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Sample records for electron-beam deposited ceria

  1. Focused electron beam induced deposition: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Porrati, Fabrizio; Schwalb, Christian; Winhold, Marcel; Sachser, Roland; Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan; Fantner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a direct-writing technique with nanometer resolution, which has received strongly increasing attention within the last decade. In FEBID a precursor previously adsorbed on a substrate surface is dissociated in the focus of an electron beam. After 20 years of continuous development FEBID has reached a stage at which this technique is now particularly attractive for several areas in both, basic and applied research. The present topical review addresses selected examples that highlight this development in the areas of charge-transport regimes in nanogranular metals close to an insulator-to-metal transition, the use of these materials for strain- and magnetic-field sensing, and the prospect of extending FEBID to multicomponent systems, such as binary alloys and intermetallic compounds with cooperative ground states. Results: After a brief introduction to the technique, recent work concerning FEBID of Pt–Si alloys and (hard-magnetic) Co–Pt intermetallic compounds on the nanometer scale is reviewed. The growth process in the presence of two precursors, whose flux is independently controlled, is analyzed within a continuum model of FEBID that employs rate equations. Predictions are made for the tunability of the composition of the Co–Pt system by simply changing the dwell time of the electron beam during the writing process. The charge-transport regimes of nanogranular metals are reviewed next with a focus on recent theoretical advancements in the field. As a case study the transport properties of Pt–C nanogranular FEBID structures are discussed. It is shown that by means of a post-growth electron-irradiation treatment the electronic intergrain-coupling strength can be continuously tuned over a wide range. This provides unique access to the transport properties of this material close to the insulator-to-metal transition. In the last part of the review, recent developments in mechanical strain

  2. Patterned electrochemical deposition of copper using an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Heijer, Mark den; Shao, Ingrid; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Radisic, Alex

    2014-02-01

    We describe a technique for patterning clusters of metal using electrochemical deposition. By operating an electrochemical cell in the transmission electron microscope, we deposit Cu on Au under potentiostatic conditions. For acidified copper sulphate electrolytes, nucleation occurs uniformly over the electrode. However, when chloride ions are added there is a range of applied potentials over which nucleation occurs only in areas irradiated by the electron beam. By scanning the beam we control nucleation to form patterns of deposited copper. We discuss the mechanism for this effect in terms of electron beam-induced reactions with copper chloride, and consider possible applications.

  3. Ion-beam assisted, electron-beam physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.

    1996-12-01

    Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) is a relatively new technology that has overcome some of the difficulties associated with chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and thermal spray processes. In the EB-PVD process, focused high-energy electron beams generated from electron guns are directed to melt and evaporate ingots, as well as preheat the substrate inside a vacuum chamber. By adding the assistance of ion beams to the process, coating density and adhesion are improved, while costs are reduced. This article describes physical vapor deposition and ion-beam processes, explains the advantages of EB-PVD, shows how ion beams optimize the benefits of EB-PVD, and enumerates a variety of applications.

  4. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication: A Rapid Metal Deposition Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley REsearch Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Thus far, this technique has been demonstrated on aluminum and titanium alloys of interest for aerospace structural applications nickel and ferrous based alloys are also planned. Deposits resulting from 2219 aluminum demonstrations have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials ave exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rated in excess of 2500 cubic centimeters per hour (150 cubic inches per our) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  5. A critical literature review of focused electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dorp, W. F. van; Hagen, C. W.

    2008-10-15

    An extensive review is given of the results from literature on electron beam induced deposition. Electron beam induced deposition is a complex process, where many and often mutually dependent factors are involved. The process has been studied by many over many years in many different experimental setups, so it is not surprising that there is a great variety of experimental results. To come to a better understanding of the process, it is important to see to which extent the experimental results are consistent with each other and with the existing model. All results from literature were categorized by sorting the data according to the specific parameter that was varied (current density, acceleration voltage, scan patterns, etc.). Each of these parameters can have an effect on the final deposit properties, such as the physical dimensions, the composition, the morphology, or the conductivity. For each parameter-property combination, the available data are discussed and (as far as possible) interpreted. By combining models for electron scattering in a solid, two different growth regimes, and electron beam induced heating, the majority of the experimental results were explained qualitatively. This indicates that the physical processes are well understood, although quantitatively speaking the models can still be improved. The review makes clear that several major issues remain. One issue encountered when interpreting results from literature is the lack of data. Often, important parameters (such as the local precursor pressure) are not reported, which can complicate interpretation of the results. Another issue is the fact that the cross section for electron induced dissociation is unknown. In a number of cases, a correlation between the vertical growth rate and the secondary electron yield was found, which suggests that the secondary electrons dominate the dissociation rather than the primary electrons. Conclusive evidence for this hypothesis has not been found. Finally

  6. Deposition of silver on titania films by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xue-Nan; Ye, Mao; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wei, Lin; Hu, Yan; Hou, Xing-Gang; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, An-Dong

    2006-06-01

    The deposition of silver on titania films prepared with sol-gel method was performed by electron beam irradiation of silver nitrate solutions. The high efficient Ag/TiO2 films were formed and exhibited enhanced photo-catalytic functions in degradation of methyl orange in aqueous solutions under UV illumination. Metallic Ag nano-clusters were confirmed by XPS, XRD and TEM. The relationship between the silver nitrate concentrations and the photo-catalytic efficiencies of the films was investigated. The optimum concentration of silver nitrate solution was found to be 5 × 10-4 M.

  7. Focused electron beam induced deposition of pure SIO II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perentes, Alexandre; Hoffmann, Patrik; Munnik, Frans

    2007-02-01

    Focused electron beam induced processing (FEBID) equipments are the "all in one" tools for high resolution investigation, and modification of nano-devices. Focused electron beam induced deposition from a gaseous precursor usually results in a nano-composite sub-structured material, in which the interesting material is embedded in an amorphous carbonaceous matrix. Using the Hydrogen free tetraisocyanatosilane Si(NCO) 4 molecule as Si source, we show how a controlled oxygen flux, simultaneously injected with the precursor vapors, causes contaminants to vanish from the FEB deposits obtained and leads to the deposition of pure SiO II. The chemical composition of the FEBID material could be controlled from SiC IINO 3 to SiO II, the latter containing undetectable foreign element contamination. The [O II] / [TICS] ratio needed to obtain SiO II in our FEB deposition equipment is larger than 300. The evolution of the FEBID material chemical composition is presented as function of the [O II] / [TICS] molecular flux ratios. A hypothetical decomposition pathway of this silane under these conditions is discussed based on the different species formed under electron bombardment of TICS. Transmission electron microscopy investigations demonstrated that the deposited oxide is smooth (roughness sub 2nm) and amorphous. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the low concentration of hydroxyl groups. The Hydrogen content of the deposited oxide, measured by elastic recoil detection analysis, is as low as 1 at%. 193nm wavelength AIMS investigations of 125nm thick SiO II pads (obtained with [O II] / [TICS] = 325) showed an undetectable light absorption.

  8. Rapid tooling by electron-beam vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, T. C., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) of tooling metal, onto a shaped substrate to produce a replica of the substrate surface, offers the potential for significant cost savings over present methods of injection mold manufacturing. These savings are realized by the high deposition rate and the corresponding short manufacturing times provided by the EBPVD process. However, on route to realizing these gains, there are process technical issues which need to be resolved. Mold surfaces typically contain relatively high aspect ratio details that must be replicated to dimensional tolerances within +/- 2 mils. The deposited mold material must also provide high surface hardness and high fracture toughness. Good quality grain structure can be obtained in deposited Al 10-wt% Cu mold material when the substrate and corresponding deposit are at high process temperature. However, the resulting mold is subject to distortion during cooldown due to differential temperatures and shrinkage rates. Thermally controlled cooldown and the use of crushable substrate materials reduce these distortions, but not to the required levels of tolerance. Deposition of the Al-Cu at lower temperature produces columnar, poorly joined grains which result in a brittle and weakened mold material. When Al 10-wt% Cu metal vapor is deposited across high aspect ratio step features on the substrate surface, a grain growth defect can form in the step-shadowed regions of the deposited material, alongside the step feature. The step coverage defect consists of entrained voids which persist at intermediate deposition temperatures and produce a weakened mold. This final 1997 LDRD report investigates causes of this step coverage defect and offers methods for their control and elimination.

  9. Fundamental Proximity Effects in Focused electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, Harald; Smith, Daryl; Haber, Thomas; Rack, Philip D; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique.

  10. Use of beam deflection to control an electron beam wire deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for controlling an electron beam process wherein a wire is melted and deposited on a substrate as a molten pool comprises generating the electron beam with a complex raster pattern, and directing the beam onto an outer surface of the wire to thereby control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool. Directing the beam selectively heats the outer surface of the wire and maintains the position of the wire with respect to the molten pool. An apparatus for controlling an electron beam process includes a beam gun adapted for generating the electron beam, and a controller adapted for providing the electron beam with a complex raster pattern and for directing the electron beam onto an outer surface of the wire to control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool.

  11. Thermal imaging for assessment of electron-beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) additive manufacturing deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Hafley, Robert A.; Taminger, Karen M.; Domack, Christopher S.; Brewer, Amy; Martin, Richard E.

    2013-05-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing field where 3-dimensional parts can be produced layer by layer. NASA's electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) technology is being evaluated to manufacture metallic parts in a space environment. The benefits of EBF3 technology are weight savings to support space missions, rapid prototyping in a zero gravity environment, and improved vehicle readiness. The EBF3 system is composed of 3 main components: electron beam gun, multi-axis position system, and metallic wire feeder. The electron beam is used to melt the wire and the multi-axis positioning system is used to build the part layer by layer. To insure a quality deposit, a near infrared (NIR) camera is used to image the melt pool and solidification areas. This paper describes the calibration and application of a NIR camera for temperature measurement. In addition, image processing techniques are presented for deposit assessment metrics.

  12. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brett B; Stanford, Michael G; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lester, Kevin; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. In addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention. PMID:25977862

  13. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. Finally, in addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhancesmore » the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.« less

  14. Electron-stimulated purification of platinum nanostructures grown via focused electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Lester, Kevin; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, platinum–carbon nanostructures deposited via electron beam induced deposition from MeCpPt(IV)Me3 are purified during a post-deposition electron exposure treatment in a localized oxygen ambient at room temperature. Time-dependent studies demonstrate that the process occurs from the top–down. Electron beam energy and current studies demonstrate that the process is controlled by a confluence of the electron energy loss and oxygen concentration. Furthermore, the experimental results are modeled as a 2nd order reaction which is dependent on both the electron energy loss density and the oxygen concentration. Finally, in addition to purification, the post-deposition electron stimulated oxygen purification process enhances the resolution of the EBID process due to the isotropic carbon removal from the as-deposited materials which produces high-fidelity shape retention.

  15. Single-crystal nanowires grown via electron-beam-induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Kate L; Randolph, Steven J; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Meyer III, Harry M; Simpson, Michael L; Rack, Philip D

    2008-01-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) is a useful technique for direct-writing of 3-dimensional dielectric, semiconductor, and metallic materials with nanoscale precision and resolution. The EBID process, however, has been limited in many cases because precursor byproducts (typically from organic precursors like W(CO)6) are incorporated into the deposited material resulting in contaminated and amorphous structures. In this manuscript, we have investigated the structure and composition of EBID tungsten nanostructures as-deposited from a tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) precursor. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and electron spectroscopy were employed to determine the effects that the electron beam scanning conditions have on the deposit characteristics. The results show that slow, one-dimensional lateral scanning produces textured -tungsten nanowire cores surrounded by an oxide secondary layer, while stationary vertical growth leads to single-crystal [100]-oriented W3O nanowires. Furthermore we correlate how the growth kinetics affect the resultant nanowire structure and composition.

  16. Inert Gas Enhanced Laser-Assisted Purification of Platinum Electron-Beam-Induced Deposits.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2015-09-09

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar-H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. A sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  17. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D.

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some loss of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.

  18. Inert gas enhanced laser-assisted purification of platinum electron-beam-induced deposits

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; ...

    2015-06-30

    Electron-beam-induced deposition patterns, with composition of PtC5, were purified using a pulsed laser-induced purification reaction to erode the amorphous carbon matrix and form pure platinum deposits. Enhanced mobility of residual H2O molecules via a localized injection of inert Ar–H2 (4%) is attributed to be the reactive gas species for purification of the deposits. Surface purification of deposits was realized at laser exposure times as low as 0.1 s. The ex situ purification reaction in the deposit interior was shown to be rate-limited by reactive gas diffusion into the deposit, and deposit contraction associated with the purification process caused some lossmore » of shape retention. To circumvent the intrinsic flaws of the ex situ anneal process, in situ deposition and purification techniques were explored that resemble a direct write atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. First, we explored a laser-assisted electron-beam-induced deposition (LAEBID) process augmented with reactive gas that resulted in a 75% carbon reduction compared to standard EBID. Lastly, a sequential deposition plus purification process was also developed and resulted in deposition of pure platinum deposits with high fidelity and shape retention.« less

  19. Metal delocalization and surface decoration in direct-write nanolithography by electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Vidyut; Stach, Eric A.; Radmilovic, Velimir R.; Mowat, Ian A.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to interconnect different nanostructures is crucial to nanocircuit fabrication efforts. A simple and versatile direct-write nanolithography technique for the fabrication of interconnects is presented. Decomposition of a metalorganic precursor gas by a focused electron beam resulted in the deposition of conductive platinum nanowires. The combination of in situ secondary electron imaging with deposition allows for the simultaneous identification and interconnection of nanoscale components. However, the deposition was not entirely localized to the electron beam raster area, as shown by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The electrical impact of the metallic spread was quantified by measuring the leakage current between closely spaced wires. The origins of the spread and strategies for minimizing it are discussed. These results indicate that, while this direct-write methodology is a convenient one for rapid prototyping of nanocircuits, caution must be used to avoid unwanted decoration of nanostructures by metallic species.

  20. Metal delocalization and surface decoration in direct-write nanolithography by electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Vidyut; Stach, Eric A.; Radmilovic, Velimir R.; Mowat, Ian A.

    2004-07-05

    The ability to interconnect different nanostructures is crucial to nanocircuit fabrication efforts. A simple and versatile direct-write nanolithography technique for the fabrication of interconnects is presented. Decomposition of a metalorganic precursor gas by a focused electron beam resulted in the deposition of conductive platinum nanowires. The combination of in situ secondary electron imaging with deposition allows for the simultaneous identification and interconnection of nanoscale components. However, the deposition was not entirely localized to the electron beam raster area, as shown by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The electrical impact of the metallic spread was quantified by measuring the leakage current between closely spaced wires. The origins of the spread and strategies for minimizing it are discussed. These results indicate that, while this direct-write methodology is a convenient one for rapid prototyping of nanocircuits, caution must be used to avoid unwanted decoration of nanostructures by metallic species.

  1. Energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during laser and electron beam irradiation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.W.; Aziz, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The fundamentals of energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during energy deposition from lasers and electron beams is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the deposition of energy from pulsed sources (10 to 100 ns pulse duration time) in order to achieve high heating and cooling rates (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/C/s) in the near surface region. The response of both metals and semiconductors to pulsed energy deposition is considered. Guidelines are presented for the choice of energy source, wavelength, and pulse duration time.

  2. Energy deposition through radiative processes in absorbers irradiated by electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuo, Tabata; Pedro, Andreo; Kunihiko, Shinoda; Rinsuke, Ito

    1994-09-01

    The component of energy deposition due to radiative processes (bremsstrahlung component) in absorbers irradiated by electron beams has been computed together with the total energy deposition by using the ITS Monte Carlo system version 3.0. Plane-parallel electron beams with energies from 0.1 to 100 MeV have been assumed to be incident normally on the slab absorber, whose thickness is 2.5 times the continuous slowing-down approximation (csda) range of the incident electrons. Absorber materials considered are elemental solids with atomic numbers between 4 and 92 (Be, C, Al, Cu, Ag, Au and U). An analytic formula is given to express the depth profile of the bremsstrahlung component as a function of scaled depth (depth in units of the csda range), incident-electron energy and absorber atomic number. It is also applicable to compounds.

  3. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J. Todd

    2017-03-01

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4–H2SO4–SDS–H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4–H2SO4–PEG–H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  4. Focused electron beam induced deposition of copper with high resolution and purity from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Esfandiarpour, Samaneh; Boehme, Lindsay; Hastings, J Todd

    2017-03-24

    Electron-beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures is desirable for nanoscale rapid prototyping, interconnection of chemically synthesized structures, and integrated circuit editing. However, metalorganic, gas-phase precursors for copper introduce high levels of carbon contamination. Here we demonstrate electron beam induced deposition of high-purity copper nanostructures from aqueous solutions of copper sulfate. The addition of sulfuric acid eliminates oxygen contamination from the deposit and produces a deposit with ∼95 at% copper. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, or polyethylene glycole (PEG) improves pattern resolution and controls deposit morphology but leads to slightly reduced purity. High resolution nested lines with a 100 nm pitch are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-SDS-H2O. Higher aspect ratios (∼1:1) with reduced line edge roughness and unintended deposition are obtained from CuSO4-H2SO4-PEG-H2O. Evidence for radiation-chemical deposition mechanisms was observed, including deposition efficiency as high as 1.4 primary electrons/Cu atom.

  5. The effect of energy deposition on pattern resolution in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Ananthan

    Electron beam lithography is one of the most important tools for nanofabrication. Electron beam lithography has consistently been able to offer higher resolution, typically better than 10 nm or so, compared to other techniques. In this work the contribution of electron-substrate interaction to pattern resolution is investigated. In electron beam lithography the incident beam is scattered in the resist-substrate stack by a combination of elastic and inelastic events which is described by the point spread function. Using a Vistec VB300 Gaussian beam lithography tool operating at 100 keV the experimental point spread function is investigated by a technique called point exposure distribution measurements. The experimental results indicate that the scattering in the sub-100 nm range shows several orders of the magnitude difference with that obtained via Monte Carlo simulations. In high energy electron beam lithography where forward scattering in small, contribution of secondary electrons generated by the primary beam must be taken into account. The chemical change leading to resist exposure is through bond scission, which is typically a low energy event between 3 -- 5 eV. Compared to the primary beam, the secondary electrons have a significantly higher probability of scission due to their lower energy. These secondary electrons are also generated with large emission angles and can travel several nanometers, leading to an increase in observed line widths compared to the size of the beam. An analytical model developed here, that considers the energy deposited by the secondary electrons, is able to predict the dependence of dose on observed diameter to within a reasonable accuracy. This technique used in conjunction with the knowledge of resist contrast is also indicative of pattern resolution limits in high energy electron beam lithography. It is also found that for negative resists, backscatter effects and resist contrast significantly degrade the resolution for large

  6. Electrical characterization of defects introduced in n-Ge during electron beam deposition or exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, S. M. M.; Auret, F. D.; Janse van Rensburg, P. J.; Nel, J. M.

    2013-11-07

    Schottky barrier diodes prepared by electron beam deposition (EBD) on Sb-doped n-type Ge were characterized using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Pt EBD diodes manufactured with forming gas in the chamber had two defects, E{sub 0.28} and E{sub 0.31}, which were not previously observed after EBD. By shielding the samples mechanically during EBD, superior diodes were produced with no measureable deep levels, establishing that energetic ions created in the electron beam path were responsible for the majority of defects observed in the unshielded sample. Ge samples that were first exposed to the conditions of EBD, without metal deposition (called electron beam exposure herein), introduced a number of new defects not seen after EBD with only the E-center being common to both processes. Substantial differences were noted when these DLTS spectra were compared to those obtained using diodes irradiated by MeV electrons or alpha particles indicating that very different defect creation mechanisms are at play when too little energy is available to form Frenkel pairs. These observations suggest that when EBD ions and energetic particles collide with the sample surface, inducing intrinsic non-localised lattice excitations, they modify defects deeper in the semiconductor thus rendering them observable.

  7. Review of magnetic nanostructures grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Teresa, J. M.; Fernández-Pacheco, A.; Córdoba, R.; Serrano-Ramón, L.; Sangiao, S.; Ibarra, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    We review the current status of the use of focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) for the growth of magnetic nanostructures. This technique relies on the local dissociation of a precursor gas by means of an electron beam. The most promising results have been obtained using the Co2(CO)8 precursor, where the Co content in the grown nanodeposited material can be tailored up to more than 95 at.%. Functional behaviour of these Co nanodeposits has been observed in applications such as arrays of magnetic dots for information storage and catalytic growth, magnetic tips for scanning probe microscopes, nano-Hall sensors for bead detection, nano-actuated magnetomechanical systems and nanowires for domain-wall manipulation. The review also covers interesting results observed in Fe-based and alloyed nanodeposits. Advantages and disadvantages of FEBID for the growth of magnetic nanostructures are discussed in the article as well as possible future directions in this field.

  8. Electron-beam-assisted oxygen purification at low temperatures for electron-beam-induced pt deposits: towards pure and high-fidelity nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Plank, Harald; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lester, Kevin; Lewis, Brett B; Rack, Philip D

    2014-01-22

    Nanoscale metal deposits written directly by electron-beam-induced deposition, or EBID, are typically contaminated because of the incomplete removal of the original organometallic precursor. This has greatly limited the applicability of EBID materials synthesis, constraining the otherwise powerful direct-write synthesis paradigm. We demonstrate a low-temperature purification method in which platinum-carbon nanostructures deposited from MeCpPtIVMe3 are purified by the presence of oxygen gas during a post-electron exposure treatment. Deposit thickness, oxygen pressure, and oxygen temperature studies suggest that the dominant mechanism is the electron-stimulated reaction of oxygen molecules adsorbed at the defective deposit surface. Notably, pure platinum deposits with low resistivity and retain the original deposit fidelity were accomplished at an oxygen temperature of only 50 °C.

  9. TEM study of annealed Pt nanostructures grown by electron beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frabboni, S.; Gazzadi, G. C.; Spessot, A.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we report on the microstructural characterization of Pt nanostructures fabricated by electron beam-induced deposition in a dual beam system and subsequently annealed in furnace. The as-deposited nanostructures are made of a mixture of nanocrystalline Pt and amorphous carbon. We show by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy that the annealing in presence of oxygen at 550 °C for 30 min is able to remove the amorphous carbon from the nanostructure, leaving polycrystalline Pt grains.

  10. Texture-Induced Anisotropy in an Inconel 718 Alloy Deposited Using Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayon, W.; Shenoy, R.; Bird, R.; Hafley, R.; Redding, M.

    2014-01-01

    A test block of Inconel (IN) 718 was fabricated using electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) to examine how the EBF(sup 3) deposition process affects the microstructure, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties of IN 718. Tests revealed significant anisotropy in the elastic modulus for the as-deposited IN 718. Subsequent tests were conducted on specimens subjected to a heat treatment designed to decrease the level of anisotropy. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to characterize crystallographic texture in the as-deposited and heat treated conditions. The anisotropy in the as-deposited condition was strongly affected by texture as evidenced by its dependence on orientation relative to the deposition direction. Heat treatment resulted in a significant improvement in modulus of the EBF(sup 3) product to a level nearly equivalent to that for wrought IN 718 with reduced anisotropy; reduction in texture through recrystallization; and production of a more homogeneous microstructure.

  11. Single-crystal nanowires grown via electron-beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, K. L.; Randolph, S. J.; Fowlkes, J. D.; Allard, L. F.; Meyer, H. M., III; Simpson, M. L.; Rack, P. D.

    2008-08-01

    Electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) is a useful technique for direct-writing of three-dimensional dielectric, semiconductor, and metallic materials with nanoscale precision and resolution. The EBID process, however, has been limited in many cases because precursor byproducts (typically from organic precursors like W(CO)6) are incorporated into the deposited material resulting in contaminated and amorphous structures. In this work, we have investigated the structure and composition of EBID tungsten nanostructures as-deposited from a tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) precursor. High resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and electron spectroscopy were employed to determine the effects that the electron beam scanning conditions have on the deposit characteristics. The results show that slow, one-dimensional lateral scanning produces textured β-tungsten nanowire cores surrounded by an oxide secondary layer, while stationary vertical growth leads to single-crystal [100]-oriented W3O nanowires. Furthermore we correlate how the growth kinetics affect the resultant nanowire structure and composition.

  12. Fabrication of nickel nanocontacts using nanostencils and electron beam assisted SiO2 deposition.

    PubMed

    Langford, R M; Wang, T X

    2006-08-01

    Nickel nanocontacts for studying ballistic magnetoresistance have been fabricated by sputtering through FIB prepared nanostencil masks and by using electron beam assisted deposition of SiO2 to reduce the size of FIB milled pores through silicon nitride membranes. These two methods are discussed in terms of the nanocontact sizes, fabrication, and yield. The smallest size of the nanocontacts prepared using the nanostencil method was 40 nm and by the filling method was 1-2 nm. The maximum magnetoresistance measured was 1% and no evidence of a large ballistic magnetoresistance was observed.

  13. Femtosecond laser-induced damage threshold of electron beam deposited dielectrics for 1-m class optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervy, Adrien; Gallais, Laurent; Chériaux, Gilles; Mouricaud, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In order to transport multi-petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser beams with large spectral bandwidth, specific mirrors have to be designed and manufactured. We report on an experimental study of the laser-damage resistance and other optical properties of coating materials deposited in a 1-m class coating chamber. The study is conducted on single-layer coatings deposited by electron beam evaporation at 500 fs. Based on the experience of large optics for nanosecond applications, hafnia and silica are particularly investigated. However, in the case of sub-15 fs, the spectral specifications for PW beam transport mirrors cannot be reached by classical high laser-resistant quarter-wave SiO2/HfO2 stacks. Therefore, we investigate the laser resistance of different dielectrics of interest deposited with electron-beam processes: Al2O3, Y2O3, Sc2O3, HfO2, Ta2O5, TiO2. The influence of multiple pulse irradiations and environmental conditions, such as vacuum and temperature, is studied. With the investigation of multilayer stacks, we also show that there is no difference in behavior when a film is studied as a single layer or embedded in a stack. Based on these results, we were able to optimize high reflective (>99.5%), broadband (300 nm) and high laser-induced damage threshold (2.5 J/cm2) mirrors for PW applications.

  14. Processing-structure-property relationships in electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D. Srinivasa; Valleti, Krishna; Joshi, S. V.; Janardhan, G. Ranga

    2011-05-15

    The physical and mechanical properties of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings deposited by the electron beam physical vapor deposition technique have been investigated by varying the key process variables such as vapor incidence angle and sample rotation speed. The tetragonal zirconia coatings formed under varying process conditions employed were found to have widely different surface and cross-sectional morphologies. The porosity, phase composition, planar orientation, hardness, adhesion, and surface residual stresses in the coated specimens were comprehensively evaluated to develop a correlation with the process variables. Under transverse scratch test conditions, the YSZ coatings exhibited two different crack formation modes, depending on the magnitude of residual stress. The influence of processing conditions on the coating deposition rate, column orientation angle, and adhesion strength has been established. Key relationships between porosity, hardness, and adhesion are also presented.

  15. Direct-write deposition and focused-electron-beam-induced purification of gold nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Belić, Domagoj; Shawrav, Mostafa M; Gavagnin, Marco; Stöger-Pollach, Michael; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2015-02-04

    Three-dimensional gold (Au) nanostructures offer promise in nanoplasmonics, biomedical applications, electrochemical sensing and as contacts for carbon-based electronics. Direct-write techniques such as focused-electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID) can provide such precisely patterned nanostructures. Unfortunately, FEBID Au traditionally suffers from a high nonmetallic content and cannot meet the purity requirements for these applications. Here we report exceptionally pure pristine FEBID Au nanostructures comprising submicrometer-large monocrystalline Au sections. On the basis of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy results and Monte Carlo simulations of electron trajectories in the deposited nanostructures, we propose a curing mechanism that elucidates the observed phenomena. The in situ focused-electron-beam-induced curing mechanism was supported by postdeposition ex situ curing and, in combination with oxygen plasma cleaning, is utilized as a straightforward purification method for planar FEBID structures. This work paves the way for the application of FEBID Au nanostructures in a new generation of biosensors and plasmonic nanodevices.

  16. Investigations of LBMO thin films deposited on different substrates by electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshendra Reddy, Ch.; Ashoka Reddy, Ch.; Sivasankar Reddy, A.; Sreedhara Reddy, P.

    2016-04-01

    La0.7Ba0.3MnO3 (LBMO) thin films were prepared on different substrates such as Si, MgO, and c-ZrO2 substrates at substrate temperature 1023 K using electron beam evaporation technique for first time. Through optimizing the preparation condition, the better film uniformity of thickness, composition, and temperature was achieved. To find the influence of substrates, we studied the structural, compositional, morphological, and electrical properties of LBMO thin films. All the LBMO films exhibited a single phase and good crystallinity with no impurity phases. Films deposited on MgO have high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) value with low transition temperature (245 K). Better TCR (4.09 %/K) value at room temperature is observed in LBMO films deposited on Si substrate.

  17. Study And Comparison Of Silver Mirrors Deposited On Different Substrates By Electron-Beam Gun Method

    SciTech Connect

    Asl, Jahanbakhsh Mashaiekhy; Shafieizadeh, Zahra; Sabbaghzadeh, Jamshid; Anaraki, Mahdi

    2010-12-23

    Choosing the right substrate is one of the important factors for improving quality parameters of thin films such as adhesion between layers and substrates. The selected substrate should have proper physical and chemical compatibility with deposited thin film. In this paper, we have been investigated four different types of high reflective laser mirrors that were produced in similar conditions on four different kinds of substrates including copper, stainless steel, brass, and nickel. We used electron-beam gun method for deposition of silver layers. At the end we compared theoretical results with practical results that were yielded by laser damage threshold test. It was shown that brass is the best choice for silver metal mirrors as a substrate.

  18. Highly conductive and pure gold nanostructures grown by electron beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shawrav, Mostafa M.; Taus, Philipp; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D.; Schinnerl, M.; Stöger-Pollach, M.; Schwarz, S.; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A.; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces an additive direct-write nanofabrication technique for producing extremely conductive gold nanostructures from a commercial metalorganic precursor. Gold content of 91 atomic % (at. %) was achieved by using water as an oxidative enhancer during direct-write deposition. A model was developed based on the deposition rate and the chemical composition, and it explains the surface processes that lead to the increases in gold purity and deposition yield. Co-injection of an oxidative enhancer enabled Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID)—a maskless, resistless deposition method for three dimensional (3D) nanostructures—to directly yield pure gold in a single process step, without post-deposition purification. Gold nanowires displayed resistivity down to 8.8 μΩ cm. This is the highest conductivity achieved so far from FEBID and it opens the possibility of applications in nanoelectronics, such as direct-write contacts to nanomaterials. The increased gold deposition yield and the ultralow carbon level will facilitate future applications such as the fabrication of 3D nanostructures in nanoplasmonics and biomolecule immobilization. PMID:27666531

  19. Thermally induced transformations of amorphous carbon nanostructures fabricated by electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Kim, Songkil; Fedorov, Andrei G; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2011-03-01

    We studied the thermally induced phase transformations of electron-beam-induced deposited (EBID) amorphous carbon nanostructures by correlating the changes in its morphology with internal microstructure by using combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution confocal Raman microscopy. These carbon deposits can be used to create heterogeneous junctions in electronic devices commonly known as carbon-metal interconnects. We compared two basic shapes of EBID deposits: dots/pillars with widths from 50 to 600 nm and heights from 50 to 500 nm and lines with variable heights from 10 to 150 nm but having a constant length of 6 μm. We observed that during thermal annealing, the nanoscale amorphous deposits go through multistage transformation including dehydration and stress-relaxation around 150 °C, dehydrogenation within 150-300 °C, followed by graphitization (>350 °C) and formation of nanocrystalline, highly densified graphitic deposits around 450 °C. The later stage of transformation occurs well below commonly observed graphitization for bulk carbon (600-800 °C). It was observed that the shape of the deposits contribute significantly to the phase transformations. We suggested that this difference is controlled by different contributions from interfacial footprints area. Moreover, the rate of graphitization was different for deposits of different shapes with the lines showing a much stronger dependence of its structure on the density than the dots.

  20. Highly conductive and pure gold nanostructures grown by electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawrav, Mostafa M.; Taus, Philipp; Wanzenboeck, Heinz D.; Schinnerl, M.; Stöger-Pollach, M.; Schwarz, S.; Steiger-Thirsfeld, A.; Bertagnolli, Emmerich

    2016-09-01

    This work introduces an additive direct-write nanofabrication technique for producing extremely conductive gold nanostructures from a commercial metalorganic precursor. Gold content of 91 atomic % (at. %) was achieved by using water as an oxidative enhancer during direct-write deposition. A model was developed based on the deposition rate and the chemical composition, and it explains the surface processes that lead to the increases in gold purity and deposition yield. Co-injection of an oxidative enhancer enabled Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition (FEBID)—a maskless, resistless deposition method for three dimensional (3D) nanostructures—to directly yield pure gold in a single process step, without post-deposition purification. Gold nanowires displayed resistivity down to 8.8 μΩ cm. This is the highest conductivity achieved so far from FEBID and it opens the possibility of applications in nanoelectronics, such as direct-write contacts to nanomaterials. The increased gold deposition yield and the ultralow carbon level will facilitate future applications such as the fabrication of 3D nanostructures in nanoplasmonics and biomolecule immobilization.

  1. Closed-Loop Process Control for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Deposition Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor); Martin, Richard E. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A closed-loop control method for an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) process includes detecting a feature of interest during the process using a sensor(s), continuously evaluating the feature of interest to determine, in real time, a change occurring therein, and automatically modifying control parameters to control the EBF(sup 3) process. An apparatus provides closed-loop control method of the process, and includes an electron gun for generating an electron beam, a wire feeder for feeding a wire toward a substrate, wherein the wire is melted and progressively deposited in layers onto the substrate, a sensor(s), and a host machine. The sensor(s) measure the feature of interest during the process, and the host machine continuously evaluates the feature of interest to determine, in real time, a change occurring therein. The host machine automatically modifies control parameters to the EBF(sup 3) apparatus to control the EBF(sup 3) process in a closed-loop manner.

  2. On the wetting behavior of ceria thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sin-Pui; Rossero, Jorge; Chen, Chen; Li, Daniel; Takoudis, Christos G.; Abiade, Jeremiah T.

    2017-02-01

    Polymers are most widely used in the production of water-repellant coatings. However, their use in applications requiring wear resistance or high-temperature stability is extremely limited. A recent report suggests that wear resistant, thermally stable rare earth oxide materials like cerium dioxide (ceria) are intrinsically water repellant. We have studied this intriguing finding for ceria thin films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at different oxygen pressures and different substrate temperatures. We used a custom apparatus for measuring water contact angles on ceria films deposited by PLD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the relationship between the ceria wetting behavior and ceria surface chemistry. Our results show that ceria thin films are intrinsically hydrophilic and that hydrophobicity arises due to adsorption of hydrocarbon species after ˜24 h.

  3. REFLEX: An energy deposition code that models the effects of electron reflection during electron beam heating tests

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.A. IV; Croessmann, C.D.; Whitley, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes an energy coupling model that considers electron reflection losses during electron beam heating experiments. This model is embodied on the REFLEX computer code, written in standard FORTRAN 77. REFLEX currently models energy deposition phenomena in three different sample geometries. These configurations include flat, cylindrical shell, and hemispherical shell surfaces. Given the electron beam operating parameters, REFLEX calculates the heat flux profile over a sample's surface, the total amount of energy deposited into a sample, and the percentage of the electron beam energy that is transferred to a sample. This document describes the energy deposition equations used in the REFLEX code; the program is described and detailed instructions are given regarding the input. Results are given for each geometry and possible experimental applications are presented. 3 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of an Electron-Beam Physical-Vapor-Deposition Coating.

    PubMed

    Slifka, A J; Filla, B J

    2003-01-01

    An industrial ceramic thermal-barrier coating designated PWA 266, processed by electron-beam physical-vapor deposition, was measured using a steady-state thermal conductivity technique. The thermal conductivity of the mass fraction 7 % yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was measured from 100 °C to 900 °C. Measurements on three thicknesses of coatings, 170 μm, 350 μm, and 510 μm resulted in thermal conductivity in the range from 1.5 W/(m·K) to 1.7 W/(m·K) with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 20 %. The thermal conductivity is not significantly dependent on temperature.

  5. Three dimensional magnetic nanowires grown by focused electron-beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pacheco, Amalio; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Michalik, Jan M.; Ibarra, M. Ricardo; De Teresa, José M.; O'Brien, Liam; Petit, Dorothée; Lee, Jihyun; Cowburn, Russell P.

    2013-01-01

    Control of the motion of domain walls in magnetic nanowires is at the heart of various recently proposed three-dimensional (3D) memory devices. However, fabricating 3D nanostructures is extremely complicated using standard lithography techniques. Here we show that highly pure 3D magnetic nanowires with aspect-ratios of ~100 can be grown using focused electron-beam-induced-deposition. By combining micromanipulation, Kerr magnetometry and magnetic force microscopy, we determine that the magnetisation reversal of the wires occurs via the nucleation and propagation of domain walls. In addition, we demonstrate that the magnetic switching of individual 3D nanostructures can be directly probed by magneto-optical Kerr effect. PMID:23512183

  6. Pyramidal growth of ceria nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bârcă, E. S.; Filipescu, M.; Luculescu, C.; Birjega, R.; Ion, V.; Dumitru, M.; Nistor, L. C.; Stanciu, G.; Abrudeanu, M.; Munteanu, C.; Dinescu, M.

    2016-02-01

    We report in this paper on the deposition and characterization of CeO2 nanostructured thin films with hierarchical morphology. Micro-sized ceria powder (CeO2, 99.9% purity) was pressed to obtain a ceramic target. An ArF laser working at 193 nm irradiated the target in controlled oxygen gas flow at constant pressure (0.1 mbar). Silicon wafers used as substrates for thin films were heated at different temperatures, up to 773 K. The influence of substrate temperature on the structure and surface morphology of ceria thin films was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The refractive indices and information about roughness and thickness were revealed by spectroellipsometry. Crystalline cubic ceria thin films exhibiting a hierarchical structure that combines columnar and dendritic growth were obtained at temperatures above 473 K. For the samples obtained at 773 K, columns ending in pyramidal formations with sharp edges and sizes of hundreds of nanometers were observed, indicating a high crystallinity of the layer. XRD analysis reveals a consistent increase of the X-ray coherence length/crystallite size along the [111] direction with increasing temperature. Using a semi-empirical formula, Raman crystallites sizes were calculated and it was found that size increases with the temperature increasing. The spectroellipsometry investigations evidenced the increasing of refractive index with the substrate temperature increase. High surface roughness and pyramidal structures were noticed from the atomic force microscopy images for layers deposited at substrate temperature above 473 K.

  7. Superconductivity and metallic behavior in PbxCyOδ structures prepared by focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winhold, M.; Weirich, P. M.; Schwalb, C. H.; Huth, M.

    2014-10-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition as a direct-write approach possesses great potential to meet the demands for superconducting nanostructure fabrication especially regarding its 3D patterning capabilities combined with the high resolution in the nanometer regime. So far, however, it was not possible to fabricate superconducting structures with this technique. In this work, we present a lead-based superconductor prepared by focused electron beam induced deposition by dissociation of the precursor tetraethyllead. The as-grown structures exhibit metallic behavior and a minimum resistivity in the normal state of ρ = 16 μΩcm at T = 9 K followed by a superconducting transition at Tc = 7.2 K.

  8. Pressure effect of growing with electron beam-induced deposition with tungsten hexafluoride and tetraethylorthosilicate precursor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young R; Rack, Philip D; Randolph, Steven J; Smith, Daryl A; Joy, David C

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) provides a simple way to fabricate submicron- or nanometer-scale structures from various elements in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The growth rate and shape of the deposits are influenced by many factors. We have studied the growth rate and morphology of EBID-deposited nanostructures as a function of the tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) precursor gas pressure and growth time, and we have used Monte Carlo simulations to model the growth of tungsten and silicon oxide to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the EBID growth. The lateral radius of the deposit decreases with increasing pressure because of the enhanced vertical growth rate which limits competing lateral broadening produced by secondary and forward-scattered electrons. The morphology difference between the conical SiO(x) and the cylindrical W nanopillars is related to the difference in interaction volume between the two materials. A key parameter is the residence time of the precursor gas molecules. This is an exponential function of the surface temperature; it changes during nanopillar growth and is a function of the nanopillar material and the beam conditions.

  9. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Weirich, Paul M; Winhold, Marcel; Huth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID). It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO)6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt–C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me)3. For W(CO)6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me)3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques. PMID:24367761

  10. In situ growth optimization in focused electron-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Paul M; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H; Huth, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present the application of an evolutionary genetic algorithm for the in situ optimization of nanostructures that are prepared by focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID). It allows us to tune the properties of the deposits towards the highest conductivity by using the time gradient of the measured in situ rate of change of conductance as the fitness parameter for the algorithm. The effectiveness of the procedure is presented for the precursor W(CO)6 as well as for post-treatment of Pt-C deposits, which were obtained by the dissociation of MeCpPt(Me)3. For W(CO)6-based structures an increase of conductivity by one order of magnitude can be achieved, whereas the effect for MeCpPt(Me)3 is largely suppressed. The presented technique can be applied to all beam-induced deposition processes and has great potential for a further optimization or tuning of parameters for nanostructures that are prepared by FEBID or related techniques.

  11. Structural transitions in electron beam deposited Co-carbonyl suspended nanowires at high electrical current densities.

    PubMed

    Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Suspended nanowires (SNWs) have been deposited from Co-carbonyl precursor (Co2(CO)8) by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). The SNWs dimensions are about 30-50 nm in diameter and 600-850 nm in length. The as-deposited material has a nanogranular structure of mixed face-centered cubic (FCC) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co phases, and a composition of 80 atom % Co, 15 atom % O and 5 atom % C, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis and by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, respectively. Current (I)-voltage (V) measurements with current densities up to 10(7) A/cm(2) determine different structural transitions in the SNWs, depending on the I-V history. A single measurement with a sudden current burst leads to a polycrystalline FCC Co structure extended over the whole wire. Repeated measurements at increasing currents produce wires with a split structure: one half is polycrystalline FCC Co and the other half is graphitized C. The breakdown current density is found at 2.1 × 10(7) A/cm(2). The role played by resistive heating and electromigration in these transitions is discussed.

  12. Mechanism of spallation in platinum aluminide/electron beam physical vapor-deposited thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gell, M.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Barber, B.; Cheng, J.; Jordan, E.

    1999-02-01

    The spallation failure of a commercial thermal barrier coating (TBC), consisting of a single-crystal RENE N5 superalloy, a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) bond coat, and an electron beam-deposited 7 wt pct yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramic layer (7YSZ), was studied following cyclic furnace testing. In the uncycled state and prior to deposition of the ceramic, the Pt-Al bond-coat surface contains a cellular network of ridges corresponding to the underlying bond-coat grain-boundary structure. With thermal cycling, the ridges and associated grain boundaries are the sites of preferential oxidation and cracking, which results in the formation of cavities that are partially filled with oxide. Using a fluorescent penetrant dye in conjunction with a direct-pull test, it is shown that, when specimens are cycled to about 80 pct of life, these grain-boundary regions show extensive debonding. The roles of oxidation and cyclic stress in localized grain boundary region spallation are discussed. The additional factors leading to large-scale TBC spallation are described.

  13. Three-dimensional core-shell ferromagnetic nanowires grown by focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablo-Navarro, Javier; Magén, César; María de Teresa, José

    2016-07-01

    Functional nanostructured materials often rely on the combination of more than one material to confer the desired functionality or an enhanced performance of the device. Here we report the procedure to create nanoscale heterostructured materials in the form of core-shell nanowires by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) technologies. In our case, three-dimensional (3D) nanowires (<100 nm in diameter) with metallic ferromagnetic cores of Co- and Fe-FEBID have been grown and coated with a protective Pt-FEBID shell (ranging 10-20 nm in thickness) aimed to minimize the degradation of magnetic properties caused by the surface oxidation of the core to a non-ferromagnetic material. The structure, chemistry and magnetism of nanowire cores of Co and Fe have been characterized in Pt-coated and uncoated nanostructures to demonstrate that the morphology of the shell is conserved during Pt coating, the surface oxidation is suppressed or confined to the Pt layer, and the average magnetization of the core is strengthened up to 30%. The proposed approach paves the way to the fabrication of 3D FEBID nanostructures based on the smart alternate deposition of two or more materials combining different physical properties or added functionalities.

  14. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties. Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.

  15. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; ...

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties.more » Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.« less

  16. Chemical tuning of PtC nanostructures fabricated via focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Plank, Harald; Haber, Thomas; Gspan, Christian; Kothleitner, Gerald; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2013-05-03

    The fundamental dependence between process parameters during focused electron beam induced deposition and the chemistry of functional PtC nanostructures have been studied via a multi-technique approach using SEM, (S)TEM, EELS, AFM, and EFM. The study reveals that the highest Pt contents can only be achieved by an ideal balance between potentially dissociating electrons and available precursor molecules on the surface. For precursor regimes apart from this situation, an unwanted increase of carbon is observed which originates from completely different mechanisms: (1) an excess of electrons leads to polymerization of precursor fragments whereas (2) a lack of electrons leads to incompletely dissociated precursor molecules incorporated into the nanostructures. While the former represents an unwanted class of carbon, the latter condition maximizes the volume growth rates and allows for post-growth curing strategies which can strongly increase the functionality. Furthermore, the study gives an explanation of why growing deposits can dynamically change their chemistry and provides a straightforward guide towards more controlled fabrication conditions.

  17. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Vollnhals, F; Lukasczyk, T; Sandmann, A; Chen, C; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-02-25

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiO(x) nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  18. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Lukasczyk, T.; Sandmann, A.; Chen, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiOx nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  19. Processing and characterization of high temperature superconductor thin films deposited by electron beam co-evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jeong-Uk

    Ever since the high temperature superconductors (HTS) were discovered in the late 1980s, there have been enormous efforts to make this into applications such as power transmission cables, transformers, motors and generators. However, many obstacles in performance and high manufacturing cost made this difficult. The first generation HTS wires had low critical current density and were expensive to fabricate. The motivation of this research was to make high performance and low cost second generation HTS coated conductor. Electron beam co-evaporation technique was used to deposit YBCO(YBa2Cu3O7-x ) film at a high rate (10nm/s and higher) on single crystals and metal tapes. The oxygen pressure at the stage of depositing Y, Ba, Cu was 5x10 -5 Torr and the process temperature was 810-840°C. In-situ Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to monitor the optical properties of the YBCO during and after deposition. The deposit transformed to a glassy amorphous mixture of Y, Ba and Cu at 3 mTorr of oxygen. YBCO crystallization occurred after extra oxygen was applied to several Torr. FTIR showed almost the same signature during the formation of YBCO and liquid Ba-Cu-O during deposition, which indicates the liquid played an important role in determining the properties of YBCO in terms of providing epitaxy and fast transport of atoms to nucleate on the film-metal interface. The transformation was very rapid---seconds to minutes, compared to minutes to hours for other post-reaction processes. The oxygen partial pressure and the rate of oxidation (supersaturation) in the liquid region defined in the YBCO phase stability diagram determined the electrical and microstructural properties. In-situ X-ray diffraction heating stage with ambient control was utilized to study this supersaturation effect and explore the temperature-pressure space during YBCO growth. With all the information gathered from FTIR and XRD in-situ experiments and also with nano-engineering during

  20. High-purity 3D nano-objects grown by focused-electron-beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Sharma, Nidhi; Kölling, Sebastian; Koenraad, Paul M.; Koopmans, Bert

    2016-09-01

    To increase the efficiency of current electronics, a specific challenge for the next generation of memory, sensing and logic devices is to find suitable strategies to move from two- to three-dimensional (3D) architectures. However, the creation of real 3D nano-objects is not trivial. Emerging non-conventional nanofabrication tools are required for this purpose. One attractive method is focused-electron-beam induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write process of 3D nano-objects. Here, we grow 3D iron and cobalt nanopillars by FEBID using diiron nonacarbonyl Fe2(CO)9, and dicobalt octacarbonyl Co2(CO)8, respectively, as starting materials. In addition, we systematically study the composition of these nanopillars at the sub-nanometer scale by atom probe tomography, explicitly mapping the homogeneity of the radial and longitudinal composition distributions. We show a way of fabricating high-purity 3D vertical nanostructures of ˜50 nm in diameter and a few micrometers in length. Our results suggest that the purity of such 3D nanoelements (above 90 at% Fe and above 95 at% Co) is directly linked to their growth regime, in which the selected deposition conditions are crucial for the final quality of the nanostructure. Moreover, we demonstrate that FEBID and the proposed characterization technique not only allow for growth and chemical analysis of single-element structures, but also offers a new way to directly study 3D core-shell architectures. This straightforward concept could establish a promising route to the design of 3D elements for future nano-electronic devices.

  1. Lung deposition and extrapulmonary translocation of nano-ceria after intratracheal instillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao; Zhang, Haifeng; Ma, Yuhui; Bai, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Kai; Ding, Yayun; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2010-07-01

    The broad potential applications of manufactured nanomaterials call for urgent assessment of their environmental and biological safety. However, most of the previous work focused on the cell level performance; little was known about the consequences of nanomaterial exposure at the whole-body and organ levels. In the present paper, the radiotracer technique was employed to study the pulmonary deposition and the translocation to secondary target organs after ceria nanoparticles (nano-ceria) were intratracheally instilled into Wistar rats. It was found that 63.9 ± 8.2% of the instilled nano-ceria remained in the lung by 28 d postexposure and the elimination half-life was 103 d. At the end of the test period, only 1/8-1/3 of the daily elimination of nano-ceria from the lung was cleared via the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages (AMs) with subsequent removal towards the larynx was no longer the predominant route for the elimination of nano-ceria from the lung. The whole-body redistribution of nano-ceria demonstrated that the deposited nano-ceria could penetrate through the alveolar wall into the systemic circulation and accumulate in the extrapulmonary organs. In vitro study suggested that nano-ceria would agglomerate and form sediments in the bronchoalveolar aqueous surrounding while binding to protein would be conducive to the redispersion of nano-ceria. The decrease in the size of agglomerates might enhance the penetration of nano-ceria into the systemic circulation. Our findings suggested that the effect of nanomaterial exposure, even at low concentration, should be assessed because of the potential lung and systemic cumulative toxicity of the nanomaterials.

  2. Lung deposition and extrapulmonary translocation of nano-ceria after intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Zhang, Haifeng; Ma, Yuhui; Bai, Wei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Kai; Ding, Yayun; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2010-07-16

    The broad potential applications of manufactured nanomaterials call for urgent assessment of their environmental and biological safety. However, most of the previous work focused on the cell level performance; little was known about the consequences of nanomaterial exposure at the whole-body and organ levels. In the present paper, the radiotracer technique was employed to study the pulmonary deposition and the translocation to secondary target organs after ceria nanoparticles (nano-ceria) were intratracheally instilled into Wistar rats. It was found that 63.9 +/- 8.2% of the instilled nano-ceria remained in the lung by 28 d postexposure and the elimination half-life was 103 d. At the end of the test period, only 1/8-1/3 of the daily elimination of nano-ceria from the lung was cleared via the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages (AMs) with subsequent removal towards the larynx was no longer the predominant route for the elimination of nano-ceria from the lung. The whole-body redistribution of nano-ceria demonstrated that the deposited nano-ceria could penetrate through the alveolar wall into the systemic circulation and accumulate in the extrapulmonary organs. In vitro study suggested that nano-ceria would agglomerate and form sediments in the bronchoalveolar aqueous surrounding while binding to protein would be conducive to the redispersion of nano-ceria. The decrease in the size of agglomerates might enhance the penetration of nano-ceria into the systemic circulation. Our findings suggested that the effect of nanomaterial exposure, even at low concentration, should be assessed because of the potential lung and systemic cumulative toxicity of the nanomaterials.

  3. NanoSQUID magnetometry of individual cobalt nanoparticles grown by focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Müller, B.; Schwebius, D.; Korinski, D.; Kleiner, R.; Sesé, J.; Koelle, D.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the operation of low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) based on the high critical field and high critical temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) as ultra-sensitive magnetometers for single magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The nanoSQUIDs exploit the Josephson behavior of YBCO grain boundaries and have been patterned by focused ion beam milling. This allows us to precisely define the lateral dimensions of the SQUIDs so as to achieve large magnetic coupling between the nanoloop and individual MNPs. By means of focused electron beam induced deposition, cobalt MNPs with a typical size of several tens of nm have been grown directly on the surface of the sensors with nanometric spatial resolution. Remarkably, the nanoSQUIDs are operative over extremely broad ranges of applied magnetic field (-1 T \\lt {μ }0H\\lt 1 T) and temperature (0.3 K \\lt T\\lt 80 K). All these features together have allowed us to perform magnetization measurements under different ambient conditions and to detect the magnetization reversal of individual Co MNPs with magnetic moments (1-30) × {10}6 {μ }{{B}}. Depending on the dimensions and shape of the particles we have distinguished between two different magnetic states yielding different reversal mechanisms. The magnetization reversal is thermally activated over an energy barrier, which has been quantified for the (quasi) single-domain particles. Our measurements serve to show not only the high sensitivity achievable with YBCO nanoSQUIDs, but also demonstrate that these sensors are exceptional magnetometers for the investigation of the properties of individual nanomagnets.

  4. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, K; Izumi, H; Watanabe-Nakayama, T; Asakawa, H; Fukuma, T

    2015-03-13

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  5. Fabrication of electron beam deposited tip for atomic-scale atomic force microscopy in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, K.; Izumi, H.; Watanabe-Nakayama, T.; Asakawa, H.; Fukuma, T.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, possibilities of improving operation speed and force sensitivity in atomic-scale atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid using a small cantilever with an electron beam deposited (EBD) tip have been intensively explored. However, the structure and properties of an EBD tip suitable for such an application have not been well-understood and hence its fabrication process has not been established. In this study, we perform atomic-scale AFM measurements with a small cantilever and clarify two major problems: contaminations from a cantilever and tip surface, and insufficient mechanical strength of an EBD tip having a high aspect ratio. To solve these problems, here we propose a fabrication process of an EBD tip, where we attach a 2 μm silica bead at the cantilever end and fabricate a 500-700 nm EBD tip on the bead. The bead height ensures sufficient cantilever-sample distance and enables to suppress long-range interaction between them even with a short EBD tip having high mechanical strength. After the tip fabrication, we coat the whole cantilever and tip surface with Si (30 nm) to prevent the generation of contamination. We perform atomic-scale AFM imaging and hydration force measurements at a mica-water interface using the fabricated tip and demonstrate its applicability to such an atomic-scale application. With a repeated use of the proposed process, we can reuse a small cantilever for atomic-scale measurements for several times. Therefore, the proposed method solves the two major problems and enables the practical use of a small cantilever in atomic-scale studies on various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.

  6. Annealing-Based Electrical Tuning of Cobalt-Carbon Deposits Grown by Focused-Electron-Beam-Induced Deposition.

    PubMed

    Puydinger Dos Santos, Marcos V; Velo, Murilo F; Domingos, Renan D; Zhang, Yucheng; Maeder, Xavier; Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Best, James P; Béron, Fanny; Pirota, Kleber R; Moshkalev, Stanislav; Diniz, José A; Utke, Ivo

    2016-11-30

    An effective postgrowth electrical tuning, via an oxygen releasing method, to enhance the content of non-noble metals in deposits directly written with gas-assisted focused-electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID) is presented. It represents a novel and reproducible method for improving the electrical transport properties of Co-C deposits. The metal content and electrical properties of Co-C-O nanodeposits obtained by electron-induced dissociation of volatile Co2(CO)8 precursor adsorbate molecules were reproducibly tuned by applying postgrowth annealing processes at 100 °C, 200 °C, and 300 °C under high-vacuum for 10 min. Advanced thin film EDX analysis showed that during the annealing process predominantly oxygen is released from the Co-C-O deposits, yielding an atomic ratio of Co:C:O = 100:16:1 (85:14:1) with respect to the atomic composition of as-written Co:C:O = 100:21:28 (67:14:19). In-depth Raman analysis suggests that the amorphous carbon contained in the as-written deposit turns into graphite nanocrystals with size of about 22.4 nm with annealing temperature. Remarkably, these microstructural changes allow for tuning of the electrical resistivity of the deposits over 3 orders of magnitude from 26 mΩ cm down to 26 μΩ cm, achieving a residual resistivity of ρ2K/ρ300 K = 0.56, close to the value of 0.53 for pure Co films with similar dimensions, making it especially interesting and advantageous over the numerous works already published for applications such as advanced scanning-probe systems, magnetic memory, storage, and ferroelectric tunnel junction memristors, as the graphitic matrix protects the cobalt from being oxidized under an ambient atmosphere.

  7. Towards a single step process to create high purity gold structures by electron beam induced deposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansilla, C.; Mehendale, S.; Mulders, J. J. L.; Trompenaars, P. H. F.

    2016-10-01

    Highly pure metallic structures can be deposited by electron beam induced deposition and they have many important applications in different fields. The organo-metallic precursor is decomposed and deposited under the electron beam, and typically it is purified with post-irradiation in presence of O2. However, this approach limits the purification to the surface of the deposit. Therefore, ‘in situ’ purification during deposition using simultaneous flows of both O2 and precursor in parallel with two gas injector needles has been tested and verified. To simplify the practical arrangements, a special concentric nozzle has been designed allowing deposition and purification performed together in a single step. With this new device metallic structures with high purity can be obtained more easily, while there is no limit on the height of the structures within a practical time frame. In this work, we summarize the first results obtained for ‘in situ’ Au purification using this concentric nozzle, which is described in more detail, including flow simulations. The operational parameter space is explored in order to optimize the shape as well as the purity of the deposits, which are evaluated through scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy measurements, respectively. The observed variations are interpreted in relation to other variables, such as the deposition yield. The resistivity of purified lines is also measured, and the influence of additional post treatments as a last purification step is studied.

  8. Fabrication of layered nanostructures by successive electron beam induced deposition with two precursors: protective capping of metallic iron structures.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Papp, C; Kronast, F; Gray, A X; Balke, B; Cramm, S; Fadley, C S; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-11-25

    We report on the stepwise generation of layered nanostructures via electron beam induced deposition (EBID) using organometallic precursor molecules in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). In a first step a metallic iron line structure was produced using iron pentacarbonyl; in a second step this nanostructure was then locally capped with a 2-3 nm thin titanium oxide-containing film fabricated from titanium tetraisopropoxide. The chemical composition of the deposited layers was analyzed by spatially resolved Auger electron spectroscopy. With spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fe L₃ edge, it was demonstrated that the thin capping layer prevents the iron structure from oxidation upon exposure to air.

  9. Electron-beam deposition of chromium carbide-based coatings with an ultradispersed structure or a nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletika, I. M.; Ivanov, S. F.; Gnyusov, S. F.; Perovskaya, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    Coatings with an ultradispersed structure and a nanostructure, which have a high wear resistance, corrosion resistance, and a satisfactory ductility, are fabricated by electron-beam vacuum-free deposition of a powder mixture of chromium carbide, chromium, and titanium carbide using a relativistic electron accelerator. The increase in the wear resistance and the ductility is shown to be associated with the modifying influence of titanium carbide, which manifests itself in sharp structure refinement the presence of numerous nucleation centers in it in the form of disperse TiC precipitates.

  10. Dynamic modulation of electronic properties of graphene by localized carbon doping using focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Russell, M; Henry, M; Kim, S S; Naik, R R; Voevodin, A A; Jang, S S; Tsukruk, V V; Fedorov, A G

    2015-09-28

    We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an "n-p-n" junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated from a low dose of high energy (25 keV) electron beam (1 × 10(18) e(-) per cm(2)). Detailed AFM imaging provides direct evidence of the new mechanism responsible for dynamic evolution of the locally varying graphene doping. The FEBID carbon atoms, which are physisorbed and weakly bound to graphene, diffuse towards the middle of graphene conduction channel due to their surface chemical potential gradient, resulting in negative shift of Dirac voltage. Increasing a primary electron dose to 1 × 10(19) e(-) per cm(2) results in a significant increase of carbon deposition, such that it covers the entire graphene conduction channel at high surface density, leading to n-doping of graphene channel. Collectively, these findings establish a unique capability of FEBID technique to dynamically modulate the doping state of graphene, thus enabling a new route to resist-free, "direct-write" functional patterning of graphene-based electronic devices with potential for on-demand re-configurability.

  11. Structural and growth aspects of electron beam physical vapor deposited NiO-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Kuanr, Sushil Kumar; K, Suresh Babu

    2016-03-15

    Deposition of composite materials as thin film by electron beam physical vapor deposition technique (EB-PVD) still remains as a challenge. Here, the authors report the deposition of NiO-CeO{sub 2} (30/70 wt. %) composites on quartz substrate by EB-PVD. Two NiO-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite targets—one as green compact and the other after sintering at 1250 °C—were used for the deposition. Though the targets varied with respect to physical properties such as crystallite size (11–45 nm) and relative density (44% and 96%), the resultant thin films exhibited a mean crystallite size in the range of 20–25 nm underlining the role of physical nature of deposition. In spite of the crystalline nature of the targets and similar elemental concentration, a transformation from amorphous to crystalline structure was observed in thin films on using sintered target. Postannealing of the as deposited film at 800 °C resulted in a polycrystalline structure consisting of CeO{sub 2} and NiO. Deposition using pure CeO{sub 2} or NiO as target resulted in the preferential orientation toward (111) and (200) planes, respectively, showing the influence of adatoms on the evaporation and growth process of NiO-CeO{sub 2} composite. The results demonstrate the influence of electron beam gun power on the adatom energy for the growth process of composite oxide thin films.

  12. Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1979-01-01

    In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

  13. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors

    PubMed Central

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T. P., Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard

    2015-01-01

    Summary Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the

  14. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors.

    PubMed

    Thorman, Rachel M; Kumar T P, Ragesh; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ingólfsson, Oddur

    2015-01-01

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (<100 eV) secondary electrons generated by interactions of the primary beam with the substrate. These low-energy electrons are abundant both inside and outside the area of the primary electron beam and are associated with reactions causing incomplete ligand dissociation from FEBID precursors. As it is not possible to directly study the effects of secondary electrons in situ in FEBID, other means must be used to elucidate their role. In this context, gas phase studies can obtain well-resolved information on low-energy electron-induced reactions with FEBID precursors by studying isolated molecules interacting with single electrons of well-defined energy. In contrast, ultra-high vacuum surface studies on adsorbed precursor molecules can provide information on surface speciation and identify species desorbing from a substrate during electron irradiation under conditions more representative of FEBID. Comparing gas phase and surface science studies allows for insight into the primary deposition mechanisms for individual precursors; ideally, this information can be used to design future FEBID precursors and optimize deposition conditions. In this review, we give a summary of different low-energy electron-induced fragmentation processes that can be initiated by the secondary electrons generated in FEBID, specifically, dissociative electron attachment, dissociative ionization, neutral dissociation, and dipolar dissociation, emphasizing the different

  15. The nanoscale implications of a molecular gas beam during electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert; Fowlkes, Jason; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Utke, Ivo; Rack, Philip D; Plank, Harald

    2014-02-26

    The gas flux direction in focused electron beam induced processes can strongly destabilize the morphology on the nanometer scale. We demonstrate how pattern parameters such as position relative to the gas nozzle, axial rotation, scanning direction, and patterning sequence result in different growth modes for identical structures. This is mainly caused by nanoscale geometric shadowing, particularly when shadowing distances are comparable to surface diffusion lengths of (CH3)3-Pt-CpCH3 adsorbates. Furthermore, two different adsorbate replenishment mechanisms exist and are governed by either surface diffusion or directional gas flux adsorption. The experimental study is complemented by calculations and dynamic growth simulations which successfully emulate the observed morphology instabilities and support the proposed growth model.

  16. Reversible wettability of electron-beam deposited indium-tin-oxide driven by ns-UV irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Persano, Luana; Del Carro, Pompilio; Pisignano, Dario

    2012-04-09

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the most widely used semiconductor oxides in the field of organic optoelectronics, especially for the realization of anode contacts. Here the authors report on the control of the wettability properties of ITO films deposited by reactive electron beam deposition and irradiated by means of nanosecond-pulsed UV irradiation. The enhancement of the surface water wettability, with a reduction of the water contact angle larger than 50 deg., is achieved by few tens of seconds of irradiation. The analyzed photo-induced wettability change is fully reversible in agreement with a surface-defect model, and it can be exploited to realize optically transparent, conductive surfaces with controllable wetting properties for sensors and microfluidic circuits.

  17. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; ...

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributedmore » to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.« less

  18. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributed to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.

  19. Interfacial mixing and internal structure of Pt-containing nanocomposites grown by room temperature electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Li Juntao; Dunn, Kathleen A.; Thiel, Bradley L.; Toth, Milos

    2010-05-15

    Material grown by room temperature electron beam induced deposition (EBID) using (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CH{sub 3}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}Pt precursor consists of platinum nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The crystallites are shown to intermix with the amorphous oxide on a Si substrate. The extent of intermixing scales with the electron energy density delivered to the material during growth. Dependencies on electron flux, fluence, and exposure time indicate that the intermixing process is athermal, electron-activated, and rate limited by mass transport inside the solid. Furthermore, the degree of deposit crystallinity is shown to scale with the electron flux and fluence used for EBID. We discuss mechanisms behind the observed changes in nanostructure and implications for the growth of functional materials by EBID.

  20. Interfacial mixing and internal structure of Pt-containing nanocomposites grown by room temperature electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juntao; Toth, Milos; Dunn, Kathleen A.; Thiel, Bradley L.

    2010-05-01

    Material grown by room temperature electron beam induced deposition (EBID) using (CH3)3CH3C5H4Pt precursor consists of platinum nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The crystallites are shown to intermix with the amorphous oxide on a Si substrate. The extent of intermixing scales with the electron energy density delivered to the material during growth. Dependencies on electron flux, fluence, and exposure time indicate that the intermixing process is athermal, electron-activated, and rate limited by mass transport inside the solid. Furthermore, the degree of deposit crystallinity is shown to scale with the electron flux and fluence used for EBID. We discuss mechanisms behind the observed changes in nanostructure and implications for the growth of functional materials by EBID.

  1. On the magnetic properties of iron nanostructures fabricated via focused electron beam induced deposition and autocatalytic growth processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, F.; Drost, M.; Vollnhals, F.; Späth, A.; Carrasco, E.; Fink, R. H.; Marbach, H.

    2016-09-01

    We employ Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) in combination with autocatalytic growth (AG) processes to fabricate magnetic nanostructures with controllable shapes and thicknesses. Following this route, different Fe deposits were prepared on silicon nitride membranes under ultra-high vacuum conditions and studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy (STXM). The originally deposited Fe nanostructures are composed of pure iron, especially when fabricated via autocatalytic growth processes. Quantitative near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was employed to derive information on the thickness dependent composition. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) in STXM was used to derive the magnetic properties of the EBID prepared structures. STXM and XMCD analysis evinces the existence of a thin iron oxide layer at the deposit-vacuum interface, which is formed during exposure to ambient conditions. We were able to extract magnetic hysteresis loops for individual deposits from XMCD micrographs with varying external magnetic field. Within the investigated thickness range (2-16 nm), the magnetic coercivity, as evaluated from the width of the hysteresis loops, increases with deposit thickness and reaches a maximum value of ˜160 Oe at around 10 nm. In summary, we present a viable technique to fabricate ferromagnetic nanostructures in a controllable way and gain detailed insight into their chemical and magnetic properties.

  2. Fabrication and electrical transport properties of binary Co-Si nanostructures prepared by focused electron beam-induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Porrati, F.; Huth, M.; Kaempken, B.; Terfort, A.

    2013-02-07

    CoSi-C binary alloys have been fabricated by focused electron beam-induced deposition by the simultaneous use of dicobaltoctacarbonyl, Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8}, and neopentasilane, Si{sub 5}H{sub 12}, as precursor gases. By varying the relative flux of the precursors, alloys with variable chemical composition are obtained, as shown by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements strongly indicate the formation of cobalt silicide and cobalt disilicide nanoclusters embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity measurements show that the transport properties are governed by electron tunneling between neighboring CoSi or CoSi{sub 2} nanoclusters. In particular, by varying the metal content of the alloy, the electrical conductivity can be finely tuned from the insulating regime into the quasi-metallic tunneling coupling regime.

  3. Fabrication and electrical transport properties of binary Co-Si nanostructures prepared by focused electron beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porrati, F.; Kämpken, B.; Terfort, A.; Huth, M.

    2013-02-01

    CoSi-C binary alloys have been fabricated by focused electron beam-induced deposition by the simultaneous use of dicobaltoctacarbonyl, Co2(CO)8, and neopentasilane, Si5H12, as precursor gases. By varying the relative flux of the precursors, alloys with variable chemical composition are obtained, as shown by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Room temperature electrical resistivity measurements strongly indicate the formation of cobalt silicide and cobalt disilicide nanoclusters embedded in a carbonaceous matrix. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity measurements show that the transport properties are governed by electron tunneling between neighboring CoSi or CoSi2 nanoclusters. In particular, by varying the metal content of the alloy, the electrical conductivity can be finely tuned from the insulating regime into the quasi-metallic tunneling coupling regime.

  4. Laser damage resistance of hafnia thin films deposited by electron beam deposition, reactive low voltage ion plating, and dual ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Gallais, Laurent; Capoulade, Jeremie; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille; Cathelinaud, Michel; Koc, Cian; Lequime, Michel

    2008-05-01

    A comparative study is made of the laser damage resistance of hafnia coatings deposited on fused silica substrates with different technologies: electron beam deposition (from Hf or HfO2 starting material), reactive low voltage ion plating, and dual ion beam sputtering.The laser damage thresholds of these coatings are determined at 1064 and 355 nm using a nanosecond pulsed YAG laser and a one-on-one test procedure. The results are associated with a complete characterization of the samples: refractive index n measured by spectrophotometry, extinction coefficient k measured by photothermal deflection, and roughness measured by atomic force microscopy.

  5. Optical properties of nanocrystalline Y2O3 thin films grown on quartz substrates by electron beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktorczyk, Tadeusz; Biegański, Piotr; Serafińczuk, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    Yttrium oxide thin films of a thickness 221-341 nm were formed onto quartz substrates by reactive physical vapor deposition in an oxygen atmosphere. An electron beam gun was applied as a deposition source. The effect of substrate temperature during film deposition (in the range of 323-673 K) on film structure, surface morphology and optical properties was investigated. The surface morphology studies (with atomic force microscopy and diffuse spectra reflectivity) show that the film surface was relatively smooth with RMS surface roughness in the range of 1.7-3.8 nm. XRD analysis has revealed that all diffraction lines belong to a cubic Y2O3 structure. The films consisted of small nanocrystals. Their average grain size increases from 1.6 nm to 22 nm, with substrate temperature rising from 323 K to 673 K. Optical examinations of transmittance and reflectance were performed in the spectral range of 0.2-2.5 μm. Optical constants and their dispersion curves were determined. Values of the refractive index of the films were in the range of n = 1.79-1.90 (at 0.55 μm) for substrate temperature during film deposition of 323-673 K. The changes in the refractive index upon substrate temperature correspond very well with the increase in the nanocrystals grain diameter and with film porosity.

  6. Plasmonic gold helices for the visible range fabricated by oxygen plasma purification of electron beam induced deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkamp, Caspar; Höflich, Katja; Jäckle, Sara; Manzoni, Anna; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) currently provides the only direct writing technique for truly three-dimensional nanostructures with geometrical features below 50 nm. Unfortunately, the depositions from metal-organic precursors suffer from a substantial carbon content. This hinders many applications, especially in plasmonics where the metallic nature of the geometric surfaces is mandatory. To overcome this problem a post-deposition treatment with oxygen plasma at room temperature was investigated for the purification of gold containing EBID structures. Upon plasma treatment, the structures experience a shrinkage in diameter of about 18 nm but entirely keep their initial shape. The proposed purification step results in a core-shell structure with the core consisting of mainly unaffected EBID material and a gold shell of about 20 nm in thickness. These purified structures are plasmonically active in the visible wavelength range as shown by dark field optical microscopy on helical nanostructures. Most notably, electromagnetic modeling of the corresponding scattering spectra verified that the thickness and quality of the resulting gold shell ensures an optical response equal to that of pure gold nanostructures.

  7. Plasmonic gold helices for the visible range fabricated by oxygen plasma purification of electron beam induced deposits.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Caspar; Höflich, Katja; Jäckle, Sara; Manzoni, Anna; Christiansen, Silke

    2017-02-03

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) currently provides the only direct writing technique for truly three-dimensional nanostructures with geometrical features below 50 nm. Unfortunately, the depositions from metal-organic precursors suffer from a substantial carbon content. This hinders many applications, especially in plasmonics where the metallic nature of the geometric surfaces is mandatory. To overcome this problem a post-deposition treatment with oxygen plasma at room temperature was investigated for the purification of gold containing EBID structures. Upon plasma treatment, the structures experience a shrinkage in diameter of about 18 nm but entirely keep their initial shape. The proposed purification step results in a core-shell structure with the core consisting of mainly unaffected EBID material and a gold shell of about 20 nm in thickness. These purified structures are plasmonically active in the visible wavelength range as shown by dark field optical microscopy on helical nanostructures. Most notably, electromagnetic modeling of the corresponding scattering spectra verified that the thickness and quality of the resulting gold shell ensures an optical response equal to that of pure gold nanostructures.

  8. Titanium dioxide fine structures by RF magnetron sputter method deposited on an electron-beam resist mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, Hideomi; Miyazaki, Yuta; Matsushita, Sachiko

    2013-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been draw attention for wide range of applications from photonic crystals for visible light range by its catalytic characteristics to tera-hertz range by its high refractive index. We present an experimental study of fabrication of fine structures of TiO2 with a ZEP electron beam resist mask followed by Ti sputter deposition techniques. A TiO2 thin layer of 150 nm thick was grown on an FTO glass substrate with a fine patterned ZEP resist mask by a conventional RF magnetron sputter method with Ti target. The deposition was carried out with argon-oxygen gases at a pressure of 5.0 x 10 -1 Pa in a chamber. During the deposition, ratio of Ar-O2 gas was kept to the ratio of 2:1 and the deposition ratio was around 0.5 Å/s to ensure enough oxygen to form TiO2 and low temperature to avoid deformation of fine pattern of the ZPU resist mask. Deposited TiO2 layers are white-transparent, amorphous, and those roughnesses are around 7 nm. Fabricated TiO2 PCs have wider TiO2 slabs of 112 nm width leaving periodic 410 x 410 nm2 air gaps. We also studied transformation of TiO2 layers and TiO2 fine structures by baking at 500 °C. XRD measurement for TiO2 shows that the amorphous TiO2 transforms to rutile and anatase forms by the baking while keeping the same profile of the fine structures. Our fabrication method can be one of a promising technique to optic devices on researches and industrial area.

  9. Direct writing of CoFe alloy nanostructures by focused electron beam induced deposition from a heteronuclear precursor.

    PubMed

    Porrati, F; Pohlit, M; Müller, J; Barth, S; Biegger, F; Gspan, C; Plank, H; Huth, M

    2015-11-27

    Recently, focused electron beam-induced deposition has been employed to prepare functional magnetic nanostructures with potential in nanomagnetic logic and sensing applications by using homonuclear precursor gases like Fe(CO)5 or Co2(CO)8. Here we show that an extension towards the fabrication of bi-metallic compounds is possible by using a single-source heteronuclear precursor gas. We have grown CoFe alloy magnetic nanostructures from the HFeCo3(CO)12 metal carbonyl precursor. The compositional analysis indicates that the samples contain about 80 at% of metal and 10 at% of carbon and oxygen. Four-probe magnetotransport measurements are carried out on nanowires of various sizes down to a width of 50 nm, for which a room temperature resistivity of 43 μΩcm is found. Micro-Hall magnetometry reveals that 50 nm × 250 nm nanobars of the material are ferromagnetic up to the highest measured temperature of 250 K. Finally, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructural investigation shows that the deposits consist of a bcc Co-Fe phase mixed with a FeCo2 O4 spinel oxide phase with nanograins of about 5 nm diameter.

  10. Direct writing of CoFe alloy nanostructures by focused electron beam induced deposition from a heteronuclear precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porrati, F.; Pohlit, M.; Müller, J.; Barth, S.; Biegger, F.; Gspan, C.; Plank, H.; Huth, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently, focused electron beam-induced deposition has been employed to prepare functional magnetic nanostructures with potential in nanomagnetic logic and sensing applications by using homonuclear precursor gases like Fe(CO)5 or Co2(CO)8. Here we show that an extension towards the fabrication of bi-metallic compounds is possible by using a single-source heteronuclear precursor gas. We have grown CoFe alloy magnetic nanostructures from the HFeCo3(CO)12 metal carbonyl precursor. The compositional analysis indicates that the samples contain about 80 at% of metal and 10 at% of carbon and oxygen. Four-probe magnetotransport measurements are carried out on nanowires of various sizes down to a width of 50 nm, for which a room temperature resistivity of 43 μΩcm is found. Micro-Hall magnetometry reveals that 50 nm × 250 nm nanobars of the material are ferromagnetic up to the highest measured temperature of 250 K. Finally, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructural investigation shows that the deposits consist of a bcc Co-Fe phase mixed with a FeCo2 O4 spinel oxide phase with nanograins of about 5 nm diameter.

  11. Electron-beam-deposited thin polymer films - Electrical properties vs bombarding current.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, L. E.; Christy, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer films about 150 A thick, deposited on glass substrates by electron bombardment of tetramethyltetraphenyltrisiloxane, were studied, after being sandwiched between evaporated aluminum electrodes, the top one semitransparent. The capacitance, conductance, and photoconductance of the sandwiches were measured at room temperature as a function of the electron bombarding current which formed the polymer. The polymer thickness was obtained independently from Christy's (1960) empirical formula for the rate of formation. The obtained results indicate that, with increasing bombarding current, the polymer undergoes an increase in both crosslinking bonds and dangling bonds. Exposure to air drastically reduces the density of dangling bonds, but does not affect the crosslinking.

  12. Optical and structural characterization of thermal oxidation effects of erbium thin films deposited by electron beam on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kamineni, Himani S.; Kamineni, Vimal K.; Moore, Richard L.; Gallis, Spyros; Diebold, Alain C.; Huang Mengbing; Kaloyeros, Alain E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal oxidation effects on the structural, compositional, and optical properties of erbium films deposited on silicon via electron beam evaporation were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. A gradual rise in oxidation temperature from 700 to 900 deg. C resulted in a transition from ErO- to Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich phase. Additional increase in oxidation temperature above 1000 deg. C led to the formation of erbium silicate due to further oxygen incorporation, as well as silicon out-diffusion from the substrate. A silicon oxide interfacial layer was also detected, with its thickness increasing with higher oxidation temperature. Additionally, film refractive index decreased, while its Tauc bandgap value increased from {approx}5.2 eV to {approx}6.4 eV, as the oxidation temperature was raised from 700 deg. C to above 900 deg. C. These transformations were accompanied by the appearance of an intense and broad absorption band below the optical gap. Thermal oxidation effects are discussed in the context of film structural characteristics and defect states.

  13. Resonant light scattering from a single dielectric nano-antenna formed by electron beam-induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Khwang; Song, Jung-Hwan; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Park, Hong-Gyu; Seo, Min-Kyo

    2015-05-19

    Dielectric nano-antennas are promising elements in nanophotonics due to their low material loss and strong leaky-mode optical resonances. In particular, light scattering can be easily manipulated using dielectric nano-antennas. To take full advantage of dielectric nano-antennas and explore their new optical applications, it is necessary to fabricate three-dimensional nano-structures under arbitrary conditions such as in non-planar substrates. Here, we demonstrate full-visible-range resonant light scattering from a single dielectric optical nano-rod antenna. The nano-rod antenna was formed by electron beam-induced deposition (EBID), a promising three-dimensional nanofabrication technique with a high spatial resolution. The nano-rods consist of amorphous alloys of C and O, with a width of 180 nm on average and a length of 4.5 μm. Polarization-resolved dark-field scattering measurements show that both transverse-electric and transverse-magnetic mode resonances cover the full visible range as the height of the nano-rod antenna varies from 90 to 280 nm. Numerical simulations successfully reproduce the measured scattering features and characterize the modal properties, using the critical points dispersive dielectric constant of the EBID carbonaceous material. Our deep understanding of resonant light scattering in the EBID dielectric nano-antenna will be useful for near-field measurement or for the implementation of three-dimensional nanophotonic devices.

  14. Nanopatterning on fragile or 3D surfaces with sterol-based vapor-deposited electron beam resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legario, Ron R.; Kelkar, Prasad S.; Beauvais, Jacques; Lavallee, Eric; Drouin, Dominique; Cloutier, Melanie; Turcotte, David; Yang, Pan; Mun, Lau K.; Awad, Yousef; Lafrance, Pierre J.

    2004-05-01

    A novel and effective approach to nano-fabrication lithography is the vapour deposition of the negative tone electron beam resists QSR-5 and QSR-15 (Quantiscript"s sterol based resist) onto a substrate. Vapour deposition is especially conducive for patterning thin delicate membranes (e.g. advanced masks for X-ray lithography - XRL, and Low Energy Electron Proximity Projection Lithography - LEEPL), that are susceptible to breakage during the spin coating process. With the capability for depositing highly uniform thin layers (<50nm) and a demonstrated resolution better than 60nm, QSR-5 and QSR-15 have potential for the fabrication of next generation lithography masks. Optimized for low energy electron exposure where proximity effects become negligible and thus well suited for 1X lithography mask patterning, QSR-5 and QSR-15 have shown exposure doses as low as 100μC/cm2 at 3KeV. In addition to this type of application, the versatility of QSR-5 and QSR-15 have also been demonstrated by the fabrication of a Fresnel zone plate lens on the tip of an optical fibre with the goal of improving the coupling of diode laser emission into the fiber. This application clearly shows the capabilities of this process for producing nano-scale patterns on very small area surfaces that are completely unsuitable for spin-coating of the resist. A second demonstration of the resist's capabilities is the patterning of optical diffractive elements directly on the facet of a semiconductor laser. This opens the way to direct patterning on laser diode facets in order to control the emission profile from the device. It has also proven capabilities in the manufacture of delicate photo masks. In their natural state, QSR-5 and QSR-15 are solids at room temperature and are sterol based heterocyclic compounds, with unsaturated bonding capable of cross linking. On their own merit, QSR-5 and QSR-15 are capable of cross linking under electron beam exposure and are comparable in certain properties to

  15. Current instabilities in dynamic random access memory storage capacitor formed with electron beam deposited Y2O3 dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, A. C.; Sharma, R. N.

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) storage capacitors based on electron beam deposited Y2O3 extrinsic dielectric on Si show changes in capacitance density depending on the amorphous and crystalline phases. Bias stress cycle-dependent changes in capacitance density occur due to the non-equilibrium nature of defect states at the Y2O3/Si interface after O2 annealing as a result of the emergence of a 4-8 nm thick SiO2 film at the interface. Leakage currents show instability under repeated dc bias stress, the nature and extent of which depend upon the structure of the Y2O3 gate dielectric and the polarity of dc bias. With amorphous Y2O3, leakage currents drift to lower values under gate injection due to electron trapping, and to higher values under Si-injection due to the generation of holes. Though leakage current drift is minimal for crystalline Y2O3, its magnitude increases as the energy of injected electrons from mid-gap states is low and the local field due to asperity is high. The emergence of interfacial SiO2 reduces the magnitude of Si-injection leakage current substantially, but causes transient changes resulting in switching to higher values at a threshold dc bias. Thermal detrapping of holes and reverse bias stress studies confirm that the instability of current is caused by an increase in the cathodic field from hole trapping at interface states. Leakage current instability limits the application of extrinsic high dielectric constant dielectrics in a high density DRAM storage capacitor, unless a new interface layer scheme other than SiO2 and a method to form a defect-free dielectric layer can be implemented.

  16. Superconductivity and metallic behavior in Pb{sub x}C{sub y}O{sub δ} structures prepared by focused electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Winhold, M. Weirich, P. M.; Schwalb, C. H.; Huth, M.

    2014-10-20

    Focused electron beam induced deposition as a direct-write approach possesses great potential to meet the demands for superconducting nanostructure fabrication especially regarding its 3D patterning capabilities combined with the high resolution in the nanometer regime. So far, however, it was not possible to fabricate superconducting structures with this technique. In this work, we present a lead-based superconductor prepared by focused electron beam induced deposition by dissociation of the precursor tetraethyllead. The as-grown structures exhibit metallic behavior and a minimum resistivity in the normal state of ρ = 16 μΩcm at T = 9 K followed by a superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 7.2 K.

  17. Failure mechanisms of platinum aluminide bond coat/electron beam-physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Krishnakumar

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) allow operation of structural components, such as turbine blades and vanes in industrial and aircraft gas engines, at temperatures close to the substrate melting temperatures. They consist of four different layers; a high strength creep-resistant nickel-based superalloy substrate, an oxidation resistant bond coat (BC), a low thermal conductivity ceramic topcoat and a thermally grown oxide (TGO), that is predominantly alpha-Al 2O3, that forms between the BC and the TBC. Compressive stresses (3--5 GPa) that are generated in the thin TGO (0.25--8 mum) due to the mismatch in thermal coefficient of expansion between the TGO and BC play a critical role in the failure of these coatings. In this study, the failure mechanisms of a commercial yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) coating on platinum aluminide (beta-(Ni,Pt)Al) bond coat have been identified. Two distinct mechanisms have been found responsible for the observed damage initiation and progression at the TGO/bond coat interface. The first mechanism leads to localized debonding at TGO/bond coat interface due to increased out-of-plane tensile stress, along bond coat features that manifest themselves as ridges. The second mechanism causes cavity formation at the TGO/bond coat interface, driven by cyclic plasticity of the bond coat. It has been found that the debonding at the TGO/bond coat interface due to the first mechanism is solely life determining. The final failure occurs by crack extension along either the TGO/bond coat interface or the TGO/YSZ interface or a combination of both, leading to large scale buckling. Based on these mechanisms, it is demonstrated that the bond coat grain size and the aspect ratio of the ridges have a profound influence on spallation lives of the coating. The removal of these ridges by fine polishing prior to TBC deposition led to a four-fold improvement in life. The failure mechanism identified for the

  18. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a process by which NASA hopes to build metal parts in zero gravity environments. It's a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and a solid wi...

  19. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  20. Impact of deposition parameters on the performance of ceria based resistive switching memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lepeng; Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Li, Sean

    2016-07-01

    Resistive-switching memories stacked in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) like structure have shown great potential for next generation non-volatile memories. In this study, ceria based resistive memory stacks are fabricated by implementing different sputter conditions (temperatures and powers). The films deposited at low temperatures were found to have random grain orientations, less porosity and dense structure. The effect of deposition conditions on resistive switching characteristics of as-prepared films were also investigated. Improved and reliable resistive switching behaviors were achieved for the memory devices occupying less porosity and densely packed structures prepared at low temperatures. Finally, the underlying switching mechanism was also explained on the basis of quantitative analysis.

  1. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  2. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  3. Comparative Study of Solid-Phase Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD, Plasma-Enhanced CVD, and Electron-Beam Evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Stradins, P.; Kunz, O.; Young, D. L.; Yan, Y.; Jones, K. M.; Xu, Y.; Reedy, R. C.; Branz, H. M.; Aberle, A. G.; Wang, Q.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-phase crystallization (SPC) rates are compared in amorphous silicon films prepared by three different methods: hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and electron-beam physical vapor deposition (e-beam). Random SPC proceeds approximately 5 and 13 times slower in PECVD and e-beam films, respectively, as compared to HWCVD films. Doping accelerates random SPC in e-beam films but has little effect on the SPC rate of HWCVD films. In contrast, the crystalline growth front in solid-phase epitaxy experiments propagates at similar speed in HWCVD, PECVD, and e-beam amorphous Si films. This strongly suggests that the observed large differences in random SPC rates originate from different nucleation rates in these materials while the grain growth rates are relatively similar. The larger grain sizes observed for films that exhibit slower random SPC support this suggestion.

  4. Formation of pure Cu nanocrystals upon post-growth annealing of Cu-C material obtained from focused electron beam induced deposition: comparison of different methods.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Rodrigues Vaz, Alfredo; Zhang, Yucheng; Rudkowski, Andrzej; Kapusta, Czesław; Erni, Rolf; Moshkalev, Stanislav; Utke, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study in detail the post-growth annealing of a copper-containing material deposited with focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). The organometallic precursor Cu(II)(hfac)2 was used for deposition and the results were compared to that of compared to earlier experiments with (hfac)Cu(I)(VTMS) and (hfac)Cu(I)(DMB). Transmission electron microscopy revealed the deposition of amorphous material from Cu(II)(hfac)2. In contrast, as-deposited material from (hfac)Cu(I)(VTMS) and (hfac)Cu(I)(DMB) was nano-composite with Cu nanocrystals dispersed in a carbonaceous matrix. After annealing at around 150-200 °C all deposits showed the formation of pure Cu nanocrystals at the outer surface of the initial deposit due to the migration of Cu atoms from the carbonaceous matrix containing the elements carbon, oxygen, and fluorine. Post-irradiation of deposits with 200 keV electrons in a transmission electron microscope favored the formation of Cu nanocrystals within the carbonaceous matrix of freestanding rods and suppressed the formation on their surface. Electrical four-point measurements on FEBID lines from Cu(hfac)2 showed five orders of magnitude improvement in conductivity when being annealed conventionally and by laser-induced heating in the scanning electron microscope chamber.

  5. Effects of annealing conditions on optical and electrical characteristics of titanium dioxide films deposited by electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhelashvili, V.; Eisenstein, G.

    2001-03-01

    We report measured evolutions of the optical band gap, refractive index, and relative dielectric constant of TiO2 film obtained by electron beam gun evaporation and annealed in an oxygen environment. A negative shift of the flat band voltage with increasing annealing temperatures, for any film thickness, is observed. A dramatic reduction of the leakage current by about four orders of magnitude to 5×10-6 A/cm2 (at 1 MV/cm) after 700 °C and 60 min annealing is found for films thinner than 15 nm. An equivalent SiO2 thickness of the order of 3-3.5 nm is demonstrated. An approach is presented to establish that at different ranges of applied voltage the hopping, space charge limited current, and Fowler-Nordheim are the basic mechanisms of carrier transport into the TiO2 film.

  6. Deposition of Thin Film Copper Nanostructures by Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition Technique on SiO2/p-TYPE Si(100) and Study of its Oxidation Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeganeh, M.; Saremi, M.

    Electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) is being used in coating components for many applications such as for producing nanostructures and integrated circuits (ICs) coating in electronic industry. In this work, copper was deposited on the SiO2/p-type Si(100). Thin film characteristics are investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Then oxidation behavior of deposits was evaluated by Dektak Surface Profiler and weight gain method at 200 and 300°C. Results showed that thin film copper deposited by EBPVD has better oxidation characteristics in comparison with copper foil.

  7. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  8. Understanding the kinetics and nanoscale morphology of electron-beam-induced deposition via a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation: the effects of the precursor molecule and the deposited material.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daryl A; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D

    2008-09-01

    The electron-beam-induced deposition of silicon oxide from tetraethyorthosilicate and tungsten from tungsten hexafluoride is simulated via a Monte Carlo simulation. Pseudo one-dimensional nanopillars are grown using comparable electron-beam parameters and a comparison of the vertical and lateral growth rate and the pillar morphology is correlated to the precursor and deposited material parameters. The primary and secondary electrons (type I) are found to dominate the vertical growth rate and the lateral growth rate is dominated by forward and secondary electrons (type II). The resolution and morphology of the nanopillars are affected by the effective electron interaction volume and the resultant surface coverage of the precursor species in the effective electron interaction region. Finally, the simulated results are compared to previously reported experimental results.

  9. Conductance enhancement due to interface magnons in electron-beam evaporated MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with CoFeB free layer deposited at different pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, P.; Yu, G. Q.; Wei, H. X.; Han, X. F. E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Li, D. L.; Feng, J. F. E-mail: xfhan@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Kurt, H.; Chen, J. Y.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-10-21

    Electron-beam evaporated MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions have been fabricated with the CoFeB free layer deposited at Ar pressure from 1 to 4 mTorr, and their tunneling process has been studied as a function of temperature and bias voltage. By changing the growth pressure, the junction dynamic conductance dI/dV, inelastic electron tunneling spectrum d²I/dV², and tunneling magnetoresistance vary with temperature. Moreover, the low-energy magnon cutoff energy E{sub C} derived from the conductance versus temperature curve agrees with interface magnon energy obtained directly from the inelastic electron tunneling spectrum, which demonstrates that interface magnons are involved in the electron tunneling process, opening an additional conductance channel and thus enhancing the total conductance.

  10. Effect of deposition temperature on electron-beam evaporated polycrystalline silicon thin-film and crystallized by diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, J. Varalmov, S.; Huang, J.; Green, M. A.; Kim, K.

    2014-06-16

    The effects of the deposition temperature on the microstructure, crystallographic orientation, and electrical properties of a 10-μm thick evaporated Si thin-film deposited on glass and crystallized using a diode laser, are investigated. The crystallization of the Si thin-film is initiated at a deposition temperature between 450 and 550 °C, and the predominant (110) orientation in the normal direction is found. Pole figure maps confirm that all films have a fiber texture and that it becomes stronger with increasing deposition temperature. Diode laser crystallization is performed, resulting in the formation of lateral grains along the laser scan direction. The laser power required to form lateral grains is higher in case of films deposited below 450 °C for all scan speeds. Pole figure maps show 75% occupancies of the (110) orientation in the normal direction when the laser crystallized film is deposited above 550 °C. A higher density of grain boundaries is obtained when the laser crystallized film is deposited below 450 °C, which limits the solar cell performance by n = 2 recombination, and a performance degradation is expected due to severe shunting.

  11. Microstructural analysis and transport properties of MoO and MoC nanostructures prepared by focused electron beam-induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Makise, Kazumasa; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki; Shinozaki, Bunju

    2014-07-18

    By electron-beam-induced deposition, we have succeeded in the direct fabrication of nanowires of molybdenum oxide (MoOx) and molybdenum carbide (MoC) on a SiO2 substrate set in a scanning electron microscope. In order to prepare MoOx specimens of high purity, a precursor gas of molybdenum hexacarbonyl [Mo(CO)6] is used, mixed with oxygen gas. On the other hand, MoC is grown by mixing H2O gas with the precursor gas. The electrical transport properties of the nanowires are investigated by the DC four-terminal method. A highly resistive MoOx nanowire prepared from an as-deposited specimen by annealing in air shows nonlinear current-voltage characteristics and a high photoconductivity. The resistivity ρ of an as-deposited amorphous MoC (a-MoC) nanowire takes its maximum at a temperature T ≈ 10 K and decreases to ≈ 0 with decreasing temperature. This behavior of ρ(T) indicates the possible occurrence of superconductivity in a-MoC nanowires. The characteristic of ρ(T) below the superconducting transition temperature Tc ≈ 4 K can be well explained by the quantum phase-slip model with a coherence length ξ(0) ≈ 8 nm at T = 0.

  12. Microstructural analysis and Transport Properties of MoO and MoC nanostructures prepared by focused electron beam-induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Makise, Kazumasa; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki; Shinozaki, Bunju

    2014-01-01

    By electron-beam-induced deposition, we have succeeded in the direct fabrication of nanowires of molybdenum oxide (MoOx) and molybdenum carbide (MoC) on a SiO2 substrate set in a scanning electron microscope. In order to prepare MoOx specimens of high purity, a precursor gas of molybdenum hexacarbonyl [Mo(CO)6] is used, mixed with oxygen gas. On the other hand, MoC is grown by mixing H2O gas with the precursor gas. The electrical transport properties of the nanowires are investigated by the DC four-terminal method. A highly resistive MoOx nanowire prepared from an as-deposited specimen by annealing in air shows nonlinear current-voltage characteristics and a high photoconductivity. The resistivity ρ of an as-deposited amorphous MoC (a-MoC) nanowire takes its maximum at a temperature T ≈ 10 K and decreases to ≈ 0 with decreasing temperature. This behavior of ρ(T) indicates the possible occurrence of superconductivity in a-MoC nanowires. The characteristic of ρ(T) below the superconducting transition temperature Tc ≈ 4 K can be well explained by the quantum phase-slip model with a coherence length ξ(0) ≈ 8 nm at T = 0. PMID:25033894

  13. Microstructural analysis and Transport Properties of MoO and MoC nanostructures prepared by focused electron beam-induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makise, Kazumasa; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki; Shinozaki, Bunju

    2014-07-01

    By electron-beam-induced deposition, we have succeeded in the direct fabrication of nanowires of molybdenum oxide (MoOx) and molybdenum carbide (MoC) on a SiO2 substrate set in a scanning electron microscope. In order to prepare MoOx specimens of high purity, a precursor gas of molybdenum hexacarbonyl [Mo(CO)6] is used, mixed with oxygen gas. On the other hand, MoC is grown by mixing H2O gas with the precursor gas. The electrical transport properties of the nanowires are investigated by the DC four-terminal method. A highly resistive MoOx nanowire prepared from an as-deposited specimen by annealing in air shows nonlinear current-voltage characteristics and a high photoconductivity. The resistivity ρ of an as-deposited amorphous MoC (a-MoC) nanowire takes its maximum at a temperature T ~ 10 K and decreases to ~ 0 with decreasing temperature. This behavior of ρ(T) indicates the possible occurrence of superconductivity in a-MoC nanowires. The characteristic of ρ(T) below the superconducting transition temperature Tc ~ 4 K can be well explained by the quantum phase-slip model with a coherence length ξ(0) ~ 8 nm at T = 0.

  14. Growth direction of oblique angle electron beam deposited silicon monoxide thin films identified by optical second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Vejling Andersen, Søren; Lund Trolle, Mads; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2013-12-02

    Oblique angle deposited (OAD) silicon monoxide (SiO) thin films forming tilted columnar structures have been characterized by second-harmonic generation. It was found that OAD SiO leads to a rotationally anisotropic second-harmonic response, depending on the optical angle of incidence. A model for the observed dependence of the second-harmonic signal on optical angle of incidence allows extraction of the growth direction of OAD films. The optically determined growth directions show convincing agreement with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy images. In addition to a powerful characterization tool, these results demonstrate the possibilities for designing nonlinear optical devices through SiO OAD.

  15. Identification and roles of nonstoichiometric oxygen in amorphous Ta2O5 thin films deposited by electron beam and sputtering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannequin, Cedric; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    The morphology and composition of tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) thin films prepared by electron-beam (EB) evaporation and radio-frequency sputtering (SP) were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray reflectometry (XRR), atomic force microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). GIXRD revealed an amorphous nature for both films, and XRR showed that the density of the Ta2O5-EB films was lower than that of the Ta2O5-SP films; both films have lower density than the bulk value. A larger amount of molecular water and peroxo species were detected for the Ta2O5-EB films by FTIR performed in ambient atmosphere. XPS analyses performed in vacuum confirmed the presence of hydroxyl groups, but no trace of chemisorbed molecular water was detected. In addition, a higher oxygen nonstoichiometry (higher O/Ta ratio) was found for the EB films. From these results, we conclude that the oxygen nonstoichiometry of the EB film accounted for its lower density and higher amount of absorbed molecular water. The results also suggest the importance of understanding the dependence of the structural and chemical properties of thin amorphous oxide films on the deposition process.

  16. Electron-beam direct processing on living cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Takayuki; Morishima, Keisuke

    2011-10-24

    We demonstrated a direct processing on a living Hep G2 cell membrane in conventional cultivation conditions using an electron beam. Electron beam-induced deposition from liquid precursor 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene and ablation was performed on the living cells. The 2.5-10 keV electron beam which was irradiated through a 100-nm-thick SiN nanomembrane could induce a deposition pattern and a ablation on a living cell membrane. This electron beam direct processing can provide simple in-situ cell surface modification for an analytical method of living cell membrane dynamic.

  17. Measuring electron beam polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, J.

    1992-12-01

    A two-hour discussion session was held on electron beam polarimetry including representatives from Halls A, B, and C. Presentations included a description of an existing Mo/ller polarimeter at the MIT-Bates laboratory, plans for Mo/ller polarimeters in Halls A and B, and a Compton (i.e., ``laser backscatter'') polarimeter planned for Hall A. This paper is a summary of those discussions.

  18. Process-Structure-Property Relationships of Micron Thick Gadolinium Oxide Films Deposited by Reactive Electron Beam-Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Z39.18 Adebo Professional 7.0 ao\\6^!0(04 The Pennsylvania State University The Graduate School College of Earth and Mineral Sciences PROCESS...temperature (650 °C) on different substrates. For evaluation of in-plane texture in the GdiGŗ films, pole figure analysis was performed. Mixed...transformation by ion beam assisted deposition (1BAD).. 117 5.5. Texture evolution in single phase cubic films deposited at low rates 122 5.6. Pole figure

  19. Electron beam dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, K R; Mills, M D; Almond, P R

    1981-05-01

    Electron beam dose distributions in the presence of inhomogeneous tissue are calculated by an algorithm that sums the dose distribution of individual pencil beams. The off-axis dependence of the pencil beam dose distribution is described by the Fermi-Eyges theory of thick-target multiple Coulomb scattering. Measured square-field depth-dose data serve as input for the calculations. Air gap corrections are incorporated and use data from'in-air' measurements in the penumbra of the beam. The effective depth, used to evaluate depth-dose, and the sigma of the off-axis Gaussian spread against depth are calculated by recursion relations from a CT data matrix for the material underlying individual pencil beams. The correlation of CT number with relative linear stopping power and relative linear scattering power for various tissues is shown. The results of calculations are verified by comparison with measurements in a 17 MeV electron beam from the Therac 20 linear accelerator. Calculated isodose lines agree nominally to within 2 mm of measurements in a water phantom. Similar agreement is observed in cork slabs simulating lung. Calculations beneath a bone substitute illustrate a weakness in the calculation. Finally a case of carcinoma in the maxillary antrum is studied. The theory suggests an alternative method for the calculation of depth-dose of rectangular fields.

  20. Ceria and copper/ceria functional coatings for electrochemical applications: Materials preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, J.; Fu, X. Z.; Luo, J. L.; Sanger, A. R.; Chuang, K. T.; Yang, Q. M.

    Following preliminary investigations, two electrodeposition techniques (electrophoretic and electrolytic) were selected and adapted for deposition of doped ceria ceramic and copper/doped ceria composite coatings on Ni substrates (foil and foam). The copper/doped ceria composites have potential value as protective functional coatings for current collectors in electrochemical cells including solid oxide fuel sells (SOFC). The doped ceria ceramic coating has potential application as a porous matrix for anodes of SOFCs operating on syngas, sour gas, or hydrocarbons.

  1. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

  2. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    In this report, a short review of electron beam particle precharging using a pulsed electric field is presented in Section B-1. Section B-2 details the design and installation of a remote focusing gear train which will allow much greater control over the particle charge measurement capability of the charge vs. radius apparatus. Under Section B-3, progress on the electrical shielding of the rotating spark gap power supply using a large Faraday cage is described. Efforts to prevent RFI interference from adversely affecting the Climet particle counter and the MicroMac current measurement device using a variety of techniques are also presented in this section. The basic effort is to optimize the removal efficiency for fly ash particles. 13 figs.

  3. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  4. Characterization of Pd catalyst-electrodes deposited on YSZ: Influence of the preparation technique and the presence of a ceria interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Borja, Carmen; Matei, Florina; Dorado, Fernando; Valverde, José Luis

    2012-11-01

    Palladium catalyst-electrodes supported on Y2O3-stabilized-ZrO2 (YSZ) prepared either by paste deposition or wet impregnation technique were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found a strong dependence of the catalytic film preparation technique as well as of the presence of a ceria interlayer between the palladium film and the solid electrolyte on the catalytic activity towards methane oxidation. Impregnated palladium films were found to be more active than films prepared by paste deposition. Besides, the addition of ceria allowed stabilizing the palladium active phase for methane oxidation.

  5. Electron beam polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1998-12-01

    Along with its well known charge and mass, the electron also carries an intrinsic angular momentum, or {ital spin}. The rules of quantum mechanics allow us to measure only the probability that the electron spin is in one of two allowed spin states. When a beam carries a net excess of electrons in one of these two allowed spin states, the beam is said to be {ital polarized}. The beam polarization may be measured by observing a sufficient number of electrons scattered by a spin-dependent interaction. For electrons, the useful scattering processes involve Coulomb scattering by heavy nuclei, or scattering from either polarized photons or other polarized electrons (known as Mott, Compton, and Mo/ller scattering, respectively). In this tutorial, we will briefly review how beam polarization is measured through a general scattering process, followed by a discussion of how the three scattering processes above are used to measure electron beam polarization. Descriptions of electron polarimeters based on the three scattering processes will be given. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Electron beam polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Charles K.

    1998-12-01

    Along with its well known charge and mass, the electron also carries an intrinsic angular momentum, or spin. The rules of quantum mechanics allow us to measure only the probability that the electron spin is in one of two allowed spin states. When a beam carries a net excess of electrons in one of these two allowed spin states, the beam is said to be polarized. The beam polarization may be measured by observing a sufficient number of electrons scattered by a spin-dependent interaction. For electrons, the useful scattering processes involve Coulomb scattering by heavy nuclei, or scattering from either polarized photons or other polarized electrons (known as Mott, Compton, and Mo/ller scattering, respectively). In this tutorial, we will briefly review how beam polarization is measured through a general scattering process, followed by a discussion of how the three scattering processes above are used to measure electron beam polarization. Descriptions of electron polarimeters based on the three scattering processes will be given.

  7. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the effect of microgravity on the fabrication of electron beam freeform (EBF) in aerospace environments. The contents include: 1) Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) Process Description; 2) Portable Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication System at NASA LaRC; 3) Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication in the Space Environment; 4) Effect of Gravity on Surface Tension; 5) Effect of Deposit Height on Cooling Path; 6) Microgravity Testing Aboard JSC's C-9; 7) Typical Test Flight Plates; 8) Direction and Height Trials for Process Control; 9) Effect of Wire Entry Direction into Molten Pool; 10) Microstructure of Single Layer EBF Deposits; 11) 0-g Deposit with Incorrect Standoff Distance; 12) Successful Demonstration of EBF in 0-g; and 13) Conclusion.

  8. Repetitively pumped electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, L.G.

    1979-07-24

    Disclosed is an apparatus for producing fast, repetitive pulses of controllable length of an electron beam by phased energy storage in a transmission line of length matched to the number of pulses and specific pulse lengths desired. 12 figs.

  9. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited).

    PubMed

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not "sorcery" but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  10. Electron beam pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Electron-beam-pumped semiconductor ultra-violet optical sources (ESUVOSs) are disclosed that use ballistic electron pumped wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The sources may produce incoherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped light emitting triodes (ELETs). The sources may produce coherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped laser triodes (ELTs). The ELTs may take the form of electron-beam-pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (EVCSEL) or edge emitting electron-beam-pumped lasers (EEELs). The semiconductor medium may take the form of an aluminum gallium nitride alloy that has a mole fraction of aluminum selected to give a desired emission wavelength, diamond, or diamond-like carbon (DLC). The sources may be produced from discrete components that are assembled after their individual formation or they may be produced using batch MEMS-type or semiconductor-type processing techniques to build them up in a whole or partial monolithic manner, or combination thereof.

  11. Fabrication of CeO 2 buffer layer with high deposition rate on biaxially textured Ni-3%W substrate by electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. B.; Park, S. K.; Kim, B. J.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, S. S.; Moon, S. H.; Lee, H. G.; Hong, G. W.

    2011-11-01

    CeO2 has been used as a buffer layer of a coated conductor because of good chemical and structural compatibility with YBCO. But cracks were often observed at the surface for films thicker than 100 nm deposited at a high temperature because of a large difference in a thermal expansion coefficient between metal and CeO2. The deposition rate was limited to be slow for getting good epitaxy. In order to increase the film deposition rate, while maintaining the epitaxy till a final thickness, two-step deposition process was tested. The thin seed layer with a thickness less than 10 nm was deposited with a deposition rate of 3 Å/s, and the homo-epitaxial layer at a thickness more than 240 nm was deposited at a deposition rate of 30 Å/s. The resulting CeO2 films deposited at 600 °C showed a good texture with a Δφ of 5.3°, Δω of 4.2° and Ra of 2.2 nm. The two-step process may be option for a low cost buffer layer for Ni-3%W metal substrates for the coated conductor.

  12. Relativistic Electron Beams Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupre, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene; Chanrion, Olivier; van der Velde, Oscar; Soula, Serge; Odzimek, Anna; Bennett, Alec; Whitley, Toby; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    It has recently been discovered that lightning discharges generate upward-directed relativistic electron beams above thunderclouds. This extends the phenomenon of relativistic runaway breakdown believed to occur inside thunderclouds to the atmosphere above thunderclouds. This marks a profound advance in our understanding of the atmosphere because we now know it acts as a giant, natural, particle accelerator. The accelerated electrons can reach significant relativistic energies of some MeV during their passage from the troposphere, through the middle atmosphere, into near-Earth space. These relativistic electron beams constitute a current above thunderclouds and effectively transfer energy from the troposphere to the middle atmosphere. This coupling process thereby forms a novel element of the global atmospheric electric circuit which links tropospheric thunderclouds to the atmosphere above. This contribution describes the radio remote sensing of upward electron beams to determine their occurrence frequency and to characterise their physical properites.

  13. Electron Beam Diagnostics in Plasmas Based on Electron Beam Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Darrin; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Blackwell, David; Walton, Scott; Murphy, Donald; Fernsler, Richard; Meger, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Over the last few years, electron beam ionization has been shown to be a viable generator of high density plasmas with numerous applications in materials modification. To better understand these plasmas, we have fielded electron beam diagnostics to more clearly understand the propagation of the beam as it travels through the background gas and creates the plasma. These diagnostics vary greatly in sophistication, ranging from differentially pumped systems with energy selective elements to metal 'hockey pucks' covered with thin layers of insulation to electrically isolate the detector from the plasma but pass high energy beam electrons. Most importantly, absolute measurements of spatially resolved beam current densities are measured in a variety of pulsed and continuous beam sources. The energy distribution of the beam current(s) will be further discussed, through experiments incorporating various energy resolving elements such as simple grids and more sophisticated cylindrical lens geometries. The results are compared with other experiments of high energy electron beams through gases and appropriate disparities and caveats will be discussed. Finally, plasma parameters are correlated to the measured beam parameters for a more global picture of electron beam produced plasmas.

  14. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Ganjiang; Nowak, Daniel Anthony; Murphy, John Thomas

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  15. Depressed collector for electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, R. Lawrence (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A depressed collector for recovery of spent beam energy from electromagnetic sources emitting sheet or large aspect ration annular electron beams operating aver a broad range of beam voltages and currents. The collector incorporates a trap for capturing and preventing the return of reflected and secondary electrons.

  16. Composite ceria-coated aerogels and methods of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Eyring, Edward M; Ernst, Richard D; Turpin, Gregory C; Dunn, Brian C

    2013-05-07

    Ceria-coated aerogels can include an aerogel support material having a stabilized ceria coating thereon. The ceria coating can be formed by solution or vapor deposition of alcogels or aerogels. Additional catalytic metal species can also be incorporated into the coating to form multi-metallic compounds having improved catalytic activity. Further, the ceria coated aerogels retain high surface areas at elevated temperatures. Thus, improvements in catalytic activity and thermal stability can be achieved using these ceria-coated composite aerogels.

  17. Evaporation rate and composition monitoring of electron beam PVD processes

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Braun, D.G.; Haynam, C.; Meier, T.; McClelland, M.A.

    1995-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing sensor and control technology to improve the quality and range of applicability of electron beam PVD. The approach being developed uses tunable lasers to measure, the density and composition of the vapor plume. This paper reviews the principles of operation of laser based sensors and discusses data from experiments in which titanium and niobium are co-vaporized. Laser data agreed well with deposited film compositions and spatial variations in deposited film cross sections. Laser based vapor monitoring appears to have broad applicability and has the potential to extend the use of high rate electron beam PVD.

  18. Electron Beam IEMP Simulation Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    Effect of Injected Current Pulse Width Variation Upon Transmittfed Current Pulse 69 4.10 Open Shutter Photograph of Surface Flashover on Dielectric Tube...occurred, presumably by electrical breakdown In volume. However it was no+ observed In all cases. Surface flashover Is another electrical failure mode...early in the Injected pulse 71 TDIELECTRIC TUBE ELECTRON BEAM oil~ Flgu--e 4.10 Open Shutter Photograph of Surface Flashover on Dielectric Tube 7

  19. Practical Teaching about Electron Beams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawson, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    If you have seen tubes like the ones we describe here in the back of a cupboard but have been reluctant to use them, now is the time to get them out. The aim of this article is to record the history of teaching about electron beams, particularly with Teltron equipment, and in doing so encourage those schools that are equipped with these tubes to…

  20. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  1. Electron Beam Could Probe Recombination Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1983-01-01

    Electron beam probe technique estimate electron/hole capture cross sections in semiconductors with wide band gaps. Amplitude-modulated electron beam induces short-circuit current collected by ohmic contacts. Phase shift between this current and electron-beam current measured as function of frequency. Results of measurements used to ascertain recombination rates and energy levels.

  2. CO2 remediation using high power electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tzvetelina; Petrov, George; Apruzese, John; Wolford, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    To mitigate increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere and alleviate global warming, we investigated a method of CO2 reduction using high-power electron beams. A series of experiments were conducted in which the reduction of CO2 is measured for different gas compositions and power deposition rates. Electron beam irradiation of gas containing 90% CO2 and 10% CH4 at beam energy density deposition of 4.2 J/cm3, reduced the CO2 concentration to 78%. Analogous experiments with a gas mixture containing 11.5% CO2, 11.5% CH4 and balance of Ar, reduced the CO2 concentration to below 11% with energy deposition 0.71 J/cm3. An electron beam deposition model computed the energy cost for breaking a CO2 molecule in flue gas (82% N2, 6% O2 and 12% CO2) to be 85 eV per molecule. Other techniques to enhance the removal of CO2 with pulsed electron beams are also explored, yielding new possible avenues of research.

  3. Microstructural evolution of the nickel platinum-aluminide bond coat on electron-beam physical-vapor deposition thermal-barrier coatings during high-temperature service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. C.; Heuer, A. H.

    2005-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of a (Ni,Pt)-aluminide bond coat underneath the ZrO2-based thermal-barrier coating (TBC) topcoat system on a René N5 Ni-based superalloy turbine blade during prolonged high-temperature service has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The as-deposited bond coat has a spatially varying microstructure, which consists of an outer layer of single-phase β-(Ni,Pt)Al, a middle layer of a β-(Ni,Pt)Al matrix containing a high number density of μ-phase precipitates, and an inner layer containing a γ/γ' matrix and numerous μ- and σ-phase precipitates. During service, microstructural changes in the hotter sections of the blade are more extensive than those in the cooler parts, as expected. As a result of interdiffusion, the inner layer grows into the γ/γ' substrate, with the formation of some M23C6 precipitates, and the β matrix in the middle layer is transformed into a two-phase mixture of β and γ'. Corresponding changes occur in the morphologies and volume fractions of the various precipitate phases present in the bond coat. The single-phase β material in the outer layer retains its basic structure, except that the compositional changes due to diffusion between the bond coat and turbine blade cause a martensitic transformation to occur in the hottest sections during the final cooling of the blade. The distribution of various elements in the different layers has also been analyzed, as has growth of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) at the bond coat/TBC interface.

  4. Nuclear astrophysics and electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenk, A.

    2013-11-07

    Electron beams provide important probes and constraints for nuclear astrophysics. This is especially exciting at energies within the regime of chiral effective field theory (EFT), which provides a systematic expansion for nuclear forces and electroweak operators based on quantum chromodynamics. This talk discusses some recent highlights and future directions based on chiral EFT, including nuclear structure and reactions for astrophysics, the neutron skin and constraints for the properties of neutron-rich matter in neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, and the dark matter response of nuclei.

  5. Reinforcing multiwall carbon nanotubes by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duchamp, Martial; Meunier, Richard; Smajda, Rita; Mionic, Marijana; Forro, Laszlo; Magrez, Arnaud; Seo, Jin Won; Song, Bo; Tomanek, David

    2010-10-15

    We study the effect of electron beam irradiation on the bending modulus of multiwall carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition. Atomic force microscopy observations of the nanotube deflection in the suspended-beam geometry suggest an internal, reversible stick-slip motion prior to irradiation, indicating presence of extended defects. Upon electron beam irradiation, nanotubes with an initial bending modulus exceeding 10 GPa initially get stiffer, before softening at high doses. Highly defective nanotubes with smaller initial bending moduli do not exhibit the initial reinforcement. These data are explained by ab initio molecular dynamics calculations suggesting a spontaneous cross-linking of neighboring nanotube walls at extended vacancy defects created by the electron beam, in agreement with electron microscopy observations. At low defect concentration, depending on the edge morphology, the covalent bonds between neighboring nanotube walls cause reinforcement by resisting relative motion of neighboring walls. At high concentration of defects that are present initially or induced by high electron beam dose, the structural integrity of the entire system suffers from increasing electron beam damage.

  6. Electron beam stimulated spin reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monchesky, T. L.; Unguris, J.; Celotta, R. J.

    2003-05-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis, we observed the electron beam induced switching of the magnetic state of epitaxial single-crystal Fe(110) films grown on atomically flat cleaved GaAs(110). For low film thickness the magnetization lies along the [-110] in-plane direction, while above a thickness of 19 monolayers, the ground state magnetization configuration switches to the [001] in-plane direction. If Fe films are grown to a thickness greater than the critical thickness of the reorientation, the magnetization is caught in a metastable state, oriented along [-110]. We discovered that we can locally switch the metastable state to the stable [001] direction by irradiating the metastable magnetic state with a suitable electron current density. The reversal proceeds by the nucleation and growth of lancet-shaped domains that move in discrete jumps between pinning sites. Our results show that there is a permanent reduction of the strength of defect sites without a permanent change in the overall anisotropy. We demonstrate how an electron beam can be used to locally control domain structure.

  7. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e[plus]e[minus] collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point.

  8. Polarized electron beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1992-11-01

    SLAC has successfully accelerated high energy polarized electrons for the Stanford Linear Collider and fixed polarized nuclear target experiments. The polarized electron beams at SLAC use a gallium arsenide (GaAlAs for E-142) photon emission source to provide the beam of polarized electrons with polarization of approximately 28% (41% for E-142). While the beam emittance is reduced in the damping ring for SLC operation a system of bend magnets and superconducting solenoids preserve and orient the spin direction for maximum longitudinal polarization at the collision point. The electron polarization is monitored with a Compton scattering polarimeter, and was typically 22% at the e{plus}e{minus} collision point for the 1992 run. Improvements are discussed to increase the source polarization and to reduce the depolarization effects between the source and the collision point.

  9. Ultraviolet optical and microstructural properties of MgF2 and LaF3 coatings deposited by ion-beam sputtering and boat and electron-beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ristau, Detlev; Günster, Stefan; Bosch, Salvador; Duparré, Angela; Masetti, Enrico; Ferré-Borrull, Josep; Kiriakidis, George; Peiró, Francesca; Quesnel, Etienne; Tikhonravov, Alexander

    2002-06-01

    Single layers of MgF2 and LaF3 were deposited upon superpolished fused-silica and CaF2 substrates by ion-beam sputtering (IBS) as well as by boat and electron beam (e-beam) evaporation and were characterized by a variety of complementary analytical techniques. Besides undergoing photometric and ellipsometric inspection, the samples were investigated at 193 and 633 nm by an optical scatter measurement facility. The structural properties were assessed with atomic-force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, TEM techniques that involved conventional thinning methods for the layers. For measurement of mechanical stress in the coatings, special silicon substrates were coated and analyzed. The dispersion behavior of both deposition materials, which was determined on the basis of various independent photometric measurements and data reduction techniques, is in good agreement with that published in the literature and with the bulk properties of the materials. The refractive indices of the MgF2 coatings ranged from 1.415 to 1.440 for the wavelength of the ArF excimer laser (193 nm) and from 1.435 to 1.465 for the wavelength of the F2 excimer laser (157 nm). For single layers of LaF3 the refractive indices extended from 1.67 to 1.70 at 193 nm to approximately 1.80 at 157 nm. The IBS process achieves the best homogeneity and the lowest surface roughness values (close to 1 nm(rms)) of the processes compared in the joint experiment. In contrast to MgF2 boat and e-beam evaporated coatings, which exhibit tensile mechanical stress ranging from 300 to 400 MPa, IBS coatings exhibit high compressive stress of as much as 910 MPa. A similar tendency was found for coating stress in LaF3 single layers. Experimental results are discussed with respect to the microstructural and compositional properties as well as to the surface topography of the coatings.

  10. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  11. Dual-Cathode Electron-Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Conley, Joseph M.; Wittry, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Beam from either cathode electromagnetically aligned with exit port. Electron beam from either of two cathodes deflected by magnetic and electric fields to central axis. Mechanical alignment of beam easy because cathode axes, anode apertures, and electron trajectories coplanar. Applications where uninterrupted service needed: scanning electron microscopes, transmission electron microscopes, electron-beam lithography equipment, Auger instruments, and microfocused x-ray sources.

  12. Beam rotation and shear in a large electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, C.R.; Oona, H.; Shurter, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The time averaged electron beam current distribution of one of the electron guns of the Large Aperture Module (LAM) of the Aurora laser was measured as part of a larger set of experiments designed to study the electron beam transport to and energy deposition in the LAM laser chamber. The LAM laser chamber has a 1-m {times} 1-m aperture and is pumped from two sides along a 2-m length. A 10 ga. stainless steel sheet was placed inside the laser chamber and served multiple purposes. First, it was used to convert high energy electrons into X-rays in order to make radiograms of the electron beam. Second, the sheet was used as a Faraday cup to measure the total beam current. Third, individual Faraday cups were mounted on the plate to sample the time history of the electron beam at various positions. Each of the LAM electron gun diodes produces a beam of 750 kV electrons with a total current of about 500 kA which is relatively uniform over the cathode area of 1 m {times} 2 m. An applied magnetic field of about 1300 Gauss is used to prevent pinch of the beam during beam transport.

  13. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stable growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.

  14. Nanowire growth by an electron beam induced massive phase transformation

    DOE PAGES

    Sood, Shantanu; Kisslinger, Kim; Gouma, Perena

    2014-11-15

    Tungsten trioxide nanowires of a high aspect ratio have been synthesized in-situ in a TEM under an electron beam of current density 14A/cm² due to a massive polymorphic reaction. Sol-gel processed pseudocubic phase nanocrystals of tungsten trioxide were seen to rapidly transform to one dimensional monoclinic phase configurations, and this reaction was independent of the substrate on which the material was deposited. The mechanism of the self-catalyzed polymorphic transition and accompanying radical shape change is a typical characteristic of metastable to stable phase transformations in nanostructured polymorphic metal oxides. A heuristic model is used to confirm the metastable to stablemore » growth mechanism. The findings are important to the control electron beam deposition of nanowires for functional applications starting from colloidal precursors.« less

  15. Intense Microsecond Electron Beam Interactions with Low-Pressure Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-28

    Gilgenbach, J. E. Tucker, and C. L. Enloe, Laser and Particle Beams, 6 687 (1988). 4) "Undulation of a Magnetized Electron Beam by a Periodic Ion...Excitation by Relativistic Electrons: I. Collisions Cross Sections and Deposition Efficiencies", Laser and Particle Beams 8 493 (1990) 11) D.B...McGarrah and M.L. Brake, Argon Ion Excitation by Relativistic Electrons: II. Chemical Kinetics", Laser and Particle Beams 8 507 (1990) 9 T-PS/18/3//35709

  16. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  17. Transverse Mode Electron Beam Microwave Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, Lawrence E.

    1994-01-01

    An electron beam microwave device having an evacuated interaction chamber to which are coupled a resonant cavity which has an opening between the resonant cavity and the evacuated interaction chamber and an electron gun which causes a narrow beam of electrons to traverse the evacuated interaction chamber. The device also contains a mechanism for feeding back a microwave electromagnetic field from the resonant cavity to the evacuated interaction chamber in such a way as to modulate the direction of propagation of the electron beam, thereby further amplifyjng the microwave electromagnetic field. Furthermore, provision is made for coupling the electromagnetic field out of the electron beam microwave device.

  18. Laser wakefield acceleration of polarized electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, D. V.; Andreev, N. E.; Cros, B.

    2016-11-01

    The acceleration of highly polarized electron beams are widely used in state-of-the-art high-energy physics experiments. In this work, a model for investigation of polarization dynamics of electron beams in the laser-plasma accelerator depending on the initial energy of electrons was developed and tested. To obtain the evolution of the trajectory and momentum of the electron for modeling its acceleration the wakefield structure was determined. The spin precession of the beam electron was described by Thomas-Bargman-Michel-Telegdi equations. The evolution of the electron beam polarization was investigated for zero-emittance beams with zero-energy spread.

  19. Atomic Image Projection Electron Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Bum

    2006-03-01

    While we are approaching to the nanotechnology era, as was proposed by Richard Feynman in 1959, our main concern still lies in how one can controllably manufacture and utilize nanometer scale features. The top-down approaches, most notably, lithography based techniques still have the problem of throughput although it has been successfully demonstrate to make features with the size less than 10 nm. The bottom-up approaches, either utilizing chemical vapor deposition process to make carbon nanotube or wet-chemical process to make size controllable quantum dots and rods, still have the limitation of extending it to many different types of materials and also delivering them on a wafer size substrate to make nanodevices. In this talk, we will propose a novel electron beam lithography technique to make nanometer scale features. The novelty of this process lies in the fact that one can utilize the crystalline lattice image commonly observed by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy as an ultimate mask to generate nanometer scale patterns. Using this technique, we demonstrate that down to 45 nm pitch size can be resolved on hydrogen silsesquioxine (HSQ) e-beam resist material. The patterns are formed on Si substarte with the dot size of about 30 nm and the line size of about 25 nm. This technique can be extend to define less than 10 nm size features only if the suitable resist is developed.

  20. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  1. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  2. Redesigned Electron-Beam Furnace Boosts Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    1995-01-01

    Redesigned electron-beam furnace features carousel of greater capacity so more experiments conducted per loading, and time spent on reloading and vacuum pump-down reduced. Common mounting plate for electron source and carousel simplifies installation and reduces vibration.

  3. Technical Seminar: Electron Beam Forming Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    EBF³ uses a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment to create a molten pool on a metallic substrate. This layer-additive process enables fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. The ...

  4. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-06-09

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  5. Electron Beam Influence on Microcrystalline Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemţanu, Monica R.; Minea, R.; Mitru, Ecaterina

    2007-04-01

    Cellulose is a natural raw material used in great quantity as stabilizer, tabletting agent, anti-caking agent, flavor carrier, etc. Due to its structure it has limited uses exhibiting some disadvantages in certain applications. Irradiation technique is frequently used to change the polymeric materials. The purpose of the work is to discuss the action of accelerated electron beams (e-beams) on microcrystalline cellulose. The results of the study showed that some properties of cellulose can be improved by electron beam treatment.

  6. Plasma lenses for focusing relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Wheeler, S.; Leemans, W.

    1997-04-01

    The next generation of colliders require tightly focused beams with high luminosity. To focus charged particle beams for such applications, a plasma focusing scheme has been proposed. Plasma lenses can be overdense (plasma density, n{sub p} much greater than electron beam density, n{sub b}) or underdense (n{sub p} less than 2 n{sub b}). In overdense lenses the space-charge force of the electron beam is canceled by the plasma and the remaining magnetic force causes the electron beam to self-pinch. The focusing gradient is nonlinear, resulting in spherical aberrations. In underdense lenses, the self-forces of the electron beam cancel, allowing the plasma ions to focus the beam. Although for a given beam density, a uniform underdense lens produces smaller focusing gradients than an overdense lens, it produces better beam quality since the focusing is done by plasma ions. The underdense lens can be improved by tapering the density of the plasma for optimal focusing. The underdense lens performance can be enhanced further by producing adiabatic plasma lenses to avoid the Oide limit on spot size due to synchrotron radiation by the electron beam. The plasma lens experiment at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) is designed to study the properties of plasma lenses in both overdense and underdense regimes. In particular, important issues such as electron beam matching, time response of the lens, lens aberrations and shot-to-shot reproducibility are being investigated.

  7. Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2007-01-31

    Original objectives of CRADA number BNL-01-03 between BNL and Acceleron, Inc., were to further develop the Plasma Window concept (a BNL invention covered by US Patent number 5,578,831), mate the Plasma Window to an existing electron beam welder to perform in-air electron beam welding, and mount the novel nonvacuum electron beam welder on a robot arm. Except for the last objective, all other goals were met or exceeded. Plasma Window design and operation was enhanced during the project, and it was successfully mated to a conventional4 kW electron beam welder. Unprecedented high quality non-vacuum electron beam . welding was demonstrated. Additionally, a new invention the Plasma Shield (US Patent number 7,075,030) that chemically and thermally shields a target object was set forth. Great interest in the new technology was shown by a number of industries and three arcs were sold for experimental use. However, the welding industry requested demonstration of high speed welding, which requires 100 kW electron beam welders. The cost of such a welder involved the need for additional funding. Therefore, some of the effort was directed towards Plasma Shield development. Although relatively a small portion of the R&D effort was spent on the Plasma Shield, some very encouraging results were obtained. Inair Plasma Shield was demonstrated. With only a partial shield, enhanced vacuum separation and cleaner welds were realized. And, electron beam propagation in atmosphere improved by a factor of about 3. Benefits to industry are the introduction of two new technologies. BNL benefited from licensing fee cash, from partial payment for employee salary, and from a new patent In addition to financial benefits, a new technology for physics studies was developed. Recommendations for future work are to develop an under-water plasma shield, perform welding with high-power electron beam:s, carry out other plasma shielded electron beam and laser processes. Potential benefits from further R

  8. Portable Electron-Beam Free-Form Fabrication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin; Petersen, Daniel D.; Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    when not under vacuum. During operation, wire will be fed to a fixed location, entering the melted pool created by the electron beam. Heated by the electron beam, the wire will melt and fuse to either the substrate or with the previously deposited metal wire fused on top of the positioning table. Based on a computer aided design (CAD) model and controlled by a computer, the positioning subsystem

  9. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  10. Artificial auroras in the upper atmosphere. 1. Electron beam injections

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.L.; Gibson, W.C.; Marshall, J.A. ); Mende, S.B.; Swenson, G.R. ); Kawashima, N. ); Roberts, W.T. ); Taylor, W.W.L. ); Neubert, T. )

    1993-03-19

    Artificial electron beams from the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) on the ATLAS 1 Spacelab payload were used to stimulate auroral emissions at southern auroral latitudes. The emitted electron beams were monoenergetic at 6.25 keV and were fired in one-second pulses every fifteen seconds with currents of 1.21 A. Optical measurements of the beam were made in the vicinity of the Shuttle Orbiter by its on-board television camera and in the upper atmosphere by the Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imager (AEPI). AEPI imaged auroral emissions in both white light and at the 427.8 nm N[sub 2][sup +] emission line. Energy deposition calculations and the results of previous sounding-rocket experiments had suggested that emissions with scale sizes of about 130 meters would result from the artificial electron beams with the visible emissions extending from about 110 to 130 km altitudes. In the ATLAS 1 experiments the auroral imaging was performed from the Shuttle, providing a new perspective on the artificial auroras and allowing the emissions to be traced from altitudes near the 295 km Shuttle altitude down to the 110 km level along the curved magnetic field lines. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Isabel A.; Dance, David R.; Skinner, Claire L.; Evans, Phil M.

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDI{sub vol}) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDI{sub vol} to an effective dose.

  12. Controlled synthesis of ceria nanoparticles for the design of nanohybrids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh-Dinh; Dinh, Cao-Thang; Mrabet, Driss; Tran-Thi, Minh-Nguyet; Do, Trong-On

    2013-03-15

    Ceria nanoparticles were synthesized from reaction mixture of cerium nitrate/hexamethylenediamine/water-ethylene glycol. Lamellar, particle-aggregated array, platelet, rice, cube, quasi-sphere shapes of the ceria nanoparticles can be controlled by tuning reaction parameters (reagent concentration, reagent components, pH, and reaction conditions). Studies on shape-dependent catalysis of the bare ceria samples toward CO oxidation indicated that the cube-shaped ceria nanoparticles show better catalytic activity than the nanospheres and the commercial micropowders. As capped by hexamethylenediamine (HEA) molecules, amine-functionalized ceria nanoparticles act as platforms for depositing copper particles to produce efficient Cu/CeO(2) hybrid nanocatalysts for CO conversion. Coupling of the copper clusters with the HEA-capped ceria nanocubes was achieved with the Cu contents up to 15 wt.%. The Cu/CeO(2) nanohybrids show an enhanced catalytic efficiency of low temperature CO conversion. This could be due to high exposure of the reactive {100} facets in the ceria nanocubes and interfacial copper-ceria interactions.

  13. Modelling of electron beam induced nanowire attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, Lucas A.; Speich, Claudia; Schäfer, David; Erni, Daniel; Prost, Werner; Tegude, Franz J.; Benson, Niels; Schmechel, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) induced nanowire (NW) attraction or bundling is a well known effect, which is mainly ascribed to structural or material dependent properties. However, there have also been recent reports of electron beam induced nanowire bending by SEM imaging, which is not fully explained by the current models, especially when considering the electro-dynamic interaction between NWs. In this article, we contribute to the understanding of this phenomenon, by introducing an electro-dynamic model based on capacitor and Lorentz force interaction, where the active NW bending is stimulated by an electromagnetic force between individual wires. The model includes geometrical, electrical, and mechanical NW parameters, as well as the influence of the electron beam source parameters and is validated using in-situ observations of electron beam induced GaAs nanowire (NW) bending by SEM imaging.

  14. Collimation Studies with Hollow Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Saewert, G.W.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    Recent experimental studies at the Fermilab Tevatron collider have shown that magnetically confined hollow electron beams can act as a new kind of collimator for high-intensity beams in storage rings. In a hollow electron beam collimator, electrons enclose the circulating beam. Their electric charge kicks halo particles transversely. If their distribution is axially symmetric, the beam core is unaffected. This device is complementary to conventional two-stage collimation systems: the electron beam can be placed arbitrarily close to the circulating beam; and particle removal is smooth, so that the device is a diffusion enhancer rather than a hard aperture limitation. The concept was tested in the Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the existing electron lenses. We describe some of the technical aspects of hollow-beam scraping and the results of recent measurements.

  15. Dual cathode system for electron beam instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G. (Inventor); Conley, Joseph M. (Inventor); Wittry, David B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An electron beam source having a single electron optical axis is provided with two coplanar cathodes equally spaced on opposite sides from the electron optical axis. A switch permits selecting either cathode, and a deflection system comprised of electromagnets, each with separate pole pieces equally spaced from the plane of the cathodes and electron optical axis, first deflects the electron beam from a selected cathode toward the electron optical axis, and then in an opposite direction into convergence with the electron optical axis. The result is that the electron beam from one selected cathode undergoes a sigmoid deflection in two opposite directions, like the letter S, with the sigmoid deflection of each being a mirror image of the other.

  16. The POSEIDON electron beam generator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sethian, J.D.; Mora, F.

    1982-09-27

    The POSEIDON electron beam generator was designed to perform a series of experiments to produce a closed field line plasma confinement system with two rotating relativistic electron beams. Previous experimental studies have shown that a single rotating beam (generated by the TRITON electron beam generator) can produce a plasma in a reversed field configuration inside an initially field free metal tube. The magnetic fields were maintained with induced plasma currents rather than the beam electrons themselves. However, because the beam was injected from one end of the system, a net axial current persisted which precluded axial containment. To eliminate this current, it was proposed to inject a second rotating beam from the opposite end of the system.

  17. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Petra; Booth, Nicola; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Labate, Luca; Levato, Tadzio; Li, Bin; Makita, Mikako; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev; Riley, David; Woolsey, Nigel; Gizzi, Leonida A.

    2015-02-01

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 1019 W/cm2. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  18. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  19. Control and Manipulation of Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2009-01-22

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  20. A conceptual design for an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-02-15

    This report is a brief description of a model electron beam, which is meant to serve as a pulsed heat source that vaporizes a metal fleck into an ''under-dense'' cloud. See Reference 1. The envelope of the electron beam is calculated from the paraxial ray equation, as stated in Reference 2. The examples shown here are for 5 A, 200 keV beams that focus to waists of under 0.4 mm diameter, within a cylindrical volume of 10 cm radius and length. The magnetic fields assumed in the examples are moderate, 0.11 T and 0.35 T, and can probably be created by permanent magnets.

  1. Control and manipulation of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe; /NICADD, DeKalb /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  2. Structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films on yttria-stabilized zirconia substrates, studied by high resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert; Lee, Sang Chul; Shi, Yezhou; Chueh, William C

    2017-01-06

    We have applied aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to study the structure and chemistry of epitaxial ceria thin films, grown by pulsed laser deposition onto (001) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. There are few observable defects apart from the expected mismatch interfacial dislocations and so the films would be expected to have good potential for applications. Under high electron beam dose rate (above about 6000 e(-)/Å(2)s) domains of an ordered structure appear and these are interpreted as being created by oxygen vacancy ordering. The ordered structure does not appear at lower lose rates (ca. 2600 e(-)/Å(2)s) and can be removed by imaging under 1 mbar oxygen gas in an environmental TEM. EELS confirms that there is both oxygen deficiency and the associated increase in Ce(3+) versus Ce(4+) cations in the ordered domains. In situ high resolution TEM recordings show the formation of the ordered domains as well as atomic migration along the ceria thin film (001) surface.

  3. Control of Space-Based Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifzer. W. J.; Taminger, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Engineering a closed-loop control system for an electron beam welder for space-based additive manufacturing is challenging. For earth and space based applications, components must work in a vacuum and optical components become occluded with metal vapor deposition. For extraterrestrial applications added components increase launch weight, increase complexity, and increase space flight certification efforts. Here we present a software tool that closely couples path planning and E-beam parameter controls into the build process to increase flexibility. In an environment where data collection hinders real-time control, another approach is considered that will still yield a high quality build.

  4. Emission of an intense electron beam from a ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Myers, M.; Hegeler, F.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Sethian, J. D.; Ludeking, L.

    2003-01-01

    Inserting a slab of honeycomb ceramic in front of the emitting surface of a large-area cathode improves the electron beam emission uniformity, decreases the beam current rise and fall times, and maintains a more constant diode impedance. Moreover, changing the cathode material from velvet to carbon fiber achieved a more robust cathode that starts to emit at a higher electric field without a degradation in beam uniformity. In addition, an 80% reduction in the postshot diode pressure was also observed when gamma alumina was deposited on the ceramic. A possible explanation is that reabsorption and recycling of adsorbed gases takes place.

  5. A simple model of electron beam initiated dielectric breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, B. L.; Daniell, R. E.; Delmer, T. N.

    1985-01-01

    A steady state model that describes the internal charge distribution of a planar dielectric sample exposed to a uniform electron beam was developed. The model includes the effects of charge deposition and ionization of the beam, separate trap-modulated mobilities for electrons and holes, electron-hole recombination, and pair production by drifting thermal electrons. If the incident beam current is greater than a certain critical value (which depends on sample thickness as well as other sample properties), the steady state solution is non-physical.

  6. Electron Beam Applications in Chemical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Dragusin, M.; Radoiu, M.; Moraru, R.; Oproiu, C.; Cojocaru, G.; Margarit, C.

    1997-05-01

    Our recent results in the field of polymeric materials obtained by electron beam irradiation are presented. Two types of polymeric flocculants and three hydrogels are described. The effects of radiation absorbed dose and chemical composition of the irradiated solutions upon the polymeric materials characteristics are discussed. The required absorbed dose levels to produce the polymeric flocculants are in the range of 0.4 kGy to 1 kGy, and 4 kGy to 12 kGy for hydrogels. Experimental results obtained by testing polymeric flocculants with waste water from food industry are given. Plymeric materials processing was developed on a pilot small scale level with a 0.7 kW and 5.5 MeV linac built in Romania. A new facility for application of combined electron beam and microwave irradiation in the field of polymeric materials preparation is presently under investigation. Preliminary results have demonstrated that some polymeric flocculants characteristics, such as linearity, were improved by using combined electron beam and microwave irradiation. Also, the absorbed dose levels decreases in comparison with those required when only electron beam irradiation was used.

  7. Adjusting an electron beam for drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childress, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reticle contains two concentric circles: inner circle insures beam circularity and outer circle is guide to prevent beam from cutting workpiece clamp. Precise measurement of beam and clamp are required with old reticle. New reticle speeds up electron-beam drilling process by eliminating need to rotate eyepiece to make measurements against reticle scale.

  8. Dielectric charging by an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upatov, V. Y.

    1996-08-01

    Experimental discovery of a charge spot field effect (CSFE) has altered considerably our understanding of dielectric charging by an electron beam, under conditions typical for the operation of a large class of cathode ray tubes (CRT). Dielectric charging by an electron beam was studied using a specific pulse method for the measurement of the potential. The accuracy of this method is discussed. Measurements were made of the potential relief of a positively charged spot on muscovite mica (quartz, aluminum oxide). The potential at the spot center, under conditions described in the paper and at a relatively long charging time, was shown to be considerably lower than that of the collector. Potential dependence on charging time, determined under the same conditions, is shown for the charged spot center and a number of adjacent points. During creation of the charged spot charging current was measured. The results of the measurements are discussed. A new mechanism of dielectric charging by electron beam is proposed. A CSFE is formulated, and its significance for the operation of CRT is stated. Criticism is given of in-plane grid effect. The paper presents calculations of fields for grid target models determining the mechanism of dielectric charging by electron beam.

  9. Electron beam emittance monitor for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E.; Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Kauffmann, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Taratin, A.

    1993-05-01

    A nondestructive beam profile monitor for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is presented using as a probe a low-energy electron beam interacting with the proton bunch charge. Results using a full Monte Carlo simulation code look promising for the transverse and longitudinal beam profile measurements.

  10. Measuring the Fluence of Clinical Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaini, Mehran

    1995-01-01

    The incident electron fluence on the patient is greatly affected by the various collimator components on the path of the beam. It is therefore important to measure and characterize these fluence perturbations, which alter the dose distributions. In addition, the incident fluence information is needed as input for the treatment planning algorithms, which are presently inferred from the dose measurements. The magnitude of electron fluence for patient treatments is very low and it is difficult to assess directly. Therefore, a specially designed fluence-meter is required. Of all the detection methods, an ion-implanted semiconductor detector with an ultra-thin depletion layer is the most suitable. We have shown that the energy deposited in an ultra-thin detector, with no window, is directly proportional to the incident fluence of clinical electron beams, including the small contribution of delta-rays. The main reasons for this concept are that (L/rho ) of silicon is essentially constant over the spectrum of any clinical beam and these beams are almost mono-energetic. Our detector is calibrated against a flat Faraday cup and can provide a measure of true electron fluence, with almost no energy and directional dependence. Calibrations are done in a vacuum chamber, where the chamber and the measuring electronics are connected to the accelerator ground. In the calibration setup, a pipe collimation system is used to create a mono-directional beam, so that Phi = Phi_{planar }. Geometrical calculations and films are used for making quantitative analysis of the beam impinging on the detector and the cup. The precision of the calibrations is below 1%. Since the calibration factors of the detector are the same on two different linacs, once a detector is calibrated, it can measure electron fluence on any clinical machine. Fluence output and profiles, and dphi /dtheta of a variety of cones and blocks are measured. The measured surface fluence values conform to the expected shape of

  11. Carbon deposition behaviour in metal-infiltrated gadolinia doped ceria electrodes for simulated biogas upgrading in solid oxide electrolysis cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duboviks, V.; Lomberg, M.; Maher, R. C.; Cohen, L. F.; Brandon, N. P.; Offer, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the attractive applications for reversible Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) is to convert CO2 into CO via high temperature electrolysis, which is particularly important for biogas upgrading. To improve biogas utility, the CO2 component can be converted into fuel via electrolysis. A significant issue for SOC operation on biogas is carbon-induced catalyst deactivation. Nickel is widely used in SOC electrodes for reasons of cost and performance, but it has a low tolerance to carbon deposition. Two different modes of carbon formation on Ni-based electrodes are proposed in the present work based on ex-situ Raman measurements which are in agreement with previous studies. While copper is known to be resistant towards carbon formation, two significant issues have prevented its application in SOC electrodes - namely its relatively low melting temperature, inhibiting high temperature sintering, and low catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation. In this study, the electrodes were prepared through a low temperature metal infiltration technique. Since the metal infiltration technique avoids high sintering temperatures, Cu-Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ (Cu-CGO) electrodes were fabricated and tested as an alternative to Ni-CGO electrodes. We demonstrate that the performance of Cu-CGO electrodes is equivalent to Ni-CGO electrodes, whilst carbon formation is fully suppressed when operated on biogas mixture.

  12. A reflex electron beam discharge as a plasma source for electron beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.S.; Rocca, J.J.; Szapiro, B. )

    1988-10-01

    A reflex electron beam glow discharge has been used as a plasma source for the generation of broad-area electron beams. An electron current of 120 A (12 A/cm/sup 2/) was extracted from the plasma in 10 ..mu..s pulses and accelerated to energies greater than 1 keV in the gap between two grids. The scaling of the scheme for the generation of multikiloamp high-energy beams is discussed.

  13. Comparative pulmonary toxicity of two ceria nanoparticles with the same primary size.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lu; He, Xiao; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Junzhe; Ma, Yuhui; Ding, Yayun; Wu, Zhenqiang; Chai, Zhifang; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-04-10

    Ceria nanoparticles (nano-ceria) have recently gained a wide range of applications, which might pose unwanted risks to both the environment and human health. The greatest potential for the environmental discharge of nano-ceria appears to be in their use as a diesel fuel additive. The present study was designed to explore the pulmonary toxicity of nano-ceria in mice after a single exposure via intratracheal instillation. Two types of nano-ceria with the same distribution of a primary size (3-5 nm), but different redox activity, were used: Ceria-p, synthesized by a precipitation route, and Ceria-h, synthesized by a hydrothermal route. Both Ceria-p and Ceria-h induced oxidative stress, inflammatory responses and cytotoxicity in mice, but their toxicological profiles were quite different. The mean size of Ceria-p agglomerates was much smaller compared to Ceria-h, thereby causing a more potent acute inflammation, due to their higher number concentration of agglomerates and higher deposition rate in the deep lung. Ceria-h had a higher reactivity to catalyzing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caused two waves of lung injury: bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammation and cytotoxicity in the early stage and redox-activity-evoked lipid peroxidation and pro-inflammation in the latter stage. Therefore, the size distribution of ceria-containing agglomerates in the exhaust, as well as their surface chemistry are essential characteristics to assess the potential risks of using nano-ceria as a fuel additive.

  14. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  15. High Density Mastering Using Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Yoshiaki; Kitahara, Hiroaki; Kasono, Osamu; Katsumura, Masahiro; Wada, Yasumitsu

    1998-04-01

    A mastering system for the next-generation digital versatile disk (DVD) is required to have a higher resolution compared with the conventional mastering systems. We have developed an electron beam mastering machine which features a thermal field emitter and a vacuum sealed air spindle motor. Beam displacement caused by magnetic fluctuation with spindle rotation was about 60 nm(p-p) in both the radial and tangential directions. Considering the servo gain of a read-out system, it has little influence on the read-out signal in terms of tracking errors and jitters. The disk performance was evaluated by recording either the 8/16 modulation signal or a groove on the disk. The electron beam recording showed better jitter values from the disk playback than those from a laser beam recorder. The deviation of track pitch was 44 nm(p-p). We also confirmed the high density recording with a capacity reaching 30 GB.

  16. Electron beam depolarization in a damping ring

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.

    1993-04-01

    Depolarization of a polarized electron beam injected into a damping ring is analyzed by extending calculations conventionally applied to proton synchrotrons. Synchrotron radiation in an electron ring gives rise to both polarizing and depolarizing effects. In a damping ring, the beam is stored for a time much less than the time for self polarization. Spin flip radiation may therefore be neglected. Synchrotron radiation without spin flips, however, must be considered as the resonance strength depends on the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude which changes as the electron beam is radiation damped. An expression for the beam polarization at extraction is derived which takes into account radiation damping. The results are applied to the electron ring at the Stanford Linear Collider and are compared with numerical matrix formalisms.

  17. Electron-beam distillation of natural polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. V.; Makarov, I. E.; Ershov, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysis of cellulose, lignin, and chitin may be upgraded by the use of an electron-beam irradiation. The radiation-thermal destruction mode does more probable production of liquid low-molecular-weight products instead of solid pyrolitic oligomers. Furans, methoxyphenols, and pyridines are dominant products of high-temperature radiolysis of cellulose, lignin, and chitin, respectively. The mechanism of chain destruction of natural polymers is considered.

  18. Wave excitation by inhomogeneous suprathermal electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Dillenburg, D.; Wu, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Wave excitation by an inhomogeneous suprathermal electron beam in a homogeneous magnetized plasma is studied. Not only is the beam density nonuniform, but the beam electrons possess a sheared bulk velocity. The general dispersion equation encompassing both electrostatic and electromagnetic effects is derived. Particular attention is given to the whistler mode. It is established that the density-gradient and velocity-shear effects are important for waves with frequencies close to the lower-hybrid resonance frequency.

  19. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  20. New shielding materials for clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Minoru; Tokiya, Yuji; Uenishi, Jun; Sunaoka, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2006-09-01

    Since lead has recently been recognized as a source of environmental pollution, we have investigated new electron shielding materials that do not contain lead. We compared the shielding thicknesses of a hard plate and a sheet composed of the new materials with that of lead for electron beams. The shielding thickness was evaluated as the thickness required for shielding primary electrons. The comparison revealed the shielding ability of the hard plate and sheet is approximately equivalent to 1.0 and 0.9 times that of lead, respectively. The thickness (in millimeters) required for shielding by the hard-plate, as well as the thickness of lead, is related to approximately half of the electron-beam energy (in MeV). The shielding ability of the sheet is also equivalent to that of Lipowitz alloy. Moreover these materials are environmentally friendly, and can be easily customized into arbitrary shapes. Therefore they can be used as lead substitutes for shielding against electron beams.

  1. Gamma Putty dosimetric studies in electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Gloi, Aime M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, lead has been used for field shaping in megavoltage electron beams in radiation therapy. In this study, we analyze the dosimetric parameters of a nontoxic, high atomic number (Z = 83), bismuth-loaded material called Gamma Putty that is malleable and can be easily molded to any desired shape. First, we placed an ionization chamber at different depths in a solid water phantom under a Gamma Putty shield of thickness (t = 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mm, respectively) and measured the ionizing radiation on the central axis (CAX) for electron beam ranging in energies from 6 to 20 MeV. Next, we investigated the relationship between the relative ionization (RI) measured at a fixed depth for several Gamma Putty shield at different cutout diameters ranging from 2 to 5 cm for various beam energies and derived an exponential fitting equation for clinical purposes. The dose profiles along the CAX show that bremsstrahlung dominates for Gamma Putty thickness >15 mm. For high-energy beams (12–20 MeV) and all Gamma Putty thicknesses up to 25 mm, RI below 5% could not be achieved due to the strong bremsstrahlung component. However, Gamma Putty is a very suitable material for reducing the transmission factor below 5% and protecting underlying normal tissues for low-energy electron beams (6–9 MeV). PMID:27651563

  2. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason D; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. Moreover, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.

  3. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D.; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. In addition, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.

  4. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Winkler, Robert; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. In addition, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to evenmore » more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.« less

  5. Improved rate control for electron-beam evaporation and evaluation of optical performance improvements.

    PubMed

    Gevelber, Michael; Xu, Bing; Smith, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    A new deposition-rate-control and electron-beam-gun (e-gun) strategy was developed that significantly reduces the growth-rate variations for e-beam-deposited SiO2 coatings. The resulting improvements in optical performance are evaluated for multilayer bandpass filters. The adverse effect of uneven silica-source depletion on coating spectral performances during long deposition runs is discussed.

  6. Electron Beam/Converter Target Interactions in Radiographic Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrick, J; Caporaso, G; Chambers, F; Chen, Y-J; Falabella, S; Goldin, F; Guethlein, G; Ho, D; Richardson, R; Weir, J

    2003-05-27

    Linear induction accelerators used in X-ray radiography have single-pulse parameters of the order 20 MeV of electron beam energy, 2 kA of beam current, pulse lengths of 50-100 ns, and spot sizes of 1-2 mm. The thermal energy deposited in a bremsstrahlung converter target made of tantalum from such a pulse is {approx}80 kJ/cc, more than enough to bring the target material to a partially ionized state. The tail end of a single beam pulse, or any subsequent pulse in a multi-pulse train, undergoes a number of interactions with the target that can affect beam transport and radiographic performance. Positive ions extracted from the target plasma by the electron beam space charge can affect the beam focus and centroid stability. As the target expands on the inter-pulse time scale, the integrated line density of material decreases, eventually affecting the X-ray output of the system. If the target plume becomes sufficiently large, beam transport through it is affected by macroscopic charge and current neutralization effects and microscopic beam/plasma instability mechanisms. We will present a survey of some of these interactions, as well as some results of an extensive experimental and theoretical campaign to understand the practical amelioration of these effects, carried out at the ETA-II accelerator facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  7. Young's Interference Experiment with Electron Beams Carrying Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yuya; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanimura, Shogo; Uchida, Masaya

    2013-03-01

    A Young's-type double-slit experiment using electron beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) is demonstrated in a transmission electron microscope. Each of the slits is replaced by a grating mask with a fork dislocation, which generates electron beams with OAM as diffracted beams. Interference fringes produced by two diffracted electron beams with OAM appear at the observation screen. The interference fringe patterns exhibit dislocation features depending on the topological charges of the two electron beams. The experimental results clearly show the wave nature of the electron beams with OAM and gives potential applications in electron physics and quantum mechanics.

  8. Electrical, Electrochemical, and Optical Characterization of Ceria Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae-Sik

    Acceptor-doped ceria has been recognized as a promising intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell electrode/electrolyte material. For practical implementation of ceria as a fuel cell electrolyte and for designing model experiments for electrochemical activity, it is necessary to fabricate thin films of ceria. Here, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was carried out in a homemade reactor to grow ceria films for further electrical, electrochemical, and optical characterization. Doped/undoped ceria films are grown on single crystalline oxide wafers with/without Pt line pattern or Pt solid layer. Deposition conditions were varied to see the effect on the resultant film property. Recently, proton conduction in nanograined polycrystalline pellets of ceria drew much interest. Thickness-mode (through-plane, z-direction) electrical measurements were made to confirm the existence of proton conductivity and investigate the nature of the conduction pathway: exposed grain surfaces and parallel grain boundaries. Columnar structure presumably favors proton conduction, and we have found measurable proton conductivity enhancement. Electrochemical property of gas-columnar ceria interface on the hydrogen electrooxidation is studied by AC impedance spectroscopy. Isothermal gas composition dependence of the electrode resistance was studied to elucidate Sm doping level effect and microstructure effect. Significantly, preferred orientation is shown to affect the gas dependence and performance of the fuel cell anode. A hypothesis is proposed to explain the origin of this behavior. Lastly, an optical transmittance based methodology was developed to obtain reference refractive index and microstructural parameters (thickness, roughness, porosity) of ceria films via subsequent fitting procedure.

  9. Facile electron-beam lithography technique for irregular and fragile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex

    2014-10-01

    A facile technique is presented which enables high-resolution electron beam lithography on irregularly-shaped, non-planar or fragile substrates such as the edges of a silicon chip, thin and narrow suspended beams and bridges, or small cylindrical wires. The method involves a spin-free dry-transfer of pre-formed uniform-thickness polymethyl methacrylate, followed by conventional electron beam writing, metal deposition, and lift-off. High-resolution patterning is demonstrated for challenging target substrates. The technique should find broad application in micro- and nano-technology research arenas.

  10. Facile electron-beam lithography technique for irregular and fragile substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiyoung; Zhou, Qin; Zettl, Alex

    2014-10-27

    A facile technique is presented which enables high-resolution electron beam lithography on irregularly-shaped, non-planar or fragile substrates such as the edges of a silicon chip, thin and narrow suspended beams and bridges, or small cylindrical wires. The method involves a spin-free dry-transfer of pre-formed uniform-thickness polymethyl methacrylate, followed by conventional electron beam writing, metal deposition, and lift-off. High-resolution patterning is demonstrated for challenging target substrates. The technique should find broad application in micro- and nano-technology research arenas.

  11. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  12. Susceptor heating device for electron beam brazing

    DOEpatents

    Antieau, Susan M.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A brazing device and method are provided which locally apply a controlled amount of heat to a selected area, within a vacuum. The device brazes two components together with a brazing metal. A susceptor plate is placed in thermal contact with one of the components. A serrated pedestal supports the susceptor plate. When the pedestal and susceptor plate are in place, an electron gun irradiates an electron beam at the susceptor plate such that the susceptor plate is sufficiently heated to transfer heat through the one component and melt the brazing metal.

  13. High Efficiency Transverse D. C. Electron Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    cathode er pressures is also possible, however, the electron beam be- materials. For example, copper beryllium has a high secon- comes poorly collimated as...50-50% by weight 0.6 acceptable Molybdenum-MgO 6. Graphite 0.1 low 7. Copper 0.05 very high .1 8. Copper- beryllium 98-2% 0.05 very high 9. Stainless...reached 10% of the initial value at a total energy of BEAM S HEET 725 J/cm2. Annealing of doped polysilicon and silicide films was also achieved. Fig

  14. Linac Coherent Light Source Electron Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2007-04-27

    This paper describes the design and simulation of the electron beam collimation system in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Dark current is expected from the gun and some of the accelerating cavities. Particle tracking of the expected dark current through the entire LCLS linac, from gun through FEL undulator, is used to estimate final particle extent in the undulator as well as expected beam loss at each collimator or aperture restriction. A table of collimators and aperture restrictions is listed along with halo particle loss results, which includes an estimate of average continuous beam power lost. In addition, the transverse wakefield alignment tolerances are calculated for each collimator.

  15. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Kovarik, Vincent J.; Prelec, Krsto

    1990-01-01

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source.

  16. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  17. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  18. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Vasko, A. C.; Karpov, V. G.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-28

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  19. Neutron diffraction of titanium aluminides formed by continuous electron-beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkov, S.; Neov, D.; Luytov, D.; Petrov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Ti-Al-based alloys were produced by hybrid electron-beam technologies. A composite Ti-Al film was deposited on a Ti substrate by electron-beam evaporation (EBE), followed by electron-beam treatment (EBT) by a continuously scanned electron beam. The speed of the specimens motion during the EBT were V 1 = 1 cm/sec and V 2 = 5 cm/sec, in order to realize two different alloying mechanisms -- by surface melting and by electron-beam irradiation without melting the surface. The samples prepared were characterized by XRD and neutron diffraction to study the crystal structure on the surface and in depth. SEM/EDX analysis was conducted to explore the surface structure and analyze the chemical composition. Nanoindentation measurements were also carried out. No intermetallic phases were registered in the sample treated at velocity V 1, while the sample treated at V 2 exhibited a Ti3Al/TiAl structure on the surface, transformed to Ti/TiAl in depth. The nanoindentation test demonstrated a significant negative hardness gradient from the surface to the depth of the sample.

  20. Electron beam-assisted healing of nanopores in magnesium alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Liu, Yu; Cao, Fan; Wu, Shujing; Jia, Shuangfeng; Cao, Ajing; Zhao, Dongshan; Wang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Nanopore-based sensing has emerged as a promising candidate for affordable and powerful DNA sequencing technologies. Herein, we demonstrate that nanopores can be successfully fabricated in Mg alloys via focused electron beam (e-beam) technology. Employing in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, we obtained unambiguous evidence that layer-by-layer growth of atomic planes at the nanopore periphery occurs when the e-beam is spread out, leading to the shrinkage and eventual disappearance of nanopores. The proposed healing process was attributed to the e-beam-induced anisotropic diffusion of Mg atoms in the vicinity of nanopore edges. A plausible diffusion mechanism that describes the observed phenomena is discussed. Our results constitute the first experimental investigation of nanopores in Mg alloys. Direct evidence of the healing process has advanced our fundamental understanding of surface science, which is of great practical importance for many technological applications, including thin film deposition and surface nanopatterning. PMID:23719630

  1. Ice-assisted electron beam lithography of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardener, Jules A.; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate that a low energy focused electron beam can locally pattern graphene coated with a thin ice layer. The irradiated ice plays a crucial role in the process by providing activated species that locally remove graphene from a silicon dioxide substrate. After patterning the graphene, the ice resist is easily removed by sublimation to leave behind a clean surface with no further processing. More generally, our findings demonstrate that ice-assisted e-beam lithography can be used to pattern very thin materials deposited on substrate surfaces. The procedure is performed in situ in a modified scanning electron microscope. Desirable structures such as nanoribbons are created using the method. Defects in graphene from electrons backscattered from the bulk substrate are identified. They extend several microns from the e-beam writing location. We demonstrate that these defects can be greatly reduced and localized by using thinner substrates and/or gentle thermal annealing.

  2. Purification of Niobium by Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, M.; Mirji, K. V.; Prasad, V. V. Satya; Baligidad, R. G.; Gokhale, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Pure niobium metal, produced by alumino-thermic reduction of niobium oxide, contains various impurities which need to be reduced to acceptable levels to obtain aerospace grade purity. In the present work, an attempt has been made to refine niobium metals by electron beam drip melting technique to achieve purity confirming to the ASTM standard. Input power to the electron gun and melt rate were varied to observe their combined effect on extend of refining and loss of niobium. Electron beam (EB) melting is shown to reduce alkali metals, trace elements and interstitial impurities well below the specified limits. The reduction in the impurities during EB melting is attributed to evaporation and degassing due to the combined effect of high vacuum and high melt surface temperature. The % removal of interstitial impurities is essentially a function of melt rate and input power. As the melt rate decreases or input power increases, the impurity levels in the solidified niobium ingot decrease. The EB refining process is also accompanied by considerable amount of niobium loss, which is attributed to evaporation of pure niobium and niobium sub-oxide. Like other impurities, Nb loss increases with decreasing melt rate or increase in input power.

  3. Mask Fabrication Using Electron Beam Exposure System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watakabe, Y.; Shigetomi, A.; Morimoto, H.; Kato, T.

    1981-07-01

    This study describes the results of feature size distribution, pattern location accuracy and level to level registration error on chrominum master masks fabricated by EeBES-40. This system has the capability of high speed electron beam blanking at 40MHz, the capacity for large size masks (with 6 inch mask cassette), and the automatic cassette handling system. OEBR-100(PGMA), as the electron beam negative resist, is used for 5 inch and 6 inch chrominum masks. The chrominum etching process is used for both wet and dry plasma technology. Test patterns and 64 K bit memory TEG, as the practical pattern, are used in this study. More than 40 measurements are taken, uniformly distributed over 96 to 112mm square, and the feature size distribution is measured by a laser interferometer X-Y measuring system. Pattern location accuracy and level to level registration error are obtained using EeBES-40 quality assurance programs called MARKET/PLOTMARKET. This program operates by scanning over the resist image of the test pattern, utilizing the normal fiducial mark location hardware. The followinc results are obtained; (1) Feature size distribution within 6 inch mask : -/+0.1 μm (2) Level-to-level registration error2 : less than 0.1 pm High quality masks with about 0.02 defects/cm2 , and rapid throughput of 6 hr./10 masks using the auto-matic 10-cassette handling system are obtained.

  4. Transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischebeck, Rasmus; Prat, Eduard; Thominet, Vincent; Ozkan Loch, Cigdem

    2015-08-01

    A transverse profile imager for ultrabright electron beams is presented, which overcomes resolution issues in present designs by observing the Scheimpflug imaging condition as well as the Snell-Descartes law of refraction in the scintillating crystal. Coherent optical transition radiation emitted by highly compressed electron bunches on the surface of the crystal is directed away from the camera, allowing to use the monitor for profile measurements of electron bunches suitable for X-ray free electron lasers. The optical design has been verified by ray tracing simulations, and the angular dependency of the resolution has been verified experimentally. An instrument according to the presented design principles has been used in the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility, and different scintillator materials have been tested. Measurements in conjunction with a transverse deflecting radiofrequency structure and an array of quadrupole magnets demonstrate a normalized slice emittance of 25 nm in the core of a 30 fC electron beam at a pulse length of 10 ps and a particle energy of 230 MeV.

  5. Holographic generation of highly twisted electron beams.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Mafakheri, Erfan; Frabboni, Stefano; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W

    2015-01-23

    Free electrons can possess an intrinsic orbital angular momentum, similar to those in an electron cloud, upon free-space propagation. The wave front corresponding to the electron's wave function forms a helical structure with a number of twists given by the angular speed. Beams with a high number of twists are of particular interest because they carry a high magnetic moment about the propagation axis. Among several different techniques, electron holography seems to be a promising approach to shape a conventional electron beam into a helical form with large values of angular momentum. Here, we propose and manufacture a nanofabricated phase hologram for generating a beam of this kind with an orbital angular momentum up to 200ℏ. Based on a novel technique the value of orbital angular momentum of the generated beam is measured and then compared with simulations. Our work, apart from the technological achievements, may lead to a way of generating electron beams with a high quanta of magnetic moment along the propagation direction and, thus, may be used in the study of the magnetic properties of materials and for manipulating nanoparticles.

  6. Proximity correction for electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrian, Christie R.; Chang, Steven; Peckerar, Martin C.

    1996-09-01

    As the critical dimensions required in mask making and direct write by electron beam lithography become ever smaller, correction for proximity effects becomes increasingly important. Furthermore, the problem is beset by the fact that only a positive energy dose can be applied with an electron beam. We discuss techniques such as chopping and dose shifting, which have been proposed to meet the positivity requirement. An alternative approach is to treat proximity correction as an optimization problem. Two such methods, local area dose correction and optimization using a regularizer proportional to the informational entropy of the solution, are compared. A notable feature of the regularized proximity correction is the ability to correct for forward scattering by the generation of a 'firewall' set back from the edge of a feature. As the forward scattering width increases, the firewall is set back farther from the feature edge. The regularized optimization algorithm is computationally time consuming using conventional techniques. However, the algorithm lends itself to a microelectronics integrated circuit coprocessor implementation, which could perform the optimization faster than even the fastest work stations. Scaling the circuit to larger number of pixels is best approached with a hybrid serial/parallel digital architecture that would correct for proximity effects over 108 pixels in about 1 h. This time can be reduced by simply adding additional coprocessors.

  7. Stress control in optical thin films by sputtering and electron beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Naoya; Murotani, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Shigeharu; Honda, Hiromitsu

    2017-02-01

    It is necessary to control the internal stress of optical thin films in order to address problems such as peeling and cracking. Internal stress differs among films prepared by different deposition methods. We investigated the internal stress of films prepared by sputtering, electron beam (EB) evaporation, and a combination deposition method that we developed. The internal stress was successfully controlled, showing a value between that of EB evaporation and sputtering.

  8. Metallurgical Mechanisms Controlling Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy 2219 Produced by Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Tainger, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) layer-additive manufacturing process has been developed to directly fabricate complex geometry components. EBF3 introduces metal wire into a molten pool created on the surface of a substrate by a focused electron beam. Part geometry is achieved by translating the substrate with respect to the beam to build the part one layer at a time. Tensile properties demonstrated for electron beam deposited aluminum and titanium alloys are comparable to wrought products, although the microstructures of the deposits exhibit cast features. Understanding the metallurgical mechanisms controlling mechanical properties is essential to maximizing application of the EBF3 process. Tensile mechanical properties and microstructures were examined for aluminum alloy 2219 fabricated over a range of EBF3 process variables. Unique microstructures were observed within the deposited layers and at interlayer boundaries, which varied within the deposit height due to microstructural evolution associated with the complex thermal history experienced during subsequent layer deposition. Microstructures exhibited irregularly shaped grains with interior dendritic structures, described based on overall grain size, morphology, distribution, and dendrite spacing, and were correlated with deposition parameters. Fracture features were compared with microstructural elements to define fracture paths and aid in definition of basic processing-microstructure-property correlations.

  9. Metallurgical Mechanisms Controlling Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy 2219 Produced By Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Taminger, Karen M. B.; Begley, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) layer-additive manufacturing process has been developed to directly fabricate complex geometry components. EBF3 introduces metal wire into a molten pool created on the surface of a substrate by a focused electron beam. Part geometry is achieved by translating the substrate with respect to the beam to build the part one layer at a time. Tensile properties have been demonstrated for electron beam deposited aluminum and titanium alloys that are comparable to wrought products, although the microstructures of the deposits exhibit features more typical of cast material. Understanding the metallurgical mechanisms controlling mechanical properties is essential to maximizing application of the EBF3 process. In the current study, mechanical properties and resulting microstructures were examined for aluminum alloy 2219 fabricated over a range of EBF3 process variables. Material performance was evaluated based on tensile properties and results were compared with properties of Al 2219 wrought products. Unique microstructures were observed within the deposited layers and at interlayer boundaries, which varied within the deposit height due to microstructural evolution associated with the complex thermal history experienced during subsequent layer deposition. Microstructures exhibited irregularly shaped grains, typically with interior dendritic structures, which were described based on overall grain size, morphology, distribution, and dendrite spacing, and were correlated with deposition parameters. Fracture features were compared with microstructural elements to define fracture paths and aid in definition of basic processing-microstructure-property correlations.

  10. Electrical properties comparison of TiO2/PS/Si devices fabricated by spin coating and electron beam gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariani, R. S.; Faraji, F.

    2016-04-01

    Three porous silicon (PS) samples with different porosities by electrochemical anodization are fabricated. Then, TiO2 nanoparticles are deposited on PS by two methods, spin coating and electron beam gun. I- V characteristics of all samples show diode behavior. Our result showed that transient current decreases with increasing porosity for PS/Si samples while increases for TiO2/PS/Si samples in both deposition methods. The reason could be due to filling pores by TiO2 nanoparticles and reduction of resistivity on PS surface. Also, our result showed that transient current increases highly for samples which were deposited by electron beam gun with respect to spin coating. The reason could be that in spin coating method TiO2 sol with high viscosity was used and causes that TiO2 nanoparticles cannot easily penetrate into PS pores. But in electron beam gun method TiO2 nanoparticles reaches to PS surface as a few atoms and can easily penetrate into PS pores. Ideality factor of our samples reduces after TiO2 deposition. Also, ideality factor of samples which were deposited by electron beam gun decreases with respect to spin coating, since transient current and I- V curve slop increase in electron beam gun.

  11. Focused electron beam in pyroelectric electron probe microanalyzer.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Imanishi, Akira; Kawai, Jun

    2013-07-01

    We report a method to focus the electron beam generated using a pyroelectric crystal. An electron beam with a spot size of 100 μm was achieved by applying an electrical field to an electroconductive needle tip set on a pyroelectric crystal. When the focused electron beam bombarded a sample, characteristic X-rays of the sample were only detected due to the production of an electric field between the needle tip and the sample.

  12. Space Charge Effect in the Sheet and Solid Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ho Young; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Ahn, Saeyoung

    1998-11-01

    We analyze the space charge effect of two different types of electron beam ; sheet and solid electron beam. Electron gun simulations are carried out using shadow and control grids for high and low perveance. Rectangular and cylindrical geometries are used for sheet and solid electron beam in planar and disk type cathode. The E-gun code is used to study the limiting current and space charge loading in each geometries.

  13. The electron beam instability and turbulence theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Extensions and practical applications of recent observations of electron beam-plasma interactions are investigated for the range of turbulence theories, extending from quasi-linear to strong turbulence theory, which have been developed on the basis of the Langmuir-wave excitation model. Electron foreshock observations have indicated that linear instability theory must encompass the excitation of waves whose frequencies are substantially different from those of the plasma frequency; the point of departure for such extensions should be a quantitative test of existing theories, and particle simulations conducive to such testing are presented. A step-by-step addition of physical considerations is used in such simulation studies to differentiate among nonlinear turbulence effects.

  14. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  15. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  16. MULTIPLE ELECTRON BEAM ION PUMP AND SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, R.E.

    1962-02-27

    A vacuum pump is designed which operates by ionizing incoming air and by withdrawing the ions from the system by means of electrical fields. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical housing communicable with the vessel to be evacuated and having a thin wall section in one end. Suitable coils provide a longitudinal magnetic field within the cylinder. A broad cathode and an anode structure is provided to establish a plurality of adjacent electron beams which are parallel to the cylinder axis. Electron reflector means are provided so that each of the beams constitutes a PIG or reflex discharge. Such structure provides a large region in which incoming gas molecules may be ionized by electron bombardment. A charged electrode assembly accelerates the ions through the thin window, thereby removing the gas from the system. The invention may also be utilized as a highly efficient ion source. (AEC)

  17. Electron beam throughput from raster to imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zywno, Marek

    2016-12-01

    Two architectures of electron beam tools are presented: single beam MEBES Exara designed and built by Etec Systems for mask writing, and the Reflected E-Beam Lithography tool (REBL), designed and built by KLA-Tencor under a DARPA Agreement No. HR0011-07-9-0007. Both tools have implemented technologies not used before to achieve their goals. The MEBES X, renamed Exara for marketing purposes, used an air bearing stage running in vacuum to achieve smooth continuous scanning. The REBL used 2 dimensional imaging to distribute charge to a 4k pixel swath to achieve writing times on the order of 1 wafer per hour, scalable to throughput approaching optical projection tools. Three stage architectures were designed for continuous scanning of wafers: linear maglev, rotary maglev, and dual linear maglev.

  18. Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J.; Weir, J.T.

    1999-10-06

    These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.

  19. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocket-borne instrumentation confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes were observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Of these, 102 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2, 4 or 8 keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher energy electrons led the lower energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. The injection process is discussed as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection.

  20. Electron Beam Technology for Environmental Pollution Control.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, there are over 1700 electron beam (EB) units in commercial use, providing an estimated added value to numerous products, amounting to 100 billion USD or more. High-current electron accelerators are used in diverse industries to enhance the physical and chemical properties of materials and to reduce undesirable contaminants such as pathogens, toxic byproducts, or emissions. Over the past few decades, EB technologies have been developed aimed at ensuring the safety of gaseous and liquid effluents discharged to the environment. It has been demonstrated that EB technologies for flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification, and sludge hygienization can be effectively deployed to mitigate environmental degradation. Recently, extensive work has been carried out on the use of EB for environmental remediation, which also includes the removal of emerging contaminants such as VOCs, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), and potential EDCs.

  1. The interaction of biomass gasification syngas components with tar in a solid oxide fuel cell and operational conditions to mitigate carbon deposition on nickel-gadolinium doped ceria anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermelstein, J.; Millan, M.; Brandon, N. P.

    The combination of biomass gasification with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is gaining increasing interest as an efficient and environmentally benign method of producing electricity and heat. However, tars in the gas stream arising from the gasification of biomass material can deposit carbon on the SOFC anode, having detrimental effects to the life cycle and operational characteristics of the fuel cell. This work examines the impact of biomass gasification syngas components combined with benzene as a model tar, on carbon formation on Ni/CGO (gadolinium-doped ceria) SOFC anodes. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that SOFCs operating at temperatures > 750 °C are not susceptible to carbon deposition from a typical biomass gasification syngas containing 15 g m -3 benzene. However, intermediate temperature SOFCs operating at temperatures < 650 °C require threshold current densities well above what is technologically achievable to inhibit the effects of carbon deposition. SOFC anodes have been shown to withstand tar levels of 2-15 g m -3 benzene at 765 °C for 3 h at a current density of 300 mA cm -2, with negligible impact on the electrochemical performance of the anode. Furthermore, no carbon could be detected on the anode at this current density when benzene levels were <5 g m -3.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation on a gold nanoparticle irradiated by electron beams.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L; Leung, Michael K K; Jaffray, David A

    2012-06-07

    This study investigated the secondary electron production from a gold nanoparticle (GNP) irradiated by monoenergetic electron beams using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Spherical GNPs with diameters of 2, 50 and 100 nm in water were irradiated by monoenergetic electron beams with energies equal to 50 keV, 250 keV, 1 MeV and 4 MeV. MC simulations were performed using the Geant4 toolkit to determine the energy of the secondary electrons emitted from the GNPs. The mean effective range and deflection angle of the secondary electrons were tracked. Energy depositions inside and outside the nanoparticles due to the secondary electrons were also calculated. For comparisons, simulations were repeated by replacing the GNPs with water. Our results show that the mean effective range of secondary electrons increased with an increase of the GNP size and electron beam energy. For the electron beam energy and GNP size used in this study, the mean effective range was 0.5-15 µm outside the nanoparticle, which is approximately within the dimension of a living cell. The mean deflection angles varied from 78 to 83 degrees as per our MC results. The proportion of energy deposition inside the GNP versus that outside increased with the GNP size. This is different from the results obtained from a previous study using photon beams. The secondary electron energy deposition ratio (energy deposition for GNP/energy deposition for water) was found to be highest for the smallest GNP of 2 nm diameter in this study. For the energy deposited by the secondary electron, we concluded that the addition of GNPs can increase the secondary electron energy deposition in water, though most of the energy was self-absorbed by the large nanoparticles (50 and 100 nm). In addition, an electron source in the presence of GNPs does not seem to be better than photons as the yield of secondary electrons per unit mass of gold is less than water.

  3. Disabling CNT Electronic Devices by Use of Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petkov, Mihail

    2008-01-01

    Bombardment with tightly focused electron beams has been suggested as a means of electrically disabling selected individual carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) in electronic devices. Evidence in support of the suggestion was obtained in an experiment in which a CNT field-effect transistor was disabled (see figure) by focusing a 1-keV electron beam on a CNT that served as the active channel of a field-effect transistor (FET). Such bombardment could be useful in the manufacture of nonvolatile-memory circuits containing CNT FETs. Ultimately, in order to obtain the best electronic performances in CNT FETs and other electronic devices, it will be necessary to fabricate the devices such that each one contains only a single CNT as an active element. At present, this is difficult because there is no way to grow a single CNT at a specific location and with a specific orientation. Instead, the common practice is to build CNTs into electronic devices by relying on spatial distribution to bridge contacts. This practice results in some devices containing no CNTs and some devices containing more than one CNT. Thus, CNT FETs have statistically distributed electronic characteristics (including switching voltages, gains, and mixtures of metallic and semiconducting CNTs). According to the suggestion, by using a 1-keV electron beam (e.g., a beam from a scanning electron microscope), a particular nanotube could be rendered electrically dysfunctional. This procedure could be repeated as many times as necessary on different CNTs in a device until all of the excess CNTs in the device had been disabled, leaving only one CNT as an active element (e.g., as FET channel). The physical mechanism through which a CNT becomes electrically disabled is not yet understood. On one hand, data in the literature show that electron kinetic energy >86 keV is needed to cause displacement damage in a CNT. On the other hand, inasmuch as a 1-keV beam focused on a small spot (typically a few tens of nanometers wide

  4. Electron beam simulation from gun to collector: Towards a complete solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mertzig, R. Shornikov, A. Wenander, F.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

    2015-01-09

    An electron-beam simulation technique for high-resolution complete EBIS/T modelling is presented. The technique was benchmarked on the high compression HEC{sup 2} test-stand with an electron beam current, current density and energy of 10 A, 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and 49.2 keV, and on the immersed electron beam at REXEBIS for electron beam characteristics of 0.4 A, 200 A/cm{sup 2} and 4.5 keV. In both Brillouin-like and immersed beams the electron-beam radius varies from several millimeters at the gun, through some hundreds of micrometers in the ionization region to a few centimeters at the collector over a total length of several meters. We report on our approach for finding optimal meshing parameters, based on the local beam properties such as magnetic field-strength, electron energy and beam radius. This approach combined with dividing the problem domain into sub-domains, and subsequent splicing of the local solutions allowed us to simulate the beam propagation in EBISes from the gun to the collector using a conventional PC in about 24–36 h. Brillouin-like electron beams propagated through the complete EBIS were used to analyze the beam behavior within the collector region. We checked whether elastically reflected paraxial electrons from a Brillouin-like beam will escape from the collector region and add to the loss current. We have also studied the power deposition profiles as function of applied potentials using two electrode geometries for a Brillouin-like beam including the effects of backscattered electrons.

  5. Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by electron beam with graphene ribbon arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has emerged as an alternative material to support surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with its excellent properties such as the tight electromagnetic field localization, low dissipative loss, and versatile tunability. Thus, graphene surface plasmon polaritons (GSPs) provide an exciting platform to develop a series of novel devices and systems from the optical band to the terahertz (THz) band. In this paper, theoretical and simulated studies about the excitation of SPPs by an injected electron beam with periodic graphene ribbon arrays deposited on a dielectric medium are presented. The analytical dispersion expression of the GSP mode on the graphene ribbon arrays is obtained by using a modal expansion method along with periodic boundary conditions in the structure. With this result, the dispersion relation, propagation loss, and field pattern of the propagating GSPs for both periodic graphene microribbon arrays and the complete graphene sheet are investigated and analyzed in the THz band. It is shown that the electromagnetic field with a better concentration on the interface can be realized with graphene ribbon arrays compared with the graphene sheet for a given frequency. Besides, the excitation of GSPs by an injected electron beam with graphene ribbon arrays is modeled and implemented by the particle-in-cell simulation based on the finite difference time domain algorithm. GSPs can be excited effectively when the dispersion line of the electron beam and SPPs on the graphene ribbon arrays is matched with each other well. Besides, the dependences of output power on electron beam parameters such as the distance of the electron beam above the graphene ribbon surface and beam voltage are studied and analyzed. Finally, the tunability of graphene conductivity via biased voltage with a ground metal is considered and the tunable excitation of GSPs on the structure with biased drive voltage by the injected electron beam is also realized. The present work can find a

  6. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  7. Effect of electron beam irradiation on PMMA films

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Pragya; Srivastava, A. K.; Khattak, B. Q.; Verma, Suveer; Upadhyay, Anuj; Sinha, A. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G. S.; Deb, S. K.

    2012-06-05

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is characterized for electron beam interactions in the resist layer in lithographic applications. PMMA thin films (free standing) were prepared by solvent casting method. These films were irradiated with 30keV electron beam at different doses. Structural and chemical properties of the films were studied by means of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy The XRD results showed that the amorphization increases with electron beam irradiation dose. FTIR spectroscopic analysis reveals that electron beam irradiation promotes the scission of carbonyl group and depletes hydrogen and converts polymeric structure into hydrogen depleted carbon network.

  8. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Tensile Strength of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masayuki; Shimbo, Minoru; Miyano, Yasushi

    In this paper, the effects of the intensity of electron beam and the variation with time after irradiation of electron beam on the tensile strength of the polypropylene (PP), which is widely used as medicine containers, were investigated. PP with and without colorants were used first and samples irradiated under various intensity of EB. A tensile test on the irradiated samples with elapsed time after the irradiation of the electron beam was carried out. The effects of those factors on the tensile strength were discussed. The following results were obtained (1) The tensile strength of PP decreased due to the influence of the electron beam irradiation, however the rate of the decrease in strength was small compared with the original one. Furthermore, the rate of the decrease in strength was very small owing to the variation with time after the EB irradiation. (2) The tensile rupture strength of PP increased and the rupture strain owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, these rupture strength increased and the rupture strain decreased along with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. (3) The tensile rupture strain energy of PP decreased owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, the strain energy decreases with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. Moreover, the strength characteristics of PP with colorants received greater influence of electron beam compared with the one without colorants.

  9. Crystallographic texture engineering through novel melt strategies via electron beam melting: Inconel 718

    DOE PAGES

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Kirka, Michael M.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; ...

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary research has demonstrated the ability to utilise novel scan strategies in the electron beam melting (EBM) process to establish control of crystallographic texture within Inconel 718 deposits. Conventional EBM scan strategies and process parameters yield coarse columnar grains aligned parallel to the build direction. Through varying process parameters such as beam power, beam velocity, beam focus and scan strategy, the behaviour of the electron beam can be manipulated from a line source to a point source. The net effect of these variations is that the resulting crystallographic texture is controlled in a manner to produce either epitaxial deposits ormore » fully equiaxed deposits. Furthermore, this research demonstrates the ability to change the crystallographic texture on the macroscale indicating that EBM technology can be used to create complex geometric components with both site-specific microstructures and material properties.« less

  10. Crystallographic texture engineering through novel melt strategies via electron beam melting: Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Kirka, Michael M.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sames, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary research has demonstrated the ability to utilise novel scan strategies in the electron beam melting (EBM) process to establish control of crystallographic texture within Inconel 718 deposits. Conventional EBM scan strategies and process parameters yield coarse columnar grains aligned parallel to the build direction. Through varying process parameters such as beam power, beam velocity, beam focus and scan strategy, the behaviour of the electron beam can be manipulated from a line source to a point source. The net effect of these variations is that the resulting crystallographic texture is controlled in a manner to produce either epitaxial deposits or fully equiaxed deposits. Furthermore, this research demonstrates the ability to change the crystallographic texture on the macroscale indicating that EBM technology can be used to create complex geometric components with both site-specific microstructures and material properties.

  11. Prevention of electron beam transmittance for biological cell imaging using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated the high-spatial-resolution imaging of label-free biological cells using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope without irradiation damage by the electron beam. An EXA microscope can be used to observe a specimen with a nanometric light source excited in the Si3N4 membrane by an electron beam. The incident electron beam penetrates the Si3N4 membrane and damages the specimen. To suppress the irradiation damage of the specimen, we prevented the transmittance of the electron beam by coating the Si3N4 membrane with a gold thin film. To obtain an electron beam transmittance through the Si3N4 of 0%, a gold film of 15 nm thickness was required. By adding the gold layer, a label-free cellular structure was observed with 135-nm spatial resolution.

  12. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  13. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2015-08-11

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.

  14. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  15. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  16. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of

  17. Evolution and Control of 2219 Aluminum Microstructural Features through Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) is a new layer-additive process that has been developed for near-net shape fabrication of complex structures. EBF3 uses an electron beam to create a molten pool on the surface of a substrate. Wire is fed into the molten pool and the part translated with respect to the beam to build up a 3-dimensional structure one layer at a time. Unlike many other freeform fabrication processes, the energy coupling of the electron beam is extremely well suited to processing of aluminum alloys. The layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process results in a tortuous thermal path producing complex microstructures including: small homogeneous equiaxed grains; dendritic growth contained within larger grains; and/or pervasive dendritic formation in the interpass regions of the deposits. Several process control variables contribute to the formation of these different microstructures, including translation speed, wire feed rate, beam current and accelerating voltage. In electron beam processing, higher accelerating voltages embed the energy deeper below the surface of the substrate. Two EBF3 systems have been established at NASA Langley, one with a low-voltage (10-30kV) and the other a high-voltage (30-60 kV) electron beam gun. Aluminum alloy 2219 was processed over a range of different variables to explore the design space and correlate the resultant microstructures with the processing parameters. This report is specifically exploring the impact of accelerating voltage. Of particular interest is correlating energy to the resultant material characteristics to determine the potential of achieving microstructural control through precise management of the heat flux and cooling rates during deposition.

  18. Limits to Electron Beam Emittance from Stochastic Coulomb Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman-Smith, Christopher; Padmore, Howard A.; Wan, Weishi

    2008-08-22

    Dense electron beams can now be generated on an ultrafast timescale using laser driven photo-cathodes and these are used for a range of applications from ultrafast electron defraction to free electron lasers. Here we determine a lower bound to the emittance of an electron beam limited by fundamental stochastic Coulomb interactions.

  19. NOx reduction by electron beam-produced nitrogen atom injection

    DOEpatents

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2002-01-01

    Deactivated atomic nitrogen generated by an electron beam from a gas stream containing more than 99% N.sub.2 is injected at low temperatures into an engine exhaust to reduce NOx emissions. High NOx reduction efficiency is achieved with compact electron beam devices without use of a catalyst.

  20. Practical Implications of Electron-Beam Surface Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Brian G.; Strutt, Peter R.

    1982-11-01

    The use of laser/electron-beam techniques to glaze large surface areas is briefly reviewed. The properties thus obtained for a range of iron-based alloys is discussed. Recent results show that electron-beam glazing can extend the wear life of certain cemented carbide materials and preliminary results indicate that glazed tool steels show enhanced corrosion resistance.

  1. Electron Beam-Cure Polymer Matrix Composites: Processing and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, G.; Frame, B.; Jensen, B.; Nettles, A.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from NASA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are evaluating a series of electron beam curable composites for application in reusable launch vehicle airframe and propulsion systems. Objectives are to develop electron beam curable composites that are useful at cryogenic to elevated temperatures (-217 C to 200 C), validate key mechanical properties of these composites, and demonstrate cost-saving fabrication methods at the subcomponent level. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites is an enabling capability for production of aerospace structures in a non-autoclave process. Payoffs of this technology will be fabrication of composite structures at room temperature, reduced tooling cost and cure time, and improvements in component durability. This presentation covers the results of material property evaluations for electron beam-cured composites made with either unidirectional tape or woven fabric architectures. Resin systems have been evaluated for performance in ambient, cryogenic, and elevated temperature conditions. Results for electron beam composites and similar composites cured in conventional processes are reviewed for comparison. Fabrication demonstrations were also performed for electron beam-cured composite airframe and propulsion piping subcomponents. These parts have been built to validate manufacturing methods with electron beam composite materials, to evaluate electron beam curing processing parameters, and to demonstrate lightweight, low-cost tooling options.

  2. Towards demonstration of electron cooling with bunched electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.

    2012-01-11

    All electron cooling systems which were in operation so far employed electron beam generated with an electrostatic electron gun in DC operating mode, immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. At low energies magnetic field is also being used to transport electron beam through the cooling section from the gun to the collector. At higher energies (few MeV), it was shown that one can have simpler electron beam transport without continuous magnetic field. Because of a rather weak magnetic field on the cathode and in the cooling section the latter approach was referred to as 'non-magnetized cooling', since there was no suppression of the transverse angular spread of the electron beam with the magnetic field in the cooling section. Such a cooler successfully operated at FNAL (2005-11) at electron beam energy of 4.3 MeV. Providing cooling at even higher energies would be easier with RF acceleration of electron beam, and thus using bunched electron beam for cooling. Significant efforts were devoted to explore various aspects of such bunched electron beam cooling as part of R and D of high-energy electron cooling for RHIC. However, experimental studies of such cooling are still lacking. Establishing this technique experimentally would be extremely useful for future high-energy applications. Presently there is an ongoing effort to build Proof-of-Principle (PoP) experiment of Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) at RHIC, which promises to be superior to conventional electron cooling for high energies. Since the CEC experiment is based on bunched electron beam and it has sections where electron beam co-propagates with the ion beam at the same velocity, it also provides a unique opportunity to explore experimentally conventional electron cooling but for the first time with a bunched electron beam. As a result, it allows us to explore techniques needed for the high-energy electron cooling such as 'painting' with a short electron beam and control of ion beam distribution under

  3. Electron beam inspection methods for imprint lithography at 32 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  4. Onorbit electron beam welding experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The proposed experiment design calls for six panels to be welded, each having unique characteristics selected to yield specific results and information. The experiment is completely automated and the concept necessitated the design of a new, miniaturized, self-contained electron beam (EB) welding system, for which purpose a separate IR and D was funded by the contractor, Martin Marietta Corporation. Since future tasks beyond the proposed experiment might call for astronauts to perform hand-held EB gun repairs or for the gun to be interfaced with a dexterous robot such as the planned flight telerobotic servicer (FTS), the EB gun is designed to be dismountable from the automated system. In the experiment design, two separate, identical sets of weld panels will be welded, one on earth in a vacuum chamber and the other onorbit in the aft cargo bay of an orbiter. Since the main objective of the experiment is to demonstrate that high quality welds can be achieved under onorbit conditions, the welds produced will be subjected to a wide range of discriminating non-destructive Q.C. procedures and destructive physical tests. However, advantage will be taken of the availability of a fairly large quantity of welded material in the two series of welded specimens to widen the circle of investigative talent by providing material to academic and scientific institutions for examination.

  5. Theory of Electron Beam Moiré

    PubMed Central

    Read, David T.; Dally, James W.

    1996-01-01

    When a specimen surface carrying a high-frequency line grating is examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM), moiré fringes are observed at several different magnifications. The fringes are characterized by their spatial frequency, orientation, and contrast. These features of the moiré pattern depend on the spatial frequency mismatch between the specimen grating and the raster scan lines, the diameter of the electron beam, and the detailed topography of the lines on the specimen. A mathematical model of e-beam moiré is developed that expresses the spatial dependence of the SEM image brightness as a product of the local intensity of the scanning beam and the local scattering function from the specimen grating. Equations are derived that give the spatial frequency of the moiré fringes as functions of the microscope settings and the spatial frequency of the specimen grating. The model also describes the contrast of several different types of moiré fringes that are observed at different magnifications. We analyze the formation of these different fringe patterns, and divide them into different categories including natural fringes, fringes of multiplication, fringes of division, and fringes of rotation. PMID:27805092

  6. Prediction of electron beam output factors.

    PubMed

    Mills, M D; Hogstrom, K R; Almond, P R

    1982-01-01

    A method to predict square and rectangular field output factors from the measurement of selected fields of electron beams on the Therac 20 Saturne has been developed. A two parameter fit of the square field output factor data, based on the functional dependence as predicted by a pencil beam calculational model, has proven clinically acceptable. The pencil beam distributions are given by the Fermi-Eyges theory of multiple Coulomb scattering. For a rectangular field, the output factor can be calculated from the square root of the product of the two square field output factors wtih sides equal to those of the rectangular field. If however, there is a significant asymmetry between the X and Y collimator systems, then rectangular field output factors should be predicted from the product of the X and Y one-dimensional output factors. One-dimensional output factors are defined as output factors of rectangular fields where one side remains constant and equal to the side of the square reference field. Measured data indicate either of the two methods of determining rectangular field output factors to be clinically acceptable for the Therac 20, the use of one-dimensional output factors demonstrating greater accuracy. Data show agreement to within approximately 1.5% at electron energies of 6, 9, 13, and 17 MeV.

  7. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Sujit K.; Chaki, T. K.; Tikku, V. K.; Pradhan, N. K.; Bhowmick, A. K.

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%.

  8. Fast magnetospheric echoes of energetic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocketborne instrumentation have confirmed earlier observations of fast magnetospheric echoes of artificially injected energetic electrons. A total of 234 echoes have been observed in a pitch angle range from 9 to 110 deg at energies of 1.87 and 3.90 keV. Out of this number, 95 echoes could unambiguously be identified with known accelerator operations at 2-, 4-, or 8-keV energy and highest current levels resulting in the determination of transit times of typically 300 to 400 ms. In most cases, when echoes were present in both energy channels, the higher-energy electrons led the lower-energy ones by 50 to 70 ms. Adiabatic theory applied to these observations yields a reflection height of 3000 to 4000 km. An alternative interpretation is briefly examined, and its relative merit in describing the observations is evaluated. The injection process is discussed in some detail as the strong beam-plasma interaction that occurred near the electron accelerator appears to be instrumental in generating the source of heated electrons required for successful echo detection for both processes.

  9. Funneling electron beams from gallium arsenide photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Omer Habib

    Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) is the most widely used source of polarized electrons around the world. Electrons are extracted from a GaAs surface, terminated by a cesium-oxygen layer. The electrons are accelerated to form a beam by a DC electric field. This beam can ionize residual gas in the chamber, and the DC field accelerates the resulting ions into the cathode surface, damaging the Cesium- Oxygen layer. This process, called Ion Back Bombardment, is the dominant mechanism for limiting photocathode lifetime. As a result, high average current operation yields charge lifetimes too low to be used in a collider design. One idea to extend the charge lifetime is to funnel the beams from multiple cathodes using a rotating magnetic field-if operation of one cathode does not affect the operation of another cathode in the same chamber, then the source's lifetime can be extended by simply adding more cathodes. This dissertation presents the design, construction and commissioning of a unique electron gun capable of operating twenty cathodes. Results of funneling two electron beams with a rotating magnetic field are also presented. For average currents at 175 nA and 350 nA, the charge lifetimes for individual cathodes and two-cathode operation were measured, showing that the charge lifetime for two beam funneling is the sum of the individual ion back bombardment charge lifetimes. The addition of charge lifetime implies that beam funneling can be used to increase charge lifetime by an order of magnitude.

  10. Picosecond runaway electron beams in air

    SciTech Connect

    Mesyats, G. A.; Yalandin, M. I.; Reutova, A. G.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.

    2012-01-15

    Experimental data on the generation of picosecond runaway electron beams in an air gap with an inhomogeneous electric field at a cathode voltage of up to 500 kV are presented. The methods and equipment developed for these experiments made it possible to measure the beam characteristics with a time resolution of better than 10{sup -11} s, determine the voltage range and the beam formation time in the breakdown delay stage, and demonstrate the influence of the state of the cathode surface on the stability of runaway electron generation. It is demonstrated that the critical electron runaway field in air agrees with the classical concepts and that the accelerated beam can be compressed to {approx}20 ps. It is unlikely that, under these conditions, the beam duration is limited due to the transition of field emission from the cathode to a microexplosion of inhomogeneities. The maximum energy acquired by runaway electrons in the course of acceleration does not exceed the value corresponding to the electrode voltage.

  11. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  12. Flexible cadmium telluride thin films grown on electron-beam-irradiated graphene/thin glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Won-Oh; Kim, Jihyun; Koo, Yong Hwan; Kim, Byungnam; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate the close-spaced sublimation growth of polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films on a flexible graphene electrode/thin glass substrate structure. Prior to the growth of CdTe films, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene was transferred onto a flexible glass substrate and subjected to electron-beam irradiation at an energy of 0.2 MeV in order to intentionally introduce the defects into it in a controlled manner. Micro-Raman spectroscopy and sheet resistance measurements were employed to monitor the damage and disorder in the electron-beam irradiated graphene layers. The morphology and optical properties of the CdTe thin films deposited on a graphene/flexible glass substrate were systematically characterized. The integration of the defective graphene layers with a flexible glass substrate can be a useful platform to grow various thin-film structures for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  13. Surface structure of coherently strained ceria ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yezhou; Stone, Kevin H.; Guan, Zixuan; Monti, Matteo; Cao, Chuntian; El Gabaly, Farid; Chueh, William C.; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-11-01

    Cerium oxide, or ceria, is an important material for solid oxide fuel cells and water splitting devices. Although the ceria surface is active in catalytic and electrochemical reactions, how its catalytic properties are affected by the surface structure under operating conditions is far from understood. We investigate the structure of the coherently strained Ce O2 ultrathin films on yttria-stabilized zirconia (001) single crystals by specular synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) under oxidizing conditions as a first step to study the surface structure in situ. An excellent agreement between the experiment data and the model is achieved by using a "stacks and islands" model that has a two-component roughness. One component is due to the tiny clusters of nanometer scale in lateral dimensions on each terrace, while the other component is due to slightly different Ce O2 thickness that span over hundreds of nanometers on neighboring terraces. We attribute the nonuniform thickness to step depairing during the thin film deposition that is supported by the surface morphology results on the microscopic level. Importantly, our model also shows that the polarity of the ceria surface is removed by a half monolayer surface coverage of oxygen. The successful resolution of the ceria surface structure using in situ specular synchrotron XRD paves the way to study the structural evolution of ceria as a fuel cell electrode under catalytically relevant temperatures and gas pressures.

  14. Novel ceria-polymer microcomposites for chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, Cecil A.; Mudhivarthi, Subrahmanya R.; Kumar, Ashok; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2008-12-01

    Abrasive particles are key components in slurries for chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Since the particle characteristics determine surface quality of wafers during polishing, in this research, novel abrasive composite particles have been developed. These composite particles contain nanoparticles of ceria dispersed within cross-linked, polymeric microspheres such that the average mass fraction of ceria is approximately 50% in the particles. The microspheres are formed by co-polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPS) and contain interpenetrating (IP) chains of poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc). Infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy are employed to characterize the composite particles. Planarization of silicon dioxide wafers is studied on a bench-top CMP tester and the polished surfaces are characterized by ellipsometry, atomic force and optical microscopy. Slurries formed from the composite ceria-polymer particles lead to lower topographical variations and surface roughness than slurries of only ceria nanoparticles even though both slurries achieve similar removal rates of ˜100 nm/min for similar ceria content. Polishing with the novel composite particles gives surfaces devoid of scratches and particle deposition, which makes these particles suitable for the next generation slurries in CMP.

  15. Structural and optical properties of electron beam evaporated yttria stabilized zirconia thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kirubaharan, A. Kamalan; Kuppusami, P. Dharini, T.; Ramachandran, D.; Singh, Akash; Mohandas, E.

    2015-06-24

    Yttria stabilized zirconia (10 mole % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using electron beam physical vapor deposition at the substrate temperatures in the range 300 – 973 K. XRD analysis showed cubic crystalline phase of YSZ films with preferred orientation along (111). The surface roughness was found to increase with the increase of deposition temperatures. The optical band gap of ∼5.7 eV was calculated from transmittance curves. The variation in the optical properties is correlated with the changes in the microstructural features of the films prepared as a function of substrate temperature.

  16. Silica-Ceria Hybrid Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Baer, Donald R.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2012-04-25

    A new hybrid material system that consists of ceria attached silica nanoparticles has been developed. Because of the versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and versatile properties of silica and antioxidant properties of ceria nanoparticles, this material system is ideally suited for biomedical applications. The silica particles of size ~50nm were synthesized by the Stöber synthesis method and ceria nanoparticles of size ~2-3nm was attached to the silica surface using a hetrocoagulation method. The presence of silanol groups on the surface of silica particles mediated homogenous nucleation of ceria which were attached to silica surface by Si-O-Ce bonding. The formations of silica-ceria hybrid nanostructures were characterized by X-photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The HRTEM image confirms the formation of individual crystallites of ceria nanoparticles attached to the silica surface. The XPS analysis indicates that ceria nanoparticles are chemically bonded to surface of silica and possess mixture of +3 and +4 chemical states.

  17. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Baertling, Y.; Hoppe, D.; Kuksanov, N.; Fadeev, S.; Salimov, R.

    2012-09-15

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  18. High harmonic terahertz confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wenjie; Guan, Xiaotong; Yan, Yang

    2016-01-15

    The harmonic confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam is proposed in this paper in order to develop compact and high power terahertz radiation source. A 0.56 THz third harmonic confocal gyrotron with a dual arc section nonuniform electron beam has been designed and investigated. The studies show that confocal cavity has extremely low mode density, and has great advantage to operate at high harmonic. Nonuniform electron beam is an approach to improve output power and interaction efficiency of confocal gyrotron. A dual arc beam magnetron injection gun for designed confocal gyrotron has been developed and presented in this paper.

  19. Economics of electron beam accelerator facilities: Concept vs actual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minbiole, Paul R.

    1995-02-01

    Electron beam accelerator facilities continue to demonstrate their ability to "add value" to a wide range of industrial products. The power, energy, and reliability of commercially available accelerators have increased steadily over the past several decades. The high throughput potential of modern electron beam facilities, together with the broad spectrum of commercial applications, result in the concept that an electron beam facility is an effective tool for adding economic value to industrial products. However, the high capital costs of such a facility (including hidden costs), together with practical limitations to high throughput (including several layers of inefficiencies), result in profit-and-loss economics which are more tenuous than expected after first analysis.

  20. Experimental observation of helical microbunching of a relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hemsing, E.; Knyazik, A.; O'Shea, F.; Marinelli, A.; Musumeci, P.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Tochitsky, S.

    2012-02-27

    Experimental observation of the microbunching of a relativistic electron beam at the second harmonic interaction frequency of a helical undulator is presented. The microbunching signal is observed from the coherent transition radiation of the electron beam and indicates experimental evidence of a dominantly helical electron beam density distribution. This result is in agreement with theoretical and numerical predictions and provides a proof-of-principle demonstration of proposed schemes designed to generate light with orbital angular momentum in high-gain free-electron lasers.

  1. Quantum effects in electron beam pumped GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Yahia, M. E.; Azzouz, I. M.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-19

    Propagation of waves in nano-sized GaAs semiconductor induced by electron beam are investigated. A dispersion relation is derived by using quantum hydrodynamics equations including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation potentials, and degenerate pressures. It is found that the propagating modes are instable and strongly depend on the electron beam parameters, as well as the quantum recoil effects and degenerate pressures. The instability region shrinks with the increase of the semiconductor number density. The instability arises because of the energetic electron beam produces electron-hole pairs, which do not keep in phase with the electrostatic potential arising from the pair plasma.

  2. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography.

    PubMed

    Hampel, U; Bärtling, Y; Hoppe, D; Kuksanov, N; Fadeev, S; Salimov, R

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  3. Dissociation phenomena in electron-beam sustained carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Michael R.; Willetts, David V.

    1990-06-01

    A number of applications are emerging requiring efficient, long pulse, long-life sealed CO2 lasers. Examples include the proposed NASA and ESA wind lidars. Electron-beam sustained discharge devices are strong contenders. Unlike self-sustained discharges, e-beam sustenance readily provides efficient performance from large volume discharges and offers pulse lengths well in excess of the microsecond or so generally associated with self-sustained devices. In the case of the e-beam sustained laser, since the plasma is externally maintained and operated at electric field strengths less than that associated with the glow to arc transition, the discharges can be run even in the presence of strongly attacking species such as O2. Build up of large levels of attacking contaminants is nevertheless undesirable as their presence reduces the current drawn by the plasma and thus the pumping rate to the upper laser level. The impedance rise leads to a mismatch of the pulse forming network with a consequent loss of control over energy deposition, operating E/N, and gain. Clearly CO2 dissociation rates, the influence of dissociation products on the discharge and gain, and tolerance of the discharge to these products need to be determined. This information can then be used to assess co-oxidation catalyst requirements for sealed operation.

  4. Dissociation phenomena in electron-beam sustained carbon dioxide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.; Willetts, David V.

    1990-01-01

    A number of applications are emerging requiring efficient, long pulse, long-life sealed CO2 lasers. Examples include the proposed NASA and ESA wind lidars. Electron-beam sustained discharge devices are strong contenders. Unlike self-sustained discharges, e-beam sustenance readily provides efficient performance from large volume discharges and offers pulse lengths well in excess of the microsecond or so generally associated with self-sustained devices. In the case of the e-beam sustained laser, since the plasma is externally maintained and operated at electric field strengths less than that associated with the glow to arc transition, the discharges can be run even in the presence of strongly attacking species such as O2. Build up of large levels of attacking contaminants is nevertheless undesirable as their presence reduces the current drawn by the plasma and thus the pumping rate to the upper laser level. The impedance rise leads to a mismatch of the pulse forming network with a consequent loss of control over energy deposition, operating E/N, and gain. Clearly CO2 dissociation rates, the influence of dissociation products on the discharge and gain, and tolerance of the discharge to these products need to be determined. This information can then be used to assess co-oxidation catalyst requirements for sealed operation.

  5. Finite Element Models for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) is a member of an emerging class of direct manufacturing processes known as solid freeform fabrication (SFF); another member of the class is the laser deposition process. Successful application of the EBF3 process requires precise control of a number of process parameters such as the EB power, speed, and metal feed rate in order to ensure thermal management; good fusion between the substrate and the first layer and between successive layers; minimize part distortion and residual stresses; and control the microstructure of the finished product. This is the only effort thus far that has addressed computer simulation of the EBF3 process. The models developed in this effort can assist in reducing the number of trials in the laboratory or on the shop floor while making high-quality parts. With some modifications, their use can be further extended to the simulation of laser, TIG (tungsten inert gas), and other deposition processes. A solid mechanics-based finite element code, ABAQUS, was chosen as the primary engine in developing these models whereas a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, Fluent, was used in a support role. Several innovative concepts were developed, some of which are highlighted below. These concepts were implemented in a number of new computer models either in the form of stand-alone programs or as user subroutines for ABAQUS and Fluent codes. A database of thermo-physical, mechanical, fluid, and metallurgical properties of stainless steel 304 was developed. Computing models for Gaussian and raster modes of the electron beam heat input were developed. Also, new schemes were devised to account for the heat sink effect during the deposition process. These innovations, and others, lead to improved models for thermal management and prediction of transient/residual stresses and distortions. Two approaches for the prediction of microstructure were pursued. The first was an empirical approach involving the

  6. Effect of Orientation on Tensile Properties of Inconel 718 Block Fabricated with Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Atherton, Todd S.

    2010-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) direct metal deposition processing was used to fabricate an Inconel 718 bulk block deposit. Room temperature tensile properties were measured as a function of orientation and location within the block build. This study is a follow-on activity to previous work on Inconel 718 EBF3 deposits that were too narrow to allow properties to be measured in more than one orientation

  7. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  8. Measurement of the electron beam mode in earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onsager, T. G.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    High frequency electric field measurements from the AMPTE IRM plasma wave receiver are used to identify three simultaneously excited electrostatic wave modes in the earth's foreshock region: the electron beam mode, the Langmuir mode, and the ion acoustic mode. A technique is developed which allows the rest frame frequecy and wave number of the electron beam waves to be determined. It is shown that the experimentally determined rest frame frequency and wave number agree well with the most unstable frequency and wave number predicted by linear homogeneous Vlasov theory for a plasma with Maxwellian background electrons and a Lorentzian electron beam. From a comparison of the experimentally determined and theoretical values, approximate limits are put on the electron foreshock beam temperatures. A possible generation mechanism for ion acoustic waves involving mode coupling between the electron beam and Langmuir modes is also discussed.

  9. Commercial applications of electron beam advanced oxidation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Randy D.; Bosma, John T.

    1995-03-01

    Emerging commercial applications of electron-beam advanced oxidation technology offer a significant advancement in the treatment of waste steams. Both electron beam and X-ray (Brehmsstrahlung) advanced oxidation processes have been shown to be effective in the destruction of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Emerging commercial applications, however, far exceed in scope current applications of oxidation technologies for the destruction of simple semivolatile and volatile organic compounds in water. Emerging applications include direct treatment of contaminated soil, removal of metal ions from water and sterilization of water, sludges, and food. Application of electron beam advanced oxidation technologies are reviewed, along with electron- beam-generated X-ray (Brehmsstrahlung) advanced oxidation processes. Advantages of each technology are discussed along with advanced accelerator technologies which are applicable for commercial processing of waste streams. An overview of the U.S. companies and laboratories participating in this research area are included in this discussion.

  10. Electron beam irradiated silver nanowires for a highly transparent heater.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chan-Hwa; Oh, Seung Kyu; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cha, Yu-Jung; Kwak, Joon Seop; Shin, Jae-Heon; Ju, Byeong-Kwon; Cheong, Woo-Seok

    2015-12-07

    Transparent heaters have attracted increasing attention for their usefulness in vehicle windows, outdoor displays, and periscopes. We present high performance transparent heaters based on Ag nanowires with electron beam irradiation. We obtained an Ag-nanowire thin film with 48 ohm/sq of sheet resistance and 88.8% (substrate included) transmittance at 550 nm after electron beam irradiation for 120 sec. We demonstrate that the electron beam creates nano-soldering at the junctions of the Ag nanowires, which produces lower sheet resistance and improved adhesion of the Ag nanowires. We fabricated a transparent heater with Ag nanowires after electron beam irradiation, and obtained a temperature of 51 °C within 1 min at an applied voltage of 7 V. The presented technique will be useful in a wide range of applications for transparent heaters.

  11. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.

  12. Characterization of Electron Beam Free-Form Fabricated 2219 Aluminum and 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekrami, Yasamin; Forth, Scott C.; Waid, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed an additive manufacturing technology for ground and future space based applications. The electron beam free form fabrication (EBF3) is a rapid metal fabrication process that utilizes an electron beam gun in a vacuum environment to replicate a CAD drawing of a part. The electron beam gun creates a molten pool on a metal substrate, and translates with respect to the substrate to deposit metal in designated regions through a layer additive process. Prior to demonstration and certification of a final EBF3 part for space flight, it is imperative to conduct a series of materials validation and verification tests on the ground in order to evaluate mechanical and microstructural properties of the EBF3 manufactured parts. Part geometries of EBF3 2219 aluminum and 316 stainless steel specimens were metallographically inspected, and tested for strength, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. Upon comparing the results to conventionally welded material, 2219 aluminum in the as fabricated condition demonstrated a 30% and 16% decrease in fracture toughness and ductility, respectively. The strength properties of the 316 stainless steel material in the as deposited condition were comparable to annealed stainless steel alloys. Future fatigue crack growth tests will integrate various stress ranges and maximum to minimum stress ratios needed to fully characterize EBF3 manufactured specimens.

  13. In-process thermal imaging of the electron beam freeform fabrication process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Domack, Christopher S.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Taminger, Brian L.; Hafley, Robert A.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have been developing the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) metal additive manufacturing process for the past 15 years. In this process, an electron beam is used as a heat source to create a small molten pool on a substrate into which wire is fed. The electron beam and wire feed assembly are translated with respect to the substrate to follow a predetermined tool path. This process is repeated in a layer-wise fashion to fabricate metal structural components. In-process imaging has been integrated into the EBF3 system using a near-infrared (NIR) camera. The images are processed to provide thermal and spatial measurements that have been incorporated into a closed-loop control system to maintain consistent thermal conditions throughout the build. Other information in the thermal images is being used to assess quality in real time by detecting flaws in prior layers of the deposit. NIR camera incorporation into the system has improved the consistency of the deposited material and provides the potential for real-time flaw detection which, ultimately, could lead to the manufacture of better, more reliable components using this additive manufacturing process.

  14. Evolution and Control of 2219 Aluminum Microstructural Features Through Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2006-01-01

    The layer-additive nature of the electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process results in a tortuous thermal path producing complex microstructures including: small homogeneous equiaxed grains; dendritic growth contained within larger grains; and/or pervasive dendritic formation in the interpass regions of the deposits. Several process control variables contribute to the formation of these different microstructures, including translation speed, wire feed rate, beam current and accelerating voltage. In electron beam processing, higher accelerating voltages embed the energy deeper below the surface of the substrate. Two EBF3 systems have been established at NASA Langley, one with a low-voltage (10-30kV) and the other a high-voltage (30-60 kV) electron beam gun. Aluminum alloy 2219 was processed over a range of different variables to explore the design space and correlate the resultant microstructures with the processing parameters. This report is specifically exploring the impact of accelerating voltage. Of particular interest is correlating energy to the resultant material characteristics to determine the potential of achieving microstructural control through precise management of the heat flux and cooling rates during deposition.

  15. In-Process Thermal Imaging of the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Domack, Christopher S.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Taminger, Brian L.; Hafley, Robert A.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have been developing the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) metal additive manufacturing process for the past 15 years. In this process, an electron beam is used as a heat source to create a small molten pool on a substrate into which wire is fed. The electron beam and wire feed assembly are translated with respect to the substrate to follow a predetermined tool path. This process is repeated in a layer-wise fashion to fabricate metal structural components. In-process imaging has been integrated into the EBF3 system using a near-infrared (NIR) camera. The images are processed to provide thermal and spatial measurements that have been incorporated into a closed-loop control system to maintain consistent thermal conditions throughout the build. Other information in the thermal images is being used to assess quality in real time by detecting flaws in prior layers of the deposit. NIR camera incorporation into the system has improved the consistency of the deposited material and provides the potential for real-time flaw detection which, ultimately, could lead to the manufacture of better, more reliable components using this additive manufacturing process.

  16. Mixed feed and its ingredients electron beam decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglov, V. V.; Bryazgin, A. A.; Vlasov, A. Yu; Voronin, L. A.; Ites, Yu V.; Korobeynikov, M. V.; Leonov, S. V.; Leonova, M. A.; Tkachenko, V. O.; Shtarklev, E. A.; Yuskov, Yu G.

    2017-01-01

    Electron beam treatment is used for food processing for decades to prevent or minimize food losses and prolong storage time. This process is also named cold pasteurization. Mixed feed ingredients supplied in Russia regularly occur to be contaminated. To reduce contamination level the contaminated mixed feed ingredients samples were treated by electron beam with doses from 2 to 12 kGy. The contamination levels were decreased to the level that ensuring storage time up to 1 year.

  17. Dense plasma heating by crossing relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratan, N.; Sircombe, N. J.; Ceurvorst, L.; Sadler, J.; Kasim, M. F.; Holloway, J.; Levy, M. C.; Trines, R.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Here we investigate, using relativistic fluid theory and Vlasov-Maxwell simulations, the local heating of a dense plasma by two crossing electron beams. Heating occurs as an instability of the electron beams drives Langmuir waves, which couple nonlinearly into damped ion-acoustic waves. Simulations show a factor 2.8 increase in electron kinetic energy with a coupling efficiency of 18%. Our results support applications to the production of warm dense matter and as a driver for inertial fusion plasmas.

  18. Dense plasma heating by crossing relativistic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ratan, N; Sircombe, N J; Ceurvorst, L; Sadler, J; Kasim, M F; Holloway, J; Levy, M C; Trines, R; Bingham, R; Norreys, P A

    2017-01-01

    Here we investigate, using relativistic fluid theory and Vlasov-Maxwell simulations, the local heating of a dense plasma by two crossing electron beams. Heating occurs as an instability of the electron beams drives Langmuir waves, which couple nonlinearly into damped ion-acoustic waves. Simulations show a factor 2.8 increase in electron kinetic energy with a coupling efficiency of 18%. Our results support applications to the production of warm dense matter and as a driver for inertial fusion plasmas.

  19. Ribbon electron beam formation by a forevacuum plasma electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, A. S. Burdovitsin, V. A.; Grishkov, A. A.; Oks, E. M.; Zenin, A. A.; Yushkov, Yu. G.

    2016-01-15

    Results of the numerical analysis and experimental research on ribbon electron beam generation based on hollow cathode discharge at forevacuum gas pressure are presented. Geometry of the accelerating gap has modified. It lets us focus the ribbon electron beam and to transport it on a distance of several tens of centimeters in the absence of an axial magnetic field. The results of numerical simulations are confirmed by the experiment.

  20. New data on electron-beam purification of wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikaev, A. K.

    2002-11-01

    Recent environmental applications of radiation technology, developed in the author's laboratory, are presented in this paper. They are electron-beam and coagulation purification of molasses distillery slops from distillery-produced ethyl alcohol by fermentation of plant materials, electron-beam purification of wastewater from carboxylic acids (for example, formic acid) and removal of petroleum products (diesel fuel, motor oil and residual fuel oil) from water by γ-irradiation.

  1. Waves in relativistic electron beam in low-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinman, I.; Sheinman (Chernenco, J.

    2016-11-01

    Waves in electron beam in low-density plasma are analyzed. The analysis is based on complete electrodynamics consideration. Dependencies of dispersion laws from system parameters are investigated. It is shown that when relativistic electron beam is passed through low-density plasma surface waves of two types may exist. The first type is a high frequency wave on a boundary between the beam and neutralization area and the second type wave is on the boundary between neutralization area and stationary plasma.

  2. Experimental study of the stability of a neutralized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kudelainen, V.I.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1983-05-01

    Results are reported from measurements of the spectral properties of a long neutralized electron beam in the NAP-M proton storage ring. It is shown that when the number of secondary electrons is small, both the longitudinal and the transverse oscillations are strongly damped, so that beam instability is suppressed. The current density of the neutralized electron beam produced in the experiments was approx.10/sup 2/ times greater than the theoretical value determined from the instability threshold for nonaxisymmetric oscillations.

  3. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  4. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-30

    We report on a method for “direct-write” conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  5. Group velocity delay spectroscopy technique for industrial monitoring of electron-beam-induced vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benterou, Jerry J.; Berzins, Leon V.; Sharma, Manish N.

    1999-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques are ideal for characterization and process control of electron beam generated beam generated vapor plumes. Absorption based techniques work well for a wide variety of applications, but are difficult to apply to optically dense or opaque vapor plumes. We describe an approach for monitoring optically dense vapor plumes that is based on measuring the group velocity delay of a laser beam near an optical transition to determine the vapor density. This technique has a larger dynamic range than absorption environment. Aluminum as chosen because of its prevalence in high performance aircraft alloys. In these applications, composition control of the alloy constituents is critical to the deposition process. Data is presented demonstrating the superior dynamic range of the measurement. In addition, preliminary data demonstrating aluminum vapor rate control in an electron beam evaporator is presented. Alternative applications where this technique could be useful are discussed.

  6. Time-dependent charge distributions in polymer films under electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Masaaki; Kainuma, Yasuaki; Kawata, Hiroaki; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Rikio; Kotera, Masatoshi

    2008-12-15

    The time-dependent charge distribution in polymer film under electron beam irradiation is studied by both experiment and numerical simulation. In the experiment, the distribution is measured with the piezoinduced pressure wave propagation method. In the simulation, the initial charge distribution is obtained by the Monte Carlo method of electron scattering, and the charge drift in the specimen is simulated by taking into account the Poisson equation, the charge continuity equation, Ohm's law, and the radiation-induced conductivity. The results obtained show that the negative charge deposited in the polymer film, whose top and bottom surfaces are grounded, drifts toward both grounded electrodes and that twin peaks appear in the charge distribution. The radiation-induced conductivity plays an important role in determining the charge distribution in the polymer films under electron beam irradiation.

  7. Phosphate modified ceria as a Brønsted acidic/redox multifunctional catalyst

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas C.; Wang, Zhuoran; Naik, Pranjali; ...

    2017-01-06

    Deposition of trimethylphosphate onto ceria followed by thermal treatment resulted in the formation of surface phosphates with retention of the ceria fluorite structure. The structural and chemical properties of the phosphate-functionalized ceria were studied using 31P solid-state NMR, XPS, zeta titration, ammonia thermal desorption, pyridine adsorption, and model reactions. The introduction of phosphates generated Brønsted acid sites and decreased the number of Lewis acid sites on the surface. The relative amount of Lewis and Brønsted acids can be controlled by the amount of trimethylphosphate used in the synthesis. Upon deposition of Pd, the multifunctional material showed enhanced activity for themore » hydrogenolysis of eugenol and guaiacol compared to Pd on the unmodified ceria support. As a result, this was attributed to the cooperativity between the Lewis acid sites, which activate the substrate for dearomatization, and the redox/Brønsted acid properties, which catalyze hydrogenolysis.« less

  8. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Zschornack, G.; König, J.; Schmidt, M.; Thorn, A.

    2014-02-15

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  9. A compact, versatile low-energy electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Zschornack, G; König, J; Schmidt, M; Thorn, A

    2014-02-01

    A new compact Electron Beam Ion Source, the Dresden EBIT-LE, is introduced as an ion source working at low electron beam energies. The EBIT-LE operates at an electron energy ranging from 100 eV to some keV and can easily be modified to an EBIT also working at higher electron beam energies of up to 15 keV. We show that, depending on the electron beam energy, electron beam currents from a few mA in the low-energy regime up to about 40 mA in the high-energy regime are possible. Technical solutions as well as first experimental results of the EBIT-LE are presented. In ion extraction experiments, a stable production of low and intermediate charged ions at electron beam energies below 2 keV is demonstrated. Furthermore, X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the possibility of using the machine as a source of X-rays from ions excited at low electron energies.

  10. An Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakeman, Michael S.

    Currently particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider use RF cavities with a maximum field gradient of 50-100 MV/m to accelerate particles over long distances. A new type of plasma based accelerator called a Laser Plasma Accelerator (LPA) is being investigated at the LOASIS group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory which can sustain field gradients of 10-100 GV/m. This new type of accelerator offers the potential to create compact high energy accelerators and light sources. In order to investigate the feasibility of producing a compact light source an undulator-based electron beam diagnostic for use on the LOASIS LPA has been built and calibrated. This diagnostic relies on the principal that the spectral analysis of synchrotron radiation from an undulator can reveal properties of the electron beam such as emittance, energy and energy spread. The effects of electron beam energy spread upon the harmonics of undulator produced synchrotron radiation were derived from the equations of motion of the beam and numerically simulated. The diagnostic consists of quadrupole focusing magnets to collimate the electron beam, a 1.5 m long undulator to produce the synchrotron radiation, and a high resolution high gain XUV spectrometer to analyze the radiation. The undulator was aligned and tuned in order to maximize the flux of synchrotron radiation produced. The spectrometer was calibrated at the Advanced Light Source, with the results showing the ability to measure electron beam energy spreads at resolutions as low as 0.1% rms, a major improvement over conventional magnetic spectrometers. Numerical simulations show the ability to measure energy spreads on realistic LPA produced electron beams as well as the improvements in measurements made with the quadrupole magnets. Experimentally the quadrupoles were shown to stabilize and focus the electron beams at specific energies for their insertion into the undulator, with the eventual hope of producing an all optical

  11. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    .]. -- Working Group 1. Summary of working group 1 on electron sources / M. Ferrario and G. Gatti. Design and RF measurements of an X-band accelerating structure for the SPARC project / D. Alesini ... [et al.]. Mitigation of RF gun breakdown by removal of tuning rods in high field regions / A.M. Cook... [et al.]. Measurements of quantum efficiency of Mg films produced by pulsed laser ablation deposition for application to bright electron sources / G. Gatti ... [et al.]. The S-band 1.6 cell RF gun correlated energy spread dependence on Pi and 0 mode relative amplitude / F. Schmerge ... [et al.]. RF gun photo-emission model for metal cathodes including time dependent emission / J.F. Schmerge ... [et al.]. Superconducting photocathodes / J. Smedley ... [et al.]. -- Working Group 2. Summary of Working Group 2: diagnostics and beam manipulation / G. Travish. Observation of coherent edge radiation emitted by a 100 Femtosecond compressed electron beam / G. Andonian, M, Dunning, E. Hemsing, J. B. Rosenzweig ... [et al.]. PARMELA simulations for PITZ: first machine studies and interpretation of measurements / M. Boscolo ... [et al.]. The LCLS single-shot relative bunch length monitor system / M.P. Dunning ... [et al.]. Beam shaping and permanent magnet quadrupole focusing with applications to the plasma wakefield accelerator / R.J. England ... [et al.]. Commissioning of the SPARC movable emittance meter and its first operation at PITZ / D. Filippetto... [et al.]. Experimental testing of dynamically optimized photoelectron beams / J.B. Rosenzweig ... [et al.]. Synchronization between the laser and electron beam in a photocathode RF gun / A. Sakumi ... [et al.]. Method of bunch radiation photochronography with 10 Femtosecond and less resolution / A. Tron and I. Merinov -- Working Group 3. New challenges in theory and modeling-summary for working group 3. L. Giannessi. Resonant modes in a 1.6 cells RF gun / M. Ferrario and C. Ronsivalle. Emittance degradation due to wake fields in a high

  12. Definition of Beam Diameter for Electron Beam Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Burgardt, Paul; Pierce, Stanley W.; Dvornak, Matthew John

    2016-03-11

    It is useful to characterize the dimensions of the electron beam during process development for electron beam welding applications. Analysis of the behavior of electron beam welds is simplest when a single number can be assigned to the beam properties that describes the size of the beam spot; this value we generically call the “beam diameter”. This approach has worked well for most applications and electron beam welding machines with the weld dimensions (width and depth) correlating well with the beam diameter. However, in recent weld development for a refractory alloy, Ta-10W, welded with a low voltage electron beam machine (LVEB), it was found that the weld dimensions (weld penetration and weld width) did not correlate well with the beam diameter and especially with the experimentally determined sharp focus point. These data suggest that the presently used definition of beam diameter may not be optimal for all applications. The possible reasons for this discrepancy and a suggested possible alternative diameter definition is the subject of this paper.

  13. Low electron beam energy CIVA analysis of passivated ICs

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Dodd, B.A.; Henderson, C.L.

    1994-08-01

    Low Energy Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration (LECIVA) is a new scanning electron microscopy technique developed to localize open conductors in passivated ICs. LECIVA takes advantage of recent experimental work showing that the dielectric surface equilibrium voltage has an electron flux density dependence at low electron beam energies ({le}1.0 keV). The equilibrium voltage changes from positive to negative as the electron flux density is increased. Like Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration (CIVA), LECIVA images are produced from the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as an electron beam is scanned over the IC surface. LECIVA image contrast is generated only by the electrically open part of a conductor, yielding, the same high selectivity demonstrated by CIVA. Because LECIVA is performed at low beam energies, radiation damage by the primary electrons and x-rays to MOS structures is far less than that caused by CIVA. LECIVA may also be performed on commercial electron beam test systems that do not have high primary electron beam energy capabilities. The physics of LECIVA signal generation are described. LECIVA imaging examples illustrate its utility on both a standard scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a commercial electron beam test system.

  14. An Electron-Beam Profile Monitor Using Fresnel Zone Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Norio; Sakai, Hiroshi; Iida, Kensuke; Shinoe, Kenji; Takaki, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masami; Hayano, Hitoshi; Muto, Toshiya; Nomura, Masaharu; Kamiya, Yukihide; Koseki, Tadashi; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Aoki, Nobutada; Nakayama, Koichi

    2004-05-12

    We have developed a beam profile monitor using two Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) at the KEK-ATF (Accelerator Test Facility) damping ring to measure small electron-beam sizes for low-emittance synchrotron radiation sources. The monitor has a structure of an X-ray microscope, where two FZPs constitute an X-ray imaging optics. In the monitor system, the synchrotron radiation from the electron beam at the bending magnet is monochromatized to 3.235-keV X-rays by a crystal monochromator and the transverse electron-beam image is twenty-times magnified by the two FZPs and detected on an X-ray CCD camera. This monitor has the following advantages: (1) high spatial resolution, (2) non-destructive measurement, (3) real-time monitoring, and (4) direct electron-beam imaging. With the beam profile monitor, we have succeeded in obtaining a clear electron-beam image and measuring the extremely small beam size less than 10 {mu}m. The measured magnification of the imaging optics was in good agreement with the design value.

  15. Thermal response of ceramic components during electron beam brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Voth, T.E.; Gianoulakis, S.E.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Ceramics are being used increasingly in applications where high temperatures are encountered such as automobile and gas turbine engines. However, the use of ceramics is limited by a lack of methods capable of producing strong, high temperature joints. This is because most ceramic-ceramic joining techniques, such as brazing, require that the entire assembly be exposed to high temperatures in order to assure that the braze material melts. Alternatively, localized heating using high energy electron beams may be used to selectively heat the braze material. In this work, high energy electron beam brazing of a ceramic part is modeled numerically. The part considered consists of a ceramic cylinder and disk between which is sandwiched an annular washer of braze material. An electron beam impinges on the disk, melting the braze metal. The resulting coupled electron and thermal transport equations are solved using Monte Carlo and finite element techniques. Results indicate that increased electron beam current decreases time to melt as well as required cooling time. Vacuum furnace brazing was also simulated and predicted results indicate increased processing times relative to electron beam brazing.

  16. Low energy electron magnetometer using a monoenergetic electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Wood, G. M.; Rayborn, G. H.; White, F. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low energy electron beam magnetometer utilizes near-monoenergetic electrons thereby reducing errors due to electron energy spread and electron nonuniform angular distribution. In a first embodiment, atoms in an atomic beam of an inert gas are excited to a Rydberg state and then electrons of near zero energy are detached from the Rydberg atoms. The near zero energy electrons are then accelerated by an electric field V(acc) to form the electron beam. In a second embodiment, a filament emits electrons into an electrostatic analyzer which selects electrons at a predetermined energy level within a very narrow range. These selected electrons make up the electron beam that is subjected to the magnetic field being measured.

  17. Ground Base Skylab Electron Beam Welds in Tantalum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of ground-based (left) and Skylab (right) electron beam welds in pure tantalum (Ta) (10X magnification). Residual votices left behind in the ground-based sample after the electron beam passed were frozen into the grain structure. These occurred because of the rapid cooling rate at the high temperature. Although the thermal characteristics and electron beam travel speeds were comparable for the skylab sample, the residual vortices were erased in the grain structure. This may have been due to the fact that final grain size of the solidified material was smaller in the Skylab sample compared to the ground-based sample. The Skylab sample was processed in the M512 Materials Processing Facility (MPF) during Skylab SL-2 Mission. Principal Investigator was Richard Poorman.

  18. Electron-beam induced recrystallization in amorphous apatite

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, In-Tae; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.; Higuchi, Mikio; Giannuzzi, Lucille

    2007-01-10

    Electron-beam-induced recrystallization of irradiation-induced amorphous Sr2Nd8(SiO4)6O2 is investigated in situ using transmission electron microscopy with 200 keV electrons at room temperature. Epitaxial recrystallization is observed from both the amorphous/crystalline interface and the surface, and the recrystallization is more pronounced with increasing electron-beam flux. Since the temperature increase induced by electron-beam irradiation is estimated to be less than 7 K and maximum energies transferred to target atoms are below the displacement energies, ionization-induced processes are considered to be the primary mechanisms for the solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization observed in the present study.

  19. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  20. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  1. Portable radiography system using a relativistic electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Hoeberling, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A portable radiographic generator is provided with an explosive magnetic flux compression generator producing the high voltage necessary to generate a relativistic electron beam. The relativistic electron beam is provided with target materials which generates the desired radiographic pulse. The magnetic flux compression generator may require at least two conventional explosively driven generators in series to obtain a desired output voltage of at least 1 MV. The cathode and anode configuration of the diode are selected to provide a switching action wherein a high impedance load is presented to the magnetic flux compression generator when the high voltage is being generated, and thereafter switching to a low impedance load to generate the relativistic electron beam. Magnetic flux compression generators can be explosively driven and provided in a relatively compact, portable form for use with the relativistic x-ray equipment.

  2. Portable radiography system using a relativistic electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Hoeberling, R.F.

    1987-09-22

    A portable radiographic generator is provided with an explosive magnetic flux compression generator producing the high voltage necessary to generate a relativistic electron beam. The relativistic electron beam is provided with target materials which generates the desired radiographic pulse. The magnetic flux compression generator may require at least two conventional explosively driven generators in series to obtain a desired output voltage of at least 1 MV. The cathode and anode configuration of the diode are selected to provide a switching action wherein a high impedance load is presented to the magnetic flux compression generator when the high voltage is being generated, and thereafter switching to a low impedance load to generate the relativistic electron beam. Magnetic flux compression generators can be explosively driven and provided in a relatively compact, portable form for use with the relativistic x-ray equipment. 8 figs.

  3. Generation And Applications Of Electron-Beam Plasma Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, M. N.; Tun Win, Aung

    2015-03-01

    Plasma flows generated by continuous or interrupted injection of an electron beam into subsonic or supersonic gaseous streams are considered. Liquid and powder spraying by the electron-beam plasma (EBP) flows is studied as a technique of the aerosol plasma generation. A number of experimental setups generating both free plasma jets and plasma flows in channels are described. Examples of the EBP flows applications for industrial and aerospace technologies are given. The applications are shown to be based on unique properties of the EBP and its stability within very wide ranges of the plasma generation conditions. Some applications of the Hybrid Plasma (HP) generated by combined action of the electron beam (EB) and intermittent gas discharge on flows of gaseous mixtures and aerosols are presented as well.

  4. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N{sub 2}). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  5. Comparison Between Simulated And Experimental Au-ion Profiles Implanted in nanocrystalline ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, Sandra J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhu, Zihua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.

    2013-07-15

    Radiation response of nanocrystalline ceria films deposited on a silicon substrate was investigated under a 3-MeV Au-ion irradiation at 300 K. A uniform grain growth cross the ceria films is observed and effective densification of the ceria thin films occurs during irradiation. The Au ion profiling was measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and compared to the Au ion distribution predicted by the Stopping and Range of Ions in Solids (SRIM) code. It is observed that the Au-ion penetration depth is underestimated in comparison with the SIMS measurements. An overestimation of the electronic stopping power for heavy incident ions in the SRIM program may account for the discrepancies between the calculations and the SIMS experimental results. This work presents an approach to compensate the overestimation of the electronic stopping powers in the SRIM program by adjusting the nanocrystalline ceria target density to better predict the ion implantation profile.

  6. Comparison between simulated and experimental Au-ion profiles implanted in nanocrystalline ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, Sandra; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhu, Zihua; Edmondson, Dr. Philip; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Radiation response of nanocrystalline ceria films deposited on a silicon substrate was investigated under a 3-MeV Au-ion irradiation at 300 K. A uniform grain growth cross the ceria films is observed and effective densification of the ceria thin films occurs during irradiation. The Au ion profiling was measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and compared to the Au ion distribution predicted by the Stopping and Range of Ions in Solids (SRIM) code. It is observed that the Au-ion penetration depth is underestimated in comparison with the SIMS measurements. An overestimation of the electronic stopping power for heavy incident ions in the SRIM program may account for the discrepancies between the calculations and the SIMS experimental results. This work presents an approach to compensate the overestimation of the electronic stopping powers in the SRIM program by adjusting the nanocrystalline ceria target density to better predict the ion implantation profile.

  7. determination of current density distribution in an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir Prasad

    Electron beams are useful in many applications because they can be focused down to a spot far exceeding the physical limit of focusing visible light or x-rays. Additionally, electron beams are useful in transferring concentrated amounts of energy to a very small well defined region of a target for a fixed duration. This has led to the development of both scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) and electron beam lithography. The goal of this work was to develop a general method that accurately and easily yields the best estimate of the electron current density distribution of a focused electron beam, known as point spread function (PSF). The method developed is fast, easy to use and accurate. Two specific areas of research have been addressed for PSF determination. The first is concerned with the monotonic response of EUV photoresist as a function of electron beam dose. An external metrology is used for mapping the change in thickness that is smaller than the beam spot size. The method developed in this study simultaneously gives the photo-resist thickness change as a function of electron dose and electron beam PSF. A second thrust of this research has been to develop set of PSF characterization approaches that apply to the SEM. Here a knowledge of the PSF offers many benefits including the ability to monitor and optimize SEM performance such as astigmatism control. Perhaps, even more importantly, a knowledge of the PSF combined with a series of well-defined experimental steps has led to the development of new methods for improving the resolution of SEM images through computational means rather than very costly and complex equipment modification.

  8. Pt/Ceria-based Catalysts for Small Alcohol Electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez-Mora, Christian L.

    High emissions of fossil-based energy sources have led to scientists around the world to develop new alternatives for the future. In this sense, fuel cells are a remarkable and promising energy option with less environmental impact. The most used fuels for this technology are hydrogen and small chain alcohols, which can be oxidized to transform their chemical energy into electrical power. To do this, fuel cells need catalysts that will act as an active surface where the oxidation can take place. The problem with platinum catalysts is its possible CO poisoning with intermediates that are produced before the complete oxidation of alcohol to CO2. Different approaches have been taken to try to resolve this issue. In this case, cerium oxide (ceria) was selected as a co-catalyst to mitigate the effect of CO poisoning of platinum. Ceria is a compound that has the ability to work as an "oxygen tank" and can donate oxygen to carbon monoxide that is strongly adsorbed at platinum surface to produce CO2 (carbon dioxide), regenerating the Pt surface for further alcohol oxidation. Therefore, enhancing the current density as well as the power output of a fuel cell. First, an occlusion deposition technique was used to prepare platinum/ceria composite electrodes and tested them towards small chain alcohol oxidation such as methanol oxidation reaction in acidic and alkaline media. The preliminary results demonstrated that the Pt/ceria electrodes were more efficient towards methanol electrooxidation when compared to Pt electrodes. This enhancement was attributed to the presence of ceria. A second preparation method was selected for the synthesis of ceria/Pt catalysts. In this case, a hydrothermal method was used and the catalysis were studied for the effect of MeOH, EtOH and n-BuOH oxidation. The observed effect was that electrodes made of Pt/Pt:CeO2-x showed better catalytic effect than Pt/ceria and platinum electrodes. Moreover, a comparison between ceria nanorods versus

  9. Numerical modeling of electron-beam welding of dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krektuleva, R. A.; Cherepanov, O. I.; Cherepanov, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to numerical modeling of heat transfer processes and estimation of thermal stresses in weld seams created by electron beam welding of heterogeneous metals. The mathematical model is based on a system of equations that includes the Lagrange's variational equation of theory of plasticity and variational equation of M. Biot's principle to simulate the heat transfer processes. The two-dimensional problems (plane strain and plane stress) are considered for estimation of thermal stresses in welds considering differences of mechanical properties of welded materials. The model is developed for simulation of temperature fields and stresses during electron beam welding.

  10. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  11. Nonlinear longitudinal space charge oscillations in relativistic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, P; Li, R K; Marinelli, A

    2011-05-06

    In this Letter we study the evolution of an initial periodic modulation in the temporal profile of a relativistic electron beam under the effect of longitudinal space-charge forces. Linear theory predicts a periodic exchange of the modulation between the density and the energy profiles at the beam plasma frequency. For large enough initial modulations, wave breaking occurs after 1/2 period of plasma oscillation leading to the formation of short current spikes. We confirm this effect by direct measurements on a ps-modulated electron beam from an rf photoinjector. These results are useful for the generation of intense electron pulse trains for advanced accelerator applications.

  12. Nonlinear Longitudinal Space Charge Oscillations in Relativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.; Marinelli, A.

    2011-05-06

    In this Letter we study the evolution of an initial periodic modulation in the temporal profile of a relativistic electron beam under the effect of longitudinal space-charge forces. Linear theory predicts a periodic exchange of the modulation between the density and the energy profiles at the beam plasma frequency. For large enough initial modulations, wave breaking occurs after 1/2 period of plasma oscillation leading to the formation of short current spikes. We confirm this effect by direct measurements on a ps-modulated electron beam from an rf photoinjector. These results are useful for the generation of intense electron pulse trains for advanced accelerator applications.

  13. High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-09-19

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - 165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  14. Biodegradability enhancement of textile wastewater by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tak-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Kwang; Lee, Myun-Joo

    2007-06-01

    Textile wastewater generally contains various pollutants, which can cause problems during biological treatment. Electron beam radiation technology was applied to enhance the biodegradability of textile wastewater for an activated sludge process. The biodegradability (BOD 5/COD) increased at a 1.0 kGy dose. The biorefractory organic compounds were converted into more easily biodegradable compounds such as organic acids having lower molecular weights. In spite of the short hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the activated sludge process, not only high organic removal efficiencies, but also high microbial activities were achieved. In conclusion, textile wastewater was effectively treated by the combined process of electron beam radiation and an activated sludge process.

  15. Pulsed-electron-beam annealing of ion-implantation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, A. C.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Little, R. G.; Minnucci, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Short-duration high-intensity pulsed electron beams have been used to anneal ion-implantation damage in silicon and to electrically activate the dopant species. Lattice regrowth and dopant activation were determined using He(+)-4 backscattering, SEM, TEM, and device performance characteristics as diagnostic techniques. The annealing mechanism is believed to be liquid-phase epitaxial regrowth initiating from the substrate. The high-temperature transient pulse produced by the electron beam causes the dopant to diffuse rapidly in the region where the liquid state is achieved.

  16. Adjustable stiffness of individual piezoelectric nanofibers by electron beam polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Li, Anton; Yao, Nan; Shi, Yong

    2011-11-01

    We present a method to adjust the stiffness of individual piezoelectric nanofiber by electron beam induced polarization under an in situ scanning electron microscopy. The lead zirconate titanate (PZT) nanofibers were fabricated by an electrospinning process. The Young's modulus was calculated from the resonant frequency excited by an oscillating electric field applied through a nanomanipulator. The stiffness can be adjusted up to 75% by induced polarization under the exposure of an electron beam to control the domain boundaries in single PZT nanofibers. Splitting effect of the resonant frequencies was observed due to anisotropic stiffness in polarized PZT nanofibers.

  17. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Mostrom, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    A radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator (RBTO) provides a compact high power microwave generator. The RBTO includes a coaxial vacuum transmission line having an outer conductor and an inner conductor. The inner conductor defines an annular cavity with dimensions effective to support an electromagnetic field in a TEM.sub.00m mode. A radial field emission cathode is formed on the outer conductor for providing an electron beam directed toward the annular cavity electrode. Microwave energy is then extracted from the annular cavity electrode.

  18. Development of hollow electron beams for proton and ion collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Assmann, R.; Kabantsev, A.; /UC, San Diego

    2010-06-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  19. Radio Spectroscopic Imaging of Electron Beams in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, Timothy S.; Chen, B.

    2012-05-01

    The recently upgraded Jansky Very Large Array was used to observe the radio emission from a C class solar flare. Observations were performed from 1-2 GHz with a spectral resolution of 1 MHz and time resolution of 100 ms. A number of fast-drift, type-III-like radio bursts was observed, the result of nonthermal electron beams propagating from the flare site, guided by the coronal magnetic field. Using these dynamic, imaging, spectroscopic observations, the electron beam trajectories are deduced.Implications are briefly discussed.

  20. Generation of subnanosecond electron beams in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Rybka, D. V.

    2009-11-01

    Optimum conditions for the generation of runaway electron beams with maximum current amplitudes and densities in nanosecond pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are determined. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with a current amplitude of ˜30 A, a current density of ˜20 A/cm2, and a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps has been observed behind the output foil of an air-filled diode. It is shown that the position of the SAEB current maximum relative to the voltage pulse front exhibits a time shift that varies when the small-size collector is moved over the foil surface.

  1. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  2. Electron beam collector for a microwave power tube

    DOEpatents

    Dandl, Raphael A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a cylindrical, electron beam collector that efficiently couples the microwave energy out of a high power microwave source while stopping the attendant electron beam. The interior end walls of the collector are a pair of facing parabolic mirrors and the microwave energy from an input horn is radiated between the two mirrors and reassembled at the entrance to the output waveguide where the transmitted mode is reconstructed. The mode transmission through the collector of the present invention has an efficiency of at least 94%.

  3. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  4. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  5. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  6. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  7. Tracking on the joint during the electron beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, V.; Bogdanov, V.; Belozertsev, V.; Uspenskiy, N.

    2016-11-01

    In the article the description of device, which provides automatic positioning of electron beam relative to joint of welded parts during welding, is given. Extremum seeking based on synchronous detection of sensor signal (X-ray or secondary emission) is realized in the device. Measurements are made when beam goes out of the channel following the welding direction. The application of synchronous detection is possible due to the fact that during joint scanning with electron beam harmonics, carrying data about beam position relative to the joint appear in the joint sensor signal spectrum.

  8. Potential for Fabric Damage by Welding Electron Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Welding electron beam effects on Nextel AF-62 ceramic fabric enable a preliminary, tentative interpretation of electron beam fabric damage. Static surface charging does not protect fabric from beam penetration, but penetration occurs only after a delay time. The delay time is thought to be that required for the buildup of outgassing products at the fabric surface to a point where arcing occurs. Extra long delays are noted when the gun is close enough to the surface to be shut off by outgassing emissions. Penetration at long distances is limited by beam attenuation from electronic collisions with the chamber atmosphere.

  9. Effective NOx remediation from a surrogate flue gas using the US NRL Electra electron beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tz. B.; Petrov, G. M.; Wolford, M. F.; Giuliani, J. L.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Hegeler, F.; Myers, M. C.; Sethian, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NOx) emission is under restrictive federal regulations because of its negative impact on atmosphere, biosphere, and human health. Therefore, its removal has been a subject of extensive research to develop new efficient and cost effective techniques that can be applied on an industrial scale. In this work, we study both experimentally and theoretically an effective removal of NOx pollutants from a surrogate flue gas (SFG) using high power electron beam (e-beam) pulses. SFG is a simulant for exhaust from coal combustion power plants (82% N2, 6% O2, 12% CO2, and ˜100 ppm of NOx). The pulsed electron beam is generated using the United States Naval Research Laboratory Electra facility, which delivers e-beams with energies of ˜500 keV and a power pulse duration of ˜140 ns. During the e-beam irradiation, the energetic electrons generate a non-equilibrium plasma containing chemically active species, which then react with NOx to form harmless substances. A non-equilibrium time-dependent model is developed to describe NOx remediation from SFG. The model combines e-beam deposition rates obtained by solving the electron Boltzmann equation and extensive plasma chemistry modeling, which follows the species on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to a few seconds. NOx decomposition as a function of electron beam parameters is studied. It is demonstrated experimentally that short (ns) pulses are the most efficient for NOx removal. A sharp reduction of NOx was measured with e-beam power deposition increasing, following the trend predicted by the model, achieving a 20 fold reduction to ˜5 ppm at energy deposition ˜20 J/l.

  10. Comparison of measured with calculated dose distribution from a 120-MeV electron beam from a laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, O.; Rechatin, C.; Faure, J.; Ben-Ismaiel, A.; Lim, J.; De Wagter, C.; De Neve, W.; Malka, V.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose distribution of a 120-MeV laser-plasma accelerated electron beam which may be of potential interest for high-energy electron radiation therapy. Methods: In the interaction between an intense laser pulse and a helium gas jet, a well collimated electron beam with very high energy is produced. A secondary laser beam is used to optically control and to tune the electron beam energy and charge. The potential use of this beam for radiation treatment is evaluated experimentally by measurements of dose deposition in a polystyrene phantom. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the geant4 code. Results: It has been shown that the laser-plasma accelerated electron beam can deliver a peak dose of more than 1 Gy at the entrance of the phantom in a single laser shot by direct irradiation, without the use of intermediate magnetic transport or focusing. The dose distribution is peaked on axis, with narrow lateral penumbra. Monte Carlo simulations of electron beam propagation and dose deposition indicate that the propagation of the intense electron beam (with large self-fields) can be described by standard models that exclude collective effects in the response of the material. Conclusions: The measurements show that the high-energy electron beams produced by an optically injected laser-plasma accelerator can deliver high enough dose at penetration depths of interest for electron beam radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors. Many engineering issues must be resolved before laser-accelerated electrons can be used for cancer therapy, but they also represent exciting challenges for future research.

  11. Reflection aspherical microlenses for planar optics fabricated by electron-beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Shiono, T; Ogawa, H

    1992-04-15

    Reflection aspherical microlenses are proposed for planar optics. These microlenses have the structure of a nonconcentric elliptical concave mirror. Broadband light can be used for these microlenses because these microlenses have no chromatic aberration. The microlens fabricated by electron-beam lithography and Ag deposition was found to have a smooth surface as designed. The focal length of the microlens was constant independent of the wavelength. The measured spot sizes agreed with diffraction-limited values at two different wavelengths. By using the array of this microlens, multiple images with excellent contrast were obtained under incoherent white-light illumination.

  12. Erbium oxide thin films on Si(100) obtained by laser ablation and electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queralt, X.; Ferrater, C.; Sánchez, F.; Aguiar, R.; Palau, J.; Varela, M.

    1995-02-01

    Erbium oxide thin films have been obtained by laser ablation and electron beam evaporation techniques on Si(100) substrates. The samples were grown under different conditions of oxygen atmosphere and substrate temperature without any oxidation process after deposition. The crystal structure has been studied by X-ray diffraction. Films obtained by laser ablation are highly textured in the [ hhh] direction, although this depends on the conditions of oxygen pressure and substrate temperature. In order to study the depth composition profile of the thin films and the interdiffusion of erbium metal and oxygen towards the silicon substrates, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses have been carried out.

  13. Current understanding and issues on electron beam injection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    The status of the physics understanding involved in electron beam injection in space is reviewed. The paper examines our understanding of beam plasma interactions and their associated wave and energized particle spectra of the processes involved in the beam plasma discharge, and of the vehicle charge neutralization. 'Strawman' models are presented for comparison with experimental observations.

  14. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  15. Short electron beam bunch characterization through measurement of terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; David Douglas; Michelle D. Shinn; Gwyn Williams

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the measurement of sub-picosecond relativistic electron beam bunch length by analyzing the spectra of the coherent terahertz pulses through Kramers-Kronig transformation. The results are compared with autocorrelation from a scanning polarization autocorrelator that measures the coherent optical transition radiation. The limitations of the different methods to such a characterization are discussed.

  16. Electron Beam Biasing of Substrates during Plasma Etching [1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, A. K.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1997-10-01

    Electron beam biasing of substrates is being studied as an alternative to the usual method of using a capacitively coupled, rf-powered wafer chuck. The advantage of biasing with an electron beam is that the electrons which arrive at the wafer do so with an anisotropic velocity distribution similar to the plasma sheath-accelerated ions. This becomes important when etching large aspect ratio features. Isotropic plasma electrons can't follow the ions to the bottom of deep wells and they adhere to and charge up the feature sidewalls. This differential charging creates electric fields which deflect incoming ions and causes sidewall profile defects such as bowing, notching, and microtrenching and contributes to RIE(Reactive Ion Etch) lag( R. A. Gottscho, C. W. Jurgensen, and D. J. Vitkavage, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 10, Sep/Oct 1992, 2133.). The effects of etching sub-half micron nested poly-Silicon lines in Cl2 plasmas in the presence of an electron beam will be presented particularly in regard to notch suppression. The effects that the electron beam has on RIE lag suppression in SiO2 etching in fluorocarbon plasmas will also be discussed.

  17. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  18. Electron beam irradiation of gemstone for color enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Idris, Sarada; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Hashim, Siti A'iasah; Ahmad, Shamshad; Jusoh, Mohd Suhaimi

    2012-09-26

    Numerous treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones obtained from Pakistan. The study shows that EB irradiation not only enhances the color but can also improves the clarity of some type of gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 KGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the natural and the faceted gemstones. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market.

  19. Microfissuring in Electron-Beam-Welded Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr

    1985-01-01

    Mathematical model developed for microfissuring of commercial nickel alloy during electron-beam welding. Number of measured microfissures per unit length of weld plotted against excess power calculated by computer model. Excess power that above level likely to produce microfissures. In agreement with model, measured microfissures increase at rate of 4.5 per inch (1.8 per centimeter) per excess kilowatt.

  20. Electron-beam induced synthesis of nanostructures: a review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Martinez, I G; Bachmatiuk, A; Bezugly, V; Kunstmann, J; Gemming, T; Liu, Z; Cuniberti, G; Rümmeli, M H

    2016-06-02

    As the success of nanostructures grows in modern society so does the importance of our ability to control their synthesis in precise manners, often with atomic precision as this can directly affect the final properties of the nanostructures. Hence it is crucial to have both deep insight, ideally with real-time temporal resolution, and precise control during the fabrication of nanomaterials. Transmission electron microscopy offers these attributes potentially providing atomic resolution with near real time temporal resolution. In addition, one can fabricate nanostructures in situ in a TEM. This can be achieved with the use of environmental electron microscopes and/or specialized specimen holders. A rather simpler and rapidly growing approach is to take advantage of the imaging electron beam as a tool for in situ reactions. This is possible because there is a wealth of electron specimen interactions, which, when implemented under controlled conditions, enable different approaches to fabricate nanostructures. Moreover, when using the electron beam to drive reactions no specialized specimen holders or peripheral equipment is required. This review is dedicated to explore the body of work available on electron-beam induced synthesis techniques with in situ capabilities. Particular emphasis is placed on the electron beam-induced synthesis of nanostructures conducted inside a TEM, viz. the e-beam is the sole (or primary) agent triggering and driving the synthesis process.

  1. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  2. Magnetic Guiding of Electron Beam in Imploded Spherical Solid Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Endo, Takuma; Firex Team

    2015-11-01

    In fast ignition, the large divergence of electron beam is one of the most critical issues for efficient core heating. For improving the efficiency in FIREX project, we proposed the electron beam guiding by externally applied kT-class longitudinal magnetic fields. The 2D collisional PIC simulations showed that the electron beam can be successfully focused by the moderately-converging fields (mirror ratio RM < 20). On the other hand, in the implosion simulation for a cone-attached CD shell target with B-field, the mirror ratio reaches RM > 100 at the maximum compression, which is too high for efficient guiding. Recently, we introduced a spherical solid target, where the mirror ratio is moderate since the density compressibility stays low (~30) and the magnetic-field compressibility will also be low. In the conference, we will show the integrated simulation results for core heating by fast electron beam with large beam divergence under the compressed core and magnetic fields formed through implosion of a solid spherical target. This work is supported by NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS12KUGK057, NIFS15KUGK094), JSPS KAKENHI (25400534, 25400539, 26400532) and DOE/OFES under DE-SC0008827.

  3. Dosimetry of small fields for Therac 20 electron beams.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S C; Wilson, D L; Jose, B

    1984-01-01

    The Therac 20 medical linear accelerator produces electron beams of 6, 9, 13, 17, and 20 MeV. We measured depth dose, isodose curves, and output factors for small electron fields using an ionization chamber, film, and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Tables and graphs were generated from these measurements for accurate treatment planning of various blocked and open fields.

  4. Flat-Lens Focusing of Electron Beams in Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yang; Cao, Xiyuan; Guo, Ran; Zhang, Yanyan; Che, Zhiyuan; Yannick, Fouodji T.; Zhang, Weiping; Du, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Coupling electron beams carrying information into electronic units is fundamental in microelectronics. This requires precision manipulation of electron beams through a coupler with a good focusing ability. In graphene, the focusing of wide electron beams has been successfully demonstrated by a circular p-n junction. However, it is not favorable for information coupling since the focal length is so small that the focal spot locates inside the circular gated region, rather than in the background region. Here, we demonstrate that an array of gate-defined quantum dots, which has gradually changing lattice spacing in the direction transverse to propagation, can focus electrons outside itself, providing a possibility to make a coupler in graphene. The focusing effect can be understood as due to the gradient change of effective refractive indices, which are defined by the local energy band in a periodic potential. The strong focusing can be achieved by suitably choosing the lattice gradient and the layer number in the incident direction, offering an effective solution to precision manipulation of electron beams with wide electron energy range and high angular tolerance. PMID:27628099

  5. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  6. Attainment of Electron Beam Suitable for Medium Energy Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, Sergei M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron cooling of charged particle beams is a well-established technique at electron energies of up to 300 keV. However, up to the present time the advance of electron cooling to the MeV-range energies has remained a purely theoretical possibility. The electron cooling project at Fermilab has recently demonstrated the ¯rst cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring, and therefore, has proved the validity of the idea of relativistic electron cool- ing. The Recycler Electron Cooler (REC) is the key component of the Teva- tron Run II luminosity upgrade project. Its performance depends critically on the quality of electron beam. A stable electron beam of 4.3 MeV car- rying 0.5 A of DC current is required. The beam suitable for the Recycler Electron Cooler must have an angular spread not exceeding 200 ¹rad. The full-scale prototype of the REC was designed, built and tested at Fermilab in the Wideband laboratory to study the feasibility of attaining the high-quality electron beam. In this thesis I describe various aspects of development of the Fermilab electron cooling system, and the techniques used to obtain the electron beam suitable for the cooling process. In particular I emphasize those aspects of the work for which I was principally responsible.

  7. Electron beam irradiation of gemstone for color enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Sarada; Ghazali, Zulkafli; Hashim, Siti A'iasah; Ahmad, Shamshad; Jusoh, Mohd Suhaimi

    2012-09-01

    Numerous treatment of gemstones has been going on for hundreds of years for enhancing color and clarity of gems devoid of these attributes. Whereas previous practices included fraudulent or otherwise processes to achieve the color enhancement, the ionizing radiation has proven to be a reliable and reproducible technique. Three types of irradiation processes include exposure to gamma radiation, electron beam irradiation and the nuclear power plants. Electron Beam Irradiation of Gemstone is a technique in which a gemstone is exposed to highly ionizing radiation electron beam to knock off electrons to generate color centers culminating in introduction of deeper colors. The color centers may be stable or unstable. Below 9MeV, normally no radioactivity is introduced in the exposed gems. A study was conducted at Electron Beam Irradiation Centre (Alurtron) for gemstone color enhancement by using different kind of precious gemstones obtained from Pakistan. The study shows that EB irradiation not only enhances the color but can also improves the clarity of some type of gemstones. The treated stones included kunzite, tourmaline, topaz, quartz, aquamarine and cultured pearls. Doses ranging from 25 kGy to 200 KGy were employed to assess the influence of doses on color and clarity and to select the optimum doses. The samples used included both the natural and the faceted gemstones. It is concluded that significant revenue generation is associated with the enhancement of the color in clarity of gemstones which are available at very cheap price in the world market.

  8. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  9. The physics of FEL in an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.

    2010-10-07

    We solve linearized Vlasov-Maxwell FEL equations for a 3-D perturbation in the infinite electron beam with Lorentzian energy distributions using paraxial approximation. We present analytical solutions for various initial perturbations and discuss the effect of optical guiding in such system.

  10. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  11. Curing Composite Materials Using Lower-Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Catherine A.; Bykanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In an improved method of fabricating composite-material structures by laying up prepreg tapes (tapes of fiber reinforcement impregnated by uncured matrix materials) and then curing them, one cures the layups by use of beams of electrons having kinetic energies in the range of 200 to 300 keV. In contrast, in a prior method, one used electron beams characterized by kinetic energies up to 20 MeV. The improved method was first suggested by an Italian group in 1993, but had not been demonstrated until recently. With respect to both the prior method and the present improved method, the impetus for the use of electron- beam curing is a desire to avoid the high costs of autoclaves large enough to effect thermal curing of large composite-material structures. Unfortunately, in the prior method, the advantages of electron-beam curing are offset by the need for special walls and ceilings on curing chambers to shield personnel from x rays generated by impacts of energetic electrons. These shields must be thick [typically 2 to 3 ft (about 0.6 to 0.9 m) if made of concrete] and are therefore expensive. They also make it difficult to bring large structures into and out of the curing chambers. Currently, all major companies that fabricate composite-material spacecraft and aircraft structures form their layups by use of automated tape placement (ATP) machines. In the present improved method, an electron-beam gun is attached to an ATP head and used to irradiate the tape as it is pressed onto the workpiece. The electron kinetic energy between 200 and 300 keV is sufficient for penetration of the ply being laid plus one or two of the plies underneath it. Provided that the electron-beam gun is properly positioned, it is possible to administer the required electron dose and, at the same time, to protect personnel with less shielding than is needed in the prior method. Adequate shielding can be provided by concrete walls 6 ft (approximately equal to 1.8 m) high and 16 in. (approximately

  12. Investigation of electron beam stabilization of 193-nm photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Park, Jong-Woon; Kim, Hak-Joon; Jun, Bum-Jin; Gil, Myung-Goon; Kim, Bong-Ho; Ross, Matthew F.; Livesay, William R.

    2001-08-01

    193nm lithography is a promising candidate for the fabrication of microelectronic devices at the 130nm design rule and below. With smaller feature sizes, below 130nm, reduced resist thickness is essential because of the pattern collapse issues at high aspect ratios and the limited depth of focus with 193nm lithography tools. However, ArF resists have shown problems with etch selectivity, especially with the thin resist layers necessary. Additionally, pattern slimming during CD-SEM measurement, due to the nature of the resist chemistry, is an issue with feature stability after patterning. At present, many studies have been performed for improving the etch selectivity of resists and addressing line slimming issues. In this study, the electron beam stabilization process has been applied for improving the etch selectivity of resist patterns having an aspect ratio less than 3.0. The electron beam stabilization has been applied to two different ArF resist types; acrylate and cyclic-olefin- maleic-anhydride (COMA), which have been evaluated with respect to materials properties, etch selectivity, and line slimming performance as a function of electron beam dose and etch condition. Film shrinkage and the change in index of refraction were monitored as a function of stabilization condition. The chemical properties were characterized before and after electron beam stabilization using FTIR analysis. Blanket resist etch rate studies were performed as a function of stabilization condition for each resist type. Cross- sectional views of resist patterns after etch processing were also investigated to evaluate the improvement in etch resistance provided by the electron beam process. CD SEM measurements were performed to evaluate the impact of the stabilization process on the patterned features. The issue of line slimming has also been evaluated, with and without electron beam stabilization, for the different ArF resist materials considered. The results were compared with a Kr

  13. Electron beam tuning of carrier concentrations in oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hyunjin; Choi, Jaewan; Cho, Youngseung; Hwang, In-Sung; Kim, Sun-Jung; Lee, Jong-Heun; Roth, Siegmar; Kim, Gyu-Tae

    2011-07-01

    In spite of the attractive electrical properties of metal oxide nanowires, it is difficult to tune their surface states, notably the ionic adsorbents and oxygen vacancies, both of which can cause instability, degradation, and the irreproducibility or unrepeatable changes of the electrical characteristics. In order to control the surface states of the nanowires, electron beams were locally irradiated onto the channels of metal oxide nanowire field effect transistors. This high energy electron beam irradiation changed the electrical properties of the individual metal oxide nanowires, due to the removal of the negative adsorbents (O2-, O-). The detachment of the ionic adsorbents changes the charge states of the nanowires, resulting in the enhancement of the electrical conductance in n-type nanowires (ZnO, SnO2) and the degradation of the conductance in p-type nanowires (CuO). By investigating the changes in the electrical properties of nanowire devices in air or vacuum, with or without exposure to electron beams, the roles of the physisorbed water molecules or chemisorbed oxygen molecules can be independently understood. Unlike the electron beam irradiation, the vacuum enhanced the conductance of both n-type (ZnO, SnO2) and p-type (CuO) nanowires, due to the release of charges caused by the detachment of the polarized water molecules that were screening them from the surface of the nanowires, irrespective of the major carrier type. The electron beam irradiation technique has the potential to locally modulate the charge carriers in electronic nanowire devices, and the changes could be maintained with proper passivation for the long-term preservation of the device characteristics.

  14. Toward ultraflat surface morphologies during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis: disruption origins and compensation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Fowlkes, Jason D; Rack, Philip D; Utke, Ivo; Plank, Harald

    2015-02-11

    Emerging applications for nanoscale materials demand precise deposit shape retention from design to deposition. This study investigates the effects that disrupt high-fidelity shapes during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis. It is shown that process parameters, patterning strategies and deposit topography can impose lateral precursor coverage gradients during growth resulting in unwanted topographic artifacts. The study classifies the evolving surface shapes into four general types and explains the formation and transition from a fundamental point of view. Continuum model calculations and simulations expand the experimental results to provide a comprehensive insight into understand the disruption mechanism. The findings demonstrate that the well-established concept of growth regimes has to be expanded by its lateral gradients as they strongly influence final shape fidelities. Finally, the study is complemented by a compensation strategy that improves the edge fidelity on the lower nanoscale to further push this technique toward the intrinsic limitations.

  15. Research on pinching characteristics of electron beams emitted from different cathode surfaces of a rod-pinch diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Qiu, Aici; Zhang, Zhong; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Hailiang

    2010-07-01

    The particle-in-cell code UNIPIC is used to simulate the working process of a rod-pinch diode and investigate the pinching characteristics of electron beams emitted from different cathode surfaces. The simulation results indicate that the electron beam emitted from the upstream surface pinches better than from other surfaces when all the three surfaces emit electrons. The charge-density deposition on the anode surface peaks at the rod tip while the deposited charge density is approximately uniform over the first 15 mm of the rod before rapidly increasing over the last 3 mm, indicating a large axial extent of electron deposition. For the case of single-surface emission, the pinching quality of the electron beam emitted from the downstream surface is better than those from other surfaces. The charge-density deposition peaks at the rod tip and decreases rapidly off the tip. Based on the relationship of Larmor radius, beam's self-magnetic field, and the spatial current distribution, the above simulation results are analyzed theoretically. The experiments are performed on the inductive voltage adder to examine the simulations. By comparing the axial distribution of the radiation on the anode rod measured with the pinhole camera and the on-axis forward x-ray dose measured with the LiF thermoluminescent detectors, the simulation results are verified. The electron emission suppression method and the impedance change for each case are investigated or discussed in this paper.

  16. WE-A-207-02: Electron Beam Therapy - Current Status and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.

    2015-06-15

    In memory of the significant contribution of Dr. Jacques Ovadia to electron beam techniques, this session will review recent, advanced techniques which are reinvigorating the science of electron beam radiation therapy. Recent research efforts in improving both the applicability and quality of the electron beam therapy will be discussed, including modulated electron beam radiotherapy (MERT) and dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR). Learning Objectives: To learn about recent advances in electron beam therapy, including modulated electron beam therapy and dynamic electron arc therapy (DEAR). Put recent advances in the context of work that Dr. Ovadia pursued during his career in medical physics.

  17. Using an energized oxygen micro-jet for improved graphene etching by focused electron beam

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-12-07

    We report on an improved Focused Electron Beam Induced Etching (FEBIE) process, which exploits heated oxygen delivery via a continuous supersonic micro-jet resulting in faster graphene patterning and better etch feature definition. Positioning a micro-jet in close proximity to a graphene surface with minimal jet spreading due to a continuous regime of gas flow at the exit of the 10 micrometer inner diameter capillary allows for focused exposure of the surface to reactive oxygen at high mass flux and impingement energy of a supersonic gas stream localized to a small etching area exposed to electron beam. These unique benefits ofmore » focused supersonic oxygen delivery to the surface enable a dramatic increase in the etch rate of graphene with no parasitic carbon ‘halo’ deposition due to secondary electrons (SE) from backscattered electrons (BSE) in the area surrounding the etched regions. Increase of jet temperature via local nozzle heating provides means for enhancing kinetic energy of impinging oxygen molecules, which further speed up the etch, thus minimizing the beam exposure time and required electron dose, before parasitic carbon film deposition due to BSE mediated decomposition of adsorbed hydrocarbon contaminants has a measurable impact on quality of graphene etched features. Interplay of different physical mechanisms underlying an oxygen micro-jet assisted FEBIE process is discussed with support from experimental observations.« less

  18. Using an energized oxygen micro-jet for improved graphene etching by focused electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-12-07

    We report on an improved Focused Electron Beam Induced Etching (FEBIE) process, which exploits heated oxygen delivery via a continuous supersonic micro-jet resulting in faster graphene patterning and better etch feature definition. Positioning a micro-jet in close proximity to a graphene surface with minimal jet spreading due to a continuous regime of gas flow at the exit of the 10 micrometer inner diameter capillary allows for focused exposure of the surface to reactive oxygen at high mass flux and impingement energy of a supersonic gas stream localized to a small etching area exposed to electron beam. These unique benefits of focused supersonic oxygen delivery to the surface enable a dramatic increase in the etch rate of graphene with no parasitic carbon ‘halo’ deposition due to secondary electrons (SE) from backscattered electrons (BSE) in the area surrounding the etched regions. Increase of jet temperature via local nozzle heating provides means for enhancing kinetic energy of impinging oxygen molecules, which further speed up the etch, thus minimizing the beam exposure time and required electron dose, before parasitic carbon film deposition due to BSE mediated decomposition of adsorbed hydrocarbon contaminants has a measurable impact on quality of graphene etched features. Interplay of different physical mechanisms underlying an oxygen micro-jet assisted FEBIE process is discussed with support from experimental observations.

  19. Using an energized oxygen micro-jet for improved graphene etching by focused electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-12-07

    We report on an improved Focused Electron Beam Induced Etching (FEBIE) process, which exploits heated oxygen delivery via a continuous supersonic micro-jet resulting in faster graphene patterning and better etch feature definition. Positioning a micro-jet in close proximity to a graphene surface with minimal jet spreading due to a continuous regime of gas flow at the exit of the 10 μm inner diameter capillary allows for focused exposure of the surface to reactive oxygen at high mass flux and impingement energy of a supersonic gas stream localized to a small etching area exposed to electron beam. These unique benefits of focused supersonic oxygen delivery to the surface enable a dramatic increase in the etch rate of graphene with no parasitic carbon “halo” deposition due to secondary electrons from backscattered electrons (BSE) in the area surrounding the etched regions. Increase of jet temperature via local nozzle heating provides means for enhancing kinetic energy of impinging oxygen molecules, which further speed up the etch, thus minimizing the beam exposure time and required electron dose, before parasitic carbon film deposition due to BSE mediated decomposition of adsorbed hydrocarbon contaminants has a measurable impact on quality of graphene etched features. Interplay of different physical mechanisms underlying an oxygen micro-jet assisted FEBIE process is discussed with support from experimental observations.

  20. Submicron Co(TaC) line array produced by electron-beam direct writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhou, T. J.; Wang, J. P.; Thong, J. T. L.; Yao, X. F.; Chong, T. C.

    2003-05-01

    (Co60C40)97Ta3 and Co60C40 films with thickness 30 nm were prepared by cosputtering Co, Ta, and C onto C-buffered glass substrates. The as-deposited (Co60C40)97Ta3 and Co60C40 films were amorphous and nonferromagnetic. These films became magnetic upon annealing and the magnetic performance of annealed (Co60C40)97Ta3 films are better than that of annealed Co60C40 films at the same annealing condition. Magnetic patterning (line array) of the as-deposited (Co60C40)97Ta3 films was realized by subjecting it to electron-beam radiation using a focused 30 keV beam with a current of 7.1 nA and a dwell time per line of 0.75 s and longer. By increasing the dwell time, the whole region where an electron beam was scanned became magnetic with clear domain structures because of thermally activated diffusion. The required dwell time of magnetically patterning nonmagnetic (Co60C40)97Ta3 thin films (0.75 s) is much shorter than that of Co60C40 films (3.8 s). The magnetic measurements show that the lines [(Co60C40)97Ta3] and dots (Co60C40) are magnetically soft. The present method of magnetically patterning a nonmagnetic film has potential application for nanoscale solid magnetic devices.

  1. A Investigation of Radiotherapy Electron Beams Using Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, George X.

    1995-01-01

    Radiotherapy electron beams are more complicated than photon beams due to variations in the beam production, the scattering of low-energy electrons, and the presence contaminant photons. The detailed knowledge of a radiotherapy beam is essential to an accurate calculation of dose distribution for a treatment planning system. This investigation aims to enhance our understanding of radiotherapy beams by focusing on electron beams used in radiotherapy. It starts with a description of the Monte Carlo simulation code, BEAM, and a detailed simulation of an accelerator head to obtain realistic radiotherapy beams. The simulation covers electron beams from various accelerators, including the NRC research accelerator, the NPL (UK), accelerator, A Varian Clinac 2100C, a Philips SL75-20, a Siemens KD2, an AECL Therac 20, and a Scanditronix MM50. The beam energies range from 4 to 50 MeV. The EGS4 user code, BEAM, is extensively benchmarked against experiment by comparing calculated dose distributions with measured dose distributions in water. The simulated beams are analyzed to obtain the characteristics of various electron beams from a variety of accelerators. The simulated beams are also used as inputs to calculate the following parameters: the mean electron energy, the most probable energy, the energy-range relationships, the depth-scaling factor to convert depths in plastic to water-equivalent depths, the water-to-air stopping-power ratios, and the electron fluence correction factors used to convert dose measured in plastics to dose in water. These parameters are essential for electron beam dosimetry. The results from this study can be applied in cancer clinics to improve the accuracy of the absolute dosimetry. The simulation also provides information about the backscatter into the beam monitor chamber, and predicts the influence on the beam output factors. This investigation presents comprehensive data on the clinical electron beams, and answers many questions which could

  2. Incubational domain characterization in lightly doped ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhipeng; Mori, Toshiyuki; John Auchterlonie, Graeme; Zou Jin; Drennan, John

    2012-08-15

    Microstructures of both Gd- and Y-doped ceria with different doping level (i.e., 10 at% and 25 at%) have been comprehensively characterized by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Coherent nano-sized domains can be widely observed in heavily doped ceria. Nevertheless, it was found that a large amount of dislocations actually exist in lightly doped ceria instead of heavily doped ones. Furthermore, incubational domains can be detected in lightly doped ceria, with dislocations located at the interfaces. The interactions between such linear dislocations and dopant defects have been simulated accordingly. As a consequence, the formation mechanism of incubational domains is rationalized in terms of the interaction between intrinsic dislocations of doped ceria and dopant defects. This study offers the insights into the initial state and related mechanism of the formation of nano-sized domains, which have been widely observed in heavily rare-earth-doped ceria in recent years. - Graphical abstract: Interactions between dislocations and dopants lead to incubational domain formation in lightly doped ceria. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures were characterized in both heavily and light Gd-/Y-doped ceria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocations are existed in lightly doped ceria rather than heavily doped one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interactions between dislocations and dopant defects were simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of dislocation associated incubational domain is rationalized.

  3. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  4. SHEEBA: A spatial high energy electron beam analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galimberti, Marco; Giulietti, Antonio; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A.

    2005-05-01

    Electron bunches with large energy and angle spread are not easy to be analyzed with conventional spectrometers. In this article, a device for the detection of high energy electrons is presented. This detector, based on the traces left by electrons on a stack of dosimetric films, together with an original numerical algorithm for traces deconvolution, is able to characterize both angularly and spectrally (up to some mega-electron-volts) a broad-spectrum electron bunch. A numerical test was successfully performed with a virtual electron beam, which was in turn reconstructed using a Montecarlo code (based on the CERN library GEANT4). Due to its simplicity and small size, the spatial high energy electron beam analyzer (SHEEBA) detector is particularly suitable to be used in laser plasma acceleration experiments.

  5. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer, John W.

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process.

  6. Generation of valley-polarized electron beam in bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Changsoo

    2015-12-28

    We propose a method to produce valley-polarized electron beams using a bilayer graphene npn junction. By analyzing the transmission properties of electrons through the junction with zigzag interface in the presence of trigonal warping, we observe that there exist a range of incident energies and barrier heights in which transmitted electrons are well polarized and collimated. From this observation and by performing numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that valley-dependent electronic currents with nearly perfect polarization can be generated. We also show that the peak-to-peak separation angle between the polarized currents is tunable either by incident energy or by barrier height each of which is controlled by using top and back gate voltages. The results can be used for constructing an electron beam splitter to produce valley-polarized currents.

  7. Limiting current of intense electron beams in a decelerating gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Beaudoin, B. L.; Thompson, C.; Karakkad, J. A.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    For numerous applications, it is desirable to develop electron beam driven efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation that are capable of producing the required power at beam voltages as low as possible. This trend is limited by space charge effects that cause the reduction of electron kinetic energy and can lead to electron reflection. So far, this effect was analyzed for intense beams propagating in uniform metallic pipes. In the present study, the limiting currents of intense electron beams are analyzed for the case of beam propagation in the tubes with gaps. A general treatment is illustrated by an example evaluating the limiting current in a high-power, tunable 1-10 MHz inductive output tube (IOT), which is currently under development for ionospheric modification. Results of the analytical theory are compared to results of numerical simulations. The results obtained allow one to estimate the interaction efficiency of IOTs.

  8. Shaping single walled nanotubes with an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zobelli, A.; Gloter, A.; Colliex, C.; Ewels, C. P.

    2008-01-15

    We show that electron irradiation in a dedicated scanning transmission microscope can be used as a nano-electron-lithography technique allowing the controlled reshaping of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. The required irradiation conditions have been optimized on the basis of total knock-on cross sections calculated within density functional based methods. It is then possible to induce morphological modifications, such as a local change of the tube chirality, by sequentially removing several tens of atoms with a nanometrical spatial resolution. We show that electron beam heating effects are limited. Thus, electron beam induced vacancy migration and nucleation might be excluded. These irradiation techniques could open new opportunities for nanoengineering a large variety of nanostructured materials.

  9. Electron beam induced modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiljeva, I. V.; Mjakin, S. V.; Makarov, A. V.; Krasovsky, A. N.; Varlamov, A. V.

    2006-10-01

    Electron beam processing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films is found to promote significant changes in the melting heat, intrinsic viscosity and polymer film-liquid (water, isooctane and toluene) boundary surface tension. These properties are featured with several maximums depending on the absorbed dose and correlating with the modification of PET surface functionality. Studies using adsorption of acid-base indicators and IR-spectroscopy revealed that the increase of PET surface hydrophilicity is determined by the oxidation of methylene and methyne groups. Electron beam treatment of PET films on the surface of N-vinylpyrrolidone aqueous solution provided graft copolymerization with this comonomer at optimum process parameters (energy 700 keV, current 1 mA, absorbed dose 50 kGy).

  10. Strongly turbulent stabilization of electron beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Haber, I.; Palmadesso, P.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1980-01-01

    The stabilization of electron beam interactions due to strongly turbulent nonlinearities is studied analytically and numerically for a wide range of plasma parameters. A fluid mode coupling code is described in which the effects of electron and ion Landau damping and linear growth due to the energetic electron beam are included in a phenomenological manner. Stabilization of the instability is found to occur when the amplitudes of the unstable modes exceed the threshold of the oscillating two-stream instability. The coordinate space structure of the turbulent spectrum which results clearly shows that soliton-like structures are formed by this process. Phenomenological models of both the initial stabilization and the asymptotic states are developed. Scaling laws between the beam-plasma growth rate and the fluctuations in the fields and plasma density are found in both cases, and shown to be in good agreement with the results of the simulation.

  11. Use of an Electron Beam for Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslave Derbenev

    2007-09-10

    Microwave instability of an electron beam can be used for a multiple increase in the collective response for the perturbation caused by a particle of a co-moving ion beam, i.e. for enhancement of friction force in electron cooling method. The low scale (hundreds GHz and higher frequency range) space charge or FEL type instabilities can be produced (depending on conditions) by introducing an alternating magnetic fields along the electron beam path. Beams’ optics and noise conditioning for obtaining a maximal cooling effect and related limitations will be discussed. The method promises to increase by a few orders of magnitude the cooling rate for heavy particle beams with a large emittance for a wide energy range with respect to either electron and conventional stochastic cooling.

  12. The tracking of interfaces in an electron-beam vaporizer

    SciTech Connect

    Westerberg, K.W.; McClelland, M.A.; Finlayson, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    A numerical analysis is made of the material and energy flow in an electron beam vaporizer. In this system the energy from an electron beam heats metal confined in a water-cooled crucible. Metal is vaporized from a liquid pool circulating in a shell of its own solid. A modified Galerkin finite element method is used to calculate the flow and temperature fields along with the interface locations. The mesh is parameterized with spines which stretch and pivot as the phase boundaries move. The discretized equations are arranged in an ``arrow`` matrix and solved using the Newton-Raphson method. Results are given for an experimental aluminum vaporizer. The effects of buoyancy and capillary driven flow are included along with the surface contributions of vapor thrust, latent heat, thermal radiation, and crucible contact resistance.

  13. Millimeter-wave generation with spiraling electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulke, B.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility of using the interaction between a thin, solid, spiraling electron beam of 10 to 20 kV energy and a microwave cavity to generate watts of CW millimeter-wave power was investigated. Experimental results are given for several prototype devices operating at 9.4 GHz and at 94 GHz. Power outputs of 5 W, and electronic efficiencies near 3%, were obtained at X band, and moderate gain was obtained at 94 GHz. The small-signal theory gives a good fit to the X-band data, and the device behavior at 94 GHz is as expected from the given beam characteristics. The performance is limited chiefly by the velocity spread in the spiraling electron beam, and once this can be brought under control, high-power generation of millimeter waves appears quite feasible with this type of device.

  14. Intense electron beam propagation across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Striffler, C.D.; Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Reiser, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we consider the propagation of an intense electron-ion beam across an applied magnetic field. In the absence of the applied field, the beam system is in a Bennett equilibrium state that involves electrons with both large axial and thermal velocities and a cold stationary space-charge neutralizing ion species. Typical parameters under consideration are V{sub o} {approximately} 1 MV, I {approximately} 5 kA, T{sub e} {approximately} 100 keV, and beam radii {approximately} 1 cm. We find that in the intense beam regime, the propagation is limited due to space-charge depression caused by the deflection of the electron beam by the transverse field. This critical field is of the order of the peak self-magnetic field of the electron beam which is substantially higher than the single particle cut-off field. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Numerical simulation of electron beam welding with beam oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Permyakov, G. L.

    2017-02-01

    This research examines the process of electron-beam welding in a keyhole mode with the use of beam oscillations. We study the impact of various beam oscillations and their parameters on the shape of the keyhole, the flow of heat and mass transfer processes and weld parameters to develop methodological recommendations. A numerical three-dimensional mathematical model of electron beam welding is presented. The model was developed on the basis of a heat conduction equation and a Navier-Stokes equation taking into account phase transitions at the interface of a solid and liquid phase and thermocapillary convection (Marangoni effect). The shape of the keyhole is determined based on experimental data on the parameters of the secondary signal by using the method of a synchronous accumulation. Calculations of thermal and hydrodynamic processes were carried out based on a computer cluster, using a simulation package COMSOL Multiphysics.

  16. Decomposition of high concentration SF6 using an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Youn-Suk; Lee, Sung-Joo; Choi, Chang Yong; Park, Jun-Hyeong; Kim, Tak-Hyun; Jung, In-Ha

    2016-07-01

    In this study, high concentration SF6 (2-10%) was decomposed using an electron beam irradiation. Various influential factors were investigated to improve the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of SF6. The initial concentrations of SF6, absorbed doses, SF6/H2 ratios and retention times were the main factors of concern. As a result, the DRE increased as the adsorbed dose and retention time increased. The DRE of SF6 also increased up to 20% approximately when H2 was added to the reaction mixture. On the other hand, the DRE of SF6 decreased as initial concentrations of SF6 increased. Finally, the main by-product formed from SF6 decomposition by the electron beam was HF.

  17. Application of electron beam plasma for biopolymers modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilieva, T. M.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of the Electron Beam Plasma treatment on natural polysaccharide chitosan were studied experimentally. Low molecular water-soluble products of chitosan and chitooligosaccharides were obtained by treating the original polymers in the Electron Beam Plasma of oxygen and water vapor. The molecular mass of the products varied from 18 kDa to monomeric fragments. The degradation of the original polymers was due to the action of active oxygen particles (atomic and singlet oxygen) and the particles of the water plasmolysis (hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxides). The 95% yield of low molecular weight chitosans was attained by optimizing the treatment conditions. The studies of the antimicrobial activity of low molecular products showed that they strongly inhibit the multiplication of colon bacillus, aurococcus and yeast-like fungi. The EBP-stimulated degradation of polysaccharides and proteins were found to result from breaking β-1,4 glycosidic bounds and peptide bonds, respectively.

  18. Synthesis of nanocrystalline materials by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.A.; Thompson, L.J. ); Marshall, D.J. )

    1992-09-01

    A new nanophase materials preparation system using electron beam heating to vaporize materials in inert or reactive gaseous environments has been developed. With this system a wide variety of materials can be produced in nanophase form with minimum contamination. Besides enabling the production of pure metals, including refractory materials, the system is designed to produce alloys and multicomponent materials by simultaneous evaporation of two or more elements. The electron beam position and dwell time are set by computer, allowing great control of the evaporation conditions. Results obtained to-date indicate great promise for obtaining increased yields and smaller grain sizes than typically obtainable when nanophase materials are produced using resistive heating. A description of nanophase [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] produced with a mean grain size of approximately 2.5 nm is given as a demonstration of the capabilities of the system.

  19. High Brightness Electron Beam Studies at the NSLS SDL

    SciTech Connect

    Qian,H.; Hidaka, Y.; Murphy, J. B.; Podobedov, B.; Seletskiy, S.; Shen, Y.; Yang, X.; Wang, X. J.; Tang, C. X.

    2009-05-04

    Experimental optimization of electron beam brightness at the NSLS SDL is reported in this paper. Using a high quantum efficiency (QE) Mg metal cathode and the S-band BNL-type RF gun, we have systematically studied electron beams transverse and longitudinal emittance. The measured thermal emittance for the Mg cathode is 0.85{+-}0.04 mm-mrad/mm, which contradicts the current thermal emittance model. For a 50 pC beam, measured normalized transverse and longitudinal RMS emittance are 0.6 mm-mrd and 5.2 ps-keV, respectively. The smallest projected transverse emittance observed for a 20 pC charge is 0.15 {+-} 0.02 mm-mrad.

  20. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Teruya, A.T.; Elmer, J.W.

    1996-12-10

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process. 4 figs.

  1. Plasma chemistry in electron-beam sustained discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Miles

    2016-09-01

    There are many emerging applications that exploit the exotic chemical characteristics of plasmas. Some of these applications, if deployed on an industrial scale, involve processing much larger volumes of gas than seems reasonable using any atmospheric pressure plasma source in wide use today. We note that an electron-beam sustained discharge permits the creation of a atmospheric pressure plasma with reasonable uniformity, large volme, and widely controllable electron temperature. Robust and durable electron beam sources now exist that would facilitate such applications. In this paper we discuss the general advantages of this approach, and we present a modelling study concerned with the production of NO in mixtures of N2 and O2, looking towards plasma aided manufacturing of fertilizers.

  2. Transmission of High-Power Electron Beams Through Small Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Tschalaer, Christoph; Alarcon, Ricardo O.; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V.; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R.; Cowan, Ray Franklin; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisher, Peter H.; Ihloff, Ernest E.; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kelleher, Aidan Michael; Legg, Robert A.; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R.; Ou, Longwu; Schmookler, Barak Abraham; Tennant, Christopher D.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Zhang, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Beam transmission losses of 3 p.p.m. through a 2 mm diameter aperture were maintained during a 7 hour continuous run.

  3. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  4. Double deflection system for an electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Norman W.; Golladay, Steven D.; Crewe, Albert V.

    1978-01-01

    A double deflection scanning system for electron beam instruments is provided embodying a means of correcting isotropic coma, and anisotropic coma aberrations induced by the magnetic lens of such an instrument. The scanning system deflects the beam prior to entry into the magnetic lens from the normal on-axis intersection of the beam with the lens according to predetermined formulas and thereby reduces the aberrations.

  5. Self-effect in expanding electron beam plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-05-07

    An analytical model of plasma flow from a metal plate hit by an intense, pulsed, electron beam aims to bridge the gap between radiation-hydrodynamics simulations and experiments, and to quantify the self-effect of the electron beam penetrating the flow. Does the flow disrupt the tight focus of the initial electron bunch, or later pulses in a train? This work aims to model the spatial distribution of plasma speed, density, degree of ionization, and magnetization to inquire. The initial solid density, several eV plasma expands to 1 cm and 10{sup {minus}4} relative density by 2 {micro}s, beyond which numerical simulations are imprecise. Yet, a Faraday cup detector at the ETA-II facility is at 25 cm from the target and observes the flow after 50 {micro}s. The model helps bridge this gap. The expansion of the target plasma into vacuum is so rapid that the ionized portion of the flow departs from local thermodynamic equilibrium. When the temperature (in eV) in a parcel of fluid drops below V{sub i} x [(2{gamma} - 2)/(5{gamma} + 17)], where V{sub i} is the ionization potential of the target metal (7.8 eV for tantalum), and {gamma} is the ratio of specific heats (5/3 for atoms), then the fractional ionization and electron temperature in that parcel remain fixed during subsequent expansion. The freezing temperature as defined here is V{sub i}/19. The balance between the self-pinching force and the space charge repulsion of an electron beam changes on penetrating a flow: (i) the target plasma cancels the space-charge field, (ii) internal eddy currents arise to counter the magnetization of relativistic electrons, and (iii) electron beam heating alters the flow magnetization by changing the plasma density gradient and the magnitude of the conductivity.

  6. Modulation of continuous electron beams in plasma wake-fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1988-09-08

    In this paper we discuss the interaction of a continuous electron beam with wake-field generated plasma waves. Using a one-dimensional two fluid model, a fully nonlinear analytical description of the interaction is obtained. The phenomena of continuous beam modulation and wave period shortening are discussed. The relationship between these effects and the two-stream instability is also examined. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Radial electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Mostrom, M.A.; Kwan, T.J.T.

    1995-01-01

    A new radially-driven electron-beam-breakup transit-time oscillator has been investigated analytically and through computer simulation as a compact low-impedance high-power microwave generator. In a 1MV, 50kA device 35cm in radius and 15cm long, with no external magnetic field, 5GW of extracted power and a growth rate of 0.26/ns have been observed. Theoretical maximum efficiencies are several times higher.

  8. A permanent magnet electron beam phase-shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, G. A.; Ermakov, A. N.; Pakhomov, N. I.; Semyachkin, V. K.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Skachkov, V. S.; Tyurin, S. A.

    2004-05-01

    We describe here the design and construction of a permanent magnet-based electron beam phase-shifter now operating in our 70 MeV Race-Track Microtron (P. Lucas, S. Webber (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2001 Particle Accelerator Conference, Vol. 4, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2001, p. 2596; L. Gennary (Ed.), Proceedings of the 1995 Particle Accelerator Conference, Vol. 2, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1996, p. 807).

  9. Intense electron-beam excitation of organic dye vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Marowsky, G.; Tittel, F.K.; Wilson, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental studies of electron-beam excitation of organic dye vapors of p-phenylene-bis-(5-phenyl-2-oxazole) POPOP and p-quaterphenyl have demonstrated short-duration high-gain and super-radiant laser behavior accompanied by severe fluorescence quenching due to dye fragmentation. This has been analyzed quantitatively by evaluation of the nitrogen fluorescence, originating from the complete breakdown of the POPOP structure.

  10. Collective microdynamics and noise suppression in dispersive electron beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, Avraham; Dyunin, Egor; Duchovni, Tamir; Nause, Ariel

    2011-12-15

    A general formulation is presented for deep collective interaction micro-dynamics in dispersive e-beam transport. In the regime of transversely coherent interaction, the formulation is applicable to both coherent and random temporal modulation of the electron beam. We demonstrate its use for determining the conditions for suppressing beam current noise below the classical shot-noise level by means of transport through a dispersive section with a small momentum compaction parameter.

  11. Whistler-Mode Radiation from the Spacelab 2 Electron Beam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-27

    launched on July 29, 1985, a spacecraft called the Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) was released from the shuttle to survey the plasma environment around...be shown, the plasma wave emissions observed are remarkably similar to emissions detected by spacecraft flying through auroral electron beams. The PDP...the spacecraft and instruments, see Shawhan [19821. The electron gun on the shuttle is part of the Vehicle Charging and Potential (VCAP) experiment

  12. Electron Beam Diagnostics using Coherent Cherenkov Radiation in Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Ruelas, M.

    2009-01-22

    The use of coherent Cherenkov radiation as a diagnostic tool for longitudinal distribution of an electron beam is studied in this paper. Coherent Cherenkov radiation is produced in an aerogel with an index of refraction close to unity. An aerogel spectral properties are experimentally studied and analyzed. This method will be employed for the helical IFEL bunching experiment at Neptune linear accelerator facility at UCLA.

  13. Electron Beam Welding to Join Gamma Titanium Aluminide Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Thomas Joseph (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is provided for welding two gamma titanium aluminide articles together. The method includes preheating the two articles to a welding temperature of from about 1700 F to about 2100 F, thereafter electron beam welding the two articles together at the welding temperature and in a welding vacuum to form a welded structure, and thereafter annealing the welded structure at an annealing temperature of from about 1800 F to about 2200 F, to form a joined structure.

  14. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  15. Pulsed Electric Discharge Laser Technology. Electron Beam Window Foil Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    6.0 INTERFEROMETRIC MEASUREMENT OF FOIL MOVEMENT A simple Michelson interferometer was used to measure foil movement on the test rig. Because the...TURNING BEAM MIRRORS BEAM DISPLAYFOCUEED IRIS AT FOOS. OPTICAL FIBRE * BUNDLE Figure 49. Schematic of interferometer . -98-7 reflected speckle. The...As a check on the pulse simulation, the actual movement of an electron-beam foil window was measured by interferometry. A speckle interferometer which

  16. Characterization of electron beam melted uranium - 6% niobium ingots

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R.H.

    1997-10-31

    A study was undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to characterize uranium, 6{percent} niobium ingots produced via electron beam melting,hearth refining and continuous casting and to compare this material with conventional VIM/skull melt /VAR material. Samples of both the ingot and feed material were analyzed for niobium, trace metallic elements, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. Ingot samples were also inspected metallographically and via microprobe analysis.

  17. Electron beam assisted synthesis of cadmium selenide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, M. C.; Guleria, A.; Singh, S.; Singh, A. K.; Adhikari, S.; Sarkar, S. K.

    2013-02-05

    Cadmium selenide nanomaterials of various shapes and sizes have been synthesized in different condensed media through electron beam irradiation using a 7 MeV linear accelerator. The microstructures in different media as well as the presence of capping reagents play a crucial role in the formation of nanomaterials of different shapes and sizes. Their optical properties could be efficiently tuned by controlling the synthetic parameters.

  18. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  19. Electron beam control using shock-induced density downramp injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, K.; Tsai, H.-E.; Barber, S.; Lehe, R.; Mao, H.-S.; Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    In these experiments, we improve the quality of electrons injected along a shock-induced density downramp. We demonstrate that beam ellipticity and steering are influenced by the shock front tilt, and we present simple models to explain these effects. By adjusting the shock front angle, we minimize the beam's off-axis steering and ellipticity, producing high-quality electron beams over a tunable energy range.

  20. Heat extraction from targets in high current electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubb, Ernest; Altemus, Rosemary; McCarthy, James; Biron, Don

    1982-12-01

    Various aspects of heat extraction from targets in high current electron beams are examined, among which are the dependences on boundary temperature, beam current density, and convective effects from an ambient gaseous environment. The design of a cooling system which extracts heat by forcing hydrogen (or helium) gas at a pressure of several Torr at near sonic velocities across a target surface is described. Boundary layer theory calculations and empirical measurements of the average heat transfer coefficient for the system are presented.

  1. Electron-beam driven relaxation oscillations in ferroelectric nanodisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Nathaniel; Ahluwalia, Rajeev; Kumar, Ashok; Srolovitz, David J.; Chandra, Premala; Scott, James F.

    2015-10-01

    Using a combination of computational simulations, atomic-scale resolution imaging and phenomenological modelling, we examine the underlying mechanism for nanodomain restructuring in lead zirconate titanate nanodisks driven by electron beams. The observed subhertz nanodomain dynamics are identified with relaxation oscillations where the charging/discharging cycle time is determined by saturation of charge traps and nanodomain wall creep. These results are unusual in that they indicate very slow athermal dynamics in nanoscale systems, and possible applications of gated versions are discussed.

  2. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  3. Electron beam-switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, L.D.; Murray, J.R.; Goldhar, J.; Bradley, L.P.

    1979-12-11

    A method and apparatus are designed for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  4. Structured electron beams from nano-engineered cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueangaramwong, A.; Mihalcea, D.; Andonian, G.; Piot, P.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to engineer cathodes at the nano-scale have opened new possibilities such as enhancing quantum efficiency via surface-plasmon excitation, forming ultra-low-emittance beams, or producing structured electron beams. In this paper, we present numerical investigations of the beam dynamics associated with this class of cathode in the weak- and strong-field regimes. We finally discuss the possible applications of some of the achievable cathode patterns when coupled with other phase space manipulations.

  5. Return Current Electron Beams and Their Generation of "Raman" Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.

    1998-11-01

    For some years, we(A. Simon and R. W. Short, Phys. Rev. Lett. 53), 1912 (1984). have proposed that the only reasonable explanation for many of the observations of "Raman" scattering is the presence of an electron beam in the plasma. (The beam creates a bump-on-tail instability.) Two major objections to this picture have been observation of Raman when no n_c/4 surface was present, with no likely source for the electron beam, and the necessity for the initially outward directed beam to bounce once to create the proper waves. Now new observations on LLE's OMEGA(R. Petrasso et al), this conference. and at LULI(C. Labaune et al)., Phys. Plasma 5, 234 (1998). have suggested a new origin for the electron beam. This new scenario answers the previous objections, maintains electron beams as the explanation of the older experiments, and may clear up puzzling observations that have remained unexplained. The new scenario is based on two assumptions: (1) High positive potentials develop in target plasmas during their creation. (2) A high-intensity laser beam initiates spark discharges from nearby surfaces to the target plasma. The resulting return current of electrons should be much more delta-like, is initially inwardly directed, and no longer requires the continued presence of a n_c/4 surface. Scattering of the interaction beam from the BOT waves yields the observed Raman signal. Experimental observations that support this picture will be cited. ``Pulsation'' of the scattering and broadband ``flashes'' are a natural part of this scenario. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  6. Conceptual design for an electron-beam heated hypersonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Kensek, R.P.

    1997-07-01

    There is a need for hypersonic wind-tunnel testing at about mach 10 and above using natural air and simulating temperatures and pressures which are prototypic of flight at 50 km altitude or below. With traditional wind-tunnel techniques, gas cooling during expansion results in exit temperatures which are too low. Miles, et al., have proposed overcoming this difficulty by heating the air with a laser beam as it expands in the wind-tunnel nozzle. This report discusses an alternative option of using a high-power electron beam to heat the air as it expands. In the e-beam heating concept, the electron beam is injected into the wind-tunnel nozzle near the exit and then is guided upstream toward the nozzle throat by a strong axial magnetic field. The beam deposits most of its power in the dense air near the throat where the expansion rate is greatest. A conceptual design is presented for a large-scale system which achieves Mach 14 for 0.1 seconds with an exit diameter of 2.8 meters. It requires 450 MW of electron beam power (5 MeV at 90 A). The guiding field is 500 G for most of the transport length and increases to 100 kG near the throat to converge the beam to a 1.0-cm diameter. The beam generator is a DC accelerator using a Marx bank (of capacitors) and a diode stack with a hot cathode. 14 refs. 38 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Creating metallic under-dense radiators by electron beam heating prior to laser impact

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1998-12-15

    A pulsed, relativistic electron beam can heat a metal foil to a plasma state, and initiate an expanding flow into vacuum. At a given time in its evolution, this flow fills a nearly spherical volume with nearly uniform density, assuming a rapid expansion prior to any condensation. A metal cloud produced in this way can serve as a target of intense laser illumination to create an under-dense radiator of x-rays. The phrase ''under-dense radiator'' means that the cloud, assumed ionized, has a plasma density that is less than the critical density for the wavelength of the laser light. The example described here is of a 2 {micro}g copper foil 23 {micro}m thick and 0.16 mm in diameter, heated by 8 mJ of electron beam energy in as short a time as possible, perhaps under 50 ns. The electron beam pulse must be at least 140 nC at 100 keV in order to transit the foil and deposit 8 mJ. A 50 ns pulse focused on the target would have a current of 2.8 A, and a current density of 14 kA/cm{sup 2}. The initial plasma temperature is 0.5 eV. After 300 ns, the flow has expanded to fill a nearly spherical volume of 1 mm diameter, with a nearly uniform copper density of 1.5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}. The leading edge of the cloud is expanding at 1700 m/s, while flow at the original position of the foil surface expands at 150 m/s. This cloud is nearly stationary during the short time of a laser pulse at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  8. Process development for electron beam joining of ceramic and glass components

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, P.; Gerstle, F.P.; Halbleib, J.A.; Voth, T.E.; McKenzie, B.; Clifford, J.R.; Habiger, K.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and extend the electron beam joining process to applications related to Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cermets for neutron tube fabrication, glass seals for flat panel displays, and ceramics for structural applications. The key issue is the identification of the allowable operating ranges that produce thermal conditions favorable to robust joining and sealing. High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately} 1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of heat sensitive components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. The combination of transient heating, with higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, enables a pulsed high power beam to melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons a well as ceramic and glass tubes and cylindrical shapes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon and thermal transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF linear accelerator at 10--13 MV. Joining experiments have provided high strength joints between alumina and alumina and between alumina and cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals.

  9. Adhesion and Atomic Structures of Gold on Ceria Nanostructures:The Role of Surface Structure and Oxidation State of Ceria Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuyuan; Wu, Zili; Wen, Jianguo; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R; Marks, Laurence D

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in heterogeneous catalysis have demonstrated that oxides supports with the same material but different shapes can result in metal catalysts with distinct catalytic properties. The shape-dependent catalysis was not well-understood owing to the lack of direct visualization of the atomic structures at metal-oxide interface. Herein, we utilized aberration-corrected electron microscopy and revealed the atomic structures of gold particles deposited on ceria nanocubes and nanorods with {100} or {111} facets exposed. For the ceria nanocube support, gold nanoparticles have extended atom layers at the metal-support interface. In contrast, regular gold nanoparticles and rafts are present on the ceria nanorod support. After hours of water gas shift reaction, the extended gold atom layers and rafts vanish, which is associated with the decrease of the catalytic activities. By understanding the atomic structures of the support surfaces, metal-support interfaces, and morphologies of the gold particles, a direct structure-property relationship is established.

  10. Development of the Science and Technology of Electron Beam Pumped KrF Lasers for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, John

    2002-11-01

    Electron beam pumped krypton fluoride (KrF) lasers are an attractive driver for inertial fusion energy. They have demonstrated very high beam quality, which is essential for reducing imprint in direct drive targets. Their short wavelength (248 nm) mitigates the growth of plasma instabilities. And they have the potential to meet the fusion needs for repetition rate, efficiency, and cost. This paper reviews the development of e-beam pumped KrF lasers. It will include a description of the fundamental physics and technology, as well as the challenges in developing a fusion system. Although KrF laser development is a multi-disciplinary endeavor, this talk will emphasize areas of interest to plasma physicists: electron beams, KrF kinetics, and pulsed power. The paper will describe experiments and modeling that has identified and mitigated instabilities in the electron beam. It will describe the electron beam propagation experiments, the supporting 3D parallel PIC codes, and how these have been used to design systems for maximum electron energy deposition into the laser gas. KrF kinetics modeling will be discussed. These newly developed time dependent codes can predict the output of several experiments operating under significantly different conditions. They are now being used as a design tool to predict the performance of future KrF systems. Finally, the talk will discuss the development of the pulsed power needed to drive the electron beams. This includes conventional gas switched systems for single shot devices together with the recently demonstrated all solid state switches that have the promise to meet the fusion requirements. The talk will be cast in context of the large, single shot KrF lasers built in the 1990's such as Nike (NRL-US), Ashura (Japan), and Titania (UK), as well as the Electra 700 J, 5 Hz rep-rate laser that is currently under development at NRL.

  11. Science and applications of low-emittance electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    van Bibber, K

    2000-08-20

    The capability of making very low-emittance electron beams of temporally short, high charge bunches has opened up exciting new possibilities in basic and applied science. Two notable applications are high energy electron-positron linear colliders for particle physics, and fourth-generation light sources consisting of linac-driven Free-Electron Lasers (FEL), both of which represent significant programmatic potential for the Laboratory in the future. The technologies contributing to low-emittance electron beams and their applications, namely precision fabrication, ultra-short pulse lasers, and RF photocathode injectors, are all areas of Lab expertise, and the work carried out under this LDRD project further expanded our core-competency in advanced concept accelerators. Furthermore, high energy accelerators have become a cornerstone of the SBSS program, as illustrated by the recent development of proton radiography as a prime technology candidate for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF), which enhanced the significance of this project all the more. This was a one-year project to both advance the technology of, and participate in the science enabled by very low-emittance electron beams. The work centered around the two themes above, namely electron-positron linear colliders, and the new fourth-generation light sources. This work built upon previous LDRD investments, and was intended to emphasize accelerator physics experiments.

  12. IBS in a CAM-Dominated Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Gusachenko, I.

    2006-03-20

    Electron cooling of the 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring requires high-quality dc electron beam with the current of several hundred mA and the kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. That high electron current is attained through beam recirculation (charge recovery). The primary current path is from the magnetized cathode at high voltage terminal to the ground, where the electron beam interacts with the antiproton beam and cooling takes place, and then to the collector in the terminal. The energy distribution function of the electron beam at the collector determines the required collector energy acceptance. Multiple and single intra-beam scattering as well as the dissipation of density micro-fluctuations during the beam transport are studied as factors forming a core and tails of the electron energy distribution. For parameters of the Fermilab electron cooler, the single intra-beam scattering (Touschek effect) is found to be of the most importance.

  13. Electron Beam Welder Used to Braze Sapphire to Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsgren, Roger C.; Vannuyen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A new use for electron beam brazing was recently developed by NASA Lewis Research Center's Manufacturing Engineering Division. This work was done to fabricate a fiberoptic probe (developed by Sentec Corporation) that could measure high temperatures less than 600 deg C of vibrating machinery, such as in jet engine combustion research. Under normal circumstances, a sapphire fiber would be attached to platinum by a ceramic epoxy. However, no epoxies can adhere ceramic fibers to platinum under such high temperatures and vibration. Also, since sapphire and platinum have different thermal properties, the epoxy bond is subjected to creep over time. Therefore, a new method had to be developed that would permanently and reliably attach a sapphire fiber to platinum. Brazing a sapphire fiber to a platinum shell. The fiber-optic probe assembly consists of a 0.015-in.-diameter sapphire fiber attached to a 0.25-in.-long, 0.059-in.-diameter platinum shell. Because of the small size of this assembly, electron beam brazing was chosen instead of conventional vacuum brazing. The advantage of the electron beam is that it can generate a localized heat source in a vacuum. Gold reactive braze was used to join the sapphire fiber and the platinum. Consequently, the sapphire fiber was not affected by the total heat needed to braze the components together.

  14. Suppression of shot noise and spontaneous radiation in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-08-23

    Shot noise in the electron beam distribution is the main source of noise in high-gain FEL amplifiers, which may affect applications ranging from single- and multi-stage HGHG FELs to an FEL amplifier for coherent electron cooling. This noise also imposes a fundamental limit of about 10{sup 6} on FEL gain, after which SASE FELs saturate. There are several advantages in strongly suppressing this shot noise in the electron beam, and the corresponding spontaneous radiation. For more than a half-century, a traditional passive method has been used successfully in practical low-energy microwave electronic devices to suppress shot noise. Recently, it was proposed for this purpose in FELs. However, being passive, the method has some significant limitations and is hardly suitable for the highly inhomogeneous beams of modern high-gain FELs. I present a novel active method of suppressing, by many orders-of-magnitude, the shot noise in relativistic electron beams. I give a theoretical description of the process, and detail its fundamental limitation.

  15. Characteristics of scattered electron beams shaped with a multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Moran, J M; Martel, M K; Bruinvis, I A; Fraass, B A

    1997-09-01

    Characteristics of dual-foil scattered electron beams shaped with a multileaf collimator (MLC) (instead of an applicator system) were studied. The electron beams, with energies between 10 and 25 MeV, were produced by a racetrack microtron using a dual-foil scattering system. For a range of field sizes, depth dose curves, profiles, penumbra width, angular spread in air, and effective and virtual source positions were compared. Measurements were made when the MLC alone provided collimation and when an applicator provided collimation. Identical penumbra widths were obtained at a source-to-surface distance of 85 cm for the MLC and 110 cm for the applicator. The MLC-shaped beams had characteristics similar to other machines which use trimmers or applicators to collimate scanned or scattered electron beams. Values of the effective source position and the angular spread parameter for the MLC beams were similar to those of the dual-foil scattered beams of the Varian Clinac 2100 CD and the scanned beams of the Sagittaire linear accelerators. A model, based on Fermi-Eyges multiple scattering theory, was adapted and applied successfully to predict penumbra width as a function of collimator-surface distance.

  16. The use of electron beams for pasteurization of meats

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, K.R.; Kaye, R.J.; Turman, B.N.; Neau, E.L.

    1994-12-01

    Electron beam accelerators can be used for electronic pasteurization of meat products by: (1) using the electrons directly impacting the products, or (2) optimizing the conversion of electron energy to x-rays and treating the product with these x-rays. The choice of process depends on the configuration of the product when it is treated. For electron treatment, ten million electron volt (MeV) kinetic energy is the maximum allowed by international agreement. The depth of penetration of electrons with that energy into a product with density of meat is about five centimeters (cm). Two-sided treatment can be done on products up to 10 cm thick with a two-to-one ratio between minimum and maximum dose. Ground beef patties are about 1.25 cm (0.5 inch thick). Beams with 2.5 MeV electron energy could be used to treat these products. Our calculations show that maximum to minimum dose ratios less than 1.2 can be achieved with this energy if the transverse beam energy is small. If the product thickness is greater than 10 cm, x-rays can provide the needed dose uniformity. Uniform doses can be supplied for pallets with dimensions greater than 1.2 m on each side using x-rays from a 5 MeV electron beam. The efficiency of converting the electron beam to x-rays and configurations to achieve dose uniformity are discussed.

  17. Large area electron beam pumped krypton fluoride laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Sethian, J.D.; Obenschain, S.P.; Gerber, K.A.; Pawley, C.J.; Serlin, V.; Sullivan, C.A.; Webster, W.; Deniz, A.V.; Lehecka, T.; McGeoch, M.W.; Altes, R.A.; Corcoran, P.A.; Smith, I.D.; Barr, O.C.

    1997-06-01

    Nike is a recently completed multi-kilojoule krypton fluoride (KrF) laser that has been built to study the physics of direct drive inertial confinement fusion. This paper describes in detail both the pulsed power and optical performance of the largest amplifier in the Nike laser, the 60 cm amplifier. This is a double pass, double sided, electron beam-pumped system that amplifies the laser beam from an input of 50 J to an output of up to 5 kJ. It has an optical aperture of 60 cm {times} 60 cm and a gain length of 200 cm. The two electron beams are 60 cm high {times} 200 cm wide, have a voltage of 640 kV, a current of 540 kA, and a flat top power pulse duration of 250 ns. A 2 kG magnetic field is used to guide the beams and prevent self-pinching. Each electron beam is produced by its own Marx/pulse forming line system. The amplifier has been fully integrated into the Nike system and is used on a daily basis for laser-target experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Electron beam direct write: shaped beam overcomes resolution concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolberg, Ines; Pain, Laurent; Kretz, Johannes; Boettcher, Monika; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Gramss, Juergen; Hahmann, Peter

    2007-02-01

    In semiconductor industry time to market is one of the key success factors. Therefore fast prototyping and low-volume production will become extremely important for developing process technologies that are well ahead of the current technological level. Electron Beam Lithography has been launched for industrial use as a direct write technology for these types of applications. However, limited throughput rates and high tool complexity have been seen as the major concerns restricting the industrial use of this technology. Nowadays this begins to change. Variable Shaped Beam (VSB) writers have been established in Electron Beam Direct Write (EBDW) on Si or GaAs. In the paper semiconductor industry requirements to EBDW will be outlined. Behind this background the Vistec SB3050 lithography system will be reviewed. The achieved resolution enhancement of the VSB system down to the 22nm node exposure capability will be discussed in detail; application examples will be given. Combining EBDW in a Mix and Match technology with optical lithography is one way to utilize the high flexibility advantage of this technology and to overcome existing throughput concerns. However, to some extend a common Single Electron Beam Technology (SBT) will always be limited in throughput. Therefore Vistec's approach of a system that is based on the massive parallelisation of beams (MBT), which was initially pursued in a European Project, will also be discussed.

  19. The electron beam cure of epoxy paste adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-07-01

    Recently developed epoxy paste adhesives were electron beam cured and experimentally explored to determine their suitability for use in an aerospace-quality aircraft component. There were two major goals for this program. The first was to determine whether the electron beam-curable past adhesives were capable of meeting the requirements of the US Air Force T-38 supersonic jet trainer composite windshield frame. The T-38 windshield frame`s arch is currently manufactured by bonding thin stainless steel plies using an aerospace-grade thermally-cured epoxy film adhesive. The second goal was to develop the lowest cost hand layup and debulk process that could be used to produce laminated steel plies with acceptable properties. The laminate properties examined to determine adhesive suitability include laminate mechanical and physical properties at room, adhesive tack, out-time capability, and the debulk requirements needed to achieve these properties. Eighteen past adhesives and four scrim cloths were experimentally examined using this criteria. One paste adhesive was found to have suitable characteristics in each of these categories and was later chosen for the manufacture of the T-38 windshield frame. This experimental study shows that by using low-cost debulk and layup processes, the electron beam-cured past adhesive mechanical and physical properties meet the specifications of the T-38 composite windshield frame.

  20. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, D.; Yang, Y.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Yao, K.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.

    2014-09-15

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10{sup −10} Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10{sup −4}. So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe{sup 53+,} {sup 54+} has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  1. Three-axis electron-beam test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Ebihara, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    An electron beam test facility, which consists of a precision multidimensional manipulator built into an ultra-high-vacuum bell jar, was designed, fabricated, and operated at Lewis Research Center. The position within the bell jar of a Faraday cup which samples current in the electron beam under test, is controlled by the manipulator. Three orthogonal axes of motion are controlled by stepping motors driven by digital indexers, and the positions are displayed on electronic totalizers. In the transverse directions, the limits of travel are approximately + or - 2.5 cm from the center with a precision of 2.54 micron (0.0001 in.); in the axial direction, approximately 15.0 cm of travel are permitted with an accuracy of 12.7 micron (0.0005 in.). In addition, two manually operated motions are provided, the pitch and yaw of the Faraday cup with respect to the electron beam can be adjusted to within a few degrees. The current is sensed by pulse transformers and the data are processed by a dual channel box car averager with a digital output. The beam tester can be operated manually or it can be programmed for automated operation. In the automated mode, the beam tester is controlled by a microcomputer (installed at the test site) which communicates with a minicomputer at the central computing facility. The data are recorded and later processed by computer to obtain the desired graphical presentations.

  2. Investigation of electron beam transport in a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Y.U.; Lee, B.C.; Kim, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Lossless transport of electrons through the undulator is essential for CW operation of the FELs driven by recirculating electrostatic accelerators. We calculate the transport ratio of an electron beam in a helical undulator by using a 3-D simulation code and compare the results with the experimental results. The energy and the current of the electron beam are 400 keV and 2 A, respectively. The 3-D distribution of the magnetic field of a practical permanent-magnet helical undulator is measured and is used in the calculations. The major parameters of the undutlator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, number of periods in adiabatic region = 3.5, magnetic field strength = 1.3 kG. The transport ratio is very sensitive to the injection condition of the electron beam such as the emittance, the diameter, the divergence, etc.. The injection motion is varied in the experiments by changing the e-gun voltage or the field strength of the focusing magnet located at the entrance of the undulator. It is confirmed experimentally and with simulations that most of the beam loss occurs at the adiabatic region of the undulator regardless of the length of the adiabatic region The effect of axial guiding magnetic field on the beam finish is investigated. According to the simulations, the increase of the strength of axial magnetic field from 0 to 1 kG results in the increase of the transport ratio from 15 % to 95%.

  3. Electron Beam Alignment Strategy in the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, H.-D.; Emma, P.J.; Gassner, G.L.; LeCocq, C.M.; Peters, E.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2007-01-03

    The x-ray FEL process puts very tight tolerances on the straightness of the electron beam trajectory (2 {micro}m rms) through the LCLS undulator system. Tight but less stringent tolerances of 80 {micro}m rms vertical and 140 {micro}m rms horizontally are to be met for the placement of the individual undulator segments with respect to the beam axis. The tolerances for electron beam straightness can only be met through beam-based alignment (BBA) based on electron energy variations. Conventional alignment will set the start conditions for BBA. Precision-fiducialization of components mounted on remotely adjustable girders and the use of beam-finder wires (BFW) will satisfy placement tolerances. Girder movement due to ground motion and temperature changes will be monitored continuously by an alignment monitoring system (ADS) and remotely corrected. This stabilization of components as well as the monitoring and correction of the electron beam trajectory based on BPMs and correctors will increase the time between BBA applications. Undulator segments will be periodically removed from the undulator Hall and measured to monitor radiation damage and other effects that might degrade undulator tuning.

  4. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  5. Optimization method for electron beam melting and refining of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchev, Veliko; Vutova, Katia

    2014-03-01

    Pure metals and special alloys obtained by electron beam melting and refining (EBMR) in vacuum, using electron beams as a heating source, have a lot of applications in nuclear and airspace industries, electronics, medicine, etc. An analytical optimization problem for the EBMR process based on mathematical heat model is proposed. The used criterion is integral functional minimization of a partial derivative of the temperature in the metal sample. The investigated technological parameters are the electron beam power, beam radius, the metal casting velocity, etc. The optimization problem is discretized using a non-stationary heat model and corresponding adapted Pismen-Rekford numerical scheme, developed by us and multidimensional trapezional rule. Thus a discrete optimization problem is built where the criterion is a function of technological process parameters. The discrete optimization problem is heuristically solved by cluster optimization method. Corresponding software for the optimization task is developed. The proposed optimization scheme can be applied for quality improvement of the pure metals (Ta, Ti, Cu, etc.) produced by the modern and ecological-friendly EBMR process.

  6. Excitation of Plasma Waves in Aurora by Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, C. E.; Vinas, A. F.; deAssis, A. S.; deAzevedo, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we study numerically the excitation of plasma waves by electron beams, in the auroral region above 2000 km of altitude. We have solved the fully kinetic dispersion relation, using numerical method and found the real frequency and the growth rate of the plasma wave modes. We have examined the instability properties of low-frequency waves such as the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) wave as well as Lower-Hybrid (LH) wave in the range of high-frequency. In all cases, the source of free energy are electron beams propagating parallel to the geomagnetic field. We present some features of the growth rate modes, when the cold plasma parameters are changed, such as background electrons and ions species (H(+) and O(+)) temperature, density or the electron beam density and/or drift velocity. These results can be used in a test-particle simulation code, to investigate the ion acceleration and their implication in the auroral acceleration processes, by wave-particle interaction.

  7. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  8. Electron beam irradiation of Matricaria chamomilla L. for microbial decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemţanu, Monica R.; Kikuchi, Irene Satiko; de Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha; Mazilu, Elena; Setnic, Silvia; Bucur, Marcela; Duliu, Octavian G.; Meltzer, Viorica; Pincu, Elena

    2008-05-01

    Wild chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is one of the most popular herbal materials with both internal and external use to cure different health disturbances. As a consequence of its origin, chamomile could carry various microbial contaminants which offer different hazards to the final consumer. Reduction of the microbial load to the in force regulation limits represents an important phase in the technological process of vegetal materials, and the electron beam treatment might be an efficient alternative to the classical methods of hygienic quality assurance. The purpose of the study was to analyze the potential application of the electron beam treatment in order to assure the microbial safety of the wild chamomile. Samples of chamomile dry inflorescences were treated in electron beam (e-beam) of 6 MeV mean energy, at room temperature and ambient pressure. Some loss of the chemical compounds with bioactive role could be noticed, but the number of microorganisms decreased as a function on the absorbed dose. Consequently, the microbial quality of studied vegetal material inflorescences was improved by e-beam irradiation.

  9. Frequency multiplying oscillator with an electron beam accelerated in a drift space

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Kyu-Ha; Lee, Kitae; Hee Park, Seong; Uk Jeong, Young; Miginsky, S.

    2012-07-02

    In a uniform acceleration region, the behavior of a velocity-modulated electron beam has been analyzed using a particle-in-cell code. By making use of one of the accelerated harmonic components of the velocity-modulated electron beam, we demonstrate a frequency multiplying oscillator for a compact THz emitter, which employs multiple electron beams and a higher order mode resonator to modulate the electron beam without an additional driving source.

  10. Simulation study of interactions of Space Shuttle-generated electron beams with ambient plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin S.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-1936. The objective of this report is to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The topics covered include the following: (1) simulation of radial expansion of an injected electron beam; (2) simulations of the active injections of electron beams; (3) parameter study of electron beam injection into an ionospheric plasma; and (4) magnetosheath-ionospheric plasma interactions in the cusp.

  11. X-ray diagnostic for current density profiling relativistic electron beams in vacuum and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; Koppel, L.; Smith, J.

    1986-02-15

    An x-ray imaging technique has been studied for the purpose of observing the current density profile in a high-current relativistic electron beam (50 MeV, 10 kA). Calculations and measurements of energy spectra and intensities are in good agreement. Results indicate sufficient photon yield for pinhole imaging when the beam deposits a small part of its energy in high-Z gas or a thin high-Z foil. Characteristic L and K x-ray emission is not found not be a reliable technique due to strong L and K shell fluorescence in the presence of intense bremsstrahlung radiation. It is also found that at pressures on the order of one atmosphere, the density of energy deposition in a gas cell is too small to generate sufficient photon yield for time-resolved measurements.

  12. Novel in situ method for locating virtual source in high-rate electron-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. S.

    1994-07-01

    The concept of virtual source simplifies calculation of thickness distribution on extended substrates in high rate vacuum coating employing electron-beam heating. The height of the point (virtual source), from which vapor can be assumed to emanate in accordance with Knudsen's cosine law, to yield the experimentally obtained thickness distribution, is calculated and this establishes the position of virtual source. Such as post facto determination is cumbersome as it is valid for the prescribed material evaporating at a certain rate in a specified geometry. A change in any of these entails a fresh measurement. Experimenters who use a large number of materials and deposit at different rates therefore have to carry out a number of trials before they can locate the virtual source at the desired deposition parameters. An in situ method for obtaining virtual source position can go a long way in reducing the labor of these experiments. A novel in situ method is described to locate the virtual source.

  13. Relativistic electron beam acceleration by Compton scattering of extraordinary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sugaya, R.

    2006-05-15

    Relativistic transport equations, which demonstrate that relativistic and nonrelativistic particle acceleration along and across a magnetic field and the generation of an electric field transverse to the magnetic field, are induced by nonlinear wave-particle scattering (nonlinear Landau and cyclotron damping) of almost perpendicularly propagating electromagnetic waves in a relativistic magnetized plasma were derived from the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The relativistic transport equations show that electromagnetic waves can accelerate particles in the k{sup ''} direction (k{sup ''}=k-k{sup '}). Simultaneously, an intense cross-field electric field, E{sub 0}=B{sub 0}xv{sub d}/c, is generated via the dynamo effect owing to perpendicular particle drift to satisfy the generalized Ohm's law, which means that this cross-field particle drift is identical to the ExB drift. On the basis of these equations, acceleration and heating of a relativistic electron beam due to nonlinear wave-particle scattering of electromagnetic waves in a magnetized plasma were investigated theoretically and numerically. Two electromagnetic waves interact nonlinearly with the relativistic electron beam, satisfying the resonance condition of {omega}{sub k}-{omega}{sub k{sup '}}-(k{sub perpendicular}-k{sub perpendicula=} r{sup '})v{sub d}-(k{sub parallel}-k{sub parallel}{sup '})v{sub b}{approx_equal}m{omega}{sub ce}, where v{sub b} and v{sub d} are the parallel and perpendicular velocities of the relativistic electron beam, respectively, and {omega}{sub ce} is the relativistic electron cyclotron frequency. The relativistic transport equations using the relativistic drifted Maxwellian momentum distribution function of the relativistic electron beam were derived and analyzed. It was verified numerically that extraordinary waves can accelerate the highly relativistic electron beam efficiently with {beta}m{sub e}c{sup 2} < or approx. 1 GeV, where {beta}=(1-v{sub b}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}){sup -1/2}.

  14. Direct-Write Fabrication of Cellulose Nano-Structures via Focused Electron Beam Induced Nanosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ganner, Thomas; Sattelkow, Jürgen; Rumpf, Bernhard; Eibinger, Manuel; Reishofer, David; Winkler, Robert; Nidetzky, Bernd; Spirk, Stefan; Plank, Harald

    2016-09-02

    In many areas of science and technology, patterned films and surfaces play a key role in engineering and development of advanced materials. Here, we introduce a new generic technique for the fabrication of polysaccharide nano-structures via focused electron beam induced conversion (FEBIC). For the proof of principle, organosoluble trimethylsilyl-cellulose (TMSC) thin films have been deposited by spin coating on SiO2 / Si and exposed to a nano-sized electron beam. It turns out that in the exposed areas an electron induced desilylation reaction takes place converting soluble TMSC to rather insoluble cellulose. After removal of the unexposed TMSC areas, structured cellulose patterns remain on the surface with FWHM line widths down to 70 nm. Systematic FEBIC parameter sweeps reveal a generally electron dose dependent behavior with three working regimes: incomplete conversion, ideal doses and over exposure. Direct (FT-IR) and indirect chemical analyses (enzymatic degradation) confirmed the cellulosic character of ideally converted areas. These investigations are complemented by a theoretical model which suggests a two-step reaction process by means of TMSC → cellulose and cellulose → non-cellulose material conversion in excellent agreement with experimental data. The extracted, individual reaction rates allowed the derivation of design rules for FEBIC parameters towards highest conversion efficiencies and highest lateral resolution.

  15. Study of plasma natural convection induced by electron beam in atmosphere [

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yongfeng Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2014-06-15

    Using high-energy electron beams to ionize air is an effective way to produce a large-size plasma in the atmosphere. In particular, with a steady-state high power generator, some unique phenomena can be achieved, including natural convection of the plasma. The characteristics of this convection are studied both experimentally and numerically. The results show that an asymmetrical temperature field develops with magnitudes that vary from 295 K to 389 K at a pressure of 100 Torr. Natural convection is greatly enhanced under 760 Torr. Nevertheless, plasma transport is negligible in this convection flow field and only the plasma core tends to move upward. Parameter analysis is performed to discern influencing factors on this phenomenon. The beam current, reflecting the Rayleigh number Ra effect, correlates with convection intensity, which indicates that energy deposition is the underlying key factor in determining such convections. Finally, natural convection is concluded to be an intrinsic property of the electron beam when focused into dense air, and can be achieved by carefully adjusting equipment operations parameters.

  16. Direct-Write Fabrication of Cellulose Nano-Structures via Focused Electron Beam Induced Nanosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ganner, Thomas; Sattelkow, Jürgen; Rumpf, Bernhard; Eibinger, Manuel; Reishofer, David; Winkler, Robert; Nidetzky, Bernd; Spirk, Stefan; Plank, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In many areas of science and technology, patterned films and surfaces play a key role in engineering and development of advanced materials. Here, we introduce a new generic technique for the fabrication of polysaccharide nano-structures via focused electron beam induced conversion (FEBIC). For the proof of principle, organosoluble trimethylsilyl-cellulose (TMSC) thin films have been deposited by spin coating on SiO2 / Si and exposed to a nano-sized electron beam. It turns out that in the exposed areas an electron induced desilylation reaction takes place converting soluble TMSC to rather insoluble cellulose. After removal of the unexposed TMSC areas, structured cellulose patterns remain on the surface with FWHM line widths down to 70 nm. Systematic FEBIC parameter sweeps reveal a generally electron dose dependent behavior with three working regimes: incomplete conversion, ideal doses and over exposure. Direct (FT-IR) and indirect chemical analyses (enzymatic degradation) confirmed the cellulosic character of ideally converted areas. These investigations are complemented by a theoretical model which suggests a two-step reaction process by means of TMSC → cellulose and cellulose → non-cellulose material conversion in excellent agreement with experimental data. The extracted, individual reaction rates allowed the derivation of design rules for FEBIC parameters towards highest conversion efficiencies and highest lateral resolution. PMID:27585861

  17. Formation and characterization of Al-Ti-Nb alloys by electron-beam surface alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkov, S.; Petrov, P.; Lazarova, R.; Bezdushnyi, R.; Dechev, D.

    2016-12-01

    The combination of attractive mechanical properties, light weight and resistance to corrosion makes Ti-Al based alloys applicable in many industrial branches, like aircraft and automotive industries etc. It is known that the incorporation of Nb improves the high temperature performance and mechanical properties. In the present study on Al substrate Ti and Nb layers were deposited by DC (Direct Current) magnetron sputtering, followed by electron-beam alloying with scanning electron beam. It was chosen two speeds of the specimen motion during the alloying process: V1 = 0.5 cm/s and V2 = 1 cm/s. The alloying process was realized in circular sweep mode in order to maintain the melt pool further. The obtained results demonstrate a formation of (Ti,Nb)Al3 fractions randomly distributed in biphasic structure of intermetallic (Ti,Nb)Al3 particles, dispersed in α-Al solid solution. The evaluated (Ti,Nb)Al3 lattice parameters are independent of the speed of the specimen motion and therefore the alloying speed does not affect the lattice parameters and thus, does not form additional residual stresses, strains etc. It was found that lower velocity of the specimen motion during the alloying process develops more homogeneous structures. The metallographic analyses demonstrate a formation of surface alloys with very high hardness. Our results demonstrate maximal values of 775 HV [kg/cm2] and average hardness of 673 HV [kg/cm2].

  18. Direct-Write Fabrication of Cellulose Nano-Structures via Focused Electron Beam Induced Nanosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganner, Thomas; Sattelkow, Jürgen; Rumpf, Bernhard; Eibinger, Manuel; Reishofer, David; Winkler, Robert; Nidetzky, Bernd; Spirk, Stefan; Plank, Harald

    2016-09-01

    In many areas of science and technology, patterned films and surfaces play a key role in engineering and development of advanced materials. Here, we introduce a new generic technique for the fabrication of polysaccharide nano-structures via focused electron beam induced conversion (FEBIC). For the proof of principle, organosoluble trimethylsilyl-cellulose (TMSC) thin films have been deposited by spin coating on SiO2 / Si and exposed to a nano-sized electron beam. It turns out that in the exposed areas an electron induced desilylation reaction takes place converting soluble TMSC to rather insoluble cellulose. After removal of the unexposed TMSC areas, structured cellulose patterns remain on the surface with FWHM line widths down to 70 nm. Systematic FEBIC parameter sweeps reveal a generally electron dose dependent behavior with three working regimes: incomplete conversion, ideal doses and over exposure. Direct (FT-IR) and indirect chemical analyses (enzymatic degradation) confirmed the cellulosic character of ideally converted areas. These investigations are complemented by a theoretical model which suggests a two-step reaction process by means of TMSC → cellulose and cellulose → non-cellulose material conversion in excellent agreement with experimental data. The extracted, individual reaction rates allowed the derivation of design rules for FEBIC parameters towards highest conversion efficiencies and highest lateral resolution.

  19. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) for Cost Effective Near-Net Shape Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. EBF3 deposits of 2219 aluminium and Ti-6Al-4V have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials have exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF3 process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rates in excess of 2500 cubic centimeters per hour (150 in3/hr) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  20. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication for Cost Effective Near-Net Shape Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. EBF3 deposits of 2219 aluminium and Ti-6Al-4V have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials have exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF3 process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rates in excess of 2500 cm3/hr (150 in3/hr) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  1. Thick barium hexaferrite (Ba-M) films prepared by electron-beam evaporation for microwave application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wane, I.; Bessaudou, A.; Cosset, F.; Célérier, A.; Girault, C.; Decossas, J. L.; Vareille, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    Hexagonal ferrites such as barium or strontium hexaferrites have many existing and potential applications. Among these are microwave devices. In this paper we present the results of Ba-M thick ferrite films deposited on silicon (1 0 0) by electron-beam evaporation. To increase adhesion and reduce cracks, the films are also deposited on thin (#1 μm) metallic underlayers. The influence of deposition rate and post-deposition annealing on crystallographic structure, magnetic properties, morphology and chemical composition has been investigated. The deposition pressure was equal to 0.46 Pa and substrate temperature was kept at 200°C. The results show that, before annealing, the films do not crystallise under the bulk phase of BaFe 12O 19 (Ba-M) and magnetic measurements show no hysteresis curve. On the other hand, films annealed at 850°C for 2 h in oxygen atmosphere are magnetic and crystallise in the Ba-M phase. The coercive fields of these films range between 160 and 360 kA/m. The saturation magnetisation of the annealed films varies between 0.15 and 0.21 T. The EDX analysis shows that the Fe/Ba atomic ratio depends on the deposition rate. The SEM study shows homogeneous film surfaces and small grains size.

  2. Comparison of the calculated and experimental data of the extracted electron beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I. A.; Povolná, A.; Stuchebrov, S. G.; Naumenko, G. A.

    2015-10-01

    The current commercial use of electron accelerators grows in research, industry, medical diagnosis and treatment. Due to this fact, the creation of a model describing the electron beam profile and shape is an actual task. The model of the TPU microtron extracted electron beam created in the program “Computer Laboratory (PCLab)” is described and compared with experimental results in this article. The value of the internal electron beam divergence determination is illustrated. The experimental data of the electron beam profiles at the selected distances from the output window are analysed and compared with the simulation data. The simulation data of the electron beam profiles are shown.

  3. Lattice Strain Defects in a Ceria Nanolayer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An ultrathin two-dimensional CeO2 (ceria) phase on a Cu(110) surface has been fabricated and fully characterized by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The atomic lattice structure of the ceria/Cu(110) system is revealed as a hexagonal CeO2(111)-type monolayer separated from the Cu(110) surface by a partly disordered Cu–O intercalated buffer layer. The epitaxial coupling of the two-dimensional ceria overlayer to the Cu(110)-O surface leads to a nanoscopic stripe pattern, which creates defect regions of quasi-periodic lattice distortions. The symmetry and lattice mismatch at the interface is clarified to be responsible for the topographic stripe geometry and the related anisotropic strain defect regions at the ceria surface. This ceria monolayer is in a fully oxidized and thermodynamically stable state. PMID:26988695

  4. Lattice Strain Defects in a Ceria Nanolayer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liying; Doudin, Nassar; Surnev, Svetlozar; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Netzer, Falko P

    2016-04-07

    An ultrathin two-dimensional CeO2 (ceria) phase on a Cu(110) surface has been fabricated and fully characterized by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory. The atomic lattice structure of the ceria/Cu(110) system is revealed as a hexagonal CeO2(111)-type monolayer separated from the Cu(110) surface by a partly disordered Cu-O intercalated buffer layer. The epitaxial coupling of the two-dimensional ceria overlayer to the Cu(110)-O surface leads to a nanoscopic stripe pattern, which creates defect regions of quasi-periodic lattice distortions. The symmetry and lattice mismatch at the interface is clarified to be responsible for the topographic stripe geometry and the related anisotropic strain defect regions at the ceria surface. This ceria monolayer is in a fully oxidized and thermodynamically stable state.

  5. Efficient Ceria-Platinum Inverse Catalyst for Partial Oxidation of Methanol.

    PubMed

    Ostroverkh, Anna; Johánek, Viktor; Kúš, Peter; Šedivá, Romana; Matolín, Vladimír

    2016-06-28

    Ceria-platinum-based bilayered thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were developed and tested in regard to their catalytic activity for methanol oxidation by employing a temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) technique. The composition and structure of the samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both conventional (oxide-supported metal nanoparticles [NPs]) and inverse configurations (metal with oxide overlayer) were analyzed to uncover the structural dependence of activity and selectivity of these catalysts with respect to different pathways of methanol oxidation. We clearly demonstrate that the amount of cerium oxide (ceria) loading has a profound influence on methanol oxidation reaction characteristics. Adding a noncontinuous adlayer of ceria greatly enhances the catalytic performance of platinum (Pt) in favor of partial oxidation of methanol (POM), gaining an order of magnitude in the absolute yield of hydrogen. Moreover, the undesired by-production of carbon monoxide (CO) is strongly suppressed, making the ceria-platinum inverse catalyst a great candidate for clean hydrogen production. It is suggested that the methanol oxidation process is facilitated by the synergistic effect between both components of the inverse catalyst (involving oxygen from ceria and providing a reaction site on the adjacent Pt surface) as well as by the fact that the ability of ceria to exchange oxygen (i.e., to alter the oxidation state of Ce between 3+ and 4+) during the reaction is inversely proportional to its thickness. The increased redox capability of the discontinuous ceria adlayer shifts the preferred reaction pathway from dehydrogenation of hydroxymethyl intermediate to CO in favor of its oxidation to formate.

  6. Improvement of electron beam shape control in radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, A.; Fang, R.; Kuntz, F.

    1994-05-01

    The development of radiation processing using electron accelerators requires good control of the treatment parameters to improve the dosimetry quality. Especially, the analysis of the shape of the scanned electron beam that interacts with the product, is of prime necessity. A Multiwire Beam Shape Analyser (MBSA) has been developed by the AERIAL Laboratory in order to insure good monitoring of the scanning length and uniformity. This device consists of an aluminum beam-stop covered with a mesh of individually insulated stainless steel wires, placed under the scanning cone. The current generated by the impact of the electron beam on each wire is converted into voltage. After pulse shaping and multiplexing of the different channels, the beam profile can be displayed on an oscilloscope or on a PC screen. A prototype is now operating on an experimental irradiation plant based on a 2.5 MeV /300 W Van de Graaff electron accelerator. It allows almost continuous visualization of the beam profile (between two conveyor passes) and its response was compared to classical film dosimeters (Gafchromic, FWT 60.00). Considering FWHM and homogeneous treatment regions of the profiles, MBSA and the dosimeters give similar responses and variations remain lower than ± 12%. The acquisition of an electrical signal corresponding to the beam profile in air constitutes the original aspect of the MBSA and is in keeping with the general pattern of continuous control and automation of the irradiation processes. Hereafter, much work has to be done to adapt this device to an industrial use (higher energy, high power electron beams, non-destructive measurements…).

  7. Cost-Effective Red Water Disposal by Electron Beam Radiolysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-28

    reation and result in water and carbon dioxide as represented by the following chemical reaction I C 7 H 80 3 +15H 20 2 - 7C02 + 4H 20 +15H 20 (3) I In...irradiating the red water with an electron beam, sodium sulfonate of 2,4,5 TNT can be reduced to NaHSO 4, NO2, water and carbon dioxide . The chemical ...be efficiently and completely oxidized to produce carbon dioxide , hydrogen and water. The concentration of organic contaminants in process water varies

  8. Effects of electron beam irradiation of cellulose acetate cigarette filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czayka, M.; Fisch, M.

    2012-07-01

    A method to reduce the molecular weight of cellulose acetate used in cigarette filters by using electron beam irradiation is demonstrated. Radiation levels easily obtained with commercially available electron accelerators result in a decrease in average molecular weight of about six-times with no embrittlement, or significant change in the elastic behavior of the filter. Since a first step in the biodegradation of cigarette filters is reduction in the filter material's molecular weight this invention has the potential to allow the production of significantly faster degrading filters.

  9. Electron Beam Moller Polarimeter at Jlab Hall a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamazdin, A.V.; Gorbenko, V.G.; Levchuk, L.G.; Pomatsalyuk, L.; Rubashkin, A.L.; Sorokin, P.V.; Dale, D.S.; Doyle, B.; Gorringe, T.; Korsch, W.; Zeps, V.; Chen, J.O.; Chudakov, E.; Nanda, S.; Saha, A.; Gasparian, A.

    As part of the spin-physics program at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), a Mo ller polarimeter was developed to measure the polarization of electron beam of energies 0.8 to 5.0 GeV. A unique signature for Mo ller scattering is obtained using a series of three quadrupole magnets which provide an angular selection, and a dipole magnet for energy analysis. The design, commissioning and the first results of the polarization measurements of this polarimeter will be presented as well as future plans to use its small scattering angle capabilities to investigate physics in very low Q2 regime.

  10. Sensor properties of electron beam irradiated fluorinated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysoev, Vitalii I.; Gusel'nikov, Artem V.; Katkov, Mikhail V.; Asanov, Igor P.; Bulusheva, Lyubov G.; Okotrub, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    A graphene-like material was recovered through the reduction of initially nonconductive C2F graphite fluoride by irradiation with an electron beam with a kinetic energy of 500 eV. The surface conductivity increased by four orders of magnitude, and Raman scattering revealed a narrowing and redshift of the G mode peak. The samples were tested as a sensor material for detecting NO2 and NH3 molecules. After 25-min exposure to 1% NH3 and 0.5% NO2 at room temperature, the relative response of the sensor materials was 6 and 4%, respectively.

  11. Microbial Safety Improvement of Sea Buckthorn by Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemţanu, Monica R.; Minea, R.; Mazilu, Elena; Rǎdulescu, Nora

    2007-04-01

    The commercialization of medicinal plants and/or their products is highly increased in Romania lately. One of the most used herbs is sea buckthorn being well known for its quality with a large potential for curing some diseases. Sea buckthorn can be contaminated with undesirable microorganisms which may affect negatively its quality. The paper presents the results regarding the action of a non-conventional technology meaning electron beam technique on sea buckthorn in order to improve its microbiological quality. Our study revealed that the sea buckthorn microbial load has been improved after 3 kGy irradiation keeping its active principles.

  12. Electron beam driven lower hybrid waves in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Ved; Vijayshri; Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Ruby

    2013-05-15

    An electron beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma drives electrostatic lower hybrid waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. A dispersion relation and the growth rate of the instability for this process have been derived taking into account the dust charge fluctuations. The frequency and the growth rate of the unstable wave increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. Moreover, the growth rate of the instability increases with beam density and scales as the one-third power of the beam density. In addition, the dependence of the growth rate on the beam velocity is also discussed.

  13. Crosslinked blends and coextruded films by electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallat, M. F.; Marouani, S.; Perraud, S.; Mendoza Patlan, N.

    2005-07-01

    Morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of polymer blends and coextruded films of hydrogenated copolymer of butadiene and acrylonitrile (HNBR) and polyethylene-co-octene (PE-co-O) are considered before and after electron beam crosslinking. It is known that the properties are depending not only on the crosslinks in the bulk of the polymers but also on that created in the interfacial domain. It is however very difficult to have direct evidence of the interfacial crosslinks. Moreover the two polymers are not compatible and the addition of an ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer as a potential polymer compatibiliser is considered.

  14. Microbial Safety Improvement of Sea Buckthorn by Electron Beam Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemtanu, Monica R.; Minea, R.; Mazilu, Elena; Radulescu, Nora

    2007-04-23

    The commercialization of medicinal plants and/or their products is highly increased in Romania lately. One of the most used herbs is sea buckthorn being well known for its quality with a large potential for curing some diseases. Sea buckthorn can be contaminated with undesirable microorganisms which may affect negatively its quality. The paper presents the results regarding the action of a non-conventional technology meaning electron beam technique on sea buckthorn in order to improve its microbiological quality. Our study revealed that the sea buckthorn microbial load has been improved after 3 kGy irradiation keeping its active principles.

  15. Applications with Intense OTR Images II: Microbunched Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Dejus, R. J.; Rule, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    In this second application for intense images we take advantage of the coherent enhancement of optical transition radiation (OTR) due to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL)-induced microbunching of the beam. A much smaller number of total particles is involved, but the microbunched fraction (NB) gives a NB2 enhancement. We report measurements on the z-dependent growth of the coherent OTR (COTR) and the effects of beam size and electron beam/photon beam coalignment in the COTR interferograms.

  16. Scattered electron beams shaped by a multileaf collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Jean Marie

    Recent developments in conformal radiation therapy have focused primarily on applying computer-controlled equipment and techniques to photon beams. Despite favorable characteristics of the dose fall-off with depth for electron beams, their application to conformal therapy has been limited. Factors such as geometrically limiting applicator systems, lack of automatic field shaping, and dose calculation model limitations must be addressed before routine clinical use of electron beams for conformal radiotherapy becomes common. This work evaluates dose characteristics and modeling of dose distributions and output factors for a system specifically designed for computer-controlled collimation of dual-foil scattered and scanned electron beams. Dose characteristics determined from measured depth dose curves and profiles were evaluated for multileaf- collimated and applicator-collimated beams produced by the dual-foil scattered gantry of a two-gantry racetrack microtron system. The resulting dose distributions and characteristics were used to evaluate and modify the existing 3-D electron pencil beam algorithm in UMPlan, the University of Michigan treatment planning system, to predict relative dose distributions for MLC-shaped fields. Output factors (dose of a field relative to that of a reference field) were measured, analyzed, and modeled for MLC-collimated rectangular and shaped fields. For output factor calculations, two models were evaluated: a pencil beam-derived model and an empirical edge model originally developed for photon dose calculations. The current work shows that the dosimetric characteristics of MLC and applicator-collimated beams of the racetrack microtron are similar once the collimation geometry is accounted for. The dosimetric characteristics are also consistent with those for other dual-foil scattered machines with applicator systems and earlier generation scanned beams collimated with trimmer bars. By accounting for collimation geometry, electron

  17. Electron beam irradiation stiffens zinc tin oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zang, Jianfeng; Bao, Lihong; Webb, Richard A; Li, Xiaodong

    2011-11-09

    We report a remarkable phenomenon that electron beam irradiation (EBI) significantly enhances the Young's modulus of zinc tin oxide (ZTO) nanowires (NWs), up to a 40% increase compared with the pristine NWs. In situ uniaxial buckling tests on individual NWs were conducted using a nanomanipulator inside a scanning electron microscope. We propose that EBI results in substantial atomic bond contraction in ZTO NWs, accounting for the observed mechanically stiffening. This argument is supported by our experimental results that EBI also reduces the electrical conductivity of ZTO NWs.

  18. Runaway electron beam control for longitudinally pumped metal vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbychev, G. V.; Kolbycheva, P. D.

    1995-08-01

    Physics and techniques for producing of the pulsed runaway electron beams are considered. The main obstacle for increasing electron energies in the beams is revealed to be a self- breakdown of the e-gun's gas-filled diode. Two methods to suppress the self-breakdown and enhance the volumetric discharge producing the e-beam are offered and examined. Each of them provides 1.5 fold increase of the ceiling potential on the gun. The methods also give the ways to control several guns simultaneously. Resulting in the possibility of realizing the powerful longitudinal pumping of metal-vapor lasers on self-terminated transitions of atoms or ions.

  19. Noninvasive measurement of electron-beam size with diamagnetic loops

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2001-07-01

    Diamagnetic loops can be used as a noninvasive method for measurements of beam size in electron beam accelerators that use solenoidal magnetic transport. A comprehensive theory for interpreting data from a diamagnetic loop is developed. It is shown that the change in flux through a diamagnetic loop can be simply related to the rms beam radius to high accuracy, regardless of the details of the current profile, when the ratio of beam current to Alfven current I{sub b}/I{sub A} is small. The difficulty in making this measurement lies in the fact that the diamagnetic-loop signal is also small to the same order.

  20. Efficient Injection of Electron Beams into Magnetic Guide Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chorny, V.; Cooperstein, G.; Dubyna, V.; Frolov, O.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Hinshelwood, D.; Schneider, R.; Solovyov, V.; Tsepilov, H.; Vitkovitsky, I.; Ware, K,

    1999-06-08

    Preliminary experimental and modeling study of injection and transport of high current electron beams in current-neutralized background gas has been performed. Initial analysis of the results indicates that high current triaxial ring diode operates very reproducibly in the pinch mode. High current density beam can be injected efficiently into the drift region, using azimuthal guide field with reduced intensity near the injection region. This was shown to improve the effectiveness of capturing the beam for the transport. The transport length was insufficient to measure losses, such as would arise from scattering with the background gas.

  1. Electron beam tomography of magnetic recording head fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, R. P.; Liu, Y.; Martin, J. L.; Arnoldussen, T. C.

    1995-09-01

    The quantitative evaluation of the 3D form of the magnetic field from a thin film recording head has been achieved by electron beam tomography. The data sets for tomographic reconstruction were obtained using the differential phase contrast mode of Lorentz electron microscopy applied in a 200 kV (scanning) transmission instrument. The high accelerating voltage and a novel method of mounting the head in the microscope offer advantages over previous experiments. The two reconstruction algorithms, which have been used previously, have been implemented and the results of their application are compared for theoretical data derived from a model head field and for data obtained experimentally from a production recording head.

  2. Electron-beam synthesis of fuel in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. V.; Holodkova, E. M.; Ershov, B. G.

    2012-09-01

    Electron-beam synthesis of liquid fuel from gaseous alkanes was upgraded for formation of conventional and alternative fuel from biomass or pyrolysis oil. Bio-feedstock conversion algorithm includes two consecutive stages: (1) initial macromolecules' transformation to low-molecular-weight intermediates; (2) transformation of these intermediates to stable fuel in gaseous alkanes' atmosphere. Radicals originated from alkanes participate in alkylation/hydrogenation of biomass intermediates. Chemical fixation of gaseous alkanes is amplified in the presence of biomass derivatives due to suppression of gas regeneration reactions, higher molar mass of reagents and lower volatility of radiolytic intermediates.

  3. Electron beam irradiation for biological decontamination of Spirulina platensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasoveanu, Mirela; Nemtanu, Monica; Minea, R.; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Mazilu, Elena; Radulescu, Nora

    2005-10-01

    The Cyanobacterium Spirulina is commercialized for its use in health foods and for therapeutic purposes due to its valuable constituents particularly proteins and vitamins. The aim of the paper is to study the Spirulina platensis behaviour when it is electron beam irradiated for biological decontamination. Microbial load, antioxidant activity, enzymatic inhibition, electron spin resonance (ESR) and UV-Vis spectra were measured for doses up to 80 kGy. The results were correlated with doses in order to find where decontamination is efficient, keeping the Spirulina qualities.

  4. Electron-beam-induced fracture of Kevlar single fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, J.T.; Jensen, L.C.; Klakken, M.L.

    1986-05-01

    We examine the unique situation involving the exposure of polymers to both electron bombardment and mechanical stress. Under certain conditions, crack formation, crack growth, and fracture can occur due to this combination of stimuli. These studies relate to the performance of a number of materials under hostile environments such as space, plasma, and propulsion systems. In this paper we present our initial measurements on the response of single Kevlar fibers loaded in tension to bombardment by 3-keV electrons. We present evidence that the resulting electron-beam-induced fracture is due to bond breaking.

  5. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H.; Henry, J. James; Davenport, Clyde M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  6. Electron beam assisted field evaporation of insulating nanowires/tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, N. P. Niguès, A.; Choueib, M.; Perisanu, S.; Ayari, A.; Poncharal, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Siria, A.; Vincent, P.

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate field evaporation of insulating materials, specifically BN nanotubes and undoped Si nanowires, assisted by a convergent electron beam. Electron irradiation leads to positive charging at the nano-object's apex and to an important increase of the local electric field thus inducing field evaporation. Experiments performed both in a transmission electron microscope and in a scanning electron microscope are presented. This technique permits the selective evaporation of individual nanowires in complex materials. Electron assisted field evaporation could be an interesting alternative or complementary to laser induced field desorption used in atom probe tomography of insulating materials.

  7. An investigation into vascular prosthesis modified with an electron beam.

    PubMed

    Lowkis, B; Szymonowicz, M; Rutkowski, J

    1997-01-01

    The present paper shows the results of an investigation into the effect of implanted electric charge on blood platelet adhesion to woven surfaces of "Dallon" polyester vascular prosthesis. The electrets were formed using the electron beam method. The assessment of the electret effect on blood platelet adhesion was performed on the basis of microscopic studies. It was shown that an implanted negative electric charge remarkably suppresses thrombocyte adhesion to the prosthesis surface. The electret effect was found to play a significant role in the process of preparing nonthrombogenic surfaces.

  8. Artificial auroras in the upper atmosphere. I - Electron beam injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Mende, S. B.; Kawashima, N.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Neubert, T.; Gibson, W. C.; Marshall, J. A.; Swenson, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The Atlas-1 Spacelab payload's Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators generated artificial electron beams for the stimulation of auroral emissions at southern auroral latitudes. Optical measurements were made by the Shuttle Orbiter's onboard TV cameras, as well as by the Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imager (in both white light and the 427.8 nm N2(+) emission line). Shuttle-based auroral imaging furnished a novel perspective on the artificial auroras; the emissions were traced from 295 km to the 110 km level along the curved magnetic-field lines.

  9. Electron beam charging and ARC discharging of spacecraft insulating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balmain, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    The properties of the arc discharges which are caused by the laboratory exposure of dielectric materials to electron beams are examined, the intent being to simulate conditions on synchronous-orbit spacecraft. Extensive experimental studies are reported for planar dielectrics (Teflon, Kapton, Mylar) on the subjects of incident-flux scaling of discharge properties and the effects of high-energy broad-spectrum electron irradiation from a radioisotpe source. In addition a preliminary evaluation is made of the discharge susceptibility of fiber optic waveguides.

  10. Electron Beam Lifetime in SPEAR3: Measurement and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Huang, X.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; /Pavilon Tech., Austin

    2007-12-19

    In this paper we report on electron beam lifetime measurements as a function of scraper position, RF voltage and bunch fill pattern in SPEAR3. We then outline development of an empirical, macroscopic model using the beam-loss rate equation. By identifying the dependence of loss coefficients on accelerator and beam parameters, a numerically-integrating simulator can be constructed to compute beam decay with time. In a companion paper, the simulator is used to train a parametric, non-linear dynamics model for the system [1].

  11. Synthesis and atomic level in situ redox characterization in ceria and ceria zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruigang

    2007-12-01

    Nanocrystalline ceria-based oxides are widely used in automotive three-way catalytic converters to reduce the emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and unburned hydrocarbons. The primary function of ceria-based oxides in the catalytic process is to adjust the local oxygen partial pressure and maintain an air-to-fuel ratio near the stoichiometric value (˜14.5) required for the optimal catalyst performance for carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon oxidation, and nitrogen oxides reduction. In this dissertation, a study of the relationship between the nanoscale structure, chemistry, and the redox behavior on high surface area ceria and ceria zirconia is presented. Precipitation and spray freezing methods were used to synthesize nanocrystalline ceria and ceria zirconia solid solution powders respectively. The effect of thermal treatments in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres on the reducibility of the materials has been systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize the average structure and reducibility. In situ environmental transmission electron microscope was exploited to visualize the dynamic changes during redox processes at the atomic level. This resulted in the identification of the nanoscale structure and chemistry for the most active nanoparticles in these oxides. The correlation between ex situ macroscopic redox properties and in situ redox behavior of individual nanoparticles is demonstrated. The addition of zirconia to ceria clearly enhances the reducibility and thermal stability of ceria. A fundamental difference between ceria and ceria zirconia during in situ redox processes is related to oxygen vacancy ordering. Ceria showed oxygen vacancy ordering during reduction, whereas ceria zirconia did not. It is suggested that the absence of oxygen vacancy ordering might be a fundamental factor for improved redox properties of ceria zirconia compared with pure ceria. The 50% ceria-50% zirconia solid

  12. Ceria nanoclusters on graphene/Ru(0001): A new model catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Z.; Netzer, F. P.; Dohnalek, Z.

    2016-03-22

    In this study, the growth of ceria nanoclusters on single-layer graphene on Ru(0001) has been examined, with a view towards fabricating a stable system for model catalysis studies. The surface morphology and cluster distribution as a function of oxide coverage and substrate temperature has been monitored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), whereas the chemical composition of the cluster deposits has been determined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The ceria nanoparticles are of the CeO2(111)-type and are anchored at the intrinsic defects of the graphene surface, resulting in a variation of the cluster densities across the macroscopic sample surface. The ceria clusters on graphene display a remarkable stability against reduction in ultrahigh vacuum up to 900 K, but some sintering of clusters is observed for temperatures > 450 K. The evolution of the cluster size distribution suggests that the sintering proceeds via a Smoluchowski ripening mechanism, i.e. diffusion and aggregation of entire clusters.

  13. Unique Electronic and Structural Effects in Vanadia/Ceria-Catalyzed Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Ping; Gong, Xue-Qing

    2015-10-21

    Vanadia/ceria supported catalysts exhibit ultrahigh catalytic activities in oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions. Here, we performed systematic density functional theory calculations to illustrate the underlying mechanisms. It is found that unique electronic and structural effects are both crucial in the catalytic processes. Calculations of the catalytic performance of different oxygen species in oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde suggested that the oxygen of the interface V-O-Ce group is catalytically more active, especially when H adsorption energy is small, indicating the strong structural effect in the vanadia/ceria supported catalyst. In addition, new empty localized states of O 2p generated in a ceria-supported system through depositing VO3- and VO4-type monomeric vanadia species are determined to participate in the whole ODH reaction processes and help to reduce the barriers at various steps.

  14. Ceria nanoclusters on graphene/Ru(0001): A new model catalyst system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Z.; Netzer, F. P.; Dohnálek, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The growth of ceria nanoclusters on single-layer graphene on Ru(0001) has been examined, with a view towards fabricating a stable system for model catalysis studies. The surface morphology and cluster distribution as a function of oxide coverage and substrate temperature has been monitored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), whereas the chemical composition of the cluster deposits has been determined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The ceria nanoparticles are of the CeO2(111)-type and are anchored at the intrinsic defects of the graphene surface, resulting in a variation of the cluster densities across the macroscopic sample surface. The ceria clusters on graphene display a remarkable stability against reduction in ultrahigh vacuum up to 900 K, but some sintering of clusters is observed for temperatures > 450 K. The evolution of the cluster size distribution suggests that the sintering proceeds via a Smoluchowski ripening mechanism, i.e. diffusion and aggregation of entire clusters.

  15. Absolute Current Calibration of 1$\\mu$A CW Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Mike Bevins; Anthony Day; Arunava Saha; Stephanie Slachtouski; Ronald Gilman; Pavel Degtiarenko

    2005-06-01

    The future experimental program at Jefferson Lab requires an absolute current calibration of a 1 {mu}A CW electron beam to better than 1% accuracy. This paper presents the mechanical and electrical design of a Tungsten calorimeter that is being constructed to provide an accurate measurement of the deposited energy. The energy is determined by measuring the change in temperature after beam exposure. Knowledge of the beam energy then yields number of electrons stopped by the calorimeter during the exposure. Simulations show that the energy lost due to electromagnetic and hadronic particle losses are the dominant uncertainty. Details of the precision thermometry and calibration, mechanical design, thermal simulations and simulations will be presented.

  16. Absolute Current Calibrations of 1muA CW Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    A. Freyberger, M.E. Bevins, A.R. Day, P. Degtiarenko, A. Saha, S. Slachtouski, R. Gilman

    2005-06-06

    The future experimental program at Jefferson Lab requires an absolute current calibration of a 1{mu}A CW electron beam to better than 1% accuracy. This paper presents the mechanical and electrical design of a Tungsten calorimeter that is being constructed to provide an accurate measurement of the deposited energy. The energy is determined by measuring the change in temperature after beam exposure. Knowledge of the beam energy then yields number of electrons stopped by the calorimeter during the exposure. Simulations show that the energy losses due to electromagnetic and hadronic losses are the dominant uncertainty. Details of the precision thermometry and calibration, mechanical design, thermal simulations and GEANT simulations will be presented.

  17. Remotion of organic compounds of actual industrial effluents by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampa, M. H. O.; Duarte, C. L.; Rela, P. R.; Somessari, E. S. R.; Silveira, C. G.; Azevedo, A. L.

    1998-06-01

    Organic compounds has been a great problem of environmental pollution, the traditional methods are not effecient on removing these compounds and most of them are deposited to ambient and stay there for long time causing problems to the environment. Ionizing radiation has been used with success to destroy organic molecules. Actual industrial effluents were irradiated using IPEN's electron beam wastewater pilot plant to study organic compounds degradation. The samples were irradiated with and without air mixture by different doses. Irradiation treatment efficiency was evaluated by the Cromatography Gas Analyses of the samples before and after irradiation. The studied organic compounds were: phenol, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, benzene, toluene and xilene. A degradation superior to 80% was achieved for the majority of the compounds with air addition and 2kGy delivered dose condition. For the samples that were irradiated without air addition the degradation was higher.

  18. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam.

  19. Effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the structural and optical properties of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Babitha, K.K.; Priyanka, K.P.; Sreedevi, A.; Ganesh, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2014-12-15

    The effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the structural and optical properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles was investigated. Ceria nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical precipitation method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Ultraviolet–visible absorption spectra, photoluminescence and Raman spectra of beam irradiated samples were modified, and shifted to blue region, which were attributed to quantum size effect. Systematic observations found that nonstoichiometry, defects and size reduction caused by beam irradiation have great influence on optical band gap, blue shift, photoluminescence and Raman band modifications. Moreover, electron beam irradiation is a suitable technique to enhance the structural and optical properties of nanoceria by controlling the particle size, which may lead to potentially useful technological applications. - Highlights: • Investigated effect of beam irradiation on CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles • Beam irradiation caused size reduction and surface modification. • It increases microstrain, decreases d-spacing and broadens XRD peaks. • It also modifies optical band gap, absorption, PL and Raman bands.

  20. Excitation of Ion Acoustic Waves by Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorenko, Dmytro; Tokluoglu, Erinc; Kaganovich, Igor; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of electron beams with plasmas is of considerable importance particularly for hybrid DC/RF coupled plasma sources used in plasma processing [1]. An electron beam is formed by emission from one surface, is accelerated through a dc bias electric field and enters the bulk plasma. Emitted electrons excite electron plasma (Langmuir) waves through the two-stream instability. Due to the high localized plasmon pressure, ion acoustic waves are excited parametrically. The plasma waves saturate by non-linear wave trapping. Eventually coupling between electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves deteriorates the Langmuir waves, which leads to a bursting behavior. The two-stream instability and the consequent ion fluctuations are studied over a wide range of system parameters using the particle-in-cell codes EDIPIC and LSP. The influenceof these instabilities on collisionless electron heating are presented for a hybrid RF-DC plasma source.[4pt] [1] Lin Xu, et al, Appl. Phys. Lett., 93, 261502 (2008).