence of any communication between the observed EPR line and the pumped EPR line. With the described modulation scheme the frequencies of the false ELDOR signals are limited to even multiples of the frequency of the wanted ELDOR signals. This makes a suppression of the false ELDOR lines easy.

  13. Rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy of 5-methoxyindole.

    PubMed

    Brand, Christian; Oeltermann, Olivia; Pratt, David; Weinkauf, Rainer; Meerts, W Leo; van der Zande, Wim; Kleinermanns, Karl; Schmitt, Michael

    2010-07-14

    Rotationally resolved electronic spectra of the vibrationless origin and of eight vibronic bands of 5-methoxyindole (5MOI) have been measured and analyzed using an evolutionary strategy approach. The experimental results are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. All vibronic bands can be explained by absorption of a single conformer, which unambiguously has been shown to be the anti-conformer from its rotational constants and excitation energy. For both anti- and syn-conformers, a (1)L(a)/(1)L(b) gap larger than 4000 cm(-1) is calculated, making the vibronic coupling between both states very small, thereby explaining why the spectrum of 5MOI is very different from that of the parent molecule, indole.

  14. Two-dimensional Electronic Double-Quantum Coherence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongho; Mukamel, Shaul

    2009-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The theory of electronic structure of many-electron systems like molecules is extraordinarily complicated. A lot can be learned by considering how electron density is distributed, on average, in the average field of the other electrons in the system. That is, mean field theory. However, to describe quantitatively chemical bonds, reactions, and spectroscopy requires consideration of the way that electrons avoid each other by the way they move; this is called electron correlation (or in physics, the many-body problem for fermions). While great progress has been made in theory, there is a need for incisive experimental tests that can be undertaken for large molecular systems in the condensed phase. Here we report a two-dimensional (2D) optical coherent spectroscopy that correlates the double excited electronic states to constituent single excited states. The technique, termed two-dimensional double-coherence spectroscopy (2D-DQCS), makes use of multiple, time-ordered ultrashort coherent optical pulses to create double- and single-quantum coherences over time intervals between the pulses. The resulting two-dimensional electronic spectrum maps the energy correlation between the first excited state and two-photon allowed double-quantum states. The principle of the experiment is that when the energy of the double-quantum state, viewed in simple models as a double HOMO to LUMO excitation, equals twice that of a single excitation, then no signal is radiated. However, electron-electron interactions—a combination of exchange interactions and electron correlation—in real systems generates a signal that reveals precisely how the energy of the double-quantum resonance differs from twice the single-quantum resonance. The energy shift measured in this experiment reveals how the second excitation is perturbed by both the presence of the first excitation and the way that the other electrons in the system have responded to the presence of that first excitation. We

  15. On the threshold conditions for electron beam damage of asbestos amosite fibers in the transmission electron microscope (TEM).

    PubMed

    Martin, Joannie; Beauparlant, Martin; Sauvé, Sébastien; L'Espérance, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    Asbestos amosite fibers were investigated to evaluate the damage caused by a transmission electron microscope (TEM) electron beam. Since elemental x-ray intensity ratios obtained by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) are commonly used for asbestos identification, the impact of beam damage on these ratios was evaluated. It was determined that the magnesium/silicon ratio best represented the damage caused to the fiber. Various tests showed that most fibers have a current density threshold above which the chemical composition of the fiber is modified. The value of this threshold current density varied depending on the fiber, regardless of fiber diameter, and in some cases could not be determined. The existence of a threshold electron dose was also demonstrated. This value was dependent on the current density used and can be increased by providing a recovery period between exposures to the electron beam. This study also established that the electron beam current is directly related to the damage rate above a current density of 165 A/cm(2). The large number of different results obtained suggest, that in order to ensure that the amosite fibers are not damaged, analysis should be conducted below a current density of 100 A/cm(2).

  16. Contamination mitigation strategies for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D R G

    2015-06-01

    Modern scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) enables imaging and microanalysis at very high magnification. In the case of aberration-corrected STEM, atomic resolution is readily achieved. However, the electron fluxes used may be up to three orders of magnitude greater than those typically employed in conventional STEM. Since specimen contamination often increases with electron flux, specimen cleanliness is a critical factor in obtaining meaningful data when carrying out high magnification STEM. A range of different specimen cleaning methods have been applied to a variety of specimen types. The contamination rate has been measured quantitatively to assess the effectiveness of cleaning. The methods studied include: baking, cooling, plasma cleaning, beam showering and UV/ozone exposure. Of the methods tested, beam showering is rapid, experimentally convenient and very effective on a wide range of specimens. Oxidative plasma cleaning is also very effective and can be applied to specimens on carbon support films, albeit with some care. For electron beam-sensitive materials, cooling may be the method of choice. In most cases, preliminary removal of the bulk of the contamination by methods such as baking or plasma cleaning, followed by beam showering, where necessary, can result in a contamination-free specimen suitable for extended atomic scale imaging and analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Accurate Nanoscale Crystallography in Real-Space Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dycus, J Houston; Harris, Joshua S; Sang, Xiahan; Fancher, Chris M; Findlay, Scott D; Oni, Adedapo A; Chan, Tsung-Ta E; Koch, Carl C; Jones, Jacob L; Allen, Leslie J; Irving, Douglas L; LeBeau, James M

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report reproducible and accurate measurement of crystallographic parameters using scanning transmission electron microscopy. This is made possible by removing drift and residual scan distortion. We demonstrate real-space lattice parameter measurements with <0.1% error for complex-layered chalcogenides Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and a Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 nanostructured alloy. Pairing the technique with atomic resolution spectroscopy, we connect local structure with chemistry and bonding. Combining these results with density functional theory, we show that the incorporation of Se into Bi2Te3 causes charge redistribution that anomalously increases the van der Waals gap between building blocks of the layered structure. The results show that atomic resolution imaging with electrons can accurately and robustly quantify crystallography at the nanoscale.

  18. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet Wavelength Range.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Moran, Andrew M

    2012-09-20

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopies conducted at visible and infrared wavelengths are having a transformative impact on the understanding of numerous processes in condensed phases. The extension of 2D spectroscopy to the ultraviolet spectral range (2DUV) must contend with several challenges, including the attainment of adequate laser bandwidth, interferometric phase stability, and the suppression of undesired nonlinearities in the sample medium. Solutions to these problems are motivated by the study of a wide range of biological systems whose lowest-frequency electronic resonances are found in the UV. The development of 2DUV spectroscopy also makes possible the attainment of new insights into elementary chemical reaction dynamics (e.g., electrocyclic ring opening in cycloalkenes). Substantial progress has been made in both the implementation and application of 2DUV spectroscopy in the past several years. In this Perspective, we discuss 2DUV methodology, review recent applications, and speculate on what the future will hold.

  19. Ion cyclotron transmission spectroscopy in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    The propagation of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies has been investigated experimentally in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. A small, broadband, radiofrequency (rf) magnetic probe located outside the plasma limiter, at a major radius near that of the plasma center, was excited with a low power, frequency swept source (1--200 MHz). Waves propagating to a distant location were detected with a second, identical probe. The rf transmission spectrum revealed a region of attenuation over a band of frequencies for which the minority fundamental resonance was located between the outer plasma edge and the major radius of the probe location. Distinct, non-overlapping attenuation bands were observed from hydrogen and helium-3 minority species; a distinct tritium band should be observed in future DT experiments. Rapid spectrum acquisition during a helium-3 gas puff experiment showed that the wave attenuation involved the plasma core and was not a surface effect. A model in which the received power varied exponentially with the minority density, averaged over the resonance region, fit the time evolution of the probe signal relatively well. Estimation of a 1-d tunneling parameter from the experimental observations is discussed. Minority concentrations of less than 0.5 % can be resolved with this measurement.

  20. Results of the First Exoplanet Transmission Spectroscopy Attempt with GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Morales, M.; Ribas, I.; Sing, D. K.; Huitson, C.; Rodler, F.; García-Melendo, E.; Belu, A.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2013-05-01

    In June 2011 we attempted to measure the first atmospheric transmission spectrum of an exoplanet with the GTC. We observed the hot Jupiter TrEs-2b during two transit epochs using the long-slit spectroscopic mode of OSIRIS. The technique consists of doing differential spectrophotometry by placing the planet host and a nearby star on a wide slit during a planetary transit. We then monitor both objects for the duration of the event to obtain simultaneous transit coverage at wavelengths between ~5000 and 9000 Å. We present here the results of our first attempt with this new technique, which holds the potential of providing a 5-10 fold improvement on the efficiency of exoplanet primary and secondary eclipse observations with the GTC. Finally, we also present a summary of the science done so far with observations from the ESO/GTC program 182.C.2018. Fernandez, J. M., et al. 2009, ApJ, 137, 4911 Sing, D. K., et al. 2011, A&A, 527, 73

  1. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  2. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  3. Electron Spectroscopy: Ultraviolet and X-Ray Excitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, A. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent growth in electron spectroscopy (54 papers cited). Emphasizes advances in instrumentation and interpretation (52); photoionization, cross-sections and angular distributions (22); studies of atoms and small molecules (35); transition, lanthanide and actinide metal complexes (50); organometallic (12) and inorganic compounds (2);…

  4. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  5. Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment in Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, H. W.; Graves, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is described. Tunnel junctions were fabricated, the tunneling spectra of several molecules absorbed on the surface of aluminum oxide measured, and mode assignments made for several of the prominent peaks in spectra using results obtained from optical…

  6. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    2006-09-01

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  7. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  8. 14 CFR 221.500 - Transmission of electronic tariffs to subscribers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transmission of electronic tariffs to... TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.500 Transmission of electronic tariffs to subscribers. (a) Each filer that files an electronic tariff under...

  9. Sub-Angstrom Low Voltage Performance of a Monochromated, Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Russo, Christopher J.; Benner, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Lowering the electron energy in the transmission electron microscope allows for a significant improvement in contrast of light elements, and reduces knock-on damage for most materials. If low-voltage electron microscopes are defined as those with accelerating voltages below 100 kV, the introduction of aberration correctors and monochromators to the electron microscope column enables Ångstrom-level resolution, which was previously reserved for higher voltage instruments. Decreasing electron energy has three important advantages: 1) knock-on damage is lower, which is critically important for sensitive materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes; 2) cross sections for electron-energy-loss spectroscopy increase, improving signal-to-noise for chemical analysis; 3) elastic scattering cross sections increase, improving contrast in high-resolution, zero-loss images. The results presented indicate that decreasing the acceleration voltage from 200 kV to 80 kV in a monochromated, aberration-corrected microscope enhances the contrast while retaining sub-angstrom resolution. These improvements in low-voltage performance are expected to produce many new results and enable a wealth of new experiments in materials science. PMID:20598206

  10. TATP and TNT detection by mid-infrared transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Johannes; Hildenbrand, Jürgen; Wöllenstein, Jürgen; Lambrecht, Armin

    2009-05-01

    Sensitive and fast detection of explosives remains a challenge in many threat scenarios. Fraunhofer IPM works on two different detection methods using mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy in combination with quantum cascade lasers (QCL). 1. stand-off detection for a spatial distance of several meters and 2. contactless extractive sampling for short distance applications. The extractive method is based on a hollow fiber that works as gas cell and optical waveguide for the QCL light. The samples are membranes contaminated with the explosives and real background. The low vapor pressure of TNT requires a thermal desorbtion to introduce gaseous TNT and TATP into the heated fiber. The advantage of the hollow fiber setup is the resulting small sample volume. This enables a fast gas exchange rate and fast detection in the second range. The presented measurement setup achieves a detection limit of around 58 ng TNT and 26 ng TATP for 1 m hollow fiber. TATP - an explosive with a very high vapor pressure in comparison to TNT or other explosives - shows potential for an adequate concentration in gas phase under normal ambient conditions and thus the possibility of an explosive detection using open path absorption of TATP at 8 μm wavelength. In order to lower the cross sensitivities or interferents with substances with an absorption in the wavelength range of the TATP absorption the probe volume is checked synchronously by a second QCL emitting beside the target absorption wavelength. In laboratory measurements a detection limit of 5 ppm*m TATP are achieved.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy characterisation of 0-D nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stuart Matthew

    When materials are scaled down to the nanometre level, a change in physical behaviour is frequently observed. In so-called 0-D nanomaterials (nanoparticles), these unique nanoscale properties are most abundant and are usually linked to either a change in (electronic) structure of the material or to the dominating influence of the particle surface at the nanometre scale. In this doctoral work the nanoscale properties of several nanoparticle systems have been studied using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Every material that was studied required for its solution a unique approach and a host of transmission electron microscopy techniques. The title of this doctoral work can be freely translated as "retrieving quantitatively the maximal and most accurate chemical, structural and morphological information from nanoparticles by advanced transmission electron microscopy, to uncover and explain their unique properties". Chapter 1 gives a brief general introduction to the world of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in general and more specifically to 0-D nanomaterials (nanoparticles). The unique properties and potential applications of these materials are described. The production of 0-D nanomaterials is not covered in this chapter, as this is an extremely broad field to cover in only a few pages. Instead, the production method for each of the materials is left to the detailed chapters that follow. In Chapter 2 the main transmission electron microscopy techniques used to characterise the materials in the further chapters are described together with the microscopes used to perform these techniques and their parameters of operation. Again, the sample-specific setups are listed in the detailed chapters that follow. Chapter 3 covers all work carried out on luminescent detonation nanodiamond powder for drug delivery and bio-medical imaging applications. Specific attention is paid to the morphology, surface chemistry and nitrogen incorporation of detonation

  12. Lessons Learned from Ground-based Transmission Spectroscopy of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snellen, I.; Albrecht, S.; de Mooij, E.; Poole, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    After many unsuccessful attempts, ground-based transmission spectroscopy has finally yielded its first detections of planetary atmospheres. Redfield et al. (2008) have presented successful observations of sodium in HD 189733b using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, and our group have detected the same chemical element in HD 209458b using archival Subaru data (Snellen et al. 2008). In this conference contribution we first argue that in the light of the earlier successes with the Hubble Space Telescope, it would have been very surprising if ground-based transmission spectroscopy had remained fruitless. Secondly, we discuss the scientific capabilities unique to high dispersion spectroscopy from the ground, and we conclude with giving some advice on how to perform successful future observations.

  13. Absolute Emission Spectroscopy of Electronically Excited Products of Dissociative Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypkowski, M. P.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.; Johnsen, R.

    1997-10-01

    We have employed spatially-resolved optical emission spectroscopy in a flowing afterglow plasma to investigate radiations in the 200-400 nm range resulting from electron-ion dissociative recombination. Calibrated emission data combined with Langmuir probe electron-density measurements are analyzed to obtain branching ratios for electronically excited recombination products. In particular, we will report absolute yields of CO(a^3Π) resulting from recombining CO_2^+ ions, NO(B^2Π) from N_2O^+, OH(A^2Σ^+) from HCO_2^+, as well as NH(A^3Π_i), and OH(A^2Σ^+) from the recombination of N_2OH^+ ions.

  14. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Kersting, R.

    2015-03-01

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  15. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Kersting, R.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.

    2015-03-02

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented.

  17. Ultrafast imaging of plasmons in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lummen, Tom T. A.; Berruto, Gabriele; Toma, Andrea; Lamb, Raymond J.; McGrouther, Damien; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized plasmonic and photonic integrated circuits are generally considered as the core of future generations of optoelectronic devices, due to their potential to bridge the size-compatibility gap between photonics and electronics. However, as the nanoscale is approached in increasingly small plasmonic and photonic systems, experimentally observing their behavior involves ever more stringent requirements in terms of both temporal and spatial resolution. This talk focuses on the use of time-resolved Photon-Induced Near-Field Electron Microscopy (PINEM) to study the excitation, propagation, (self-)interference and dynamics of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in various plasmonic nanostructures with both nanometer and ultrafast resolution in a transmission electron microscope. Using this field-ofview technique, we directly show how photo-excited plasmonic interference patterns are controlled through the combination of excitation polarization and nanostructure geometry. Moreover, we capture the propagation of the photoinduced self-interfering plasmonic wave, clearly demonstrating the effects of axial confinement in nanostructured plasmonic thin film stacks.

  18. Improved Zernike-type phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeck, P J B

    2015-07-01

    Zernike phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high-resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode can be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryosections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal discussed in Danev and Nagayama (2001) and references therein, the Zernike phase plate applies a phase shift of π/2 to all scattered electron beams outside a given scattering angle and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus or slight underfocus (below Scherzer defocus). Alternatively, a phase shift of -π/2 is applied to the central beam using the Boersch phase plate. The resulting image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from a given lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length, the amount of defocus and the spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper, I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably without loss of contrast by using a Zernike or Boersch phase plate that leads to a phase shift between scattered and unscattered electrons of only π /4, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Woehl, Taylor J.; Parent, Lucas R.; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke

    2014-04-15

    One of the experimental challenges in the study of nanomaterials in liquids in the (scanning) transmission electron microscope ((S)TEM) is gaining quantitative information. A successful experiment in the fluid stage will depend upon the ability to plan for sensitive factors such as the electron dose applied, imaging mode, acceleration voltage, beam-induced solution chemistry changes, and the specifics of solution reactivity. In this paper, we make use of a visual approach to show the extent of damage of different instrumental and experimental factors in liquid samples imaged in the (S)TEM. Previous results as well as new insights are presented to create an overview of beam-sample interactions identified for changing imaging and experimental conditions. This work establishes procedures to understand the effect of the electron beam on a solution, provides information to allow for a deliberate choice of the optimal experimental conditions to enable quantification, and identifies the experimental factors that require further analysis for achieving fully quantitative results in the liquid (S)TEM.

  20. Transient Thermometry and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of Filamentary Resistive Switches.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jonghan; Sharma, Abhishek A; Chen, Chao-Yang; Fantini, Andrea; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Herzing, Andrew A; Bain, James A; Picard, Yoosuf N; Skowronski, Marek

    2016-08-10

    We present data on the filament size and temperature distribution in Hf0.82Al0.18Ox-based Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) devices obtained by transient thermometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The thermometry shows that the temperature of the nonvolatile conducting filament can reach temperatures as high as 1600 K at the onset of RESET at voltage of 0.8 V and power of 40 μW. The size of the filament was estimated at about 1 nm in diameter. Hot filament increases the temperature of the surrounding high resistivity oxide, causing it to conduct and carry a significant fraction of the total current. The current spreading results in slowing down the filament temperature increase at higher power. The results of thermometry have been corroborated by HRTEM analysis of the as-fabricated and switched RRAM devices. The functional HfAlOx layer in as-fabricated devices is amorphous. In devices that were switched, we detected a small crystalline region of 10-15 nm in size. The crystallization temperature of the HfAlOx was determined to be 850 K in an independent annealing experiment. The size of the crystalline region agrees with thermal modeling based on the thermometry data. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coordinated with electron energy loss spectroscopy could not detect changes in the chemical makeup of the filament.

  1. Examining Electron-Boson Coupling Using Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sentef, Michael; Kemper, Alexander F.; Moritz, Brian; Freericks, James K.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2013-12-26

    Nonequilibrium pump-probe time-domain spectroscopies can become an important tool to disentangle degrees of freedom whose coupling leads to broad structures in the frequency domain. Here, using the time-resolved solution of a model photoexcited electron-phonon system, we show that the relaxational dynamics are directly governed by the equilibrium self-energy so that the phonon frequency sets a window for “slow” versus “fast” recovery. The overall temporal structure of this relaxation spectroscopy allows for a reliable and quantitative extraction of the electron-phonon coupling strength without requiring an effective temperature model or making strong assumptions about the underlying bare electronic band dispersion.

  2. Secondary Electron Emission Materials for Transmission Dynodes in Novel Photomultipliers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shu Xia; Chan, Hong Wah; van der Graaf, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Secondary electron emission materials are reviewed with the aim of providing guidelines for the future development of novel transmission dynodes. Materials with reflection secondary electron yield higher than three and transmission secondary electron yield higher than one are tabulated for easy reference. Generations of transmission dynodes are listed in the order of the invention time with a special focus on the most recent atomic-layer-deposition synthesized transmission dynodes. Based on the knowledge gained from the survey of secondary election emission materials with high secondary electron yield, an outlook of possible improvements upon the state-of-the-art transmission dynodes is provided. PMID:28774137

  3. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguy, Amanda

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than adenine

  4. Monitoring electron-beam irradiation effects on graphenes by temporal Auger electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingsheng; Fujita, Daisuke; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2010-07-02

    Because of its unique electronic transport properties, graphene has attracted an enormous amount of interest recently. By using standard Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we have studied electron-beam irradiation effects on graphene damage. We have shown that irradiation with an electron-beam can selectively remove graphene layers and induce chemical reactions, as well as possible structural transformations. We have also demonstrated the dependence of damage in graphene on electron-beam dose. Our work provides ideas on how to optimize the experimental conditions for graphene characterization and device fabrication. The results throw light on how energy transfer from the electron beam to graphene layers leads to the removal of carbon atoms from graphene layers and on the possibility of using electron-beam irradiation to locally induce chemical reactions in a controlled manner.

  5. Transmission Probability for Interacting Electrons Connected to Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Akira

    2001-09-01

    Transport through small interacting systems connected to noninteracting leads is studied based on the Kubo formalism using a Éliashberg theory of the analytic properties of the vertex part. The transmission probability, by which the conductance is expressed as g = (2e2/h) \\int dɛ (- \\partial f / \\partial ɛ) \\mathcal{T}(ɛ), is introduced for interacting electrons. Here f(ɛ) is the Fermi function, and the transmission probability T(ɛ) is defined in terms of a current vertex or a three-point correlation function. We apply this formulation to a series of Anderson impurities of size N (=1, 2, 3, 4), and calculate T(ɛ) using the order U2 self-energy and current vertex which satisfy a generalized Ward identity. The results show that T(ɛ) has much information about the excitation spectrum: T(ɛ) has two broad peaks of the upper and lower Hubbard bands in addition to N resonant peaks which have direct correspondence with the noninteracting spectrum. The peak structures disappear at high temperatures.

  6. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) investigations of ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, C.; Walter, P.; Castaing, J.; Penhoud, P.; Veyssière, P.

    The processing technologies available during the time of ancient Egypt are of present concern to the field of Archaeology and Egyptology. Materials characterization is the best tool for establishing the processing history of archaeological objects. In this study, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used, in addition to other techniques, for phase identification and study of the microstructure and characteristic defect structures in ancient Egyptian cosmetic powders. These powders generally consist of a mix of Pb-containing mineral phases: galena (PbS), cerussite (PbCO3), and phosgenite (Pb2Cl2CO3), among others. Modern materials are fabricated according to recipes found in ancient texts to mimic the processing of ancient times and to compare with the archaeological specimens. In particular, a comparison between the dislocation structures of PbS crystals deformed in the laboratory and PbS from archaeological specimens from the collections of the Louvre Museum is presented .

  8. A Transmission Electron Microscope Study of Experimentally Shocked Pregraphitic Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A transmission electron microscope study of experimental shock metamorphism in natural pre-graphitic carbon simulates the response of the most common natural carbons to increased shock pressure. The d-spacings of this carbon are insensitive to the shock pressure and have no apparent diagnostic value, but progressive comminution occurs in response to increased shock pressure up to 59.6 GPa. The function, P = 869.1 x (size(sub minimum )(exp -0.83), describes the relationship between the minimum root-mean-square subgrain size (nm) and shock pressure (GPa). While a subgrain texture of natural pregraphitic carbons carries little information when pre-shock textures are unknown, this texture may go unnoticed as a shock metamorphic feature.

  9. Temperature Calibration for In Situ Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, JP; Lin, PA; Sharma, R

    2016-01-01

    In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) experiments require specimen heating holders to study material behavior in gaseous environments at elevated temperatures. In order to extract meaningful kinetic parameters, such as activation energies, it is essential to have a direct and accurate measurement of local sample temperature. This is particularly important if the sample temperature might fluctuate, for example when room temperature gases are introduced to the sample area. Using selected-area diffraction (SAD) in an ETEM, the lattice parameter of Ag nanoparticles was measured as a function of the temperature and pressure of hydrogen gas to provide a calibration of the local sample temperature. SAD permits measurement of temperature to an accuracy of ± 30 °C using Ag lattice expansion. Gas introduction can cause sample cooling of several hundred degrees celsius for gas pressures achievable in the ETEM. PMID:26441334

  10. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  11. Interfacing Microfluidics with Negative Stain Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mukhitov, Nikita; Spear, John M.; Stagg, Scott M.; Roper, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic platform is presented for preparing negatively stained grids for use in transmission electron microscopy (EM). The microfluidic device is composed of glass etched with readily fabricated features that facilitate the extraction of the grid post-staining and maintains the integrity of the sample. Utilization of this device simultaneously reduced environmental contamination on the grids and improved the homogeneity of the heavy metal stain needed to enhance visualization of biological specimens as compared to conventionally prepared EM grids. This easy-to-use EM grid preparation device provides the basis for future developments of systems with more integrated features, which will allow for high throughput and dynamic structural biology studies. PMID:26642355

  12. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals from cattle bones

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Sangeeta; Wei, Shanghai; Han, Jie; Gao, Wei

    2015-11-15

    In this present study, hydroxyapatite which was obtained from cattle bones has been heat treated at temperature 400 °C and 600 °C. The microstructure after the treatment has been studied in detail using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The TEM results indicate that natural bone consists of collagen and hydroxyapatite nano-crystals which are needle shaped. The heat treatment influences the crystallinity and growth of these hydroxyapatite nano-crystals known as ‘crystal maturation’ or ‘crystal ageing’. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite is obtained from cattle bones. • Material has been characterised using XRD and TEM. • Crystal growth and orientation has been studied in detail.

  13. Detector non-uniformity in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M

    2013-01-01

    A non-uniform response across scanning transmission electron microscope annular detectors has been found experimentally, but is seldom incorporated into simulations. Through case study simulations, we establish the nature and scale of the discrepancies which may arise from failing to account for detector non-uniformity. If standard detectors are used at long camera lengths such that the detector is within or near to the bright field region, we find errors in contrast of the order of 10%, sufficiently small for qualitative work but non-trivial as experiments become more quantitative. In cases where the detector has been characterized in advance, we discuss the detector response normalization and how it may be incorporated in simulations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore » to those of other techniques available.« less

  15. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  16. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these.

  17. Transmission electron microscope cells for use with liquid samples

    DOEpatents

    Khalid, Waqas; Alivisatos, Paul A.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-08-09

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and devices related to transmission electron microscopy cells for use with liquids. In one aspect a device includes a substrate, a first graphene layer, and a second graphene layer. The substrate has a first surface and a second surface. The first surface defines a first channel, a second channel, and an outlet channel. The first channel and the second channel are joined to the outlet channel. The outlet channel defines a viewport region forming a though hole in the substrate. The first graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including an interior area of the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel. The second graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including open regions defined by the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel.

  18. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Knut; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Strüder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef; Soltau, Heike; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 × 10-3, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100×100 nm2 region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike; Strueder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef

    2012-11-19

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  20. Assessing energy relaxation in 2d with ballistic electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohls, F.; Pepper, M.; Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of ballistic electron spectroscopy in a two-dimensional electron system to assess energy relaxation of non-equilibrium electrons. The spectrometer consists of a quantum dot tuned to the transition between none and one electron on the dot. The readout of the spectrometer is provided by a nearby one-dimensional wire used as charge detector. We prepare a well defined distribution of non-equilibrium ballistic electrons using a quantum point contact on the first conductance plateau. The energy distribution evolves due to scattering during the 2.5 μm long path towards the spectrometer were it is detected. We use varying injection energy to map out the energy relaxation.

  1. Novel method for measurement of transistor gate length using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungho; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kang, Jonghyuk; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2016-12-01

    As the feature size of devices continues to decrease, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is becoming indispensable for measuring the critical dimension (CD) of structures. Semiconductors consist primarily of silicon-based materials such as silicon, silicon dioxide, and silicon nitride, and the electrons transmitted through a plan-view TEM sample provide diverse information about various overlapped silicon-based materials. This information is exceedingly complex, which makes it difficult to clarify the boundary to be measured. Therefore, we propose a simple measurement method using energy-filtered TEM (EF-TEM). A precise and effective measurement condition was obtained by determining the maximum value of the integrated area ratio of the electron energy loss spectrum at the boundary to be measured. This method employs an adjustable slit allowing only electrons with a certain energy range to pass. EF-TEM imaging showed a sharp transition at the boundary when the energy-filter’s passband centre was set at 90 eV, with a slit width of 40 eV. This was the optimum condition for the CD measurement of silicon-based materials involving silicon nitride. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and EF-TEM images were used to verify this method, which makes it possible to measure the transistor gate length in a dynamic random access memory manufactured using 35 nm process technology. This method can be adapted to measure the CD of other non-silicon-based materials using the EELS area ratio of the boundary materials.

  2. Combined study of the ground and unoccupied electronic states of graphite by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Löffler, Stefan; Eder, Franz; Meyer, Jannik C.; Su, Dangsheng; Schattschneider, Peter

    2013-11-14

    Both the unoccupied and ground electronic states of graphite have been studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. Electron energy-loss near-edge structures of the K-edge of carbon have been investigated in detail for scattering angles from 0 to 2.8 mrad. The π{sup *} and σ{sup *} components were separated. The angular and energy dependences of the π{sup *} and σ{sup *} structures were in fair agreement with theory. Electron energy loss Compton spectra of graphite were recorded at scattering angles from 45 to 68 mrad. One Compton scattering spectrum was obtained in 1 min compared with several hours or days using photons. The contributions of core electrons were calculated by the exact Hartree-Slater method in the Compton scattering region. The electron Compton profile for graphite is in good agreement with other conventional Compton profile measurements, as well as with theory, thus establishing the validity of the technique.

  3. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M. C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co 2 P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  4. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.; Syed Asif, S. A.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-06-28

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were applied at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 106 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10–12 m·cycle–1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.

  5. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.; ...

    2016-06-28

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were appliedmore » at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 106 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10–12 m·cycle–1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.« less

  6. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  7. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Barnaby D.A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M.C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data. PMID:27272459

  8. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F.; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaNxAs1−x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with GexSi1−x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16–255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering. PMID:27849001

  9. High Cycle Fatigue in the Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Bufford, Daniel C; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M; Syed Asif, S A; Boyce, Brad L; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-08-10

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this study, the tension-tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were applied at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 10(6) cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ∼10(-12) m·cycle(-1). This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. These observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.

  10. Combined scanning transmission electron microscopy tilt- and focal series.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Lupini, Andrew R; Kübel, Christian; Slusallek, Philipp; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt-focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller "missing wedge" artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  11. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  12. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.; Syed Asif, S. A.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-06-28

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were applied at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 106 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10–12 m·cycle–1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.

  13. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; ...

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co 2 P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibremore » imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.« less

  14. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeck, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Two novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals [1] from either a high resolution (HR) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image or a precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] are described (and demonstrated on a mixture of nanocrystalline maghemite and magnetite [3]). The structural information that can be extracted from a HRTEM image is the projected reciprocal lattice geometry, the plane symmetry group, a few structure factor amplitudes and phases. Except for the structure factor phases, the same kind of information can be extracted from a PED, but the information that can be used for structural fingerprinting is in this case not limited to the resolution of the TEM. Searching for this kind of information in (open access) databases (e.g. [4]) and matching it with high figures of merit to that of candidate structures allows for highly discriminatory identifications of nanocrystals. [1] P. Moeck, P. Fraundorf, Z. f"ur Kristallogr. 222 (2007) 634-645; open-access issue at http://www.atypon-link.com/OLD/doi/pdf/10.1524/zkri.2007.222.11.634; expanded version at arXiv:0706.2021 [2] http://www.nanomegas.com [3] P. Moeck, arXiv:0804.0063 [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  15. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Goldsbury, Claire; Baxa, Ulrich; Simon, Martha N.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Engel, Andreas; Wall, Joseph S.; Aebi, Ueli; Müller, Shirley A.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). PMID:20868754

  16. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F.; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaNxAs1‑x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with GexSi1‑x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16–255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering.

  17. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M. C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  18. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-11-16

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaNxAs1-x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with GexSi1-x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16-255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering.

  19. Amyloid structure and assembly: insights from scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire; Baxa, Ulrich; Simon, Martha N; Steven, Alasdair C; Engel, Andreas; Wall, Joseph S; Aebi, Ueli; Müller, Shirley A

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  1. Transmission electron microscope calibration methods for critical dimension standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Garcia-Gutierrez, Domingo I.; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Bishop, Michael; Cresswell, Michael W.; Allen, Richard A.; Allgair, John A.

    2016-10-01

    One of the key challenges in critical dimension (CD) metrology is finding suitable dimensional calibration standards. The transmission electron microscope (TEM), which produces lattice-resolved images having scale traceability to the SI (International System of Units) definition of length through an atomic lattice constant, has gained wide usage in different areas of CD calibration. One such area is critical dimension atomic force microscope (CD-AFM) tip width calibration. To properly calibrate CD-AFM tip widths, errors in the calibration process must be quantified. Although the use of TEM for CD-AFM tip width calibration has been around for about a decade, there is still confusion on what should be considered in the uncertainty analysis. We characterized CD-AFM tip-width samples using high-resolution TEM and high angle annular dark field scanning TEM and two CD-AFMs that are implemented as reference measurement systems. The results are used to outline how to develop a rigorous uncertainty estimate for TEM/CD-AFM calibration, and to compare how information from the two electron microscopy modes are applied to practical CD-AFM measurements. The results also represent a separate validation of previous TEM/CD-AFM calibration. Excellent agreement was observed.

  2. Transmission Electron Diffraction Studies of Xenon Adsorbed on Graphite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, A. Q. D.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Adsorption studies of xenon on graphite were performed using the Hitachi HU-11B Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). It has been used as a Transmission High Energy Electron Diffraction (THEED) camera. This has been modified to include an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) environmental chamber. This chamber was isolated from the microscope vacuum by two 400 μm diameter differentially pumped apertures. Pressures of {~}10 ^{-6} torr and {~ }10^{-9} torr were achieved inside the microscope column and the environmental chamber respectively. The chamber was fitted with a new sample holder designed with double "O" rings. The sample was cooled with liquid helium. Previous THEED experiments by Venables et al and Schabes-Retchkiman and Venables revealed the presence of a 2D-solid incommensurate (I)-commensurate (C) phase transition as the temperature is lowered. These results were confirmed and extended in the present work. Hong et al have recently interpreted their X-ray diffraction experiments as showing an incommensurate-striped domain phase transition at {~}65rm K. No evidence was found for the existence of a striped domain structure on any part of the xenon phase diagram studied. Experiments of xenon adsorbed on the basal plane (0001) of graphite were carried out at pressures from {~}1.5 times 10^{-5} torr to {~}1.8 times 10^{-8} torr over a temperature range from 55K^.90K. A set of lattice parameter (misfit) measurements were made as a function of temperature at constant pressure with an accuracy of +/-0.1% rather than +/-0.3% previously obtained. The misfit data was fitted to a power law formula, i.e. misfit m = B_{rm o} (rm T - rm T_{rm o})^{rm A} , where A is a constant and equal to 0.8. It was found that B_{rm o} and T_{rm o} are functions of log(P). The data fell into two groups corresponding to two phase transitions. The same power law was used for both sets of data. Two transitions were found, one is I-C and

  3. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Solid-surface electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomoyunova, M. V.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy (ES) of the surface of a solid comprises a set of methods of studying its elemental composition, structure, electronic structure, and dynamics. The essence of almost all the methods consists in obtaining and studying the energy spectra and angular distributions of electrons emitted by the surface of the solid upon irradiation with fluxes of photons, electrons, or ions, or upon creating a strong electric field near it. Depending on the nature of the probe, one can distinguish photoelectron, secondary-electron, ion-electron, and field spectroscopy. Each of them is realized by several methods. In practically all the methods analysis of the characteristics that are obtained consists of singling out certain unitypical elementary events of interaction of the probe agent with the surface layers of the solid. As a rule, the depth of probing is determined by the mean free path of the electron with respect to inelastic interaction. In the electron energy range from tens to approximately hundreds of electron volts in various materials, it constitutes from one to several atomic layers. In determining elemental composition, the sensitivity of most of the ES methods is approximately equal to hundredths of a monolayer. One can employ a scanning probe to obtain the distribution of the elements over the surface of the specimen. Most of the ES methods have been invented in the past decade. At present the studies in the field of surface physics are intensively developing and have great scientific and important applied significance. This review briefly treats the physical fundamentals of the ES methods, their potentialities, classifies the methods, gives examples to illustrate them, and cursorily throws light on the fundamental technical means of realizing the methods.

  4. In situ transmission electron microscopy of electron-beam induced damage process in nuclear grade graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, C.; Kane, J.; Butt, D. P.; Windes, W. E.; Ubic, R.

    2011-05-01

    Atomic level processes involved in the swelling and crack-closing in nuclear grade graphite under electron irradiation have been observed in real-time using transmission electron microscopy. Noise-filtered lattice images show the formation of vacancy loops, interstitial loops and resulting dislocations with unprecedented clarity. The dislocation dipoles formed via vacancy loops were found to undergo climb resulting in extra basal planes. Concurrent EELS studies showed a reduction in the atomic density because of the breakage of hexagonal carbon rings. The formation of new basal planes via dislocation climb in addition to the bending/breaking of basal planes leads to swelling and closing of micro-cracks.

  5. Ultrahigh-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy with Sub-Angstrom-Sized Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, E.; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with an annular dark-field (ADF) detector provides atomic-resolution incoherent images, whose resolution is dominated, to a good approximation, by the size of convergent electron beams. Improving a spherical aberration of microscope objective lenses has been successful in converging the beam into sub-angstrom scale, promising a remarkably higher resolution for STEM. Here we describe the performance of aberration-corrected 300kV-STEM-the world-best STEM available today. The results clearly demonstrate that a sub-angstrom resolution has been indeed achieved for not only simple structures but also structurally complex systems (quasicrystals).

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  7. Vibrational photodetachment spectroscopy near the electron affinity of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrick, J. B.; Yukich, J. N.

    2016-02-01

    We have conducted laser photodetachment spectroscopy near the detachment threshold of the electron affinity of S2 in a 1.8-T field. The ions are prepared by dissociative electron attachment to carbonyl sulfide. The experiment is conducted in a Penning ion trap and with a narrow-band, tunable, Ti:sapphire laser. A hybrid model for photodetachment in an ion trap is fit to the data using the appropriate Franck-Condon factors. The observations reveal detachment from and to the first few vibrational levels of the anion and the neutral molecule, respectively. Evaporative cooling of the anion ensemble condenses the thermal distribution to the lowest initial vibrational states. The subsequent detachment spectroscopy yields results consistent with a vibrationally cooled anion population.

  8. On the electronic configuration in Pu: spectroscopy and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Soderlind, P; Landa, A; Moore, K T; Schwartz, A J; Chung, B W; Wall, M; Wills, J M; Eriksson, O; Haire, R; Kutepov, A L

    2006-10-11

    Photoelectron spectroscopy, synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray absorption, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and density-functional calculations within the mixed-level and magnetic models, together with canonical band theory have been used to study the electron configuration in Pu. These methods suggest a 5f{sup n} configuration for Pu of 5 {le} n < 6, with n {ne} 6, contrary to what has recently been suggested in several publications. We show that the n = 6 picture is inconsistent with the usual interpretation of photoemission and x-ray absorption spectra. Instead, these spectra support the traditional conjecture of a 5f{sup 5} configuration in Pu as is obtained by density-functional theory. We further argue, based on 5f-band filling, that an n = 6 hypothesis is incompatible with the position of Pu in the actinide series and its monoclinic ground-state phase.

  9. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular excitons.

    PubMed

    Milota, Franz; Sperling, Jaroslaw; Nemeth, Alexandra; Mancal, Tomás; Kauffmann, Harald F

    2009-09-15

    Understanding of the nuclear and electronic structure and dynamics of molecular systems has advanced considerably through probing the nonlinear response of molecules to sequences of pulsed electromagnetic fields. The ability to control various degrees of freedom of the excitation pulses-such as duration, sequence, frequency, polarization, and shape-has led to a variety of time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The various techniques that researchers use are commonly classified by their dimensionality, which refers to the number of independently variable time delays between the pulsed fields that induce the signal. Though pico- and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopies of electronic transitions have come of age, only recently have researchers been able to perform two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) in the visible frequency regime and correlate transition frequencies that evolve in different time intervals. The two-dimensional correlation plots and their temporal evolution allow one to access spectral information that is not exposed directly in other one-dimensional nonlinear methods. In this Account, we summarize our studies of a series of increasingly complex molecular chromophores. We examine noninteracting dye molecules, a monomer-dimer equilibrium of a prototypical dye molecule, and finally a supramolecular assembly of electronically coupled absorbers. By tracing vibronic signal modulations, differentiating line-broadening mechanisms, analyzing distinctly different relaxation dynamics, determining electronic coupling strengths, and directly following excitation energy transfer pathways, we illustrate how two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can image physical phenomena that underlie the optical response of a particular system. Although 2D-ES is far from being a "turn-key" method, we expect that experimental progress and potential commercialization of instrumentation will make 2D-ES accessible to a much broader scientific audience, analogous to

  10. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode.

    PubMed

    Bücker, K; Picher, M; Crégut, O; LaGrange, T; Reed, B W; Park, S T; Masiel, D J; Banhart, F

    2016-12-01

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Site-selected Auger electron spectroscopy of N2O.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Paola; Coreno, Marcello; Avaldi, Lorenzo; Storchi, Loriano; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2006-08-07

    The N 1s Auger spectra for the two nonequivalent N atoms in N2O have been measured via Auger electron-photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy. The site-selected Auger spectra are compared with the normal Auger spectrum and with accurate theoretical calculations accounting for the effects of the dynamics of the nuclei on the energy and linewidth of the Auger bands. Such effects are found to be crucial factors in determining the different band shapes in the site-selected spectra.

  12. A Molecular Beam Source for Electron Spectroscopy of Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Marburger, Simon P.; Kugeler, Oliver; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2004-05-12

    We describe the construction and testing of a supersonic jet apparatus to carry out electron spectroscopy on Van-der-Waals clusters using Synchrotron Radiation as an excitation source. The cluster source works with a conical nozzle that can be cooled with LHe as well as with LN2. The system has been optimized for mechanical and thermal stability, for low residual magnetic fields and is of a compact design.

  13. Studying the Stereochemistry of Naproxen Using Rotationally Resolved Electronic Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Justin W.; Alvarez-Valtierra, Leonardo; Pratt, David W.

    2009-06-01

    Many biochemical processes are stereospecific. An example is the physiological response to a drug that depends on its enantiomeric form. Naproxen is a drug which shows this stereo-specific physiological response. To better understand the stereo specificity of chiral substances, we observed the S_1←S_0 transitions of R- and S-naproxen in the gas phase using rotationally resolved electronic spectroscopy. The results will be discussed.

  14. Quantification of ordering at a solid-liquid interface using plasmon electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gandman, Maria; Kauffmann, Yaron; Kaplan, Wayne D.

    2015-02-02

    We present an in situ electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) study of ordering of liquid Al at various Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. This technique utilizes precise measurements of the shifts in bulk plasmon resonance and their sensitivity to the valence electron density. Plasmon EELS combined with high resolution transmission electron microscopy provides information regarding the chemical composition in liquid Al at Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces. Preferential oxygen segregation to the (0006) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} plane was verified, and the (101{sup ¯}2) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} plane was found to contain the lowest amount of segregated species.

  15. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kayla X.; Holtz, Megan E.; Richmond-Decker, Justin; Muller, David A.

    2016-07-25

    Abstract

    A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope’s objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens andin situchemical and electrochemical processes.

  16. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kayla X; Holtz, Megan E; Richmond-Decker, Justin; Muller, David A

    2016-08-01

    A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope's objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400 μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens and in situ chemical and electrochemical processes.

  17. The electronic properties of potassium doped copper-phthalocyanine studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flatz, K; Grobosch, M; Knupfer, M

    2007-06-07

    The authors have studied the electronic structure of potassium doped copper-phthalocyanine using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The evolution of the loss function indicates the formation of distinct KxCuPc phases. Taking into account the C1s and K2p core level excitations and recent results by Giovanelli et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 044709 (2007)], they conclude that these are K2CuPc and K4CuPc. They discuss the changes in the electronic excitations upon doping on the basis of the molecular electronic levels and the presence of electronic correlations.

  18. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  19. High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Chutjian, A.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique for measuring high-resolution threshold photoelectron spectra of atoms, molecules, and radicals is described. It involves photoionization of a gaseous species, attachment of the threshold, or nearly zero electron to some trapping molecule (here SF6 or CFCl3), and mass detection of the attachment product (SF6/-/ or Cl/-/ respectively). This technique of threshold photoelectron spectroscopy by electron attachment was used to measure the spectra of argon and xenon at 11 meV (FWHM) resolution, and was also applied to CFCl3.

  20. Molecular Shock Response of Explosives: Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, S. D.; Moore, D. S.; Whitley, V. H.; Bolme, C. A.; Eakins, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation and the need for time dependent absorption (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  1. Tracing electronic pathways in molecules by using inelastic tunneling spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Troisi, Alessandro; Beebe, Jeremy M.; Picraux, Laura B.; van Zee, Roger D.; Stewart, Duncan R.; Ratner, Mark A.; Kushmerick, James G.

    2007-01-01

    Using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) to measure the vibronic structure of nonequilibrium molecular transport, aided by a quantitative interpretation scheme based on Green's function-density functional theory methods, we are able to characterize the actual pathways that the electrons traverse when moving through a molecule in a molecular transport junction. We show that the IETS observations directly index electron tunneling pathways along the given normal coordinates of the molecule. One can then interpret the maxima in the IETS spectrum in terms of the specific paths that the electrons follow as they traverse the molecular junction. Therefore, IETS measurements not only prove (by the appearance of molecular vibrational frequencies in the spectrum) that the tunneling charges, in fact, pass through the molecule, but also can be used to determine the transport pathways and how they change with the geometry and placement of molecules in junctions. PMID:17726099

  2. Advancing Atomic Scale Quantification of Interface Structure and Chemistry via Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dycus, Joseph Houston

    Electron microscopy is a powerful tool to characterize materials from the micro to atomic scale. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has become notably important with resolution within the Angstrom regime. Such resolution provides information on the relationship between atomic structure and material properties. In addition, breakthroughs in spectroscopy have provided elemental mapping of individual atom columns leading to information such as chemical segregation. Although STEM is a powerful tool, its widespread use is relatively recent, leaving many opportunities to employ STEM to discover new information in materials systems and develop techniques to further advance capabilities of the instrument. In this work, the combination of aberration-corrected STEM imaging and spectroscopy are employed to identify relationships between structure and chemistry in materials systems for interfaces and bulk materials. Further, by building upon recently developed revolving STEM (RevSTEM), a calibration scheme has been developed to reduce scan distortion in imaging, enabling highly precise and accurate determination of atom column positions. Additionally, pathways for improving the signal-to-noise in energy dispersive X-ray mapping are shown. By a combination highly accurate distance mapping and atomic scale EDS, important materials relationships can be determined such as the effects of elemental segregation on strain and changes in the local bonding environment at surface reconstructions.

  3. Prospecting nanomaterials in aqueous environments by cloud-point extraction coupled with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Reed, Robert; Schoepf, Jared; Hristovski, Kiril; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul

    2017-04-15

    Increasing application of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in industry and consumer products inevitably lead to their release into and impact on aquatic environments. To characterize the NMs efficiently in surface water, a fast and simple method is needed to separate and concentrate nanomaterials from the aqueous matrix without altering their shape and size. Applying cloud-point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton 114 to an array of NMs (titanium dioxide, gold, silver, and silicon dioxide) with different sizes or capping agents in nanopure water resulted in extraction efficiency of 83%-107%. Additional CPE experiments were conducted to extract NMs from surface, potable, and sewage waters, and NMs enriched in the surfactant phase were characterized using transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The most abundant nanoparticles identified in surface water were silica, titanium dioxide, and iron oxide with 4-99nm diameter. The extraction efficiencies of CPE for silicon, titanium, and iron elements from environmental water samples were 51%, 15%, and 99%, respectively. This study applied CPE with TEM to enrich and analyze popular nanoparticles such as SiO2 and TiO2 from natural waters, which has not been well addressed by previous researches. Overall, CPE coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can be an effective method to characterize NMs in aqueous water samples, and further optimization will increase the extraction efficiency of NMs in complicated surface water matrix.

  4. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Eu-Doped Y2O3 Nanosheets and Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    H Sun; T Chaudhuri; E Kenik; H Zhu; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize high-purity Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanosheets and nanotubes with an approximate molar ratio of (0.1):(1.0) for Eu:Y. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis and synchrotron X-ray diffraction were used to characterize these nanomaterials. A body-centered cubic structure was confirmed for the nanotubes. The lattice parameter of Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes were 0.12% larger as compared to that of pure Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} which was attributed to the larger ionic radius of Eu{sup 3+} (0.947 {angstrom}) than that of Y{sup 3+} (0.900 {angstrom}). The nanosheets had a similar structure. Nanosheets of approximate dimensions 600 to 800 nm length and width were obtained using a slightly lower pH value, and they were highly textured. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanotubes are fully crystalline. The nanotubes were typically 1.5-3 {micro}m in length and 50-200 nm in diameter. Using a pH value of approximately 10, stable nanotubes were obtained. It is anticipated that nanosheets might have rolled to form more stable nanotubes.

  5. Characterizations of Preheated and Non-Preheated HY-80 Steel Weldments by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    D- 36 966 CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PREHEATED AND NON-PREHEATED HY-80 i/I • " STEEL NELDMENTS BY TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY(U) C T T NAVAL...34. NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PREHEATED AND NON-PREHEATED HY-80 STEEL WELDMENTS BY TRANSMISSION ELECTRON...Master’s Thesis; Non-Preheated HY-80 Steel Weldments September 1983 by Transmission Electron Microscopy S. PERFORMING ONG. REPORT NUMBER 7. ATNOR"a S

  6. DNA Electronic Fingerprints by Local Spectroscopy on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balatsky, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Working and scalable alternatives to the conventional chemical methods of DNA sequencing that are based on electronic/ionic signatures would revolutionize the field of sequencing. The approach of a single molecule imaging and spectroscopy with unprecedented resolution, achieved by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS) and nanopore electronics could enable this revolution. We use the data from our group and others in applying this local scanning tunneling microscopy and illustrate possibilities of electronic sequencing of freeze dried deposits on graphene. We will present two types of calculated fingerprints: first in Local Density of States (LDOS) of DNA nucleotide bases (A,C,G,T) deposited on graphene. Significant base-dependent features in the LDOS in an energy range within few eV of the Fermi level were found in our calculations. These features can serve as electronic fingerprints for the identification of individual bases in STS. In the second approach we present calculated base dependent electronic transverse conductance as DNA translocates through the graphene nanopore. Thus we argue that the fingerprints of DNA-graphene hybrid structures may provide an alternative route to DNA sequencing using STS. Work supported by US DOE, NORDITA.

  7. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of GaAs quantum dots fabricated by filling of droplet-etched nanoholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemcsics, Á.; Heyn, Ch.; Tóth, L.; Dobos, L.; Stemmann, A.; Hansen, W.

    2011-11-01

    We investigate strain-free GaAs quantum dots (QDs) fabricated by filling of nanoholes in semiconductor surfaces. The nanoholes are created in a self-organized fashion by local droplet etching with Al droplets as etchants. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrates that the quantum dots are free of extended defects. Elemental mapping using local electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) shows that the walls surrounding the nanohole openings consist of AlAs. This result confirms that the walls are optically inactive.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy of polymer blends and block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft matter is a field that warrants further investigation. Developments in sample preparation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques could lead to novel experiments that may further our understanding of the structure and the role structure plays in the functionality of various organic materials. Unlike most hard materials, TEM of organic molecules is limited by the amount of radiation damage the material can withstand without changing its structure. Despite this limitation, TEM has been and will be a powerful tool to study polymeric materials and other soft matter. In this dissertation, an introduction of TEM for polymer scientists is presented. The fundamentals of interactions of electrons with matter are described using the Schrodinger wave equation and scattering cross-sections to fully encompass coherent and incoherent scattering. The intensity, which is the product of the wave function and its complex conjugate, shows no perceptible change due to the sample. Instead, contrast is generated through the optical system of the microscope by removing scattered electrons or by generating interference due to material-induced phase changes. Perhaps the most challenging aspect of taking TEM images, however, is sample preparation, because TEM experiments require materials with approximately 50 nm thickness. Although ultramicrotomy is a well-established powerful tool for preparing biological and polymeric sections for TEM, the development of cryogenic Focused Ion Beam may enable unprecedented cross-sectional TEM studies of polymer thin films on arbitrary substrates with nanometer precision. Two examples of TEM experiments of polymeric materials are presented. The first involves quantifying the composition profile across a lamellar phase obtained in a multicomponent blend of saturated poly(butadiene) and poly(isobutylene), stabilized by a saturated poly(butadiene) copolymer serving as a surfactant, using TEM and self

  9. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Graetz, Jason; Moreno, M. Sergio; Ma, Chao; Wu, Lijun; Volkov, Vyacheslav; Zhu, Yimei

    2011-01-10

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10-50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  10. Chemical Distribution and Bonding of Lithium in Intercalated Graphite: Identification with Optimized Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Wang, F.; Graetz, J.; Moreno, M.S.; Ma, C.; Wu, L.; Volkov, V.

    2011-02-01

    Direct mapping of the lithium spatial distribution and the chemical state provides critical information on structure-correlated lithium transport in electrode materials for lithium batteries. Nevertheless, probing lithium, the lightest solid element in the periodic table, poses an extreme challenge with traditional X-ray or electron scattering techniques due to its weak scattering power and vulnerability to radiation damage. Here, we report nanoscale maps of the lithium spatial distribution in electrochemically lithiated graphite using electron energy loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope under optimized experimental conditions. The electronic structure of the discharged graphite was obtained from the near-edge fine structure of the Li and C K-edges and ab initio calculations. A 2.7 eV chemical shift of the Li K-edge, along with changes in the density of states, reveals the ionic nature of the intercalated lithium with significant charge transfer to the graphene sheets. Direct mapping of lithium in graphite revealed nanoscale inhomogeneities (nonstoichiometric regions), which are correlated with local phase separation and structural disorder (i.e., lattice distortion and dislocations) as observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The surface solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer was also imaged and determined to have a thickness of 10-50 nm, covering both edge and basal planes with LiF as its primary inorganic component. The Li K-edge spectroscopy and mapping, combined with electron microscopy-based structural analysis provide a comprehensive view of the structure-correlated lithium intercalation in graphite and of the formation of the SEI layer.

  11. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  12. Femtosecond electron spectroscopy in an electron microscope with high brightness beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Faran; Williams, Joseph; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2017-09-01

    A concept of performing femtosecond electron spectroscopy in an electron microscope with adaptive optics to handle space-charge-dominated beams is presented. Improved temporal-spectral resolutions are obtained through a combination of time and energy compression optics to disentangle the spectral information buried in temporally compressed pulses. A combined ∼1 eV-sub-ps performance with 105 electrons in single pulses, and femtosecond core-level spectroscopy at single-shots with higher doses are demonstrated. This strategy provides several orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity compared to the state-of-the-art ultrafast electron microscopes, representing a flexible solution for studying electronic and chemical dynamics in complex systems overcoming the collective space-charge limitations.

  13. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  14. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-01-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg2+ doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown. PMID:25362434

  15. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sidabras, Jason W; Varanasi, Shiv K; Mett, Richard R; Swarts, Steven G; Swartz, Harold M; Hyde, James S

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg(2+) doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  16. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg2+ doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  17. Sample thickness determination by scanning transmission electron microscopy at low electron energies.

    PubMed

    Volkenandt, Tobias; Müller, Erich; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2014-02-01

    Sample thickness is a decisive parameter for any quantification of image information and composition in transmission electron microscopy. In this context, we present a method to determine the local sample thickness by scanning transmission electron microscopy at primary energies below 30 keV. The image intensity is measured with respect to the intensity of the incident electron beam and can be directly compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Screened Rutherford and Mott scattering cross-sections are evaluated with respect to fitting experimental data with simulated image intensities as a function of the atomic number of the sample material and primary electron energy. The presented method is tested for sample materials covering a wide range of atomic numbers Z, that is, fluorenyl hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (Z = 3.5), carbon (Z = 6), silicon (Z = 14), gallium nitride (Z = 19), and tungsten (Z = 74). Investigations were conducted for two primary energies (15 and 30 keV) and a sample thickness range between 50 and 400 nm.

  18. [application of the analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques for detection, identification and visualization of localization of nanoparticles of titanium and cerium oxides in mammalian cells].

    PubMed

    Shebanova, A S; Bogdanov, A G; Ismagulova, T T; Feofanov, A V; Semenyuk, P I; Muronets, V I; Erokhina, M V; Onishchenko, G E; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V

    2014-01-01

    This work represents the results of the study on applicability of the modern methods of analytical transmission electron microscopy for detection, identification and visualization of localization of nanoparticles of titanium and cerium oxides in A549 cell, human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. A comparative analysis of images of the nanoparticles in the cells obtained in the bright field mode of transmission electron microscopy, under dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron was performed. For identification of nanoparticles in the cells the analytical techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, were compared when used in the mode of obtaining energy spectrum from different particles and element mapping. It was shown that the method for electron tomography is applicable to confirm that nanoparticles are localized in the sample but not coated by contamination. The possibilities and fields of utilizing different techniques for analytical transmission electron microscopy for detection, visualization and identification of nanoparticles in the biological samples are discussed.

  19. In situ transmission electron microscopy experimentation of nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alducin, Diego

    Due to the remarkable mechanical and electrical properties some nanostructured materials possess, it is important to be able to quantitatively characterize how these materials react under different types of stimulus. In situ transmission electron microscopy is a unique technique that allows the user to fully observe and record the crystallographic behavior of such materials undergoing a variety of tests. The crystallographic orientations silver nanowires were mapped in order to understand the structure and facets due to its geometry. Measuring the toughness and yield of the material led us to understand the anisotropic behavior of AgNWs. Depending on whether a load is applied to either a boundary between facets or on a facet will change the mechanical strength of the nanowire. By measuring the resistivity of the this material during deformation has also led us to understand that the intrinsic defects in the crystal structure of nanowires will change the way the material reacts to an electric potential. We have been also able to completely map the crystallographic orientations of very complex geometries of gold nanoparticles and characterize the weak forces involved in the manipulation if these nanoparticles. Finally, the elasticity of MoS2 was tested and found to be exponentially dependent upon the thickness of the nanosheets. However, the resistivity of this material does not seem to be affected by any type of deformation it is subjected to. The complete categorization of how materials interact with external stimulus while comparing the changes observed in its crystal structure is essential to understanding the underlying properties of nanostructured materials, which would not be possible without in situ transmisison electron microscopy experimentation.

  20. Two-dimensional spectroscopy of electronic couplings in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brixner, Tobias; Stenger, Jens; Vaswani, Harsha M; Cho, Minhaeng; Blankenship, Robert E; Fleming, Graham R

    2005-03-31

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy is widely used to study vibrational and electronic dynamics by monitoring transient changes in excited state populations on a femtosecond timescale. Yet the fundamental cause of electronic and vibrational dynamics--the coupling between the different energy levels involved--is usually inferred only indirectly. Two-dimensional femtosecond infrared spectroscopy based on the heterodyne detection of three-pulse photon echoes has recently allowed the direct mapping of vibrational couplings, yielding transient structural information. Here we extend the approach to the visible range and directly measure electronic couplings in a molecular complex, the Fenna-Matthews-Olson photosynthetic light-harvesting protein. As in all photosynthetic systems, the conversion of light into chemical energy is driven by electronic couplings that ensure the efficient transport of energy from light-capturing antenna pigments to the reaction centre. We monitor this process as a function of time and frequency and show that excitation energy does not simply cascade stepwise down the energy ladder. We find instead distinct energy transport pathways that depend sensitively on the detailed spatial properties of the delocalized excited-state wavefunctions of the whole pigment-protein complex.

  1. Low Voltage Transmission Electron Microscopy in Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Bendayan, Moise; Paransky, Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Low voltage transmission electron microscopy (LVTEM) was employed to examine biological tissues with accelerating voltages as low as 5kV. Tissue preparation was modified to take advantage of the low-voltage techniques. Treatments with heavy metals, such as post-fixation with osmium tetroxide, on block and counterstaining were omitted. Sections (40nm) were thinner than usual and generated highly contrasted images. General appearance of the cells remains similar to that of conventional TEM. New features were however revealed. The matrix of the pancreatic granules displays heterogeneity with partitions that may correspond to the inner-segregation of their secretory proteins. Mitochondria revealed the presence of the ATP synthase granules along their cristea. The nuclear dense chromatin displayed a honeycomb organization while distinct beads, nucleosomes, aligned along thin threads were seen in the dispersed chromatin. Nuclear pore protein complexes revealed their globular nature. The intercalated disks in cardiac muscle displayed their fine structural organization. These features correlate well with data described or predicted by cell and molecular biology. These new aspects are not revealed when thicker and conventionally osmicated tissue sections were examined by LVTEM, indicating that major masking effects are associated with standard TEM techniques. Immunogold was adapted to LVTEM further enhancing its potential in cell biology.

  2. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  3. Spatial resolution and information transfer in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiping; Oxley, Mark P; Lupini, Andrew R; Chisholm, Matthew F; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The relation between image resolution and information transfer is explored. It is shown that the existence of higher frequency transfer in the image is just a necessary but not sufficient condition for the achievement of higher resolution. Adopting a two-point resolution criterion, we suggest that a 10% contrast level between two features in an image should be used as a practical definition of resolution. In the context of scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is shown that the channeling effect does not have a direct connection with image resolution because sharp channeling peaks do not move with the scanning probe. Through a quantitative comparison between experimental image and simulation, a Fourier-space approach is proposed to estimate defocus and sample thickness. The effective atom size in Z-contrast imaging depends on the annular detector's inner angle. Therefore, an optimum angle exists for the highest resolution as a trade-off between reduced atom size and reduced signal with limited information transfer due to noise.

  4. Characterization of paired helical filaments by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ksiezak-Reding, Hanna; Wall, Joseph S

    2005-07-01

    Paired helical filaments (PHFs) are abnormal twisted filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. They are found in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders designated as tauopathies. They are a major component of intracellular inclusions known as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The objective of this review is to summarize various structural studies of PHFs in which using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been particularly informative. STEM provides shape and mass per unit length measurements important for studying ultrastructural aspects of filaments. These include quantitative comparisons between dispersed and aggregated populations of PHFs as well as comparative studies of PHFs in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Other approaches are also discussed if relevant or complementary to studies using STEM, e.g., application of a novel staining reagent, Nanovan. Our understanding of the PHF structure and the development of PHFs into NFTs is presented from a historical perspective. Others goals are to describe the biochemical and ultrastructural complexity of authentic PHFs, to assess similarities between authentic and synthetic PHFs, and to discuss recent advances in PHF modeling.

  5. Rapid diagnosis of plant virus diseases by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zechmann, Bernd; Zellnig, Günther

    2009-12-01

    A clear and rapid diagnosis of plant virus diseases is of great importance for agriculture and scientific experiments in plant phytopathology. Even though negative staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are often used for detection and identification of viral particles and provide rapid and reliable results, it is necessary to examine ultrastructural changes induced by viruses for clear identification of the disease. With conventional sample preparation for TEM it can take several days to obtain ultrastructural results and it is therefore not suitable for rapid diagnosis of virus diseases of plants. The use of microwave irradiation can reduce the time for sample preparation for TEM investigations. Two model virus-plant systems [Nicotiana tabacum plants infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Cucurbita pepo plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV)] demonstrate that it is possible to diagnose ultrastructural alterations induced by viruses in less than half a day by using microwave irradiation for preparation of samples. Negative staining of the sap of plants infected with TMV and ZYMV and the examination of ultrastructure and size were also carried out during sample preparation thus permitting diagnosis of the viral agent by TEM in a few hours. These methods will contribute towards a rapid and clear identification of virus diseases of plants and will be useful for diagnostic purposes in agriculture and in plant phytopathology.

  6. Nanomaterial engineering and property studies in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Costa, Pedro M F J; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wei, Xianlong; Tang, Dai-Ming; Xu, Zhi; Huang, Yang; Gautam, Ujjal K; Liu, Baodan; Zeng, Haibo; Kawamoto, Naoyki; Zhi, Chunyi; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio

    2012-01-10

    Modern methods of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) allow one to not only manipulate with a nanoscale object at the nanometer-range precision but also to get deep insights into its physical and chemical statuses. Dedicated TEM holders combining the capabilities of a conventional high-resolution TEM instrument and atomic force -, and/or scanning tunneling microscopy probes become the powerful tools in nanomaterials analysis. This progress report highlights the past, present and future of these exciting methods based on the extensive authors endeavors over the last five years. The objects of interest are diverse. They include carbon, boron nitride and other inorganic one- and two-dimensional nanoscale materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanowires and nanosheets. The key point of all experiments discussed is that the mechanical and electrical transport data are acquired on an individual nanostructure level under ultimately high spatial, temporal and energy resolution achievable in TEM, and thus can directly be linked to morphological, structural and chemical peculiarities of a given nanomaterial. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Probing electron beam effects with chemoresistive nanosensors during in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, S.; Wang, Z.; Zhou, Z.; Krainer, J.; Köck, A.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Grammatikopoulos, P.; Sowwan, M.

    2017-02-01

    We report in situ and ex situ fabrication approaches to construct p-type (CuO) and n-type (SnO2) metal oxide nanowire devices for operation inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM). By taking advantage of their chemoresistive properties, the nanowire devices were employed as sensitive probes for detecting reactive species induced by the interactions of high-energy electrons with surrounding gas molecules, in particular, for the case of O2 gas pressures up to 20 mbar. In order to rationalize our experimental findings, a computational model based on the particle-in-cell method was implemented to calculate the spatial distributions of scattered electrons and ionized oxygen species in the environmental TEM. Our approach enables the a priori identification and qualitative measurement of undesirable beam effects, paving the way for future developments related to their mitigation.

  8. Simulating electron energy loss spectroscopy with the MNPBEM toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Within the MNPBEM toolbox, we show how to simulate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of plasmonic nanoparticles using a boundary element method approach. The methodology underlying our approach closely follows the concepts developed by García de Abajo and coworkers (Garcia de Abajo, 2010). We introduce two classes eelsret and eelsstat that allow in combination with our recently developed MNPBEM toolbox for a simple, robust, and efficient computation of EEL spectra and maps. The classes are accompanied by a number of demo programs for EELS simulation of metallic nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanotriangles, and for electron trajectories passing by or penetrating through the metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss how to compute electric fields induced by the electron beam and cathodoluminescence. Catalogue identifier: AEKJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 38886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1222650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Computer: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Operating system: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). RAM:≥1 GB Classification: 18. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 370 External routines: MESH2D available at www.mathworks.com Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for plasmonic nanoparticles. Solution method: Boundary element method using electromagnetic potentials. Reasons for new version: The new version of the toolbox includes two additional classes for the simulation of electron energy

  9. Resonance tunneling electron-vibrational spectroscopy of polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Dalidchik, F I; Kovalevskii, S A; Balashov, E M

    2017-05-21

    The tunneling spectra of the ordered monolayer films of decamolybdodicobaltate (DMDC) compounds deposited from aqueous solutions on HOPG were measured by scanning tunnel microscopy in air. The DMDC spectra, as well as the tunneling spectra of other polyoxometalates (POMs), exhibit well-defined negative differential resistances (NDRs). The mechanism of formation of these spectral features was established from the collection of revealed NDR dependences on the external varying parameters and found to be common to all systems exhibiting Wannier-Stark localization. A model of biresonance tunneling was developed to provide an explanation for the totality of experimental data, both the literature and original, on the tunneling POM probing. A variant of the tunneling electron-vibrational POM spectroscopy was proposed allowing the determination of the three basic energy parameters-energy gaps between the occupied and unoccupied states, frequencies of the vibrational transitions accompanying biresonance electron-tunneling processes, and electron-vibrational interaction constants on the monomolecular level.

  10. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at a superconducting electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Anwand, W.; Attallah, A. G.; Dornberg, G.; Elsayed, M.; Enke, D.; Hussein, A. E. M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Liedke, M. O.; Potzger, K.; Trinh, T. T.

    2017-01-01

    The Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf operates a superconducting linear accelerator for electrons with energies up to 35 MeV and average beam currents up to 1.6 mA. The electron beam is employed for production of several secondary beams including X-rays from bremsstrahlung production, neutrons, and positrons. The secondary positron beam after moderation feeds the Monoenergetic Positron Source (MePS) where positron annihilation lifetime (PALS) and positron annihilation Doppler-broadening experiments in materials science are performed in parallel. The adjustable repetition rate of the continuous-wave electron beams allows matching of the pulse separation to the positron lifetime in the sample under study. The energy of the positron beam can be set between 0.5 keV and 20 keV to perform depth resolved defect spectroscopy and porosity studies especially for thin films.

  11. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    SciTech Connect

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Perna, Rosalba; Heng, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  12. Directional Auger Electron Spectroscopy — Physical Foundations and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mróz, S.

    Experimental data about the dependence of the Auger signal from crystalline samples on the primary beam direction are presented and discussed. It is shown that, for Auger electrons and elastically and inelastically backscattered electrons, maxima of the signal in its dependence on the polar and azimuth angles of the primary beam (in polar and azimuth profiles, respectively) appear when the primary beam is parallel either to one of the close-packed rows of atoms or to one of the densely packed atomic planes in the sample. This indicates that the diffraction of the primary electron beam is responsible for the dependence mentioned above. Mechanisms proposed for simple explanation of this dependence (channeling and forward focusing of primary electrons) are presented and results of their application are discussed. It is shown that both those mechanisms play an important role in the creation of the Auger signal contrast. The possibilities and limitations of the application of polar and azimuth Auger emission profiles in the determination of the surface layer crystalline structure (directional Auger electron spectroscopy — DAES) are presented and discussed. It is shown that the thickness of the investigated surface layer can be decreased up to a few monolayers. Results obtained with DAES are similar to those provided by X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and Auger electron diffraction (AED), but the DAES experimental equipment is simple and inexpensive and measurements are fast. Finally, experimental systems for DAES are described and examples of DAES applications are presented.

  13. The VUV electronic spectroscopy of acetone studied by synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Nobre, M; Fernandes, A; Ferreira da Silva, F; Antunes, R; Almeida, D; Kokhan, V; Hoffmann, S V; Mason, N J; Eden, S; Limão-Vieira, P

    2008-01-28

    The electronic state spectroscopy of acetone (CH3)2CO has been investigated using high-resolution VUV photoabsorption spectroscopy in the energy range 3.7-10.8 eV. New vibronic structure has been observed, notably in the low energy absorption band assigned to the 1(1)A(1) --> 1(1)A2 (ny --> pi*) transition. The local absorption maximum at 7.85 eV has been tentatively attributed to the 4(1)A1 (pi --> pi*) transition. Six Rydberg series converging to the lowest ionisation energy (9.708 eV) have been assigned as well as a newly-resolved ns Rydberg series converging to the first ionic excited state (12.590 eV). Rydberg orbitals of each series have been classified according to the magnitude of the quantum defect (delta) and are extended to higher quantum numbers than in the previous analyses.

  14. Valence Electronic Structure of Aqueous Solutions: Insights from Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Bradforth, Stephen E.

    2016-05-01

    The valence orbital electron binding energies of water and of embedded solutes are crucial quantities for understanding chemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution, including oxidation/reduction, transition-metal coordination, and radiation chemistry. Their experimental determination based on liquid-photoelectron spectroscopy using soft X-rays is described, and we provide an overview of valence photoelectron spectroscopy studies reported to date. We discuss principal experimental aspects and several theoretical approaches to compute the measured binding energies of the least tightly bound molecular orbitals. Solutes studied are presented chronologically, from simple electrolytes, via transition-metal ion solutions and several organic and inorganic molecules, to biologically relevant molecules, including aqueous nucleotides and their components. In addition to the lowest vertical ionization energies, the measured valence photoelectron spectra also provide information on adiabatic ionization energies and reorganization energies for the oxidation (ionization) half-reaction. For solutes with low solubility, resonantly enhanced ionization provides a promising alternative pathway.

  15. Valence Electronic Structure of Aqueous Solutions: Insights from Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Bradforth, Stephen E

    2016-05-27

    The valence orbital electron binding energies of water and of embedded solutes are crucial quantities for understanding chemical reactions taking place in aqueous solution, including oxidation/reduction, transition-metal coordination, and radiation chemistry. Their experimental determination based on liquid-photoelectron spectroscopy using soft X-rays is described, and we provide an overview of valence photoelectron spectroscopy studies reported to date. We discuss principal experimental aspects and several theoretical approaches to compute the measured binding energies of the least tightly bound molecular orbitals. Solutes studied are presented chronologically, from simple electrolytes, via transition-metal ion solutions and several organic and inorganic molecules, to biologically relevant molecules, including aqueous nucleotides and their components. In addition to the lowest vertical ionization energies, the measured valence photoelectron spectra also provide information on adiabatic ionization energies and reorganization energies for the oxidation (ionization) half-reaction. For solutes with low solubility, resonantly enhanced ionization provides a promising alternative pathway.

  16. Atomic resolution elemental mapping using energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy with chromatic aberration correction.

    PubMed

    Krause, F F; Rosenauer, A; Barthel, J; Mayer, J; Urban, K; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Brown, H G; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2017-10-01

    This paper addresses a novel approach to atomic resolution elemental mapping, demonstrating a method that produces elemental maps with a similar resolution to the established method of electron energy-loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dubbed energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM) this mode of imaging is, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, equivalent to tilting the probe in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) through a cone and incoherently averaging the results. In this paper we present a proof-of-principle EFISTEM experimental study on strontium titanate. The present approach, made possible by chromatic aberration correction, has the advantage that it provides elemental maps which are immune to spatial incoherence in the electron source, coherent aberrations in the probe-forming lens and probe jitter. The veracity of the experiment is supported by quantum mechanical image simulations, which provide an insight into the image-forming process. Elemental maps obtained in EFTEM suffer from the effect known as preservation of elastic contrast, which, for example, can lead to a given atomic species appearing to be in atomic columns where it is not to be found. EFISTEM very substantially reduces the preservation of elastic contrast and yields images which show stability of contrast with changing thickness. The experimental application is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle study on strontium titanate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 2012 ELECTRONIC SPECTROSCOPY & DYNAMICS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JULY 22-27, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Bern

    2012-07-27

    Topics covered in this GRC include high-resolution spectroscopy, coherent electronic energy transport in biology, excited state theory and dynamics, excitonics, electronic spectroscopy of cold and ultracold molecules, and the spectroscopy of nanostructures. Several sessions will highlight innovative techniques such as time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy, frequency combs, and liquid microjet photoelectron spectroscopy that have forged stimulating new connections between gas-phase and condensed-phase work.

  18. 21 CFR 1311.05 - Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders. 1311.05 Section 1311.05 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... technologies for electronic transmission of orders. (a) A registrant or a person with power of attorney to sign...

  19. Imaging and elemental mapping of biological specimens with a dual-EDS dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wu, J S; Kim, A M; Bleher, R; Myers, B D; Marvin, R G; Inada, H; Nakamura, K; Zhang, X F; Roth, E; Li, S Y; Woodruff, T K; O'Halloran, T V; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2013-05-01

    A dedicated analytical scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with dual energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors has been designed for complementary high performance imaging as well as high sensitivity elemental analysis and mapping of biological structures. The performance of this new design, based on a Hitachi HD-2300A model, was evaluated using a variety of biological specimens. With three imaging detectors, both the surface and internal structure of cells can be examined simultaneously. The whole-cell elemental mapping, especially of heavier metal species that have low cross-section for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), can be faithfully obtained. Optimization of STEM imaging conditions is applied to thick sections as well as thin sections of biological cells under low-dose conditions at room and cryogenic temperatures. Such multimodal capabilities applied to soft/biological structures usher a new era for analytical studies in biological systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging and elemental mapping of biological specimens with a dual-EDS dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J.S.; Kim, A. M.; Bleher, R.; Myers, B.D.; Marvin, R. G.; Inada, H.; Nakamura, K.; Zhang, X.F.; Roth, E.; Li, S.Y.; Woodruff, T. K.; O'Halloran, T. V.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated analytical scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with dual energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detectors has been designed for complementary high performance imaging as well as high sensitivity elemental analysis and mapping of biological structures. The performance of this new design, based on a Hitachi HD-2300A model, was evaluated using a variety of biological specimens. With three imaging detectors, both the surface and internal structure of cells can be examined simultaneously. The whole-cell elemental mapping, especially of heavier metal species that have low cross-section for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), can be faithfully obtained. Optimization of STEM imaging conditions is applied to thick sections as well as thin sections of biological cells under low-dose conditions at room- and cryogenic temperatures. Such multimodal capabilities applied to soft/biological structures usher a new era for analytical studies in biological systems. PMID:23500508

  1. Transmission electron microscopy studies of squeeze cast Al-AlN composites.

    PubMed

    Chédru, M.; Vicens, J.; Chermant, J. L.; Mordike, B. L.

    2001-02-01

    Aluminium-matrix composites containing approximately 45 vol.% AlN particles were fabricated by melt infiltration of aluminium into an AlN preform under a pressure up to 130 MPa. Three types of aluminium alloy (2024, 6060 and 5754) were used. The as-prepared composites were studied by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. As a result of the melt infiltration process, the composites are very dense and the microstructure shows a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement. The interfaces are clean with very little porosity. Composites with 2024 and 6060 matrices were carefully studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) after heat treatments. Dislocation density in the matrix of the reinforced material increases due to the difference in thermal expansion coefficients of aluminium alloys and AlN. This can induce an accelerated ageing response of the coherent and semicoherent precipitations of age-hardened matrices. This behaviour has been studied in the 2024 and 6060 composites by using microhardness measurements and TEM. Reactions between the AlN reinforcement and aluminium matrices (6060 and 5754) were observed and analysed by TEM. Matrices containing some of magnesium display a MgAl2O4 spinel formation at the AlN/matrix interface. The spinel formation is probably due to the reaction between magnesium of the matrix and the thin Al2O3 layer on the AlN surfaces. This reaction can affect the mechanical behaviour of the composite infiltrated with the 5754 matrix. This has been confirmed by overageing some samples at high temperatures (300 degrees C and 550 degrees C) for 10 days in order to emphasize the interfacial reactions.

  2. Choice of operating voltage for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Egerton, R F

    2014-10-01

    An accelerating voltage of 100-300kV remains a good choice for the majority of TEM or STEM specimens, avoiding the expense of high-voltage microscopy but providing the possibility of atomic resolution even in the absence of lens-aberration correction. For specimens thicker than a few tens of nm, the image intensity and scattering contrast are likely to be higher than at lower voltage, as is the visibility of ionization edges below 1000eV (as required for EELS elemental analysis). In thick (>100nm) specimens, higher voltage ensures less beam broadening and better spatial resolution for STEM imaging and EDX spectroscopy. Low-voltage (e.g. 30kV) TEM or STEM is attractive for a very thin (e.g. 10nm) specimen, as it provides higher scattering contrast and fewer problems for valence-excitation EELS. Specimens that are immune to radiolysis suffer knock-on damage at high current densities, and this form of radiation damage can be reduced or avoided by choosing a low accelerating voltage. Low-voltage STEM with an aberration-corrected objective lens (together with a high-angle dark-field detector and/or EELS) offers atomic resolution and elemental identification from very thin specimens. Conventional TEM can provide atomic resolution in low-voltage phase-contrast images but requires correction of chromatic aberration and preferably an electron-beam monochromator. Many non-conducting (e.g. organic) specimens damage easily by radiolysis and radiation damage then determines the TEM image resolution. For bright-field scattering contrast, low kV can provide slightly better dose-limited resolution if the specimen is very thin (a few nm) but considerably better resolution is possible from a thicker specimen, for which higher kV is required. Use of a phase plate in a conventional TEM offers the most dose-efficient way of achieving atomic resolution from beam-sensitive specimens.

  3. Transmission electron microscopy of subsolidus oxidation and weathering of olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banfield, J.F.; Veblen, D.R.; Jones, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Olivine crystals in basaltic andesites which crop out in the Abert Rim, south-central Oregon have been studied by high-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy. The observations reveal three distinct assemblages of alteration products that seem to correspond to three episodes of olivine oxidation. The olivine crystals contain rare, dense arrays of coherently intergrown Ti-free magnetite and inclusions of a phase inferred to be amorphous silica. We interpret this first assemblage to be the product of an early subsolidus oxidation event in the lava. The second olivine alteration assemblage contains complex ordered intergrowths on (001) of forsterite-rich olivine and laihunite (distorted olivine structure with Fe3+ charge balanced by vacancies). Based on experimental results for laihunite synthesis (Kondoh et al. 1985), these intergrowths probably formed by olivine oxidation between 400 and 800??C. The third episode of alteration involves the destruction of olivine by low-temperature hydrothermal alteration and weathering. Elongate etch-pits and channels in the margins of fresh olivine crystals contain semi-oriented bands of smectite. Olivine weathers to smectite and hematite, and subsequently to arrays of oriented hematite crystals. The textures resemble those reported by Eggleton (1984) and Smith et al. (1987). We find no evidence for a metastable phase intermediate between olivine and smectite ("M" - Eggleton 1984). The presence of laihunite exerts a strong control on the geometry of olivine weathering. Single laihunite layers and laihunite-forsteritic olivine intergrowths increase the resistance of crystals to weathering. Preferential development of channels between laihunite layers occurs where growth of laihunite produced compositional variations in olivine, rather than where coherency-strain is associated with laihunite-olivine interfaces. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Advanced fertility diagnosis in stallion semen using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Sandra; Bostedt, Hartwig; Failing, Klaus; Bergmann, Martin

    2006-02-01

    Routine semen analysis of stallions is based on light microscopy (LM). However, there are still a number of animals that are subfertile or even infertile not being identified with conventional semen analysis. The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for advanced fertility diagnosis in stallion. We examined ejaculates of 46 stallions with known fertility. Animals were divided into three different groups: group 1, fertile stallions (pregnant mares> or =70%, n=29); group 2, subfertile stallions (pregnant mares 10-69%, n=14); group 3, infertile stallions (pregnant mares<10%, n=3). Ejaculates were collected in spring 2002. Conventional semen analysis (volume, sperm concentration, motility, live:dead ratio and percentage of morphologically normal sperm) was immediately performed after semen collection. Ultrastructural analysis included the evaluation of 200 acrosomes, heads, midpieces and cross-sections of tails as well as 100 longitudinal sections of tails from every ejaculate. Using LM, we found a significant increase of morphological deviations from 24.5% (x ) in group 1 to 34.5% in group 2 and 73.5% in group 3. Using TEM, we found a significant increase of detached acrosomes from 6.1% in group 1 to 7.6% in group 2 and 21.4% in group 3. Deviations in tubule pattern were also increased (but not significant) from 2.7% in fertile and 2.8% in subfertile to 11.4% in infertile stallions as well as multiple tails from 1.9% in fertile to 2.0% in subfertile and 8.9% in infertile. Our data indicate that TEM is suitable for advanced fertility diagnostic in stallions, giving a connection between fertility and morphology. It suggests that the most likely reason for sub- and infertility in stallion in case of increased LM pathomorphology of semen are acrosomal alterations, especially detached acrosomes.

  5. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  6. Electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques for the study of microbial chromium(VI) reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques were used to determine oxidation state, at high spatial resolution, of chromium associated with the metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis, in anaerobic cultures containing Cr(VI)O4(2-). These techniques were applied to fixed cells examined in thin section by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as unfixed, hydrated bacteria examined by environmental cell (EC)-TEM. Two distinct populations of bacteria were observed by TEM: bacteria exhibiting low image contrast and bacteria exhibiting high contrast in their cell membrane (or boundary) structure which was often encrusted with high-contrast precipitates. Measurements by EELS demonstrated that cell boundaries became saturated with low concentrations of Cr and the precipitates encrusting bacterial cells contained a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state + 3 or lower.

  7. Electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques for the study of microbial chromium(VI) reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daulton, Tyrone L.; Little, Brenda J.; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2002-01-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques were used to determine oxidation state, at high spatial resolution, of chromium associated with the metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis, in anaerobic cultures containing Cr(VI)O4(2-). These techniques were applied to fixed cells examined in thin section by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as unfixed, hydrated bacteria examined by environmental cell (EC)-TEM. Two distinct populations of bacteria were observed by TEM: bacteria exhibiting low image contrast and bacteria exhibiting high contrast in their cell membrane (or boundary) structure which was often encrusted with high-contrast precipitates. Measurements by EELS demonstrated that cell boundaries became saturated with low concentrations of Cr and the precipitates encrusting bacterial cells contained a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state + 3 or lower.

  8. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of anomalous plutonium behavior in nuclear waste materials.

    PubMed

    Buck, Edgar C; Finn, Patricia A; Bates, John K

    2004-01-01

    Plutonium-enriched layer has been observed in corroded spent uranium oxide fuel (CSNF). These Pu-enriched regions were examined with analytical transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The enriched region also contained U, Am, Ru, Zr, but only minor enrichment of rare earth elements. The Pu, possibly as Pu(V) according to EELS measurements, was dispersed within re-precipitated uranium oxide (identified as U3O8) nano-crystals between U(VI) secondary phases and the CSNF surface. The U, Pu, and Am enrichment was observed in the corrosion products with tests on different nuclear fuels. This may have implications for the long-term behavior of CSNF under storage in a geologic waste repository. Furthermore, there may be an increased potential for the generation of Pu-bearing colloids from this type of weathered CSNF.

  9. Electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques for the study of microbial chromium(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Daulton, Tyrone L; Little, Brenda J; Lowe, Kristine; Jones-Meehan, Joanne

    2002-06-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques were used to determine oxidation state, at high spatial resolution, of chromium associated with the metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis, in anaerobic cultures containing Cr(VI)O4(2-). These techniques were applied to fixed cells examined in thin section by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as unfixed, hydrated bacteria examined by environmental cell (EC)-TEM. Two distinct populations of bacteria were observed by TEM: bacteria exhibiting low image contrast and bacteria exhibiting high contrast in their cell membrane (or boundary) structure which was often encrusted with high-contrast precipitates. Measurements by EELS demonstrated that cell boundaries became saturated with low concentrations of Cr and the precipitates encrusting bacterial cells contained a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state + 3 or lower.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of auto catalyst and cobalt germanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiping

    The modern ceria-zirconia based catalysts are used in automobiles to reduce exhaust pollutants. Cobalt germanides have potential applications as electrical contacts in the future Ge-based semiconductor devices. In this thesis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to study the atomic scale interactions between metallic nanostructures and crystalline substrates in the two material systems mentioned above. The model catalyst samples consisted of precious metal nano-particles (Pd, Rh) supported on the surface of (Ce,Zr)O2 thin films. The response of the microstructure of the metal-oxide interface to the reduction and oxidation treatments was investigated by cross-sectional high resolution TEM. Atomic detail of the metal-oxide interface was obtained. It was found that Pd and Rh showed different sintering and interaction behaviors on the oxide surface. The preferred orientation of Pd particles in this study was Pd(111)//CZO(111). Partial encapsulation of Pd particles by reduced (Ce,Zr)O 2 surface was observed and possible mechanisms of the encapsulation were discussed. The characteristics of the metal-oxide interaction depend on the properties of the oxide, as well as their relative orientation. The results provide experimental evidence for understanding the thermodynamics of the equilibrium morphology of a solid particle supported on a solid surface that is not considered as inert. The reaction of Co with Ge to form epitaxial Co5Ge7 was studied by in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) TEM using two methods. One was reactive deposition of Co on Ge, in which the Ge substrate was maintained at 350°C during deposition. The other method was solid state reaction, in which the deposition of Co on Ge was carried out at room temperature followed by annealing to higher temperatures. During reactive deposition, the deposited Co reacted with Ge to form nanosized 3D Co 5Ge7 islands. During solid state reaction, a continuous epitaxial Co5Ge7 film on the (001) Ge

  11. Surface segregation in titanium as monitored by Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, I. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the surface diffusion and segregation of bulk impurities in titanium single crystals under well-defined and controlled experimental conditions. It is shown that an atomically clean titanium single-crystal surface can be obtained by argon ion bombardment within the temperature range from 700 to 800 C. It is demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopy that, if such clean surfaces are subjected to thermal treatment, bulk impurities, especially sulfur, diffuse out to the crystal surface, and that the rate of surface segregation increases with increasing temperature.

  12. Surface segregation in titanium as monitored by Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, I. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the surface diffusion and segregation of bulk impurities in titanium single crystals under well-defined and controlled experimental conditions. It is shown that an atomically clean titanium single-crystal surface can be obtained by argon ion bombardment within the temperature range from 700 to 800 C. It is demonstrated by Auger electron spectroscopy that, if such clean surfaces are subjected to thermal treatment, bulk impurities, especially sulfur, diffuse out to the crystal surface, and that the rate of surface segregation increases with increasing temperature.

  13. Tomography of particle plasmon fields from electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hörl, Anton; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2013-08-16

    We theoretically investigate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of metallic nanoparticles in the optical frequency domain. Using a quasistatic approximation scheme together with a plasmon eigenmode expansion, we show that EELS can be rephrased in terms of a tomography problem. For selected single and coupled nanoparticles we extract the three-dimensional plasmon fields from a collection of rotated EELS maps. Our results pave the way for a fully three-dimensional plasmon-field tomography and establish EELS as a quantitative measurement device for plasmonics.

  14. 8th international conference on electronic spectroscopy and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2000-10-16

    Gathering from 33 countries around the world, 408 registrants and a number of local drop-in participants descended on the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from Monday, August 7 through Saturday, August 12, 2000 for the Eighth International Conference on Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy (ICESS8). At the conference, participants benefited from an extensive scientific program comprising more than 100 oral presentations (plenary lectures and invited and contributed talks) and 330 poster presentations, as well as ample time for socializing and a tour of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the nearby Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  15. Mapping of valence energy losses via energy-filtered annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lin; Sigle, Wilfried; Koch, Christoph T; Nelayah, Jaysen; Srot, Vesna; van Aken, Peter A

    2009-08-01

    The advent of electron monochromators has opened new perspectives on electron energy-loss spectroscopy at low energy losses, including phenomena such as surface plasmon resonances or electron transitions from the valence to the conduction band. In this paper, we report first results making use of the combination of an energy filter and a post-filter annular dark-field detector. This instrumental design allows us to obtain energy-filtered (i.e. inelastic) annular dark-field images in scanning transmission electron microscopy of the 2-dimensional semiconductor band-gap distribution of a GaN/Al(45)Ga(55)N structure and of surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoprisms. In comparison to other approaches, the technique is less prone to inelastic delocalization and relativistic artefacts. The mixed contribution of elastic and inelastic contrast is discussed.

  16. Combined scanning transmission X-ray and electron microscopy for the characterization of bacterial endospores.

    PubMed

    Jamroskovic, Jan; Shao, Paul P; Suvorova, Elena; Barak, Imrich; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2014-09-01

    Endospores (also referred to as bacterial spores) are bacterial structures formed by several bacterial species of the phylum Firmicutes. Spores form as a response to environmental stress. These structures exhibit remarkable resistance to harsh environmental conditions such as exposure to heat, desiccation, and chemical oxidants. The spores include several layers of protein and peptidoglycan that surround a core harboring DNA as well as high concentrations of calcium and dipicolinic acid (DPA). A combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy was used for the direct quantitative characterization of bacterial spores. The concentration and localization of DPA, Ca(2+) , and other elements were determined and compared for the core and cortex of spores from two distinct genera: Bacillus subtilis and Desulfotomaculum reducens. This micro-spectroscopic approach is uniquely suited for the direct study of individual bacterial spores, while classical molecular and biochemical methods access only bulk characteristics. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Delocalized Excited States of the Hydrated Electron

    SciTech Connect

    Paul F. Barbara

    2005-09-28

    Research under support of this grant has been focused on the understanding of highly delocalized ''conduction-band-like'' excited states of solvated electrons in bulk water, in water trapped in the core of reverse micelles, and in alkane solvents. We have strived in this work to probe conduction-band-like states by a variety of ultrafast spectroscopy techniques. (Most of which were developed under DOE support in a previous funding cycle.) We have recorded the optical spectrum of the hydrated electron for the first time. This was accomplished by applying a photo-detrapping technique that we had developed in a previous funding cycle, but had not yet been applied to characterize the actual spectrum. In the cases of reverse micelles, we have been investigating the potential role of conduction bands in the electron attachment process and the photoinduced detrapping, and have published two papers on this topic. Finally, we have been exploring solvated electrons in isooctane from various perspectives. All of these results strongly support the conclusion that optically accessible, highly delocalized electronic states exist in these various media.

  18. Metal particles in a ceramic matrix--scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy characterization.

    PubMed

    Konopka, K

    2006-09-01

    This paper is concerned with ceramic matrix (Al(2)O(3)) composites with introduced metal particles (Ni, Fe). The composites were obtained via sintering of powders under very high pressure (2.5 GPa). Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were chosen as the tools for the identification and description of the shape, size and distribution of the metal particles. The Al(2)O(3)-Ni composite contained agglomerates of the Ni particles surrounded by ceramic grains and nanometre-size Ni particles located inside the ceramic grains and at the ceramic grain boundaries. In the Al(2)O(3)-Fe composite, the Fe particles were mostly surrounded by ceramic grains. Moreover, holes left by the Fe particles were found. The high pressure used in the fabrication of the composites changed the shape of the metal and ceramic powder grains via plastic deformation.

  19. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored.

  20. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-07

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.